WorldWideScience

Sample records for sealed air filled

  1. Dye filled security seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    A security seal for providing an indication of unauthorized access to a sealed object includes an elongate member to be entwined in the object such that access is denied unless the member is removed. The elongate member has a hollow, pressurizable chamber extending throughout its length that is filled with a permanent dye under greater than atmospheric pressure. Attempts to cut the member and weld it together are revealed when dye flows through a rupture in the chamber wall and stains the outside surface of the member

  2. POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN BUILDUP IN HANFORD SEALED AIR FILLED NUCLEAR STORAGE VESSELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEY BE

    2008-01-01

    This calculation is performed in accordance with HNF-PRO-8259, PHMC Calculation Preparation and Issue and addresses the question as to whether a flammable mixture of hydrogen gas can accumulate in a Hanford sealed nuclear storage vessel where the only source of hydrogen is the moisture in the air that initially filled the vessel Of specific concern is nuclear fuel inside IDENT 69-Gs, placed in Core Component Containers (CCCs) located inside Interim Storage Vaults (ISVs) at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) The CCCs are to be removed from the ISVs and placed inside a Hanford Unirradiated Fuel Package (HUFP) for transport and interim storage. The repackaging procedures mandated that no plastics were permitted, all labels and tape were to be removed and the pins to be clean and inspected Loading of the fuel into the CCC/ISV package was permitted only if it was not raining or snowing. This was to preclude the introduction of any water The purpose was to minimize the presence of any hydrogenous material inside the storage vessels. The scope of NFPA 69, 'Standard on Explosion Prevention Systems', precludes its applicability for this case. The reactor fuel pins are helium bonded. The non-fuel pins, such as the pellet stacks, are also helium bonded. The fuel pellets were sintered at temperatures that preclude any residual hydrogenous material. Hydrogen gas can be formed from neutron and gamma radiolysis of water vapor. The radiolysis reaction is quite complex involving several intermediate radicals, and competing recombination reactions. Hydrogen gas can also be formed through corrosion. This analysis takes a simplistic approach and assumes that all water vapor present in the storage vessel is decomposed into hydrogen gas. Although the analysis is needed to specifically address HUFP storage of nuclear fuel, it is equally applicable to any sealed fuel storage vessel under the assumptions listed

  3. Air riding seal with purge cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Thomas D; Mills, Jacob A

    2017-08-15

    An air riding seal for a turbine in a gas turbine engine, where an annular piston is axial moveable within an annular piston chamber formed in a stator of the turbine and forms a seal with a surface on the rotor using pressurized air that forms a cushion in a pocket of the annular piston. A purge cavity is formed on the annular piston and is connected to a purge hole that extends through the annular piston to a lower pressure region around the annular piston or through the rotor to an opposite side. The annular piston is sealed also with inner and outer seals that can be a labyrinth seal to form an additional seal than the cushion of air in the pocket to prevent the face of the air riding seal from overheating.

  4. Sealing ability of a new polydimethylsiloxane-based root canal filling material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özok, A.R.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.; Wu, M.K.; Wesselink, P.R.

    2008-01-01

    We tested the null hypothesis that there is no difference in the sealing ability of GuttaFlow, RoekoSeal, and AH26 in root canals. Sixty extracted mandibular premolars were filled with AH26 (lateral compaction), RoekoSeal, or GuttaFlow (modified single-cone). The sealing ability of the root canal

  5. Sealing ability of a new polydimethylsiloxane-based root canal filling material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozok, Ahmet R.; van der Sluis, Lucas W. M.; Wu, Min-Kai; Wesselink, Paul R.

    We tested the null hypothesis that there is no difference in the sealing ability of GuttaFlow, RoekoSeal, and AH26 in root canals. Sixty extracted mandibular premolars were filled with AH26 (lateral compaction), RoekoSeal, or GuttaFlow (modified single-cone). The sealing ability of the root canal

  6. Measure Guideline: Guide to Attic Air Sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lstiburek, J.

    2014-09-01

    The Guide to Attic Air Sealing was completed in 2010 and although not in the standard Measure Guideline format, is intended to be a Measure Guideline on Attic Air Sealing. The guide was reviewed during two industry stakeholders meetings held on December 18th, 2009 and January 15th, 2010, and modified based on the comments received. Please do not make comments on the Building America format of this document. The purpose of the Guide to Attic Air Sealing is to provide information and recommendations for the preparation work necessary prior to adding attic insulation. Even though the purpose of this guide is to save energy - health, safety and durability should not be compromised by energy efficiency. Accordingly, combustion safety and ventilation for indoor air quality are addressed first. Durability and attic ventilation then follow. Finally, to maximize energy savings, air sealing is completed prior to insulating. The guide is intended for home remodelers, builders, insulation contractors, mechanical contractors, general contractors who have previously done remodeling and homeowners as a guide to the work that needs to be done.

  7. An in vitro evaluation of the apical sealing ability of new polymeric endodontic filling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onay, Emel Olga; Ungor, Mete; Unver, Saadet; Ari, Hale; Belli, Sema

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the short-term sealing abilities of recently introduced polymeric endodontic filling systems. Root canals of 120 extracted and decoronated human single-rooted teeth were instrumented using crown-down technique with HERO Shaper rotary instruments. The roots were divided randomly into 8 groups (6 experimental and 2 control groups of 15 roots each) and filled with different combinations of core and sealer as follows: group 1, RealSeal/Resilon; group 2, RealSeal/Herofill; group 3, Hybrid Root Seal/Resilon; group 4, Hybrid Root Seal/Herofill; group 5, MM-Seal/Resilon; group 6, MM-Seal/Herofill; group 7, positive controls (Herofill only); group 8, negative controls. Apical leakage quantity was evaluated after 1 week by using a fluid filtration model. For each sample, measurements of fluid movement were recorded at 2-minute intervals for a total of 8 minutes, and then averaged. The data were calculated and analyzed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the Tukey test. Significance was set at P less than .05. Multiple paired comparisons (Tukey test) showed that, of all the groups, MM-Seal/Herofill combination exhibited the least microleakage, and RealSeal/Herofill combination ranked second in this regard. The mean leakage values for the RealSeal/Resilon and MM-Seal/Resilon combinations were both significantly higher than the means for the other 4 experimental groups (P < .01). Hybrid Root Seal combined with Resilon resulted in significantly less microleakage than Hybrid Root Seal combined with Herofill (P = .001). The results suggest that the sealing properties of epoxy-resin-based sealer (MM-Seal) combined with gutta-percha (Herofill) are superior to those of methacrylate-based sealers (Hybrid Root Seal and Realseal) combined with Resilon.

  8. Measure Guideline: Guide to Attic Air Sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lstiburek, Joseph [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline is to provide information and recommendations for the preparation work necessary prior to adding attic insulation. Even though the purpose of this guide is to save energy, health, safety, and durability should not be compromised by energy efficiency. Accordingly, combustion safety and ventilation for indoor air quality are addressed first. Durability and attic ventilation then follow. Finally, to maximize energy savings, air sealing is completed prior to insulating. The guide is intended for home remodelers, builders, insulation contractors, mechanical contractors, general contractors who have previously done remodeling and homeowners as a guide to the work that needs to be done.

  9. Measuring the fill height of sealed cans with a compound pendulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinard, P.M.

    1995-06-01

    A compound pendulum has been designed, fabricated, tested, and used to determine the fill height of material in sealed cans. The specific cans that stimulated this work are partially filled with uranium and plutonium oxide. Fill height affects nondestructive assays using fission neutrons, but corrections for various fill heights can be made once the height is known. Heights vary with use as the powder compacts or loosens, so it is necessary to determine the height at the time of the neutron measurement. The pendulum is small and readily portable so it can be taken to the location of the neutron measurement. Tests with open cans filled with sand to various known heights had accuracies generally within 3%. Factors that can affect the accuracy are examined and discussed. Experience in using the pendulum on sealed cans is related

  10. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Attic Air Sealing Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes the DOE-sponsored Guide to Attic Air Sealing by Building America research partner Building Science Corporation, which provides best practices for attic air sealing. The guide has had 21,000 views and 13,000 downloads since it was posted.

  11. Air filled porosity in composting processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggieri, L.; Gea, T.; Artola, A.; Sanchez, A.

    2009-07-01

    As it is widely known, the composting process consists in the aerobic decomposition of the biodegradable organic matter present in different types of solid wastes. Water and oxygen are necessary for the biological activity of microorganisms involved in the composting process and their availability is directly related to the total and the air filled porosity (AFP). Maintaining adequate AFP level satisfies the oxygen content requirement to achieve the desired composting conditions and thus, tho enhance biological activity. (Author)

  12. Air filled porosity in composting processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, L.; Gea, T.; Artola, A.; Sanchez, A.

    2009-01-01

    As it is widely known, the composting process consists in the aerobic decomposition of the biodegradable organic matter present in different types of solid wastes. Water and oxygen are necessary for the biological activity of microorganisms involved in the composting process and their availability is directly related to the total and the air filled porosity (AFP). Maintaining adequate AFP level satisfies the oxygen content requirement to achieve the desired composting conditions and thus, tho enhance biological activity. (Author)

  13. Measure Guideline. Air Sealing Attics in Multifamily Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otis, Casey [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Maxwell, Sean [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2012-06-01

    This Building America Measure Guideline is intended for owners, builders, contractors, homeowners, and other stakeholders in the multifamily building industry, and focuses on challenges found in existing buildings for a variety of housing types. It explains why air sealing is desirable, explores related health and safety issues, and identifies common air leakage points in multifamily building attics. In addition, it also gives an overview of materials and techniques typically used to perform air sealing work.

  14. Development of a selective thin film and of a hermetically sealed flat plate solar collector with gas filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zernial, W.

    1982-12-01

    The industrial productibility of a selective absorbing thin film was investigated on the basis of reactive cathodic sputtering of Ni. On substrates of 1.8 sq m of Al, Cu, steel and stainless steel, solar absorption values up to 97% were achieved at emissivities of 5 to 10%. A prototype flat plate collector for high temperatures with two covers and hermetical sealing was developed. The technical data of the collector were measured, dependent on the selectivity of the absorber, gas fillings of dry air, argon or SF6 and the geometry and were compared with those of an evacuated flat plate collector. A hermetical sealed double flat plate collector for low temperatures was developed which has the advantage of lower no load temperatures and higher energy gain for heating swimming pool water compared with a conventional flat plate collector. The insolation values on collectors were measured and were used for a calculation of the energy gains of different collector types.

  15. 2007 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Delgado, Irebert

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA's new Orion project aimed at developing a new spacecraft that will fare astronauts to the International Space Station, the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (ii) Overview of NASA's fundamental aeronautics technology project; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn s seal project aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA's turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of NASA prime contractor, vendor, and university advanced sealing concepts, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. Turbine engine studies have shown that reducing seal leakage as well as high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip clearances will reduce fuel burn, lower emissions, retain exhaust gas temperature margin, and increase range. Turbine seal development topics covered include a method for fast-acting HPT blade tip clearance control, noncontacting low-leakage seals, intershaft seals, and a review of engine seal performance requirements for current and future Army engine platforms.

  16. 2005 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop, Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA s new Exploration Initiative program aimed at exploring the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (ii) Overview of the NASA-sponsored Propulsion 21 Project; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn s seal project aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA s turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of NASA prime contractor, vendor, and university advanced sealing concepts including tip clearance control, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. Turbine engine studies have shown that reducing high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip clearances will reduce fuel burn, lower emissions, retain exhaust gas temperature margin, and increase range. Several organizations presented development efforts aimed at developing faster clearance control systems and associated technology to meet future engine needs. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to develop technologies for the Exploration Initiative and advanced reusable space vehicle technologies. NASA plans on developing an advanced docking and berthing system that would permit any vehicle to dock to any on-orbit station or vehicle. Seal technical challenges (including space environments, temperature variation, and seal-on-seal operation) as well as plans to develop the necessary "androgynous" seal technologies were reviewed. Researchers also reviewed tests completed for the shuttle main landing gear door seals.

  17. The water-filled versus air-filled status of vessels cut open in air: the 'Scholander assumption' revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.T. Tyree; H. Cochard; P. Cruziat

    2003-01-01

    When petioles of transpiring leaves are cut in the air, according to the 'Scholander assumption', the vessels cut open should fill with air as the water is drained away by continued transpiration, The distribution of air-filled vessels versus distance from the cut surface should match the distribution of lengths of 'open vessels', i.e. vessels cut...

  18. Lifetime and shelf life of sealed tritium-filled plasma focus chambers with gas generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.D. Lemeshko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the operation features of plasma focus chambers using deuterium–tritium mixture. Handling tritium requires the use of sealed, vacuum-tight plasma focus chambers. In these chambers, there is an accumulation of the impurity gases released from the inside surfaces of the electrodes and the insulator while moving plasma current sheath inside chambers interacting with β-electrons generated due to the decay of tritium. Decay of tritium is also accompanied by the accumulation of helium. Impurities lead to a decreased yield of neutron emission from plasma focus chambers, especially for long term operation. The paper presents an option of absorption type gas generator in the chamber based on porous titanium, which allows to significantly increase the lifetime and shelf life of tritium chambers. It also shows the results of experiments on the comparison of the operation of sealed plasma focus chambers with and without the gas generator. Keywords: Plasma focus, Neutron yield, Tritium-filled plasma focus chambers, PACS Codes: 29.25.-v, 52.58.Lq

  19. Portable optical frequency standard based on sealed gas-filled hollow-core fiber using a novel encapsulation technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triches, Marco; Brusch, Anders; Hald, Jan

    2015-01-01

    A portable stand-alone optical frequency standard based on a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber is developed to stabilize a fiber laser to the 13C2H2 P(16) (ν1 + ν3) transition at 1542 nm using saturated absorption. A novel encapsulation technique is developed to permanently seal...

  20. Comparison of the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement used as root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Shahriar; Yavari, Hamid R; Rahimi, Saeed; Eskandarinezhad, Mahsa; Shakouei, Sahar; Unchi, Mahsa

    2011-12-01

    Inadequate apical seal is the major cause of surgical endodontic failure. The root-end filling material used should prevent egress of potential contaminants into periapical tissue. The purpose of this study was to compare the sealing ability of four root-end filling materials: white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), gray MTA, white Portland cement (PC) and gray PC by dye leakage test. Ninety-six human single-rooted teeth were instrumented, and obturated with gutta-percha. After resecting the apex, an apical cavity was prepared. The teeth were randomly divided into four experimental groups (A: white MTA, B: gray MTA, C: white PC and D: gray PC; n = 20) and two control groups (positive and negative control groups; n = 8). Root-end cavities in the experimental groups were filled with the experimental materials. The teeth were exposed to Indian ink for 72 hours. The extent of dye penetration was measured with a stereomicroscope at 16× magnification. The negative controls showed no dye penetration and dye penetration was seen in the entire root-end cavity of positive controls. However, there was no statistically significant difference among the four experimental groups (P > 0.05). All retrograde filling materials tested in this study showed the same microleakage in vitro. Given the low cost and apparently similar sealing ability of PC, PC could be considered as a substitute for MTA as a root-end filling material.

  1. Sealing of minimally invasive Class II fillings (slot) using an adhesive patch: sealant margin extension for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, Patrick R; Seemann, Rainer; Filli, Tilla; Attin, Thomas; Imfeld, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory study was performed to assess the potential of an adhesive patch to seal small, unbeveled, Class II, box-only (slot) composite fillings. After minimal access cavity preparation with an 80 pm diamond bur, 40 box-only Class II cavities were prepared mesially and distally in 20 extracted human molars using a u-shaped PCS insert (EMS). One cavity per tooth was adhesively filled with a hybrid composite material in one increment. A patch, acting as an adhesive matrice, was applied to the other cavity of each tooth to seal the restoration. The margin of the patch was located in areas easily accessible to oral hygiene measures and self-cleaning. All the teeth were subjected to thermo-mechanical stress in a computer-controlled masticator device. In 10 teeth, caries was induced in a microbial-based artificial mouth model and quantitatively determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Microleakage was assessed in the other 10 teeth in two planar sections after immersion in 0.5% basic fuchsin solution. The results showed no demineralization at the filling margins protected with the patch. Microleakage was observed in one sample only and was limited to the enamel. In contrast, the margins of fillings without the patch application showed a mean demineralization depth of 146 +/- 42 microm and dye penetration into the dentin in five sections. This innovative approach to sealing restorative margins with an adhesive patch results in less leakage and filling margin demineralization and merits further investigation.

  2. Interaction of antimicrobial preservatives with blow-fill-seal packs: correlating sorption with solubility parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Aeshna; Dare, Manish; Sangamwar, Abhay; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the interaction of four commonly used ophthalmic antimicrobial preservatives [benzyl alcohol (BA), chlorbutol (CBL), benzalkonium chloride (BKC), and chlorhexidine gluconate (CG)] with Blow-Fill-Seal (BFS) packs. Effect of packaging material [low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP)], humidity (25% RH, 75% RH) and concentration (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 mM BA/CBL in LDPE) was studied. BKC and CG gave negligible loss (<4%) in BFS packs over a period of 3 months. BA and CBL, however, gave marked losses in LDPE (ca. 70-90%) and PP (ca. 7-25%) packs. Humidity did not have any effect on the sorption loss of any preservative. Loss of BA switched from Case II to anomalous behavior with increasing initial concentration. A two-stage sorption behavior was inherent at all concentrations. Loss of CBL followed anomalous behavior with biphasic kinetics of loss. It was concluded that all the four preservatives were appropriate for use in PP BFS packs. However, only BKC and CG were amenable to be used in LDPE BFS packs. Lastly, an empirical expression consisting of the "solubility parameter distance" and "molar volume" of preservatives was developed to correlate the preservative loss in LDPE with the physicochemical properties of the preservatives.

  3. Cavity air flow behavior during filling in microinjection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griffiths, C.A.; Dimov, S.S.; Scholz, S.

    2011-01-01

    Process monitoring of microinjection molding (μ-IM) is of crucial importance in understanding the effects of different parameter settings on the process, especially on its performance and consistency with regard to parts' quality. Quality factors related to mold cavity air evacuation can provide...... valuable information about the process dynamics and also about the filling of a cavity by a polymer melt. In this paper, a novel experimental setup is proposed to monitor maximum air flow and air flow work as an integral of the air flow over time by employing a microelectromechanical system gas sensor...... the effects of process parameters on cavity air evacuation, and the influence of air evacuation on the part flow length. © 2011 American Society of Mechanical Engineers....

  4. Security of bottle to fill in a high pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todic, M.; Latinovic, T.; Golubovic-Bugarski, V.; Majstorovic, A.

    2018-01-01

    Charging the bottle of high pressure air isolation devices is performed by a high-pressure compressor. The charging time is in function of the compressor capacity and the intensity of the nominal pressure of the air in the bottle. However, in accident situations this time is long and therefore high-pressure accumulators are used where the filling time of the bottle of isolation apparatus has been drastically reduced. Due to the short filling time of the bottle through the air flow, there is a thermodynamic load of bottle material that could endanger the safety of users and other participants in the area. It is therefore necessary to determine the critical parameters of the rapid charge and their intensity.

  5. Prospective randomized trial compares suction versus water seal for air leaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerfolio, R J; Bass, C; Katholi, C R

    2001-05-01

    Surgeons treat air leaks differently. Our goal was to evaluate whether it is better to place chest tubes on suction or water seal for stopping air leaks after pulmonary surgery. A second goal was to evaluate a new classification system for air leaks that we developed. Patients were prospectively randomized before surgery to receive suction or water seal to their chest tubes on postoperative day (POD) #2. Air leaks were described and quantified daily by a classification system and a leak meter. The air-leak meter scored leaks from 1 (least) to 7 (greatest). The group randomized to water seal stayed on water seal unless a pneumothorax developed. On POD #2, 33 of 140 patients had an air leak. Eighteen patients had been preoperatively randomized to water seal and 15 to suction. Air leaks resolved in 12 (67%) of the water seal patients by the morning of POD #3. All 6 patients whose air leak did not stop had a leak that was 4/7 or greater (p leak meter. Of the 15 patients randomized to suction, only 1 patient's air leak (7%) resolved by the morning of POD #3. The randomization aspect of the trial was ended and statistical analysis showed water seal was superior (p = 0.001). The remaining 14 patients were then placed to water seal and by the morning of POD #4, 13 patients' leaks had stopped. Of the 32 total patients placed to seal, 7 (22%) developed a pneumothorax and 6 of these 7 patients had leaks that were 4/7 or greater (p = 0.001). Placing chest tubes on water seal seems superior to wall suction for stopping air leaks after pulmonary resection. However, water seal does not stop expiratory leaks that are 4/7 or greater. Pneumothorax may occur when chest tubes are placed on seal with leaks this large.

  6. Seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsher, R.A.G.

    1982-01-01

    An aperture through a biological shield is sealed by a flexible sheath having a beading at one end located on an annular member slidable in the aperture such that the beading bears in sealing engagement against the sides of the aperture. The annular member is retained by a retractable latch and can be rejected by pushing it out of the aperture using a replacement annular member with a replacement sheath thereon to butt against the annular member to be rejected. The replacement annular member may be mounted on a tubular device having an outer co-axial member for operating the latch when the replacement annular member butts against the annular member to be rejected. Applications include effecting a seal between a remote handling equipment and a wall through which the equipment extends. (author)

  7. Estimation of water-filled and air-filled porosity in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, P.H.

    1993-01-01

    Water content and porosity vary considerably within the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. Measurement of these quantities has been based on core samples. A log-based approach offers the advantage of in-situ measurements, continuous throughout the borehole. This paper describes an algorithm which determines the air-filled and water-filled porosities from density and dielectric logs. The responses of density and dielectric logs are formulated in terms of the matrix properties, air-filled porosity and water-filled porosity. Porosity values obtained from logs from borehole USW G-2 are in reasonable agreement with estimates from core determinations

  8. Macrobending loss properties of photonic crystal fibres with different air filling fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thorkild; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2001-01-01

    We present experimental and theoretical analysis of macrobending losses of photonic crystal fibres with various air filling fractions. A scalar, effective-index method provides a good description of the losses for fibres with limited air filling fractions, whereas the method overestimates...... the losses for fibres with larger air filling fractions....

  9. Sealing ability of MTA, CPM, and MBPc as root-end filling materials: a bacterial leakage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Paulo Leal; Bernardineli, Norberti; Cavenago, Bruno Cavalini; Torres, Sérgio Aparecido; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Marciano, Marina Angélica

    2016-04-01

    Objectives To evaluate the sealing ability of three root-end filling materials (white MTA, CPM, and MBPc) using an Enterococcus faecalis leakage model. Material and Methods Seventy single-root extracted human teeth were instrumented and root-ends were resected to prepare 3 mm depth cavities. Root-end preparations were filled with white MTA, CPM, and MBPc cements. Enterococcus faecalis was coronally introduced and the apical portion was immersed in BHI culture medium with phenol red indicator. The bacterial leakage was monitored every 24 h for 4 weeks. The statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon-Gehan test (pCPM and the other groups. Conclusions The epoxy resin-based cement MBPc had lower bacterial leakage compared with the calcium silicate-based cements MTA and CPM.

  10. Procedure for filling with gas and sealing a nuclear fuel element consisting of a container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyko, E.S.; Campbell, J.; Wiggins, R.J.

    1971-01-01

    A procedure for sealing the end plug of a fuel pin of a zirconium alloy or stainless steel within a pressure container, which contains an inert gas (preferably helium) atmosphere at a pressure of 35-133 kp/cm 2 , is described. The internal pressure in the fuel pin allows detection of leakages by means of a helium spectrometer and reduces the compressive stresses to which the fuel is subjected in the reactor. (JIW)

  11. Symptoms prevalence among office workers of a sealed versus a non-sealed building: associations to indoor air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, José Luiz de Magalhães; Boechat, José Laerte; Gioda, Adriana; dos Santos, Celeste Yara; de Aquino Neto, Francisco Radler; Lapa e Silva, José Roberto

    2009-11-01

    An increasing number of complaints related to time spent in artificially ventilated buildings have been progressively reported and attributed, at least in part, to physical and chemical exposures in the office environment. The objective of this research was to investigate the association between the prevalence of work-related symptoms and the indoor air quality, comparing a sealed office building with a naturally ventilated one, considering, specially, the indoor concentration of TPM, TVOCs and the main individual VOCs. A cross-sectional study was performed to compare the prevalence of sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms among 1736 office workers of a sealed office building and 950 of a non-sealed one, both in Rio de Janeiro's downtown. The prevalence of symptoms was obtained by a SBS standardized questionnaire. The IAQ of the buildings was evaluated through specific methods, to determine the temperature, humidity, particulate matter and volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations. Upper airways and ophthalmic symptoms, tiredness and headache were highly prevalent in both buildings. Some symptoms were more prevalent in the sealed building: "eye dryness" 33.3% and 27.1% (p: 0.01); "runny nose" 37.3% and 31.3% (p: 0.03); "dry throat" 42% and 36% (p: 0.02); and "lethargy" 58.5% and 50.5% (p: 0.03) respectively. However, relative humidity and indoor total particulate matter (TPM) concentration as well as total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) were paradoxically greater in the non-sealed building, in which aromatic compounds had higher concentration, especially benzene. The analysis between measured exposure levels and resulting symptoms showed no association among its prevalence and TPM, TVOCs, benzene or toluene concentration in none of the buildings. Other disregarded factors, like undetected VOCs, mites, molds and endotoxin concentrations, may be associated to the greater prevalence of symptoms in the sealed building.

  12. Apical sealing of root canal fillings performed with five different endodontic sealers: analysis by fluid filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Carvalho de Vasconcelos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the sealing ability of five root canal sealers, including two experimental cements (MBP and MTA-Obtura using the fluid filtration method. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Teeth were divided into 5 study groups: G1-AH Plus; G2-Acroseal; G3Sealapex; G4-MBP; G5-MTA-Obtura; and two controls. Chemical-mechanical preparation was performed with ProFile rotary nickel-titanium instruments 1 mm short of the apical foramen. The sealing ability was evaluated by fluid filtration at 15, 30, and 60 days. RESULTS: The statistical analysis showed significant difference between the materials at different periods (p<0.05. AH Plus and MBP had similar leakage values at 15 and 60 days, alternating with significant reduction at 30 days, while the other materials showed progressive increase in leakage values. Acroseal and Sealapex presented the best results at 15 days and the worst at 60 days. CONCLUSIONS: All sealers evaluated presented fluid leakage, with AH Plus and MBP showing the best results at the end of the experimental period. Acroseal, Sealapex, and MTA-Obtura presented increase in leakage values at longer observation periods.

  13. Sealing ability of cermet ionomer cement as a retrograde filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktener, B O; Pehlivan, Y

    1993-03-01

    An in vitro dye leakage study was performed to compare the sealing ability of high copper amalgam with cavity varnish and cermet ionomer cement with and without varnish when used as retrofilling materials. The root canals of 54 maxillary anterior teeth were instrumented and obturated with gutta-percha and sealer. The apical 3 mm of the roots were resected and apical class I cavity preparations were made. The roots were then randomly divided into three groups and retrofilled with one of the experimental materials. After 72 h of immersion in India ink, the roots were cleared and evaluated for leakage with a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis indicated that the cermet ionomer cement with varnish group had significantly less leakage than the amalgam group (P cermet ionomer cement without varnish group (P 0.05).

  14. Measure Guideline: Wall Air Sealing and Insulation Methods in Existing Homes; An Overview of Opportunity and Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, S.; Stephenson, R.

    2012-09-01

    This guide provides renovators and retrofit contractors an overview of considerations when including wall air sealing and insulation in an energy retrofit project. It also outlines the potential project risks, various materials for insulating, possible field inspections needed, installation procedures, as well as the benefits and drawbacks. The purpose of this document is to provide the outline of the overview and process of insulating and air sealing walls so that home retrofit professionals can identify approaches to air sealing and insulation measures.

  15. Nonlinear Vibration Analysis for a Jeffcott Rotor with Seal and Air-Film Bearing Excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuefang Wang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear coupling vibration and bifurcation of a high-speed centrifugal compressor with a labyrinth seal and two air-film journal bearings are presented in this paper. The rotary shaft and disk are modeled as a rigid Jeffcott rotor. Muszynska's model is used to express the seal force with multiple parameters. For air-film journal bearings, the model proposed by Zhang et al. is adopted to express unsteady bearing forces. The Runge-Kutta method is used to numerically determine the vibration responses of the disk center and the bearings. Bifurcation diagrams for transverse motion of the rotor are presented with parameters of rotation speed and pressure drop of the seal. Multiple subharmonic, periodic, and quasiperiodic motions are presented with two seal-pressure drops. The bifurcation characteristics show inherent interactions between forces of the air-film bearings and the seal, presenting more complicated rotor dynamics than the one with either of the forces alone. Bifurcation diagrams are obtained with parameters of pressure drop and seal length determined for the sake of operation safety.

  16. Simultaneous in vivo comparison of water-filled and air-filled pressure measurement catheters: Implications for good urodynamic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammie, A; Abrams, P; Bevan, W; Ellis-Jones, J; Gray, J; Hassine, A; Williams, J; Hashim, H

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether the pressure readings obtained from air-filled catheters (AFCs) are the same as the readings from simultaneously inserted water-filled catheters (WFCs). It also aimed to make any possible recommendations for the use of AFCs to conform to International Continence Society (ICS) Good Urodynamic Practices (GUP). Female patients undergoing urodynamic studies in a single center had water-filled and air-filled catheters simultaneously measuring abdominal and intravesical pressure during filling with saline and during voiding. The pressures recorded by each system at each event during the test were compared using paired t-test and Bland-Altman analyses. 62 patients were recruited, of whom 51 had pressures that could be compared during filling, and 23 during voiding. On average, the pressures measured by the two systems were not significantly different during filling and at maximum flow, but the values for a given patient were found to differ by up to 10 cmH 2 O. This study shows that AFCs and WFCs cannot be assumed to register equal values of pressure. It has further shown that even when the p det readings are compared with their value at the start of a test, a divergence of values of up to 10 cmH 2 O remains. If AFCs are used, care must be taken to compensate for any p det variations that occur during patient movement. Before AFCs are adopted, new normal values for resting pressures need to be developed to allow good quality AFC pressure readings to be made. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:926-933, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Air-soil exchange of organochlorine pesticides in a sealed chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Han, Baolu; Xue, Nandong; Zhou, Lingli; Li, Fasheng

    2015-01-01

    So far little is known about air-soil exchange under any sealed circumstances (e.g., in plastic and glass sheds), which however has huge implications for the soil-air-plant pathways of persistent organic pollutants including organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). A newly designed passive air sampler was tested in a sealed chamber for measuring the vertical concentration profiles of gaseous phase OCPs (hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs)). Air was sampled at 5, 15, and 30 cm above ground level every 10th day during a 60-day period by deploying polyurethane foam cylinders housed in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene-covered cartridges. Concentrations and compositions of OCPs along the vertical sections indicated a clear relationship with proximity to the mixture of HCHs and DDTs which escapes from the soils. In addition, significant positive correlations were found between air temperatures and concentrations of HCHs and DDTs. These results indicated revolatilization and re-deposition being at or close to dynamic pseudo-equilibrium with the overlying air. The sampler used for addressing air-soil exchange of persistent organic pollutants in any sealed conditions is discussed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are (1) the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and (2) the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  19. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, A. [ABT Systems, LLC, Annville, PA (United States); Prahl, D. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  20. Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 10: Retrofit Techniques and Technologies: Air Sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Cole, Pamala C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Love, Pat M.

    2010-04-12

    This report was prepared by PNNL for the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Program. The report provides information to home owners who want to make their existing homes more energy efficient by sealing leaks in the building envelope (ceiling, walls, and floors) that let in drafts and let conditioned air escape. The report provides descriptions of 19 key areas of the home where air sealing can improve home performance and energy efficiency. The report includes suggestions on how to find a qualified weatherization or home performance contractor, what to expect in a home energy audit, opportune times for performing air sealing, and what safety and health concerns to be aware of. The report describes some basic building science concepts and topics related to air sealing including ventilation, diagnostic tools, and code requirements. The report will be available for free download from the DOE Building America website. It is a suitable consumer education tool for home performance and weatherization contractors to share with customers to describe the process and value of home energy retrofits.

  1. Demonstration and evaluation of recent air-sealing techniques in housing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayhew, W.J.

    1987-09-01

    The Airtight Drywall Approach (ADA) and the sealed polyethylene approach were developed as two distinct systems for reducing air leakage in housing. Builders have not totally accepted either method but have instead tended to borrow the most practical and cost-effective techniques and materials from each system and combined them into hybrid systems. This project evaluated current air-sealing techniques, developed refinements to some of those techniques and incorporated them into the construction of the Cold Climate Demonstration House (CCDH), a research and demonstration facility in Alberta. By comparing the effectiveness and practical use of different air and vapour retarder materials and techniques, it was found that for the air barrier, ADA materials and techniques were more easily installed. The resulting air seal was more reliable. However, until inspectors accept alkyd or vapor barrier paints as the vapor retarder, polyethylene is recommended. The construction techniques recommended in this report can be installed with a minimum of experience and with minimal involvement of other subtrades. The cost to provide an air/vapor barrier for a 1000 ft /sup 2/ bilevel with both levels fully developed (as demonstrated in the CCDH) was approximately $360. 26 figs.

  2. Hot air balloons fill gap in atmospheric and sensing platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Steven M.; Price, Russ

    Eric Edgerton was having a problem he could not solve: how to noninvasively collect in situ incinerator plume data. So he called in the Air Force and learned about its Atmospheric and Sensor Test Platform program; its platform is a manned hot air balloon. Many investigators are discovering the advantages of hot air balloons as stable, inexpensive platforms for performing in situ atmospheric measurements. Some are also using remote sensing capabilities on the balloon platforms.

  3. An evaluation of the effectiveness of air leakage sealing. Ener-Corp Management Ltd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    A field study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the sealing techniques for reducing air infiltration in houses. Tests were performed on single detached houses in Manitoba. The sample group consisted of 56 conventionally-constructed houses of varying size, style, occupancy and airtightness, and 26 nonstandard structures of smaller but identical size and age. Results show the median reduction in airtightness of the conventional structures, defined using the Equivalent Leakage Area at 10 Pascals (ELA/sub 10/), was 31.6%, with significant variations occurring both between individual houses and between different types of construction. The median reduction of the nonstandard houses was 42.5%, again with significant variations. An estimate was made of the naturally-occurring air infiltration rates for all the test houses. This analysis indicated that the sealing produced a median reduction in the infiltration rate of 32.8% for the conventional houses and 46.1% for the nonstandard ones. To relate the benefits of sealing in terms of its impact upon the space heating load, the data were used in conjuction with standardized house descriptions to simulate five different styles of houses using the HOTCAN energy analysis program. This analysis indicated that air leakage sealing would produce reductions in the space heating load (and bill) for most conventionally insulated houses averaging 10% to 15%. The results of this study are likely representative of houses constructed only in Manitoba and possibly Saskatchewan and Alberta. 3 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Quantification of Emboli by Visualization of Air Filled Xylem Vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, J.; Keijzer, C.J.; Meeteren, van U.

    2001-01-01

    Between harvest and vase life the cut surface of most cut flowers is exposed to air for a longer or shorter period. It was hypothesized that under normal harvest and transport conditions air only enters the cut open vessels and does not move to non-cut vessels. The vessel length distribution of

  5. Convective losses through an air-filled gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, V A; Ovezsakhatov, N

    1976-01-01

    Simplified formulas for the heat fluxes with given parameters of the air are used to calculate the specific heat losses by convection in a number of solar-energy systems (water heater, thermal generator, double-glazed window, and still). Heat losses by convection and radiation are compared.

  6. Device for filling up air cleaning cells with adsorbent coal and its loading process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parish, H.C.; Allard, M.D.; Petit, J.L.; Sfulgis, I.S.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns improved appliances enabling granules to be compressed, evenly on the whole, in a hopper, filter or any other component to be filled with such granules. This criterion is particularly important in the case of air filters using granulated adsorbing coal for separating the radioactive substances in the air should an ccident occur in a nuclear power station [fr

  7. Air-Filled porosity and permeability relationships during solid-waste fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, T.L.; Veeken, A.H.M.; Wilde, de V.; Hamelers, H.V.M.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental apparatus was constructed to measure the structural parameters of organic porous media, i.,e. mechanical strength, air-filled porosity, air permeability, and the Ergun particle size. These parameters are critical to the engineering of aerobic bioconversion systems and were measured

  8. MATHEMATICAL MODELLING OF QUAZISTEADY MODE OF BEARING AIR BUFFER FILLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Chertov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Today the only way to eliminate contact with the product during the manufacturing process is to provide a support surface under its support surface air buffer layer formed due to the expiration of the working environment through holes perforated gas distribution grids forms. There proposed the method of contactless formation of products consisting of composite materials by the means of air buffer in the article. The results of theoretical and experimental investigations of hydro-gas-dynamic processes occurring when casting of organic- mineral composite material onto the bearing air buffer expressed in the form of mathematical description realizing original hypotheses reflected in the choice of transformation algorithm and limiting conditions are presented. On the base of obtained mathematical model the algorithm of calculation of optimum parameters of transporting systems with discretely powered gas buffer is developed. The method of deduction of a semi-finished product on the gas buffer, which allows to level the pressure field under the bearing surface of the deduction object due to the usage of devices of pseudo fluidized granular material in pneumatic chambers is offered. The application of this method allows to eliminate the possibility of contact between the composite material and the working surface of the equipment and also to reduce the cost of production of pneumatic devices, to improve operational characteristics of this equipment. Submitted depending allowed to develop the methodology and implementation of engineering calculation device for non-contact casting composite materials on air buffer, semi-industrial and industrial variants were created and put into production.

  9. Validation of Heat-Flux Predictions on the Outer Air Seal of a Transonic Turbine Blade (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clark, John P; Polanka, Marc D; Meininger, Matthew; Praisner, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    .... So, a set of predictions of the heat flux on the Blade Outer Air Seal (BOAS) of a transonic turbine is here validated with time-resolved measurements obtained in a single-stage high pressure turbine rig...

  10. Effect of sealing on the morphology of anodized aluminum oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Naiping; Dong, Xuecheng; He, Xueying; Browning, James F.; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We explored structural change of anodizing aluminum oxide induced by sealing. • All sealing methods decrease pore size as shown by X-ray/neutron scattering. • Cold sealing and hot water sealing do not alter the aluminum oxide framework. • Hot nickel acetate sealing both fills the pores and deposits on air oxide interface. • Samples with hot nickel acetate sealing outperform other sealing methods. - Abstract: Ultra-small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), X-ray reflectometry (XRR) and neutron reflectometry (NR) were used to probe structure evolution induced by sealing of anodized aluminum. While cold nickel acetate sealing and hot-water sealing decrease pore size, these methods do not alter the cylindrical porous framework of the anodic aluminum oxide layer. Hot nickel acetate both fills the pores and deposits on the air surface (air–oxide interface), leading to low porosity and small mean pore radius (39 Å). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and direct current polarization show that samples sealed by hot nickel acetate outperform samples sealed by other sealing methods

  11. Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klocke, S.; Faakye, O.; Puttagunta, S.

    2014-10-01

    ​While previous versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) have included provisions to improve the air tightness of dwellings, for the first time, the 2012 IECC mandates compliance verification through blower door testing. Simply completing the Air Barrier and Insulation Installation checklist through visual inspection is no longer sufficient by itself. In addition, the 2012 IECC mandates a significantly stricter air sealing requirement. In Climate Zones 3 through 8, air leakage may not exceed 3 ACH50, which is a significant reduction from the 2009 IECC requirement of 7 ACH50. This requirement is for all residential buildings, which includes low-rise multifamily dwellings. While this air leakage rate requirement is an important component to achieving an efficient building thermal envelope, currently, the code language doesn't explicitly address differences between single family and multifamily applications. In addition, the 2012 IECC does not provide an option to sample dwellings for larger multifamily buildings, so compliance would have to be verified on every unit. With compliance with the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements on the horizon, several of CARB's multifamily builder partners are evaluating how best to comply with this requirement. Builders are not sure whether it is more practical or beneficial to simply pay for guarded testing or to revise their air sealing strategies to improve compartmentalization to comply with code requirements based on unguarded blower door testing. This report summarizes CARB's research that was conducted to assess the feasibility of meeting the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements in 3 multifamily buildings.

  12. Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klocke, S. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Faakye, O. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Puttagunta, S. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2014-10-01

    While previous versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) have included provisions to improve the air tightness of dwellings, for the first time, the 2012 IECC mandates compliance verification through blower door testing. Simply completing the Air Barrier and Insulation Installation checklist through visual inspection is no longer sufficient by itself. In addition, the 2012 IECC mandates a significantly stricter air sealing requirement. In Climate Zones 3 through 8, air leakage may not exceed 3 ACH50, which is a significant reduction from the 2009 IECC requirement of 7 ACH50. This requirement is for all residential buildings, which includes low-rise multifamily dwellings. While this air leakage rate requirement is an important component to achieving an efficient building thermal envelope, currently, the code language doesn't explicitly address differences between single family and multifamily applications. In addition, the 2012 IECC does not provide an option to sample dwellings for larger multifamily buildings, so compliance would have to be verified on every unit. With compliance with the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements on the horizon, several of Consortium for Advanced Residential Building's (CARB’s) multifamily builder partners are evaluating how best to comply with this requirement. Builders are not sure whether it is more practical or beneficial to simply pay for guarded testing or to revise their air sealing strategies to improve compartmentalization to comply with code requirements based on unguarded blower door testing. This report summarizes CARB's research that was conducted to assess the feasibility of meeting the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements in 3 multifamily buildings.

  13. Effect of filling ratio on premixed methane/air explosion in an open-end pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Guo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The propagation characteristics of premixed methane/air explosion under different filling ratios (20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, and 100% were studied using an experimental system. The results indicate that the peak overpressure showed a decreasing trend at the initial stage but then showed an increasing trend until reaching its maximum value under different filling ratios. As the explosion propagated to the open end, the overpressure showed a downtrend. At this point, the flame speed initially increased along the pipe but then dropped dramatically. In addition, the explosion overpressure and flame speed increased with the increase of filling ratio. However, when the filling ratio reached 50%, the explosion overpressure and flame speed tended to be stable and the increase was not obvious. These results will be of great importance in evaluating the explosive damage to equipment and human personnel working in coal mines or other chemical industries.

  14. Airtightness Results of Roof-Only Air Sealing Strategies on 1 ½-Story Homes in Cold Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojczyk, C.; Murry, T.; Mosiman, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this second study on solutions to ice dams in 1-1/2 story homes, the NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team analyzed five test homes located in both cold and very cold climates for air leakage reduction rates following modifications by independent contractors on owner-occupied homes. These homes were chosen for testing as they are common in Minnesota and very difficult to air seal and insulate effectively. Two projects followed a roof-only Exterior Thermal Moisture Management System (ETMMS) process. One project used an interior-only approach to roof air sealing and insulation. The remaining two projects used a deep energy retrofit approach for whole house (foundation wall, above grade wall, roof) air leakage and heat loss reduction. All were asked to provide information regarding project goals, process, and pre and post-blower door test results. Additional air leakage reduction data was provided by several NorthernSTAR industry partners for interior-applied, roof-only modifications on 1-1/2 story homes. The data represents homes in the general market as well as homes that were part of the state of Minnesota weatherization program. A goal was to compare exterior air sealing methods with interior approaches. This pool of data enabled the team to compare air tightness data from over 220 homes using similar air seal methods.

  15. Airtightness Results of Roof-Only Air Sealing Strategies on 1-1/2 Story Homes in Cold Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojczyk, C.; Murry, T.; Mosiman, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this second study on solutions to ice dams in 1-1/2 story homes, five test homes located in both cold and very cold climates were analyzed for air leakage reduction rates following modifications by independent contractors on owner-occupied homes. The reason for choosing this house type was they are very common in our area and very difficult to air seal and insulate effectively. Two projects followed a roof-only Exterior Thermal Moisture Management System (ETMMS) process. One project used an interior-only approach to roof air sealing and insulation. The remaining two projects used a deep energy retrofit approach for whole house (foundation wall, above grade wall, roof) air leakage and heat loss reduction. All were asked to provide information regarding project goals, process, and pre and post-blower door test results. Additional air leakage reduction data was provided by several NorthernSTAR Building America industry partners for interior-applied, roof-only modifications on 1-1/2 story homes. The data represents homes in the general market as well as homes that were part of the state of Minnesota weatherization program. A goal was to compare exterior air sealing methods with interior approaches. This pool of data enabled us to compare air tightness data from over 220 homes using similar air seal methods.

  16. Hydraulic Transients Caused by Air Expulsion During Rapid Filling of Undulating Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Apollonio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main issues arising during the rapid filling of a pipeline is the pressure transient which originates after the entrapped air has been expelled at the air release valve. Because of the difference in density between water and air, a pressure transient originates at the impact of the water column. Many authors have analyzed the problem, both from the theoretical and the experimental standpoint. Nevertheless, mainly vertical or horizontal pipelines have been analyzed, whereas in real field applications, the pipe profile is a sequence of ascending and descending pipes, with air release/vacuum valves at high points. To overcome lack of knowledge regarding this latter case, laboratory experiments were carried out to simulate the filling of an undulating pipeline, initially empty at atmospheric pressure. The pipe profile has a high point where an orifice is installed for air venting, so as to simulate the air release valve at intermediate high point of a supply pipeline. In the experiments, the diameter of the orifice and the opening degree of both upstream and downstream valves were varied, in order to analyze their effect on the pressure transient. The experiments were also carried out with a longer descending pipe, in order to assess the effects on the pressure surge of the air volume downstream of the orifice.

  17. Liquid- and air-filled catheters without balloon as an alternative to the air-filled balloon catheter for measurement of esophageal pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beda, Alessandro; Güldner, Andreas; Carvalho, Alysson R; Zin, Walter Araujo; Carvalho, Nadja C; Huhle, Robert; Giannella-Neto, Antonio; Koch, Thea; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama

    2014-01-01

    Measuring esophageal pressure (Pes) using an air-filled balloon catheter (BC) is the common approach to estimate pleural pressure and related parameters. However, Pes is not routinely measured in mechanically ventilated patients, partly due to technical and practical limitations and difficulties. This study aimed at comparing the conventional BC with two alternative methods for Pes measurement, liquid-filled and air-filled catheters without balloon (LFC and AFC), during mechanical ventilation with and without spontaneous breathing activity. Seven female juvenile pigs (32-42 kg) were anesthetized, orotracheally intubated, and a bundle of an AFC, LFC, and BC was inserted in the esophagus. Controlled and assisted mechanical ventilation were applied with positive end-expiratory pressures of 5 and 15 cmH2O, and driving pressures of 10 and 20 cmH2O, in supine and lateral decubitus. Cardiogenic noise in BC tracings was much larger (up to 25% of total power of Pes signal) than in AFC and LFC (<3%). Lung and chest wall elastance, pressure-time product, inspiratory work of breathing, inspiratory change and end-expiratory value of transpulmonary pressure were estimated. The three catheters allowed detecting similar changes in these parameters between different ventilation settings. However, a non-negligible and significant bias between estimates from BC and those from AFC and LFC was observed in several instances. In anesthetized and mechanically ventilated pigs, the three catheters are equivalent when the aim is to detect changes in Pes and related parameters between different conditions, but possibly not when the absolute value of the estimated parameters is of paramount importance. Due to a better signal-to-noise ratio, and considering its practical advantages in terms of easier calibration and simpler acquisition setup, LFC may prove interesting for clinical use.

  18. Liquid- and air-filled catheters without balloon as an alternative to the air-filled balloon catheter for measurement of esophageal pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Beda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Measuring esophageal pressure (Pes using an air-filled balloon catheter (BC is the common approach to estimate pleural pressure and related parameters. However, Pes is not routinely measured in mechanically ventilated patients, partly due to technical and practical limitations and difficulties. This study aimed at comparing the conventional BC with two alternative methods for Pes measurement, liquid-filled and air-filled catheters without balloon (LFC and AFC, during mechanical ventilation with and without spontaneous breathing activity. Seven female juvenile pigs (32-42 kg were anesthetized, orotracheally intubated, and a bundle of an AFC, LFC, and BC was inserted in the esophagus. Controlled and assisted mechanical ventilation were applied with positive end-expiratory pressures of 5 and 15 cmH2O, and driving pressures of 10 and 20 cmH2O, in supine and lateral decubitus. MAIN RESULTS: Cardiogenic noise in BC tracings was much larger (up to 25% of total power of Pes signal than in AFC and LFC (<3%. Lung and chest wall elastance, pressure-time product, inspiratory work of breathing, inspiratory change and end-expiratory value of transpulmonary pressure were estimated. The three catheters allowed detecting similar changes in these parameters between different ventilation settings. However, a non-negligible and significant bias between estimates from BC and those from AFC and LFC was observed in several instances. CONCLUSIONS: In anesthetized and mechanically ventilated pigs, the three catheters are equivalent when the aim is to detect changes in Pes and related parameters between different conditions, but possibly not when the absolute value of the estimated parameters is of paramount importance. Due to a better signal-to-noise ratio, and considering its practical advantages in terms of easier calibration and simpler acquisition setup, LFC may prove interesting for clinical use.

  19. Heat loss in air of an Antarctic marine mammal, the Weddell seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellish, Jo-Ann; Hindle, Allyson; Skinner, John; Horning, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The conflicting needs of homeostasis in air versus water complicate our understanding of thermoregulation in marine mammals. Large-scale modeling efforts directed at predicting the energetic impact of changing sea ice conditions on polar ecosystems require a better understanding of thermoregulation in air of free-ranging animals. We utilized infrared imaging as an indirect approach to determine surface temperatures of dry, hauled-out Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii, n = 35) of varying age and body condition during the Antarctic summer. The study groups provided a fivefold range in body mass and a threefold range in blubber depth. Surface temperature (T s) did not vary by body region (head, shoulder, axilla, torso, hip, flippers). Average seal T s (mean 13.9 ± 11.2 °C) was best described through a combination of the physical traits of body mass and environmental variables of ambient temperature T air, and wind speed. Additional factors of ice temperature (T ice), relative humidity and cloud cover did not improve the model. Heat transfer model estimates suggested that radiation contributed 56.6 ± 7.7 % of total heat loss. Convection and conduction accounted for the remaining 15.7 ± 12.3 and 27.7 ± 9.3 %, respectively. Heat loss by radiation was primarily influenced by body mass and wind speed, whereas convective heat loss was influenced primarily by blubber depth and wind speed. Conductive heat loss was modeled largely as a function of physical traits of mass and blubber depth rather than any environmental covariates, and therefore was substantially higher in animals in leaner condition.

  20. The effect of gingival wall location on the marginal seal of class ii restorations prepared with a flowable bulk-fill resin-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, P; Candotto, V; Ben-Amar, A; Eger, M; Matalon, S; Lauritano, D; Ormianer, Z

    2018-01-01

    SureFil SDR is a flowable resin-based composite that allows a single incremental bulk placement. The marginal seal of SureFil SDR at the gingival margins of class II restorations located apical to the cemento-enamel-junction (CEJ) has not been adequately evaluated compared to those located occlusal to the CEJ. Forty class II cavities were prepared in human molars. The gingival margins of 20 preparations were located 0.5 mm occlusal to the CEJ, and the other 20 preparations were located 0.5 mm apical to the CEJ. The cavities surfaces were bonded with XenoV dental adhesive and filled with SDR in one bulk increment up to 4 mm, after which they were covered with CeramX. The teeth were subjected to thermo-and load-cycling, and their gingival margins were exposed to 0.5% basic-fuchsin solution. The specimens were sectioned mesio-distally and scored for microleakage. A Wilcoxon test for pairwise comparison was performed to determine significance. Dye penetration was observed in 30% of the 20 restorations with cavo-surface margins located occlusal to the CEJ and in 55% of the 20 restorations with cavo-surface margins located apical to the CEJ. The bulk-fill flowable resin base SureFil SDR with XenoV dental adhesive provided a better marginal seal in class II restorations with gingival margins above the CEJ compared to restorations with gingival margins below the CEJ. SDR should not be recommended for class II cavity preparations with gingival margins located below the CEJ.

  1. In-air evoked potential audiometry of grey seals (Halichoerus grypus from the North and Baltic Seas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Ruser

    Full Text Available In-air anthropogenic sound has the potential to affect grey seal (Halichoerus grypus behaviour and interfere with acoustic communication. In this study, a new method was used to deliver acoustic signals to grey seals as part of an in-air hearing assessment. Using in-ear headphones with adapted ear inserts allowed for the measurement of auditory brainstem responses (ABR on sedated grey seals exposed to 5-cycle (2-1-2 tone pips. Thresholds were measured at 10 frequencies between 1-20 kHz. Measurements were made using subcutaneous electrodes on wild seals from the Baltic and North Seas. Thresholds were determined by both visual and statistical approaches (single point F-test and good agreement was obtained between the results using both methods. The mean auditory thresholds were ≤40 dB re 20 µPa peak equivalent sound pressure level (peSPL between 4-20 kHz and showed similar patterns to in-air behavioural hearing tests of other phocid seals between 3 and 20 kHz. Below 3 kHz, a steep reduction in hearing sensitivity was observed, which differed from the rate of decline in sensitivity obtained in behavioural studies on other phocids. Differences in the rate of decline may reflect influence of the ear inserts on the ability to reliably transmit lower frequencies or interference from the structure of the distal end of the ear canal.

  2. Air-Filled Nanopore Based High-Performance Thermal Insulation Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Gangåssæter, Haakon Fossen; Jelle, Bjørn Petter; Alex Mofid, Sohrab; Gao, Tao

    2017-01-01

    State-of-the-art thermal insulation solutions like vacuum insulation panels (VIP) and aerogels have low thermal conductivity, but their drawbacks may make them unable to be the thermal insulation solutions that will revolutionize the building industry regarding energy-efficient building envelopes. Nevertheless, learning from these materials may be crucial to make new and novel high-performance thermal insulation products. This study presents a review on the state-of-the-art air-filled thermal...

  3. Imputation methods for filling missing data in urban air pollution data for Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Afiqah Zakaria

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The air quality measurement data obtained from the continuous ambient air quality monitoring (CAAQM station usually contained missing data. The missing observations of the data usually occurred due to machine failure, routine maintenance and human error. In this study, the hourly monitoring data of CO, O3, PM10, SO2, NOx, NO2, ambient temperature and humidity were used to evaluate four imputation methods (Mean Top Bottom, Linear Regression, Multiple Imputation and Nearest Neighbour. The air pollutants observations were simulated into four percentages of simulated missing data i.e. 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%. Performance measures namely the Mean Absolute Error, Root Mean Squared Error, Coefficient of Determination and Index of Agreement were used to describe the goodness of fit of the imputation methods. From the results of the performance measures, Mean Top Bottom method was selected as the most appropriate imputation method for filling in the missing values in air pollutants data.

  4. High-voltage leak detection of a parenteral proteinaceous solution product packaged in form-fill-seal plastic laminate bags. Part 1. Method development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, Rasmus; Rasmussen, Mats; Buus, Peter; Mulhall, Brian; Guazzo, Dana Morton

    2013-01-01

    In Part 1 of this three-part research series, a leak test performed using high-voltage leak detection (HVLD) technology, also referred to as an electrical conductivity and capacitance leak test, was developed and validated for container-closure integrity verification of a small-volume laminate plastic bag containing an aqueous solution for injection. The sterile parenteral product is the rapid-acting insulin analogue, insulin aspart (NovoRapid®/NovoLog®, by Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark). The aseptically filled and sealed package is designed to preserve product sterility through expiry. Method development and validation work incorporated positive control packages with a single hole laser-drilled through the laminate film of each bag. A unique HVLD method characterized by specific high-voltage and potentiometer set points was established for testing bags positioned in each of three possible orientations as they are conveyed through the instrument's test zone in each of two possible directions-resulting in a total of six different test method options. Validation study results successfully demonstrated the ability of all six methods to accurately and reliably detect those packages with laser-drilled holes from 2.5-11.2 μm in nominal diameter. Part 2 of this series will further explore HVLD test results as a function of package seal and product storage variables. The final Part 3 will report the impact of HVLD exposure on product physico-chemical stability. In this Part 1 of a three-part research series, a leak test method based on electrical conductivity and capacitance, called high voltage leak detection (HVLD), was used to find leaks in small plastic bags filled with an insulin pharmaceutical solution for human injection by Novo Nordisk A/S (Bagsværd, Denmark). To perform the test, the package is electrically grounded while being conveyed past an electrode linked to a high-voltage, low-amperage transformer. The instrument measures the current that passes

  5. Development of a high temperature ceramic-to-metal seal for Air Force Weapons Laboratory Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnell, R. E.; Stoddard, S. D.

    1987-03-01

    Procedures were developed for fabricating vacuum tight metal-to-ceramic ring seals between Inconel 625 and MgO-3 wt % Y2O3 tubes metallized with a calcia-alumina-silica glass (CaO-29 wt % Al2O3-35 wt % SiO2) containing 50 vol % molybdenum filler. Palniro No. 1 (Au-25 wt % Pd-25 wt % Ni) was found to be the most reliable braze for joining Inconel to metallized MgO-3 wt % Y2O3 bodies. The reliabilities of the processing procedures and the material systems were demonstrated. A prototype electrical feedthrough was fabricated for 1173 K operation in air or vacuum.

  6. Engineering report. Part 1: NASA wheel air seal development for space shuttle type environmental requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The sealing techniques are studied for existing aircraft wheel-tire designs to meet the hard vacuum .00001 torr and cold temperature -65 F requirements of space travel. The investigation covers the use of existing wheel seal designs.

  7. Measure Guideline. Wall Air Sealing and Insulation Methods in Existing Homes; An Overview of Opportunity and Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, S. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Stephenson, R. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This guide provides renovators and retrofit contractors an overview of considerations when including wall air sealing and insulation in an energy retrofit project. It also outlines the potential project risks, various materials for insulating, possible field inspections needed, installation procedures, as well as the benefits and drawbacks.

  8. Comparison of air-charged and water-filled urodynamic pressure measurement catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M A; Fletter, P C; Zaszczurynski, P J; Damaser, M S

    2011-03-01

    Catheter systems are utilized to measure pressure for diagnosis of voiding dysfunction. In a clinical setting, patient movement and urodynamic pumps introduce hydrostatic and motion artifacts into measurements. Therefore, complete characterization of a catheter system includes its response to artifacts as well its frequency response. The objective of this study was to compare the response of two disposable clinical catheter systems: water-filled and air-charged, to controlled pressure signals to assess their similarities and differences in pressure transduction. We characterized frequency response using a transient step test, which exposed the catheters to a sudden change in pressure; and a sinusoidal frequency sweep test, which exposed the catheters to a sinusoidal pressure wave from 1 to 30 Hz. The response of the catheters to motion artifacts was tested using a vortex and the response to hydrostatic pressure changes was tested by moving the catheter tips to calibrated heights. Water-filled catheters acted as an underdamped system, resonating at 10.13 ± 1.03 Hz and attenuating signals at frequencies higher than 19 Hz. They demonstrated significant motion and hydrostatic artifacts. Air-charged catheters acted as an overdamped system and attenuated signals at frequencies higher than 3.02 ± 0.13 Hz. They demonstrated significantly less motion and hydrostatic artifacts than water-filled catheters. The transient step and frequency sweep tests gave comparable results. Air-charged and water-filled catheters respond to pressure changes in dramatically different ways. Knowledge of the characteristics of the pressure-measuring system is essential to finding the best match for a specific application. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Pulsed neutron generators based on the sealed chambers of plasma focus design with D and DT fillings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurkov, D I; Dulatov, A K; Lemeshko, B D; Golikov, A V; Andreev, D A; Mikhailov, Yu V; Prokuratov, I A; Selifanov, A N

    2015-01-01

    Development of neutron generators using plasma focus (PF) chambers is being conducted in the All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA) during more than 25 years. PF is a source of soft and hard x-rays and neutrons 2.5 MeV (D) or 14 MeV (DT). Pulses of x-rays and neutrons have a duration of about several tens of nanoseconds, which defines the scope of such generators—the study of ultrafast processes. VNIIA has developed a series of pulse neutron generators covering the range of outputs 10 7 –10 12 n/pulse with resources on the order of 10 3 –10 4 switches, depending on purposes. Generators have weights in the range of 30–700 kg, which allows referring them to the class of transportable generators. Generators include sealed PF chambers, whose manufacture was mastered by VNIIA vacuum tube production plant. A number of optimized PF chambers, designed for use in generators with a certain yield of neutrons has been developed. The use of gas generator based on gas absorber of hydrogen isotopes, enabled to increase the self-life and resource of PF chambers. Currently, the PF chambers withstand up to 1000 switches and have the safety of not less than 5 years. Using a generator with a gas heater, significantly increased security of PF chambers, because deuterium-tritium mixture is released only during work, other times it is in a bound state in the working element of the gas generator. (paper)

  10. Wheel traffic effect on air-filled porosity and air permeability in a soil catena across the wheel rut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berisso, Feto Esimo; Schjønning, Per; Lamandé, Mathieu

    might induce different effects on soil physical properties. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of vehicle traffic on soil physical properties and air permeability by systematic collection of samples in a transect running from the center to the outside of the wheel rut. A field...... catena running from center of the wheel rut to un wheeled part of the field ( 0, 20, 40, 50,60 and 400 cm horizontal distance). We measured water retention and air permeability (ka) at -30, -100 and -300 hPa matric potentials. At -100 hPa, we obtained consistently lower air filled under the wheel rut......The impact of wheel traffic on soil physical properties is usually quantified by randomly collecting soil cores at specific depths below the wheeled surface. However, modeling studies as well as few measurements indicated a non-uniform stress distribution in a catena across the wheel rut, which...

  11. Novel use of an air-filled breast prosthesis to allow radiotherapy to recurrent colonic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Duffy, F

    2012-02-01

    AiM: The authors present the novel and successful use of an air-filled breast prosthesis for extra pelvic exclusion of small bowel to facilitate adjuvant radiotherapy following resection of recurrent adenocarcinoma of the ascending bowel. The therapeutic use of radiotherapy in colon cancer can cause acute or chronic radiation enteropathy. Mobile small bowel can be sequestered in \\'dead space\\' or by adhesions exposing it to adjuvant radiotherapy. A variety of pelvic partitioning methods have been described to exclude bowel from radiation fields using both native and prosthetic materials. METHOD: In this case a 68 year old presented with ascending colon adenocarcinoma invading the peritoneum and underwent en bloc peritoneal resection. Thirty-seven months later surveillance CT identified a local recurrence. Subsequent resection resulted in a large iliacus muscle defect which would sequester small bowel loops thus exposing the patient to radiation enteropathy. The lateral position of the defect precluded the use of traditional pelvic partitioning methods which would be unlikely to remain in place long enough to allow radiotherapy. A lightweight air-filled breast prosthesis (Allergan 133 FV 750 cms) secured in place with an omentoplasty was used to fill the defect. RESULTS: Following well tolerated radiotherapy the prosthesis was deflated under ultrasound guidance and removed via a 7-cm transverse incision above the right iliac crest. The patient is disease free 18 months later with no evidence of treatment related morbidity. CONCLUSION: The use of a malleable air-filled prosthesis for pelvic partitioning allows specific tailoring of the prosthesis size and shape for individual patient defects. It is also lightweight enough to be secured in place using an omentoplasty to prevent movement related prosthesis migration. In the absence of adequate omentum a mesh sling may be considered to allow fixation. In this case the anatomy of the prosthesis position allowed for its

  12. Apical adaptation, sealing ability and push-out bond strength of five root-end filling materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Andrés AMOROSO-SILVA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the fluid filtration, adaptation to the root canal walls, and the push-out bond strength of two resin-based sealers and three calcium silicate-based retrograde filling materials. Fifty maxillary canines were shaped using manual instruments and the apical portion was sectioned. Retrograde cavities of 3-mm depth were prepared. The specimens were divided into five groups (n = 10: Sealer 26 (S26; MBPc (experimental; MTA; Portland cement with 20% zirconium oxide (PC/ZO, and Portland cement with 20% calcium tungstate (PC/CT. The fluid filtration was measured at 7 and 15 days. To evaluate the interfacial adaptation, sections of the teeth, 1 and 2 mm from the apex, were prepared and the percentage of gaps was calculated. The push-out bond strength at 2 mm from the apex was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA/Tukey’s test (p < 0.05. At 7 and 15 days (p = 0.0048, p = 0.006, the PC/CT group showed higher fluid filtration values when compared to other groups. At 1 mm from the apex, no statistical differences in the adaptation were found among the cements (p = 0.44. At 2 mm from the apex, the PC/ZO group presented statistically lower percentage of gaps than S26, MBPc, and MTA (p = 0.0007. The MBPc group showed higher push-out bond strength than other cements evaluated (p = 0.0008. The fluid filtration and interfacial adaptation of the calcium silicate-based cements were similar to those of the resin-based cements. The resinous cement MBPc showed superior push-out bond strength.

  13. Neonatal Presentation of an Air-Filled Neck Mass that Enlarges with Valsalva: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jasminkumar Bharatbhai; Kilbride, Howard; Paulson, Lorien

    2015-01-01

    Branchial cleft cysts are common causes of congenital neck masses in the pediatric population. However, neonatal presentation of branchial cleft cysts is uncommon, but recognizable secondary to acute respiratory distress from airway compression or complications secondary to infection. We report a 1-day-old infant presenting with an air-filled neck mass that enlarged with Valsalva and was not associated with respiratory distress. The infant was found to have a third branchial cleft cyst with an internal opening into the pyriform sinus. The cyst was conservatively managed with endoscopic surgical decompression and cauterization of the tract and opening. We review the embryology of branchial cleft cysts and current management. PMID:26495186

  14. Novel use of an air-filled breast prosthesis to allow radiotherapy to recurrent colonic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Duffy, F

    2011-03-01

    AiM: The authors present the novel and successful use of an air-filled breast prosthesis for extra pelvic exclusion of small bowel to facilitate adjuvant radiotherapy following resection of recurrent adenocarcinoma of the ascending bowel. The therapeutic use of radiotherapy in colon cancer can cause acute or chronic radiation enteropathy. Mobile small bowel can be sequestered in \\'dead space\\' or by adhesions exposing it to adjuvant radiotherapy. A variety of pelvic partitioning methods have been described to exclude bowel from radiation fields using both native and prosthetic materials.

  15. Effect of air-filled vest on exercise-heat strain when wearing ballistic protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J D; McDermott, Brendon P; Ridings, Christian B; Mainer, Lacey L; Ganio, Matthew S; Kavouras, Stavros A

    2014-10-01

    The purpose was to determine if an air-filled vest worn under ballistic protection reduces physiological strain during exercise in the heat either while wearing a tactical military (TM) protective vest or a law enforcement (LE) concealable vest. Sixteen men (24.5±3.9 years; 179.5±5.6 cm; 84.6±12.3kg) performed either two or four trials of treadmill walking (1.34 m s(-1); 2% grade) over 120 min in a hot, dry environment (37°C, 30% relative humidity, wind speed 3.5 m s(-1)). Participants completed trials wearing a TM or LE, with either the air-filled vest (TMa; LEa) or no vest (TMc; LEc) in random order. During trials, participants wore Army Combat Uniform pants. Physiological variables measured every 5min included gastrointestinal temperature (T GI), mean skin temperature (T sk), and heart rate (HR). Sweat rate (SR) was calculated based on fluid intake and body mass measures. In the tactical trial (TMa versus TMc), no differences in final T GI (38.2±0.4 versus 38.3±0.4°C), T sk (35.0±0.9 versus 35.0±1.0°C), HR (142±19 versus 143±23 bpm) existed (P>0.05). In the LE trials (LEa versus LEc), no differences in final T GI (38.0±0.4 versus 38.1±0.3°C), T sk (35.3±1.1 versus 35.6±0.9°C), HR (132±20 versus 135±20 bpm) existed (P>0.05). Despite slightly higher SR, there was no statistical difference in TM (1.15±1.13 versus 1.54±0.46 l h(-1); P=0.10) or in LE (1.39±0.52 versus 1.37±0.18 l h(-1); P=0.35) during trials. When participants exercised with a TM or LE while wearing the air-filled vest, there were no thermoregulatory and physiological differences compared to control trials. In our testing conditions, the air-filled device had little effect on physiological responses during prolonged mild exercise in the heat. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  16. Air filled ionization chambers and their response to high LET radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki

    Background Air filled ionization chambers (ICs) are widely used for absolute dosimetry, not only in photon beams but also in beams of heavy charged particles. Within the IC, electron hole pairs are generated by the energy deposition originating from incoming radiation. High-LET particles create......-plate ionization chamber exposed to heavy ions Phys. Med. Biol. 43 3549–58, 1998. ELSAESSER, T. et al.: Impact of track structure on biological treatment planning ion ion radiotherapy. New Journal pf Physics 10. 075005, 2008...

  17. Seals and sealing handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Flitney, Robert K

    2014-01-01

    Seals and Sealing Handbook, 6th Edition provides comprehensive coverage of sealing technology, bringing together information on all aspects of this area to enable you to make the right sealing choice. This includes detailed coverage on the seals applicable to static, rotary and reciprocating applications, the best materials to use in your sealing systems, and the legislature and regulations that may impact your sealing choices. Updated in line with current trends this updated reference provides the theory necessary for you to select the most appropriate seals for the job and with its 'Failur

  18. High-voltage leak detection of a parenteral proteinaceous solution product packaged in form-fill-seal plastic laminate bags. Part 2. Method performance as a function of heat seal defects, product-package refrigeration, and package plastic laminate lot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Mats; Damgaard, Rasmus; Buus, Peter; Mulhall, Brian; Guazzo, Dana Morton

    2013-01-01

    Part 1 of this three-part research series detailed the development and validation of a high-voltage leak detection test (HVLD, also known as an electrical conductivity and capacitance test) for verifying the container-closure integrity of a small-volume laminate plastic bag containing an aqueous solution formulation of the rapid-acting insulin analogue, insulin aspart (NovoRapid®/NovoLog®) by Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark. Leak detection capability was verified using positive controls each with a single laser-drilled hole in the bag film face. In this Part 2, HVLD leak detection capability was further explored in four separate studies. Study 1 investigated the ability of HVLD to detect weaknesses and/or gaps in the bag heat seal. Study 2 checked the HVLD detection of bag holes in packages stored 4 days at ambient conditions followed by 17 days at refrigeration. Study 3 examined HVLD test results for packages tested when cold. Study 4 compared HVLD test results as a function of bag plastic film lots. The final Part 3 of this series will report the impact of HVLD exposure on product visual appearance and chemical stability. In Part 1 of this three-part series, a leak test method based on electrical conductivity and capacitance, also called high-voltage leak detection (HVLD), was used to find leaks in small plastic bags filled with a solution for injection of the rapid-acting insulin analogue, insulin aspart (NovoRapid®/NovoLog®) by Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark. In this Part 2, HVLD leak detection capability was further explored in four separate studies. Study 1 investigated the ability of HVLD to detect bag heat seal leaks. Study 2 checked HVLD's ability to detect bag holes after a total of 21 days at ambient plus refrigerated temperatures. Study 3 looked to see if HVLD results changed for packages tested when still cold. Study 4 compared HVLD results for multiple bag plastic film lots. The final Part 3 of this series will report any evidence of

  19. Filling a Conical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Kyle; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2016-11-01

    Root canal treatment involves the removal of infected tissue inside the tooth's canal system and filling the space with a dense sealing agent to prevent further infection. A good root canal treatment happens when the canals are filled homogeneously and tightly down to the root apex. Such a tooth is able to provide valuable service for an entire lifetime. However, there are some examples of poorly performed root canals where the anterior and posterior routes are not filled completely. Small packets of air can be trapped in narrow access cavities when restoring with resin composites. Such teeth can cause trouble even after many years and lead the conditions like acute bone infection or abscesses. In this study, the filling of dead-end conical cavities with various liquids is reported. The first case studies included conical cavity models with different angles and lengths to visualize the filling process. In this investigation, the rate and completeness at which a variety of liquids fill the cavity were observed to find ideal conditions for the process. Then, a 3D printed model of the scaled representation of a molar with prepared post spaces was used to simulate the root canal treatment. The results of this study can be used to gain a better understanding of the restoration for endodontically treated teeth.

  20. Mode-based microparticle conveyor belt in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Oliver A; Euser, Tijmen G; Russell, Philip St J

    2013-12-02

    We show how microparticles can be moved over long distances and precisely positioned in a low-loss air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber using a coherent superposition of two co-propagating spatial modes, balanced by a backward-propagating fundamental mode. This creates a series of trapping positions spaced by half the beat-length between the forward-propagating modes (typically a fraction of a millimeter). The system allows a trapped microparticle to be moved along the fiber by continuously tuning the relative phase between the two forward-propagating modes. This mode-based optical conveyor belt combines long-range transport of microparticles with a positional accuracy of 1 µm. The technique also has potential uses in waveguide-based optofluidic systems.

  1. Critical analysis of partial discharge dynamics in air filled spherical voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, G.; Golosnoy, I. O.; Rapisarda, P.; Lewin, P. L.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper partial discharge (PD) is investigated inside a spherical air filled void at atmospheric pressure using a drift diffusion model. Discharge dynamics consisted of an electron avalanche transitioning into positive streamer, in agreement with earlier work on dielectric barrier discharges. Different model configurations were utilised to test many of the concepts employed in semi-analytical PD activity models, which use simplistic descriptions of the discharge dynamics. The results showed that many of these concepts may be erroneous, with significant discrepancies between the canonical reasoning and the simulation results. For example, the residual electric field, the electric field after a discharge, is significantly lower than the estimates used by classical PD activity models in the literature.

  2. Effect of Nd:YAG and Diode Lasers on Apical Seal of Root Canals Filled with AH Plus and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate-Based Sealers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Khoshbin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Laser irradiation, as an adjunct to root canal preparation, may increase the success rate of endodontic treatments. This study aimed to assess the effect of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG and diode lasers on the apical seal of the root canals filled with AH Plus® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA-based sealers.Materials and Methods: This in-vitro experimental study was conducted on 96 single-rooted, single-canal extracted human teeth with closed apices. The root canals were prepared by using ProTaper® rotary instruments and were randomly divided into six groups (n=16: 940-nm diode laser and AH Plus® sealer (group 1, Nd:YAG laser and AH Plus® sealer (group 2, AH Plus® sealer (group 3, 940-nm diode laser and MTA-based sealer (group 4, Nd:YAG laser and MTA-based sealer (group 5, MTA-based sealer (group 6, as well as positive and negative control groups. A bacterial leakage model was used for microleakage assessment. Qualitative assessment was done by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA at the significance level of 0.05.Results: There were statistically significant differences between the experimental and control groups (P=0.002. The laser-treated groups showed a lower apical microleakage compared to the non-laser-treated groups, although the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05. No significant differences were noted between the two lasers in terms of the apical microleakage, irrespective of the type of sealer (P>0.05.Conclusions: Laser irradiation, as an adjunct to root canal preparation, has no significant effect on the level of apical microleakage.

  3. A micro-gap, air-filled ionisation chamber as a detector for criticality accident dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murawski, I.; Zielczynski, M.; Gryzinski, M.A.; Golnik, N.

    2014-01-01

    A micro-gap air-filled ionisation chamber was designed for criticality dosimetry. The special feature of the chamber is its very small gap between electrodes of only 0.3 mm. This prevents ion recombination at high dose rates and minimises the influence of gas on secondary particles spectrum. The electrodes are made of polypropylene because of higher content of hydrogen in this material, when compared with soft tissue. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity in such chamber becomes practically negligible. The chamber's envelope contains two specially connected capacitors, one for polarising the electrodes and the other for collecting the ionisation charge. Air-filled ionisation chamber with very small gap is a simple dosemeter, which fulfills the most desired properties of criticality accident dosemeters. Short ion collection time is achieved by combination of small gap and relatively high polarising voltage. For the same reason, parasitic recombination of ions in the chamber is negligibly small even at high dose rates. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity is small for tissue-equivalent chamber and is expected to become practically negligible when the chamber electrodes are made of polypropylene. Additional capacitor provides a broad measuring range from ∼0.1 Gy up to ∼25 Gy; however, leakage of electrical charge from polarising capacitor has to be observed and taken into account. Periodical re-charging of the device is necessary. Obviously, final test of the device in conditions simulating criticality accident is needed and will be performed as soon as available. (authors)

  4. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method for sealing the cold leg nozzles of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location during maintenance and inspection of associated steam generators and pumps while the pressure vessel and refueling canal are filled with water. The apparatus includes a sealing plug for mechanically sealing the cold leg nozzle from the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plugs include a primary and a secondary O-ring. An installation tool is suspended within the reactor vessel and carries the sealing plug. The tool telescopes to insert the sealing plug within the cold leg nozzle, and to subsequently remove the plug. Hydraulic means are used to activate the sealing plug, and support means serve to suspend the installation tool within the reactor vessel during installation and removal of the sealing plug

  5. The use of a water seal to manage air leaks after a pulmonary lobectomy: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Junichi; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Fukuyama, Yasuro; Ushijima, Chie; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Ichinose, Yukito

    2006-08-01

    The methods for managing chest drainage tubes during the postoperative period differ among thoracic surgeons and, as a result, the optimal method remains controversial. We reviewed 170 consecutive patients undergoing a pulmonary lobectomy for either primary lung cancer or metastatic lung cancer from January 1998 to December 2002. After the operation, the chest drainage tube was placed on a suction pump with a negative pressure of -10 cmH(2)O in 120 patients before 2001, while such drainage tubes were kept on water seal in 47 cases mainly since 2001. Regarding the preoperative and postoperative variables, postoperative air leak as well as the video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) procedure were more frequently observed in the water seal group than in the suction group (p=0.01580, pleak seemed to be similar between the two methods. These observations suggest that applying chest tubes on water seal seems to be an effective method for preventing postoperative air leak in clinical practice. However, a prospective randomized trial using a larger series of patients is warranted for this subject.

  6. Moist air state above counterflow wet-cooling tower fill based on Merkel, generalised Merkel and Klimanek & Białecky models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2017-09-01

    The article deals with an evaluation of moist air state above counterflow wet-cooling tower fill. The results based on Klimanek & Białecky model are compared with results of Merkel model and generalised Merkel model. Based on the numerical simulation it is shown that temperature is predicted correctly by using generalised Merkel model in the case of saturated or super-saturated air above the fill, but the temperature is underpredicted in the case of unsaturated moist air above the fill. The classical Merkel model always under predicts temperature above the fill. The density of moist air above the fill, which is calculated using generalised Merkel model, is strongly over predicted in the case of unsaturated moist air above the fill.

  7. Seals and sealing handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Flitney, Robert K

    2007-01-01

    Wherever machinery operates there will be seals of some kind ensuring that the machine remains lubricated, the fluid being pumped does not leak, or the gas does not enter the atmosphere. Seals are ubiquitous, in industry, the home, transport and many other places. This 5th edition of a long-established title covers all types of seal by application: static, rotary, reciprocating etc. The book bears little resemblance to its predecessors, and Robert Flitney has re-planned and re-written every aspect of the subject. No engineer, designer or manufacturer of seals can afford to be without this uniq

  8. Investigating Liquid Leak from Pre-Filled Syringes upon Needle Shield Removal: Effect of Air Bubble Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Edwin; Maa, Yuh-Fun; Overcashier, David; Hsu, Chung C

    2011-01-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of headspace air pressure in pre-filled syringes on liquid leak (dripping) from the syringe needle upon needle shield removal. Drip tests to measure drip quantity were performed on syringes manually filled with 0.5 or 1.0 mL of various aqueous solutions. Parameters assessed included temperature (filling and test), bulk storage conditions (tank pressure and the type of the pressurized gas), solution composition (pure water, 0.9% sodium chloride, and a monoclonal antibody formulation), and testing procedures. A headspace pressure analyzer was used to verify the drip test method. Results suggested that leakage is indeed caused by headspace pressure increase, and the temperature effect (ideal gas expansion) is a major, but not the only, factor. The dissolved gases in the liquid bulk prior to or during filling may contribute to leakage, as these gases could be released into the headspace due to solubility changes (in response to test temperature and pressure conditions) and cause pressure increase. Needle shield removal procedures were found to cause dripping, but liquid composition played little role. Overall, paying attention to the processing history (pressure and temperature) of the liquid bulk is the key to minimize leakage. The headspace pressure could be reduced by decreasing liquid bulk storage pressure, filling at a higher temperature, or employing lower solubility gas (e.g., helium) for bulk transfer and storage. Leakage could also be mitigated by simply holding the syringe needle pointing upward during needle shield removal. Substantial advances in pre-filled syringe technology development, particularly in syringe filling accuracy, have been made. However, there are factors, as subtle as how the needle shield (or tip cap) is removed, that may affect dosing accuracy. We recently found that upon removal of the tip cap from a syringe held vertically with needle pointed downwards, a small amount of solution, up to 3-4% of

  9. Effect of the insulation materials filling on the thermal performance of sintered hollow bricks under the air-conditioning intermittent operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoping Hou

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Wall insulation performance is an important factor affecting building energy consumption and indoor comfortable level. This study proposes that the insulation materials are filled into the cavities of the sintered hollow brick to replace the single insulation layer. The physical models of typical walls were built by the hollow bricks filled with expanding polystyrene board (EPS in cavities and wall thermal performance is numerically analyzed by the Finite Volume Method under air-conditioning intermittent operation, which conforms to the actual operation rules of air-conditioning. Results show that filling EPS in cavities is beneficial to improve the thermal performance of the bricks, and the larger the EPS filling ratio, the higher the thermal performance improvement. The EPS filling ratio increase has the higher sensitivity on inner surface heat flow under the low EPS filling ratio, and filling EPS in the external cavities is optimum with the decrement rate 5.92% higher than filling EPS in internal cavities for the EPS filling ratio of 20%, while filling EPS in internal and external cavities simultaneously is optimum with decrement rate 2.45%–6.87% higher than that with filling EPS in the internal cavities for the EPS filling ratio of 40%–80%. Keywords: Insulation filling ratio, Insulation filling location, Thermal performance, Sintered hollow bricks

  10. Analysis of marginal seal of ProRoot MTA, MTA Angelus biodentine, and glass ionomer cement as root-end filling materials: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakshi Malhotra

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Microleakage was present in all the samples. Least amount of apical dye microleakage was seen in biodentine with mean value of 0.16 mm followed by ProRoot MTA 0.68 mm, MTA Angelus 0.74 mm, and GIC 1.53 mm. The best sealing ability was seen in biodentine, and this difference was statistically significant.

  11. Seals in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The seals described are for use in a nuclear reactor where there are fuel assemblies in a vessel, an inlet and an outlet for circulating a coolant in heat transfer relationship with the fuel assemblies and a closure head on the vessel in a tight fluid relationship. The closure head comprises rotatable plugs which have mechanical seals disposed in the annulus around each plug while allowing free rotation of the plug when the seal is not actuated. The seal is usually an elastomer or copper. A means of actuating the seal is attached for drawing it vertically into the annulus for sealing. When the reactor coolant is liquid sodium, contact with oxygen must be avoided and argon cover gas fills the space between the bottom of the closure head and the coolant liquid level and the annuli in the closure head. (U.K.)

  12. Development of three dimensional seismic isolation device with laminated rubber bearing and rolling seal type air spring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Yasuo; Suhara, Junji; Tamura, Tadashi; Ohta, Kazuya; Moro, Satoshi

    2003-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) seismic isolation device has been developed to use for the base isolation system of the heavy building like a nuclear reactor building. The developed device is the 3D seismic isolation device that consists of the laminated rubber baring as a horizontal isolation device and the rolling seal type air spring as the vertical isolation device in series. In this research, the 3D seismic isolation device reduction model whose scale is 1/10 is made and the workability of the device by the horizontal and vertical dynamic load is examined. Two experiment parameters are considered. One is the case that the structure of the part that the horizontal load and the vertical load contact is pin condition and the other is the case of the roller condition. As a result of the examination, the workability of the vertical direction is confirmed when the horizontal load acts. The pressure resistant ability test for the air spring is performed by the monotonic pressurization. As the result, it is confirmed that pressure resistant ability improved by restricting the side deformation of the air spring and that the material of the existing air spring can withstand high pressure use sufficiently. As the result, it is confirmed that the developed 3D seismic isolation device is applicable to the actual plant. This study was performed under the sponsorship of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan. (author)

  13. Flow development through HP & LP turbines, Part II: Effects of the hub endwall secondary sealing air flow on the turbine's mainstream flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jialin; Du, Qiang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Pei; Liu, Guang; Liu, Hongrui; Du, Meimei

    2017-08-01

    Although many literatures have been focused on the underneath flow and loss mechanism, very few experiments and simulations have been done under the engines' representative working conditions or considering the real cavity structure as a whole. This paper aims at realizing the goal of design of efficient turbine and scrutinizing the velocity distribution in the vicinity of the rim seal. With the aid of numerical method, a numerical model describing the flow pattern both in the purge flow spot and within the mainstream flow path is established, fluid migration and its accompanied flow mechanism within the realistic cavity structure (with rim seal structure and considering mainstream & secondary air flow's interaction) is used to evaluate both the flow pattern and the underneath flow mechanism within the inward rotating cavity. Meanwhile, the underneath flow and loss mechanism are also studied in the current paper. The computational results show that the sealing air flow's ingestion and ejection are highly interwound with each other in both upstream and downstream flow of the rim seal. Both the down-stream blades' potential effects as well as the upstream blades' wake trajectory can bring about the ingestion of the hot gas flow within the cavity, abrupt increase of the static pressure is believed to be the main reason. Also, the results indicate that sealing air flow ejected through the rear cavity will cause unexpected loss near the outlet section of the blades in the downstream of the HP rotor passages.

  14. Air-filled postcranial bones in theropod dinosaurs: physiological implications and the 'reptile'-bird transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Roger B J; Butler, Richard J; Carrano, Matthew T; O'Connor, Patrick M

    2012-02-01

    Pneumatic (air-filled) postcranial bones are unique to birds among extant tetrapods. Unambiguous skeletal correlates of postcranial pneumaticity first appeared in the Late Triassic (approximately 210 million years ago), when they evolved independently in several groups of bird-line archosaurs (ornithodirans). These include the theropod dinosaurs (of which birds are extant representatives), the pterosaurs, and sauropodomorph dinosaurs. Postulated functions of skeletal pneumatisation include weight reduction in large-bodied or flying taxa, and density reduction resulting in energetic savings during foraging and locomotion. However, the influence of these hypotheses on the early evolution of pneumaticity has not been studied in detail previously. We review recent work on the significance of pneumaticity for understanding the biology of extinct ornithodirans, and present detailed new data on the proportion of the skeleton that was pneumatised in 131 non-avian theropods and Archaeopteryx. This includes all taxa known from significant postcranial remains. Pneumaticity of the cervical and anterior dorsal vertebrae occurred early in theropod evolution. This 'common pattern' was conserved on the line leading to birds, and is likely present in Archaeopteryx. Increases in skeletal pneumaticity occurred independently in as many as 12 lineages, highlighting a remarkably high number of parallel acquisitions of a bird-like feature among non-avian theropods. Using a quantitative comparative framework, we show that evolutionary increases in skeletal pneumaticity are significantly concentrated in lineages with large body size, suggesting that mass reduction in response to gravitational constraints at large body sizes influenced the early evolution of pneumaticity. However, the body size threshold for extensive pneumatisation is lower in theropod lineages more closely related to birds (maniraptorans). Thus, relaxation of the relationship between body size and pneumatisation preceded

  15. Regenerator cross arm seal assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Anthony V.

    1988-01-01

    A seal assembly for disposition between a cross arm on a gas turbine engine block and a regenerator disc, the seal assembly including a platform coextensive with the cross arm, a seal and wear layer sealingly and slidingly engaging the regenerator disc, a porous and compliant support layer between the platform and the seal and wear layer porous enough to permit flow of cooling air therethrough and compliant to accommodate relative thermal growth and distortion, a dike between the seal and wear layer and the platform for preventing cross flow through the support layer between engine exhaust and pressurized air passages, and air diversion passages for directing unregenerated pressurized air through the support layer to cool the seal and wear layer and then back into the flow of regenerated pressurized air.

  16. Sealing ability of white and gray mineral trioxide aggregate mixed with distilled water and 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate as a root end filling material: An ex vivo evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreegowri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability of white and gray mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA mixed with distilled water and 0.12% chlorhexidine (CHX gluconate when used as a root-end filling material using the dye-penetration technique. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 single-rooted human teeth were cleaned, shaped, and obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer. The apical 3 mm of each root was resected, and 3-mm deep root-end cavity preparations were made. The teeth were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups, each containing 8 teeth, and 2 negative and positive control groups, each containing 8 teeth. Root-end cavities in the experimental groups were filled with the experimental materials. After application of nail polish, the teeth were exposed to India ink for 72 h and longitudinally sectioned, and the extent of dye penetration was measured with a stereomicroscope. Results : No statistically significant differences were observed in the sealing ability of gray and white MTA mixed with distilled water and 0.12% CHX. Conclusion : CHX appears to be a good alternative to replace distilled water, as a solution to be mixed with MTA.

  17. Optimization of air-curtain sealing efficiency with respect to heat transfer in naturally ventilated buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khayrullina, A.; Hooff, van T.A.J.; Blocken, B.J.E.; van Heijst, G.J.F.; Sun, Y.; Pei, J.; Zhao, X

    This study presents results of coupled 3D steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of an isolated naturally-ventilated building with the application of an air curtain to prevent heat transfer across a doorway. The considered parameters include air

  18. An air-filled GM counter as an educational tool and its use at senior high school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikado, Shogo

    1999-01-01

    A Yano-Yonemura type air-filled Geiger-Meuller tube which operates at about 4 kV, having poor resolution but rather high sensitivity, and which is capable of detecting alpha-particles was fabricated. It was found suitable as an educational material for use for one of the 2-hours group experiments in Physics IB' course at senior high school of Japan. Detailed instruction for the fabrication is given, together with some results of the measurement of beta-rays from potassium and also alpha-rays from thorium. (S. Ohno)

  19. The Transmission of Thermal and Fast Neutrons in Air Filled Annular Ducts through Slabs of Iron and Heavy Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, J; Sandlin, R

    1964-12-15

    An investigation has been carried out concerning the transmission of thermal and fast neutrons in air filled annular ducts through laminated Fe-D{sub 2}O shields. Measurements have been made with annular air gaps of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 cm, at a duct length of half a meter. The neutron fluxes were determined with a foil activation technique. The thermal flux was theoretically and experimentally divided into three components, a streaming, a leakage and an albedo component. The fast flux was similarly divided into a streaming component and a 'leakage' component. A calculational model to predict the components was then developed and fitted, to the data obtained by experiments. The model reported here for prediction of neutron attenuation in ducted configurations may be applied to straight annular ducts of arbitrary dimensions and material configurations but is especially designed for the problems met with in short ducts.

  20. Glass sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  1. Rotatable seal assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibaldi, J.L.; Logan, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an oring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers

  2. High-resolution ion pulse ionization chamber with air filling for the {sup 222}Rn decays detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilyuk, Yu.M.; Gangapshev, A.M.; Gezhaev, A.M.; Etezov, R.A.; Kazalov, V.V.; Kuzminov, V.V. [Baksan Neutrino Observatory,Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, 361609 Neutrino (Russian Federation); Panasenko, S.I. [V.N.Karazin Kharkiv National University, 61022 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Ratkevich, S.S., E-mail: ssratk@gmail.com [V.N.Karazin Kharkiv National University, 61022 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Tekueva, D.A.; Yakimenko, S.P. [Baksan Neutrino Observatory,Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, 361609 Neutrino (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-21

    The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. The chamber is intended to register α-particles from the {sup 222}Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. The digital pulse processing method is proposed to improve the energy resolution of the ion pulse ionization chamber. An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV α-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure has been investigated and the results are presented. - Highlights: • The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. • The chamber is intended to register alpha-particles from {sup 222}Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. • The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. • An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV alpha-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure have been investigated and the results are presented.

  3. Sealing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2013-12-10

    A sealing device for sealing a gap between a dovetail of a bucket assembly and a rotor wheel is disclosed. The sealing device includes a cover plate configured to cover the gap and a retention member protruding from the cover plate and configured to engage the dovetail. The sealing device provides a seal against the gap when the bucket assemply is subjected to a centrifugal force.

  4. Venous filling time using air-plethysmography correlates highly with great saphenous vein reflux time using duplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattimer, C R; Azzam, M; Kalodiki, E; Geroulakos, G

    2014-03-01

    Venous filling time (VFT90) is the time taken to reach 90% of the venous volume in the calf. It is recorded by air-plethysmography (APG(®)) and is assumed to measure global venous reflux duration. However, this has never been confirmed by duplex. The aim of the study was to compare VFT on APG to venous reflux time/duration (RT) measured simultaneously with duplex on the same patients. Twenty-six consecutive patients, M:F = 16:10, age (25-78), C1 = 1, C2 = 4, C3 = 8, C4a = 6, C4b = 4, C5 = 2, C6 = 1, underwent simultaneous APG with duplex. The venous filling index (VFI, mL/second), VFT90 (seconds), great saphenous vein (GSV) RT on duplex, averaged thigh GSV diameter and thigh length (length) between the APG sensor air-cuff and duplex transducer were recorded. The VFT100 was calculated by VFT90/0.9. The additional time taken to fill the thigh was achieved using the VFI, length and deep vein diameter (d), to determine the corrected reflux duration: CRD = VFT100 + (length × πd(2)/4 (1/VFI)). Twenty-five patients are presented. One patient with very mild reflux (VFT90 = 55.9 seconds) had an indeterminate endpoint on duplex and was excluded. The median (range) VFI and GSV diameter was 4.9(1.3-15.5) mL/second and 7(4-17) mm, respectively. The VFT90 and VFT100 both correlated with RT on duplex (Spearman, P duplex RT at 24 (16.9) versus 28 (20) seconds respectively, P duplex by performing simultaneous measurements. There was an excellent correlation between the VFT90 versus duplex RT, thereby comparing reverse flow in a single superficial vein against the legs overall venous haemodynamic status. These tests can both be used in the quantification of reflux.

  5. Thermo-Hydraulic Analysis of Heat Storage Filled with the Ceramic Bricks Dedicated to the Solar Air Heating System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemś, Magdalena; Nemś, Artur; Kasperski, Jacek; Pomorski, Michał

    2017-08-12

    This article presents the results of a study into a packed bed filled with ceramic bricks. The designed storage installation is supposed to become part of a heating system installed in a single-family house and eventually to be integrated with a concentrated solar collector adapted to climate conditions in Poland. The system's working medium is air. The investigated temperature ranges and air volume flow rates in the ceramic bed were dictated by the planned integration with a solar air heater. Designing a packed bed of sufficient parameters first required a mathematical model to be constructed and heat exchange to be analyzed, since heat accumulation is a complex process influenced by a number of material properties. The cases discussed in the literature are based on differing assumptions and different formulas are used in calculations. This article offers a comparison of various mathematical models and of system operating parameters obtained from these models. The primary focus is on the Nusselt number. Furthermore, in the article, the thermo-hydraulic efficiency of the investigated packed bed is presented. This part is based on a relationship used in solar air collectors with internal storage.

  6. Thermo-Hydraulic Analysis of Heat Storage Filled with the Ceramic Bricks Dedicated to the Solar Air Heating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemś, Magdalena; Nemś, Artur; Kasperski, Jacek; Pomorski, Michał

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study into a packed bed filled with ceramic bricks. The designed storage installation is supposed to become part of a heating system installed in a single-family house and eventually to be integrated with a concentrated solar collector adapted to climate conditions in Poland. The system’s working medium is air. The investigated temperature ranges and air volume flow rates in the ceramic bed were dictated by the planned integration with a solar air heater. Designing a packed bed of sufficient parameters first required a mathematical model to be constructed and heat exchange to be analyzed, since heat accumulation is a complex process influenced by a number of material properties. The cases discussed in the literature are based on differing assumptions and different formulas are used in calculations. This article offers a comparison of various mathematical models and of system operating parameters obtained from these models. The primary focus is on the Nusselt number. Furthermore, in the article, the thermo-hydraulic efficiency of the investigated packed bed is presented. This part is based on a relationship used in solar air collectors with internal storage. PMID:28805703

  7. SU-E-T-297: Dosimetric Assessment of An Air-Filled Balloon Applicator in HDR Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy Using the Monte Carlo Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, H; Lee, Y; Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As an alternative to cylindrical applicators, air inflated balloon applicators have been introduced into HDR vaginal cuff brachytherapy treatment to achieve sufficient dose to vagina mucosa as well as to spare rectum and bladder. In general, TG43 formulae based treatment planning systems do not take into account tissue inhomogeneity, and air in the balloon applicator can cause higher delivered dose to mucosa than treatment plan reported. We investigated dosimetric effect of air in balloon applicator using the Monte Carlo method. Methods: The thirteen-catheter Capri applicator with a Nucletron Ir-192 seed was modeled for various balloon diameters (2cm to 3.5cm) using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. Ir-192 seed was placed in both central and peripheral catheters to replicate real patient situations. Existence of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) with air balloon was evaluated by comparing kerma and dose at various distances (1mm to 70mm) from surface of air-filled applicator. Also mucosa dose by an air-filled applicator was compared with by a water-filled applicator to evaluate dosimetry accuracy of planning system without tissue inhomogeneity correction. Results: Beyond 1mm from air/tissue interface, the difference between kerma and dose was within 2%. CPE (or transient CPE) condition was deemed existent, and in this region no electron transport was necessary in Monte Carlo simulations. At 1mm or less, the deviation of dose from kerma became more apparent. Increase of dose to mucosa depended on diameter of air balloon. The increment of dose to mucosa was 2.5% and 4.3% on average for 2cm and 3.5cm applicators, respectively. Conclusion: After introduction of air balloon applicator, CPE fails only at the proximity of air/tissue interface. Although dose to mucosa is increased, there is no significant dosimetric difference (<5%) between air and water filled applicators. Tissue inhomogeneity correction is not necessary for air-filled applicators.

  8. SU-E-T-297: Dosimetric Assessment of An Air-Filled Balloon Applicator in HDR Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy Using the Monte Carlo Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, H; Lee, Y; Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: As an alternative to cylindrical applicators, air inflated balloon applicators have been introduced into HDR vaginal cuff brachytherapy treatment to achieve sufficient dose to vagina mucosa as well as to spare rectum and bladder. In general, TG43 formulae based treatment planning systems do not take into account tissue inhomogeneity, and air in the balloon applicator can cause higher delivered dose to mucosa than treatment plan reported. We investigated dosimetric effect of air in balloon applicator using the Monte Carlo method. Methods: The thirteen-catheter Capri applicator with a Nucletron Ir-192 seed was modeled for various balloon diameters (2cm to 3.5cm) using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. Ir-192 seed was placed in both central and peripheral catheters to replicate real patient situations. Existence of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) with air balloon was evaluated by comparing kerma and dose at various distances (1mm to 70mm) from surface of air-filled applicator. Also mucosa dose by an air-filled applicator was compared with by a water-filled applicator to evaluate dosimetry accuracy of planning system without tissue inhomogeneity correction. Results: Beyond 1mm from air/tissue interface, the difference between kerma and dose was within 2%. CPE (or transient CPE) condition was deemed existent, and in this region no electron transport was necessary in Monte Carlo simulations. At 1mm or less, the deviation of dose from kerma became more apparent. Increase of dose to mucosa depended on diameter of air balloon. The increment of dose to mucosa was 2.5% and 4.3% on average for 2cm and 3.5cm applicators, respectively. Conclusion: After introduction of air balloon applicator, CPE fails only at the proximity of air/tissue interface. Although dose to mucosa is increased, there is no significant dosimetric difference (<5%) between air and water filled applicators. Tissue inhomogeneity correction is not necessary for air-filled applicators

  9. Purging of an air-filled vessel by horizontal injection of steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B.L.; Andreani, M

    2000-07-01

    Reported here are results from an idealised 2D problem in which cold air is purged from a large vessel by a steam jet. The focus of the study is the prediction of the evolution of the flow regimes resulting from changes in the relative importance of buoyancy and inertia forces, and time histories of the temperature and concentration fields. Global parameters of interest are the mixture concentration at the vessel outlet and the total time taken to purge the air. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code CFX-4 has been used to perform calculations for different inlet velocities, covering a range of (densimetric) Froude numbers from Fr=0.8 (buoyancy dominated) to Fr=7.1 (inertia dominated). Animations have been used to help understand the dynamics of the flow transitions, and temperature and concentration histories at specific monitoring points have been compared with coarse-mesh predictions obtained using the containment code GOTHIC. (authors)

  10. Purging of an air-filled vessel by horizontal injection of steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.L.; Andreani, M.

    2000-01-01

    Reported here are results from an idealised 2D problem in which cold air is purged from a large vessel by a steam jet. The focus of the study is the prediction of the evolution of the flow regimes resulting from changes in the relative importance of buoyancy and inertia forces, and time histories of the temperature and concentration fields. Global parameters of interest are the mixture concentration at the vessel outlet and the total time taken to purge the air. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code CFX-4 has been used to perform calculations for different inlet velocities, covering a range of (densimetric) Froude numbers from Fr=0.8 (buoyancy dominated) to Fr=7.1 (inertia dominated). Animations have been used to help understand the dynamics of the flow transitions, and temperature and concentration histories at specific monitoring points have been compared with coarse-mesh predictions obtained using the containment code GOTHIC. (authors)

  11. Mechanical seals

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, E

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical Seals, Third Edition is a source of practical information on the design and use of mechanical seals. Topics range from design fundamentals and test rigs to leakage, wear, friction and power, reliability, and special designs. This text is comprised of nine chapters; the first of which gives a general overview of seals, including various types of seals and their applications. Attention then turns to the fundamentals of seal design, with emphasis on six requirements that must be considered: sealing effectiveness, length of life, reliability, power consumption, space requirements, and c

  12. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) air-filled nanocapsules as a contrast agent for ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Néstor, Mendoza-Muñoz; Kei, Noriega-Peláez Eddy; Guadalupe, Nava-Arzaluz María; Elisa, Mendoza-Elvira Susana; Adriana, Ganem-Quintanar; David, Quintanar-Guerrero

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare air-filled nanocapsules intended ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) with a biodegradable polymeric shell composed of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA). Because of their size, current commercial UCAs are not capable of penetrating the irregular vasculature that feeds growing tumors. The new generation of UCAs should be designed on the nanoscale to enhance tumor detection, in addition, the polymeric shell in contrast with monomolecular stabilized UCAs improves the mechanical properties against ultrasound pressure and lack of stability. The preparation method of air-filled nanocapsules was based on a modification of the double-emulsion solvent evaporation technique. Air-filled nanocapsules with a mean diameter of 370±96nm were obtained. Electronic microscopies revealed spherical-shaped particles with smooth surfaces and a capsular morphology, with a shell thickness of ∼50nm. Air-filled nanocapsules showed echogenic power in vitro, providing an enhancement of up to 15dB at a concentration of 0.045mg/mL at a frequency of 10MHz. Loss of signal for air-filled nanocapsules was 2dB after 30min, suggesting high stability. The prepared contrast agent in this work has the potential to be used in ultrasound imaging. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparison of the moisture gauge and the neutron log in air-filled holes at NTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearst, J.R.; Carlson, R.C.

    1993-08-01

    Two methods are commonly used to measure water content of geologic materials by neutron diffusion, the moisture gauge and the neutron log. Both are used at NTS, the moisture gauge in tunnels, the neutron log in vertical drilled holes. In this work, the moisture gauge and the neutron log are compared for use in air-filled holes NTS. The measurement instruments have evolved with very different operational characteristics and one important physics difference, the source to detector spacing. The moisture gauge has a very short, 0--6 cm spacing, with little internal shielding, and count increases with water. The neutron log has a long spacing, 30--50 cm, substantial internal shielding, and exhibits decreasing count with increasing water. The moisture gauge gives better bed resolution than the neutron log. Because its count increases with water, the moisture gauge is more strongly affected by water in the borehole, especially in dry formations. In these conditions the neutron log is the method of choice. In air-filled holes, if source size or logging time is not a constraint, the relative sensitivity of the two tools to water is determined by the relative strengths of borehole effects as fluid, holesize, or tool-wall gap. If source size is a constraint for safety reasons, the short spacing provides higher countrates for a given detector efficiency and thus better relative precision in determining the true count. If source size is limited because of detector or electronics saturation, the short spacing will be better at high water content, while the long spacing will be better at low water content. The short spacing may have an advantage because it can make better contact with the hole wall and can be more easily corrected for gap. The long spacing tool is currently used in vertical holes at NTS because that is the only tool available from logging contractors. Since they are most concerned with high water contents, the short spacing tool could prove to be better

  14. Security seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobeli, Garth W.

    1985-01-01

    Security for a package or verifying seal in plastic material is provided by a print seal with unique thermally produced imprints in the plastic. If tampering is attempted, the material is irreparably damaged and thus detectable. The pattern of the imprints, similar to "fingerprints" are recorded as a positive identification for the seal, and corresponding recordings made to allow comparison. The integrity of the seal is proved by the comparison of imprint identification records made by laser beam projection.

  15. Seal arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempsey, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    A hydraulically balanced face type shaft seal is provided in which the opening and closing seal face areas retain concentricity with each other in the event of lateral shaft displacement. The seal arrangement is for a vertical high pressure pump, indented for use in the cooling system of a nuclear reactor. (Auth.)

  16. Low Pressure Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy With the AirSeal System at OLV Hospital: Results From a Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Falce, Sabrina; Novara, Giacomo; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Umari, Paolo; De Naeyer, Geert; D'Hondt, Frederiek; Beresian, Jean; Carette, Rik; Penicka, Martin; Mo, Yujiing; Vandenbroucke, Geert; Mottrie, Alexandre

    2017-12-01

    Limited studies examined effects of pneumoperiotneum during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and with AirSeal. The aim of this study was to assess the effect on hemodynamics of a lower pressure pneumoperitoneum (8 mmHg) with AirSeal, during RARP in steep Trendelenburg 45° (ST). This is an institutional review board-approved, prospective, interventional, single-center study including patients treated with RARP at OLV Hospital by one extremely experienced surgeon (July 2015-February 2016). Intraoperative monitoring included: arterial pressure, central venous pressure, cardiac output, heart rate, stroke volume, systemic vascular resistance, intrathoracic pressure, airways pressures, left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic areas/volumes and ejection fraction, by transesophageal echocardiography, an esophageal catheter, and FloTrac/Vigileo system. Measurements were performed after induction of anesthesia with patient in horizontal (T0), 5 minutes after 8 mmHg pneumoperitoneum (TP), 5 minutes after ST (TT1) and every 30 minutes thereafter until the end of surgery (TH). Parameters modification at the prespecified times was assessed by Wilcoxon and Friedman tests, as appropriate. All analyses were performed by SPSS v. 23.0. A total of 53 consecutive patients were enrolled. The mean patients age was 62.6 ± 6.9 years. Comorbidity was relatively limited (51% with Charlson Comorbidity Index as low as 0). Despite the ST, working always at 8 mmHg with AirSeal, only central venous pressure and mean airways pressure showed a statistically significant variation during the operative time. Although other significant hemodynamic/respiratory changes were observed adding pneumoperitoneum and then ST, all variables remained always within limits safely manageable by anesthesiologists. The combination of ST, lower pressure pneumoperitoneum and extreme surgeon's experience enables to safely perform RARP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Small bowel necrosis as a consequence of spontaneous deflation and migration of an air-filled intragastric balloon - a potentially life-threatening complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdowski, Robert; Wyleżoł, Mariusz; Frączek, Mariusz; Hevelke, Piotr; Giaro, Marcin; Sobański, Paweł

    2014-06-01

    Intragastric balloon placement is a common method of treatment of obesity and is often used by non-surgical teams in endoscopy departments. The likelihood of spontaneous intragastric balloon damage is a well-known phenomenon. We describe a patient who was disqualified from surgical obesity treatment and in whom intragastric fluid-filled balloons had already been inserted twice and removed due to their intolerance. Therefore we qualified this patient for placement of the air-filled balloon Heliosphere BAG. Two months after the planned check-up, he arrived at the surgery department complaining of nausea and vomiting and due to symptoms of ileus diagnosed with an X-ray and ultrasound examination we qualified him for emergency surgery. We would like to emphasise the following issues: the necessity of air-filled balloon removal according to the producer's instructions and multidisciplinary specialist team care along with appropriate diagnostic tools in every case of intragastric balloon insertion.

  18. Nozzle seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, having an internal hoop from which the heated coolant emerges from the reactor core and passes through to the reactor outlet nozzles, is provided with sealing members operatively disposed between the outlet nozzle and the hoop. The sealing members are biased against the pressure vessel and the hoop and are connected by a leak restraining member establishing a leak-proof condition between the inlet and outlet coolants in the region about the outlet nozzle. Furthermore, the flexible responsiveness of the seal assures that the seal will not structurally couple the hoop to the pressure vessel

  19. Nozzle seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walling, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, having an internal hoop from which the heated coolant emerges from the reactor core and passes through to the reactor outlet nozzles, is provided with sealing rings operatively disposed between the outlet nozzles and the hoop. The sealing rings connected by flexible members are biased against the pressure vessel and the hoop, establishing a leak-proof condition between the inlet and outlet coolants in the region about the outlet nozzle. Furthermore, the flexible responsiveness of the seal assures that the seal will not structurally couple the hoop to the pressure vessel. 4 claims, 2 figures

  20. Single-mode pumped high air-fill fraction photonic crystal fiber taper for high-power deep-blue supercontinuum sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Simon Toft; Larsen, Casper; Jakobsen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Dispersion control with axially nonuniform photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) permits supercontinuum (SC) generation into the deep-blue from an ytterbium pump laser. In this Letter, we exploit the full degrees of freedom afforded by PCFs to fabricate a fiber with longitudinally increasing air-fill fr...

  1. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  2. Ceramic Seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smartt, Heidi A.; Romero, Juan A.; Custer, Joyce Olsen; Hymel, Ross W.; Krementz, Dan; Gobin, Derek; Harpring, Larry; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael; Varble, Don; DiMaio, Jeff; Hudson, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  3. Electronic seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musyck, E.

    1981-01-01

    An electronic seal is presented for a volume such as container for fissile materials. The seal encloses a lock for barring the space as well as a device for the detection and the recording of the intervention of the lock. (AF)

  4. Ferrules seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.L.

    1984-07-10

    A device is provided for sealing an inner tube and an outer tube without excessively deforming the tubes. The device includes two ferrules which cooperate to form a vacuum-tight seal between the inner tube and outer tube and having mating surfaces such that overtightening is not possible. 3 figs.

  5. Sealing devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulson, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A sealing device for minimising the leakage of toxic or radioactive contaminated environments through a biological shield along an opening through which a flexible component moves that penetrates the shield. The sealing device comprises an outer tubular member which extends over a length not less than the maximum longitudinal movement of the component along the opening. An inner sealing block is located intermediate the length of the component by connectors and is positioned in the bore of the outer tubular member to slide in the bore and effect a seal over the entire longitudinal movement of the component. The cross-section of the device may be circular and the block may be of polytetrafluoroethylene or of nylon impregnated with molybdenum or may be metallic. A number of the sealing devices may be combined into an assembly for a plurality of adjacent longitudinally movable components, each adapted to sustain a tensile load, providing the various drives of a master-slave manipulator. (author)

  6. Experimental and numerical investigations on flame stability of methane/air mixtures in mesoscale combustors filled with fibrous porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yi; Ning, Daoguan; Fan, Aiwu; Yao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Flame stability in mesoscale channels with fibrous porous media was investigated. • Standing combustion waves were observed in the channels of 6-mm and 5-mm diameter. • The standing combustion wave was not observed in the channel with a diameter of 4 mm. • Flame velocity was inversely proportional to equivalence ratio and channel diameter. • A sharp drop in the efficiency was seen for the 4-mm channel due to wall quenching. - Abstract: Flame stability of methane/air mixtures in mesoscale channels with different diameters (6 mm, 5 mm and 4 mm) filled with fibrous porous media was experimentally investigated. Standing combustion waves (namely, stationary flame) are observed under low inlet velocity and high equivalence ratio conditions. Moreover, the standing wave regime becomes narrower as the channel diameter is reduced from 6 mm to 5 mm and vanishes for the 4-mm channel. For a fixed equivalence ratio, the flame length becomes shorter at a smaller channel or a less inlet velocity. Regarding the downstream propagating wave, its propagation velocity increases with the decrease of channel diameter. Splitting flame appears at large inlet velocities. Besides, at low equivalence ratios, the downstream propagating flames grow into small flame balls and can survive until the channel exit. Numerical results demonstrate that for a smaller channel, although the total heat loss rate is reduced, its heat loss ratio is increased, which leads to a lower wall temperature level and the flame is quenched out near the wall. The combustion efficiency is decreased significantly for the 4-mm channel due to fuel leakage from the near-wall “dead space”.

  7. A comparison of the moisture gauge and the neutron log in air-filled holes at NTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearst, J.R.; Carlson, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    Two methods are commonly used to measure water content of geologic materials by neutron diffusion. One is used mostly in agricultural, mining and civil engineering areas and is called a moisture gauge. The other is used principally in petroleum and mineral exploration, and is called a neutron log. Both are used at NTS, the moisture gauge principally in tunnels, the neutron log in vertical drilled holes. There is little communication between the two industrial groups, and the measurement instruments have evolved with very different operational characteristics, and one important physics difference, the source to detector spacing. The moisture gauge has a very short, 0-6 cm, spacing, with little internal shielding, and count increases with water. In contrast, the neutron log has a long spacing, 30-50 cm, substantial internal shielding, and exhibits decreasing count with increasing water. Because of its short spacing the moisture gauge gives better bed resolution than the neutron log. Because its count increases with water, the moisture gauge is more strongly affected by water in the borehole, especially in dry formations. In these conditions the neutron log is the method of choice. In air-filled holes, if source size or logging time is not a constraint, the relative sensitivity of the two tools to water is determined by the relative strengths of borehole effects as fluid, holesize, or tool-wall gap. If source size is a constraint for safety reasons, the short spacing provides higher countrates for a given detector efficiency and thus better relative precision in determining the true count. If source size is limited because of detector or electronics saturation, the short spacing will be better at high water content, while the long spacing will be better at low water content. In any case the short spacing may have an advantage because it can make better contact with the hole wall and it can be more easily corrected for gap

  8. EBR-II rotating plug seal maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    The EBR-II rotating plug seals require frequent cleaning and maintenance to keep the plugs from sticking during fuel handling. Time consuming cleaning on the cover gas and air sides of the dip ring seal is required to remove oxidation and sodium reaction products that accumulate and stop plug rotation. Despite severely limited access, effective seal cleaning techniques have removed 11 800 lb (5 352 kg) of deposits from the seals since 1964. Temperature control modifications and repairs have also required major maintenance work. Suggested seal design recommendations could significantly reduce maintenance on future similar seals

  9. The influence of air-filled structures on wave propagation and beam formation of a pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) in horizontal and vertical planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhongchang; Zhang, Yu; Thornton, Steven W; Li, Songhai; Dong, Jianchen

    2017-10-01

    The wave propagation, sound field, and transmission beam pattern of a pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) were investigated in both the horizontal and vertical planes. Results suggested that the signals obtained at both planes were similarly characterized with a high peak frequency and a relatively narrow bandwidth, close to the ones recorded from live animals. The sound beam measured outside the head in the vertical plane was narrower than that of the horizontal one. Cases with different combinations of air-filled structures in both planes were used to study the respective roles in controlling wave propagation and beam formation. The wave propagations and beam patterns in the horizontal and vertical planes elucidated the important reflection effect of the spermaceti and vocal chambers on sound waves, which was highly significant in forming intensive forward sound beams. The air-filled structures, the forehead soft tissues and skull structures formed wave guides in these two planes for emitted sounds to propagate forward.

  10. Towards a liquid Argon TPC without evacuation filling of a 6$m^3$ vessel with argon gas from air to ppm impurities concentration through flushing

    CERN Document Server

    Curioni, A; Gendotti, A; Knecht, L; Lussi, D; Marchionni, A; Natterer, G; Resnati, F; Rubbia, A; Coleman, J; Lewis, M; Mavrokoridis, K; McCormick, K; Touramanis, C

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a successful experimental test of filling a volume of 6 $m^3$ with argon gas, starting from normal ambient air and reducing the impurities content down to few parts per million (ppm) oxygen equivalent. This level of contamination was directly monitored measuring the slow component of the scintillation light of the Ar gas, which is sensitive to $all$ sources of impurities affecting directly the argon scintillation.

  11. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for Canister Storage Building (revised sealing configuration for spent nuclear fuel) - Project W-379

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamberg, L.D.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this Notice of Construction (NOC) is to provide a rewritten NOC for obtaining regulatory approval for changes to the previous Canister Storage Building (CSB) NOCs (WDOH, 1996 and EPA, 1996) as were approved by the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH, 1996a) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA, 1996a). These changes are because of a revised sealing configuration of the multi-canister overpacks (MCOS) that are used to store the SNF. A flow schematic of the SNF Project is provided in Figure 1-1. A separate notification of startup will be provided apart from this NOC

  12. Electron beam selectively seals porous metal filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, J. A.; Tulisiak, G.

    1968-01-01

    Electron beam welding selectively seals the outer surfaces of porous metal filters and impedances used in fluid flow systems. The outer surface can be sealed by melting a thin outer layer of the porous material with an electron beam so that the melted material fills all surface pores.

  13. Sealing a Loosely Fitting Valve Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, L.; Tellier, G.

    1986-01-01

    Double-ring seal avoids expense of remachining or redesigning valve parts. Mating fittings on valve sealed by pair of rings - one O-ring and backup ring. Backup ring fills relatively large gap between parts. Prevents softer O-ring from being pushed into and through gap.

  14. T-staging of gastric cancer of air-filling multidetector-row CT: Comparison with hydro-multidetector-row CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumano, Seishi, E-mail: kumano@radiol.med.kindai.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Okada, Masahiro; Shimono, Taro; Kuwabara, Masatomo; Yagyu, Yukinobu; Imaoka, Izumi; Ashikaga, Ryuichiro; Ishii, Kazunari; Murakami, Takamichi [Department of Radiology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of T-staging of gastric cancer by air-filling multidetector-row CT (air-MDCT) compared with water-filling MDCT (hydro-MDCT). Materials and methods: One hundred fifteen patients with histologically diagnosed gastric cancer were included in this study. Fifty-eight patients underwent air-MDCT, and the remaining 57 had hydro-MDCT using a 64-channel scanner. Based on the volumetric data of contrast-enhanced MDCT obtained about 75 s after intravenously injecting 525 mg iodine per kilogram patients weight (525 mgI/kg) nonionic contrast material at the rate of 2 ml/s, oblique coronal and oblique sagittal multi-planar reformatted images perpendicular to the stomach wall, including the tumor, were reconstructed on a workstation. Mural invasion of gastric cancer into the gastric wall, as visualized by CT, was classified according to the TNM classification, and the results of T-staging by MDCT were compared with those by pathologic analysis after surgery. Results: Correct assessment of T-staging by air-CT was achieved in 48 of 58 patients (83%), and that by hydro-MDCT was 49 of 57 patients (86%). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the technique in determining the invasion of serosa were 88%, 93%, and 91% for air-CT and 83%, 95%, and 91% for hydro-CT. There were no significant differences between hydro-MDCT and air-MDCT in sensitivity (P = 0.73), specificity (P = 0.71) and accuracy (P = 0.98). Conclusion: Air-MDCT is a very valuable tool in T-staging of gastric cancer as well as hydro-MDCT.

  15. Characterization of bacterial and archaeal communities in air-cathode microbial fuel cells, open circuit and sealed-off reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Chehab, Noura A.

    2013-06-18

    A large percentage of organic fuel consumed in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) is lost as a result of oxygen transfer through the cathode. In order to understand how this oxygen transfer affects the microbial community structure, reactors were operated in duplicate using three configurations: closed circuit (CC; with current generation), open circuit (OC; no current generation), and sealed off cathodes (SO; no current, with a solid plate placed across the cathode). Most (98 %) of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) was removed during power production in the CC reactor (maximum of 640 ± 10 mW/m 2), with a low percent of substrate converted to current (coulombic efficiency of 26.5 ± 2.1 %). Sealing the cathode reduced COD removal to 7 %, but with an open cathode, there was nearly as much COD removal by the OC reactor (94.5 %) as the CC reactor. Oxygen transfer into the reactor substantially affected the composition of the microbial communities. Based on analysis of the biofilms using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, microbes most similar to Geobacter were predominant on the anodes in the CC MFC (72 % of sequences), but the most abundant bacteria were Azoarcus (42 to 47 %) in the OC reactor, and Dechloromonas (17 %) in the SO reactor. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens were most predominant, with sequences most similar to Methanobacterium in the CC and SO reactor, and Methanocorpusculum in the OC reactors. These results show that oxygen leakage through the cathode substantially alters the bacterial anode communities, and that hydrogenotrophic methanogens predominate despite high concentrations of acetate. The predominant methanogens in the CC reactor most closely resembled those in the SO reactor, demonstrating that oxygen leakage alters methanogenic as well as general bacterial communities. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  16. Characterization of bacterial and archaeal communities in air-cathode microbial fuel cells, open circuit and sealed-off reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Chehab, Noura A.; Li, Dong; Amy, Gary L.; Logan, Bruce E.; Saikaly, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    A large percentage of organic fuel consumed in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) is lost as a result of oxygen transfer through the cathode. In order to understand how this oxygen transfer affects the microbial community structure, reactors were operated in duplicate using three configurations: closed circuit (CC; with current generation), open circuit (OC; no current generation), and sealed off cathodes (SO; no current, with a solid plate placed across the cathode). Most (98 %) of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) was removed during power production in the CC reactor (maximum of 640 ± 10 mW/m 2), with a low percent of substrate converted to current (coulombic efficiency of 26.5 ± 2.1 %). Sealing the cathode reduced COD removal to 7 %, but with an open cathode, there was nearly as much COD removal by the OC reactor (94.5 %) as the CC reactor. Oxygen transfer into the reactor substantially affected the composition of the microbial communities. Based on analysis of the biofilms using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, microbes most similar to Geobacter were predominant on the anodes in the CC MFC (72 % of sequences), but the most abundant bacteria were Azoarcus (42 to 47 %) in the OC reactor, and Dechloromonas (17 %) in the SO reactor. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens were most predominant, with sequences most similar to Methanobacterium in the CC and SO reactor, and Methanocorpusculum in the OC reactors. These results show that oxygen leakage through the cathode substantially alters the bacterial anode communities, and that hydrogenotrophic methanogens predominate despite high concentrations of acetate. The predominant methanogens in the CC reactor most closely resembled those in the SO reactor, demonstrating that oxygen leakage alters methanogenic as well as general bacterial communities. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  17. Sealing of rock fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Erlstroem, M.; Boergesson, L.

    1985-12-01

    The major water-bearing fractures in granite usually from fairly regular sets but the extension and degree of connectivity is varying. This means that only a few fractures that are interconnected with the deposition holes and larger water-bearing structures in a HLW repository are expected and if they can be identified and cut off through sealing it would be possible to improve the isolation of waste packages very effectively. Nature's own fracture sealing mechanisms may be simulated and a survey of the involved processes actually suggests a number of possible filling methods and substances. Most of them require high temperature and pressure and correspondingly sophisticated techniques, but some are of potential interest for immediate application with rather moderate effort. Such a technique is to fill the fractures with clayey substances which stay flexible and low-permeable provided that they remain physically and chemically intact. It is demonstrated in the report that effective grouting requires a very low viscosity and shear strength of the substance and this can be achieved by mechanical agitation as demonstrated in this report. Thus, by superimposing static pressure and shear waves induced by percussion hammering at a suitable frequency, clays and fine-grained silts as well as cement can be driven into fractures with an average aperture as small as 0.1 mm. Experiments were made in the laboratory using concrete and steel plates, and a field pilot test was also conducted under realistic conditions on site in Stripa. They all demonstrated the practicality of the 'dynamic injection technique' and that the fluid condition of the grouts yielded complete filling of the injected space to a considerable distance from the injection point. The field test indicated a good sealing ability as well as a surprisingly high resistance to erosion and piping. (author)

  18. Repository Closure and Sealing Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A.T. Watkins

    2000-01-01

    The scope of this analysis will be to develop the conceptual design of the closure seals and their locations in the Subsurface Facilities. The design will be based on the recently established program requirements for transitioning to the Site Recommendation (SR) design as outlined by ''Approach to Implementing the Site Recommendation Baseline'' (Stroupe 2000) and the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1999b). The objective of this analysis will be to assist in providing a description for the Subsurface Facilities System Description Document, Section 2 and finally to document any conclusions reached in order to contribute and provide support to the SR. This analysis is at a conceptual level and is considered adequate to support the SR design. The final closure barriers and seals for the ventilation shafts, and the north and south ramps will require these openings to be permanently sealed to limit excessive air and water inflows and prevent human intrusion. The major tasks identified with closure in this analysis are: (1) Developing the overall subsurface seal layout and identifying design and operational interfaces for the Subsurface Facilities. (2) Summarizing the general site conditions and general rock characteristic with respect to seal location and describing the seal selected. (3) Identify seal construction materials, methodology of construction and strategic locations including design of the seal and plugs. (4) Discussing methods to prevent human intrusion

  19. X-ray detector for automatic exposure control using ionization chamber filled with xenon gas

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, A; Yoshida, T

    2003-01-01

    This report refers to our newly developed X-ray detector for reliable automatic X-ray exposure control, which is to be widely used for X-ray diagnoses in various clinical fields. This new detector utilizes an ionization chamber filled with xenon gas, in contrast to conventional X-ray detectors which use ionization chambers filled with air. Use of xenon gas ensures higher sensitivity and thinner design of the detector. The xenon gas is completely sealed in the chamber, so that the influence of the changes in ambient environments is minimized. (author)

  20. Improved circumferential shaft seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Strom, T. N.

    1974-01-01

    Comparative tests of modified and unmodified carbon ring seals showed that addition of helical grooves to conventional segmented carbon ring seals reduced leakage significantly. Modified seal was insensitive to shaft runout and to flooding by lubricant.

  1. Comparison of intraocular pressure measured by non-contact air puff versus Goldmann applanation tonometers in gas-filled vitrectomized eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patikulsila, Direk; Taweemankongsab, Srisuda; Ngamtipakorn, Supob

    2003-05-01

    To compare intraocular pressure (IOP) measured by two different instruments, air puff tonometer (APT) versus Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT), in gas-filled vitrectomized eyes. Three-month, prospective, comparative trial. Thirty-eight patients (38 eyes), who underwent a pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with gas injection, were enrolled in the study. The IOP was measured by an APT, followed by GAT within 10 minutes by two different, masked investigators. IOPs were measured by two methods and then were compared. Overall, there was a high correlation between both measurements (r = 0.908, p 0.05). By a subgroup analysis of 17 eyes with IOP measured by a GAT of 21 mmHg or less, the APT readings (15.28 +/- 4.81) and GAT readings (14.47 +/- 3.89) were not significantly different (p > 0.05). Of 21 eyes, with IOP measured by a GAT of 22 mmHg or more, the APT readings (26.88 +/- 8.81) were significantly lower than those obtained by the GAT (29.62 +/- 7.69) (p < 0.05). In gas-filled vitrectomized eyes, IOP measurements obtained by an APT correlated well with those obtained by GAT, especially when the IOP was within normal range. However, in eyes with elevated IOP, the APT significantly underestimated the IOP measurement when compared to the gold standard, GAT.

  2. Sealed can of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a seal plug cover with a gripping portion fitted to a canning machine and a gripping portion fitted to a gripper of the same configuration as a fuel body for handling the fuel body so as to facilitate the handling work. Structure: A sealed can comprises a vessel and a seal plug cover, said cover being substantially in the form of a bottomed cylinder, which is slipped on the vessel and air-tightly secured by a fastening bolt between it and a flange. The spent fuel body is received into the vessel together with coolant during the step of canning operation. Said seal plug cover has two gripping portions, one for opening and closing the plug cover of the canning machine as an exclusive use member, the other being in the form of a hook-shaped peripheral groove, whereby the gripping portions may be effectively used using the same gripper when the spent fuel body is transported while being received in the sealed can or when the fuel body is removed from the sealed can. (Kawakami, Y.)

  3. A study on the method for estimating the life time of O-rings made of NBR used in sealing air operating cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Yuzo; Mitsuta, Yasumasa

    2003-01-01

    At nuclear power plants, a large number of O-rings made of rubber are attached to safety related machines and apparatus for sealing two metallic components. O-rings degrade during the long term exposure in environmental conditions in use, and finally lose the requested functions. Therefore it is important to exchange them in a proper period based on the precise life time estimation. This study aimed at to investigate the method for estimating the life time of O-rings made of NBR (acrylonitrile butadiene rubber) attached to the air cylinders which drive the dampers of ventilation systems in nuclear power plants. It has been conducted as follows: (1) After confirming that the main cause of degradation of O-rings is thermo-oxidation reaction, thermally accelerated aging tests were carried out for O-rings with three different temperatures. (2) It was certified that the elongation values of O-rings obtained by the tests could be fitted by the Arrhenius rule, and then the life time of O-rings was estimated using the Arrhenius rule. (3) In order to validate the reliability of this estimation, we measured the elongation values of the O-rings which had been actually used at nuclear power plants, and compared them to the predicted elongation values obtained by the above estimation. The average and standard deviation of the values which is calculated by the equation {(measured value-predicted value)/ predicted value} are 11% and 8%, respectively and there are small errors between the measured value and the predicted values. As a result we can judge that good estimation of life time of O-rings can be done by the above method. (author)

  4. Effects of caffeine, sleep loss, and stress on cognitive performance and mood during U.S. Navy SEAL training. Sea-Air-Land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Harris R; Tharion, William J; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Speckman, Karen L; Tulley, Richard

    2002-11-01

    When humans are acutely exposed to multiple stressors, cognitive performance is substantially degraded. Few practical strategies are available to sustain performance under such conditions. This study examined whether moderate doses of caffeine would reduce adverse effects of sleep deprivation and exposure to severe environmental and operational stress on cognitive performance. Volunteers were 68 U.S. Navy Sea-Air-Land (SEAL) trainees, randomly assigned to receive either 100, 200, or 300 mg caffeine or placebo in capsule form after 72 h of sleep deprivation and continuous exposure to other stressors. Cognitive tests administered included scanning visual vigilance, four-choice visual reaction time, a matching-to-sample working memory task and a repeated acquisition test of motor learning and memory. Mood state, marksmanship, and saliva caffeine were also assessed. Testing was conducted 1 and 8 h after treatment. Sleep deprivation and environmental stress adversely affected performance and mood. Caffeine, in a dose-dependent manner, mitigated many adverse effects of exposure to multiple stressors. Caffeine (200 and 300 mg) significantly improved visual vigilance, choice reaction time, repeated acquisition, self-reported fatigue and sleepiness with the greatest effects on tests of vigilance, reaction time, and alertness. Marksmanship, a task that requires fine motor coordination and steadiness, was not affected by caffeine. The greatest effects of caffeine were present 1 h post-administration, but significant effects persisted for 8 h. Even in the most adverse circumstances, moderate doses of caffeine can improve cognitive function, including vigilance, learning, memory, and mood state. When cognitive performance is critical and must be maintained during exposure to severe stress, administration of caffeine may provide a significant advantage. A dose of 200 mg appears to be optimal under such conditions.

  5. Comparison of effects of ProSeal LMA™ laryngeal mask airway cuff inflation with air, oxygen, air:oxygen mixture and oxygen:nitrous oxide mixture in adults: A randomised, double-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims : Laryngeal mask airway (LMA cuff pressure increases when the air is used for the cuff inflation during oxygen: nitrous oxide (O 2 :N 2 O anaesthesia, which may lead to various problems. We compared the effects of different gases for ProSeal LMA™ (PLMA cuff inflation in adult patients for various parameters. Methods: A total of 120 patients were randomly allocated to four groups, according to composition of gases used to inflate the PLMA cuff to achieve 40 cmH 2 O cuff pressure, air (Group A, 50% O 2 :air (Group OA, 50% O 2 :N 2 O (Group ON and 100% O 2 (Group O. Cuff pressure, cuff volume and ventilator parameters were monitored intraoperatively. Pharyngolaryngeal parameters were assessed at 1, 2 and 24 h postoperatively. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA, Fisher′s exact test and step-wise logistic regression. Results: Cuff pressure significantly increased at 10, 15 and 30 min in Group A, OA and O from initial pressure. Cuff pressure decreased at 5 min in Group ON (36.6 ± 3.5 cmH 2 O (P = 0.42. PLMA cuff volume increased in Group A, OA, O, but decreased in Group ON (6.16 ± 2.8 ml [P < 0.001], 4.7 ± 3.8 ml [P < 0.001], 1.4 ± 3.19 ml [P = 0.023] and − 1.7 ± 4.9 ml [P = 0.064], respectively, from basal levels. Ventilatory parameters were comparable in all four groups. There was no significant association between sore throat and cuff pressure, with odds ratio 1.002. Conclusion: Cuff inflation with 50% O 2 :N 2 O mixture provided more stable cuff pressure in comparison to air, O 2 :air, 100% O 2 during O 2 :N 2 O anaesthesia. Ventilatory parameters did not change with variation in PLMA cuff pressure. Post-operative sore throat had no correlation with cuff pressure.

  6. Rotary plug seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Koji; Abiko, Yoshihiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable fuel exchange even upon failure of regular seals and also to enable safety seal exchange by the detection of the reduction in the contact pressure of a rotary plug seal. Constitution: If one of a pair of regular tube seals for the rotary plug is failed during ordinary operation of a FBR type reactor, the reduction in the contact pressure of the seal to the plug gibbousness is detected by a pressure gauge and a solenoid valve is thereby closed. Thus, a back-up-tube seal provided above or below the tube seal is press-contacted by way of argon gas to the gibbousness to enter into operation state and lubricants are supplied from an oil tank. In such a structure, the back-up-tube seal is operated before the failure of the tube seal to enable to continue the fuel exchange work, as well as safety exchange for the tube seal. (Moriyama, K.)

  7. Seal design alternatives study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Sambeek, L.L.; Luo, D.D.; Lin, M.S.; Ostrowski, W.; Oyenuga, D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results from a study of various sealing alternatives for the WIPP sealing system. Overall, the sealing system has the purpose of reducing to the extent possible the potential for fluids (either gas or liquid) from entering or leaving the repository. The sealing system is divided into three subsystems: drift and panel seals within the repository horizon, shaft seals in each of the four shafts, and borehole seals. Alternatives to the baseline configuration for the WIPP seal system design included evaluating different geometries and schedules for seal component installations and the use of different materials for seal components. Order-of-magnitude costs for the various alternatives were prepared as part of the study. Firm recommendations are not presented, but the advantages and disadvantages of the alternatives are discussed. Technical information deficiencies are identified and studies are outlined which can provide required information

  8. Mechanical seal assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    2001-01-01

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transferring it to the mechanical diode.

  9. Mechanical Seal Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    1999-06-18

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transferring it to the mechanical diode.

  10. Mechanical seal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowery, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental plans and timing for completion of the mechanical seal program for both the slurry and transfer pumps are given. The slurry pump seal program will be completed by April 1984 with turnover of two seals in pumps to SRP Tank 15H. Transfer pump seal design will be released for plant use by May 1984. Also included are various other pump and seal related tests

  11. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1995-07-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with a piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changes suddenly. the experimental results were compared to the predictions from the mathematical model. The model was successful in predicting the trends in leakage rate that occurred as the balance ratio and sealed pressure changed

  12. Numerical Investigation on Windback Seals Used in Aero Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Flouros

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Seals are considered one of the most important flow elements in turbomachinery applications. The most traditional and widely known seal is the labyrinth seal but in recent years other types like the brush or carbon seals were introduced since they considerably reduce the sealing air consumption. When seals are used for sealing of aero engine bearing chambers they are subjected to high “bombardment” through oil particles which are present in the bearing chamber. These particles mainly result from the bearings as a consequence of the high rotational speeds. Particularly when carbon or brush seals are used, problems with carbon formation (coking may arise when oil gets trapped in the very tight gap of these seals. In order to prevent oil migration into the turbomachinery, particularly when the pressure difference over a seal is small or even negligible, significant improvement can be achieved through the introduction of so called windback seals. This seal has a row of static helical teeth (thread and below this thread a scalloped or smooth shaft section is rotating. Depending on the application, a windback seal can be used alone or as a combination with another seal (carbon, brush or labyrinth seal. A CFD analysis carried out with ANSYS CFX version 11 is presented in this paper with the aim to investigate this seal type. The simulations were performed by assuming a two-phase flow of air and oil in the bearing compartment. Design parameters like seal clearance, thread size, scallop width, were investigated at different operating conditions.

  13. Nuclear reactor sealing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEdwards, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor sealing system is disclosed. The nuclear reactor includes a vessel sealed at its upper end by a closure head. The closure head comprises at least two components, one of which is rotatable; and the two components define an annulus therebetween. The sealing system includes at least a first and second inflatable seal disposed in series in an upper portion of the annulus. The system further includes a dip seal extending into a body of insulation located adjacent a bottom portion of the closure head. The dip seal comprises a trough formed by a lower portion of one of the components, and a seal blade pendently supported from the other component and extending downwardly into the trough. A body of liquid metal is contained in the trough which submerges a portion of the seal blade. The seal blade is provided with at least one aperture located above the body of liquid metal for providing fluid communication between the annulus intermediate the dip seal and the inflatable seals, and a body of cover gas located inside the vessel. There also is provided means for introducing a purge gas into the annulus intermediate the inflatable seals and the seal blade. The purge gas is introduced in an amount sufficient to substantially reduce diffusion of radioactive cover gas or sodium vapor up to the inflatable seals. The purge gas mixes with the cover gas in the reactor vessel where it can be withdrawn from the vessel for treatment and recycle to the vessel

  14. Inboard seal mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, John R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A regenerator assembly for a gas turbine engine has a hot side seal assembly formed in part by a cast metal engine block having a seal recess formed therein that is configured to supportingly receive ceramic support blocks including an inboard face thereon having a regenerator seal face bonded thereto. A pressurized leaf seal is interposed between the ceramic support block and the cast metal engine block to bias the seal wear face into sealing engagement with a hot side surface of a rotary regenerator matrix.

  15. Decontamination of objects in a sealed container by means of atmospheric pressure plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leipold, Frank; Schultz-Jensen, Nadja; Kusano, Yukihiro

    2011-01-01

    . The ambient atmosphere was air at atmospheric pressure. A plasma is generated inside the bag forming ozone from the oxygen. The maximum ozone concentration in the bag was found to be 140 ppm. A log 6 reduction of L. innocua is obtained after 15 min of exposure time. The temperature of the slides after...... for the experiments. Glass slides were inoculated with L. innocua. The slides were placed inside a low density polyethylene (LDPE) bag. The bag was filled with a gas mixture of 97.5 Vol% Ar and 2.5 Vol% O2 and subsequently sealed. The bag was placed between the electrodes of a dielectric barrier discharge...

  16. Crashworthy sealed pressure vessel for plutonium transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A rugged transportation package for the air shipment of radioisotopic materials was recently developed. This package includes a tough, sealed, stainless steel inner containment vessel of 1460 cc capacity. This vessel, intended for a mass load of up to 2 Kg PuO 2 in various isotopic forms (not to exceed 25 watts thermal activity), has a positive closure design consisting of a recessed, shouldered lid fastened to the vessel body by twelve stainless-steel bolts; sealing is accomplished by a ductile copper gasket in conjunction with knife-edge sealing beads on both the body and lid. Follow-on applications of this seal in newer, smaller packages for international air shipments of plutonium safeguards samples, and in newer, more optimized packages for greater payload and improved efficiency and utility, are briefly presented

  17. Field Trial of an Aerosol-Based Enclosure Sealing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Curtis [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Springer, David [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report presents the results from several demonstrations of a new method for sealing building envelope air leaks using an aerosol sealing process developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at UC Davis. The process involves pressurizing a building while applying an aerosol sealant to the interior. As air escapes through leaks in the building envelope, the aerosol particles are transported to the leaks where they collect and form a seal that blocks the leak. Standard blower door technology is used to facilitate the building pressurization, which allows the installer to track the sealing progress during the installation and automatically verify the final building tightness. Each aerosol envelope sealing installation was performed after drywall was installed and taped, and the process did not appear to interrupt the construction schedule or interfere with other trades working in the homes. The labor needed to physically seal bulk air leaks in typical construction will not be replaced by this technology.

  18. Nuclear waste vault sealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyenge, M.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear waste vault must be designed and built to ensure adequate isolation of the nuclear wastes from human contact. Consequently, after a vault has been fully loaded, it must be adequately sealed off to prevent radionuclide migration which may be provided by circulating groundwater. Vault sealing entails four major aspects, i.e.: (a) vault grouting; (b) borehole sealing; (c) buffer packing; and (d) backfilling. Of particular concern in vault sealing are the physical and chemical properties of the sealing material, its long-term durability and stability, and the techniques used for its emplacement. Present sealing technology and sealing materials are reviewed in terms of the particular needs of vault sealing. Areas requiring research and development are indicated

  19. Fog seal guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Fog seals are a method of adding asphalt to an existing pavement surface to improve sealing or waterproofing, prevent further stone loss by holding aggregate in place, or simply improve the surface appearance. However, inappropriate use can result in...

  20. Hermetically Sealed Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed hermetically sealed pump compresses fluid to pressure up to 4,000 atm (400 MPa). Pump employs linear electric motor instead of rotary motor to avoid need for leakage-prone rotary seals. In addition, linear-motor-powered pump would not require packings to seal its piston. Concept thus eliminates major cause of friction and wear. Pump is double-ended diaphragm-type compressor. All moving parts sealed within compressor housing.

  1. Investigation of positive shaft seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfouts, J. O.

    1970-01-01

    Welded metal bellows secondary seals prevent secondary seal leakage with a minimum number of potential leak paths. High performance seal is obtained by controlling the potentially unstable seal-face movements induced by mechanical vibrations and fluid pressure pulsations.

  2. Dampers for Stationary Labyrinth Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Aini, Yehia; Mitchell, William; Roberts, Lawrence; Montgomery, Stuart; Davis, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Vibration dampers have been invented that are incorporated as components within the stationary labyrinth seal assembly. These dampers are intended to supplement other vibration-suppressing features of labyrinth seals in order to reduce the incidence of high-cycle-fatigue failures, which have been known to occur in the severe vibratory environments of jet engines and turbopumps in which labyrinth seals are typically used. A vibration damper of this type includes several leaf springs and/or a number of metallic particles (shot) all held in an annular seal cavity by a retaining ring. The leaf springs are made of a spring steel alloy chosen, in conjunction with design parameters, to maintain sufficient preload to ensure effectiveness of damping at desired operating temperatures. The cavity is vented via a small radial gap between the retaining ring and seal housing. The damping mechanism is complex. In the case of leaf springs, the mechanism is mainly friction in the slippage between the seal housing and individual dampers. In the case of a damper that contains shot, the damping mechanism includes contributions from friction between individual particles, friction between particles and cavity walls, and dissipation of kinetic energy of impact. The basic concept of particle/shot vibration dampers has been published previously; what is new here is the use of such dampers to suppress traveling-wave vibrations in labyrinth seals. Damping effectiveness depends on many parameters, including, but not limited to, coefficient of friction, mode shape, and frequency and amplitude of vibrational modes. In tests, preloads of the order of 6 to 15 lb (2.72 to 6.8 kilograms) per spring damper were demonstrated to provide adequate damping levels. Effectiveness of shot damping of vibrations having amplitudes from 20 to 200 times normal terrestrial gravitational acceleration (196 to 1,960 meters per square second) and frequencies up to 12 kHz was demonstrated for shot sizes from 0.032 to

  3. UPTF loop seal tests and their RELAP simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuomainen, M.; Tuunanen, J.

    1997-01-01

    In a pressurized water reactor the loop seals have an effect on the natural circulation. If a loop seal is filled with water it can cause a flow stagnation in the loop during two-phase natural circulation. Also the pressure loss over a filled loop seal is high, which lowers the water level in the core. Tests to investigate the loop seal behaviour were performed on a German Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF). The purpose of the tests was to study the amount of water in the loop seal under different steam flow rates. The tests were simulated with RELAP5/MOD3.2. With high steam flow rates the code had problems in simulating the amount of the water remaining in the pump elbow, but in general the agreement between the calculated results and the experimental data was good. (orig.)

  4. Circumferential shaft seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A circumferential shaft seal comprising two sealing rings held to a rotating shaft by means of a surrounding elastomeric band is disclosed. The rings are segmented and are of a rigid sealing material such as carbon or a polyimide and graphite fiber composite.

  5. Seals in motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brasseur, Sophie Marie Jacqueline Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The harbour seal Phoca vitulina and the grey seal Halichoerus grypus have been inhabitants of the Wadden Sea since millennia. Prehistoric findings indicate the presence of both species around 5000 BC. This changed dramatically in the mid Middle-Ages as around 1500 AC, the grey seal disappeared from

  6. Resolving the stratification discrepancy of turbulent natural convection in differentially heated air-filled cavities. Part III: A full convection–conduction–surface radiation coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin, Shihe; Salat, Jacques; Joubert, Patrice; Sergent, Anne; Penot, François; Quéré, Patrick Le

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Turbulent natural convection is studied numerically and experimentally. ► DNS of full conduction–convection–radiation coupling is performed. ► Spectral methods are combined with domain decomposition. ► Considering surface radiation improves strongly numerical results. ► Surface radiation is responsible for the weak stratification. -- Abstract: The present study concerns an air-filled differentially heated cavity of 1 m × 0.32 m × 1 m (width × depth × height) subject to a temperature difference of 15 K and is motivated by the need to understand the persistent discrepancy observed between numerical and experimental results on thermal stratification in the cavity core. An improved experiment with enhanced metrology was set up and experimental data have been obtained along with the characteristics of the surfaces and materials used. Experimental temperature distributions on the passive walls have been introduced in numerical simulations in order to provide a faithful prediction of experimental data. By means of DNS using spectral methods, heat conduction in the insulating material is first coupled with natural convection in the cavity. As heat conduction influences only the temperature distribution on the top and bottom surfaces and in the near wall regions, surface radiation is added to the coupling of natural convection with heat conduction. The temperature distribution in the cavity is strongly affected by the polycarbonate front and rear walls of the cavity, which are almost black surfaces for low temperature radiation, and also other low emissivity walls. The thermal stratification is considerably weakened by surface radiation. Good agreement between numerical simulations and experiments is observed on both time-averaged fields and turbulent statistics. Treating the full conduction–convection–radiation coupling allowed to confirm that experimental wall temperatures resulted from the coupled phenomena and this is another way to

  7. High-Voltage Leak Detection of a Parenteral Proteinaceous Solution Product Packaged in Form-Fill-Seal Plastic Laminate Bags. Part 3. Chemical Stability and Visual Appearance of a Protein-Based Aqueous Solution for Injection as a Function of HVLD Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Mats; Damgaard, Rasmus; Buus, Peter; Guazzo, Dana Morton

    2013-01-01

    This Part 3 of this three-part research series reports the impact of high-voltage leak detection (HVLD) exposure on the physico-chemical stability of the packaged product. The product, intended for human administration by injection, is an aqueous solution formulation of the rapid acting insulin analogue, insulin aspart (NovoRapid®/NovoLog®) by Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark. The package is a small-volume form-fill-seal plastic laminate bag. Product-packages exposed to HVLD were compared to unexposed product after storage for 9 months at recommended storage conditions of 5 ± 3 °C. No differences in active ingredient or degradation products assays were noted. No changes in any other stability indicating parameter results were observed. This report concludes this three-part series. Part 1 documented HVLD method development and validation work. Part 2 explored the impact of various package material, package temperature, and package storage conditions on HVLD test results. Detection of leaks in the bag seal area was investigated. In conclusion, HVLD is reported to be a validatable leak test method suitable for rapid, nondestructive container-closure integrity evaluation of the subject product-package. In Part 1 of this three-part series, a leak test method based on electrical conductivity and capacitance, also called high-voltage leak detection (HVLD), was proven to find hole leaks in small plastic bags filled with a solution of insulin aspart intended for human injection (NovoRapid®/NovoLog® by Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark). In Part 2, the ability of the HVLD method to find other types of package leaks was tested, and the impact of package material and product storage temperature on HVLD results was explored. This final Part 3 checked how well the packaged protein drug solution maintained its potency after HVLD exposure over 9 months of storage under long-term stability conditions. Results showed that HVLD caused no harm to the product.

  8. Electronic self-monitoring seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The Electronic Self-Monitoring Seal is a new type of security seal which allows continuous verification of the seal's identity and status. The identity information is a function of the individual seal, time, and seal integrity. A description of this seal and its characteristics are presented. Also described are the use cycle for the seal and the support equipment for programming and verifying the seal

  9. Detection of seal contamination in heat-sealed food packaging based on active infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'huys, Karlien; Saeys, Wouter; De Ketelaere, Bart

    2015-05-01

    In the food industry packaging is often applied to protect the product from the environment, assuring quality and safety throughout shelf life if properly performed. Packaging quality depends on the material used and the closure (seal). The material is selected based on the specific needs of the food product to be wrapped. However, proper closure of the package is often harder to achieve. One problem possibly jeopardizing seal quality is the presence of food particles between the seal. Seal contamination can cause a decreased seal strength and thus an increased packaging failure risk. It can also trigger the formation of microchannels through which air and microorganisms can enter and spoil the enclosed food. Therefore, early detection and removal of seal-contaminated packages from the production chain is essential. In this work, a pulsed-type active thermography method using the heat of the sealing bars as an excitation source was studied for detecting seal contamination. The cooling profile of contaminated seals was recorded. The detection performance of four processing methods (based on a single frame, a fit of the cooling profile, pulsed phase thermography and a matched filter) was compared. High resolution digital images served as a reference to quantify contamination. The lowest detection limit (equivalent diameter of 0.63 mm) and the lowest processing time (0.42 s per sample) were obtained for the method based on a single frame. Presumably, practical limitations in the recording stage prevented the added value of active thermography to be fully reflected in this application.

  10. VAK III. Seals and sealing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    d'Agraives, B.C.; Dal Cero, G.; Debeir, R.; Mascetti, E.; Toornvliet, J.; Volcan, A.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents the VAK III seals and sealing system, which have been used over a period of two years at the Kahl nuclear facility (Federal Republic of Germany), where field tests and feasibility studies were conducted in order to offer a possible solution for the sealing of LWR fuel assemblies. It has been prepared with the aim of an assessment study to be done at the IAEA. It gives all characteristics and technical descriptions for: the sealing principle, the seal construction, the operating tools, the data processing, the drawings, the publications related to that seal. The main points of progress are: the Strong Random Internal Defects (STRID) incorporated in the seals, allowing the obtention of a good signature stability; the Integrity Check on the Seal Status (broken or not) obtained through a decisive mechanical improvement: the Double Breakage Integrity Check (DOBRIC) and with a better ultrasonic evidence of that status; the provision of new function tools, allowing the performance of Identity Measurements in dry conditions (which means also at the manufacturer plant) or in deeper water (wet storage); the study and development of a new JRC VAK 45 Compact Instrument Box, in which all the measuring functions can be grouped and incorporating an autonomous Minicomputer offering to the Inspection the possibility of performing, on the spot, Correlation and Decision processes. The general benefit of such a feasibility study should be to convince the potential users that such a Safeguards Sealing System can be studied for slightly - or largely - different other applications, provided that the Basic and Operating Functions required to the system be clearly defined, possibly after a common agreement would be stated

  11. Reinforced seal component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanson, G.M.; Odent, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    The invention concerns a seal component of the kind comprising a soft sheath and a flexible reinforcement housed throughout the entire length of the sheath. The invention enables O ring seals to be made capable of providing a radial seal, that is to say between two sides or flat collars of two cylindrical mechanical parts, or an axial seal, that is to say between two co-axial axisymmetrical areas. The seal so ensured is relative, but it remains adequately sufficient for many uses, for instance, to ensure the separation of two successive fixed blading compartments of axial compressors used in gas diffusion isotope concentration facilities [fr

  12. The IRES electronic seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autrusson, B.; Brochard, D.; Moreau, J.F.; Martin, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the French Support Program for the IAEA Safeguards, the 'Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire' (IPSN), developed an electronic seal called Integrated and Reusable Electronic Seal (IRES) that enables independent verification by different inspectorates (IAEA, Euratom, and National Inspectorate). The seal can be remotely interrogated by radio frequency and integrated to other Containment/surveillance systems by serial line RS 485. Data are authenticated and the IRESMAG software manages in the seal reader all functionalities of the seal and records inspection data compatible with the IAEA's Seal Database. To perform this development, IPSN relies on industrial partners: SAPHYMO for the general architecture of the seal and the electronics, THALES for the authentication of data and the security of transmission. The main features of the IRES seal are the following: Interrogation by different inspectorate, allowing independent conclusions; Recording of events, including tampering, in a non-volatile memory; Authentication of data and enhanced security of the communication between the seal and the seal reader; Remote interrogation by an inspector or/and automatic for unattended systems or remote monitoring; Reusable after erasing the seal memory and replacement of the batteries

  13. Severe service sealing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, R.; Wensel, R.

    1994-09-01

    Successful sealing usually requires much more than initial leak-tightness. Friction and wear must also be acceptable, requiring a good understanding of tribology at the sealing interface. This paper describes various sealing solutions for severe service conditions. The CAN2A and CAN8 rotary face seals use tungsten carbide against carbon-graphite to achieve low leakage and long lifetime in nuclear main coolant pumps. The smaller CAN6 seal successfully uses tungsten carbide against silicon carbide in reactor water cleanup pump service. Where friction in CANDU fuelling machine rams must be essentially zero, a hydrostatic seal using two silicon carbide faces is the solution. In the NRU reactor moderator pumps, where pressure is much lower, eccentric seals that prevent boiling at the seal faces are giving excellent service. All these rotary face seals rely on supplementary elastomer seals between their parts. An integrated engineering approach to high performance sealing with O-rings is described. This is epitomized in critical Space Shuttle applications, but is increasingly being applied in CANDU plants. It includes gland design, selection and qualification of material, quality assurance, detection of defects and the effects of lubrication, surface finish, squeeze, stretch and volume constraints. In conclusion, for the severe service applications described, customized solutions have more than paid for themselves by higher reliability, lower maintenance requirements and reduced outage time. (author)

  14. The IRES electronic seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourlez, P.; Funk, P.; Brochard, D.; Moreau, J.F.; Martin, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the French Support Program for the IAEA Safeguards, the 'Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire' (IPSN), developed an electronic seal called Integrated and Reusable Electronic Seal (IRES) that enables independent verification by different inspectorates (IAEA, Euratom, and National Inspectorate) Furthermore, a bilateral co-ordination between Euratom and French domestic safeguards takes place in some French facilities regarding a common approach concerning the seals especially in case of crisis situation. The seal can be remotely interrogated by radio frequency and integrated to other Containment/surveillance systems by serial line RS 485. Data are authenticated and the IRESMAG software manages in the seal reader all functionalities of the seal and records inspection data compatible with the IAEA's Seal Database

  15. High pressure shaft seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinson, A.R.; Rogers, V.D.

    1980-01-01

    In relation to reactor primary coolant pumps, mechanical seal assembly for a pump shaft is disclosed which features a rotating seal ring mounting system which utilizes a rigid support ring loaded through narrow annular projections in combination with centering non-sealing O-rings which effectively isolate the rotating seal ring from temperature and pressure transients while securely positioning the ring to adjacent parts. A stationary seal ring mounting configuration allows the stationary seal ring freedom of motion to follow shaft axial movement up to 3/4 of an inch and shaft tilt about the pump axis without any change in the hydraulic or pressure loading on the stationary seal ring or its carrier. (author)

  16. Leak-thight seals got high pressure testing of pipes, tanks, valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrade, J.

    1985-01-01

    Leak-tight seals ensure quick, safe and efficient testing of pipes with plain-ended or flanged openings, valves with flanged or welded edges, manifields, recipients, etc. They are inserted into the pipe end manually then simply a slight turn of the seal treated wheel commences the pressure test. Hydraulic pressure is supplied by a pump through the inlet seal and air is purged through the outlet seal which then closes. The higher the pressure, the greater the sealing strength of the seal which prevents accidental unplugging. There are different types of seals: for interior plain-ended openings, for pipes with plain-ended opening, for flanged pipes. (author)

  17. Nusselt-Rayleigh correlations for design of industrial elements: Experimental and numerical investigation of natural convection in tilted square air filled enclosures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairi, A.

    2008-01-01

    Natural convection in air filled 2D tilted square cavities is experimentally and numerically studied. The hot and cold walls of the cavity are maintained isothermal at temperatures T h and T c , respectively, and the channel of the cavity is adiabatic. Measurements and simulations are performed for various geometrical and thermal configurations. Different values of the Rayleigh number Ra and the tilt angle α of the cavity are considered. The range of Ra covered in our work extends from 10 to 10 10 while α varies from 0 to 360 deg. This permits the analysis of several significant situations corresponding to vertical active walls (α 0 deg.), hot wall at the bottom (α = 90 deg.; Rayleigh-Benard convection) and hot wall at the top, pure conductive mode (α = 270 deg.). A computational 2D model based on the finite volume method is used for solving the mass, momentum and energy transfer governing equations. The simulation provides thermal and dynamic maps of the fluid for all configurations treated. The influence of Ra and α on the flow pattern and on the convective heat transfer are analysed and discussed. The thermal boundary distribution and the convective heat transfer calculated are, for most treated cases, close to those obtained experimentally by means of a simple bench specifically designed for this purpose. The maximum discrepancy between the simulations and measurements is relatively small, corresponding to the expected uncertainty of the model and measurements. The convective heat transfer is determined while calculating the radiative and conductive contributions to the global exchange. Radiation is determined by the radiosity method associated with the measured field of temperatures as well as to the global IR emissivities of all the internal elements of the cavity. The average Nusselt number Nu-bar is used to quantify the calculated convective contribution of the heat exchange within the cavity, and is compared with the measured value Nu-bar m . We

  18. Flexible ring seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbes, Claude; Gournier, Andre; Rouaud, Christian; Villepoix, Raymond de.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns a flexible metal ring seal, able to ensure a perfect seal between two bearings due to the crushing and elastic deformation properties akin to similar properties in elastomers. Various designs of seal of this kind are already known, particularly a seal made of a core formed by a helical wire spring with close-wound turns and with high axial compression ratio, closed on itself and having the shape of an annulus. This wire ring is surrounded by at least one envelope having at rest the shape of a toroidal surface of which the generating circle does not close on itself. In a particular design mode, the seal in question can include, around the internal spring, two envelopes of which one in contact with the spring is composed of a low ductility elastic metal, such as mild steel or stainless steel and the other is, on the contrary, made of a malleable metal, such as copper or nickel. The first envelope evenly distributes the partial crushing of the spring, when the seal is tightened, on the second envelope which closely fits the two surfaces between which the seal operates. The stress-crushing curve characteristic of the seal comprises two separate parts, the first with a relatively sharp slope corresponds to the start of the seal compression phase, enabling at least some of these curves to reach the requisite seal threshold very quickly, then, beyond this, a second part, practically flat, where the stress is appreciably constant for a wide operating bracket [fr

  19. Seals in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this invention is the provision of improved seals for reactor vessels in which fuel assemblies are located together with inlets and outlets for the circulation of a coolant. The object is to provide a seal arrangement for the rotatable plugs of nuclear reactor closure heads which has good sealing capacities over a wide gap during operation of the reactor but which also permits uninhibited rotation of the plugs for maintenance. (U.K.)

  20. Compliant seal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    1993-10-01

    The compliant metallic seal combines the noncontact feature of the labyrinth seal, the low leakage of a mechanical seal, and the compliant nature of the brush seal. It consists of several thin metallic elements or leaves mounted within a ring which is press fit into the housing, and in form, sort of resembles a lip seal sections wiping the shaft. A second set of overlapping cover leaves are placed on top of the shaft riding leaves which reduces leakage and provides stiffness. The leaves can be straight or angle cut. The shaft riding fingers are designed with mismatched curvature to provide lift off similar to the Rayleigh lift pads in mechanical seals with leading edge clearances nearly twice those of the trailing edge as as shown by Fleming to be optimal for gas flows in convergent seal passages. Leading edge clearances range from 300 to 500 microinches. Balance pockets beneath the leaves provide fluid film feed to the 'Rayleigh lift' surface and the proper balance ratio (mechanical seal) when combined with the static pressure and film pressure. The leaves flex in the radial direction and accommodate thermomechanical behavior as well as axial motion and angular misalignment. In the static mode, there is a net closing force on the leaves. The seals were tested to 70 psi at speeds to 16,000 rpm or surface speeds to 330 fps and temperatures from ambient to 440 F. A slow cycle through the rig critical at 10,000 rpm induced a radial vibration response of 0.004 to 0.005 inch were accommodated by the seal. Preliminary performance data are encouraging demonstrating hydrodynamic liftoff and noncontacting operation at pressure and speeds typical of gas turbine engines. The leakage performance data are significantly better than commercial labyrinth and brush seals which should be expected as this design incorporates the features of the low leakage face or mechanical seal along with the flexibility of the brush configuration.

  1. Seal containment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugler, R.W.; Gerkey, K.S.; Kasner, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    An automated system for transporting nuclear fuel elements between fuel element assembly stations without contaminating the area outside the sealed assembly stations is described. The system comprises a plurality of assembly stations connected together by an elongated horizontal sealing mechanism and an automatic transport mechanism for transporting a nuclear fuel element in a horizontal attitude between the assembly stations while the open end of the fuel element extends through the sealing mechanism into the assembly station enclosure. The sealing mechanism allows the fuel element to be advanced by the transport mechanism while limiting the escape of radioactive particles from within the assembly station enclosure. 4 claims, 6 figures

  2. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for

  3. Improved cryogenic shaft seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, W. A., Jr.; Tellier, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Seals are designed for use with liquid propellant ball valves at temperatures ranging from -400 F to 130 F and 8,000 psig. Seals are capable of sustaining 90 degree rotation, with substantial amount of lateral and axial play, caused by large pressure loads and differential thermal contraction.

  4. Sealed radioactive sources toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Kenzie, C.

    2005-09-01

    The IAEA has developed a Sealed Radioactive Sources Toolkit to provide information to key groups about the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources. The key groups addressed are officials in government agencies, medical users, industrial users and the scrap metal industry. The general public may also benefit from an understanding of the fundamentals of radiation safety

  5. Low Leakage Turbine Shaft Seals for Advanced Combined Cycle Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    Study of Shaft Face Seal With Self-Acting Lift Augmentation", N71- 11579, Nov. 1970 29p. Povinelli , V.P. and McKibbin, A. H., "Development of...34, N73-24086, May 1973, 28p. Povinelli , V. P. and McKibbin, A. H., "Development of Mainshaft Seals for Advanced Air Breathing Propulsion Systems... Povinelli , V. P., "Current Seal Designs and Future Requirements for Turbine Engine Seals and Bearings", Journal of Aircraft, Vol. 12, No. 4, April 1975

  6. Rotary shaft seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langebrake, C.O.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a novel rotary shaft seal assembly which provides positive-contact sealing when the shaft is not rotated and which operates with its sealing surfaces separated by a film of compressed ambient gas whose width is independent of the speed of shaft rotation. In a preferred embodiment, the assembly includes a disc affixed to the shaft for rotation therewith. Axially movable, non-rotatable plates respectively supported by sealing bellows are positioned on either side of the disc to be in sealing engagement therewith. Each plate carries piezoelectric transducer elements which are electrically energized at startup to produce films of compressed ambient gas between the confronting surfaces of the plates and the disc. Following shutdown of the shaft, the transducer elements are de-energized. A control circuit responds to incipient rubbing between the plate and either disc by altering the electrical input to the transducer elements to eliminate rubbing

  7. Sealing a conduit end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mentz, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for sealing or blocking conduits, such as the primary nozzles of a nuclear steam generator is described. It includes an annular bracket sealingly attached to the open end of the nozzle, the bracket having a plurality of threaded holes therein. Mounted atop the bracket is a generally circular nozzle dam for covering the opening. Interposed between the nozzle dam and the bracket is an extrusion-resistant seal member having a plurality of apertures therethrough for receiving each bolt. The seal member is configured to resist extrusion by having laminated layers of differing hardnesses, so that the seal member will not laterally extrude away from each bolt in a manner that enlarges the aperture surrounding each bolt as the nozzle dam is bolted to the bracket. (author)

  8. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus is described for sealing a cold leg nozzle of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location comprising: at least one sealing plug for mechanically sealing the nozzle from the inside of the reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plug includes a plate and a cone assembly having an end part receptive in the nozzle, the plate being axially moveable relative to the cone assembly. The plate and cone assembly have confronting bevelled edges defining an opening therebetween. A primary O-ring is disposed about the opening and is supported on the bevelled edges, the plate being guidably mounted to the cone assembly for movement toward the cone assembly to radially expand the primary O-ring into sealing engagement with the nozzle. A means is included for providing relative movement between the outer plate and the cone assembly

  9. Brush seal performance measurement system

    OpenAIRE

    Aksoy, Serdar; Akşit, Mahmut Faruk; Aksit, Mahmut Faruk; Duran, Ertuğrul Tolga; Duran, Ertugrul Tolga

    2009-01-01

    Brush seals are rapidly replacing conventional labyrinth seals in turbomachinery applications. Upon pressure application, seal stiffness increases drastically due to frictional bristle interlocking. Operating stiffness is critical to determine seal wear life. Typically, seal stiffness is measured by pressing a curved shoe to brush bore. The static-unpressurized measurement is extrapolated to pressurized and high speed operating conditions. This work presents a seal stiffness measurement syste...

  10. Management of disused sealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukauskas, D.; Skridaila, N.

    2003-01-01

    The report presents the requirements on management of disused sealed sources in Lithuania; disused sealed source disposal facilities; performed safety analysis and planed repository safety improvements. The requirements on pre-disposal management of Disused Sealed Sources (DSS) are presented. The requirements on disposal of short lived VLLW and LILW (A, B and C classes) radioactive waste approved in 2002-2003. Generic Waste Acceptance Criteria for Near Surface Disposal, P-2003-01 approved in 2003. Requirements on disposal of Low and intermediate level long lived waste do not exist (D and E classes). Requirements for the disposal of disused sealed sources (F class) do not exist. Disposal method for the F class - Near Surface or Deep geological repository, depending on the waste acceptance criteria. Only one repository for institutional radioactive waste exist in Lithuania - Maisiagala repository. It is near surface RADON type disposal facility, built in 1963 and closed in 1988. It was constructed of the monolithic reinforced concrete with the dimensions 5 m x 15 m x 3 m, the thickness of the sidewalls is about 0.25 m and the thickness of the bottom is about 0.2 m. The overall volume is about 200 m 3 . At time of closure only three fifths of the volume had been filled. The empty two fifths of the vault were filled with concrete, then with sand, then with the concrete (0.01 m), hot bitumen and the 0.05 m asphalt layers. Monolithic concrete that was covered with bitumen and 0.05 m thick layer of asphalt closed the vault. Sand layer the thickness of which was not less than 1.2 m formed the cap. Disused radioactive sources embedded in a biological shielding were buried together with their shielding, the sources without the shielding were buried in two stainless steel containers. The total activity of buried radioactive nuclides is 3.42.10 -15 Bq (calculated according the documentation). There are some uncertainties about the inventory: from 1963 to 1973. After the

  11. Experimental Study and Application of Inorganic Solidified Foam Filling Material for Coal Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Wen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous combustion of residual coal in a gob due to air leakage poses a major risk to mining safety. Building an airtight wall is an effective measure for controlling air leakage. A new type of inorganic solidified foam-filled material was developed and its physical and chemical properties were analyzed experimentally. The compressive strength of this material increased with the amount of sulphoaluminate cement. With an increasing water–cement ratio, the initial setting time was gradually extended while the final setting time firstly shortened and then extended. The change in compressive strength had the opposite tendency. Additionally, as the foam expansion ratio increased, the solidification time tended to decrease but the compressive strength remained approximately constant. With an increase in foam production, the solidification time increased and the compressive strength decreased exponentially. The results can be used to determine the optimal material ratios of inorganic solidified foam-filled material for coal mines, and filling technology for an airtight wall was designed. A field application of the new material demonstrated that it seals crossheadings tightly, leaves no fissures, suppresses air leakage to the gob, and narrows the width of the spontaneous combustion and heat accumulation zone.

  12. Theoretical investigations of grout seal longevity - Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcorn, S.; Coons, W.; Christian-Frear, T.; Wallace, M.

    1992-04-01

    Theoretical investigations into the longevity of repository seals have dealt primarily with the development of a methodology to evaluate interactions between portland cement-based grout and groundwater. Evaluation of chemical thermodynamic equilibria between grout and groundwater, and among grout, groundwater, and granitic host rock phases using the geochemical codes EQ3NR/EQ6 suggests that a fracture filled with grout and saturated with groundwater will tend to fill and 'tighten' with time. Results of these investigations suggest that cement grout seals will maintain an acceptable level of performance for tens of thousands to millions of years, provided the repository is sited where groundwater chemistry is compatible with the seals and hydrologic gradients are low. The results of the grout: groundwater: rock calculations suggest that buffering of the fracture seals chemical systems by the granite rock may be important in determining the long-term fate of grout seals and the resulting phase assemblage in the fracture. The similarity of the modelled reaction products to those observed in naturally filled fractures suggests that with time equilibrium will be approached and grouted fractures subject to low hydrologic gradients will continue to seal. If grout injected into fractures materially reduces groundwater flux, the approach to chemical equilibrium will likely be accelerated. In light of this, even very thin or imperfectly grouted fractures would tighten in suitable hydrogeologic environments. (29 refs.) (au)

  13. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  14. Innovative Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Raj

    2008-06-30

    A functioning SOFC requires different type of seals such as metal-metal, metal-ceramic, and ceramic-ceramic. These seals must function at high temperatures between 600--900{sup o}C and in oxidizing and reducing environments of the fuels and air. Among the different type of seals, the metal-metal seals can be readily fabricated using metal joining, soldering, and brazing techniques. However, the metal-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic seals require significant research and development because the brittle nature of ceramics/glasses can lead to fracture and loss of seal integrity and functionality. Consequently, any seals involving ceramics/glasses require a significant attention and technology development for reliable SOFC operation. This final report is prepared to describe the progress made in the program on the needs, approaches, and performance of high temperature seals for SOFC. In particular, a new concept of self-healing glass seals is pursued for making seals between metal-ceramic material combinations, including some with a significant expansion mismatch.

  15. Reactor cavity seal ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankinson, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    A hydrostatic seal is described for sealing an annular gap between two flat substantially horizontal coplanar surfaces comprising, in combination: a generally flat annular plate of a width sufficient to span a gap between two surfaces: compressible annular sealing means disposed on the bottom surface of the flat annular plate for sealingly engaging the two flat surfaces in response to a downward force exerted on the plate; and fastening means, distributed along the center line of the plate, for releasably fastening the plate in a position to span the gap to be sealed and exert a downward force on the plate, each fastening means including a pair of elongated members of a size to fit into the gap to be sealed, means for mounting the members on the bottom surface of the plate so that at least a portion of each member is radially moveable in a direction toward a respective one of the vertical side surfaces defining the gap to be sealed to engage same and so that the plate is moveable relative to the members in a downward direction in response to hydrostatic pressure applied to the upper surface of the plate when the members are engaging the vertical side surfaces of an annular gap, and an actuating means, mounted on the plate for movement therewith in response to hydrostatic pressure, for radially moving the members, the actuating means extending through a bore in the plate to the upper surface of the plate

  16. SEALING SIMULATED LEAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-09-01

    This report details the testing equipment, procedures and results performed under Task 7.2 Sealing Simulated Leaks. In terms of our ability to seal leaks identified in the technical topical report, Analysis of Current Field Data, we were 100% successful. In regards to maintaining seal integrity after pigging operations we achieved varying degrees of success. Internal Corrosion defects proved to be the most resistant to the effects of pigging while External Corrosion proved to be the least resistant. Overall, with limitations, pressure activated sealant technology would be a viable option under the right circumstances.

  17. Direct Measurement of the Mode O Turbulent Boundary Layer Wall Pressure and Wall Shear Stress Spectra Using Air-Backed and Oil-Filled Multichannel Wavenumber Filters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peloquin, Mark

    1999-01-01

    ..., thin cylinder in an axial flow field. These measurements, processed as wavenumber-frequency spectra, were made with a multichannel array composed of an air-backed cylinder structure and a 32-channel aperture of PVDF film sensors having...

  18. Cover-gas seals: 11-LMFBR seal-test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, O.P. III; Horton, P.H.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of the Cover Gas Seal Material Development Program is to perform the engineering development required to provide reliable seals for LMFBR application. Specific objectives are to verify the performance of commercial solid cross-section and inflatable seals under reactor environments including radiation, to develop advanced materials and configurations capable of achieving significant improvement in radioactive gas containment and seal temperature capabilities, and to optimize seal geometry for maximum reliability and minimal gas permeation

  19. Development of the DWPF canister temporary shrink-fit seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelker, J.W. Jr.

    1986-04-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility is being constructed at The Savannah River Plant for the containerization of high-level nuclear waste in a wasteform for eventual permanent disposal. The waste will be incorporated in molten glass and solidified in type 304L stainless steel canisters, 2-feet in diameter x 9-feet 10-inches long, containing a flanged 6-in.-diam pipe fill-nozzle. The canisters have a minimum wall thickness of 3/8 in. Utilizing the heat from the glass filling operation, a shrink-fit seal for a plug in the end of the canister fill nozzle was developed that: will withstand the radioactive environment; will prevent the spread of contamination, and will keep moisture and water from entering the canister during storage and decontamination of the canister by wet-frit blasting to remove smearable and oxide-film fixed radioactive nuclides; is removable and can be replaced by a new oversize plug in the event the seal fails the pressure decay leakage test ( -4 atm cc/sec helium); will keep the final weld closure clean and free of nuclear contamination; will withstand being pressed into the nozzle without exposing external contamination or completely breaking the seal; is reliable; and is easily installed. The seal consists of: a removable sleeve (with a tapered bore) which is shrink-fitted into the nozzle bore during canister fabrication; and a tapered plug which is placed into the sleeved nozzle after the canister is filled with radioactive molten glass. A leak-tight shrink-fit seal is formed between the nozzle, sleeve, and plug upon temperature equilibrium. The temporarily sealed canister is transferred from the Melt cell to the Decon cell, and the surface is decontaminated. Next it is transferred to the Weld/Test cell where the temporary seal is pressed down into the nozzle, revealing a clean cavity where the canister final closure weld is made

  20. Selective filling of Photonic Crystal Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian; Noordegraaf, Danny; Sørensen, Thorkild

    2005-01-01

    A model for calculating the time necessary for filling one or more specific holes in a photonic crystal fibre is made. This model is verified for water, and its enabling potential is illustrated by a polymer application. Selective filling of the core in an air-guide photonic crystal fibre...

  1. Core disruptive accident margin seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus for sealing the annulus defined within a substantially cylindrical rotatable riser assembly and plug combination of a nuclear reactor closure head is described. The apparatus comprises an inflatable sealing mechanism disposed in one portion of the riser assembly near the annulus such that upon inflation the sealing mechanism is radially actuated against the other portion of the riser assembly thereby sealing the annulus. The apparatus further comprises a connecting mechanism which places one end of the sealing mechanism in fluid communication with the reactor cover gas so that overpressurization of the reactor cover gas will increase the radial actuation of the sealing mechanism thus enhancing sealing of the annulus

  2. Self-acting shaft seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    Self-acting seals are described in detail. The mathematical models for obtaining a seal force balance and the equilibrium operating film thickness are outlined. Particular attention is given to primary ring response (seal vibration) to rotating seat face runout. This response analysis reveals three different vibration models with secondary seal friction being an important parameter. Leakage flow inlet pressure drop and affects of axisymmetric sealing face deformations are discussed. Experimental data on self-acting face seals operating under simulated gas turbine conditions are given. Also a spiral groove seal design operated to 244 m/sec (800 ft/sec) is described.

  3. Research on 3-D base isolation system applied to new power reactor 3-D seismic isolation device with rolling seal type air spring: Pt.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junji Suhara; Ryoichiro Matsumoto; Shinsuke Oguri; Yasuo Okada; Kazuhiko Inoue; Kenji Takahashi

    2005-01-01

    A three dimensional seismic base isolation device was developed for heavy structures and buildings such as nuclear power reactor buildings. The device realizes 3-D isolation by combining a LRB (laminated rubber bearing) for horizontal isolation with an air spring for vertical isolation in series. In this study, scale models of the 3-D base isolation device were made and were tested to examine the dynamic properties and ultimate strengths of the device. The performance of the device under earthquake excitation was examined through shaking table tests of 1/7 scale models. As the results, it was confirmed that the device worked smoothly under the horizontal and vertical excitations, and that the theoretical formulae of the orifice damping could explain the test results. The high-pressure air springs of trial production were forced to burst to find out which factor influenced ultimate strength. It was confirmed from results of the burst test that the strength of the air spring depended upon the diameter of rolling part of the bellows and the number of layers of the reinforcing fibers. Judging from the results of the shaking table test and the burst test, the developed 3-D base isolation device was applicable to a nuclear power plant building. (authors)

  4. Sealing arrangement for radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, I.L.S.; Sievwright, R.W.T.; Elliott, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    A sealing arrangement for hermetically sealing two mating surfaces comprises two seals arranged to lie between the surfaces. Each seal provides hermetic sealing over a respective different temperature range and lie serially along the surfaces between the regions to be isolated. A main seal integrity test arrangement is provided in the form of a port and passage. This allows for the introduction of a fluid into or the evacuation of a region between the two seals to detect a leak. The port is also provided with at least two test port seals which seal with a plug. The plug is also provided with a test port to allow the integrity of the test port seal to be tested. (UK)

  5. Effect of pore water pressure on P-wave velocity in water-filled sands with partial air saturation; Fukanzen howa jotai no suna shiryo wo denpasuru P ha sokudo ni oyobosu kangeki suiatsu no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanema, T [Chishitsu-Keisoku Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    With an objective to elucidate change in velocity of elastic waves in association with water pressure increase in a sand bed below the groundwater level in a shallow portion of the ground, a measurement experiment was carried out on P-wave velocity in sand samples with partial air saturation. The experiment has used fine sand having an equivalent coefficient of 2.40, a soil particle density of 2.68 g/cm {sup 3} or 60%, and a grain size of 0.36 mm. Inside the water-filled sand sample, two accelerometers were embedded 20 cm apart from each other as vibration receivers. An electromagnetic hammer for P-wave was used as the vibration source. In the experiment, measurement was carried out on the P-wave velocity in association with increase in pore water pressure by applying water pressure afresh to the water-filled sample. As a result of the experiment, the following matters were disclosed: the P-wave velocity increases as the pore water pressure was increased, and a phenomenon was recognized that the dominant frequency changes into high frequency; the degree of increase in the P-wave velocity varies depending on initial saturation of the sample; and bubbles in the pore fluid have their volume decreased due to compression resulted from increased pore water pressure and dissolution of air into the pore water. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  6. System for the sealing of containers and pipelines, especially in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, R

    1976-01-22

    In order to seal containers and pipelines especially in nuclear power plants, it is suggested to incorporate hollow bodies of an elastic material in the pipeline connections which can be blown up by pressure-gas and which are placed for sealing on the inner walls of the pipe. During a longer shutdown, system parts can thus be protected from corrosion. Various forms of such cavities are shown in design examples. The sealed sections can be filled with inert gas (nitrogen).

  7. Explaining the Impfact of Cloud Assurance Seals on Customers’ Perceived Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Michael; Wiesche, Manuel; Krcmar, Helmut

    2018-01-01

    Privacy concerns inhabit professional cloud adoption. Assurance seals resulting from a third-party cer-tification are frequently used from cloud service provider to provide privacy assurance for their cus-tomers. However, empirical findings on the effectiveness of assurance seals focusing on “who” issues those, even if customers also require the information why the assurance seal is valid and reliable. To fill this gap, we build on information integration theory and investigate the impact of ...

  8. Nuclear instrumentation cable end seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, C.P.; Brown, D.P.

    1979-01-01

    An improved coaxial end seal for hermetically sealed nuclear instrumentation cable exhibiting an improved breakdown pulse noise characteristic under high voltage, high temperature conditions is described. A tubular insulator body has metallized interior and exterior surface portions which are braze sealed to a center conductor and an outer conductive sheath. The end surface of the insulator body which is directed toward the coaxial cable to which it is sealed has a recessed surface portion within which the braze seal material terminates

  9. A new concept in rotary shaft seal lubrication : viscoelastohydrodynamic (VEHD) lubrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van H.J.; Stakenborg, M.J.L.; Dowson, D.; Taylor, C.M.; Godet, M.

    1991-01-01

    In practice rotary shaft seals will experience a small-amplitude dynamic excitation. It is shown that under periodic excitation circumferentially nonuniform clearances develop due to viscous seal material behaviour. The nearby fluid will fill these gaps, so entrainment and squeeze effects can

  10. Pressure Actuated Leaf Seals for Improved Turbine Shaft Sealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondahl, Clayton

    2006-01-01

    This presentation introduces a shaft seal in which leaf seal elements are constructed from slotted shim material formed and layered into a frusto-conical assembly. Limited elastic deflection of seal leaves with increasing system pressure close large startup clearance to a small, non-contacting, steady state running clearance. At shutdown seal elements resiliently retract as differential seal pressure diminishes. Large seal clearance during startup and shutdown provides a mechanism for rub avoidance. Minimum operating clearance improves performance and non-contacting operation promises long seal life. Design features of this seal, sample calculations at differential pressures up to 2400 psid and benefit comparison with brush and labyrinth seals is documented in paper, AIAA 2005 3985, presented at the Advanced Seal Technology session of the Joint Propulsion Conference in Tucson this past July. In this presentation use of bimetallic leaf material will be discussed. Frictional heating of bimetallic leaf seals during a seal rub can relieve the rub condition to some extent with a change in seal shape. Improved leaf seal rub tolerance is expected with bimetallic material.

  11. Upgrading inflatable door seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, T.M.; Metcalfe, R.; Welch, L.A.; Josefowich, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Inflatable door seals are used for airlocks in CANDU stations. They have been a significant source of unreliability and maintenance cost. A program is underway to improve their performance and reliability, backed by environmental qualification testing. Only commercial products and suppliers existed in 1993. For historical reasons, these 'existing products' did not use the most durable material then available. In hindsight, neither had they been adapted nor optimized to combat conditions often experienced in the plants-sagging doors, damaged sealing surfaces, and many thousands of openings and closings per year. Initial attempts to involve the two existing suppliers in efforts to upgrade these seals were unsuccessful. Another suitable supplier had therefore to be found, and a 'new,' COG-owned seal developed; this was completed in 1997. This paper summarizes its testing, along with that of the two existing products. Resistance to aging has been improved significantly. Testing has shown that an accident can be safely withstood after 10 years of service or 40,000 openings-closings, whichever comes first. AECL's Fluid Sealing Technology Unit (FSTU) has invested in the special moulds, test fixtures and other necessary tooling and documentation required to begin commercial manufacture of this new quality product. Accordingly, as with FSTU's other nuclear products such as pump seals, the long-term supply of door seals to CANDU plants is now protected from many external uncertainties-e.g., commercial products being discontinued, materials being changed, companies going out of business. Manufacturing to AECL's detailed specifications is being subcontracted to the new supplier. FSTU is performing the quality surveillance, inspection, testing, and customer service activities concomitant with direct responsibility for supply to the plants. (author)

  12. Shaft seal assembly and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keba, John E. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A pressure-actuated shaft seal assembly and associated method for controlling the flow of fluid adjacent a rotatable shaft are provided. The seal assembly includes one or more seal members that can be adjusted between open and closed positions, for example, according to the rotational speed of the shaft. For example, the seal member can be configured to be adjusted according to a radial pressure differential in a fluid that varies with the rotational speed of the shaft. In addition, in the closed position, each seal member can contact a rotatable member connected to the shaft to form a seal with the rotatable member and prevent fluid from flowing through the assembly. Thus, the seal can be closed at low speeds of operation and opened at high speeds of operation, thereby reducing the heat and wear in the seal assembly while maintaining a sufficient seal during all speeds of operation.

  13. Sealed liquid helium cryostats for mobile superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulhall, B.E.; Rhodes, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    The predicted behaviour of the sealed cryostat system, which has been designed for the niobium-titanium superconducting coils of the on-board refrigerator of the small Wolfson electrodynamically levitated vehicle now under development, is summarized. Calculations suggest that the time taken by a sealed liquid helium cryostat to reach a specified final temperature is reasonably insensitive to the level of initial filling. Moreover, with a sufficiently large initial fill (for example, 70%) two or possibly three such temperature cycles, separated by the simple process of gas recovery, should be possible before replenishment of the helium is necessary. The useful time of operation of the cryostat between transfers of liquid helium is then not very much less than can be obtained with a freely boiling bath of liquid. For the low pressures involved the sealed cryostat is probably not much heavier or more complex than the open cryostat, and thus is ideal for a mobile application. (U.K.)

  14. Method for filling a reactor with a catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for filling a reactor with a catalyst for the carbonylation of carbonylated compounds in the gas phase. According to said method, a SILP catalyst is covered with a filling agent which is liquid under normal conditions and is volatile under carbonylation reaction...... conditions, and a thus-treated catalyst is introduced into the reactor and the reactor is sealed....

  15. In core monitor having multi-step seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Makoto; Ono, Susumu.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To completely prevent a sensor gas sealed in a pipe from leaking in an in-core neutron detector for use with a bwr type reactor. Constitution: In an in core monitor fabricated by disposing inner and outer electrodes in a housing, forming a layer of neutron conversion material on the outer electrode, filling an ionizing gas within the space between the layer and the inner electrode and, thereafter, attaching an insulation cable and an exhaust pipe respectively by way of insulators to both ends of the housing, the exhaust pipe is sealed in two-steps through pressure bonding using a multi-stepped pincher tool having two pressure bonding bits of a step shape and the outer sealing portion is further welded. The sensor gas sealed in the pipe can thus be prevented from leaking upon pressure bonding and welding. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. In core monitor having multi-step seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, M; Ono, S

    1976-12-09

    A method to completely prevent a sensor gas sealed in a pipe from leaking in an in-core neutron detector for use with a BWR type reactor is described. In an in core monitor fabricated by disposing inner and outer electrodes in a housing, forming a layer of neutron conversion material on the outer electrode, filling an ionizing gas within the space between the layer and the inner electrode and, thereafter, attaching an insulation cable and an exhaust pipe respectively by way of insulators to both ends of the housing, the exhaust pipe is sealed in two-steps through pressure bonding using a multi-stepped pincher tool having two pressure bonding bits of a step shape and the outer sealing portion is further welded. The sensor gas sealed in the pipe can thus be prevented from leaking upon pressure bonding and welding.

  17. Temporal sealing material of tritium-contaminated stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Wei; Dan Guiping; Zhang Dong; Qiu Yongmei; Zhang Li

    2010-01-01

    Tritium can be released from the exterior of tritium-contaminated stainless steel by slight stirring while decontaminating and disassembling. In order to avoid secondary tritium contamination to environment and operators, it is necessary to cover with an effective coating to tritium on the exterior of tritium-contaminated stainless steel and fill an effective substance to tritium inside. The results of tritium sealed experiments show that sealing efficiency of neutral silicone rubber is more than 85% for condition of static state and more than 99% for foam concrete condition of dynamic state. Neutral silicone rubber and foam concrete which have finer sealing efficiency can be used as temporal sealed material for the decontamination and disassembly of tritium-contaminated stainless steel. (authors)

  18. Pool gateway seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starr, J.A.; Steinert, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    A device for sealing a gateway between interconnectable pools in a nuclear facility comprising a frame supporting a liquid impermeable sheet positioned in a u-shaped gateway between the pools. An inflatable tube carried in a channel in the periphery of the frame and adjoining the gateway provides a seal therebetween when inflated. A restraining arrangement on the bottom edge of the frame is releasably engagable with an adjacent portion of the gateway to restrict the movement of the frame in the u-shaped gateway upon inflation of the tube, thereby enhancing the seal. The impermeable sheet is formed of an elastomer and thus is conformable to a liquid permeable supportive wall upon application of liquid pressure to the side of the sheet opposite the wall

  19. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Master Identification Records (seal)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records of all individually identified Hawaiian monk seals since 1981. These seals were identified by PSD personnel and cooperating scientists...

  20. Laboratory evaluation of a field-portable sealed source X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for determination of metals in air filter samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawryk, Nicholas J; Feng, H Amy; Chen, Bean T

    2009-07-01

    Recent advances in field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FP XRF) spectrometer technology have made it a potentially valuable screening tool for the industrial hygienist to estimate worker exposures to airborne metals. Although recent studies have shown that FP XRF technology may be better suited for qualitative or semiquantitative analysis of airborne lead in the workplace, these studies have not extensively addressed its ability to measure other elements. This study involved a laboratory-based evaluation of a representative model FP XRF spectrometer to measure elements commonly encountered in workplace settings that may be collected on air sample filter media, including chromium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead, and zinc. The evaluation included assessments of (1) response intensity with respect to location on the probe window, (2) limits of detection for five different filter media, (3) limits of detection as a function of analysis time, and (4) bias, precision, and accuracy estimates. Teflon, polyvinyl chloride, polypropylene, and mixed cellulose ester filter media all had similarly low limits of detection for the set of elements examined. Limits of detection, bias, and precision generally improved with increasing analysis time. Bias, precision, and accuracy estimates generally improved with increasing element concentration. Accuracy estimates met the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health criterion for nearly all the element and concentration combinations. Based on these results, FP XRF spectrometry shows potential to be useful in the assessment of worker inhalation exposures to other metals in addition to lead.

  1. Sodium fill of FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldo, J.B.; Greenwell, R.K.; Keasling, T.A.; Collins, J.R.; Klos, D.B.

    1980-02-01

    With construction of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) completed, the first major objective in the startup program was to fill the sodium systems. A sodium fill sequence was developed to match construction completion, and as systems became available, they were inerted, preheated, and filled with sodium. The secondary sodium systems were filled first while dry refueling system testing was in progress in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel and the primary loops were filled last. This paper describes the methods used and some of the key results achieved for this major FFTF objective

  2. Operation feedback of hydrogen filling station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pregassame, S.; Barral, K.; Allidieres, L.; Charbonneau, T.; Lacombe, Y.

    2004-01-01

    One of the technical challenges of hydrogen technology is the development of hydrogen infrastructures which satisfy either safety requirements and reliability of filling processes. AIR LIQUIDE realized an hydrogen filling station in Sassenage (France) operational since September 2003. This station is able to fill 3 buses a day up to 350bar by equilibrium with high pressure buffers. In parallel with commercial stations, the group wanted to create a testing ground in real conditions running with several objectives: validate on a full scale bench a simulation tool able to predict the temperature of both gas and cylinder's materials during filling processes; define the best filling procedures in order to reach mass, temperature and filling time targets; analyse the temperature distribution and evolution inside the cylinder; get a general knowledge about hydrogen stations from safety and reliability point of view; operate the first full scale refuelling station in France. The station is also up-graded for 700bar filling from either a liquid hydrogen source or a gas booster, with cold filling possibility. This paper presents the results concerning 350bar filling : thermal effects, optimal filling procedures and influence of parameters such as climatic conditions are discussed. (author)

  3. Cost saving synergistic shaft seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Strom, T. N.

    1976-01-01

    Segmented carbon rings, used to replace elastomeric seal lip, provide resistance to high temperatures generated in lubricating film. Machining and close manufacturing tolerances of conventional segmented seal are avoided by mounting segmented rings in elastomeric flex section.

  4. Magnetically Actuated Seal, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT proposes development of a magnetically actuated dynamic seal. Dynamic seals are used throughout the turbopump in high-performance, pump-fed, liquid rocket...

  5. Magnetically Actuated Seal, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT proposes development of a magnetically actuated dynamic seal. Dynamic seals are used throughout the turbopump in high-performance, pump-fed, liquid rocket...

  6. Continuous improvement of pump seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, W.; Eyvindson, A.; Rhodes, D.B.

    2003-01-01

    Pump seal reliability continues to be an area needing improvement and ongoing vigilance. Methods have been developed for identifying and assessing factors relating to seal performance, selecting the most relevant ones for a specific station, and then focusing on the most significant aspects and how to improve. Discussion invariably addresses maintenance practices, seal design, monitoring capabilities, operating conditions, transients, and pump and motor design. Success in reliability improvement requires ongoing dialogue among the station operators, pump manufacturers and seal designers. AECL CAN-seals lead the nuclear industry in reliability and seal life. They effectively save operators millions of dollars in outage time and person-rem. This paper describes some of the significant developments in AECL's ongoing program in seal R and D, as well as recent new installations following the most demanding seal qualification programs to date. (author)

  7. Intratracheal Seal Disc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Karen J; Moeslund, Niels; Lauridsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    . The device consisted of an intratracheal silicone seal disc fixated by a cord through the stoma to an external part. At day 14, computed tomography (CT) was performed before the device was extracted. With the pulling of a cord, the disc unraveled into a thin thread and was extracted through the stoma. At day...

  8. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  9. Shaft Seal Compensates for Cold Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, W. N.; Hein, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    Seal components easy to install. Ring seal for rotating or reciprocating shafts spring-loaded to compensate for slow yielding (cold flow) of sealing material. New seal relatively easy to install because components preassembled, then installed in one piece.

  10. Sealing of polymer micro-structures by over-moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vingaard, Mathias; Christiansen, Jesper de Claville

    2012-01-01

    A concept for sealing of polymer micro-structures by over-moulding with polystyrene was devised and investigated by both experiments and simulations. The depth to which the melt filled the structure, i.e. a groove in the surface of the insert, before solidification was compared with results from...... simulations by computational fluid dynamics software. In both experiments and simulations, there was clearly an increase of filling depth with groove width and, especially for wide grooves, with injection temperature. In the simulations, changes in prescribed heat transfer coefficient had the largest effect...... on filling depth in the narrowest grooves. Around the experimental groove widths, there was good agreement between experiments and simulations. It was concluded that sealing by over-moulding is feasible if the depth/width ratio of the structure is large enough which in this paper is larger than six, i.e. up...

  11. Design analysis of a self-acting spiral-groove ring seal for counter-rotating shafts. [o ring seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirusso, E.

    1983-01-01

    A self-acting spiral groove inter-shaft ring seal of nominal 16.33 cm (6.43 in.) diameter for sealing fan bleed air between counter rotating shafts in advanced turbofan engines was analyzed. The analysis focused on the lift force characteristics of the spiral grooves. A NASA Lewis developed computer program for predicting the performance of gas lubricated face seals was used to optimize the spiral groove geometry to produce maximum lift force. Load capacity curves (lift force as function of film thickness) were generated for four advanced turbofan engine operating conditions at relative seal speeds ranging from 17,850 to 29,800 rpm, sealed air pressures from 6 to 42 N/sq cm (9 to 60 psi) absolute and temperatures from 95 to 327 C (203 to 620 F). The relative seal sliding speed range was 152 to 255 m/sec (500 to 836 ft/sec). The analysis showed that the spiral grooves are capable of producing sufficient lift force such that the ring seal will operate in a noncontacting mode over the operating range of typical advanced turbofan engines.

  12. Fiber Optic Safeguards Sealing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    8217 or trade names does not constitute an official indorsement or approval of the use thereof. Destroy this report when it is no longer needed. Do not...an intergrity check of a seal than to photograph the seal’s fingerprints and to match positive/negative overlays. The seal identification time and

  13. Ultrasonic dip seal maintenance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poindexter, A.M.; Ricks, H.E.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for removing impurities from the surfaces of liquid dip seals and for wetting the metal surfaces of liquid dip seals in nuclear components. The system comprises an ultrasonic transducer that transmits ultrasonic vibrations along an ultrasonic probe to the metal and liquid surfaces of the dip seal thereby loosening and removing those impurities

  14. Radial lip seals, thermal aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stakenborg, M.J.L.; van Ostaijen, R.A.J.; Dowson, D.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the influence of temperature on tne seal-snarc contact is studied, using coupled temperature-stress FEH analysis. A thermal network model is used to calculate the seal-shaft contact temperature for steady-state and transient conditions. Contact temperatures were measured under the seal

  15. Cover gas seals: FFTF-LMFBR seal test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurzeka, W.; Oliva, R.; Welch, T.S.; Shimazaki, T.

    1974-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to: (1) conduct static and dynamic tests to demonstrate or determine the mechanical performance of full-size (cross section) FFTF fuel transfer machine and reactor vessel head seals intended for use in a sodium vapor-inert gas environment, (2) demonstrate that these FFTF seals or new seal configurations provide acceptable fission product and cover gas retention capabilities at Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) operating environmental conditions other than radiation, and (3) develop improved seals and seal technology for the CRBRP to support the national objective to reduce all atmospheric contaminations to low levels

  16. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.A.; Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application

  17. Failure analysis and seal life prediction for contacting mechanical seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J. J.; He, X. Y.; Wei, L.; Feng, X.

    2008-11-01

    Fault tree analysis method was applied to quantitatively investigate the causes of the leakage failure of mechanical seals. It is pointed out that the change of the surface topography is the main reasons causing the leakage of mechanical seals under the condition of constant preloads. Based on the fractal geometry theory, the relationship between the surface topography and working time were investigated by experiments, and the effects of unit load acting on seal face on leakage path in a mechanical seal were analyzed. The model of predicting seal life of mechanical seals was established on the basis of the relationship between the surface topography and working time and allowable leakage. The seal life of 108 mechanical seal operating at the system of diesel fuel storage and transportation was predicted and the problem of the condition monitoring for the long-period operation of mechanical seal was discussed by this method. The research results indicate that the method of predicting seal life of mechanical seals is feasible, and also is foundation to make scheduled maintenance time and to achieve safe-reliability and low-cost operation for industrial devices.

  18. Advanced Seal Sessions I and II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H.; Sarawate, Neelesh

    2013-01-01

    As aircraft operators continue to seek higher fuel efficiency, lower emissions, and longer on-wing performance, turbine engine designers are scrutinizing all components for areas of improvement. To achieve overall goals, turbine pressure ratios and by-pass ratios continue to climb. Also, designers are seeking to minimize parasitic and cooling flows to extract the most useful work out of the flow stream, placing a renewed interest on seal technology and secondary flow path management. In the area of future manned spacecraft, advancements are being examined for both habitat seals and re-entry thermal protection system thermal barrierseals. For long duration space craft, designers are continuing to look for savings in parasitic losses to reduce the amount of cabin re-supply air that needs to be brought along. This is placing greater demands on seal designs and materials to exhibit low leakage and be resistant to space environments. For future missions to and from distant planets, the re-entry heating will be higher than for low-earth orbit or lunar return motivating advanced thermal barrier development. This presentation will provide an overview of the seal challenges and opportunities in these diverse areas.

  19. Biocompatibility of root-end filling materials: recent update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Saxena

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of a root-end filling is to establish a seal between the root canal space and the periradicular tissues. As root-end filling materials come into contact with periradicular tissues, knowledge of the tissue response is crucial. Almost every available dental restorative material has been suggested as the root-end material of choice at a certain point in the past. This literature review on root-end filling materials will evaluate and comparatively analyse the biocompatibility and tissue response to these products, with primary focus on newly introduced materials.

  20. Refrigeration system with clearance seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    In a refrigeration system such as a split Stirling system, fluid seals associated with the reciprocating displacer are virtually dragless clearance seals. Movement of the displacer relative to the pressure variations in the working volume of gas is retarded by a discrete braking element. Because it is not necessary that the brake providing any sealing action, the brake can be designed for greater durability and less dependence on ambient and operating temperatures. Similarly, the clearance seal can be formed of elements having low thermal expansion such that the seal is not temperature dependent. In the primary embodiments the braking element is a split friction brake

  1. Hermetic Seal Leak Detection Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a hermetic seal leak detection apparatus, which can be used to test for hermetic seal leaks in instruments and containers. A vacuum tight chamber is created around the unit being tested to minimize gas space outside of the hermetic seal. A vacuum inducing device is then used to increase the gas chamber volume inside the device, so that a slight vacuum is pulled on the unit being tested. The pressure in the unit being tested will stabilize. If the stabilized pressure reads close to a known good seal calibration, there is not a leak in the seal. If the stabilized pressure reads closer to a known bad seal calibration value, there is a leak in the seal. The speed of the plunger can be varied and by evaluating the resulting pressure change rates and final values, the leak rate/size can be accurately calculated.

  2. Sealing wells with gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, E C

    1967-10-01

    A new system is being used in Mexico to temporarily plug producing wells. The temporary seal is a gel with a catalyst. The use of this temporary plug allows gas-lift wells to be taken off production in order to carry out emergency repairs. The gel solidifies by the action of the catalyst to a high temperature (70 - 150/sup 0/C). By locating the bottom of the tubing at the top of the production interval, the gel material will go into the permeable formation, and immediately set. When the gel has solidified, it seals off the horizon that must not be stimulated, and leaves the others exposed to the acid action. When the treatment is finished, the gel, by action of the catalyst, is liquefied and removed from the formation, being produced with the oil.

  3. Radioactive waste sealing container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozawa, S.; Kitamura, T.; Sugimoto, S.

    1984-01-01

    A low- to medium-level radioactive waste sealing container is constructed by depositing a foundation coating consisting essentially of zinc, cadmium or a zinc-aluminum alloy over a steel base, then coating an organic synthetic resin paint containing a metal phosphate over the foundation coating, and thereafter coating an acryl resin, epoxy resin, and/or polyurethane paint. The sealing container can consist of a main container body, a lid placed over the main body, and fixing members for clamping and fixing the lid to the main body. Each fixing member may consist of a material obtained by depositing a coating consisting essentially of cadmium or a zinc-aluminum alloy over a steel base

  4. Predicting heat transfer in long, R-134a filled thermosyphons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grooten, M.H.M.; Geld, van der C.W.M.

    2008-01-01

    When traditional air-to-air cooling is too voluminous, heat exchangers with long thermosyphons offer a good alternative. Experiments with a single thermosyphon with a large length-to-diameter ratio (188) and filled with R-134a are presented and analyzed. Saturation temperatures, filling ratios, and

  5. A review of the available technologies for sealing a potential underground nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.A.; Richardson, A.M.

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess the availability of technologies to seal underground openings. The technologies are needed to seal the potential high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Technologies are evaluated for three basic categories of seal components: backfill (general fill and graded fill), bulkheads, and grout curtains. Not only is placement of seal components assessed, but also preconditioning of the placement area and seal component durability. The approach taken was: First, review selected sealing case histories (literature searches and site visits) from the mining, civil, and defense industries; second, determine whether reasonably available technologies to seal the potential repository exist; and finally, identify deficiencies in existing technologies. It is concluded that reasonably available technologies do exist to place backfill, bulkheads, and grout curtains. Technologies also exist to precondition areas where seal components are to be placed. However, if final performance requirements are stringent for these engineered structures, some existing technologies may need to be developed. Deficiencies currently do exist in technologies that demonstrate the long-term durability and performance of seal components. Case histories do not currently exist that demonstrate the placement of seal components in greatly elevated thermal and high-radiation environments and in areas where ground support (rock bolts and concrete liners) has been removed. The as-placed, in situ material properties for sealing materials appropriate to Yucca Mountain are not available

  6. Electromagnetic shaft seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kenji.

    1994-01-01

    As an electromagnetic shaft seal, there are disposed outwarding electromagnetic induction devices having generating power directing to an electroconductive fluid as an object of sealing, and inwarding electromagnetic induction device added coaxially. There are disposed elongate rectangular looped first coils having a predetermined inner diameter, second coils having the same shape and shifted by a predetermined pitch relative to the first coil and third coil having the same shape and shifted by a predetermined pitch relative to the second coil respectively each at a predetermined inner diameter of clearance to the outwarding electromagnetic induction devices and the inwarding electromagnetic induction device. If the inwarding electromagnetic induction device and the outwarding electromagnetic induction device are operated, they are stopped at a point that the generating power of the former is equal with the sum of the generating power of the latter and a differential pressure. When three-phase AC is charged to the first coil, the second coil and the third coil successively, a force is generated in the advancing direction of the magnetic field in the electroconductive fluid by the similar effect to that of a linear motor, and the seal is maintained at high reliability. Moreover, the limit for the rotational angle of the shaft is not caused. (N.H.)

  7. Enhanced sealing project (ESP): evolution of a full-sized concrete and bentonite shaft seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.A.; Priyanto, D.G.; Martino, J.B.; De Combarieu, M.; Johansson, R.; Korkeakoski, P.; Villagran, J.

    2012-01-01

    monitored to determine the influence of the thermal pulse induced during concrete curing as well as to determine what, if any, internal strain or bulk movement has occurred. Thermal evaluation has been accomplished using an array of thermocouples in and around the concrete components while internal shrinkage induced by concrete curing and cooling as well as the location of the seal within the shaft have been monitored using Fibre-optic strain gages and displacement transducers respectively. Fig. 2 shows the limited magnitude and duration of the thermal transient associated with the concrete curing. Monitoring of the strain sensors within the concrete indicate that the net radial shrinkage of the concrete within the shaft, if no bonding to the adjacent rock occurred, would result in no more than a 0.6 mm gap between the concrete and rock. The displacement sensors installed at the upper surface of the concrete segment shows that the seal has not moved discernibly since its installation. Monitoring of water uptake by the bentonite-sand portion of the seal indicates that by early 2012, the seal had saturated to a distance of approximately 1 to 1.5 m in from the contact with the rock and concrete. The central clay-filled region is still unsaturated and water uptake is continuing. Ultimately, once the water level in the shaft reaches the surface and groundwater pressures recover, there should be little or no hydraulic pressure differential across the seal (beyond that associated with elevation difference (6 m)). Piezometers installed in and around the seal currently show that the lower shaft has pressurized to a level approximately 280 kPa higher than can be accounted by the difference in the elevation between the sensors (Fig. 3). This elevated-pressure below the seal indicates that groundwater is entering the lower, flooded excavations and that the hydraulic connection between the upper and lower shaft sections is very constricted. This is evidence that the seal is providing

  8. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Lahnalampi; J. Case

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post-closure monitoring will not

  9. TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPPING FOR IAEA SEALS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOFFHEINS,B.; ANNESE,C.; GOODMAN,M.; OCONNOR,W.; GUSHUE,S.; PEPPER,S.

    2003-07-13

    In the fall of 2002, the U.S. Support Program (USSP) initiated an effort to define a strategy or ''roadmap'' for future seals technologies and to develop a generalized process for planning safeguards equipment development, which includes seals and other safeguards equipment. The underlying objectives of the USSP include becoming more proactive than reactive in addressing safeguards equipment needs, helping the IAEA to maintain an inventory of cost-effective, reliable, and effective safeguards equipment, establishing a long-term planning horizon, and securing IAEA ownership in the process of effective requirements definition and timely transitioning of new or improved systems for IAEA use. At an initial workshop, seals, their functions, performance issues, and future embodiments were discussed in the following order: adhesive seals, metal seals, passive and active loop seals, ultrasonic seals, tamper indicating enclosures (including sample containers, equipment enclosures, and conduits). Suggested improvements to these technologies focused largely on a few themes: (1) The seals must be applied quickly, easily, and correctly; (2) Seals and their associated equipment should not unduly add bulk or weight to the inspectors load; (3) Rapid, in-situ verifiability of seals is desirable; and (4) Seal systems for high risk or high value applications should have two-way, remote communications. Based upon these observations and other insights, the participants constructed a skeletal approach for seals technology planning. The process begins with a top-level review of the fundamental safeguards requirements and extraction of required system features, which is followed by analysis of suitable technologies and identification of technology gaps, and finally by development of a planning schedule for system improvements and new technology integration. Development of a comprehensive procedure will require the partnership and participation of the IAEA. The

  10. Compaction creep of simulated anhydrite fault gouge by pressure solution: theory v. experiments and implications for fault sealing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluymakers, A. M. H; Spiers, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The sealing and healing behaviour of faults filled with anhydrite gouge, by processes such as pressure solution, is of interest in relation both to the integrity of faults cutting geological storage systems sealed by anhydrite caprocks and to seismic events that may nucleate in anhydrite-bearing

  11. Shaft and tunnel sealing considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsall, P.C.; Shukla, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    Much of the emphasis of previous repository sealing research has been placed on plugging small diameter boreholes. It is increasingly evident that equal emphasis should now be given to shafts and tunnels which constitute more significant pathways between a repository and the biosphere. The paper discusses differences in requirements for sealing shafts and tunnels as compared with boreholes and the implications for seal design. Consideration is given to a design approach for shaft and tunnel seals based on a multiple component design concept, taking into account the requirements for retrievability of the waste. A work plan is developed for the future studies required to advance shaft and tunnel sealing technology to a level comparable with the existing technology for borehole sealing

  12. Development of sealed sheet sources for calibration of whole-body counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Mai; Ishigure, Nobuhito; Ogata, Yoshimune; Narita, Norihiko; Kawaura, Chiyo; Nakano, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Whole body counters are usually calibrated with the aid of a whole body phantom assembled with simply-shaped plastic vessels that are filled with an aqueous solution of the relevant radioisotopes. Most vessel-type phantoms represent only a human body in which radioisotopes are homogeneously distributed, whereas the radioisotopes in vivo are sometimes localized to specific organs. Each set of the vessels is usually applicable only to a specific combination of radioisotopes, because the replacement of radioisotopes requires troublesome procedures. Possible leakage of the solution is another disadvantage of the vessel-type phantom. The authors are developing a new-type calibration phantom that is free from these disadvantages, in which sealed sheet sources are sandwiched between sections of a sliced anthropomorphic phantom. This paper describes a method to prepare sealed sheet sources for this calibration phantom. Instead of γ-ray emitters a pure β-ray emitter 32 P was used. This isotope is suitable for autoradiography and is easy to handle as its half-life is relatively short. An ink-jet printer was used to spread the solution of 32 P mixed with ink on a sheet of paper. The surface concentration of radioactivity was regulated by the function of color density adjustment of an image processing software. The radioisotope-printed paper was laminated for sealing. Through the measurement of surface concentration of radioactivity with a liquid scintillation counter, the autoradiographical investigation of the pattern of the radioactivity distributed on the sheet sources, the immersion test of the sealed sheet sources and the monitoring of the concentration of 32 P in air during the printing, it was demonstrated that sealed sheet sources for the calibration phantom can be prepared safely by the method described in this paper. Furthermore, by using sheet sources of 99m Tc prepared as a trial it was confirmed that discrete arrangement of sheet sources in a phantom at a

  13. Sealed radioactive source management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Sealed radioactive sources have been used in a wide range of application in medicine, agriculture, geology, industry and other fields. Since its utilization many sources have become out of use and became waste but no proper management. This has lead to many accidents causing deaths and serious radiation injuries worldwide. Spent sources application is expanding but their management has seen little improvements. Sealed radioactive sources have become a security risk calling for prompt action. Source management helps to maintain sources in a good physical status and provide means of source tracking and control. It also provides a well documented process of the sources making any future management options safe, secure and cost effective. Last but not least good source management substantially reduces the risk of accidents and eliminates the risk of malicious use. The International Atomic Energy Agency assists Member States to build the infrastructure to properly manage sealed radioactive sources. The assistance includes training of national experts to handle, condition and properly store the sources. For Member States that do not have proper facilities, we provide the technical assistance to design a proper facility to properly manage the radioactive sources and provide for their proper storage. For Member States that need to condition their sources properly but don't have the required infrastructure we provide direct assistance to physically help them with source recovery and provide an international expert team to properly condition their sources and render them safe and secure. We offer software (Radioactive Waste Management Registry) to properly keep a complete record on the sources and provide for efficient tracking. This also helps with proper planning and decision making for long term management

  14. Low-Torque Seal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattime, Scott B.; Borowski, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The EcoTurn Class K production prototypes have passed all AAR qualification tests and received conditional approval. The accelerated life test on the second set of seals is in progress. Due to the performance of the first set, no problems are expected.The seal has demonstrated superior performance over the HDL seal in the test lab with virtually zero torque and excellent contamination exclusion and grease retention.

  15. The design and performance evaluation of the ultrasonic random coil identity-integrity element for underwater safeguards seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, V.H.; Backer, S.; Smith, M.T.

    1983-06-01

    Irradiated fuel discharged from CANDU power reactors is stored underwater and, in order to comply with the requirements of International Safe-guards, the fuel is stacked in sealed containers which are examined at intervals by IAEA inspectors. The seals are verified for identity and integrity and this report describes the design of an identity/integrity element for the seals. The element is in the form of a random coil of wire which is interrogated by ultrasonic methods. An evaluation of thirty-six seals is reported. The application of seals to stacks of fuel was simulated in a water-filled bay at CRNL and repetitive verification measurements were made which simulated inspection procedures. The seal identity signatures were compared using cross-correlation methods and the results show that a broken or tampered seal can be identified with a high level of confidence

  16. Fractal modeling of fluidic leakage through metal sealing surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Xiaoqian; Huang, Yiyong; Chen, Yong

    2018-04-01

    This paper investigates the fluidic leak rate through metal sealing surfaces by developing fractal models for the contact process and leakage process. An improved model is established to describe the seal-contact interface of two metal rough surface. The contact model divides the deformed regions by classifying the asperities of different characteristic lengths into the elastic, elastic-plastic and plastic regimes. Using the improved contact model, the leakage channel under the contact surface is mathematically modeled based on the fractal theory. The leakage model obtains the leak rate using the fluid transport theory in porous media, considering that the pores-forming percolation channels can be treated as a combination of filled tortuous capillaries. The effects of fractal structure, surface material and gasket size on the contact process and leakage process are analyzed through numerical simulations for sealed ring gaskets.

  17. Production of sealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandi, L.N.

    2016-01-01

    Radioisotope production has been an ongoing activity in India since the sixties. Radioisotopes find wide-ranging applications in various fields, including industry, research, agriculture and medicine. Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology, an industrial unit of Department of Atomic Energy is involved in fabrication and supply of wide variety of sealed sources. The main radioisotopes fabricated and supplied by BRIT are Cobalt-60, Iridium-192. These isotopes are employed in industrial and laboratory irradiators, teletherapy machines, radiography exposure devices, nucleonic gauges. The source fabrication facilities of BRIT are located at Rajasthan Atomic Power Project Cobalt-60 Facility (RAPPCOF), Kota, Radiological Laboratories Group (RLG) and High Intensity Radiation Utilization Project (HIRUP) at Trombay

  18. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  19. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-10-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  20. Borehole sealing method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.N.; Jansen, G. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for sealing boreholes in the earth. The borehole is blocked at the sealing level, and a sealing apparatus capable of melting rock and earth is positioned in the borehole just above seal level. The apparatus is heated to rock-melting temperature and powdered rock or other sealing material is transported down the borehole to the apparatus where it is melted, pooling on the mechanical block and allowed to cool and solidify, sealing the hole. Any length of the borehole can be sealed by slowly raising the apparatus in the borehole while continuously supplying powdered rock to the apparatus to be melted and added to the top of the column of molten and cooling rock, forming a continuous borehole seal. The sealing apparatus consists of a heater capable of melting rock, including means for supplying power to the heater, means for transporting powdered rock down the borehole to the heater, means for cooling the apparatus and means for positioning the apparatus in the borehole. 5 claims, 1 figure

  1. Joint seal in tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colquhoun, J.; White, G.V.

    1981-01-01

    A seal for a joint or gap between edges of adjacent wall sections (e.g. of concrete) of a liquid-containing vessel, such as a nuclear reactor cooling pond, comprises a sheet metal strip having longitudinally-extending edge parts, secured to the respective vessel-section edges, and a central part which is longitudinally corrugated to provide sufficient flexibility to accommodate slight relative movements between the vessel-section edges (e.g. due to thermal expansions). The edges of the sheet metal of the strip are turned in so that the edge parts of the strip are formed as generally U-section channels. These accommodate longitudinally extending securing bars which are bolted to the vessel wall sections by bolts which pass through the bars, through the free-edged wall of the channel section and through a longitudinally extending resilient seal pad compressed between that wall of the channel section and the vessel wall section to which it is secured. The other wall of the channel section (integral with the corrugated central part of the strip) has access windows through which the bolts are inserted and tightened, the windows being then closed off in liquid-tight manner by welding closure caps over them. (author)

  2. Healthy Air Outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a few sources. Even natural sources such as fires and dust contribute to air pollution. Learn more ... Walks Cycling Events Donate a Car Memorial & Honor Gifts Planned Giving Christmas Seals ABOUT THE LUNG ASSOCIATION ...

  3. Improving Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usually the most effective way to improve indoor air quality is to eliminate individual sources of pollution or to reduce their emissions. Some sources, like those that contain asbestos, can be sealed or enclosed.

  4. Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugele, B.; Scheider, J.; Spangl, W.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years several regulations and standards for air quality and limits for air pollution were issued or are in preparation by the European Union, which have severe influence on the environmental monitoring and legislation in Austria. This chapter of the environmental control report of Austria gives an overview about the legal situation of air pollution control in the European Union and in specific the legal situation in Austria. It gives a comprehensive inventory of air pollution measurements for the whole area of Austria of total suspended particulates, ozone, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, heavy metals, benzene, dioxin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and eutrophication. For each of these pollutants the measured emission values throughout Austria are given in tables and geographical charts, the environmental impact is discussed, statistical data and time series of the emission sources are given and legal regulations and measures for an effective environmental pollution control are discussed. In particular the impact of fossil-fuel power plants on the air pollution is analyzed. (a.n.)

  5. Flexible walled container having membrane fitment for use with aseptic filling apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.C.; Reiss, R.J.; Rica, A.F.

    1984-01-01

    There is disclosed an aseptic flexible walled container having a rigid fitment member cooperative with an aseptic filling apparatus and including a neck, outer flanges surrounding the neck, a frangible membrane and an outer end rim receptive of an hermetically sealed lid. The neck is formed with an internal chamferred seating shoulder for fluid-tight engagement with a fill tube. One outer flange cooperates with clamping jaws of the aseptic filling apparatus for detachably sealing the fitment to a sterilizing chamber and placing it in position for insertion of the filling tube which ruptures the membrane and permits the aseptic introduction of product to the container's interior. The other outer flange is secured to an opening in a wall of the flexible container. The joined fitment and container are presterilized prior to filling. Selected materials for the multi-ply container walls and the fitment permit the container to withstand gamma ray and other sterilization treatment, heat and pressure while maintaining required strength. After the container is aseptically filled, such as with flowable food product, the fill tube is withdrawn and a lid is hermetically sealed onto the rim of the fitment. A heat shield adjacent a container wall surrounds the fitment to protect the container from excessive heat generated by the associated filling apparatus during filling

  6. A shaft seal system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, F.D.; Ahrens, E.H.; Dennis, A.W.; Hurtado, L.D.; Knowles, M.K.; Tillerson, J.R.; Thompson, T.W.; Galbraith, D.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the demonstration of compliance with federal regulations, a shaft seal system has been designed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The system completely fills the 650 m shafts with components consisting of the common engineering materials, each of which possesses low permeability, longevity, and can be constructed using available technology. Design investigations couple rock mechanics and fluid flow analysis and tests of these materials within the natural geological setting, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the design

  7. Face-Sealing Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervo, John N.

    1992-01-01

    Valve plate made to translate as well as rotate. Valve opened and closed by turning shaft and lever. Interactions among lever, spring, valve plate, and face seal cause plate to undergo combination of translation and rotation so valve plate clears seal during parts of opening and closing motions.

  8. Seals, Concrete Anchors, and Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    caulking compounds, nonhardening extruded tapes, nonhardening mastics, strippable spray coatings, pressure sensitive tapes, gaskets, adhesives, fabrics...films, etc. Although all of these materials may provide a seal, care must be taken when selecting a sealing material as to its chemical and...gaskets have performed satisfactorily. Another factor to be considered in the selection of gasketing material is its compatibility with both the

  9. Seismic considerations in sealing a potential high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.A.; Richardson, A.M.; Lin, Ming

    1993-01-01

    The potential repository system is intended to isolate high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain according the performance objective--10 CFR 60.112. One subsystem that may contribute to achieving this objective is the sealing subsystem. This subsystem is comprised of sealing components in the shafts, ramps, underground network of drifts, and the exploratory boreholes. Sealing components can be rigid, as in the case of a shaft seal, or can be more compressible, as in the case of drift fill comprised of mined rockfill. This paper presents the preliminary seismic response of discrete sealing components in welded and nonwelded tuff. Special consideration is given to evaluating the stress in the seal, and the behavior of the interface between the seal and the rock. The seismic responses are computed using both static and dynamic analyses. Also presented is an evaluation of the maximum seismic response encountered by a drift seal with respect to the angle of incidence of the seismic wave. Mitigation strategies and seismic design considerations are proposed which can potentially enhance the overall response of the sealing component and subsequently, the performance of the overall repository system

  10. Seismic considerations in sealing a potential high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.A.; Richardson, A.M.; Lin, Ming

    1992-01-01

    The potential repository system is intended to isolate high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain. One subsystem that may contribute to achieving this objective is the sealing subsystem. This subsystem is comprised of sealing components in the shafts, ramps, underground network of drifts, and the exploratory boreholes. Sealing components can be rigid, as in the case of a shaft seal, or can be more compressible, as in the case of drift fill comprised of mined rockfill. This paper presents the preliminary seismic response of discrete sealing components in welded and nonwelded tuff. Special consideration is given to evaluating the stress in the seal, and the behavior of the interface between the seal and the rock. The seismic responses are computed using both static and dynamic analyses. Also presented is an evaluation of the maximum seismic response encountered by a drift seal with respect to the angle of incidence of the seismic wave. Mitigation strategies and seismic design considerations are proposed which can potentially enhance the overall response of the sealing component and subsequently, the performance of the overall repository system

  11. Research on seal control systems for international nuclear safeguard and the vulnerability assessment on the seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongjian; Liu Tianshu; Cao Fangfang; Xu Chunyan

    2014-01-01

    Safeguard seals, also called Tamper-indicating devices (TIDs), are widely used to detect tampering or unauthorized entry in the international safeguard and security systems, Seal control systems consist of seal implementing plan, seal development and the vulnerability assessment on tbe seals, effective implementing procedures and methods of the seals. The vulnerability assessment contents of safeguard seals, thermo-shrinked film seals being as an example, and seals control systems in the implementation program are researched. The seal control systems discuss task assignment, seals management flow and seals program data flow to promote applying effectively seals. The vulnerability assessment program of seals studies assurance level to some different tampering techniques and measures. The researches must promote utilizing seals effectively for nuclear security, non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, radioactive waste management, and the nuclear material accounting and control. (authors)

  12. Device for sealing and shielding a nuclear fuel storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki, Gengo.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide a shield device for opening and closing a great opening in a relay-storage-tank within a hot cell for temporarily storing a nuclear fuel, in which the device is simplified in construction and which can perform the opening and closing operation in simple, positive and quick manner. Structure: A biological shield is positioned upwardly of an opening of a nuclear fuel storage tank to render an actuator inoperative. A sealing plate, which is pivotally supported by a plurality of support rod devices from the biological shield for parallel movement with respect to the biological shield, comes in contact with a resilient seal disposed along the entire peripheral edge of the opening to form an air-tight seal therebetween. In order to release the opening, the actuator is first actuated and the end of the sealing plate is horizontally pressed by a piston rod thereof. Then, the sealing plate is moved along the line depicted by the end of the support rod in the support rod devices and as a consequence, the plate is moved away from the resilient seal in the peripheral edge of the opening. When a driving device is actuated to travel the plate along the aforesaid line while maintaining the condition as described, the biological device moves along the guide. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. Airfoil seal system for gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    None, None

    2013-06-25

    A turbine airfoil seal system of a turbine engine having a seal base with a plurality of seal strips extending therefrom for sealing gaps between rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components. The seal strips may overlap each other and may be generally aligned with each other. The seal strips may flex during operation to further reduce the gap between the rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components.

  14. Tamper tape seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, B.W.; Undem, H.A.

    1994-07-01

    Tamper tapes are appealing for many applications due to their ease of use and relative robustness. Applications include seals for temporary area denial, protection of sensitive equipment, chain-of-custody audit trails, and inventory control practices. A next generation of adhesive tamper tapes is being developed that combines the best features of commercially available devices with additional state-of-the-art features in tamper indication, tamper-resistance, and counterfeit-resistance. The additional features are based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research and development (R ampersand D) activities that were originally associated with preparations for the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START). New features include rapid-set, chemical-cure adhesive systems that allow user-friendly application and layered levels of counterfeit-resistance based on unique open-quotes fingerprintclose quotes characteristics that can be accessed as desired

  15. High pressure mechanical seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, Henry W. (Inventor); Anderson, Raymond H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A relatively impervious mechanical seal is formed between the outer surface of a tube and the inside surface of a mechanical fitting of a high pressure fluid or hydraulic system by applying a very thin soft metal layer onto the outer surface of the hard metal tube and/or inner surface of the hard metal fitting. The thickness of such thin metal layer is independent of the size of the tube and/or fittings. Many metals and alloys of those metals exhibit the requisite softness, including silver, gold, tin, platinum, indium, rhodium and cadmium. Suitably, the coating is about 0.0025 millimeters (0.10 mils) in thickness. After compression, the tube and fitting combination exhibits very low leak rates on the order or 10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second or less as measured using the Helium leak test.

  16. Turbine and Structural Seals Team Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Seals Team Facilities conceive, develop, and test advanced turbine seal concepts to increase efficiency and durability of turbine engines. Current projects include...

  17. Leakage rate from LOCA-aged inflatable airlock seals Pickering NGS 'B' personnel doors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayle, G.W.; Cordingley, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    In order to demonstrate to the Atomic Energy Control Board that an air-lock inflatable seal will function after a LOCA exposure, an inflatable seal intended for personnel doors at the Pickering NGS 'B' was exposed to the thermal/moisture conditions of the LOCA requirement. While attending to determine the post-LOCA leakage rate it was found that additional leaks developed during each post-LOCA inflation/deflation cycle. The seal had been significantly and irreparably deteriorated by the LOCA exposure. The test has demonstrated that this type of LOCA exposed seal should not be expected to withstand either additional pressure above 207 kPa or additional inflation/deflation cycling. A higher inflation pressure and/or cycling will reduce the likelihood of a post-LOCA seal retaining an inflation pressure sufficient to prevent leakage across the seal

  18. Environmental Impact Assessment of Petrol and Gas Filling Stations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated pollutants emissions from filling stations and their impact on the air quality. Gas monitors were employed to identify the different pollutants present in the ambient air of the study areas. The results showed that the most prominent pollutants present in the ambient air are the volatile organic compounds ...

  19. Root canal filling using Resilon: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, D J

    2011-07-01

    Root canal treatment is achieved by chemo-mechanical debridement of the root canal system followed by filling. The filling material \\'entombs\\' residual bacteria and acts as a barrier which prevents the entrance of oral microorganisms and reinfection of the root canal system through microleakage. However, filling with contemporary root filling materials such as gutta-percha offers limited long-term resistance to microorganisms; as a result other materials such as Resilon have been investigated as alternatives. The aim of this review was to analyse the literature to consider whether Resilon is a suitable root canal filling material. A MEDLINE and Cochrane library search including various keyword searches identified several papers which investigated or discussed Resilon or RealSeal\\/Epiphany. Analysis of the literature demonstrated that the bulk of the literature is in vitro in nature, based largely on leakage-type studies, and demonstrates a wide variety of methodologies with conflicting findings; as a result meaningful conclusions are difficult. Within the limit of these in vitro studies Resilon appears to perform adequately in comparison to gutta-percha, however, as a result of the questionable merit of such studies, it cannot presently be considered an evidence-based alternative to the current gold standard gutta-percha. It is imperative that before Resilon is considered as a replacement material, a better understanding of the physical properties of the resin sealer and the reality of the adhesive \\'monoblock\\' are elucidated. The literature also demonstrates a paucity of quality long-term clinical outcome studies which will need to be addressed before firm conclusions can be reached.

  20. Static seals and their application in water-cooled nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Information relative to six types of static seals commonly used in the primary cooling systems of nuclear reactors is compiled. This information includes a description of each type of seal, its material of construction, design features, operating experience, and advantages and disadvantages. The types covered include spiral-wound asbestos-filled gaskets, hollow metallic O-rings, Belleville spring type of gasketed joints, integrated elastomer and metal retainer gaskets, and solid metal gaskets with heavy cross sections. Omega, canopy, and lip seals are discussed briefly, and information on flange design for gasketing is also presented

  1. System for the sealing of containers and pipelines, especially in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.

    1976-01-01

    In order to seal containers and pipelines especially in nuclear power plants, it is suggested to incorporate hollow bodies of an elastic material in the pipeline connections which can be blown up by pressure-gas and which are placed for sealing on the inner walls of the pipe. During a longer shutdown, system parts can thus be protected from corrosion. Various forms of such cavities are shown in design examples. The sealed sections can be filled with inert gas (nitrogen). (RW/LH) [de

  2. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  3. Brush seal leakage performance with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlile, Julie A.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    1992-01-01

    The leakage performance of a brush seal with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions was studied. The leakage results included for air, helium, and carbon dioxide at several bristle/rotor interferences. Also, the effects of packing a lubricant into the bristles and also of reversing the pressure drop across the seal were studied. Results were compared to that of an annular seal at similar operating conditions. In order to generalize the results, they were correlated using corresponding state theory. The brush seal tested had a bore diameter of 3.792 cm (1.4930 in.), a fence height of 0.0635 cm (0.025 in.), and 1800 bristles/cm circumference (4500 bristles/in. circumference). Various bristle/rotor radial interferences were achieved by using a tapered rotor. The brush seal reduced the leakage in comparison to the annular seal, up to 9.5 times. Reversing the pressure drop across the brush seal produced leakage rates approximately the same as that of the annular seal. Addition of a lubricant reduced the leakage by 2.5 times. The air and carbon dioxide data were successfully correlated using corresponding state theory. However, the helium data followed a different curve than the air and carbon dioxide data.

  4. Tension-filled Governance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celik, Tim Holst

    on the statesituated tension-filled functional relationship between legitimation and accumulation, the study both historically and theoretically reworks this approach and reapplies it for the post-1970s/1990s governance period. It asks whether and to what extent governance has served as a distinctive post- 1970s/1990s...

  5. filled neutron detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boron trifluoride (BF3) proportional counters are used as detectors for thermal neutrons. They are characterized by high neutron sensitivity and good gamma discriminating properties. Most practical BF3 counters are filled with pure boron trifluoride gas enriched up to 96% 10B. But BF3 is not an ideal proportional counter ...

  6. Gas filled detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, C.

    1993-01-01

    The main types of gas filled nuclear detectors: ionization chambers, proportional counters, parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPAC) and microstrip detectors are described. New devices are shown. A description of the processes involved in such detectors is also given. (K.A.) 123 refs.; 25 figs.; 3 tabs

  7. Adherence evaluation of vented chest seals in a swine skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Françoise; Maudlin-Jeronimo, Eric; Higgins, Adam; Kheirabadi, Bijan; McCarron, Richard; Kennedy, Daniel; Housler, Greggory

    2016-10-01

    Perforation of the chest (open pneumothorax) with and without lung injury can cause air accumulation in the chest, positive intrapleural pressure and lead to tension pneumothorax if untreated. The performance of chest seals to prevent tension physiology depends partially on their ability to adhere to the skin and seal the chest wound. Novel non-occlusive vented chest seals were assessed for their adhesiveness on skin of live swine under normal and extreme environmental conditions to simulate austere battlefield conditions. Chest seals were applied on the back of the swine on skin that was soiled by various environmental contaminants to represent battlefield situations. A peeling (horizontal rim peeling) and detachment and breaching (vertical pulling) techniques were used to quantify the adhesive performance of vented chest seals. Among eight initially selected vented seals, five (Bolin, Russell, Fast breathe, Hyfin and SAM) were further down-selected based on their superior adherence scores at ambient temperatures. The adherence of these seals was then assessed after approximately 17h storage at extreme cold (-19.5°C) and hot (71.5°C) temperatures. Adherence scores for peeling (above 90%) and detachment scores (less than 25%) were comparable for four vented chest seals when tested at ambient temperature, except for the Bolin seal which had higher breaching. Under extreme storage temperatures, adherence peeling scores were comparable to those at ambient temperatures for four chest seals. Scores were significantly lower for the Bolin seal at extreme temperatures. This seal also had the highest detachment and breaching scores. In contrast, the Russell, Fast breathe, Hyfin and SAM seals showed similar ability to stay air tight without breaching after hot storage. No significant difference was found in skin adherence of the five vented chest seals at ambient temperature and the four seals (Russell, Fast breathe, Hyfin and SAM) maintained superior adherence even after

  8. Comparative evaluation of microleakage of various retrograde filling materials: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhotra, Virat; Sofat, Anjali; Pandit, Inder K; Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gugnani, Neeraj

    2013-07-01

    The present study is envisaged to evaluate and compare the microleakage of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) with commonly used retrograde filling materials, like light-cured composite with dentin-bonding agents, light-cured glass ionomer cement (LC GIC) and resin-modified zinc oxide eugenol. Ninety freshly extracted non-carious single-rooted human anterior teeth were used in the study. They were randomly divided into four experimental groups and two control groups of 15 each. Following the biomechanical preparation, all teeth were obturated and then the apices of the obturated teeth were resected by removing 3 mm of each apex at 90° to the long axis of the tooth with a straight fissure bur in a high-speed air-rotor handpiece with water coolant. A 3-mm-deep root end cavity was prepared and the root end fillings were placed as per the manufacturer's instructions and according to the groups divided. The samples were then immersed in 1% methylene blue at room temperature for 72 h, 96 h and 1 week and the dye penetration was measured. All the four materials used in the study showed some microleakage throughout the experimental period. The sealing ability in terms of microleakage can be summarized as: MTA > Composite resin with dentin bonding agent > LC GIC > Resin modified zinc oxide eugenol.

  9. Leak detection of KNI seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranyai, G.; Peter, A.; Windberg, P.

    1990-03-01

    In Unit 3 and 4 of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary, KNI type seals are used as lead-throughs with conical nickel sealing rings. Their failure can be critical for the operation of the reactor. An Acoustical Leak Detection System (ALDS) was constructed and tested for the operational testing of the seals. Some individual papers are presented in this collection on the calibration and testing of the ALDS intended to be placed on the top of the reactor vessels. The papers include simulation measurements of Unit 3 of NPP, laboratory experiments, evaluation of measurements, and further development needs with the ALDS. (R.P.) 50 figs.; 19 tabs

  10. Silicone foam for penetration seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Yoshikazu

    1986-01-01

    In nuclear power plants or general buildings, it is very important to form a fire-resistant seal around cables, cable trays and conduits passing through a wall or a floor. Rockwool, asbestos, glasswool and flame-retarded urethane foam have so far been used for these purposes. However, they were not satisfactory in sealing property, workability and safety. The silicone foam newly developed, ''TOSSEAL'' 300, has cleared these defects. It has now come to be used for fire resistant seal in nuclear power plants. (author)

  11. The comparison of microbial leakage in roots filled with resilon and gutta-percha: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashidhar, C; Shivanna, Vasundhara; Shivamurthy, Gb; Shashidhar, Jyothi

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare bacterial leakage using streptococcus mutans through gutta-percha and a thermoplastic synthetic polymer based root canal filling material (Resilon) using two filling techniques. A total of 90 single-rooted extracted human teeth were subjected for the study. Teeth were divided into 6 groups of 10 and 3 control groups of 10 teeth each. All the samples were decoronated and the coronal surfaces of the roots were prepared perpendicular to the long axis of the root with a high-speed handpiece and a multipurpose bur using air water spray. The length of all the roots was prepared approximately 16 mm from the coronal surface to the apex of the root. Roots were filled using lateral and vertical condensation techniques with gutta-percha and AH26 sealer (Group 1 and 2) or with gutta-percha and epiphany sealer (Group 3 and 4). Group 5 and 6 were filled with Resilon and epiphany sealer using the lateral and vertical condensation techniques. A split chamber microbial leakage model was used in which S. mutans placed in the upper chamber could reach the lower chamber only through the filled root canal. Group 7 and 8 (positive control) were filled with Resilon and gutta-percha without sealer and tested with bacteria, whereas Group 7 (negative control) was sealed with wax to test the seal between the chambers. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test. All positive groups (Group 7 and 8) showed leakage within 1 hour of the start of the study (100%), whereas none of the negative control (Group 9) leaked. The roots obturated with Resilon and epiphany (Group 5 and 6) showed minimal leakage, i.e., each with 6 leakages, which was significantly less than gutta-percha (Group 1-4), in which approximately 80% of specimens with either sealer or techniques leaked. Kruskal-Wallis test showed statistical significance when all groups were compared (P<0.05). Mann-Whitney U test compared the respective groups and found Resilon

  12. PREPP [Process Experimental Pilot Plant] rotary kiln seals: Problem and resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP) is a facility designed to demonstrate processing of low level chemical and transuranic hazardous waste. The plant includes equipment for handling the incoming waste containers, shredding, incineration and cooling the waste, grouting the residue and scrubbing and filtration of the off gas. The process incinerator is a rotary kiln approximately 8-1/2 ft diameter and 25 ft long with a rotary seal assembly at each end. Each seal assembly consists of a primary, secondary and tertiary seal, with a positive air pressure between primary and secondary seals to prevent out-leakage from the kiln. The kiln operates at 0.5 inch water negative pressure. From the very outset the kiln seals exhibited excessive drag which taxed the kiln drive capacity and excessive in-leakage which limited kiln temperature. An engineering evaluation concluded that the original seals supplied by the kiln vendor could not accommodate expansion and centerline shift of the kiln resulting from heatup of the kiln and its support system. A totally new concept kiln seal design has been generated to replace the (modified) original seals. This new seal system has been designed to provide a very tight long lasting seal which will accommodate the 1.5 inch axial shift and up to 1 inch radial movement of the kiln shell. Design lifetime of the seal is 10,000 operating hours between major maintenance services while maintaining an acceptable leak rate hot or cold, rotating or stopped. The design appears adaptable to any size kiln and is suitable for retrofit to existing kilns. A one-third scale prototype seal assembly is being built to verify the concept prior to construction of the 10 ft diameter seals for the PREPP rotary kiln. 4 figs

  13. Interaction between clay-based sealing components and crystalline host rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyanto, D. G.; Dixon, D. A.; Man, A. G.

    The results of hydraulic-mechanical (H-M) numerical simulation of a shaft seal installed at a fracture zone (FZ) in a crystalline host rock using the finite element method are presented. The primary function of a shaft seal is to limit short-circuiting of the groundwater flow regime via the shaft in a deep geological repository. Two different stages of system evolution were considered in this numerical modelling. Stage 1 simulates the groundwater flow into an open shaft, prior to seal installation. Stage 2 simulates the groundwater flow into the shaft seal after seal installation. Four different cases were completed to: (i) evaluate H-M response due to the interaction between clay-based sealing material and crystalline host rock in the shaft seal structure; (ii) quantify the effect of the different times between the completion of the shaft excavation and the completion of shaft seal installation on the H-M response; and (iii) define the potential effects of different sealing material configurations. Shaft sealing materials include the bentonite-sand mixture (BSM), dense backfill (DBF), and concrete plug (CP). The BSM has greater swelling capacity and lower hydraulic conductivity ( K) than the DBF. The results of these analyses show that the decrease of the pore water pressure is concentrated along the fracture zone (FZ), which has the greatest K. As the time increases, the greatest decrease in pore water pressure is found around the FZ. Following FZ isolation and the subsequent filling of the shaft with water as it floods, the pore water pressure profile tends to recover back to the initial conditions prior to shaft excavation. The majority of the fluids that ultimately saturate the centre of the shaft seal flow radially inwards from the FZ. The time between the completion of the shaft excavation and the completion of shaft seal installation has a significant effect on the saturation time. A shorter time can reduce the saturation time. Since most of the inflow

  14. Vented chest seals for prevention of tension pneumothorax in a communicating pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotora, Joseph G; Henao, Jose; Littlejohn, Lanny F; Kircher, Sara

    2013-11-01

    Tension pneumothorax accounts for 3%-4% of combat casualties and 10% of civilian chest trauma. Air entering a wound via a communicating pneumothorax rather than by the trachea can result in respiratory arrest and death. In such cases, the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care advocates the use of unvented chest seals to prevent respiratory compromise. A comparison of three commercially available vented chest seals was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of tension pneumothorax prevention after seal application. A surgical thoracostomy was created and sealed by placing a shortened 10-mL syringe barrel (with plunger in place) into the wound. Tension pneumothorax was achieved via air introduction through a Cordis to a maximum volume of 50 mL/kg. A 20% drop in mean arterial pressure or a 20% increase in heart rate confirmed hemodynamic compromise. After evacuation, one of three vented chest seals (HyFin(®), n = 8; Sentinel(®), n = 8, SAM(®), n = 8) was applied. Air was injected to a maximum of 50 mL/kg twice, followed by a 10% autologous blood infusion, and finally, a third 50 mL/kg air bolus. Survivors completed all three interventions, and a 15-min recovery period. The introduction of 29.0 (±11.5) mL/kg of air resulted in tension physiology. All three seals effectively evacuated air and blood. Hemodynamic compromise failed to develop with a chest seal in place. HyFin(®), SAM(®), and Sentinel(®) vented chest seals are equally effective in evacuating blood and air in a communicating pneumothorax model. All three prevented tension pneumothorax formation after penetrating thoracic trauma. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Systolic ventricular filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent-Guasp, Francisco; Kocica, Mladen J; Corno, Antonio; Komeda, Masashi; Cox, James; Flotats, A; Ballester-Rodes, Manel; Carreras-Costa, Francesc

    2004-03-01

    The evidence of the ventricular myocardial band (VMB) has revealed unavoidable coherence and mutual coupling of form and function in the ventricular myocardium, making it possible to understand the principles governing electrical, mechanical and energetical events within the human heart. From the earliest Erasistratus' observations, principal mechanisms responsible for the ventricular filling have still remained obscured. Contemporary experimental and clinical investigations unequivocally support the attitude that only powerful suction force, developed by the normal ventricles, would be able to produce an efficient filling of the ventricular cavities. The true origin and the precise time frame for generating such force are still controversial. Elastic recoil and muscular contraction were the most commonly mentioned, but yet, still not clearly explained mechanisms involved in the ventricular suction. Classical concepts about timing of successive mechanical events during the cardiac cycle, also do not offer understandable insight into the mechanism of the ventricular filling. The net result is the current state of insufficient knowledge of systolic and particularly diastolic function of normal and diseased heart. Here we summarize experimental evidence and theoretical backgrounds, which could be useful in understanding the phenomenon of the ventricular filling. Anatomy of the VMB, and recent proofs for its segmental electrical and mechanical activation, undoubtedly indicates that ventricular filling is the consequence of an active muscular contraction. Contraction of the ascendent segment of the VMB, with simultaneous shortening and rectifying of its fibers, produces the paradoxical increase of the ventricular volume and lengthening of its long axis. Specific spatial arrangement of the ascendent segment fibers, their interaction with adjacent descendent segment fibers, elastic elements and intra-cavitary blood volume (hemoskeleton), explain the physical principles

  16. Seal coat binder performance specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Need to improve seal coat binder specs: replace empirical tests (penetration, ductility) with : performance-related tests applicable to both : unmodified and modified binders; consider temperatures that cover entire in service : range that are tied t...

  17. Alaska Harbor Seal Glacial Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Floating glacial ice serves as a haul-out substrate for a significant number (10-15%) of Alaskan harbor seals, and thus surveying tidewater glacial fjords is an...

  18. Coupled processes in repository sealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case, J.B.; Kelsall, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    The significance of coupled processes in repository sealing is evaluated. In most repository designs, shaft seals will be located in areas of relatively low temperature perturbation, in which case the coupling of temperature with stress and permeability may be less significant than the coupling between stress and permeability that occurs during excavation. Constitutive relationships between stress and permeability are reviewed for crystalline rock and rocksalt. These provide a basis for predicting the development of disturbed zones near excavations. Field case histories of the degree of disturbance are presented for two contrasting rock types - Stripa granite and Southeastern New Mexico rocksalt. The results of field investigations in both rock types confirm that hydraulic conductivity or permeability is stress dependent, and that shaft seal performance may be related to the degree that stresses are perturbed and restored near the seal

  19. Northern Fur Seal Food Habits

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains food habits samples, usually scats, collected opportunistically on northern fur seal rookeries and haulouts in Alaska from 1987 to present....

  20. Optimization of material and production to develop fluoroelastomer inflatable seals for sodium cooled fast breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, N.K., E-mail: nksinha@igcar.gov.i [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India); Raj, Baldev, E-mail: dir@igcar.gov.i [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: Production of thin fluoroelastomer profiles by cold feed extrusion and continuous cure involving microwave and hot air heating. Use of peroxide curing in air during production. Use of fluoroelastomers based on advanced polymer architecture (APA) for the production of profiles. Use of the profiles in inflatable seals for critical application of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor. Tailoring of material formulation by synchronized optimization of material and production technologies to ensure that the produced seal ensures significant gains in terms of performance and safety in reactor under synergistic influences of temperature, radiation, air and sodium aerosol. - Abstract: The feasibility of producing thin-walled fluoroelastomer profiles under continuous, atmospheric-pressure vulcanization conditions in air has been demonstrated by successful manufacture of {approx}2 m diameter test inflatable seals for the 500 MWe, Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) using a 50/50 blend formulation of Viton GBL-200S/600S based on advanced polymer architecture (APA). A commercial cold feed screw extruder with 90 mm diameter screw was used along with continuous cure by microwave (2.45 GHz) and hot air heating (190 {sup o}C) at a line speed of 1 m/min to produce the seals. The blend formulation promises significant improvement in the performance and safety of the seals. This article depicts the relevant characteristics of the original inflatable seal compound that was used as reference to achieve the objectives through synchronized optimization of material and production technologies. The production trials are outlined and the blend formulation used with minor factory modifications to produce the test seals is reported. Progressive refinements of the original, Viton A-401C based compound to the blend formulation is presented along with an assessment of potential performance gains. Possible uses of the reported formulation and production technique for other large

  1. Optimization of material and production to develop fluoroelastomer inflatable seals for sodium cooled fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, N.K.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Production of thin fluoroelastomer profiles by cold feed extrusion and continuous cure involving microwave and hot air heating. → Use of peroxide curing in air during production. → Use of fluoroelastomers based on advanced polymer architecture (APA) for the production of profiles. → Use of the profiles in inflatable seals for critical application of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor. → Tailoring of material formulation by synchronized optimization of material and production technologies to ensure that the produced seal ensures significant gains in terms of performance and safety in reactor under synergistic influences of temperature, radiation, air and sodium aerosol. - Abstract: The feasibility of producing thin-walled fluoroelastomer profiles under continuous, atmospheric-pressure vulcanization conditions in air has been demonstrated by successful manufacture of ∼2 m diameter test inflatable seals for the 500 MWe, Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) using a 50/50 blend formulation of Viton GBL-200S/600S based on advanced polymer architecture (APA). A commercial cold feed screw extruder with 90 mm diameter screw was used along with continuous cure by microwave (2.45 GHz) and hot air heating (190 o C) at a line speed of 1 m/min to produce the seals. The blend formulation promises significant improvement in the performance and safety of the seals. This article depicts the relevant characteristics of the original inflatable seal compound that was used as reference to achieve the objectives through synchronized optimization of material and production technologies. The production trials are outlined and the blend formulation used with minor factory modifications to produce the test seals is reported. Progressive refinements of the original, Viton A-401C based compound to the blend formulation is presented along with an assessment of potential performance gains. Possible uses of the reported formulation and production technique for

  2. Design considerations for mechanical face seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Greiner, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    Two companion reports deal with design considerations for improving performance of mechanical face seals, one of family of devices used in general area of fluid sealing of rotating shafts. One report deals with basic seal configuration and other with lubrication of seal.

  3. Multiple lead seal assembly for a liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutter, E.; Pardini, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A reusable multiple lead seal assembly provides leak-free passage of stainless-steel-clad instrument leads through the cover on the primary tank of a liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder nuclear reactor. The seal isolates radioactive argon cover gas and sodium vapor within the primary tank from the exterior atmosphere and permits reuse of the assembly and the stainless-steel-clad instrument leads. Leads are placed in flutes in a seal body, and a seal shell is then placed around the seal body. Circumferential channels in the body and inner surface of the shell are contiguous and together form a conduit which intersects each of the flutes, placing them in communication with a port through the wall of the seal shell. Liquid silicone rubber sealant is injected into the flutes through the port and conduit; the sealant fills the space in the flutes not occupied by the leads themselves and dries to a rubbery hardness. A nut, threaded onto a portion of the seal body not covered by the seal shell, jacks the body out of the shell and shears the sealant without damage to the body, shell, or leads. The leads may then be removed from the body. The sheared sealant is cleaned from the body, leads, and shell and the assembly may then be reused with the same or different leads. 3 claims, 6 figures

  4. Seals Research at AlliedSignal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, M. Rifat

    1996-01-01

    A consortium has been formed to address seal problems in the Aerospace sector of Allied Signal, Inc. The consortium is represented by makers of Propulsion Engines, Auxiliary Power Units, Gas Turbine Starters, etc. The goal is to improve Face Seal reliability, since Face Seals have become reliability drivers in many of our product lines. Several research programs are being implemented simultaneously this year. They include: Face Seal Modeling and Analysis Methodology; Oil Cooling of Seals; Seal Tracking Dynamics; Coking Formation & Prevention; and Seal Reliability Methods.

  5. Sealing Failure Analysis on V-Shaped Sealing Rings of an Inserted Sealing Tool Used for Multistage Fracturing Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Hu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The inserted sealing tool is a critical downhole implement that is used to balance the downhole pressure in multistage fracturing operations and prevent fracturing fluid from overflow and/or backward flow. The sealing ring of an inserted sealing tool plays an important role in downhole sealing since a sealing failure would ail the fracturing operation. In order to improve the sealing performance and reduce the potential fracturing failures, this research aims to investigate the influence of V-shaped sealing ring geometries on sealing performance. Constitutive experiments of rubber materials were carried out and the parameters of the constitutive relationship of rubber materials were obtained. A two-dimensional axisymmetric model considering the sealing ring has been established and influences are investigated with considerations of various system parameters and operating conditions. It is found that the stresses concentrated at the shoulder and inner vertex of the sealing ring have direct impact on the damage of the sealing rings under operational conditions. Moreover, the sealing interference, among several other factors, greatly affects the life of the sealing ring. A new design of the sealing ring is suggested with optimized geometric parameters. Its geometric parameters are the edge height of 5 mm, the vertex angle of 90°–100°, and the interference of 0.1 mm, which show a better performance and prolonged operation life of the sealing ring.

  6. Reusable, tamper-indicating seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    A reusable, tamper-indicating seal is comprised of a drum confined within a fixed body and rotatable in one direction therewithin, the top of the drum constituting a tray carrying a large number of small balls of several different colors. The fixed body contains parallel holes for looping a seal wire therethrough. The base of the drums carries cams adapted to coact with cam followers to lock the wire within the seal at one angular position of the drum. A channel in the fixed body, visible from outside the seal, adjacent the tray constitutes a segregated location for a small plurality of the colored balls. A spring in the tray forces colored balls into the segregated location at one angular position of the drum, further rotation securing the balls in position and the wires in the seal. A wedge-shaped plough removes the balls from the segregated location, at a different angular position of the drum, the wire being unlocked at the same postion. A new pattern of colored balls will appear in the segregated location when the seal is relocked

  7. Hydrodynamic perception in true seals (Phocidae) and eared seals (Otariidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Wolf; Wieskotten, Sven; Marshall, Christopher; Dehnhardt, Guido

    2013-06-01

    Pinnipeds, that is true seals (Phocidae), eared seals (Otariidae), and walruses (Odobenidae), possess highly developed vibrissal systems for mechanoreception. They can use their vibrissae to detect and discriminate objects by direct touch. At least in Phocidae and Otariidae, the vibrissae can also be used to detect and analyse water movements. Here, we review what is known about this ability, known as hydrodynamic perception, in pinnipeds. Hydrodynamic perception in pinnipeds developed convergently to the hydrodynamic perception with the lateral line system in fish and the sensory hairs in crustaceans. So far two species of pinnipeds, the harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) representing the Phocidae and the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) representing the Otariidae, have been studied for their ability to detect local water movements (dipole stimuli) and to follow hydrodynamic trails, that is the water movements left behind by objects that have passed by at an earlier point in time. Both species are highly sensitive to dipole stimuli and can follow hydrodynamic trails accurately. In the individuals tested, California sea lions were clearly more sensitive to dipole stimuli than harbour seals, and harbour seals showed a superior trail following ability as compared to California sea lions. Harbour seals have also been shown to derive additional information from hydrodynamic trails, such as motion direction, size and shape of the object that caused the trail (California sea lions have not yet been tested). The peculiar undulated shape of the harbour seals' vibrissae appears to play a crucial role in trail following, as it suppresses self-generated noise while the animal is swimming.

  8. Service life evaluation of non-metallic containment seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pringle, T.G.

    1994-01-01

    A Service Life Evaluation Program (SLEP) was successfully completed for expansion joint seals used in the pressure relief duct of Pickering NGS, an eight unit CANDU station. These seals are part of the containment boundary, are difficult to replace and then only during station outages which are scheduled at ten year intervals. The SLEP, consisting of an accelerated aging program and a qualification test, was undertaken to determine the service life of the seals such that they would be capable of remaining functional following a combination of service life, a design basis accident and a subsequent seismic event. The Arrhenius model of aging was used for the accelerated aging program. Samples of seal material were subjected to oven aging at five temperatures, 150, 160, 170, 180 and 190 deg C. Tensile properties and hardness were measured at various aging times and Arrhenius plots constructed. Based on changes in elongation, activation energies of 1.2 eV and 1.1 eV were calculated for the reinforcing fabric and the silicone cover rubber, respectively. Hardness measurements were also taken but as expected, no precise quantitative aging relationship could be determined from material hardness. For the qualification test a representative length of seal was installed and field-spliced in a test frame built to simulate the installed configuration of the seal. It then underwent accelerated aging equivalent to the service life, followed by LOCA irradiation exposure to LOCA conditions of humidity, temperature and pressure and a design-basis seismic event. Finally, a pressure test to approximately five times design pressure was successfully performed to demonstrate the remaining margin of safety. Periodic air leakage tests indicated no deterioration in sealing performance and no physical deterioration was apparent. (author). 11 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs

  9. Numerical solution of a flow inside a labyrinth seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šimák Jan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is a behaviour of a flow inside a labyrinth seal on a rotating shaft. The labyrinth seal is a type of a non-contact seal where a leakage of a fluid is prevented by a rather complicated path, which the fluid has to overcome. In the presented case the sealed medium is the air and the seal is made by a system of 20 teeth on a rotating shaft situated against a smooth static surface. Centrifugal forces present due to the rotation of the shaft create vortices in each chamber and thus dissipate the axial velocity of the escaping air.The structure of the flow field inside the seal is studied through the use of numerical methods. Three-dimensional solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for turbulent flow is very time consuming. In order to reduce the computational time we can simplify our problem and solve it as an axisymmetric problem in a two-dimensional meridian plane. For this case we use a transformation of the Navier-Stokes equations and of the standard k-omega turbulence model into a cylindrical coordinate system. A finite volume method is used for the solution of the resulting problem. A one-side modification of the Riemann problem for boundary conditions is used at the inlet and at the outlet of the axisymmetric channel. The total pressure and total density (temperature are to be used preferably at the inlet whereas the static pressure is used at the outlet for the compatibility. This idea yields physically relevant boundary conditions. The important characteristics such as a mass flow rate and a power loss, depending on a pressure ratio (1.1 - 4 and an angular velocity (1000 - 15000 rpm are evaluated.

  10. Amphibious hearing in spotted seals (Phoca largha): underwater audiograms, aerial audiograms and critical ratio measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Jillian M; Southall, Brandon L; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2014-03-01

    Spotted seals (Phoca largha) inhabit Arctic regions that are facing both rapid climate change and increasing industrialization. While little is known about their sensory capabilities, available knowledge suggests that spotted seals and other ice seals use sound to obtain information from the surrounding environment. To quantitatively assess their auditory capabilities, the hearing of two young spotted seals was tested using a psychophysical paradigm. Absolute detection thresholds for tonal sounds were measured in air and under water over the frequency range of hearing, and critical ratios were determined using octave-band masking noise in both media. The behavioral audiograms show a range of best sensitivity spanning four octaves in air, from approximately 0.6 to 11 kHz. The range of sensitive hearing extends across seven octaves in water, with lowest thresholds between 0.3 and 56 kHz. Critical ratio measurements were similar in air and water and increased monotonically from 12 dB at 0.1 kHz to 30 dB at 25.6 kHz, indicating that the auditory systems of these seals are quite efficient at extracting signals from background noise. This study demonstrates that spotted seals possess sound reception capabilities different from those previously described for ice seals, and more similar to those reported for harbor seals (Phoca vitulina). The results are consistent with the amphibious lifestyle of these seals and their apparent reliance on sound. The hearing data reported herein are the first available for spotted seals and can inform best management practices for this vulnerable species in a changing Arctic.

  11. Geochemical modelling of grout-groundwater-rock interactions at the seal-rock interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcorn, S.; Christian-Frear, T.

    1992-02-01

    Theoretical investigations into the longevity of repository seals have dealt primarily with the development of a methodology to evaluate interactions between portland cement-based grout and groundwater. Evaluation of chemical thermodynamic equilibria among grout, groundwater, and granitic host rock phases using the geochemical codes EQ3NR/EQ6 suggests that a fracture filled with grout and saturated with groundwater will tend to fill and 'tighten' with time. These calculations predict that some grout and rock phases will dissolve, and that there will be precipitation of secondary phases which collectively have a larger overall volume than that of the material dissolved. Model assumptions include sealing of the fracture in a sluggish hydrologic regime (low gradient) characterized by a saline groundwater environment. The results of the calculations suggest that buffering of the fracture seals chemical system by the granitic rock may be important in determining the long-term fate of grout seals and the resulting phase assemblage in the fracture. The similarity of the predicted reaction product phases to those observed in naturally filled fractures suggests that with time equilibrium will be approached and grouted fractures subject to low hydrologic gradients will continue to seal. If grout injected into fractures materially reduces groundwater flux, the approach to chemical equilibrium will likely be accelerated. In light of this, even very thin or imperfectly grouted fractures would tighten in suitable hydrogeologic environments. In order to determine the period of time necessary to approach equilibrium, data on reaction rates are required. (au)

  12. Spray sealing: A breakthrough in integral fuel tank sealing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Martin D.; Zadarnowski, J. H.

    1989-11-01

    In a continuing effort to increase readiness, a new approach to sealing integral fuel tanks is being developed. The technique seals potential leak sources by spraying elastomeric materials inside the tank cavity. Laboratory evaluations project an increase in aircraft supportability and reliability, an improved maintainability, decreasing acquisition and life cycle costs. Increased usable fuel volume and lower weight than conventional bladders improve performance. Concept feasibility was demonstrated on sub-scale aircraft fuel tanks. Materials were selected by testing sprayable elastomers in a fuel tank environment. Chemical stability, mechanical properties, and dynamic durability of the elastomer are being evaluated at the laboratory level and in sub-scale and full scale aircraft component fatigue tests. The self sealing capability of sprayable materials is also under development. Ballistic tests show an improved aircraft survivability, due in part to the elastomer's mechanical properties and its ability to damp vibrations. New application equipment, system removal, and repair methods are being investigated.

  13. Benign gastric filling defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, K. K.; Lee, Y. H.; Cho, O. K.; Park, C. Y.

    1979-01-01

    The gastric lesion is a common source of complaints to Orientals, however, evaluation of gastric symptoms and laboratory examination offer little specific aid in the diagnosis of gastric diseases. Thus roentgenography of gastrointestinal tract is one of the most reliable method for detail diagnosis. On double contract study of stomach, gastric filling defect is mostly caused by malignant gastric cancer, however, other benign lesions can cause similar pictures which can be successfully treated by surgery. 66 cases of benign causes of gastric filling defect were analyzed at this point of view, which was verified pathologically by endoscope or surgery during recent 7 years in Yensei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital. The characteristic radiological picture of each disease was discussed for precise radiologic diagnosis. 1. Of total 66 cases, there were 52 cases of benign gastric tumor 10 cases of gastric varices, 5 cases of gastric bezoar, 5 cases of corrosive gastritis, 3 cases of granulomatous disease and one case of gastric hematoma. 2. The most frequent causes of benign tumors were adenomatous polyp (35/42) and the next was leiomyoma (4/42). Others were one of case of carcinoid, neurofibroma and cyst. 3. Characteristic of benign adenomatous polyp were relatively small in size, smooth surface and were observed that large size, benign polyp was frequently type IV lesion with a stalk. 4. Submucosal tumors such as leiomyoma needed differential diagnosis with polypoid malignant cancer. However, the characteristic points of differentiation was well circumscribed smooth margined filling defect without definite mucosal destruction on surface. 5. Gastric varices showed multiple lobulated filling defected especially on gastric fundus that changed its size and shape by respiration and posture of patients. Same varices lesions on esophagus and history of liver disease were helpful for easier diagnosis. 6. Gastric bezoar showed well defined movable mass

  14. Benign gastric filling defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, K. K.; Lee, Y. H.; Cho, O. K.; Park, C. Y. [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-06-15

    The gastric lesion is a common source of complaints to Orientals, however, evaluation of gastric symptoms and laboratory examination offer little specific aid in the diagnosis of gastric diseases. Thus roentgenography of gastrointestinal tract is one of the most reliable method for detail diagnosis. On double contract study of stomach, gastric filling defect is mostly caused by malignant gastric cancer, however, other benign lesions can cause similar pictures which can be successfully treated by surgery. 66 cases of benign causes of gastric filling defect were analyzed at this point of view, which was verified pathologically by endoscope or surgery during recent 7 years in Yensei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital. The characteristic radiological picture of each disease was discussed for precise radiologic diagnosis. 1. Of total 66 cases, there were 52 cases of benign gastric tumor 10 cases of gastric varices, 5 cases of gastric bezoar, 5 cases of corrosive gastritis, 3 cases of granulomatous disease and one case of gastric hematoma. 2. The most frequent causes of benign tumors were adenomatous polyp (35/42) and the next was leiomyoma (4/42). Others were one of case of carcinoid, neurofibroma and cyst. 3. Characteristic of benign adenomatous polyp were relatively small in size, smooth surface and were observed that large size, benign polyp was frequently type IV lesion with a stalk. 4. Submucosal tumors such as leiomyoma needed differential diagnosis with polypoid malignant cancer. However, the characteristic points of differentiation was well circumscribed smooth margined filling defect without definite mucosal destruction on surface. 5. Gastric varices showed multiple lobulated filling defected especially on gastric fundus that changed its size and shape by respiration and posture of patients. Same varices lesions on esophagus and history of liver disease were helpful for easier diagnosis. 6. Gastric bezoar showed well defined movable mass

  15. Benign gastric filling defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, K K; Lee, Y H; Cho, O K; Park, C Y [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-06-15

    The gastric lesion is a common source of complaints to Orientals, however, evaluation of gastric symptoms and laboratory examination offer little specific aid in the diagnosis of gastric diseases. Thus roentgenography of gastrointestinal tract is one of the most reliable method for detail diagnosis. On double contract study of stomach, gastric filling defect is mostly caused by malignant gastric cancer, however, other benign lesions can cause similar pictures which can be successfully treated by surgery. 66 cases of benign causes of gastric filling defect were analyzed at this point of view, which was verified pathologically by endoscope or surgery during recent 7 years in Yensei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital. The characteristic radiological picture of each disease was discussed for precise radiologic diagnosis. 1. Of total 66 cases, there were 52 cases of benign gastric tumor 10 cases of gastric varices, 5 cases of gastric bezoar, 5 cases of corrosive gastritis, 3 cases of granulomatous disease and one case of gastric hematoma. 2. The most frequent causes of benign tumors were adenomatous polyp (35/42) and the next was leiomyoma (4/42). Others were one of case of carcinoid, neurofibroma and cyst. 3. Characteristic of benign adenomatous polyp were relatively small in size, smooth surface and were observed that large size, benign polyp was frequently type IV lesion with a stalk. 4. Submucosal tumors such as leiomyoma needed differential diagnosis with polypoid malignant cancer. However, the characteristic points of differentiation was well circumscribed smooth margined filling defect without definite mucosal destruction on surface. 5. Gastric varices showed multiple lobulated filling defected especially on gastric fundus that changed its size and shape by respiration and posture of patients. Same varices lesions on esophagus and history of liver disease were helpful for easier diagnosis. 6. Gastric bezoar showed well defined movable mass

  16. Development of laser beam welding for the lip seal configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Ashish; Joshi, Jaydeep; Singh, Dhananjay Kumar; Natu, Harshad; Rotti, Chandramouli; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Chakraborty, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser welding parameter optimization for required weld penetration. • Parametric study of actual scenarios like air gap, plate & beam misalignment. • Destructive and non-destructive examination of the welds and He-leak testing. - Abstract: A vacuum seal using the lip sealing technique is emerging as the most likely choice for fusion devices, to comply with the requirement of maintainability. The welding technology considered for lip sealing is laser welding, due to the attributes of small spot diameter, low concentrated heat input, high precision and penetration. To establish the process, an experiment has been conducted on a sample size of 150 mm × 50 mm having thickness of 2 mm, material AISI304L to assess the dependence of beam parameters like, laser power, speed and focusing distance on penetration and quality of weld joint. Further, the assessment of the effect of welding set-up variables like air-gap between plates, plate misalignment, and laser beam misalignment on the weld quality is also required. This paper presents the results of this experimental study and also the plan for developing a large (∼10 m) size laser welded seal, that simulates, appropriately, the configuration required in large dimension fusion devices.

  17. Radon and the seal offered by the building shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crameri, R.; Furrer, D.; Burkart, W.

    1992-01-01

    Long term measurements of the radon level before and after the building shell is sealed were carried out in 25 apartment buildings and 7 houses. The average values of the most important meteorological parameters of wind speed, external temperature and barometric pressure which may influence the radon level, were absolutely comparable during the measurement periods before and after the energy renovation of the buildings. Both in houses and in apartment buildings the radon level remained practically unchanged after the building shell was sealed. The lack of any increase in the radon level after reducing the air exchange rate can be explained by virtue of the fact that the balance between the infiltration and elimination of the radon before and after the energy renovation of the buildings remained unchanged. In addition to reducing the air exchange rate, sealing the building shell therefore also results in a reduction in radon infiltration from the soil. Although it is possible in certain cases for the radon level to increase after the building shell has been sealed, a general increase in radon levels inside living areas as a result of energy renovation work can be dismissed. 2 figs., 3 tabs., 30 refs

  18. Development of laser beam welding for the lip seal configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Ashish, E-mail: ashish.yadav@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Sector 25, Gandhinagar 382016, Gujarat (India); Joshi, Jaydeep; Singh, Dhananjay Kumar [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Sector 25, Gandhinagar 382016, Gujarat (India); Natu, Harshad [Magod Laser Machining Pvt. Ltd., KIADB Ind. Area, Jigani, Anekal Taluk, Bengaluru 560105 (India); Rotti, Chandramouli; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Chakraborty, Arun [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Sector 25, Gandhinagar 382016, Gujarat (India)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Laser welding parameter optimization for required weld penetration. • Parametric study of actual scenarios like air gap, plate & beam misalignment. • Destructive and non-destructive examination of the welds and He-leak testing. - Abstract: A vacuum seal using the lip sealing technique is emerging as the most likely choice for fusion devices, to comply with the requirement of maintainability. The welding technology considered for lip sealing is laser welding, due to the attributes of small spot diameter, low concentrated heat input, high precision and penetration. To establish the process, an experiment has been conducted on a sample size of 150 mm × 50 mm having thickness of 2 mm, material AISI304L to assess the dependence of beam parameters like, laser power, speed and focusing distance on penetration and quality of weld joint. Further, the assessment of the effect of welding set-up variables like air-gap between plates, plate misalignment, and laser beam misalignment on the weld quality is also required. This paper presents the results of this experimental study and also the plan for developing a large (∼10 m) size laser welded seal, that simulates, appropriately, the configuration required in large dimension fusion devices.

  19. Seal Related Development Activities at EG/G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Harold F.

    1991-01-01

    Seal related development activities including modeling, analysis, and performance testing are described for several current seal related projects. Among the current seal related projects are the following: high pressure gas sealing systems for turbomachinery; brush seals for gas path sealing in gas turbines; and tribological material evaluation for wear surfaces in sealing systems.

  20. Radioactive material package seal tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, M.M.; Humphreys, D.L.; Edwards, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    General design or test performance requirements for radioactive materials (RAM) packages are specified in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1983). The requirements for Type B packages provide a broad range of environments under which the system must contain the RAM without posing a threat to health or property. Seals that provide the containment system interface between the packaging body and the closure must function in both high- and low-temperature environments under dynamic and static conditions. A seal technology program, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories. Experiments were performed in this program to characterize the behavior of several static seal materials at low temperatures. Helium leak tests on face seals were used to compare the materials. Materials tested include butyl, neoprene, ethylene propylene, fluorosilicone, silicone, Eypel, Kalrez, Teflon, fluorocarbon, and Teflon/silicone composites. Because most elastomer O-ring applications are for hydraulic systems, manufacturer low-temperature ratings are based on methods that simulate this use. The seal materials tested in this program with a fixture similar to a RAM cask closure, with the exception of silicone S613-60, are not leak tight (1.0 x 10 -7 std cm 3 /s) at manufacturer low-temperature ratings. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Protective air lock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    A device suitable for preventing escape and subsequent circulation of toxic gases is described. An enclosure is sealed by a surrounding air lock, and an automatic mechanism partially evacuates the enclosure and air lock. The enclosure ventilating mechanism can be disconnected so that a relatively undisturbed atmosphere is created in the enclosure

  2. Testing of isolation barrier sealing surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, C.E.

    1994-12-15

    Isolation barrier doors are to be installed in the 105KE and 105KW basins as part of the 1994 unreviewed safety question (USQ) resolution plan to isolate the fuel storage basin from the fuel discharge chute. Included in this installation is the placement of new sealing surfaces for the barriers by affixing stainless steel plates to existing carbon steel angle bars with a specially formulated epoxy adhesive/sealant material. The sealant is a two-part component consisting of an epoxy resin (the condensation product of bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin) and a curing agent (a proprietary cycloaliphatic polyamine). The sealant is solvent free (complying with air pollution regulations) and capable of withstanding the surrounding radiation fields over an estimated 15-year service life. The epoxy sealant experiences negligible water damage partly because of its hydrophobic (water-repelling) nature. With bond tensile strengths measured at greater than 862 kPa (125 lbf/in{sup 2}), the epoxy sealant is judged acceptable for its intended application. The four-hour pot life of the epoxy sealant provides sufficient time to apply the epoxy, examine the epoxy bead for continuity, and position the stainless steel sealing plates.

  3. Testing of isolation barrier sealing surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    Isolation barrier doors are to be installed in the 105KE and 105KW basins as part of the 1994 unreviewed safety question (USQ) resolution plan to isolate the fuel storage basin from the fuel discharge chute. Included in this installation is the placement of new sealing surfaces for the barriers by affixing stainless steel plates to existing carbon steel angle bars with a specially formulated epoxy adhesive/sealant material. The sealant is a two-part component consisting of an epoxy resin (the condensation product of bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin) and a curing agent (a proprietary cycloaliphatic polyamine). The sealant is solvent free (complying with air pollution regulations) and capable of withstanding the surrounding radiation fields over an estimated 15-year service life. The epoxy sealant experiences negligible water damage partly because of its hydrophobic (water-repelling) nature. With bond tensile strengths measured at greater than 862 kPa (125 lbf/in 2 ), the epoxy sealant is judged acceptable for its intended application. The four-hour pot life of the epoxy sealant provides sufficient time to apply the epoxy, examine the epoxy bead for continuity, and position the stainless steel sealing plates

  4. Liquid-filled ionization chamber temperature dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, L. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)]. E-mail: luciaff@usc.es; Gomez, F. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Iglesias, A. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pardo, J. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pazos, A. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pena, J. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Zapata, M. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2006-05-10

    Temperature and pressure corrections of the read-out signal of ionization chambers have a crucial importance in order to perform high-precision absolute dose measurements. In the present work the temperature and pressure dependences of a sealed liquid isooctane filled ionization chamber (previously developed by the authors) for radiotherapy applications have been studied. We have analyzed the thermal response of the liquid ionization chamber in a {approx}20 deg. C interval around room temperature. The temperature dependence of the signal can be considered linear, with a slope that depends on the chamber collection electric field. For example, a relative signal slope of 0.27x10{sup -2}K{sup -1} for an operation electric field of 1.67x10{sup 6}Vm{sup -1} has been measured in our detector. On the other hand, ambient pressure dependence has been found negligible, as expected for liquid-filled chambers. The thermal dependence of the liquid ionization chamber signal can be parametrized within the Onsager theory on initial recombination. Considering that changes with temperature of the detector response are due to variations in the free ion yield, a parametrization of this dependence has been obtained. There is a good agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical model from the Onsager framework.

  5. Fissure fillings from the Klipperaas study site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tullborg, E.L.

    1986-07-01

    The Klipperaas study site is located within the Smaaland-Vaermland granitoid belt in southern Sweden. The area investigated can be subdivided into blocks with different hydraulic character and fracture frequency of the rocks. A fissure filling, study has been carried out within the area. This includes identification of the minerals, mineral frequency, textures within the fissures and isotope analyses of calcites. Four generation of fissure fillings, within the time space c. 1600 M.a. to present, has been distinguished. These are 1) quartz; 2) epidote + muscovite and adularia + hematite; 3) calcite + chlorite +/hematite; 4) calcite, clay minerals and Fe-oxyhydroxide. It is observed that the surface water affect the uppermost part of the bedrock resulting in calcite dissolution, break down of pyrite and precipitation of Fe-oxyhydroxide. It is also obvious from the fracture calcite frequency that calcite dissolution is more intensive close to and within the fracture zones. There, Fe-oxyhydroxide can be found down to at least 400 m depth. This gives valuable information about the physic-chemical character of the groundwater within the bedrock. Several fracture zones have been reactivated. It is also suspected that relatively late movements have taken place causing crushing of the rock and only a slight cementation of the crushed material is visible. Some of the fracture zones correspond to mafic dikes. These zones exhibit lower hydraulic conductivity than other zones due to fracture sealing by clay minerals but also by chlorite and calcite. (author)

  6. Tribology and Microstructure of PS212 with a Cr2O3 Seal Coat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Benoy, Patricia A.; Korenyi-Both, Andras; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    PS212 is a plasma sprayed metal bonding chrome carbide coating with solid lubricant additives which has lubricating properties at temperatures up to about 900 deg C. The coating is diamond ground to achieve an acceptable tribological surface. But, as with many plasma spray coatings, PS212 is not fully-dense. In this study, a chromium oxide base seal coating is used in an attempt to seal any porosity that is open to the surface of the PS212 coating, and to study the effect of the sealant on the tribological properties of PS212. The results indicate that the seal coating reduces friction and wear when it is applied and then diamond ground leaving a thin layer of seal coating which fills in the surface pits of the PS212 coating.

  7. A fully sealed plastic chip for multiplex PCR and its application in bacteria identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Youchun; Yan, He; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Kewei; Lu, Ying; Ren, Yonghong; Wang, Hui; Wang, Shan; Xing, Wanli

    2015-07-07

    Multiplex PCR is an effective tool for simultaneous multiple target detection but is limited by the intrinsic interference and competition among primer pairs when it is performed in one reaction tube. Dividing a multiplex PCR into many single PCRs is a simple strategy to overcome this issue. Here, we constructed a plastic, easy-to-use, fully sealed multiplex PCR chip based on reversible centrifugation for the simultaneous detection of 63 target DNA sequences. The structure of the chip is quite simple, which contains sine-shaped infusing channels and a number of reaction chambers connecting to one side of these channels. Primer pairs for multiplex PCR were sequentially preloaded in the different reaction chambers, and the chip was enclosed with PCR-compatible adhesive tape. For usage, the PCR master mix containing a DNA template is pipetted into the infusing channels and centrifuged into the reaction chambers, leaving the infusing channels filled with air to avoid cross-contamination of the different chambers. Then, the chip is sealed and placed on a flat thermal cycler for PCR. Finally, amplification products can be detected in situ using a fluorescence scanner or recovered by reverse centrifugation for further analyses. Therefore, our chip possesses two functions: 1) it can be used for multi-target detection based on end-point in situ fluorescence detection; and 2) it can work as a sample preparation unit for analyses that need multiplex PCR such as hybridization and target sequencing. The performance of this chip was carefully examined and further illustrated in the identification of 8 pathogenic bacterial genomic DNA samples and 13 drug-resistance genes. Due to simplicity of its structure and operation, accuracy and generality, high-throughput capacity, and versatile functions (i.e., for in situ detection and sample preparation), our multiplex PCR chip has great potential in clinical diagnostics and nucleic acid-based point-of-care testing.

  8. Mechanical seal with textured sidewall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khonsari, Michael M.; Xiao, Nian

    2017-02-14

    The present invention discloses a mating ring, a primary ring, and associated mechanical seal having superior heat transfer and wear characteristics. According to an exemplary embodiment of the present invention, one or more dimples are formed onto the cylindrical outer surface of a mating ring sidewall and/or a primary ring sidewall. A stationary mating ring for a mechanical seal assembly is disclosed. Such a mating ring comprises an annular body having a central axis and a sealing face, wherein a plurality of dimples are formed into the outer circumferential surface of the annular body such that the exposed circumferential surface area of the annular body is increased. The texture added to the sidewall of the mating ring yields superior heat transfer and wear characteristics.

  9. Turbine interstage seal with self-balancing capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jacob A; Jones, Russell B; Sexton, Thomas D

    2017-09-26

    An interstage seal for a turbine of a gas turbine engine, the interstage seal having a seal carrier with an axial extending seal tooth movable with a stator of the engine, and a rotor with a seal surface that forms the interstage seal with the seal tooth, where a magnetic force produced by two magnets and a gas force produced by a gas pressure acting on the seal carrier forms a balancing force to maintain a close clearance of the seal without the seal tooth contacting the rotor seal surfaces during engine operation. In other embodiments, two pairs of magnets produce first and second magnetic forces that balance the seal in the engine.

  10. Self-acting and hydrodynamic shaft seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1973-01-01

    Self-acting and hydrodynamic seals are described. The analytical procedures are outlined for obtaining a seal force balance and the operating film thickness. Particular attention is given to primary ring response (seal vibration) to rotating seat face runout. This response analysis revealed three different vibration modes. Proposed applications of self-acting seals in gas turbine engines and in rocket vehicle turbopumps are described. Also experimental data on self-acting face seals operating under simulated gas turbine conditions are given; these data show the feasibility of operating the seal at conditions of 345 newtons per square centimeter (500 psi) and 152 meters per second (500 ft/sec) sliding speed.

  11. Sealed source peer review plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, Alexander; Leonard, Lee; Burns, Ron

    2009-01-01

    Sealed sources are known quantities of radioactive materials that have been encapsulated in quantities that produce known radiation fields. Sealed sources have multiple uses ranging from instrument calibration sources to sources that produce radiation fields for experimental applications. The Off-Site Source Recovery (OSR) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), created in 1999, under the direction of the Waste Management Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque has been assigned the responsibility to recover and manage excess and unwanted radioactive sealed sources from the public and private sector. LANL intends to ship drums containing qualified sealed sources to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Prior to shipping, these drums must be characterized with respect to radiological content and other parameters. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that ten radionulcides be quantified and reported for every container of waste to be disposed in the WIPP. The methods traditionally approved by the EPA include non-destructive assay (NDA) in accordance with Appendix A of the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (DOE, 2002) (CH WAC). However, because of the nature and pedigree of historical records for sealed sources and the technical infeasibility of performing NDA on these sources, LANL proposes to characterize the content of these waste drums using qualified existing radiological data in lieu of direct measurement. This plan describes the process and documentation requirements for the use of the peer review process to qualify existing data for sealed radiological sources in lieu of perfonning radioassay. The peer review process will be performed in accordance with criteria provided in 40 CFR (section) 194.22 which specifies the use of the NUREG 1297 guidelines. The plan defines the management approach, resources, schedule, and technical requirements

  12. Controlling fugitive emissions from mechanical seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, W.V.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that enactment of the 1990 Federal Clean Air Amendments will sharply focus efforts in the process industries to reduce fugitive emissions. Moreover, state and local governments may be imposing stricter laws and regulations which will affect allowable fugitive emissions from U.S. refineries and process plants. Plants outside the U.S. have similar concerns. Clearly, mechanical seals for process pumps represent an enormous population and is one category of equipment destined for careful evaluation as a means to control fugitive emissions. Fugitive are unintentional emissions from valves, pumps, flanges, compressors, etc., as opposed to point-source emissions from stacks, vents and flares. Fugitive emissions do not occur as a part of normal plant operations, but result from the effects of: Malfunctions, Age, Lack of proper maintenance, Operator error, Improper equipment specification, Use of inferior technology, and externally caused damage

  13. Secondary seal effects in hydrostatic non-contact seals for reactor coolant pump shaft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, T.; Koga, T.; Tanoue, H.; Hirabayashi, H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents a seal flow analysis in a hydrostatic non-contact seal for a PWR coolant pump shaft. A description is given of the non-contact seal for the reactor coolant pump. Results are presented for a distortion analysis of the seal ring, along with the seal flow characteristics and the contact pressure profiles of the secondary seals. The results of the work confirm previously reported findings that the seal ring distortion is sensitive to the o-ring location (which was placed between the ceramic seal face and the seal ring retainer). The paper concludes that the seal flow characteristics and the tracking performance depend upon the dynamic properties of the secondary seal. (U.K.)

  14. Preparing for faster filling

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Following the programmed technical stop last week, operators focussed on preparing the machine for faster filling, which includes multibunch injection and a faster pre-cycle phase.   The LHC1 screen shot during the first multibunch injection operation. The LHC operational schedule incorporates a technical stop for preventive maintenance roughly every six weeks of stable operation, during which several interventions on the various machines are carried out. Last week these included the replacement of a faulty magnet in the SPS pre-accelerator, which required the subsequent re-setting of the system of particle extraction and transfer to the LHC. At the end of last week, all the machines were handed back for operation and work could start on accommodating all the changes made into the complex systems in order for normal operation to be resumed. These ‘recovery’ operations continued through the weekend and into this week. At the beginning of this week, operators succeeded in pro...

  15. Active bypass flow control for a seal in a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Todd A.; Kimmel, Keith D.

    2017-01-10

    An active bypass flow control system for controlling bypass compressed air based upon leakage flow of compressed air flowing past an outer balance seal between a stator and rotor of a first stage of a gas turbine in a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The active bypass flow control system is an adjustable system in which one or more metering devices may be used to control the flow of bypass compressed air as the flow of compressed air past the outer balance seal changes over time as the outer balance seal between the rim cavity and the cooling cavity wears. In at least one embodiment, the metering device may include a valve formed from one or more pins movable between open and closed positions in which the one pin at least partially bisects the bypass channel to regulate flow.

  16. Active bypass flow control for a seal in a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Todd A.; Kimmel, Keith D.

    2017-03-14

    An active bypass flow control system for controlling bypass compressed air based upon leakage flow of compressed air flowing past an outer balance seal between a stator and rotor of a first stage of a gas turbine in a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The active bypass flow control system is an adjustable system in which one or more metering devices may be used to control the flow of bypass compressed air as the flow of compressed air past the outer balance seal changes over time as the outer balance seal between the rim cavity and the cooling cavity wears In at least one embodiment, the metering device may include an annular ring having at least one metering orifice extending therethrough, whereby alignment of the metering orifice with the outlet may be adjustable to change a cross-sectional area of an opening of aligned portions of the outlet and the metering orifice.

  17. Amphibious hearing in ringed seals (Pusa hispida): underwater audiograms, aerial audiograms and critical ratio measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Jillian M; Southall, Brandon L; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2015-07-01

    Ringed seals (Pusa hispida) are semi-aquatic marine mammals with a circumpolar Arctic distribution. In this study, we investigate the amphibious hearing capabilities of ringed seals to provide auditory profiles for this species across the full range of hearing. Using psychophysical methods with two trained ringed seals, detection thresholds for narrowband signals were measured under quiet, carefully controlled environmental conditions to generate aerial and underwater audiograms. Masked underwater thresholds were measured in the presence of octave-band noise to determine critical ratios. Results indicate that ringed seals possess hearing abilities comparable to those of spotted seals (Phoca largha) and harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), and considerably better than previously reported for ringed and harp seals. Best sensitivity was 49 dB re. 1 µPa (12.8 kHz) in water, and -12 dB re. 20 µPa (4.5 kHz) in air, rivaling the acute hearing abilities of some fully aquatic and terrestrial species in their respective media. Critical ratio measurements ranged from 14 dB at 0.1 kHz to 31 dB at 25.6 kHz, suggesting that ringed seals--like other true seals--can efficiently extract signals from background noise across a broad range of frequencies. The work described herein extends similar research on amphibious hearing in spotted seals recently published by the authors. These parallel studies enhance our knowledge of the auditory capabilities of ice-living seals, and inform effective management strategies for these and related species in a rapidly changing Arctic environment. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  19. The behavioural response of Australian fur seals to motor boat noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy S Tripovich

    Full Text Available Australian fur seals breed on thirteen islands located in the Bass Strait, Australia. Land access to these islands is restricted, minimising human presence but boat access is still permissible with limitations on approach distances. Thirty-two controlled noise exposure experiments were conducted on breeding Australian fur seals to determine their behavioural response to controlled in-air motor boat noise on Kanowna Island (39°10'S, 146°18'E. Our results show there were significant differences in the seals' behaviour at low (64-70 dB versus high (75-85 dB sound levels, with seals orientating themselves towards or physically moving away from the louder boat noise at three different sound levels. Furthermore, seals responded more aggressively with one another and were more alert when they heard louder boat noise. Australian fur seals demonstrated plasticity in their vocal responses to boat noise with calls being significantly different between the various sound intensities and barks tending to get faster as the boat noise got louder. These results suggest that Australian fur seals on Kanowna Island show behavioural disturbance to high level boat noise. Consequently, it is recommended that an appropriate level of received boat sound emissions at breeding fur seal colonies be below 74 dB and that these findings be taken into account when evaluating appropriate approach distances and speed limits for boats.

  20. Knife-edge seal for vacuum bagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Cam actuated clamps pinch bagging material between long knife edge (mounted to clamps) and high temperature rubber cushion bonded to baseplate. No adhesive, tape, or sealing groove is needed to seal edge of bagging sheet against base plate.

  1. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Crittercam video

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project investigates foraging behavior of Hawaiian monk seals by conducting telemetry studies. During these studies, live seals are instrumented with dive...

  2. Film riding seals for rotary machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Sarawate, Neelesh Nandkumar; Wolfe, Christopher Edward; Ruggiero, Eric John; Raj Mohan, Vivek Raja

    2017-03-07

    A seal assembly for a rotary machine is provided. The seal assembly includes multiple sealing device segments disposed circumferentially intermediate to a stationary housing and a rotor. Each of the segments includes a shoe plate with a forward-shoe section and an aft-shoe section having one or more labyrinth teeth therebetween facing the rotor. The sealing device includes a stator interface element having a groove or slot for allowing disposal of a spline seal for preventing segment leakages. The sealing device segment also includes multiple bellow springs or flexures connected to the shoe plate and to the stator interface element. Further, the sealing device segments include a secondary seal integrated with the stator interface element at one end and positioned about the multiple bellow springs or flexures and the shoe plate at the other end.

  3. Legacy HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Ultrasound Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ultrasound images for measuring the condition of juvenile seals at Laysan Island during 2009-2010, collected when seals were handled as part of the De-Worming Project

  4. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Telemetry Tag Deployments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project investigates foraging behavior of Hawaiian monk seals by conducting telemetry studies. During these studies, live seals are instrumented with dive...

  5. Legacy HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seals Observers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set documents observers that have collected monk seal data as part of the ongoing monk seal population assessment efforts by PSD personnel and cooperating...

  6. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Handling Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records for all handling and measurement of Hawaiian monk seals since 1981. Live seals are handled and measured during a variety of events...

  7. Recent advances in magnetic liquid sealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, K.; Stahl, P.; Bottenberg, W.; True, D.; Martis, G.; Zook, C.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper recent work in design and testing of two special magnetic liquid seals extending the state-of-the-art of ferrofluidic sealing is discussed. These custom seals are a moving belt edge seal and an exclusion seal. The first seal provides a hermetic barrier to solid particulates expected to be present in enclosed nuclear environments. The second seal is used on a magnetic disk drive spindle and reduces the particulate contaminants in the memory disk pack area by up to three orders of magnitude. In addition, bearing life in the spindle is found to be doubled due to reduction of operating temperature. The fundamentals of magnetic fluid sealing are presented in terms of magnetic circuit design and physical properties of ferrofluids

  8. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Argos Location Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project investigates foraging behavior of Hawaiian monk seals by conducting telemetry studies. During these studies, live seals are instrumented with satellite...

  9. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Entanglement data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains records of all entanglements of Hawaiian monk seals in marine debris. The data set comprises records of seals entangled by derelict fishing...

  10. Seal Apparatus and Methods to Manufacture Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    In some implementations, apparatus and methods are provided through which a dynamic cryogenic seal is manufactured. In some implementations, the seal includes a retainer and a spring-seal assembly, the assembly being comprised of a main spring housing and fluorine-containing polymer seals. In some implementations, either a radial seal, or an axial (or "piston seal") is provided. In some implementations, methods of manufacturing the dynamic cryogenic seal are also provided. In some implementations, the methods include assembling the components while either heated or cooled, taking advantage of thermal expansion and contraction, such that there is a strong interference fit between the components at room temperature. In some implementations, this process ensures that the weaker fluorine-containing polymer seal is forced to expand and contract with the stronger retainer and spring and is under constant preload. In some implementations, the fluorine-containing polymer is therefore fluidized and retained, and can not lift off.

  11. Geological conditions for lateral sealing of active faults and relevant research methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Fu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers worked a lot on geologic conditions for lateral sealing of faults, but none of their studies took the effect of internal structures of fault zones on the lateral sealing capacity of faults. Therefore, the lateral sealing of active faults has rarely been discussed. In this paper, based on the analysis of the composition and structure characteristics of fault fillings, the geological conditions for lateral sealing of active faults and relevant research method were discussed in reference to the lateral sealing mechanisms of inactive fault rocks. It is shown that, in order to satisfy geologically the lateral sealing of active faults, the faults should be antithetic and the faulted strata should be mainly composed of mudstone, so that the displacement pressure of fault fillings is higher than or equal to that of reservoir rocks in oil and gas migration block. Then, a research method for the lateral sealing of active faults was established by comparing the displacement pressure of fillings in the fault with that of reservoir rocks in oil and gas migration block. This method was applied to three antithetic faults (F1, F2 and F3 in No. 1 structure of the Nanpu Sag, Bohai Bay Basin. As revealed, the fillings of these three active faults were mostly argillaceous at the stage of natural gas accumulation (the late stage of Neogene Minghuazhen Fm sedimentation, and their displacement pressures were higher than that of reservoir rocks in the first member of Paleogene Dongying Fm (F1 and F3 and the Neogene Guantao Fm (F2. Accordingly, they are laterally sealed for natural gas, which is conducive to the accumulation and preservation of natural gas. Industrial gas flow has been produced from the first member of Paleogene Dongying Fm in Well Np101, the Guantao Fm in Well Np1-2 and the first member of Paleogene Dongying Fm in Well Np1, which is in agreement with the analysis result. It is verified that this method is feasible for investigating the

  12. Feasibility of using microencapsulated phase change materials as filler for improving low temperature performance of rubber sealing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Avinash; Shubin, Sergey N; Alcock, Ben; Freidin, Alexander B; Thorkildsen, Brede; Echtermeyer, Andreas T

    2017-11-01

    The feasibility of a novel composite rubber sealing material to improve sealing under transient cooling (in a so-called blowdown scenario) is investigated here. A composite of hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) filled with Micro Encapsulated Phase Change Materials (MEPCM) is described. The fillers contain phase change materials that release heat during the phase transformation from liquid to solid while cooling. This exotherm locally heats the rubber and may improve the function of the seal during a blowdown event. A representative HNBR-MEPCM composite was made and the critical thermal and mechanical properties were obtained by simulating the temperature distribution during a blowdown event. Simulations predict that the MEPCM composites can delay the temperature decrease in a region of the seal during the transient blowdown. A sensitivity analysis of material properties is also presented which highlights possible avenues of improvement of the MEPCMs for sealing applications.

  13. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy intrinsic seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinger, C.T.; Burr, T.; Vnuk, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    We have begun to quantify the ability of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to detect the removal and replacement of the lid of a simulated special nuclear materials drum. Conceptually, the acoustic spectrum of a container establishcs a baseline fingerprint, which we refer to as an intrinsic seal, for the container. Simply removing and replacing the lid changes some of the resonant frequencies because it is impossible to exactly duplicate all of the stress patterns between the lid and container. Preliminary qualitative results suggested that the ARS intrinsic seal could discriminate between cases where a lid has or has not been removed. The present work is directed at quantifying the utility of the ARS intrinsic seal technique, including the technique's sensitivity to ''nuisance'' effects, such as temperature swings, movement of the container, and placement of the transducers. These early quantitative tests support the potential of the ARS intrinsic seal application, but also reveal a possible sensitivity to nuisance effects that could limit environments or conditions under which the technique is effective

  14. Pre-sealing risk analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensminger, D.A.; Hough, M.E.; Oston, S.G.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes studies of accidents involving high-level radioactive waste before sealing the waste into a repository. The report summarizes work done in this area during Fiscal Year 1978 and supplements previous work. Models of accident probability, severity, and consequences are refined and extended

  15. Reactor coolant pump seals: improving their performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pothier, N.E.; Metcalfe, R.

    1986-06-01

    Large CANDU plants are benefitting from transient-resistant four-year reliable reactor coolant pump seal lifetimes, a direct result of AECL's 20-year comprehensive seal improvement program involving R and D staff, manufacturers, and plant designers and operators. An overview of this program is presented, which covers seal modification design, testing, post-service examination, specialized maintenance and quality control. The relevancy of this technology to Light Water Reactor Coolant Pump Seals is also discussed

  16. Development of simplified rotating plug seal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueta, M.; Ichimiya, M.; Kanaoka, T.; Sekiya, H.; Ueda, S.; Ishibashi, S.

    1991-01-01

    We studied a compact and simplified rotating plug seal structure and conducted experiments for key elements of the concept such us the mechanical seal structure and sodium deposit prevention system. Good characteristics were confirmed for the mechanical seal structure, which utilizes an elastomer seal and thin lathe bearing. Applicability of the density barrier concept was also confirmed as the sodium deposit prevention system. This concept can be applied to actual plants. (author)

  17. Sealed Attics Exposed to Two Years of Weathering in a Hot and Humid Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, William A [ORNL; Railkar, Sudhir [GAF; Shiao, Ming C [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Field studies in a hot, humid climate were conducted to investigate the thermal and hygrothermal performance of ventilated attics and non-ventilated semi-conditioned attics sealed with open-cell and with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam insulation. Moisture pin measurements made in the sheathing and absolute humidity sensor data from inside the foam and from the attic air show that moisture is being stored in the foam. The moisture in the foam diffuses to and from the sheathing dependent on the pressure gradient at the foam-sheathing interface which is driven by the irradiance and night-sky radiation. Ventilated attics in the same hot, humid climate showed less moisture movement in the sheathing than those sealed with either open- or closed-cell spray foam. In the ventilated attics the relative humidity drops as the attic air warms; however, the opposite was observed in the sealed attics. Peaks in measured relative humidity in excess of 80 90% and occasionally near saturation (i.e., 100%) were observed from solar noon till about 8 PM on hot, humid days. The conditioned space of the test facility is heated and cooled by an air-to-air heat pump. Therefore the partial pressure of the indoor air during peak irradiance is almost always less than that observed in the sealed attics. Field data will be presented to bring to light the critical humidity control issues in sealed attics exposed to hot, humid climates.

  18. Piston rod seal for a Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal for a Stirling engine, a hydrostatic bearing and differential pressure regulating valve are utilized to provide for a low pressure differential across a rubbing seal between the hydrogen and oil so as to reduce wear on the seal.

  19. 19 CFR 113.25 - Seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... signatures of principal and surety, if individuals, and the corporate seal shall be affixed close to the... law of the state in which executed. However, when the charter or governing statute of a corporation requires its acts to be evidenced by its corporate seal, such seal is required. ...

  20. Ergonomics and safety of manual bag sealing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.D. de; Bosch, T.; Eikhout, S.M.; Vink, P.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of seals is used to close bags. Each seal has advantages and disadvantages. For shop assistants sealing bags could be a repetitive physically demanding action. Opening and closing the bags again can cause some discomfort or annoyance for consumers. Besides, it is an activity which can

  1. Improved sealing for in-core systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunford, S.

    1989-01-01

    The in-core instrumentation sealing nozzles designed by Framatome have three mechanical seals in series instead of the one traditional seal, and are pressurized by simply tightening up the nozzle covers. They have been installed from the start on all Framatome PWRs, as well as having been backfitted on Belgium and Yugoslavian units and chosen for the Chinese Qinshan plant. (author)

  2. Borehole sealing with highly compactd Na bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1981-12-01

    This report describes the use of highly compacted Na bentonite for borehole plugging. Bentonites have an extremely low permeability and a low diffusivity, and a swelling ability which produces a nonleaching boundary between clay and rock if the initial bulk density of the bentonite is sufficiently high. The suggested technique, which is applicable to long vertical, and inclined, as well as horizontal boreholes, is based on the use of perforated copper pipes to insert elements of compacted bentonite. Such pipe segments are connected at the rock surface and successively inserted in the hole. When the hole is equipped, the clay takes up water spontaneously and swells through the perforation, and ultimately forms an almost completely homogenous clay core. It embeds the pipe which is left in the hole. Several tests were conducted in the laboratory and one field test was run in Stripa. They all showed that a gel soon fills the slot between the pipe and the confinement which had the form of metal pipes in the laboratory investigations. Subsequently, more clay migrates through the perforation and produces a stiff clay filling in the slot. The redistribution of minerals, leading ultimately to a high degree of homogeneity, can be described as a diffusion process. The rate of redistribution depends on the joint geometry and water flow pattern in the rock. In the rock with an average joint frequence of one per meter or higher, very good homogeneity and sealing ability of the clay are expected within a few months after the application of the plug. (author)

  3. Comparative study on two different seal surface structure for reactor pressure vessel sealing behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jun; Xiong Guangming; Deng Xiaoyun

    2014-01-01

    The seal surface structure is very important to reactor pressure vessel (RPV) sealing behavior. In this paper, two 3-D RPV sealing analysis finite models have been established with different seal surface structures, in order to study the influence of two structures. The separation of RPV upper and lower flanges, bolt loads and etc. are obtained, which are used to evaluate the sealing behavior of the RPV. Meanwhile, the comparative analysis of safety margin of two seal surface structural had been done, which provides the theoretical basis for RPV seal structure design optimization. (authors)

  4. Three-dimensional evaluation of effectiveness of hand and rotary instrumentation for retreatment of canals filled with different materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Mohammad; Qualtrough, Alison; Silikas, Nick

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the remaining filling volume of different obturation materials from root-filled extracted teeth by using 2 removal techniques. Eighty single-rooted teeth were collected and decoronated, and the root canal was prepared by using the ProTaper nickel-titanium rotary files. The teeth were randomly allocated into 4 groups, and each group was obturated by using a different material. Group 1 was filled with gutta-percha and TubliSeal sealer, group 2 was filled with EndoRez points and EndoRez sealer, group 3 was filled with RealSeal points and RealSeal sealer, and Group 4 was filled with a gutta-percha point and GuttaFlow sealer. Teeth were scanned with a micro-computed tomography scan, and then root fillings were removed by using ProTaper retreatment files or hand K-files. Teeth were scanned again, and volume measurements were carried out with micro-computed tomography software. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between the 2 removal techniques for gutta-percha and for both techniques between gutta-percha and the other groups. The present study showed that all tested filling materials were not completely removed during retreatment by using hand or rotary files. Gutta-percha was more efficiently removed by using hand K-files.

  5. Sealing performance of a magnetic fluid seal for rotary blood pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Sayaka; Kano, Kentaro; Okamoto, Eiji; Murabayashi, Shun; Nishimura, Ikuya; Higuchi, Taka-Aki

    2009-09-01

    A magnetic fluid (MF) for a rotary blood pump seal enables mechanical contact-free rotation of the shaft and, hence, has excellent durability. The performance of a MF seal, however, has been reported to decrease in liquids. We have developed a MF seal that has a "shield" mechanism and a new MF with a higher magnetization of 47.9 kA/m. The sealing performance of the MF seal installed in a rotary blood pump was studied. Under the condition of continuous flow, the MF seal remained in perfect condition against a pressure of 298 mm Hg (pump flow rate: 3.96 L/min). The seal was also perfect against a pressure of 170 mm Hg in a continuous flow of 3.9 L/min for 275 days. We have developed a MF seal that works in liquid against clinically used pressures. The MF seal is promising as a shaft seal for rotary blood pumps.

  6. Synthetic materials for sealing ventilation structures in mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhanov, V V; Putilina, O.N.; Shubina, L Ya [Donetskii NII Gigeny Truda i Profzabolevanii (USSR)

    1990-11-01

    Discusses use of polyurethanes and phenol-formaldehydes for sealing ventilation barriers and voids in underground workings in coal mines. Standard mixtures used in the USSR, their composition and components are comparatively evaluated. The evaluations concentrate on health hazards to coal miners. The following aspects of polyurethane and phenol-formaldehyde use are analyzed: noxious components, component storage, mixing, foaming, hardening, emission of vapors and gases from hardening mixture, time dependence of noxious emission, effects of air velocity, air humidity and other factors on noxious emission, methods for reducing the noxious emission, health hazards to coal miners associated with the noxious emission.

  7. Verification of Drift Seal Systems at the Morsleben Repository, Germany - Proof of Technical Feasibility and Functionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollrath, Juergen; Mauke, R.; Siemann, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Morsleben repository (ERAM) for low- and intermediate-level mainly short-lived radioactive wastes is located in a former salt mine. The closure concept is based on extensive backfilling with salt concrete complemented by seals that should prevent the penetration of solution into the waste emplacement areas and the emission of radionuclides out of these areas. The drift seals located in rock salt are made up of one or more segments of salt concrete in lengths between 25 m and 30 m. The sealing structure consists of three components: the seal body made of salt concrete, the contact zone between the seal body and the surrounding rock salt and the rock salt excavation damaged zone (EDZ). To demonstrate the feasibility of constructing such a seal structure an in-situ experiment is performed and a test drift and an accompanying parallel drift have been excavated for the experiment. The trial construction also comprises geotechnical instrumentation for stress, strain, displacement, temperature and pore pressure measurements and a comprehensive site investigation programme has been carried out, notably with regard to the stress state and the convergence behaviour of the surrounding rock salt. In addition to in-situ measurements, test specimens from different areas of the construction have been drilled and tested (strength and permeability). The pressure chamber has also been filled with brine solution to ascertain the permeability of the whole sealing structure. Another in-situ experiment is planned for the seal to be built in the non-creeping anhydrite. Both in-situ experiments will aid to prove the technical feasibility and functionality of the drift seal systems

  8. Turbine Seal Research at NASA GRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Delgado, Irebert R.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Low-leakage, long-life turbomachinery seals are important to both Space and Aeronautics Missions. (1) Increased payload capability (2) Decreased specific fuel consumption and emissions (3) Decreased direct operating costs. NASA GRC has a history of significant accomplishments and collaboration with industry and academia in seals research. NASA's unique, state-of-the-art High Temperature, High Speed Turbine Seal Test Facility is an asset to the U.S. Engine / Seal Community. Current focus is on developing experimentally validated compliant, non-contacting, high temperature seal designs, analysis, and design methodologies to enable commercialization.

  9. Periapical repair after root canal filling with different root canal sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Tanomaru, Juliane Maria Guerreiro; Leonardo, Mario Roberto; da Silva, Lea Assed Bezerra

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate periapical repair after root canal filling with different endodontic sealers. Sixty-four root canals from dog s teeth were filled, divided into 4 groups (n=16). Root canals were instrumented with K-type files and irrigated with 1% sodium hypochlorite solution. Root canals were filled in the same session by active lateral condensation of the cones and sealers: Intrafill, AH Plus, Roeko Seal and Resilon/Epiphany System. After 90 days, the animals were euthanized and the tissues to be evaluated were processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. For histopathological analysis, the following parameters were evaluated: inflammatory process, mineralized tissue resorption, and apical mineralized tissue deposition. Histopathological analysis demonstrated that Intrafill had less favorable results in terms of apical and periapical repair, compared to the other sealers (p0.05). In conclusion, AH Plus and the materials Roeko Seal and Epiphany are good options for clinical use in Endodontics.

  10. The Effect of Canal Contamination with Saliva on Apical Sealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sabaghi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Root canal obturation aims at sealing the root canal system to prevent re-contamination of canal and periapical space. Presence of moisture in canal before obturation may posit a negative effect on the quality of canal sealing. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the effect of canal contamination with saliva on apical microleakage. Methods: In this laboratory study, 58 human uni-root teeth were cleaned and shaped for obturation with gutta percha and sealer AH26. In the case group, specimens were contaminated with human saliva immediately before obturation, whereas the teeth in the control group were kept dry. All canals were filled by lateral condensation technique. Moreover, the teeth were placed in methylene blue dye for 3 days. Dye penetration was measured using a stereomicrosope. As a matter of fact, the study data were analyzed via utilizing t-test. Results: A significant difference was found between the two groups in regard with the apical leakage(P<0.001. The microleakage mean of dye in the dry group was 3/48mm, whereas it was 6/36mm in the saliva contaminated group. Conclusion: The study findings revealed that complete drying of canal can improve apical sealing.

  11. Double angle seal forming lubricant film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, William D.

    1984-01-01

    A lubricated piston rod seal which inhibits gas leaking from a high pressure chamber on one side of the seal to a low pressure chamber on the other side of the seal. A liquid is supplied to the surface of the piston rod on the low pressure side of the seal. This liquid acts as lubricant for the seal and provides cooling for the rod. The seal, which can be a plastic, elastomer or other material with low elastic modulus, is designed to positively pump lubricant through the piston rod/seal interface in both directions when the piston rod is reciprocating. The capacity of the seal to pump lubricant from the low pressure side to the high pressure side is less than its capacity to pump lubricant from the high pressure side to the low pressure side which ensures that there is zero net flow of lubricant to the high pressure side of the seal. The film of lubricant between the seal and the rod minimizes any sliding contact and prevents the leakage of gas. Under static conditions gas leakage is prevented by direct contact between the seal and the rod.

  12. Insecurity of imperfect quantum bit seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, H.F.

    2006-01-01

    Quantum bit seal is a way to encode a classical bit quantum mechanically so that everyone can obtain non-zero information on the value of the bit. Moreover, such an attempt should have a high chance of being detected by an authorized verifier. Surely, a reader looks for a way to get the maximum amount of information on the sealed bit and at the same time to minimize her chance of being caught. And a verifier picks a sealing scheme that maximizes his chance of detecting any measurement of the sealed bit. Here, I report a strategy that passes all measurement detection procedures at least half of the time for all quantum bit sealing schemes. This strategy also minimizes a reader's chance of being caught under a certain scheme. In this way, I extend the result of Bechmann-Pasquinucci et al. by proving that quantum seal is insecure in the case of imperfect sealed bit recovery

  13. Development of the seal for nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Feng; Lu Zhao; Zhao Yonggang; Zhang Qixin; Xiao Xuefu

    2000-01-01

    Two kinds of double cap metallic seal and an adhesive seal are developed for the purpose of the accounting for and control of nuclear material. Two kinds of double cap metallic seal are made of stainless steel and copper, respectively and the self-locked technique is used. The number and the random pattern are carved out side and in side of a cap, respectively, for the seal. The random pattern carved inside of a cap for seal is taken a picture using numeral camera and memorized in computer. Special software is developed for verification of the random pattern memorized in computer. The adhesive seal is made of special adhesive paper for purpose of security, and a special pattern guarded against falsification is printed on seal paper using ultraviolet fluorescent light technique

  14. Core disruptive accident margin seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, J.; Belsick, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for sealing the annulus defined between a substantially cylindrical rotatable first riser assembly and plug combination disposed in a substantially cylindrical second riser assembly and plug combination of a nuclear reactor system. The apparatus comprises a flexible member disposed between the first and second riser components and attached to a metal member which is attached to an actuating mechanism. When the actuating mechanism is not actuated, the flexible member does not contact the riser components thus allowing the free rotation of the riser components. When desired, the actuating mechanism causes the flexible member to contact the first and second riser components in a manner to block the annulus defined between the riser components, thereby sealing the annulus between the riser components

  15. Transport of multiassembly sealed canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, R.D.; Lehnert, R.A.; Rosa, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    A significant portion of the commercial spent nuclear fuel in dry storage in the US will be stored in multiassembly sealed canisters before the DOE begins accepting fuel from utilities in 1998. This paper reports that it is desirable from economic and ALARA perspectives to transfer these canisters directly from the plant to the MRS. To this end, it is necessary that the multiassembly sealed canisters, which have been licensed for storage under 10CFR72, be qualified for shipment within a suitable shipping cask under the rules of 10CFR71. Preliminary work performed to date indicates that it is feasible to license a current canister design for transportation, and work is proceeding on obtaining NRC approval

  16. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVault, Robert C.; McConnell, Benjamin W.; Phillips, Benjamin A.

    1996-01-01

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit.

  17. Fabrication of sealed radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mars, Jean.

    1977-01-01

    The description is given for fabricating a sealed radiation source, consisting in depositing on a metal substrate a thin active coat of a radioelement, termed first coat, submitting this coated substrate to an oxidation treatment in order to obtain on the first coat an inactive coat of an oxide of the metal, termed second coat, and depositing a coat of varnish on this second inactive coat [fr

  18. Filter to be tightly installed in a room as a partition and which can be filled with a contact material susceptible of being poured e.g. activated charcoal for cleaning especially radioactive air or gases in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    The filter is designed in such manner that it will resist all loads - including earthquake - without loosing its operability. It consists of a box formed by stable corner irons filled with absorbing material and bounded on two sides by sieves through which the radioactive gases can flow in and out. The invention especially concerns the configuration of the perforations and the screwing of the casing elements to the frame as well as the arrangement in the concrete wall. Measures for fire fighting are also provided for. (UWI) [de

  19. A comparison of the sealing ability of various temporary restorative materials to seal the access cavity: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aji Markose

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In multiple-appointment root canal treatment, a temporary filling material is used to seal the access cavity between visits. The primary function of this material is to prevent the contamination of the root canal system by fluids, organic debris, and bacteria from the oral cavity. Material and Methods: A total of fifty extracted noncarious unrestored human maxillaryanterior teeth with intact crowns and roots were selected The canals were instrumented using stepback technique and sodium hypochlorite (3% and hydrogen peroxide (3% were used as irrigants for each specimen alternatively. The coronal two-thirds of each canal were flared using Gates-Glidden drills up to no. 3 size and obturated with Gutta-percha using zinc oxide-eugenol (ZnOE as sealer. The teeth were then randomly selected and divided into six groups out of which four were experimental groups and two control groups. The teeth were then immersed in 2% methylene blue dye solution for 3 days. All sealing materials and Gutta-percha were gently removed from the walls of the canal, and the entire circumference of the canal wall examined for dye penetration. Results: The lowest mean leakage was in the Fermit-N group followed by Cavit-W, ZnOE, intermediate restorative materials (IRM, and positive control. Conclusion: Fermit-N showed better sealing ability compared to cavit, ZnOE and IRM.

  20. Schematic designs for penetration seals for a repository in the Paradox Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsall, P.C.; Meyer, D.; Case, J.B.; Coons, W.E.

    1985-12-01

    The isolation of radioactive wastes in geologic repositories requires that human-made penetrations such as shafts, tunnels, or boreholes are adequately sealed. This report describes schematic seal designs for a repository in bedded salt referenced to the stratigraphy of the Paradox Basin. The designs are presented for extensive peer review and will be updated as conceptual designs if the Paraodx Basin is selected as a candidate repository site. The principal components used in the shaft seal system are concrete bulkheads interspersed with highly compacted bentonite-rich earth fill. In the repository-level tunnels and rooms, the principal material used in the seal system is crushed salt obtained from excavating the repository. It is anticipated that crushed salt will consolidate in response to closure of the repository rooms, to the degree that mechanical and hydrologic properties will eventually match those of undisturbed, intact salt. For Paradox Basin Cycle 6 salt, analyses indictate that this process will require approximately 300 years for a seal located at the base of one of the repository shafts (where there is little increase in temperature due to waste emplacement) and approximately 140 years for a seal located in a main passageway within the repository. These analyses are based on uncertain laboratory data regarding intact salt creep rates and crushed salt consolidation characteristics, and must be regarded as preliminary

  1. Seals for sealing a pressure vessel such as a nuclear reactor vessel or the like

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruns, H.J.; Huelsermann, K.H.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of seals for sealing a pressure vessel such as a nuclear reactor vessel, steam boiler vessel, or any other vessel which is desirably sealed against pressure of the type including a housing and a housing closure that present opposed vertical sealing surfaces which define the sides of a channel. The seals of the present invention comprise at least one sealing member disposed in the channel, having at least one stop face, a base portion and two shank portions extending from the base portion to form a groove-like recess. The shank portions are provided with sealing surfaces arranged to mate with the opposed vertical pressure vessel sealing surfaces. A shank-spreading wedge element also disposed in the channel has at least one stop face and is engaged in the groove-like recess with the sealing member and wedge element stop face adjacent to each other

  2. Gas-filled hohlraum fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, M.A.; Gobby, P.L.; Foreman, L.R.; Bush, H. Jr.; Gomez, V.M.; Moore, J.E.; Stone, G.F.

    1995-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) researchers have fabricated and fielded gas-filled hohlraums at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nova laser. Fill pressures of 1--5 atmospheres have been typical. We describe the production of the parts, their assembly and fielding. Emphasis is placed on the production of gas-tight polyimide windows and the fielding apparatus and procedure

  3. Cellulose insulation as an air barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, K.

    1989-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if a wet sprayed cellulose wall insulation system would function satisfactorily without use of a polyethylene air/vapour barrier. The research was designed to demonstrate that this particular insulation system would form enough of a barrier to air leakage, that moisture accumulation from condensation and vapour diffusion would be insignificant. Field work conducted in Alberta, involved construction of a conventional duplex housing unit which was insulated with wet sprayed cellulose in the exterior walls and dry loose-fill cellulose in the attic areas. One half of the unit did not have a polyethylene air/vapor barrier installed. Air leakage and exterior wall moisture levels were monitored for a year following construction. Data collected during this time indicated that the moisture added to the walls during the insulating process was dissipated over the study period. The presence of polyethylene sheeting had no significant effect on the moisture levels in either the wall or attic areas of the test structure. On the other hand, testing indicated that the use of polyethylene sheeting in the wall system did serve to improve blower door air test results. In conclusion, although the air leakage resistance apparently provided by the polyethylene sheeting is significant, the amount is probably not more than could otherwise be obtained by more careful attention to sealing procedures such as those used in the airtight drywall technique. A more important finding is that the use of polyethylene sheeting is not essential in a structure which has the degree of air leakage resistance provided by the insulation system used in this project. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.; Cachim, P.B.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.

    2014-04-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Early age sealing of buffer-rock gap by artificial wetting to induce bentonite swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, Erika; Marjavaara, Pieti

    2012-01-01

    to quantify the variation of water content, SHORE hardness and density across the buffer and gap filling. The results showed that the bentonite buffer exposed to rapid artificial wetting is able to uniformly swelling to fill the gap within the first day with 25 mm gap. When only a water-filled gap was used, a radial pressure of about 200 kPa was achieved within the first few days with gas-tight steel lid in use. The pressure reached a maximum after about 2 weeks and then gradually declined due to moisture distribution from the gap towards the centre of the buffer block. Radial cracks appeared within the blocks within the test duration, which extended the full depth and across blocks. These could tighten and seal with prolonged testing or water addition. When gap filling materials were used, such as Cebogel pellets or Ibeco Seal granules, the radial pressure had maximum values up to 600 kPa. The pressure developed at a much faster rate and was better maintained over time, without the same type of pressure drop experienced with only an air-water filled gap. It was demonstrated that water could percolate through the pellet filling to be evenly distributed within a few minutes. This was also achieved in longer tube-filling tests simulating actual deposition holes, showing that when the pellets were placed by free-falling there was enough void space to allow full water filtration. The swollen material was well confined in the gap when an axial confining pressure was used from the start of testing. In some cases, the vertical, or axial, uplift pressure due to swelling was as much as double the radial pressure. Yet this could theoretically be counter-balanced by applying a confining load or lid to prevent buffer uplift into the tunnel backfill area. These post-test assessments showed that moisture equilibrium between the gap and buffer was not reached within the short test duration as expected. The outer gap filled material could have water contents on the order of 100 to

  7. Steam Turbine Flow Path Seals (a Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuimin, V. M.

    2018-03-01

    Various types of shroud, diaphragm, and end seals preventing idle leak of working steam are installed in the flow paths of steam turbine cylinders for improving their efficiency. Widely known labyrinth seals are most extensively used in the Russian turbine construction industry. The category of labyrinth seals also includes seals with honeycomb inserts. The developers of seals with honeycomb inserts state that the use of such seals makes it possible to achieve certain gain due to smaller leaks of working fluid and more reliable operation of the system under the conditions in which the rotor rotating parts may rub against the stator elements. However, a positive effect can only be achieved if the optimal design parameters of the honeycomb structure are fulfilled with due regard to the specific features of its manufacturing technology and provided that this structure is applied in a goal-seeking manner in the seals of steam and gas turbines and compressors without degrading their vibration stability. Calculated and preliminary assessments made by experts testify that the replacement of conventional labyrinth seals by seals with honeycomb inserts alone, due to which the radial gaps in the shroud seal can be decreased from 1.5 to 0.5 mm, allows the turbine cylinder efficiency to be increased at the initial stage by approximately 1% with the corresponding gain in the turbine set power output. The use of rectangular-cellular seals may result, according to estimates made by their developers, in a further improvement of turbine efficiency by 0.5-1.0%. The labor input required to fabricate such seals is six to eight times smaller than that to fabricate labyrinth seals with honeycomb inserts. Recent years have seen the turbine construction companies of the United States and Germany advertising the use of abradable (sealing) coatings (borrowed from the gas turbine construction technology) in the turbine designs instead of labyrinth seals. The most efficient performance of

  8. Innovative technology summary report: Sealed-seam sack suits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    Sealed-seam sack suits are an improved/innovative safety and industrial hygiene technology designed to protect workers from dermal exposure to contamination. Most of these disposable, synthetic-fabric suits are more protective than cotton suits, and are also water-resistant and gas permeable. Some fabrics provide a filter to aerosols, which is important to protection against contamination, while allowing air to pass, increasing comfort level of workers. It is easier to detect body-moisture breakthrough with the disposable suits than with cotton, which is also important to protecting workers from contamination. These suits present a safe and cost-effective (6% to 17% less expensive than the baseline) alternative to traditional protective clothing. This report covers the period from October 1996 to August 1997. During that time, sealed-seam sack suits were demonstrated during daily activities under normal working conditions at the C Reactor and under environmentally controlled conditions at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

  9. Design optimization of seal structure for sealing liquid by magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tonggang; Cheng Yusheng; Yang Zhiyi

    2005-01-01

    The durability of the magnetic fluid seal clearly decreases when sealing another liquid because of the interface instability caused by the applied magnetic field and the velocity difference of the two liquids. With an intention to establish a stable interface during sealing liquid, a new magnetic fluid seal was developed in this paper. The parameters of the structure were optimized by a simulation apparatus. And the magnetic fluid seal designed based on the optimum parameters shows good performance and long life for sealing lubricating oil

  10. Oxygen Compatibility of Brass-Filled PTFE Compared to Commonly Used Fluorinated Polymers for Oxygen Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herald, Stephen D.; Frisby, Paul M.; Davis, Samuel Eddie

    2009-01-01

    Safe and reliable seal materials for high-pressure oxygen systems sometimes appear to be extinct species when sought out by oxygen systems designers. Materials that seal well are easy to find, but these materials are typically incompatible with oxygen, especially in cryogenic liquid form. This incompatibility can result in seals that leak, or much worse, seals that easily ignite and burn during use. Materials that are compatible with oxygen are easy to find, such as the long list of compatible metals, but these metallic materials are limiting as seal materials. A material that seals well and is oxygen compatible has been the big game in the designer's safari. Scientists at the Materials Combustion Research Facility (MCRF), part of NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), are constantly searching for better materials and processes to improve the safety of oxygen systems. One focus of this effort is improving the characteristics of polymers used in the presence of an oxygen enriched environment. Very few systems can be built which contain no polymeric materials; therefore, materials which have good impact resistance, low heat of combustion, high auto-ignition temperature and that maintain good mechanical properties are essential. The scientists and engineers at the Materials Combustion Research Facility, in cooperation with seal suppliers, are currently testing a new formulation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with Brass filler. This Brass-filled PTFE is showing great promise as a seal and seat material for high pressure oxygen systems. Early research has demonstrated very encouraging results, which could rank this material as one of the best fluorinated polymers ever tested. This paper will compare the data obtained for Brass-filled PTFE with other fluorinated polymers, such as TFE-Teflon (PTFE) , Kel-F 81, Viton A, Viton A-500, Fluorel , and Algoflon . A similar metal filled fluorinated polymer, Salox-M , was tested in comparison to Brass-filled PTFE to

  11. Vacuum sealing with a spiral grooved gas dynamic seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tadashi

    1979-01-01

    Gas dynamic seals with rectangular spiral grooves are studied theoretically taking the effects of sidewalls of the grooves and the effects of gas compressibility into account, and slip boundary conditions are employed. The results are compared with the existing experimental data and the validity of the theory is confirmed over a wide pressure range except for the extremely low pressures. Suggestions are made regarding the choice of the geometrical dimensions, i.e., aspect ratio, helix angle, clearance parameter and groove width ratio. (author)

  12. Globally sourced mineral commodities used in U.S. Navy SEAL gear—An illustration of U.S. net import reliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Jamie; Nassar, Nedal T.; Gambogi, Joseph; Baker, Michael S.; Jarvis, Michael T.

    2018-01-25

    A U.S. Navy SEAL (an acronym for sea, air, land) carries gear containing at least 23 nonfuel mineral commodities for which the United States is greater than 50 percent net import reliant. The graphics display the leading world producers of selected nonfuel mineral commodities used to manufacture U.S. Navy SEAL gear. SEALs are members of the U.S. Navy's special operations forces.

  13. Radiopacity of root filling materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer-Olsen, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    A method for measuring the radiopacity of root filling materials is described. Direct measurements were made of the optic density values of the materials in comparison with a standard curve relating optic density to the thickness of an aluminium step wedge exposed simultaneously. By proper selection of film and conditions for exposure and development, it was possible to obtain a near-linear standard curve which added to the safety and reproducibility of the method. The technique of radiographic assessment was modified from clinical procedures in evaluating the obturation in radiographs, and it was aimed at detecting slits or voids between the dental wall and the filling material. This radiographic assessment of potensial leakage was compared with actual in vitro lekage of dye (basic fuchsin) into the roots of filled teeth. The result of the investigation show that root filling materials display a very wide range of radiopacity, from less than 3 mm to more than 12 mm of aluminium. It also seem that tooth roots that appear to be well obturated by radiographic evaluation, stand a good chance of beeing resistant to leakage in vitro, and that the type of filling material rather than its radiographic appearance, determines the susceptibility of the filled tooth to leakage in vitro. As an appendix the report contains a survey of radiopaque additives in root filling materials

  14. Safety Distances for hydrogen filling stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthijsen, A. J. C. M.; Kooi, E. S.

    2005-07-01

    In the Netherlands there is a growing interest in using natural gas as a transport fuel. The most important drivers behind this development are formed by poor inner city air quality and the decision to close several LPG filling stations. Dwellings are not allowed within the safety distances of 45 or 110 meters from the tanker filling point of these LPG stations, depending on the capacity of the station. Another driver is global warming. We are carrying out a study on station supply, compression, storage and filling for natural gas stations, and a similar, simultaneous study on hydrogen as a followup to our risk analysis for the hydrogen filling station in Amsterdam. Here, three buses drive on hydrogen as part of the European CUTE project. Driving on natural gas is an important step in the transition to cars on hydrogen. This study was commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Spatial Planning, Housing and the Environment to advise on external safety aspects of future hydrogen filling stations. According to Dutch law homes may not be built within an individual risk contour of 10-6 per year of a dangerous object, such as a plant with hazardous materials or a filling station. An individual risk contour of 10-6 is represented by a line around a dangerous object that connects locations with an individual risk level of 10-6 per year. An individual 'located' within this contour line has a chance of one per million per year or more to be killed as a result of an accident caused by this object. The longest distance between the object and such a contour is called a 'safety distance'. A study on safety distances is now in progress for different kinds of hydrogen filling stations (e. g. gaseous and liquid hydrogen) and for different capacities, such as big, medium and small stations. The focus is on different kinds of hydrogen production and the hydrogen supply of the filling station. To decide on the design and supply of the hydrogen station, we examined the

  15. Guide to optimized replacement of equipment seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleason, J.F.

    1990-03-01

    A reevaluation of current scheduled replacement intervals of polymeric seals in plant equipment can achieve significant benefits. Information is provided which has the potential for increasing replacement intervals based on better information on how seals have performed through unique nuclear industry tests to qualify equipment, improved elastomers and increased knowledge of the failure mechanisms and related performance. The research was performed by reviewing applications of elastomeric seals in nuclear plants and practice associated with defining seal replacement intervals in the nuclear power and other industries. Performance indicators and how they predict degradation of seals were evaluated. Guidelines and a flow chart for reevaluating seal replacement intervals are provided. 29 refs., 38 figs., 8 tabs

  16. Seal analysis technology for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Liangang; Zhang Liping; Yang Yu; Zang Fenggang

    2009-01-01

    There is the coolant with radiation, high temperature and high pressure in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). It is closely correlated to RPV sealing capability whether the whole nuclear system work well or not. The aim of this paper is to study the seal analysis method and technology, such as the pre-tensioning of the bolt, elastoplastic contact and coupled technology of thermal and structure. The 3 D elastoplastic seal analysis method really and generally consider the loads and model the contact problem with friction between the contact plates. This method is easier than the specialized seal program and used widely. And it is more really than the 2 D seal analysis method. This 3 D elastoplastic seal analysis method has been successfully used in the design and analysis of RPV. (authors)

  17. Folded membrane dialyzer with mechanically sealed edges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markley, F.W.

    A semipermeable membrane is folded in accordion fashion to form a stack of pleats and the edges are sealed so as to isolate the opposite surfaces of the membrane. The stack is contained within a case that provides ports for flow of blood in contact with one surface of the membrane through channels formed by the pleats and also provides ports for flow of a dialysate through channels formed by the pleats in contact with the other surface of the membrane. The serpentine side edges of the membrane are sealed by a solidified plastic material, whereas effective mechanical means are provided to seal the end edges of the folded membrane. The mechanical means include a clamping strip which biases case sealing flanges into a sealed relationship with end portions of the membrane near the end edges, which portions extend from the stack and between the sealing flanges.

  18. Sealing method and sealing device for radioactive waste containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Koji; Otsuki, Akira

    1998-01-01

    A radioactive waste-containing body is hoisted down into a strong-material vessel opened upwardly, and a strong-material lid is hoisted down to the opening of the strong-material-vessel and welded. The strong material vessel is hoisted up and loaded on a corrosion resistant-material bottom plate placed horizontally. A corrosion resistant-material vessel having one opening end and having a corrosion resistant-material flange on the other end and previously agreed with the strong material-vessel main body is hoisted up by a hoisting device having an inserting device so that the opening of the corrosion resistant vessel is directed downwardly. The corrosion resistant vessel is press-fitted to the outside of the strong material-vessel by the inserting device while being heated by a preheater to shrink. Subsequently, the lower end of the corrosion resistant-material vessel and the corrosion resistant-material bottom plate are welded to constitute a corrosion resistant-material vessel. Then, the radioactive waste containing body can be sealed in a sealing vessel comprising the strong-material vessel and the corrosion resistant-material vessel. (N.H.)

  19. Comment on 'Quantum string seal is insecure'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Guangping

    2007-01-01

    An attack strategy was recently proposed by Chau [Phys. Rev. A 75, 012327 (2007)], which was claimed to be able to break all quantum string seal protocols. Here it will be shown that the attack cannot obtain nontrivial information and escape the detection simultaneously in a class of quantum string seal, including the one proposed by He [Int. J. Quantum Inf. 4, 677 (2006)]. Thus it is insufficient to conclude that all quantum string seals are insecure

  20. A seal analyzer for testing container integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, P.; Jenkins, C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of laboratory and production seal analyzer that offers a rapid, nondestructive method of assuring the seal integrity of virtually any type of single or double sealed container. The system can test a broad range of metal cans, drums and trays, membrane-lidded vessels, flexible pouches, aerosol containers, and glass or metal containers with twist-top lids that are used in the chemical/pesticide (hazardous materials/waste), beverage, food, medical and pharmaceutical industries

  1. Sealing a nuclear waste repository in Columbia river basalt: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodges, F.N.

    1980-01-01

    The long containment time required of repositories for nuclear waste (10 4 to 10 6 years) requires that materials used for repository seals be stable in the geologic environment of the repository and of proven longevity. A list of candidate materials for sealing a repository in Columbia River Basalts has been prepared and refined through laboratory testing. The most feasible techniques for emplacing preferred plug materials have been identified and the resultant plugs have been evaluated on the basis of design functions. Preconceptual designs for tunnel, shaft, and borehole seals consist of multiple zone plugs with each zone fulfilling one or more design functions. Zones of disturbed rock around tunnels and shafts, resulting from excavation and subsequent stress release, are zones of higher permeability and of possible fluid migration. In preliminary designs the disturbed zones are blocked by cut-off collars filled with low permeability materials

  2. Ceramic blade with tip seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezer, B.; Bhardwaj, N.K.; Jones, R.B.

    1997-08-05

    The present gas turbine engine includes a disc assembly defining a disc having a plurality of blades attached thereto. The disc has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion and the plurality of blades have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the disc. A shroud assembly is attached to the gas turbine engine and is spaced from the plurality of blades a preestablished distance forming an interface there between. Positioned in the interface is a seal having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being generally equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the plurality of blades. 4 figs.

  3. The Sealed Tube Neutron Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunnell, L.N.; Beyerle, A.; Durkee, R.; Headley, G.; Hurley, P.

    1992-01-01

    A Sealed Tube Neutron Generator (STNG) has been designed and tested at Special Technologies Laboratories (STL) in Santa Barbara, California. Unlike similar tubes that have been used for years in other applications, e.g., by the oil well logging industry, the present device was designed primarily to be part of the Associated Particle Imaging (API) system. Consequently, the size and quality of the neutron spot produced by the STNG is of primary importance. Results from initial measurements indicate that performance goals are satisfied

  4. Upgrading primary heat transport pump seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, T.; Metcalfe, R.; Rhodes, D.; McInnes, D.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the operating environment at the Bruce-A Nuclear Generating Station created the need for an upgraded Primary Heat Transport Pump (PHTP) seal. In particular, the requirement for low pressure running during more frequent start-ups exposed a weakness of the CAN2 seal and reduced its reliability. The primary concern at Bruce-A was the rotation of the CAN2 No. 2 stators in their holders. The introduction of low pressure running exacerbated this problem, giving rapid wear of the stator back face, overheating, and thermocracking. In addition, the resulting increase in friction between the stator and its holder increased stationary-side hysteresis and thereby changed the seal characteristic to the point where interseal pressure oscillations became prevalent. The resultant increased hysteresis also led to hard rubbing of the seal faces during temperature transients. An upgraded seal was required for improved reliability to avoid forced outages and to reduce maintenance costs. This paper describes this upgraded 'replacement seal' and its performance history. In spite of the 'teething' problems detailed in this paper, there have been no forced outages due to the replacement seal, and in the words of a seal maintenance worker at Bruce-A, 'it allows me to go home and sleep at night instead of worrying about seal failures.' (author)

  5. Seal for an object containing nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuerpflug, W.; Nentwich, D.

    1977-01-01

    This seal which cannot be counterfeited, specially for sealing nuclear objects, e.g. fuel rods, not only makes any damage which has taken place obvious, but makes identification according to a key possible. For this purpose a minimum number of 'particles' or small bodies, which are identical but of different permeability, are fixed inside a short tube during 'loading' of the seal in a certain or an accidental sequence. The sequence of the spheres, which represents a key, can only be determined by special electromagnetic measuring equipment. On first opening the seal, this key sequence is irrevocably destroyed. (HP) [de

  6. Quick-sealing design for radiological containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampdla, D.S.; Speer, E.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a quick-sealing assembly and method for forming an adhesive seal on opposite sides of a mechanical seal for a flexible containment bag of the type used for working with radioactively contaminated objects. The assembly includes an elongated mechanical fastener having opposing engaging members affixed at a predetermined distance from each of the elongated edges, with an adhesive layer formed between the mechanical fastener and the elongated edge such that upon engagement of the mechanical fastener and adhesive layers to opposing containment fabric, a neat triple hermetic seal is formed

  7. Quick-sealing design for radiological containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampolia, D.S.; Speer, E.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a quick-sealing assembly and method for forming an adhesive seal on opposite sides of a mechanical seal for a flexible containment bag of the type used for working with radioactively contaminated objects. The assembly includes an elongated mechanical fastener having opposing engaging members affixed at a predetermined distance from each of the elongated edges, with an adhesive layer formed between the mechanical fastener and the elongated edge such that upon engagement of the mechanical fastener and adhesive layers to opposing containment fabric, a neat triple hermetic seal is formed

  8. Reusable tamper-indicating security seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    A reusable tamper-indicating mechanical security seal for use in safeguarding nuclear material has been developed. The high-security seal displays an unpredictable, randomly selected, five-digit code each time it is used. This five digit code serves the same purpose that the serial number does for conventional non-reusable seals - a unique identifier for each use or application. The newly developed reusable seal is completely enclosed within a seamless, tamper-indicating, plastic jacket. The jacket is designed to reveal any attempts to penetrate, section or to chemically remove and replace with a counterfeit for surreptitious purposes

  9. Ductile alloys for sealing modular component interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J.; Wessell, Brian J.; James, Allister W.; Marsh, Jan H.; Gear, Paul J.

    2017-08-08

    A vane assembly (10) having: an airfoil (12) and a shroud (14) held together without metallurgical bonding there between; a channel (22) disposed circumferentially about the airfoil (12), between the airfoil (12) and the shroud (14); and a seal (20) disposed in the channel (22), wherein during operation of a turbine engine having the vane assembly (10) the seal (20) has a sufficient ductility such that a force generated on the seal (20) resulting from relative movement of the airfoil (12) and the shroud (14) is sufficient to plastically deform the seal (20).

  10. Quick-sealing design for radiological containment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampolia, Donald S.; Speer, Elmer

    1990-01-01

    A quick-sealing assembly and method for forming an adhesive seal on opposite sides of a mechanical seal for a flexible containment bag of the type used for working with radioactively contaminated objects. The assembly includes an elongated mechanical fastener having opposing engaging members affixed at a predetermined distance from each of the elongated edges, with an adhesive layer formed between the mechanical fastener and the elongated edge such that upon engagement of the mechanical fastener and adhesive layers to opposing containment fabric, a neat triple hermetic seal is formed.

  11. Properties of Sealing Materials in Groundwater Wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köser, Claus

    pellets as sealing material in groundwater wells. The way and the pattern, in which bentonite pellets are deposited, have been shown to have an effect on the swelling pressure of the bentonite seal. During the transport phase of pellets from the terrain to a given sedimentation depth, a sorting process......) into densities for clay/water systems has been developed. This method has successfully been used to evaluate e.g., macroporosity, homogenization of the bentonite seal during the hydration of water, hydraulic conductivity and the creation of channels in the bentonite seals. Based on the results obtained...

  12. Bingham Sealing and Application in Vacuum Clamping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, S. M.; Teo, Wee Kin; Geng, Zunmin; Turner, Sam; Ridgway, Keith

    2011-12-01

    Vacuum clamping is extensively used in shell machining. In this paper a Bingham Sealing (BS) is presented and formulized based on Bingham plastic performance. The sealing capability of BS is evaluated in various cases. A new Bingham plastic is developed and the yield stress is measured. The performances of "O"ring sealing and BS with the developed Bingham plastic are compared to the static experiment. In this experiment the same vacuum is achieved and the distortion of the blade with BS is better than that with "O" ring sealing.

  13. Bingham Sealing and Application in Vacuum Clamping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, S M; Teo, Wee Kin; Geng Zunmin; Turner, Sam; Ridgway, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Vacuum clamping is extensively used in shell machining. In this paper a Bingham Sealing (BS) is presented and formulized based on Bingham plastic performance. The sealing capability of BS is evaluated in various cases. A new Bingham plastic is developed and the yield stress is measured. The performances of Or ing sealing and BS with the developed Bingham plastic are compared to the static experiment. In this experiment the same vacuum is achieved and the distortion of the blade with BS is better than that with 'O' ring sealing.

  14. Removal of root filling materials.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duncan, H.F. Chong, B.S.

    2011-05-01

    Safe, successful and effective removal of root filling materials is an integral component of non-surgical root canal re-treatment. Access to the root canal system must be achieved in order to negotiate to the canal terminus so that deficiencies in the original treatment can be rectified. Since a range of materials have been advocated for filling root canals, different techniques are required for their removal. The management of commonly encountered root filling materials during non-surgical re-treatment, including the clinical procedures necessary for removal and the associated risks, are reviewed. As gutta-percha is the most widely used and accepted root filling material, there is a greater emphasis on its removal in this review.

  15. Ceramic/metal seals. [refractory materials for hermetic seals for lighium-metal sulfide batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredbenner, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    Design criteria are discussed for a hermetic seal capable of withstanding the 450 C operating temperature of a lithium-metal sulfide battery system. A mechanical seal consisting of two high strength alloy metal sleeves welded or brazed to a conductor assembly and pressed onto a ceramic is described. The conductor center passes through the ceramic but is not sealed to it. The seal is effected on the outside of the taper where the tubular part is pressed down over and makes contact.

  16. Better building of valley fills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chironis, N.P.

    1980-03-01

    Current US regulations for building valley fills or head of hollow fills to hold excess spoil resulting from contour mining are meeting with considerable opposition, particularly from operators in steep-slope areas. An alternative method has been submitted to the Office of Surface Mining by Virgina. Known as the zoned concept method, it has already been used successfully in building water-holding dams and coal refuse embankments on sloping terrain. The ways in which drainage and seepage are managed are described.

  17. Flow and wall shear stress characterization following endovascular aneurysm repair and endovascular aneurysm sealing in an infrarenal aneurysm model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersen, Johannes T.; Groot Jebbink, Erik; Versluis, Michel; Slump, Cornelis H.; Ku, David N.; de Vries, Jean-Paul P.M.; Reijnen, Michel M.P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with a modular endograft has become the preferred treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms. A novel concept is endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS), consisting of dual endoframes surrounded by polymer-filled endobags. This dual-lumen configuration is

  18. 30 CFR 75.337 - Construction and repair of seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sealed areas. (b) Prior to sealing, the mine operator shall— (1) Remove insulated cables, batteries, and other potential electric ignition sources from the area to be sealed when constructing seals, unless it... after April 18, 2008, the seal at the lowest elevation shall have a corrosion-resistant, non-metallic...

  19. Albinistic common seals (Phoca vitulina) and melanistic grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) rehabilitated in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osinga, Nynke; 't Hart, Pieter; Vader, Pieter C. van Voorst

    2010-01-01

    The Seal Rehabilitation and Research Centre (SRRC) in Pieterburen, The Netherlands, rehabilitates seals from the waters of the Wadden Sea, North Sea and Southwest Delta area. Incidental observations of albinism and melanism in common and grey seals are known from countries surrounding the North Sea.

  20. Deep repository - Engineered barrier system. Erosion and sealing processes in tunnel backfill materials investigated in laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanden, Torbjoern; Boergesson, Lennart; Dueck, Ann; Goudarzi, Reza; Loennqvist, Margareta (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    an additional test series have been performed. These additional tests examined the influence of fine clay material mixed with the pellets, a topic not previously examined. These tests showed that the powder had strong influence on the erosion rate during the first 24 hours of water flow but after that time period the erosion rate was unaffected by the presence of fines. The investigation of how backfill blocks move when water enter slots between them produced predictable results. Two types of tests were performed; in one the displacement was measured and in the other the development of swelling pressure as physically constrained blocks attempted to separate was monitored. In the course of these tests the influence of the initial slot width is determined to be very strong. The majority of the tests were done using Friedland clay blocks. In these tests water influx to a small initial slot resulted in rather large movements, with deformation starting immediately. A large initial slot resulted in smaller overall movement with deformation not starting until about 1.5-2 days after test start. Tests done using Asha 230 behaved in a manner similar to the Friedland blocks, but those made of the 30/70 mixture showed no movement. The self-sealing ability of MX-80 pellets was tested and showed that a water flow of 0.01 l/min and 0.1 l/min through a volume filled with MX-80 pellets will result in transport of fine material within the water and these fines subsequently swell and seal slots with an aperture up to 150 mum. The sealing ability of a saturated backfill after a simulated piping scenario was also tested. After three weeks of healing of an intentionally installed piping feature that had been given access to water, the hydraulic conductivity was measured again. The specimens made of Friedland and Asha 230 showed a very strong ability to seal the hole while the 30/70 mixture couldn't seal the drilled hole at all. MX-80 pellets installed at a dry bulk density

  1. High thermal expansion, sealing glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.

    1993-11-16

    A glass composition is described for hermetically sealing to high thermal expansion materials such as aluminum alloys, stainless steels, copper, and copper/beryllium alloys, which includes between about 10 and about 25 mole percent Na[sub 2]O, between about 10 and about 25 mole percent K[sub 2]O, between about 5 and about 15 mole percent Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], between about 35 and about 50 mole percent P[sub 2]O[sub 5] and between about 5 and about 15 mole percent of one of PbO, BaO, and mixtures thereof. The composition, which may also include between 0 and about 5 mole percent Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] and between 0 and about 10 mole percent B[sub 2]O[sub 3], has a thermal expansion coefficient in a range of between about 160 and 210[times]10[sup [minus]7]/C and a dissolution rate in a range of between about 2[times]10[sup [minus]7] and 2[times]10[sup [minus]9]g/cm[sup 2]-min. This composition is suitable to hermetically seal to metallic electrical components which will be subjected to humid environments over an extended period of time.

  2. Safeguards sealing systems for Zebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingram, G.; Jamieson, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    A relatively simple design has been produced for safeguards seals to be applied throughout the fuel containing areas at Zebra. It is based on the use of wire seals and regular Inspector surveillance. The application of the system would allow an Inspector to establish to a high degree of confidence that significant quantities of fuel had not been diverted during an intensive experimental programme. It would add about 5% to the time required for experiments, and careful planning would reduce this value. The inspection effort required to witness element movements during the experimental programme would average about 2 hours per day, with a further 2 hours spent each week on NDA of the fuel exposed. The Safeguards Inspector would require to spend about 25% of his time in the reactor area and would have ample time to deal with the relatively small number of fuel movements taking place in the storage area and with his duties elsewhere in the plant. During a core change, full-time inspection effort would be required for about 6 weeks each year. (author)

  3. Influence of steam parameters on static and dynamic characteristics of labyrinth seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Wenqiang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] In order to study the influence of working medium parameters on the static and dynamic characteristics of seals in turbomachinery,[Methods] a three-dimensional model of a labyrinth seal was created, and air and steam were applied in the numerical simulation. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD method and a rotating frame were applied to analyze the influence of different steam parameters on the leakage characteristics and dynamic characteristic coefficients.[Results] The results show that great differences in leakage flow rate are apparent under different air and steam conditions, and the fluid-induced force shows linear and nonlinear variation with the increasing whirl speed. When the steam temperature increases, the system stability decreases as the dynamic characteristic coefficients change.[Conclusions] In consequence, working medium parameters are of great significance for turbine stability, and the influence of working medium parameters on the static and dynamic characteristics of seals should be given great attention in practical application.

  4. Design, development and deployment of special sealing plug for 540 MWe PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, G.; Roy, S.; Patel, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    The coolant channel in Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors is a pressure boundary component and is very important for reactor performance and reactor safety. Monitoring the condition of the pressure tube of each coolant channel on a periodic basis is very important. In-Service Inspection (ISI) of the coolant channels in water filled condition is done regularly for 220 MWe PHWR. For the same purpose BARC Channel Inspection System is developed for 540 MWe PHWR also. Special Sealing Plug has been developed to facilitate the channel inspection (in water filled condition) with all necessary safety features at par with normal sealing plug. Special Sealing Plug provides a 50 mm through hole for passage of drive tube of Inspection Head maintaining integrity of PHT. Lot of challenges were faced for developing the Special Sealing Plug and its associated tools. It was a first of its kind design. First ISI of TAPS-4 was conducted successfully using this plug along with associated tools in November 2011. This development has provided immense help to NPCIL in life management of 540 MWe PHWR coolant channels. (author)

  5. A magnetic fluid seal for rotary blood pumps: effects of seal structure on long-term performance in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Sayaka; Amari, Shuichi; Okamoto, Eiji; Murabayashi, Shun; Nishimura, Ikuya

    2011-03-01

    A magnetic fluid (MF) seal enables mechanical contact-free rotation of the shaft and hence has excellent durability. The performance of an MF seal, however, has been reported to decrease in liquids. We developed an MF seal that has a "shield" mechanism, and a new MF with a higher magnetization of 47.9 kA/m. The sealing performance of the MF seal installed in a rotary blood pump was studied. Three types of MF seals were used. Seal A was a conventional seal without a shield. Seal B had the same structure as that of Seal A, but the seal was installed at 1 mm below liquid level. Seal C was a seal with a shield and the MF was set at 1 mm below liquid level. Seal A failed after 6 and 11 days. Seal B showed better results (20 and 73 days). Seal C showed long-term durability (217 and 275 days). The reason for different results in different seal structures was considered to be different flow conditions near the magnetic fluid. Fluid dynamics near the MF in the pump were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. We have developed an MF seal with a shield that works in liquid for >275 days. The MF seal is promising as a shaft seal for rotary blood pumps.

  6. Evaluation of the Sealing Ability of Three Obturation Techniques Using a Glucose Leakage Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Olczak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability of three different canal filling techniques. Sixty-four roots of extracted human maxillary anterior teeth were prepared using ProTaper® rotary instruments. The specimens were then randomly divided into 3 experimental groups (n=16 and 2 control groups (n=8. The root canals were filled using cold lateral compaction (CLC group, continuous wave condensation technique using the Elements Obturation Unit® (EOU group, and ProTaper obturators (PT group. For the negative control group, 8 roots were filled using lateral compaction as in the CLC group, and the teeth were covered twice with a layer of nail varnish (NCG group. Another 8 roots were filled using lateral compaction, but without sealer, and these were used as the positive control (PCG group. A glucose leakage model was used for quantitative evaluation of microleakage for 24 hours and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 weeks. No significant difference in the cumulative amount of leakage was found between the three experimental groups at all observation times. The lateral condensation of cold gutta-percha can guarantee a similar seal of canal fillings as can be achieved by using thermal methods, in the round canals.

  7. The five year report of the Tunnel Sealing Experiment: an international project of AECL, JNC, ANDRA and WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, N.A.; Cournut, A.; Dixon, D.

    2002-01-01

    The Tunnel Sealing Experiment (TSX) was conducted to address construction and performance issues of full-scale seals for potential application to deep geological repositories for radioactive waste. The TSX was performed by an international partnership representing Japan, France, the United States and Canada. The experiment was installed at the 420-m depth of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Underground Research Laboratory in the granite rock of the Precambrian Canadian Shield. The experiment involved the construction of two full-scale tunnel seals at either end of a single excavation. One seal was an assembly of pre-compacted sand-bentonite blocks and the second seal was a single cast of Low-Heat High-Performance concrete. The objective of the TSX was to assess the applicability of technologies for construction of practicable concrete and bentonite bulkheads; to evaluate the performance of each bulkhead; and to identify and document the parameters that affect that performance. This report documents the construction and operation of the experiment over its first five years. During this period, the experiment was designed, tunnels were excavated, and the seals were constructed. The sand-filled region between the two bulkhead seals was filled and pressurized with water to 800 and 2000 kPa. A tracer test was conducted at a tunnel pressure of 800 kPa to assess the solute transport characteristics of full-scale tunnel seals. The most important outcome from the TSX is that functional full-scale repository seals can be constructed using currently available technology. Factors identified as potentially affecting seal performance included: excavation method and minimizing the excavation damaged zone (EDZ); keying bulkheads into the rock to interrupt the EDZ; compacted sand-bentonite placement method; treatment of clay bulkhead-rock interface; rate of clay saturation compared with the rate of water pressurization; clay bulkhead volume expansion; the resealing properties of

  8. The Pharmaceutical Capping Process-Correlation between Residual Seal Force, Torque Moment, and Flip-off Removal Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathaes, Roman; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Vorgrimler, Lothar; Steinberg, Henrik; Dreher, Sascha; Roggo, Yves; Nieto, Alejandra; Brown, Helen; Roehl, Holger; Adler, Michael; Luemkemann, Joerg; Huwyler, Joerg; Lam, Philippe; Stauch, Oliver; Mohl, Silke; Streubel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The majority of parenteral drug products are manufactured in glass vials with an elastomeric rubber stopper and a crimp cap. The vial sealing process is a critical process step during fill-and-finish operations, as it defines the seal quality of the final product. Different critical capping process parameters can affect rubber stopper defects, rubber stopper compression, container closure integrity, and also crimp cap quality. A sufficiently high force to remove the flip-off button prior to usage is required to ensure quality of the drug product unit by the flip-off button during storage, transportation, and until opening and use. Therefore, the final product is 100% visually inspected for lose or defective crimp caps, which is subjective as well as time- and labor-intensive. In this study, we sealed several container closure system configurations with different capping equipment settings (with corresponding residual seal force values) to investigate the torque moment required to turn the crimp cap. A correlation between torque moment and residual seal force has been established. The torque moment was found to be influenced by several parameters, including diameter of the vial head, type of rubber stopper (serum or lyophilized) and type of crimp cap (West(®) or Datwyler(®)). In addition, we measured the force required to remove the flip-off button of a sealed container closure system. The capping process had no influence on measured forces; however, it was possible to detect partially crimped vials. In conclusion, a controlled capping process with a defined target residual seal force range leads to a tight crimp cap on a sealed container closure system and can ensure product quality. The majority of parenteral drug products are manufactured in a glass vials with an elastomeric rubber stopper and a crimp cap. The vial sealing process is a critical process step during fill-and-finish operations, as it defines the seal quality of the final product. An adequate force

  9. The five year report of the Tunnel Sealing Experiment: an international project of AECL, JNC, ANDRA and WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, N.A.; Cournut, A.; Dixon, D. (and others)

    2002-07-01

    The Tunnel Sealing Experiment (TSX) was conducted to address construction and performance issues of full-scale seals for potential application to deep geological repositories for radioactive waste. The TSX was performed by an international partnership representing Japan, France, the United States and Canada. The experiment was installed at the 420-m depth of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Underground Research Laboratory in the granite rock of the Precambrian Canadian Shield. The experiment involved the construction of two full-scale tunnel seals at either end of a single excavation. One seal was an assembly of pre-compacted sand-bentonite blocks and the second seal was a single cast of Low-Heat High-Performance concrete. The objective of the TSX was to assess the applicability of technologies for construction of practicable concrete and bentonite bulkheads; to evaluate the performance of each bulkhead; and to identify and document the parameters that affect that performance. This report documents the construction and operation of the experiment over its first five years. During this period, the experiment was designed, tunnels were excavated, and the seals were constructed. The sand-filled region between the two bulkhead seals was filled and pressurized with water to 800 and 2000 kPa. A tracer test was conducted at a tunnel pressure of 800 kPa to assess the solute transport characteristics of full-scale tunnel seals. The most important outcome from the TSX is that functional full-scale repository seals can be constructed using currently available technology. Factors identified as potentially affecting seal performance included: excavation method and minimizing the excavation damaged zone (EDZ); keying bulkheads into the rock to interrupt the EDZ; compacted sand-bentonite placement method; treatment of clay bulkhead-rock interface; rate of clay saturation compared with the rate of water pressurization; clay bulkhead volume expansion; the resealing properties

  10. The five year report of the Tunnel Sealing Experiment: an international project of AECL, JNC, ANDRA and WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, N A; Cournut, A; Dixon, D [and others

    2002-07-01

    The Tunnel Sealing Experiment (TSX) was conducted to address construction and performance issues of full-scale seals for potential application to deep geological repositories for radioactive waste. The TSX was performed by an international partnership representing Japan, France, the United States and Canada. The experiment was installed at the 420-m depth of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Underground Research Laboratory in the granite rock of the Precambrian Canadian Shield. The experiment involved the construction of two full-scale tunnel seals at either end of a single excavation. One seal was an assembly of pre-compacted sand-bentonite blocks and the second seal was a single cast of Low-Heat High-Performance concrete. The objective of the TSX was to assess the applicability of technologies for construction of practicable concrete and bentonite bulkheads; to evaluate the performance of each bulkhead; and to identify and document the parameters that affect that performance. This report documents the construction and operation of the experiment over its first five years. During this period, the experiment was designed, tunnels were excavated, and the seals were constructed. The sand-filled region between the two bulkhead seals was filled and pressurized with water to 800 and 2000 kPa. A tracer test was conducted at a tunnel pressure of 800 kPa to assess the solute transport characteristics of full-scale tunnel seals. The most important outcome from the TSX is that functional full-scale repository seals can be constructed using currently available technology. Factors identified as potentially affecting seal performance included: excavation method and minimizing the excavation damaged zone (EDZ); keying bulkheads into the rock to interrupt the EDZ; compacted sand-bentonite placement method; treatment of clay bulkhead-rock interface; rate of clay saturation compared with the rate of water pressurization; clay bulkhead volume expansion; the resealing properties of

  11. study on trace contaminants control assembly for sealed environment chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, L. P.; Wang, J.; Liu, L. K.; Liu, H.

    The biological and Physicochemical P C life support technologies are all important parts to establish a human Closed Ecological Life Support System CELSS for long-duration mission The latter has the advantages of lower power consumption lower mass and higher efficiency therefore researchers often incorporate the use of biological systems with P C life support technologies to continuously recycle air water and part of the solid waste stream generated such as the Russian BLSS and the NASA-sponsored Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project LMLSTP In short these tests were very successful in integrating biological and P C life support technologies for long-duration life support Therefore we should use a combination of integrated biological with P C life support technologies in a human CELSS Human construction materials plants animals and soils release much trace toxic gases in a CELSS and they will inhibit plant growth and badly affect human health when their concentrations rise over their threshold levels The effect of biological trace contaminant control technologies is slower especially for a human sealed chamber because human produce much more methane and other contaminants A regenerative Trace Contaminant Control Subsystem TCCS with P C technology is a more important part in this case to control quickly the airborne contaminants levels and assure human in good condition in a sealed chamber This paper describes a trace contaminant control test facility incorporated a 8 m3 sealed environment chamber a regenerative TCCS with P C

  12. Crown sealing and buckling instability during water entry of spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2016-04-05

    We present new observations from an experimental investigation of the classical problem of the crown splash and sealing phenomena observed during the impact of spheres onto quiescent liquid pools. In the experiments, a 6 m tall vacuum chamber was used to provide the required ambient conditions from atmospheric pressure down to of an atmosphere, whilst high-speed videography was exploited to focus primarily on the above-surface crown formation and ensuing dynamics, paying particular attention to the moments just prior to the surface seal. In doing so, we have observed a buckling-type azimuthal instability of the crown. This instability is characterised by vertical striations along the crown, between which thin films form that are more susceptible to the air flow and thus are drawn into the closing cavity, where they atomize to form a fine spray within the cavity. To elucidate to the primary mechanisms and forces at play, we varied the sphere diameter, liquid properties and ambient pressure. Furthermore, a comparison between the entry of room-temperature spheres, where the contact line pins around the equator, and Leidenfrost spheres (i.e. an immersed superheated sphere encompassed by a vapour layer), where there is no contact line, indicates that the buckling instability appears in all crown sealing events, but is intensified by the presence of a pinned contact line. © 2016 Cambridge University Press.

  13. Geomechanical investigations for the designing of cemented filling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, P.

    1980-05-15

    Laboratory and in situ investigations have led to the identification of the main geomechanical parameters that condition the stability of the cemented fill in the Gavorrano pyrite mine (Tuscany, Italy); such parameters were used for working out a satisfactory mining method. The pyrite is mined with the descending horizontal slice method with integral cemented filling which is obtained by throwing a mixture of limestone aggregates and cement into the mined voids. The laboratory geomechanical investigations carried out on fill samples have pointed out that the physical and mechanical characteristics are highly variable and this is essentially due to the fact that the fill is cast into place by compressed air. In particular, it was pointed out that the strength depends upon the cement content and upon the porosity according to a power law. The in situ measurements of the convergence between the roof and the floor, and the load measurements pointed out the considerable importance of the horizontal and vertical joints that cross the fill mass and that are inevitably brought about by a discontinuity of the fill. The results of the study made it possible to adopt an acceptable geomechanical behaviour model of the fill. On the basis of this model the mining pattern was deeply modified, the width and the height of the slices were considerably enlarged and thus the output was improved.

  14. Cover gas seals. 11 - FFTF-LMFBR seal-test program, January-March 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurzeka, W.; Oliva, R.; Welch, F.

    1974-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to: (1) conduct static and dynamic tests to demonstrate or determine the mechanical performance of full-size (cross section) FFTF fuel transfer machine and reactor vessel head seals intended for use in a sodium vapor - inert gas environment, (2) demonstrate that these FFTF seals or new seal configuration provide acceptable fission product and cover gas retention capabilities at LMFBR Clinch River Plant operating environmental conditions other than radiation, and (3) develop improved seals and seal technology for the LMFBR Clinch River Plant to support the national objective to reduce all atmospheric contaminations to low levels

  15. Phocine Distemper in German Seals, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlsein, Peter; Beineke, Andreas; Haas, Ludwig; Greiser-Wilke, Irene; Siebert, Ursula; Fonfara, Sonja; Harder, Timm; Stede, Michael; Gruber, Achim.D.; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 21,700 seals died during a morbillivirus epidemic in northwestern Europe in 2002. Phocine distemper virus 1 was isolated from seals in German waters. The sequence of the P gene showed 97% identity with the Dutch virus isolated in 1988. There was 100% identity with the Dutch isolate from 2002 and a single nucleotide mismatch with the Danish isolate. PMID:15200869

  16. Earlier pupping in harbour seals, Phoca vitulina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, P.J.H.; Brasseur, S.M.J.M.; Meesters, H.W.G.

    2010-01-01

    The annual reproductive cycle of most seal species is characterized by a tight synchrony of births. Typically, timing of birth shows little inter-annual variation. Here, however we show that harbour seals Phoca vitulina from the Wadden Sea (southeast North Sea) have shortened their yearly cycle,

  17. Performance evaluation of chip seals in Idaho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The intent of this research project is to identify a wide variety of parameters that influence the performance of pavements treated via chip seals within the State of Idaho. Chip sealing is currently one of the most popular methods of maintenance for...

  18. 39 CFR 2.4 - Seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seal. 2.4 Section 2.4 Postal Service UNITED STATES... Secretary of State, and is required by 39 U.S.C. 207 to be judicially noticed. The Seal shall be in the... description of the Postal Service emblem is described at 39 CFR 221.7. ...

  19. Floating seal system for rotary devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasiuk, H.A.

    1983-08-23

    This invention relates to a floating seal system for rotary devices to reduce gas leakage around the rotary device in a duct and across the face of the rotary device to an adjacent duct. The peripheral seal bodies are made of resilient material having a generally U-shaped cross section wherein one of the legs is secured to a support member and the other of the legs forms a contacting seal against the rotary device. The legs of the peripheral seal form an extended angle of intersection of about 10[degree] to about 30[degree] in the unloaded condition to provide even sealing forces around the periphery of the rotary device. The peripheral seal extends around the periphery of the support member except where intersected by radial seals which reduce gas leakage across the face of the rotary device and between adjacent duct portions. The radial seal assembly is fabricated from channel bars, the smaller channel bar being secured to the divider of the support member and a larger inverted rigid floating channel bar having its legs freely movable over the legs of the smaller channel bar forming therewith a tubular channel. A resilient flexible tube is positioned within the tubular channel for substantially its full length to reduce gas leakage across the tubular channel. A spacer extends beyond the face of the floating channel near each end of the floating channel a distance to provide desired clearance between the floating channel and the face of the rotary device. 5 figs.

  20. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF MAGNETIC FLUID SEAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Bashtovoi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Dependences of critical pressure drop, being held by magnetic fluid seal, on time in a static state and shaft rotation velocity in dynamics have been experimentally determined. The significant influence of particles’ redistribution in magnetic fluid on static parameters of magnetic fluid seal has been established.

  1. Molybdenum sealing glass-ceramic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagan, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    A glass-ceramic composition is described having low hydrogen and helium permeability properties, along with high fracture strength, and a thermal coefficient of expansion similar to that of molybdenum. The composition is adaptable for hermetically sealing to molybdenum at temperatures between 900 and about 950 0 C to form a hermetically sealed insulator body

  2. 19 CFR 101.7 - Customs seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs seal. 101.7 Section 101.7 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.7 Customs seal. (a) Design. According to the design furnished by the Department...

  3. Dura Seal recommendations for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Reactor systems (BWR, PWR and Candu) are briefly reviewed with reference to the pumping services encountered in each system, to indicate the conditions imposed on mechanical seals for nuclear power plant liquid handling equipment. A description of the Dura Seals used in each service is included. (U.K.)

  4. Sealing Occlusal Dentin Caries in Permanent Molars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Vibeke; Borum, Mette Kit; Møller, Kirsten Dynes

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of postponing restorative intervention of manifest occlusal caries in young, permanent dentition by non-invasive sealing. This RCT-designed study included 521 occlusal lesions in 521 patients aged 6 to 17 y. Based on clinical and radiog......The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of postponing restorative intervention of manifest occlusal caries in young, permanent dentition by non-invasive sealing. This RCT-designed study included 521 occlusal lesions in 521 patients aged 6 to 17 y. Based on clinical...... longevity of sealings and restorations until retreatments, and 3) compare effectiveness of sealings and restorations to halt caries progression in sealed lesions and beneath restorations. Furthermore, we aimed to identify factors influencing longevity and the effectiveness of sealings and restorations.......001). The median survival time for sealings not replaced by restorations was 7.3 y (CI, 6.4 y to NA). Survival of sealings was increased in patients with low caries risk and/or excellent oral hygiene, second molars compared with first molars, and lesions not extending the middle one-third of the dentin. Survival...

  5. Machine Vision Inspection of Polymeric Traypack Seal Areas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coburn, John

    2002-01-01

    .... Since entrapped matter can lead to open seals, defects, and seal anomalies, a method of measurement for seal area contamination is useful in quantifying effects of filler changes, line speeds, and product formulations...

  6. Sealing of boreholes using natural, compatible materials: Granular salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, R.E.; Zeuch, D.H.; Stormont, J.C.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1994-01-01

    Granular salt can be used to construct high performance permanent seals in boreholes which penetrate rock salt formations. These seals are described as seal systems comprised of the host rock, the seal material, and the seal rock interface. The performance of these seal systems is defined by the complex interactions between these seal system components through time. The interactions are largely driven by the creep of the host formation applying boundary stress on the seal forcing host rock permeability with time. The immediate permeability of these seals is dependent on the emplaced density. Laboratory test results suggest that careful emplacement techniques could results in immediate seal system permeability on the order of 10 -16 m 2 to 10 -18 m 2 (10 -4 darcy to 10 -6 ). The visco-plastic behavior of the host rock coupled with the granular salts ability to ''heal'' or consolidate make granular salt an ideal sealing material for boreholes whose permanent sealing is required

  7. Vault sealing research and development for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.S.; Johnson, L.H.

    1986-08-01

    The major research and development activities in the disposal vault sealing program are buffer development, backfill development, grouting, tunnel and shaft sealing development, and borehole sealing development. The buffer is likely to be a mixture of clay and sand surrounding the waste package and is intended, primarily, to minimize near-field mass transport. The backfill would fill the remainder of the underground workings and most of the volume of the access shafts. Its major component would be crushed rock or sand, or both, with sufficient clay added to achieve the required permeability specification. Boreholes would be sealed throughout their length with low-permeability materials. These may be cements or clays. Shaft seals would be emplaced at specific locations and, probably, would be composed of a low-permeability clay or concrete plug, together with grouting of the rock surrounding the plug. Progress to date and planned future activities for each major part of the program are described. The principal foci of the program are the research and development activities required to assess the concept of underground disposal in plutonic rock and the design and implementation of vault sealing experiments in the Underground Research Laboratory. Program plans are presented that describe the logical progression of each major component of the program, and that indicate the timing of major events that contribute to the final objective of the program, which is to develop engineering specifications for the buffer, backfill and seals, and to justify these specifications in terms of the performance of the waste disposal system. 131 refs

  8. Sealed Crawl Spaces with Integrated Whole-House Ventilation in a Cold Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoeller, William [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Williamson, James [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Puttafunta, Srikanth [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-07-30

    One method of code-compliance for crawlspaces is to seal and insulate the crawlspace, rather than venting to the outdoors. However, codes require mechanical ventilation; either via conditioned supply air from the HVAC system, or a continuous exhaust ventilation strategy. As the CARB's building partner, Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, intended to use the unvented crawlspace in a recent

  9. 19 CFR 122.188 - Issuance of temporary Customs access seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Issuance of temporary Customs access seal. 122.188 Section 122.188 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Access to Customs Security Areas § 122.188 Issuance of...

  10. Design analysis of a self-acting spiral-groove ring seal for counter-rotating shafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirusso, E.

    1983-01-01

    A self-acting spiral groove inter-shaft ring seal of nominal 16.33 cm (6.43 in.) diameter for sealing fan bleed air between counter-rotating hafts in advanced turbofan engines was analyzed. The analysis focused on the lift force characteristics of the spiral grooves. A NASA Lewis developed computer program for predicting the performance of gas lubricated face seals was used to optimize the spiral groove geometry to produce maximum lift force. Load capacity curves (lift force as function of film thickness) were generated for four advanced turbofan engine operating conditions at relative seal speeds ranging from 17,850 to 29,800 rpm, sealed air pressures from 6 to 42 N/sq cm (9 to 60 psi) absolute and temperatures from 95 deg to 327 C (203 deg to 620 F). The relative seal sliding speed range was 152 to 255 m/sec (500 to 836 ft/sec). The analysis showed that the spiral grooves are capable of producing sufficient lift force such that the ring seal will operate in a noncontacting mode over the operating range of typical advanced turbofan engines.

  11. Variations in the response of AECL random coil seals as a function of the angular position of the probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, M.G.

    1986-04-01

    The AECL random coil seal is to be used as a Nuclear Safeguards seal to deter and detect tampering with nuclear material in store. To be effective the ultrasonic signature from the seal must remain constant and be different from that of other seals. Angular variations in the ultrasonic response from certain seals have, however, been observed and the programme of study reported here has been carried out in order to clarify the source of this variation. It is shown that the variation observed may most probably be attributed to the ultrasonic probes used in the investigation and, in particular, to deviation of the probe beam from circularity. However it is probable that the angle of the beam with respect to the probe case (squint) is also a contributory factor. In addition, to reduce the degree of angular variation it is important to exclude air bubbles and to ensure that the coil is placed as centrally in the beam as possible. It is anticipated that the exclusion of air bubbles will be easier in the field than in the laboratory studies. The need to place the seal reasonably centrally with respect to the beam places some minor limits on the coil design and also makes it essential that the probe fits closely into its holder in the seal as any slackness may give rise to signature variations. (author)

  12. Active Infrared Thermography for Seal Contamination Detection in Heat-Sealed Food Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlien D’huys

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Packaging protects food products from environmental influences, assuring quality and safety throughout shelf life if properly performed. Packaging quality depends on the quality of the packaging material and of the closure or seal. A common problem possibly jeopardizing seal quality is the presence of seal contamination, which can cause a decreased seal strength, an increased packaging failure risk and leak formation. Therefore, early detection and removal of seal contaminated packages from the production chain is crucial. In this work, a pulsed-type active thermography method using the heated seal bars as an excitation source was studied for detecting seal contamination. Thermal image sequences of contaminated seals were recorded shortly after sealing. The detection performances of six thermal image processing methods, based on a single frame, a fit of the cooling profiles, thermal signal reconstruction, pulsed phase thermography, principal component thermography and a matched filter, were compared. High resolution digital images served as a reference to quantify seal contamination, and processed thermal images were mapped to these references. The lowest detection limit (equivalent diameter 0.60 mm was obtained for the method based on a fit of the cooling profiles. Moreover, the detection performance of this method did not depend strongly on the time after sealing at which recording of the thermal images was started, making it a robust and generally applicable method.

  13. Techniques of preoxygenation in patients with ineffective face mask seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kundra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ineffective face mask seal is the most common cause for suboptimal pre-oxygenation. Room air entrainment can be more with vital capacity (VC breaths when the mask is not a tight fit. Aims: This study was designed to compare 5 min tidal volume (TV breathing and eight VC breaths in patients with ineffective face mask seal. Methods: Twenty eight ASA I adults with ineffective face mask seal were randomized to breathe 100% oxygen at normal TV for 5 min (Group TV and eight VC breaths (Group VC in a cross over manner through circle system at 10 L/min. End tidal oxygen concentration (EtO 2 and arterial blood gas analysis was performed to evaluate oxygenation with each technique. Statistical Analysis: Data were analysed using SPSS statistical software, version 16. Friedman′s two-way analysis of variance by ranks was used for non-parametric data. Results: Significant increase in EtO 2 (median 90 and PaO 2 (228.85 was seen in group TV when compared to group VC (EtO 2 median 85, PaO 2 147.65, P<0.05. Mean total ventilation volume in 1 min in group VC was 9.4±3.3 L/min and more than fresh gas flow (10 L/min in seven patients. In group TV, the fresh gas flow (50 L/5 min was sufficient at normal TV (mean total ventilation in 5 min 36.7±6.3 L/min. Conclusions: TV breathing for 5 min provides better pre-oxygenation in patients with ineffective mask seal with fresh gas flow of 10 L/min delivered through a circle system.

  14. Integrated Management Program for Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt IMPRSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, A.; El-Adham, K.

    2004-01-01

    Sealed sources are usually in capsules made of stainless steel. They are the size of a pen or a finger and contain one of hundreds of radioactive elements (e.g., Iridium, Radium) or their isotopes. They are air-tight and very durable, contain the radioactive material but not radiation. They are used in the health sector, industry, military, and universities. Incidents occurred in Met Halfa, Egypt, 2000 (Iridium-192); Goiania, Brazil, 1987 (Cesium-137); Mexico and Southwest U.S., 1977 -1984 (Cobalt-60); Peru, 1999 (Iridium-1992); Poland 2001 (Cobalt-60). The IMPRSS Mission is based on a joined partnership between the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, the Egyptian Ministry of Health, the Sandia National Laboratories, the International Atomic Energy Agency and others. The IMPRSS Mission protects human health and the environment in Egypt from mismanaged sealed sources, is developed jointly with MOH and EAEA, provides capabilities for managing radioactive sealed sources in Egypt, increases public awareness, provides education and training, improves emergency response capabilities, develops a permanent disposal facility, ensures the program is self-sustaining and ensures close coordination with the IAEA. Infrastructure how to manage sealed sources is discussed. It includes awareness, tracking and inventory control, security, recovery, conditioning and storage, recycling and disposal. Emergency response, regulatory reform, education and training and its targets are provided. The government of Egypt can protect the people of Egypt and is ready for emergencies. Prevention is the first line of defence and detection is the second line of defence. Adequate Emergency Response saves lives and adequate control reduces risk of mismanaged uses or deliberate misuses of sources. A Cradle-to-Grave approach is built on existing capabilities at EAEA and MOH

  15. Sealed ion accelerator tubes (survey)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsik, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    The first publications on developing commercial models of small-scale sealed accelerator tubes in which neutrons are generated appeared in the foreign press in 1954 to 1957; they were very brief and were advertising-oriented. The tubes were designed for neutron logging of oil wells instead of ampule neutron sources (Po + Be, Ra + Be). Later, instruments of this type began to be called neutron tubes from the resulting neutron radiation that they gave off. In Soviet Union a neutron tube was developed in 1958 in connection with the development of the pulsed neutron-neutron method of studying the geological profile of oil wells. At that time the tube developed was intended, in the view of its inventors, to replace standard isotope sources with constant neutron yield. A fairly detailed survey of neutron tubes was made in the studies. 8 refs., 8 figs

  16. PWR thermocouple mechanical sealing structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Qiuping; He Youguang

    1991-08-01

    The PWR in-core temperature detection device, which is one of measures to insure reactor safety operation, is to monitor and diagnose reactor thermal power output and in-core power distribution. The temperature detection device system uses thermocouples as measuring elements with stainless steel protecting sleeves. The thermocouple has a limited service time and should be replaced after its service time has reached. A new sealing device for the thermocouples of reactor in-core temperature detection system has been developed to facilitate replacement. The structure is complete tight under high temperature and pressure without any leakage and seepage, and easy to be assembled or disassembled in radioactive environment. The device is designed to make it possible to replace the thermocouple one by one if necessary. This is a new, simple and practical structure

  17. Study on sealing of boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    A bibliographical research on the problem of the backfilling and sealing of boreholes, shafts and tunnels for radioactive waste disposal has been carried out. Various materials - both natural and artificial - like clay, industrial cement, polymer concrete, geothermical and magnesium cement have been examined. Their main physico-chemical and durability characteristics have been examined. The problem of the interaction between the sealing and the geological environment has been also dealt. The final subject discussed in the bibliography is the damage caused to the host formation by the excavation of shafts and tunnels. The laboratory tests have been performed on a natural clay and other types of material (cement grout, cement grout with expansive additive, cement mortar and remoulded clay) which have been used as plug materials. The main conclusions obtained from the tests are the following: - The permeability of the cement is lower than the permeability of the clay; - no adhesion was observed between clay and cement mortar, with or without expansive additive, when cured under different ambient conditions, but without any application of load; - When curing took place under load, good adhesion was observed between the clay and the cement mortar; - The flow of water in a specimen consisting of a clay core surrounded by remoulded clay is larger than in the natural clay. These results seem to be caused by the different permeabilities of the remoulded and undisturbed clay and not to depend on flow at the contact between the two materials. A remote instrumentation package for the in situ evaluation of the performance of a plug, has been developed. In order to get rid of the uncertainty associated with the infiltration of the cables through the plug a wireless data transmission system, based on acoustic waves, has been developed

  18. Ocean climate and seal condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crocker Daniel E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The condition of many marine mammals varies with fluctuations in productivity and food supply in the ocean basin where they forage. Prey is impacted by physical environmental variables such as cyclic warming trends. The weaning weight of northern elephant seal pups, Mirounga angustirostris, being closely linked to maternal condition, indirectly reflects prey availability and foraging success of pregnant females in deep waters of the northeastern Pacific. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of ocean climate on foraging success in this deep-diving marine mammal over the course of three decades, using cohort weaning weight as the principal metric of successful resource accrual. Results The mean annual weaning weight of pups declined from 1975 to the late 1990s, a period characterized by a large-scale, basin-wide warm decadal regime that included multiple strong or long-duration El Niños; and increased with a return to a cool decadal regime from about 1999 to 2004. Increased foraging effort and decreased mass gain of adult females, indicative of reduced foraging success and nutritional stress, were associated with high ocean temperatures. Conclusion Despite ranging widely and foraging deeply in cold waters beyond coastal thermoclines in the northeastern Pacific, elephant seals are impacted significantly by ocean thermal dynamics. Ocean warming redistributes prey decreasing foraging success of females, which in turn leads to lower weaning mass of pups. Annual fluctuations in weaning mass, in turn, reflect the foraging success of females during the year prior to giving birth and signals changes in ocean temperature cycles.

  19. A hybrid floating brush seal (HFBS) for improved sealing and wear performance in turbomachinery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattime, Scott Byran

    A conceptually new type of seal has been developed for gas turbine applications which dramatically reduces wear and leakage associated with current labyrinth and brush seal technologies. The Hybrid Floating Brush Seal (HFBS) combines brush seal and film riding face seal technologies to create a hybrid seal that allows both axial and radial excursions of the sealed shaft, while simultaneously eliminating interface surface speeds (friction and heat) between the rotor and the brush material that characterize standard brush seal technology. A simple test rig was designed to evaluate feasibility of the HFBS under relatively low pressures and rotational speeds (50psig, 5krpm). A second test stand was created to study the effects of centrifugal force on bristle deflection. A third test facility was constructed for prototype development and extensive room temperature testing at moderate pressures and fairly high rotational speeds (100psig, 40krpm). This test rig also allowed the evaluation of the HFBS during axial movement of a rotating shaft. An analytical model to predict the effects of centrifugal force on the bristles of a rotating brush seal was developed. Room temperature analysis of the HFBS proved successful for relatively high operating rotational velocities at moderate pressures with very acceptable leakage rates for gas turbine engines. Brush seals were able to track rotor speeds up to 24krpm while maintaining sealing integrity. The HFBS's ability to function under axial shaft displacement and synchronous dynamic radial loading was also proven successful. Hydrodynamic performance of the face seal was proven to provide adequate stiffness and load carrying capacity to keep the brush seal from contacting the face seal at pressure drops across the brush of up to 100psi. Leakage performance over standard brush seal and labyrinth technology was quite dramatic. The HFBS showed its sealing advantage using much higher radial interference between the rotor and the bristle

  20. Does the seal licensing system in Scotland have a negative impact on seal welfare?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Nunny

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the licensing system that permits seal shooting in Scotland, which was established under Part 6 Conservation of Seals of the Marine (Scotland Act 2010. Four approaches were used: data were collated and analyzed from both the Scottish Government and Scottish Marine Animal Stranding Scheme; a survey was sent to current license holders and informal interviews were conducted with key stakeholder types. Between February 2011 and the end of October 2015, 1229 gray seals and 275 common seals were reported shot under license to the Scottish Government. The numbers of seals reported as shot has reduced year-on-year since the licensing system was put in place. While some license holders, notably fish farms, were using some non-lethal forms of deterrent to reduce seal-related damage, these were often used alongside seal shooting. Of the seals reported as shot to the Scottish Government, only a small percentage were also reported to the Scottish Marine Animal Stranding Scheme, despite this being a licensing requirement. Only 2.3% of the shot gray seals and 4.5% of the shot common seals were necropsied. There is evidence from these necropsies that some seals had not died instantly or had not been shot in the manner recommended by the Scottish Seal Management Code of Practice. These preliminary results show that more carcasses need to be recovered and necropsied if the welfare implications of current seal shooting practice are to be properly assessed. The current legislation does not specify closed seasons to protect breeding seals and thirty-five per cent of necropsied seals were pregnant gray seals. Seals have also been shot during their lactation periods when pups are dependent on their mothers. This raises significant welfare concerns. The re-introduction of closed seasons specific to each species of seal is recommended along with greater effort to deploy non-lethal methods. Independent assessment of the number of seals being killed

  1. Dynamic Moisture Sorption and Desorption in Fumed Silica-filled Silicone Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautschold, Olivia Carol [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-02

    Characterizing dynamic moisture sorption and desorption in fumed silica-filled silicone foam is necessary for determining material compatibilities and life predictions, particularly in sealed environments that may be exposed to a range of environmental conditions. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) were performed on S5470 fumed silica-filled silicone foam to determine the weight percent of moisture at saturation. Additionally, TGA was used to determine the time, temperature, and relative humidity levels required for sorption and desorption of physisorbed moisture in S5470.

  2. Climate change and the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris population in Baja California, Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María C García-Aguilar

    Full Text Available The Earth's climate is warming, especially in the mid- and high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. The northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris breeds and haul-outs on islands and the mainland of Baja California, Mexico, and California, U.S.A. At the beginning of the 21st century, numbers of elephant seals in California are increasing, but the status of Baja California populations is unknown, and some data suggest they may be decreasing. We hypothesize that the elephant seal population of Baja California is experiencing a decline because the animals are not migrating as far south due to warming sea and air temperatures. Here we assessed population trends of the Baja California population, and climate change in the region. The numbers of northern elephant seals in Baja California colonies have been decreasing since the 1990s, and both the surface waters off Baja California and the local air temperatures have warmed during the last three decades. We propose that declining population sizes may be attributable to decreased migration towards the southern portions of the range in response to the observed temperature increases. Further research is needed to confirm our hypothesis; however, if true, it would imply that elephant seal colonies of Baja California and California are not demographically isolated which would pose challenges to environmental and management policies between Mexico and the United States.

  3. MEMS-based Porous Silicon Preconcentrators Filled with Carbopack-B for Explosives Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Camara , El Hadji Malik; James , Franck; Breuil , Philippe; Pijolat , Christophe; Briand , Danick; De Rooij , Nicolaas F

    2014-01-01

    International audience; In this paper we report the detection of explosive compounds using a miniaturized gas preconcentrator (μGP) made of porous silicon (PS) filled in with Carbopack B as an adsorbent material. The μGP includes also a platinum heater patterned at the backside and fluidic connectors sealed on the glass cover. Our μGP is designed and optimized through fluidic and thermal simulations for meeting the requirements of trace explosives detection. The thermal mass of the device was...

  4. Static and Dynamic Friction Behavior of Candidate High Temperature Airframe Seal Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, C.; Lukaszewicz, V.; Morris, D. E.; Steinetz, B. M.

    1994-01-01

    The following report describes a series of research tests to evaluate candidate high temperature materials for static to moderately dynamic hypersonic airframe seals. Pin-on-disk reciprocating sliding tests were conducted from 25 to 843 C in air and hydrogen containing inert atmospheres. Friction, both dynamic and static, was monitored and serves as the primary test measurement. In general, soft coatings lead to excessive static friction and temperature affected friction in air environments only.

  5. Investigations of glass sealing and reactive air brazing materials for joining high temperature solid oxide fuel cells by dilatometric examinations; Anwendung dilatometrischer Messungen bei der Entwicklung von Glasloten und reaktiven Metallloten zum Fuegen von Hochtemperaturbrennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichle, M.S. [Parker Hannifin GmbH, Bietigheim-Bissingen (Germany); Federmann, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, ZAT, Juelich (Germany); Reisgen, U. [RWTH Aachen University, ISF, Aachen (Germany); Koppitz, T.

    2011-03-15

    The principle of operation of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is very simple. However, the fact that very different materials are used for the individual components requires advanced thermal joining techniques to join them in a functional manner. Two very distinct designs have established themselves for the two different intended applications: decentralised power generation (stationary SOFCs) on the one hand, and power converters for vehicles (mobile SOFCs) on the other hand. As a consequence, alternative techniques for joining the individual components are also required. The principal joining process for the stationary SOFC design consists of joining individual steel plates with a glass sealant in an electrically insulating way so that they form an SOFC stack. For the mobile fuel cell design, the SOFC stack consists of individual thin steel cassettes. The window frame of the cassettes, which is made of ferritic chromium steel, is brazed to the ceramic layer of the zirconium oxide solid electrolyte using a filler metal. The material used is a silver-based brazing filler metal which contains only small amounts of copper oxide (CuO) and titanium hydride (TiH{sub 2}) as wetting agents. Both joining processes must be applicable in normal atmospheric air, i. e. under oxidative conditions. R and D activities continue for improving the efficiency and long-term operational stability of the technology to such an extent that SOFCs will become ready for the energy sector market. The two joining techniques described cannot yet be considered standard processes. They, too, will require continuous improvement with respect to reproducibility, endurance and strength of the joints. The Special Joining Techniques working group at Forschungszentrum Juelich uses specially modified dilatometric techniques as suitable quick replacement methods for studying and measuring the joining characteristics of the materials without having to manufacture complex and expensive SOFC stacks. The

  6. QENS investigation of filled rubbers

    CERN Document Server

    Triolo, A; Desmedt, A; Pieper, J K; Lo Celso, F; Triolo, R; Negroni, F; Arrighi, V; Qian, H; Frick, B

    2002-01-01

    The polymer segmental dynamics is investigated in a series of silica-filled rubbers. The presence of inert fillers in polymers greatly affects the mechanical and physical performance of the final materials. For example, silica has been proposed as a reinforcing agent of elastomers in tire production. Results from quasielastic neutron scattering and Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA) measurements are presented on styrene-ran-butadiene rubber filled with silica. A clear indication is obtained of the existence of a bimodal dynamics, which can be rationalized in terms of the relaxation of bulk rubber and the much slower relaxation of the rubber adsorbed on the filler surface. (orig.)

  7. Gas-Filled Capillary Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a 1-D, quasi-steady-state numerical model for a gas-filled capillary discharge that is designed to aid in selecting the optimum capillary radius in order to guide a laser beam with the required intensity through the capillary. The model also includes the option for an external solenoid B-field around the capillary, which increases the depth of the parabolic density channel in the capillary, thereby allowing for propagation of smaller laser beam waists. The model has been used to select the parameters for gas-filled capillaries to be utilized during the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration -- Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) experiment

  8. Prototypes of phosphorus-32 sealed sources for use in Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaya Garro, Olgger; Vela Mora, Mariano; Revilla Silva, Angel Revilla

    2005-01-01

    It has developed prototypes of phosphorus-32 sealed sources for use in Brachytherapy. This one was made in two stages, at the first one, we designed and constructed the container (capsule), the filling system and the sealed system; at the second one, we made the irradiation of the capsules containing the 'target'. The prototypes was made of aluminum in cylindrical geometry. During the irradiation test was made using two different dimensions: one of 1 mm outer diameter and 1 cm length and another one of 0.8 mm outer diameter and 5 mm length. They were radiated in the core of the RP-10 research reactor, at 7.93 x10 13 n/cm 2 .s thermal neutron flux during 27 operation cycles. Activities of 144.53 MBq (3.91 mCi) and 107.67 MBq (2.91 mCi) was obtained for each case. This activities are adequate to restenosis and for some tumors treatment. We can observed that the capsules irradiated passed visual inspection in its physical integrity (leakage and geometry). It has been demonstrated, that the beta radiation for his minor power of penetration and its high interaction, causes major local damage to the malignant tissue, minimizing the damage of the healthy surrounding tissues. It has been advisable to use for the treatment of illnesses of the circulatory system and some tumors. At the present, the source of strontium-90 are the most beta ray source used, but of this one are obtained as fission product of uranium target, where valuable radioactive waste is generated, whereas if we were using phosphorus-32 that we propose, radioactive waste would not be generated since it would take place directly as sealed source, for reaction (n, β). (author)

  9. The Effect of Canal Contamination with Saliva on Apical Sealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sabaghi

    2014-08-01

    Methods: In this laboratory study, 58 human uni-root teeth were cleaned and shaped for obturation with gutta percha and sealer AH26. In the case group, specimens were contaminated with human saliva immediately before obturation, whereas the teeth in the control group were kept dry. All canals were filled by lateral condensation technique. Moreover, the teeth were placed in methylene blue dye for 3 days. Dye penetration was measured using a stereomicrosope. As a matter of fact, the study data were analyzed via utilizing t-test. Results: A significant difference was found between the two groups in regard with the apical leakage(P<0.001. The microleakage mean of dye in the dry group was 3/48mm, whereas it was 6/36mm in the saliva contaminated group. Conclusion: The study findings revealed that complete drying of canal can improve apical sealing.

  10. High pressure, high current, low inductance, high reliability sealed terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN; McKeever, John W [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-03-23

    The invention is a terminal assembly having a casing with at least one delivery tapered-cone conductor and at least one return tapered-cone conductor routed there-through. The delivery and return tapered-cone conductors are electrically isolated from each other and positioned in the annuluses of ordered concentric cones at an off-normal angle. The tapered cone conductor service can be AC phase conductors and DC link conductors. The center core has at least one service conduit of gate signal leads, diagnostic signal wires, and refrigerant tubing routed there-through. A seal material is in direct contact with the casing inner surface, the tapered-cone conductors, and the service conduits thereby hermetically filling the interstitial space in the casing interior core and center core. The assembly provides simultaneous high-current, high-pressure, low-inductance, and high-reliability service.

  11. Analysis on the Viscous Pumping in a Magnetic Fluid Seal Under a Rotating Load and the Seal Design

    OpenAIRE

    長屋, 幸助; 大沼, 浩身; 佐藤, 淳

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses effects of viscous pumping in a magnetic fluid seal under a rotating load. The Reynolds equation was presented for the seal based on magnetic fluid mechanics, and the expressions for obtaining pressures in the seal, eccentricities of the rotating shaft due to the viscous pumping and seal pressures were given. Numerical Calculations were carried out for some sample problems, and the effect of magnetic flux densities on the pressure in the seal and the seal pressures were c...

  12. Gas sealing welding method and device for nuclear fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Masayuki; Nishiyama, Motokuni; Kamimura, Katsuichiro; Yagi, Eiji; Nakase, Tsuyoshi; Kobogata, Sadao; Taniguchi, Jun-ichi; Uesugi, Yoshisaku.

    1995-01-01

    An end plug and a cladding tube are held by clamping, respectively, by opposing movable electrode and static electrode. The movable electrode is forwarded toward the static electrode. The end plug and the cladding tube are abutted and held at a slight gap between their end faces. A region to be welded is surrounded by a pressurizing chamber and the side of the chamber is evacuated and He gas is filled in the cladding tube. Then, one of the electrodes is forwarded, to seal the abutted end faces of the end plug and the cladding tube. Then, pressure and welding current required for welding are applied to the abutted ends, and He gas is sealed in the vessel. The displacement of pressurization caused by slipping when the required pressure is applied to the abutted ends is detected by a sensor, and the operation of the welding control device for starting current supply is terminated by the detection signals. Abutment accuracy between the abutment of the cladding tube and the end plug as a nuclear fuel rod can be ensured, to further improve and stabilize the welding quality. (N.H.)

  13. Design and development of face seal type sealing plug for advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, S.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Patel, R.J.; Agrawal, R.G.; Vaze, K.K.

    2005-09-01

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor is a vertical pressure tube type reactor having light water as its coolant and heavy water as moderator. Sealing plug is required to close the pressure boundary of main heat transport system of the reactor by preventing escape of light water/steam From the coolant channel. There are 452 coolant channels in the reactor located in square lattice pitch. Sealing plug is located at the top of each coolant channel (in the top end fitting). Top end fitting is having a stepped bore to create a sealing face. Sealing plug is held through its expanded jaws in a specially provided groove of the end fitting. The plug was designed and prototypes were manufactured considering its functional importance, intricate design and precision machining requirements. Sealing plug consists of about 20 components mostly made up of precipitation hardening stainless steel, which is suitable for water environment and meets other requirements of strength and resistance to wear and galling. Seal disc is a critical component of the sealing plug as it is the pressure-retaining component. It is a circular disc with protruded stem. One face of the seal disc is nickel plated in the peripheral area that creates the sealing by abutting against the sealing face provided in the end fitting. The typical shape and profile of seal disc provides flexibility and allows elastic deformation to assist in locking of sealing plug and creating adequate seating force for effective sealing. Design and development aspects of the sealing plug have been detailed out in this report. Also results of stress analysis and experimental studies for seal disc have been mentioned in the report. Stress analysis and experimental testing was required for the seal disc because high stresses are developed due to its exposure to high pressure and temperature environment of Main Heat Transport system. Hot testing was carried out to simulate the reactor-simulated condition. The performance was found to be

  14. Filling of charged cylindrical capillaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Siddhartha; Chanda, Sourayon; Eijkel, J.C.T.; Tas, N.R.; Chakraborty, Suman; Mitra, Sushanta K.

    2014-01-01

    We provide an analytical model to describe the filling dynamics of horizontal cylindrical capillaries having charged walls. The presence of surface charge leads to two distinct effects: It leads to a retarding electrical force on the liquid column and also causes a reduced viscous drag force because

  15. Space-filling polyhedral sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaland, Peter

    2016-06-21

    Solid sorbents, systems, and methods for pumping, storage, and purification of gases are disclosed. They derive from the dynamics of porous and free convection for specific gas/sorbent combinations and use space filling polyhedral microliths with facial aplanarities to produce sorbent arrays with interpenetrating interstitial manifolds of voids.

  16. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  17. Numerical Investigation of the Effect of Radial Lip Seal Geometry on Sealing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tok, G.; Parlar, Z.; Temiz, V.

    2018-01-01

    Sealing elements are often needed in industry and especially in machine design. With the change and development of machine technology from day to day, sealing elements show continuous development and change in parallel with these developments. Many factors influence the performance of the sealing elements such as shaft surface roughness, radial force, lip geometry etc. In addition, the radial lip seals must have a certain pre-load and interference in order to provide a good sealing. This also affects the friction torque. Researchers are developing new seal designs to reduce friction losses in mechanical systems. In the presented study, the effect of the lip seal geometry on sealing performance will be examined numerically. The numerical model created for this purpose will be verified with experimental data firstly. In the numerical model, shaft and seal will be modeled as hyper-elastic in 2D and 3D. NBR (Nitrile Butadiene Rubber) as seal material will be analyzed for the rotating shaft state at constant speed by applying a uniform radial force.

  18. Tamper-indicating quantum optical seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humble, Travis S [ORNL; Williams, Brian P [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Confidence in the means for identifying when tampering occurs is critical for containment and surveillance technologies. Fiber-optic seals have proven especially useful for actively surveying large areas or inventories due to the extended transmission range and flexible layout of fiber. However, it is reasonable to suspect that an intruder could tamper with a fiber-optic sensor by accurately replicating the light transmitted through the fiber. In this contribution, we demonstrate a novel approach to using fiber-optic seals for safeguarding large-scale inventories with increased confidence in the state of the seal. Our approach is based on the use of quantum mechanical phenomena to offer unprecedented surety in the authentication of the seal state. In particular, we show how quantum entangled photons can be used to monitor the integrity of a fiber-optic cable - the entangled photons serve as active sensing elements whose non-local correlations indicate normal seal operation. Moreover, we prove using the quantum no-cloning theorem that attacks against the quantum seal necessarily disturb its state and that these disturbances are immediately detected. Our quantum approach to seal authentication is based on physical principles alone and does not require the use of secret or proprietary information to ensure proper operation. We demonstrate an implementation of the quantum seal using a pair of entangled photons and we summarize our experimental results including the probability of detecting intrusions and the overall stability of the system design. We conclude by discussing the use of both free-space and fiber-based quantum seals for surveying large areas and inventories.

  19. Reactor coolant pump seal leakage monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, D.M.; Spencer, J.W.; Morris, D.J.; James, W.; Shugars, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    Problems with reactor coolant pump seals have historically accounted for a large percentage of unscheduled outages. Studies performed for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have shown that the replacement of coolant pump seals has been one of the leading causes of nuclear plant unavailability over the last ten years. Failures of coolant pump seals can lead to primary coolant leakage rates of 200-500 gallons per minute into the reactor building. Airborne activity and high surface contamination levels following these failures require a major cleanup effort and increases the time and personnel exposure required to refurbish the pump seals. One of the problems in assessing seal integrity is the inability to accurately measure seal leakage. Because seal leakage flow is normally very small, it cannot be sensed directly with normal flow instrumentation, but must be inferred from several other temperature and flow measurements. In operating plants the leakage rate has been quantified with a tipping-bucket gauge, a device which indicates when one quart of water has been accumulated. The tipping-bucket gauge has been used for most rainfall-intensity monitoring. The need for a more accurate and less expensive gauge has been addressed. They have developed a drop-counter precipitation sensor has been developed and optimized. The applicability of the drop-counter device to the problem of measuring seal leakage is being investigated. If a review of system specification and known drop-counter performance indicates that this method is feasible for measuring seal leak rates, a drop-counter gauge will be fabricated and tested in the laboratory. If laboratory tests are successful the gauge will be demonstrated in a pump test loop at Ontario Hydro and evaluated under simulated plant conditions. 3 references, 2 figures

  20. Numerical simulation on reasonable hole-sealing depth of boreholes for gas extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dan; Pan, Jingtao

    2018-04-01

    To overcome the low efficiency of extracting gas in coal reservoirs with a low gas permeability, some boreholes were drilled for gas extraction in No. 2 coal reservoir of Wangjialing Coalmine in Shanxi Province, China and reasonably sealed. Aiming at shortfalls such as rapid attenuation of volume for extracted gas as well as low gas permeability when using boreholes in the No. 2 coal reservoir, the traditional COMSOL MultiphysicsMT Earth Science Module was used to couple the three governing equations (Darcy-Brinkman-Navier-Stokes) for fluids. On this basis, numerical simulation on the seepage law along the directions of roadways and boreholes was carried out. The simulation results indicated that when the hole-sealing length was within the width range of fractures in roadways, the negative pressure not only led the gas in surrounding rock masses to flow to the boreholes, but also made the air flow in roadways to permeate into coal walls. As a result, gas and air flows both entered into the boreholes through the loosening zone containing fractures, resulting in seepage of air in roadway to the boreholes. The seepage velocity along the roadway direction under condition with a hole-sealing length of 12 m was obviously slower than that when the hole-sealing length was 8 m. While, the method by simply increasing the length of the hole-sealing section for boreholes failed to effectively stop the air flow in roadways from permeating into the coal wall and then entering the boreholes. Moreover, the increase in the hole-sealing length brought about much more difficulties to the hole-sealing construction. So, the method is not operable in practical condition of the coal mine. Therefore, it is necessary to improve the traditional hole-sealing technology based on foamed macromolecular materials which are mainly made of polyurethane (PU) and use the fluid wall-type hole-sealing technology based on solid-liquid coupling. Then, the effects of gas extraction before and after using

  1. Numerical simulation on reasonable hole-sealing depth of boreholes for gas extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the low efficiency of extracting gas in coal reservoirs with a low gas permeability, some boreholes were drilled for gas extraction in No. 2 coal reservoir of Wangjialing Coalmine in Shanxi Province, China and reasonably sealed. Aiming at shortfalls such as rapid attenuation of volume for extracted gas as well as low gas permeability when using boreholes in the No. 2 coal reservoir, the traditional COMSOL MultiphysicsMT Earth Science Module was used to couple the three governing equations (Darcy-Brinkman–Navier-Stokes for fluids. On this basis, numerical simulation on the seepage law along the directions of roadways and boreholes was carried out. The simulation results indicated that when the hole-sealing length was within the width range of fractures in roadways, the negative pressure not only led the gas in surrounding rock masses to flow to the boreholes, but also made the air flow in roadways to permeate into coal walls. As a result, gas and air flows both entered into the boreholes through the loosening zone containing fractures, resulting in seepage of air in roadway to the boreholes. The seepage velocity along the roadway direction under condition with a hole-sealing length of 12 m was obviously slower than that when the hole-sealing length was 8 m. While, the method by simply increasing the length of the hole-sealing section for boreholes failed to effectively stop the air flow in roadways from permeating into the coal wall and then entering the boreholes. Moreover, the increase in the hole-sealing length brought about much more difficulties to the hole-sealing construction. So, the method is not operable in practical condition of the coal mine. Therefore, it is necessary to improve the traditional hole-sealing technology based on foamed macromolecular materials which are mainly made of polyurethane (PU and use the fluid wall-type hole-sealing technology based on solid-liquid coupling. Then, the effects of gas extraction

  2. Design, construction and monitoring of sealing work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischle, W.R.; Schwieger, K.

    1986-01-01

    By flooding a worked-out mine, it was possible to test the sealing work on a full scale. The aim is to erect an impermeable, statically secure seal requiring no maintenance. Apart from testing measuring equipment, data were to be obtained for later safety calculations. The measurements are also used to check the computer programs. After a dry period of over a year, flooding started at the beginning of 1985 and so did the testing of the seal and the measuring equipment in caustic soda solution. (orig./PW) [de

  3. Magnetic fluid seals for DWDM filter manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhixin

    2002-01-01

    Performance requirements of rotary magnetic fluid seals for thin film dense wavelength division multiplexing filter manufacturing are discussed. High speed, large diameter, tight tolerance for rotating accuracy and motion control are some of the technical challenges in this application. Analytical methods for studying these technical issues and experimental data are presented. Innovative design approaches are also discussed. It is shown that using the most advanced magnetic fluid technology and seal design technology, magnetic fluid seals can provide satisfactory performance in this challenging new application

  4. Pilot cryo tunnel: Attachments, seals, and insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. F.; Ware, G. D.; Ramsey, J. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Several different tests are described which simulated the actual configuration of a cryogenic wind tunnel operating at pressures up to 5 atmospheres (507 kPa) and temperatures from -320 F (78K) to 120 F (322K) in order to determine compatible bolting, adequate sealing, and effective insulating materials. The evaluation of flange attachments (continuous threaded studs) considered bolting based on compatible flanges, attachment materials, and prescribed bolt elongations. Various types of seals and seal configurations were studied to determine suitability and reusability under the imposed pressure and temperature loadings. The temperature profile was established for several materials used for structural supports.

  5. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Yeong -Shyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Choi, Jung-Pyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephens, Elizabeth V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevenson, Jeffry W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lara-Curzio, Edgar [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-04-30

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  6. Infiltrating/sealing proximal caries lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martignon, S; Ekstrand, K R; Gomez, J

    2012-01-01

    This randomized split-mouth controlled clinical trial aimed at assessing the therapeutic effects of infiltration vs. sealing for controlling caries progression on proximal surfaces. Out of 90 adult students/patients assessed at university clinics and agreeing to participate, 39, each with 3...... differences in lesion progression between infiltration and placebo (P = 0.0012) and between sealing and placebo (P = 0.0269). The study showed that infiltration and sealing are significantly better than placebo treatment for controlling caries progression on proximal lesions. No significant difference...

  7. The development of auto-sealing system for field joints of polyethylene coated pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okano, Yoshihiro [NKK Corp., Tsu, Mie (Japan); Shoji, Norio [NKK Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Namioka, Toshiyuki [Nippon Kokan Koji Corp., Osaka (Japan); Komura, Minoru [Nitto Denko Corp., Fukaya, Saitama (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    The paper describes the development of a system to create high quality, automatic sealing of field joints of polyethylene coated pipelines. The system uses a combination of electrically heated shrink sleeves and a low pressure chamber. The self-heating shrink sleeves include electric wires and heat themselves when connected to electricity. A method was developed to eliminate air trapped between the sleeve and steel pipe by shrinking the sleeves under low pressure. The low pressure condition was automatically and easily attained by using a vacuum chamber. The authors verified that the system produces high quality sealing of field joints.

  8. Effect of bar sealing parameters on OPP/MCPP heat seal strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bar sealing parameters on the heat seal strength of oriented polypropylene (OPP/metallic cast polypropylene (MCPP laminate film was investigated. Based on the results obtained from the parametric study, a bar sealing process window was developed. All points drop within the process window are combinations of platen temperature and dwell time that produce acceptable heat seal. Optimum combinations are indicated by the lower border of the window. The plateau initiation temperature, Tpi of OPP/MCPP laminate film used in the present study occurred before the final melting temperature, Tmf of the sealant material. The highest achievable heat seal strength was at the plateau region, and the corresponding failure modes were delaminating, tearing or combine failure modes (delaminating and tearing. Minimum pressure level of 1.25 bars is necessary to bring the laminate interface into intimate contact in order to effect sealing.

  9. Aerial surveys of seals at Rødsand seal sanctuary and adjacent haul-out sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilmann, J.; Dietz, R.; Edren, Susi M.C.

    This report describes the preliminary results of aerial surveys at Rødsand seal sanctuary, southeast Denmark and adjacent seal haul-out sites in southwestern Baltic. The work was carried out in connection with studies of potential effects of the Nysted offshore wind farm. Rødsand seal sanctuary...... is a part of seal management area 4, and the area is believed to hold a more or less closed population with little exchange to other areas. Although the harbour seal is relatively stationary there may be movements between the haul-out sites in the area. A possible reaction to disturbance from...... the construction and operation of the wind farm may be that the seals use other haul-out sites to a higher extend....

  10. Investigating the sealing capacity of a seal system in rock salt (DOPAS project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantschik, Kyra; Moog, Helge C.; Czaikowski, Oliver; Wieczorek, Klaus [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    This paper describes research and development work on plugging and sealing repositories, an issue of fundamental importance for the rock salt option which represents one of the three European repository options, besides the clay rock and the crystalline rock options. The programme aims at providing experimental data needed for the theoretical analysis of the long-term sealing capacity of concrete- based sealing materials. In order to demonstrate hydro-mechanical material stability under representative load scenarios, a comprehensive laboratory testing programme is carried out. This comprises investigation of the sealing capacity of the combined seal system and impact of the so-called excavation-damaged zones (EDZ) as well as investigation of the hydro-chemical long-term stability of the seal in contact with different brines under diffusive and advective conditions. This paper presents experimental approaches and preliminary results from laboratory investigations on salt concrete and combined systems as obtained to date.

  11. Air tight electrical box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pringle, C.G.

    1990-08-14

    An air-impervious electrical box to facilitate air sealing a house comprises an integral, rigid box body having a continuous flange, integral with the body, circumscribing and outwardly extending from the sides of the body. This flange is rearwardly positioned behind the front edges of the sides of the body a predetermined distance so that the electrical box may be secured to framing by nailing through the flange. Drywall is then secured to the frame on top of and adjecent to the flange. Such box eliminates the necessity for solid backing and minimizes passage of air through the box and space between the drywall and the box.

  12. Determination of the Apical Sealing Abilities of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Portland Cement, and Bioaggregate After Irrigation with Different Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, H Melike; Saklar, Feridun; Bayram, Emre; Orucoglu, Hasan; Bozkurt, Alperen

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the sealing ability of root-end filling materials such as mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Portland cement, and bioaggregate (BA) after irrigation with different solutions. We examined 130 human maxillar central teeth. After cutting the teeth at the cementoenamel junction, the root canals were expanded using nickel-titanium rotary instruments. Root canals were filled with AH-plus and gutta-percha. Then, the roots were cut apically, and 3 mm deep retrograde cavities were prepared. The roots were divided 12 experimental groups, consisting 10 teeth each; the positive and negative control groups contained five teeth each. The retrograde cavities were rinsed using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), chlorhexidine (CHX), BioPure(™) mixture of a tetracycline isomer, an acid, and a detergent (MTAD), or distilled water. Next, groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were sealed with MTA; groups 5, 6, 7, and 8 were sealed with Portland cement; and groups 9, 10, 11, and 12 were sealed with BA. Then, apical microleakage was evaluated by using a computerized fluid filtration method. The results of the leakage test were statistically evaluated by the post-hoc Tukey's test. MTA, Portland cement, and BA root-end filling materials showed the least leakage in the CHX and distilled water groups. The highest leakage was observed in the EDTA and MTAD groups. The sealing ability of BA was as good as that of MTA. EDTA and MTAD increased the apical leakage and CHX and distilled water decreased the leakage of the root-end filling materials examined in this study.

  13. Troubleshooting ProSeal LMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimla Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Supraglottic devices have changed the face of the airway management. These devices have contributed in a big way in airway management especially, in the difficult airway scenario significantly decreasing the pharyngolaryngeal morbidity. There is a plethora of these devices, which has been well matched by their wider acceptance in clinical practice. ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (PLMA is one such frequently used device employed for spontaneous as well as controlled ventilation. However, the use of PLMAat tunes maybe associated with certain problems. Some of the problems related with its use are unique while others are akin to the classic laryngeal mask airway (eLMA. However, expertise is needed for its safe and judicious use, correct placement, recognition and management of its various malpositions and complications. The present article describes the tests employed for proper confirmation of placementto assess the ventilatooy and the drain tube functions of the mask, diagnosis of various malpositions and the management of these aspects. All these areas have been highlighted under the heading of troubleshooting PLMA. Many problems can be solved by proper patient and procedure selection, maintaining adequate depth of anaesthesia, diagnosis and management of malpositions. Proper fixation of the device and monitoring cuff pressure intraopera-tively may bring down the incidence of airway morbidity.

  14. Rapid Sampling from Sealed Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, R.G.; Garcia, A.R.E.; Martinez, R.K.; Baca, E.T.

    1999-01-01

    The authors have developed several different types of tools for sampling from sealed containers. These tools allow the user to rapidly drill into a closed container, extract a sample of its contents (gas, liquid, or free-flowing powder), and permanently reseal the point of entry. This is accomplished without exposing the user or the environment to the container contents, even while drilling. The entire process is completed in less than 15 seconds for a 55 gallon drum. Almost any kind of container can be sampled (regardless of the materials) with wall thicknesses up to 1.3 cm and internal pressures up to 8 atm. Samples can be taken from the top, sides, or bottom of a container. The sampling tools are inexpensive, small, and easy to use. They work with any battery-powered hand drill. This allows considerable safety, speed, flexibility, and maneuverability. The tools also permit the user to rapidly attach plumbing, a pressure relief valve, alarms, or other instrumentation to a container. Possible applications include drum venting, liquid transfer, container flushing, waste characterization, monitoring, sampling for archival or quality control purposes, emergency sampling by rapid response teams, counter-terrorism, non-proliferation and treaty verification, and use by law enforcement personnel during drug or environmental raids

  15. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seals on Social Media

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As social media platforms develop, they potentially provide valuable information for wildlife researchers and managers. NOAA’s Hawaiian Monk Seal Research Program...

  16. Multi-Canister overpack sealing configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMITH, K.E.

    1998-01-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) position regarding the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) sealing configuration is to initially rely on an American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section III Subsection NB code compliant mechanical closure/sealing system to quickly and safely establish and maintain full confinement of radioactive materials prior to and during MCO fuel drying activities. Previous studies have shown the mechanical seal to be the preferred closure method, based on dose, cost, and schedule considerations. The cost and schedule impacts of redesigning the mechanical closure to a welded shield plug do not support changing the closure system. The SNF Project has determined that the combined mechanical/welded closure system meets or exceeds the regulatory requirements to provide redundant seals while accommodating key safety and schedule limitations that are unique to K Basins fuel removal effort

  17. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Fisheries Interactions data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains records of all documented hookings and/or entanglements of Hawaiian monk seals with actively fished gear, both commercial and recreational. The...

  18. Temporary fire sealing of penetrations on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondorp, H.L.

    1981-02-01

    The radiation shielding provided for TFTR for D-D and D-T operation will be penetrated by numerous electrical and mechanical services. Eventually, these penetrations will have to be sealed to provide the required fire resistance, tritium sealability, pressure integrity and radiation attenuation. For the initial hydrogen operation, however, fire sealing of the penetrations in the walls and floor is the primary concern. This report provides a discussion of the required and desirable properties of a temporary seal which can be used to seal these penetrations for the hydrogen operation and then subsequently be removed and replaced as required for the D-D and D-T operations. Several candidate designs are discussed and evaluated and recommendations are made for specific applications

  19. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Microsatellite Genotypes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Currently ~2,400 Hawaiian monk seal specimens have been analyzed genetically, providing genotypes at 18 microsatellite loci. These data are organized by individual,...

  20. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Survival Factors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records of survival factors recorded by PSD personnel and cooperating scientists as part of the ongoing monk seal population assessment...