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Sample records for seal glass enhanced

  1. Glass sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  2. Solid oxide fuel cell having a glass composite seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rose, Anthony J.; Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl Jacob

    2013-04-16

    A solid oxide fuel cell stack having a plurality of cassettes and a glass composite seal disposed between the sealing surfaces of adjacent cassettes, thereby joining the cassettes and providing a hermetic seal therebetween. The glass composite seal includes an alkaline earth aluminosilicate (AEAS) glass disposed about a viscous glass such that the AEAS glass retains the viscous glass in a predetermined position between the first and second sealing surfaces. The AEAS glass provides geometric stability to the glass composite seal to maintain the proper distance between the adjacent cassettes while the viscous glass provides for a compliant and self-healing seal. The glass composite seal may include fibers, powders, and/or beads of zirconium oxide, aluminum oxide, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), or mixtures thereof, to enhance the desirable properties of the glass composite seal.

  3. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Yeong -Shyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Choi, Jung-Pyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephens, Elizabeth V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevenson, Jeffry W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lara-Curzio, Edgar [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-04-30

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  4. High thermal expansion, sealing glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.

    1993-11-16

    A glass composition is described for hermetically sealing to high thermal expansion materials such as aluminum alloys, stainless steels, copper, and copper/beryllium alloys, which includes between about 10 and about 25 mole percent Na[sub 2]O, between about 10 and about 25 mole percent K[sub 2]O, between about 5 and about 15 mole percent Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], between about 35 and about 50 mole percent P[sub 2]O[sub 5] and between about 5 and about 15 mole percent of one of PbO, BaO, and mixtures thereof. The composition, which may also include between 0 and about 5 mole percent Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] and between 0 and about 10 mole percent B[sub 2]O[sub 3], has a thermal expansion coefficient in a range of between about 160 and 210[times]10[sup [minus]7]/C and a dissolution rate in a range of between about 2[times]10[sup [minus]7] and 2[times]10[sup [minus]9]g/cm[sup 2]-min. This composition is suitable to hermetically seal to metallic electrical components which will be subjected to humid environments over an extended period of time.

  5. Molybdenum sealing glass-ceramic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagan, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    A glass-ceramic composition is described having low hydrogen and helium permeability properties, along with high fracture strength, and a thermal coefficient of expansion similar to that of molybdenum. The composition is adaptable for hermetically sealing to molybdenum at temperatures between 900 and about 950 0 C to form a hermetically sealed insulator body

  6. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  7. Glass ceramic seals to inconel

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollister, Howard L.; Reed, Scott T.

    1983-11-08

    A glass ceramic composition prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight, 65-80% SiO.sub.2, 8-16%, Li.sub.2 O, 2-8% , Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 1-8% K.sub.2 O, 1-5% P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and 1.5-7% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, to the following processing steps of heating the glass composition to a temperature sufficient to crystallize lithium metasilicate therein, holding the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to dissolve the lithium metasilicate therein thereby creating cristobalite nucleii, cooling the glass composition and maintaining the composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to recrystallize lithium metasilicate therein, and thermally treating the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to cause growth of cristobalite and further crystallization of lithium metasilicate producing a glass ceramic composition having a specific thermal expansion coefficient and products containing said composition.

  8. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    1987-11-10

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  9. Glass-ceramic composition for hermetic seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, C.P. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The invention relates to a glass-ceramic composition having a high fracture strength adaptable for hermetically sealing to chromium bearing iron or nickel base alloys at temperatures of between about 950 0 C to about 1100 0 C to form a hermetically sealed insulator body, comprising from about 55 to about 65 weight percent SiO 2 , from about 0 to about 5 weight percent Al 2 O 3 , from about 6 to about 11 weight % Li 2 O, from about 25 to about 32 weight percent BaO, from about 0.5 to about 1.0 weight percent CoO and from about 1.5 to about 3.5 weight percent P 2 O 5

  10. Glass-ceramic composition for hermetic seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Jr., Clifford P.

    1979-01-01

    The invention relates to a glass-ceramic composition having a high fracture strength adaptable for hermetically sealing to chromium bearing iron or nickel base alloys at temperatures of between about 950.degree. C to about 1100.degree. C to form a hermetically sealed insulator body, comprising from about 55 to about 65 weight percent SiO.sub.2, from about 0 to about 5 weight percent Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, from about 6 to about 11 weight % Li.sub.2 O, from about 25 to about 32 weight percent BaO, from about 0.5 to about 1.0 weight percent CoO and from about 1.5 to about 3.5 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5.

  11. Crack Growth Properties of Sealing Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Tandon, R.

    2008-01-01

    The crack growth properties of several sealing glasses were measured using constant stress rate testing in 2% and 95% RH (relative humidity). Crack growth parameters measured in high humidity are systematically smaller (n and B) than those measured in low humidity, and velocities for dry environments are approx. 100x lower than for wet environments. The crack velocity is very sensitivity to small changes in RH at low RH. Confidence intervals on parameters that were estimated from propagation of errors were comparable to those from Monte Carlo simulation.

  12. Ceramic-glass-metal seal by microwave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1985-01-01

    A method for producing a ceramic-glass-metal seal by microwaving mixes a slurry of glass sealing material and coupling agent and applies same to ceramic and metal workpieces. The slurry and workpieces are then insulated and microwaved at a power, time and frequency sufficient to cause a liquid phase reaction in the slurry. The reaction of the glass sealing material forms a chemically different seal than that which would be formed by conventional heating because it is formed by diffusion rather than by wetting of the reactants.

  13. Glass ceramic-to-metal seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    1982-04-19

    A glass ceramic composition prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight, 65 to 80% SiO/sub 2/, 8 to 16% Li/sub 2/O, 2 to 8% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 1 to 8% K/sub 2/O, 1 to 5% P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and 1.5 to 7% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, to the following processing steps of heating the glass composition to a temperature sufficient to crystallize lithium metasilicate therein, holding the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to dissolve the lithium metasilicate therein thereby creating cristobalite nucleii, cooling the glass composition and maintaining the composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to recrystallize lithium metasilicate therein, and thermally treating the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to caus growth of cristobalite and further crystallization of lithium metasilicate producing a glass ceramic composition having a specific thermal expansion coefficient and products containing said composition.

  14. Development of Hermetic Sealing Glasses for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sealing glasses, either rigid glass-ceramics or viscous, non-crystallizing compositions, will be developed and sealing processes will be optimized based on NASA's...

  15. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weite; Chu, Cha Y.; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Routbort, Jules L.

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

  16. Mechanical properties of molybdenum-sealing glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swearengen, J.C.; Eagan, R.J.

    1975-07-01

    Elastic constants, thermal expansion, strength, and fracture toughness were determined for a molybdenum-sealing glass-ceramic containing approximately 31 volume percent Zn 2 SiO 4 crystals in a glass matrix. The microstructure was studied for two different crystallization treatments and moderate changes in composition. Mechanical properties of the composite were compared with the properties of the constituent phases through application of mixture theory and by fractographic observations. The reinforcing effects of the crystal phase at room temperature are evident in comparison with the properties of the residual glass but not necessarily in comparison with the parent glass. Fracture toughness of the composite depends primarily upon additive properties of the separate phases instead of by interactive effects such as microcracks. (U.S.)

  17. Glass/Ceramic Composites for Sealing Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2007-01-01

    A family of glass/ceramic composite materials has been investigated for use as sealants in planar solid oxide fuel cells. These materials are modified versions of a barium calcium aluminosilicate glass developed previously for the same purpose. The composition of the glass in mole percentages is 35BaO + 15CaO + 5Al2O3 + 10B2O3 + 35SiO2. The glass seal was found to be susceptible to cracking during thermal cycling of the fuel cells. The goal in formulating the glass/ ceramic composite materials was to (1) retain the physical and chemical advantages that led to the prior selection of the barium calcium aluminosilicate glass as the sealant while (2) increasing strength and fracture toughness so as to reduce the tendency toward cracking. Each of the composite formulations consists of the glass plus either of two ceramic reinforcements in a proportion between 0 and 30 mole percent. One of the ceramic reinforcements consists of alumina platelets; the other one consists of particles of yttria-stabilized zirconia wherein the yttria content is 3 mole percent (3YSZ). In preparation for experiments, panels of the glass/ceramic composites were hot-pressed and machined into test bars.

  18. Glass ceramics for sealing to high-thermal-expansion metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, J.A. Jr.

    1980-10-01

    Glass ceramics were studied, formulated in the Na 2 O CaO.P 2 O 5 , Na 2 O.BaOP 2 O 5 , Na 2 O.Al 2 O 3 .P 2 O 5 , and Li 2 O.BaO.P 2 O 5 systems to establish their suitability for sealing to high thermal expansion metals, e.g. aluminum, copper, and 300 series stainless steels. Glass ceramics in Na 2 O.CaO.P 2 O 5 and Na 2 O.BaO.P 2 O 5 systems have coefficients of thermal expansion in the range 140 x 10 -1 per 0 C less than or equal to α less than or equal to 225 x 10 -7 per 0 C and fracture toughness values generally greater than those of phosphate glasses; they are suitable for fabricating seals to high thermal expansion metals. Crystal phases include NaPo 3 , (NaPO 3 ) 3 , NaBa(PO 3 ) 3 , and NaCa(PO 3 ) 3 . Glass ceramics formed in the Na 2 O.Al 2 O 3 .P 2 O 5 systems have coefficients of thermal expansion greater than 240 x 10 -7 per 0 C, but they have extensive microcracking. Due to their low thermal expansion values (α less than or equal to 120 x 10 -7 per 0 C), glass ceramics in the Li 2 O.BaO.P 2 O 5 system are unsuitable for sealing to high thermal expansion metals

  19. Study of Seal Glass for Solid Oxide Fuel/Electrolyzer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Seal glass is essential and plays a crucial role in solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell performance and durability. A seal glass should have a combination of thermal, chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties in order to seal different cell components and stacks and prevent gas leakage. All the desired properties can simultaneously be obtained in a seal glass by suitable compositional design. In this dissertation, SrO-La₂O₃-A₂O₃-B₂O₃3-SiO₂ based seal glasses have been developed and compo...

  20. Stress Mapping in Glass-to-Metal Seals using Indentation Crack Lengths.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strong, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Buchheit, Thomas E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Diebold, Thomas Wayne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newton, Clay S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bencoe, Denise N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stavig, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jamison, Ryan Dale [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Predicting the residual stress which develops during fabrication of a glass-to-metal compression seal requires material models that can accurately predict the effects of processing on the sealing glass. Validation of the predictions requires measurements on representative test geometries to accurately capture the interaction between the seal materials during a processing cycle required to form the seal, which consists of a temperature excursion through the glass transition temperature of the sealing glass. To this end, a concentric seal test geometry, referred to as a short cylinder seal, consisting of a stainless steel shell enveloping a commercial sealing glass disk has been designed, fabricated, and characterized as a model validation test geometry. To obtain data to test/validate finite element (FE) stress model predictions of this geometry, spatially-resolved residual stress was calculated from the measured lengths of the cracks emanating from radially positioned Vickers indents in the glass disk portion of the seal. The indentation crack length method is described, and the spatially-resolved residual stress determined experimentally are compared to FE stress predictions made using a nonlinear viscoelastic material model adapted to inorganic sealing glasses and an updated rate dependent material model for 304L stainless steel. The measurement method is a first to achieve a degree of success for measuring spatially resolved residual stress in a glass-bearing geometry and a favorable comparison between measurements and simulation was observed.

  1. Stress Mapping in Glass-to-Metal Seals using Indentation Crack Lengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchheit, Thomas E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Component & Systems Analysis; Strong, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Material Mechanics and Tribology; Newton, Clay S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Material Mechanics and Tribology; Diebold, Thomas Wayne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Material Mechanics and Tribology; Bencoe, Denise N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electronic, Optical and Nano; Stavig, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Organic Materials Science; Jamison, Ryan Dale [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Transportation System Analysis

    2017-08-01

    Predicting the residual stress which develops during fabrication of a glass-to-metal compression seal requires material models that can accurately predict the effects of processing on the sealing glass. Validation of the predictions requires measurements on representative test geometries to accurately capture the interaction between the seal materials during a processing cycle required to form the seal, which consists of a temperature excursion through the glass transition temperature of the sealing glass. To this end, a concentric seal test geometry, referred to as a short cylinder seal, consisting of a stainless steel shell enveloping a commercial sealing glass disk has been designed, fabricated, and characterized as a model validation test geometry. To obtain data to test/validate finite element (FE) stress model predictions of this geometry, spatially-resolved residual stress was calculated from the measured lengths of the cracks emanating from radially positioned Vickers indents in the glass disk portion of the seal. The indentation crack length method is described, and the spatially-resolved residual stress determined experimentally are compared to FE stress predictions made using a nonlinear viscoelastic material model adapted to inorganic sealing glasses and an updated rate dependent material model for 304L stainless steel. The measurement method is a first to achieve a degree of success for measuring spatially resolved residual stress in a glass-bearing geometry and a favorable comparison between measurements and simulation was observed.

  2. Glass-ceramic hermetic seals to high thermal expansion metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.

    1987-04-28

    A process for forming glass-ceramic materials from an alkaline silica-lithia glass composition comprising 60-72 mole-% SiO/sub 2/, 18-27 mole-% Li/sub 2/O, 0-5 mole-% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 0-6 mole-% K/sub 2/O, 0-3 mole-% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 0.5-2.5 mole-% P/sub 2/O/sub 5/, which comprises heating said glass composition at a first temperature within the 950-1050/degree/C range for 5-60 minutes, and then at a devitrification temperature within the 700-900/degree/C range for about 5-300 minutes to obtain a glass-ceramic having a thermal expansion coefficient of up to 210 x 10/sup /minus/7///degree/C. These ceramics form strong, hermetic seals with high expansion metals such as stainless steel alloys. An intermediate nucleation heating step conducted at a temperature within the range of 675-750/degree/C for 10-120 minutes may be employed between the first stage and the devitrification stage. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Validation Assessment of a Glass-to-Metal Seal Finite-Element Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, Ryan Dale [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Buchheit, Thomas E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Emery, John M [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Vicente J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stavig, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newton, Clay S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, Arthur [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Sealing glasses are ubiquitous in high pressure and temperature engineering applications, such as hermetic feed-through electrical connectors. A common connector technology are glass-to-metal seals where a metal shell compresses a sealing glass to create a hermetic seal. Though finite-element analysis has been used to understand and design glass-to-metal seals for many years, there has been little validation of these models. An indentation technique was employed to measure the residual stress on the surface of a simple glass-to-metal seal. Recently developed rate- dependent material models of both Schott 8061 and 304L VAR stainless steel have been applied to a finite-element model of the simple glass-to-metal seal. Model predictions of residual stress based on the evolution of material models are shown. These model predictions are compared to measured data. Validity of the finite- element predictions is discussed. It will be shown that the finite-element model of the glass-to-metal seal accurately predicts the mean residual stress in the glass near the glass-to-metal interface and is valid for this quantity of interest.

  4. Development of a low-permeability glass--ceramic to seal to molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagan, R.J.

    1975-03-01

    This report describes the development of low-permeability glass-ceramics which can be sealed directly to molybdenum for the purpose of producing long-life vacuum tubes. Low permeability to helium and thermal expansion match to molybdenum are the bases upon which particular glass-ceramic compositions were selected and developed. The fabrication of tube envelopes using glass-ceramics is simplified when compared to conventional ceramic/metal tubes and these melting and sealing techniques are presented

  5. Proposed Testing to Assess the Accuracy of Glass-To-Metal Seal Stress Analyses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, Robert S.; Emery, John M; Tandon, Rajan; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Stavig, Mark E.; Newton, Clay S.; Gibson, Cory S; Bencoe, Denise N.

    2014-09-01

    The material characterization tests conducted on 304L VAR stainless steel and Schott 8061 glass have provided higher fidelity data for calibration of material models used in Glass - T o - Metal (GTM) seal analyses. Specifically, a Thermo - Multi - Linear Elastic Plastic ( thermo - MLEP) material model has be en defined for S S304L and the Simplified Potential Energy Clock nonlinear visc oelastic model has been calibrated for the S8061 glass. To assess the accuracy of finite element stress analyses of GTM seals, a suite of tests are proposed to provide data for comparison to mo del predictions.

  6. Effect of binder burnout on the sealing performance of glass ceramics for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertugrul, Tugrul Y.; Celik, Selahattin; Mat, Mahmut D.

    2013-11-01

    The glass ceramics composite sealants are among few materials suitable for the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) due to their high operating temperatures (600 °C-850 °C). The glass ceramics chemically bond to both the metallic interconnector and the ceramic electrolyte and provide a gas tight connection. A careful and several stages manufacturing procedure is required to obtain a gas tight sealing. In this study, effects of binder burnout process on the sealing performance are investigated employing commercially available glass ceramic powders. The glass ceramic laminates are produced by mixing glass ceramic powders with the organic binders and employing a tape casting method. The laminates are sandwiched between the metallic interconnectors of an SOFC cell. The burnout and subsequent sealing quality are analyzed by measuring leakage rate and final macrostructure of sealing region. The effects of heating rate, dead weight load, solid loading, carrier gas and their flow rates are investigated. It is found that sealing quality is affected from all investigated parameters. While a slower heating rate is required for a better burnout, the mass flow rate of sweep gas must be adequate for removal of the burned gas. The leakage rate is reduced to 0.1 ml min-1 with 2 °C min-1 + 1 °C min-1 heating rate, 86.25% solid loading, 200 N dead weight load and 500 ml min-1 sweep gas flow rate.

  7. Window Spacers and Edge Seals in Insulating Glass Units: A State-of-the-Art Review and Future Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SINTEF Building and Infrastructure; Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU); Bergh, Sofie Van Den; Hart, Robert; Jelle, Bjrn Petter; Gustavsen, Arild

    2013-01-31

    Insulating glass (IG) units typically consist of multiple glass panes that are sealed and held together structurally along their perimeters. This report describes a study of edge seals in IG units. First, we summarize the components, requirements, and desired properties of edge construction in IG units, based on a survey of the available literature. Second, we review commercially available window edge seals and describe their properties, to provide an easily accessible reference for research and commercial purposes. Finally, based on the literature survey and review of current commercial edge seal systems, we identify research opportunities for future edge seal improvements and solutions.

  8. Network structure and thermal stability study of high temperature seal glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, K.; Mahapatra, M. K.

    2008-10-01

    High temperature seal glass has stringent requirement on glass thermal stability, which is dictated by glass network structures. In this study, a SrO-La2O3-Al2O3-B2O3-SiO2 based glass system was studied using nuclear magnetic resonance, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction for solid oxide cell application purpose. Glass structural unit neighboring environment and local ordering were evaluated. Glass network connectivity as well as silicon and boron glass former coordination were calculated for different B2O3:SiO2 ratios. Thermal stability of the borosilicate glasses was studied after thermal treatment at 850 °C. The study shows that high B2O3 content induces BO4 and SiO4 structural unit ordering, increases glass localized inhomogeneity, decreases glass network connectivity, and causes devitrification. Glass modifiers interact with either silicon- or boron-containing structural units and form different devitrified phases at different B2O3:SiO2 ratios. B2O3-free glass shows the best thermal stability among the studied compositions, remaining stable after thermal treatment for 200 h at 850 °C.

  9. Enhanced sealing project (ESP): design, construction and monitoring of a full-scale shaft seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.; Martino, J.; Kim, C.S.; Holowick, B.; Kwong, G.; Jonsson, E.; Palonen, E.; DeCombarieu, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Enhanced Sealing Project (ESP) consists of instrumenting and monitoring a full-scale shaft seal installed to permanently close the access shaft for Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL's) Underground Research Laboratory (URL) at the intersection of an ancient low dipping thrust fault. The URL was built to provide a facility where concepts for long-term management of Canada's nuclear fuel waste in a deep geological repository could be studied. Operated since the early 1980's, this facility provided much of the technical information used in developing the deep geological repository concept submitted by AECL to the Government of Canada in 1994 and continued to provide valuable technical data after that submission. In 2003, a decision was made to discontinue operation of the URL and ultimately decommission and permanently close the underground portion of this facility. As part of the Nuclear Legacy Liability Program (NLLP) being funded by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), facilities including the URL that are no longer part of AECL's mandate or operations are being decommissioned. Included in this work is the installation of seals at the intersection of the access shaft and ventilation raise with a deep fracture zone in order to limit the potential for mixing of deeper saline and shallower less saline groundwater. The funding available from NRCan was limited to the seal installation, with no mandate to provide any more than basic hydrological monitoring of the rock mass at a considerable distance from these seals, and so the opportunity to monitor a full-scale shaft seal similar to one for a deep geological repository would have been lost. The ESP arose from the recognition by a number of organizations that the URL closure presented a unique opportunity to monitor the evolution of a full-scale repository-type shaft seal in a very well-characterized and otherwise undisturbed rock mass. As

  10. Enhanced sealing project: monitoring the THM response of a full-scale shaft seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.A.; Martino, J.B.; Holowick, B.; Priyanto, D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, MB (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Closure of the subsurface facilities at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Underground Research Laboratory (URL) was completed in 2010 with installation of a concrete surface cap. Additionally, as part of decommissioning, seals were installed at the penetration of the shafts through the major hydro-geological feature known as Fracture Zone 2 (FZ2). The seal construction was funded by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) under the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP). The shaft seals at the URL were based on the composite seal concept developed for application in a deep geological repository for disposal of used nuclear fuel. The access shaft seal consists of two 3-m thick concrete segments that rigidly confine a 6-m long section of swelling clay-based material (40% bentonite clay - 60% sand by dry mass). Monitoring of the regional groundwater recovery following flooding of the lower shaft is a closure requirement and was included in the design. It was widely recognized that the installation of the seals at the URL represented a unique opportunity to monitor the evolution of the type of seal that might be installed in an actual repository but the NLLP mandate did not include any monitoring of shaft seal evolution. As a result the Enhanced Sealing Project (ESP) partnership composed of NWMO, Posiva, SKB and ANDRA was established and a set of 68 instruments (containing 100 sensors) were installed to monitor the evolution of the seal. In the first year of operation sensors have monitored the following parameters in the ESP: thermal evolution and strain of the concrete components, thermal, hydraulic and mechanical changes in the clay component and its contacts with the rock and concrete confinement. Additionally, monitoring of the near-field and regional groundwater evolution has been undertaken. Monitoring of the short-term thermal-mechanical evolution of the concrete components was successfully accomplished and only a small temperature rise occurred due to

  11. Enhanced sealing project: monitoring the THM response of a full-scale shaft seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.A.; Martino, J.B.; Holowick, B.; Priyanto, D.

    2011-01-01

    Closure of the subsurface facilities at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Underground Research Laboratory (URL) was completed in 2010 with installation of a concrete surface cap. Additionally, as part of decommissioning, seals were installed at the penetration of the shafts through the major hydro-geological feature known as Fracture Zone 2 (FZ2). The seal construction was funded by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) under the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP). The shaft seals at the URL were based on the composite seal concept developed for application in a deep geological repository for disposal of used nuclear fuel. The access shaft seal consists of two 3-m thick concrete segments that rigidly confine a 6-m long section of swelling clay-based material (40% bentonite clay - 60% sand by dry mass). Monitoring of the regional groundwater recovery following flooding of the lower shaft is a closure requirement and was included in the design. It was widely recognized that the installation of the seals at the URL represented a unique opportunity to monitor the evolution of the type of seal that might be installed in an actual repository but the NLLP mandate did not include any monitoring of shaft seal evolution. As a result the Enhanced Sealing Project (ESP) partnership composed of NWMO, Posiva, SKB and ANDRA was established and a set of 68 instruments (containing 100 sensors) were installed to monitor the evolution of the seal. In the first year of operation sensors have monitored the following parameters in the ESP: thermal evolution and strain of the concrete components, thermal, hydraulic and mechanical changes in the clay component and its contacts with the rock and concrete confinement. Additionally, monitoring of the near-field and regional groundwater evolution has been undertaken. Monitoring of the short-term thermal-mechanical evolution of the concrete components was successfully accomplished and only a small temperature rise occurred due to

  12. SON68 glass alteration enhanced by magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godon, Nicole; Gin, Stephane; Rebiscoul, Diane; Frugier, Pierre [CEA, DEN-Marcoule, F30207, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports experimental and modeling results of SON68 glass / magnetite interactions while in contact with synthetic groundwater from a clay environment. It is shown that magnetite enhances glass alteration, first by the sorption of Si released from the glass onto magnetite surfaces, then by a second process that could be the precipitation of an iron silicate mineral or the transformation of magnetite into a more reactive phase like hematite or goethite. This study globally suggests a detrimental effect of magnetite on the long-term durability of nuclear glass in geological disposal conditions. (authors)

  13. Controlling the reaction between boron-containing sealing glass and a lanthanum-containing cathode by adding Nb2O5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dandan; Fang, Lihua; Tang, Dian; Zhang, Teng

    2016-09-01

    In solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks, the volatile boron species present in the sealing glass often react with the lanthanum-containing cathode, degrading the activity of the cathode (this phenomenon is known as boron poisoning). In this work, we report that this detrimental reaction can be effectively reduced by doping bismuth-containing borosilicate sealing glass-ceramic with a niobium dopant. The addition of Nb2O5 not only condenses the [SiO4] structural units in the glass network, but also promotes the conversion of [BO3] to [BO4]. Moreover, the Nb2O5 dopant enhances the formation of boron-containing phases (Ca3B2O6 and CaB2Si2O8), which significantly reduces the volatility of boron compounds in the sealing glass, suppressing the formation of LaBO3 in the reaction couple between the glass and the cathode. The reported results provide a new approach to solve the problem of boron poisoning.

  14. Effect of aluminizing of Cr-containing ferritic alloys on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell sealing glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    A novel high-temperature alkaline earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two metallic coupons of Cr-containing ferritic stainless steel for seal strength evaluation. In previous work, SrCrO 4 was found to form along the glass/steel interface, which led to severe strength degradation. In the present study, aluminization of the steel surface was investigated as a remedy to minimize or prevent the strontium chromate formation. Three different processes for aluminization were evaluated with Crofer22APU stainless steel: pack cementation, vapor-phase deposition, and aerosol spraying. It was found that pack cementation resulted in a rough surface with occasional cracks in the Al-diffused region. Vapor-phase deposition yielded a smoother surface, but the resulting high Al content increased the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), resulting in the failure of joined coupons. Aerosol spraying of an Al-containing salt resulted in the formation of a thin aluminum oxide layer without any surface damage. The room temperature seal strength was evaluated in the as-fired state and in environmentally aged conditions. In contrast to earlier results with uncoated Crofer22APU, the aluminized samples showed no strength degradation even for samples aged in air. Interfacial and chemical compatibility was also investigated. The results showed aluminization to be a viable candidate approach to minimize undesirable chromate formation between alkaline earth silicate sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloys for SOFC applications.

  15. Sealing of ceramic SOFC-components with glass seals; Fuegen von keramischen Komponenten der Hochtemperatur-Brennstoffzellen mittels Glas- und Glaskeramikloten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schillig, Cora

    2012-07-10

    The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) converts chemical energy of a fuel directly into electrical energy. However, for the implementation of SOFC-technology in competition to conventional power plants costs have to be reduced. The use of an alternative tubular cell design without closed end would allow reducing costs during cell manufacturing. However, this change in design makes a gastight sealing inside the generator near the gas inlet necessary. Different ceramic materials with varying coefficients of thermal expansion have to be sealed gastight and electrical insulating at temperatures between 850 C and 1000 C to prevent the gases from mixing and an electrical shortcut between the cells. This work comprises analysis of commercially available glass and glass-ceramic systems manufactured by Schott Electronic Packaging, Areva T and D and Ferro Corporation. Additionally new developed sealing glass and glass-ceramic systems were investigated and all systems were characterized fundamentally for the use as sealing material in SOFC generators. Therefore different test assemblies and series were conducted. Essential characteristics of a suitable sealing system are a thermal expansion coefficient between 9,5 and 12 . 10{sup -6}K{sup -1}, a viscosity in the range between 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} dPa{sup *}s and a wetting angle smaller than 90 during the sealing process. Also unwanted chemical side reactions between the sealing partners must be prevented, because a change in the phase composition or the creation of new phases in the sealing material could endanger the stability of the seal. Heat cycles, particularly those during generator operation, cause deterioration of the sealing material and subsequent reduction in its ability to prevent mixing of the gases. Sealant leaks can drastically impact efficiency of the generator. In order to ensure optimum operation low leak rates around 2,3 . 10{sup -4} mbar l/sec/cm{sup 2} must be maintained. Especially glass and glass

  16. Planar ultra thin glass seals with optical fiber interface for monitoring tamper attacks on security eminent components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, M.; Flachenecker, G.; Schade, W.; Gorecki, C.; Thoma, A.; Rathje, R.

    2017-11-01

    Optical seals consisting of waveguide Bragg grating sensor structures in ultra thin glass transparencies have been developed to cover security relevant objects for detection of unauthorized access. For generation of optical signature in the seals, femtosecond laser pulses were used. The optical seals were connected with an optical fiber to enable external read out of the seal. Different attack scenarios for getting undetected access to the object, covered by the seal, were proven and evaluated. The results presented here, verify a very high level of security. An unauthorized detaching and subsequent replacement by original or copy of the seals for tampering would be accompanied with a very high technological effort, posing a substantial barrier towards an attacker. Additionally, environmental influences like temperature effects have a strong but reproducible influence on signature, which in context of a temperature reference database increases the level of security significantly.

  17. Improving the chemical compatibility of sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cells: Blocking the reactive species by controlled crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Zou, Qi; Zeng, Fanrong; Wang, Shaorong; Tang, Dian; Yang, Hiswen

    2012-10-01

    The chemical compatibility of sealing glass is of great importance for Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). In this work, the interfacial reaction between sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloy is characterized by reacting Cr2O3 powders with a representative SrO-containing glass crystallized by different heat-treatment schedules. The crystalline structure and crystalline content of sealing glass are determined by X-ray diffraction. The results show that the fraction of Cr6+ decreases from 39.8 ± 1.9% for quenched glass to 8.2 ± 0.4% for glass crystallized at 900 °C for 2 h. In addition, the interfacial reaction can be further reduced with increasing crystallization temperature and time as well as the addition of nucleation agent (TiO2). The formation of some Sr-containing crystalline phases, Sr2SiO4 and Sr(TiO3), contributes to the improvement of chemical compatibility of sealing glass, in agreement with the results of thermodynamic calculations.

  18. Seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsher, R.A.G.

    1982-01-01

    An aperture through a biological shield is sealed by a flexible sheath having a beading at one end located on an annular member slidable in the aperture such that the beading bears in sealing engagement against the sides of the aperture. The annular member is retained by a retractable latch and can be rejected by pushing it out of the aperture using a replacement annular member with a replacement sheath thereon to butt against the annular member to be rejected. The replacement annular member may be mounted on a tubular device having an outer co-axial member for operating the latch when the replacement annular member butts against the annular member to be rejected. Applications include effecting a seal between a remote handling equipment and a wall through which the equipment extends. (author)

  19. Spectroscopic enhancement in nanoparticles embedded glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahar, M. R., E-mail: mrahim057@gmail.com; Ghoshal, S. K., E-mail: mrahim057@gmail.com [Advanced Optical Material Research Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, Skudai, Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-25

    This presentation provides an overview of the recent progress in the enhancement of the spectroscopic characteristics of the glass embedded with nanoparticles (NPs). Some of our research activities with few significantly new results are highlighted and facilely analyzed. The science and technology dealing with the manipulation of the physical properties of rare earth doped inorganic glasses by embedding metallic NPs or nanoclusters produce the so-called 'nanoglass'. Meanwhile, the spectroscopic enhancement relates the intensity of the luminescence measured at certain transition. The enhancement which expectedly due to the 'plasmonics wave' (referring to the coherent coupling of photons to free electron oscillations called plasmon) occurs at the interface between a conductor and a dielectric. Plasmonics being an emerging concept in advanced optical material of nanophotonics has given this material the ability to exploit the optical response at nanoscale and opened up a new avenue in metal-based glass optics. There is a vast array of plasmonic NPs concepts yet to be explored, with applications spanning solar cells, (bio) sensing, communications, lasers, solid-state lighting, waveguides, imaging, optical data transfer, display and even bio-medicine. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) can enhance the optical response of nanoglass by orders of magnitude as observed. The luminescence enhancement and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) are new paradigm of research. The enhancement of luminescence due to the influence of metallic NPs is the recurring theme of this paper.

  20. Apparatus for sealing access holes to cavities within the earth with rock glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, R.R.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus is disclosed for establishing a solid, very low permeable rock glass plug to seal access holes through rock to underground storage vaults. The apparatus is designed to supply a filler material having a constituency substantially matching that of the rock formation surrounding the access port to the vault, through a central feeder tube under pressure to the vault. Means are provided for heating the filler material and surrounding rock formation at the point where the filler material exits the feeder tube, to a temperature sufficient to melt both the rock formation and the filler material. The remaining portion of the feeder tube is cooled to preserve the surrounding rock formaion spaced from the feeder orifice. The melt at the extremity of the feeder tube is forced through the orifice to a region below the tool by the force of the pressure feed. As the melt is forced below the tool, the tool is retracted until the access hole is completely sealed. A second embodiment is provided to seal enlarged openings which further includes a cooled core follower that enables the deposit to be fused in layers closing in the circumference of the hole until a final pass fuses the central core

  1. Effect of Al2O3 nano-filler on properties of glass-based seals for solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Bok; Choi, Myong-Jae; Park, Sung; Lee, Jae Chun

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the viscosity and strength of three glass-based seals prepared with or without nano or micron-sized alumina powder used as filler material. Measurements of the viscosity and bending strength of the glass-based seals showed that addition of the nano-sized alumina powder to the glass increased both the high-temperature viscosity and the strength of the sintered glass matrix. Strength tests and observations of the microstructure of the fracture surface of the seal samples confirmed the strengthening of the glass network structure. Conversion of non-bridging oxygen to bridging oxygen is presumed to occur upon the addition of alumina to the glass sample. The strengthening of the alumina-glass composite seal was attributed to the alumina nano-filler and prolonged heat treatment at elevated temperatures.

  2. Method and apparatus for dispensing small quantities of mercury from evacuated and sealed glass capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.; Pai, Robert Y.

    1985-01-01

    A technique for opening an evacuated and sealed glass capsule containing a material that is to be dispensed which has a relatively high vapor pressure such as mercury. The capsule is typically disposed in a discharge tube envelope. The technique involves the use of a first light source imaged along the capsule and a second light source imaged across the capsule substantially transversely to the imaging of the first light source. Means are provided for constraining a segment of the capsule along its length with the constraining means being positioned to correspond with the imaging of the second light source. These light sources are preferably incandescent projection lamps. The constraining means is preferably a multiple looped wire support.

  3. Test Method Variability in Slow Crack Growth Properties of Sealing Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, J. A.; Tandon, R.

    2010-01-01

    The crack growth properties of several sealing glasses were measured by using constant stress rate testing in 2 and 95 percent RH (relative humidity). Crack growth parameters measured in high humidity are systematically smaller (n and B) than those measured in low humidity, and crack velocities for dry environments are 100x lower than for wet environments. The crack velocity is very sensitive to small changes in RH at low RH. Biaxial and uniaxial stress states produced similar parameters. Confidence intervals on crack growth parameters that were estimated from propagation of errors solutions were comparable to those from Monte Carlo simulation. Use of scratch-like and indentation flaws produced similar crack growth parameters when residual stresses were considered.

  4. The effect of heat treatment on the magnitude and composition of residual gas in sealed silica glass ampoules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, W.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    The residual gas pressure and composition in sealed silica glass ampoules as a function of different treatment procedures has been investigated. The dependence of the residual gas on the outgassing and annealing parameters has been determined. The effects of the fused silica brand, of the ampoule fabrication, and of post-outgassing procedures have been evaluated.

  5. Commercial alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glasses for sealing solid oxide cell stacks. Part I: Development of glass-ceramic microstructure and thermomechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersted, Karsten; Balic-Zunic, Tonci

    2018-01-01

    Sealing performance in solid oxide cell (SOC) stacks and the devitrification process of commercially available alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glasses containing 48‐61 mol% SiO2, 18‐28 mol% CaO, 1‐7 mol% MgO, 7‐10 mol% Al2O3, 1‐11 mol% B2O3 plus minor amounts of Na2O, K2O, FeO, and TiO2 were...... investigated and quantified through analysis of phase assemblages as function of heat treatments above the glass transition temperatures using the electron microprobe and powder X‐ray diffraction. For two of these glasses devitrification behavior was compared to the devitrification behavior of similar glasses...... produced in the laboratory. Glasses were characterized after annealing in air at 800°C and 850°C for up to 6 weeks. Even though the glasses lie within a relatively narrow compositional range, sealing performance and the resulting microstructures differed significantly. Best thermomechanical properties...

  6. Enhanced sealing project (ESP): evolution of a full-sized concrete and bentonite shaft seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.A.; Priyanto, D.G.; Martino, J.B.; De Combarieu, M.; Johansson, R.; Korkeakoski, P.; Villagran, J.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A full-scale shaft seal was designed and installed in the 5-m-diameter access shaft at Atomic Energy of Canada's (AECL's) Underground Research Laboratory (URL) at the point where he shaft intersects an ancient water-bearing, low-angle thrust fault in granitic rock. The seal, part of the permanent closure of the URL, consists of a 6-m-thick bentonite-based component sandwiched between 3-m-thick upper and lower, 3-m-thick concrete components. The bentonite-based component spans the fracture zone and extends approximately 1 m beyond the maximum identified extent of the fracture. This design was adopted in order to limit water from the deeper, saline regions mixing with the fresher, near-surface groundwater regime. The concrete components provide the mechanical confinement and an in situ compacted 40/60 mixture of bentonite clay and quartz sand provides the sealing component. Construction of the shaft seal was done as part of Canada's Nuclear Legacies Liability Program. However, monitoring the seal evolution was not part of the decommissioning program's mandate. In addition to accomplishing the permanent closure of the URL, this seal's construction provides a unique opportunity to instrument and monitor the evolution of a full-scale shaft seal as well as the recovery of the regional groundwater regime as the facility passively floods above the seal. A jointly funded monitoring project was developed by NWMO (Canada), SKB (Sweden), Posiva (Finland) and ANDRA (France) and since mid 2009 the thermal, hydraulic and mechanical evolution of the seal has been constantly monitored. The evolution of the type of seal being monitored in the ESP is of relevance to repository closure planning, gaining confidence in the functionality of shaft seals. Although constructed in a crystalline rock medium, the results of the ESP are expected to be relevant to the performance of seals in a variety of host rock types. The shaft seal has been

  7. A Novel SOFC/SOEC Sealing Glass with a Low SiO2 Content and a High Thermal Expansion Coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiebach, Wolff-Ragnar; Agersted, Karsten; Zielke, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    the amount of Si emission, a low Si containing sealing glass (chemical composition: 50 mol% CaO, 20 mol% ZnO, 20 mol% B2O3 and 10 mol% SiO2) was developed at DTU. In this work, the results from thermal characterization, the crystallization behavior of the glass and the long-term stability and adhesion......Solid oxide cells require seals that can function in harsh, elevated temperature environments. In addition, a low Si content can be advantageous, since Si impurities from the glass sealant can be transported to the active fuel electrode and poison the Ni-YSZ triple phase boundaries. To reduce...... behavior of the glass were studied under SOFC and SOEC relevant conditions. The glass-ceramic sealant performed well over 400 h, and no cell degradation or leakage related to the seal was found, indicating that the developed glass system is applicable for the use in SOFC/SOEC stacks....

  8. A method for determining leakage of 133Xe gas from septum-sealed glass vials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAllister, J.R.; Borak, T.B.; Pellicciarini, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    The authors have developed a method for determining the leakage of 133 Xe gas from septum-sealed glass vials that are supplied for medical examinations. Twenty vials each originally containing 370 MPq of 133 Xe and 20 vials each originally containing 740 MBq 133 Xe were measured daily for 26 d. Retention of 133 Xe within the vial was modeled as a first order process with a constant rate coefficient, λ T . The value of λ T was estimated for each vial using a regression analysis. The leakage rate, λ L , was then determined assuming that λ L = λ L + λ r where λ r represents the physical decay of 133 Xe. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using uncertainties in the estimates of each vial to obtain the mean and tails of the distribution for the average leakage rate, bar λ L . the average leakage rate for the complete sample of vials was 0.00007 d -1 with an upper, one-sided, 95% confidence limit of 0.0011 d -1 . Uncertainties in the published values of λ r for 133 Xe made a significant contribution to the uncertainties of the leakage rate for this sample of vials. The methods described can be applied to other situations where leakage of radioactive materials may be of concern

  9. A Novel SOFC/SOEC Sealing Glass with a Low SiO2 Content and a High Thermal Expansion Coefficient  

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiebach, Wolff-Ragnar; Agersted, Karsten; Zielke, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    phase boundaries. To reduce the amount of Si emission, a low Si containing sealing glass (chemical composition: 48 mol% CaO, 19 mol% ZnO, 21 mol% B2O3 and 12 mol% SiO2) was developed at DTU. In this presentation, the results from thermal characterization, like thermal expansion coefficient, glass......Solid oxide cells require seals that can function in harsh, elevated temperature environments. In the case of solid oxide electrolysis (SOEC), also a low Si content is desired, since Si impurities from the glass sealing can be transported to the active fuel electrode and poison the Ni-YSZ triple...... transition temperature, crystallization temperature, etc., of the glass will be presented. Additionally, the crystallization behavior of the glass was analyzed by in-situ X-ray diffraction, recording temperature resolved XRD spectra from 30 °C up to 900 °C. Furthermore, the long-term stability...

  10. A Ba-free sealing glass with a high CTE and excellent interface stability optimized for SOFC/SOEC stack applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritucci, Ilaria; Agersted, Karsten; Zielke, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    -mechanical properties and compositional variations are reviewed and discussed by thermal analyses and in situ XRD, in order to design and optimize the sealing profile and reduce the residual porosity. The glass after heat treatment partially devitrifies into augite and nepheline with residual glass phase of around 64...

  11. Sealing Clay Text Segmentation Based on Radon-Like Features and Adaptive Enhancement Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Text extraction is a key issue in sealing clay research. The traditional method based on rubbings increases the risk of sealing clay damage and is unfavorable to sealing clay protection. Therefore, using digital image of sealing clay, a new method for text segmentation based on Radon-like features and adaptive enhancement filters is proposed in this paper. First, adaptive enhancement LM filter bank is used to get the maximum energy image; second, the edge image of the maximum energy image is calculated; finally, Radon-like feature images are generated by combining maximum energy image and its edge image. The average image of Radon-like feature images is segmented by the image thresholding method. Compared with 2D Otsu, GA, and FastFCM, the experiment result shows that this method can perform better in terms of accuracy and completeness of the text.

  12. Nitrogen doped germania glasses with enhanced optical and mechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard-Larsen, Torben; Poulsen, Christian; Leistiko, Otto

    1997-01-01

    A new type of ultraviolet photosensitive germanium doped glass has been developed for use in the fabrication of optical waveguide structures. By adding ammonia to the source gases during a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of these glasses, ultraviolet induced refractive index changes of ...

  13. Enhanced LAW Glass Correlation - Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Joseph, Innocent [Atkins Energy Federal EPC, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

    2016-12-01

    About 50 million gallons of high-level mixed waste is currently stored in underground tanks at the United States Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford site in the State of Washington. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will provide DOE’s Office of River Protection (ORP) with a means of treating this waste by vitrification for subsequent disposal. The tank waste will be separated into low- and high-activity waste fractions, which will then be vitrified respectively into Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) and Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) products. The ILAW product will be disposed in an engineered facility on the Hanford site while the IHLW product is designed for acceptance into a national deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste. The ILAW and IHLW products must meet a variety of requirements with respect to protection of the environment before they can be accepted for disposal. Acceptable glass formulations for vitrification of Hanford low activity waste (LAW) must meet a variety of product quality, processability, and waste loading requirements. To this end, The Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) at The Catholic University of America (CUA) developed and tested a number of glass formulations during Part A, Part B1 and Part B2 of the WTP development program. The testing resulted in the selection of target glass compositions for the processing of eight of the Phase I LAW tanks. The selected glass compositions were tested at the crucible scale to confirm their compliance with ILAW performance requirements. Duramelter 100 (DM100) and LAW Pilot Melter tests were then conducted to demonstrate the viability of these glass compositions for LAW vitrification at high processing rates.

  14. Crystallization behaviors and seal application of basalt based glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateş, A.; Önen, U.; Ercenk, E.; Yılmaz, Ş.

    2017-02-01

    Basalt based glass-ceramics were prepared by conventional melt-quenching technique and subsequently converted to glass-ceramics by a controlled nucleation and crystallization process. Glass materials were obtained by melt at 1500°C and quenched in cold water. The powder materials were made by milling and spin coating. The powders were applied on the 430 stainless steel interconnector material, and heat treatment was carried out. The interface characteristics between the glass-ceramic layer and interconnector were investigated by using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the basalt base glass-ceramic sealant material exhibited promising properties to use for SOFC.

  15. An augmented-reality edge enhancement application for Google Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Alex D; Peli, Eli

    2014-08-01

    Google Glass provides a platform that can be easily extended to include a vision enhancement tool. We have implemented an augmented vision system on Glass, which overlays enhanced edge information over the wearer's real-world view, to provide contrast-improved central vision to the Glass wearers. The enhanced central vision can be naturally integrated with scanning. Google Glass' camera lens distortions were corrected by using an image warping. Because the camera and virtual display are horizontally separated by 16 mm, and the camera aiming and virtual display projection angle are off by 10°, the warped camera image had to go through a series of three-dimensional transformations to minimize parallax errors before the final projection to the Glass' see-through virtual display. All image processes were implemented to achieve near real-time performance. The impacts of the contrast enhancements were measured for three normal-vision subjects, with and without a diffuser film to simulate vision loss. For all three subjects, significantly improved contrast sensitivity was achieved when the subjects used the edge enhancements with a diffuser film. The performance boost is limited by the Glass camera's performance. The authors assume that this accounts for why performance improvements were observed only with the diffuser filter condition (simulating low vision). Improvements were measured with simulated visual impairments. With the benefit of see-through augmented reality edge enhancement, natural visual scanning process is possible and suggests that the device may provide better visual function in a cosmetically and ergonomically attractive format for patients with macular degeneration.

  16. SEALING ABILITY OF MINERAL TRIOXIDE AGGREGATE, CALCIUM PHOSPHATE CEMENT, AND GLASS IONOMER CEMENT IN THE REPAIR OF FURCATION PERFORATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabath Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro sealing ability of three repair materials. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA; Group A, calcium phosphate cement (CPC; Group B, and light cured glass ionomer cement (GIC; Group C when used to repair the perforation created in the pulpal floor of fifty extracted human permanent molars. Materials and methods: Preparation of access openings and furcation perforations were done, and the teeth divided into five experimental groups (A, B, C including two controls (D, E with ten samples in each group randomly. Following the repair procedure, the pulp chambers and access openings were filled with composite resin and immersed in 2% methylene blue solution for 48 hours. The teeth were sectioned longitudinally and the linear dye penetration measured under a stereo­microscope. Results: The comparison of the linear length of micro-leakage (mm among the experimental groups revealed no significant difference (p = 0.332. On calculating the percentage of depth of leakage to the total length of the perforation, it was observed that the mean leakage was 35.5% in Group A, 53.6% in Group B and the highest, 87.5% in Group C. The mean of leakage percentage was statistically significant by Kruskal-Wallis test (p = 0.003. The results indicated that the dye penetration used as furcation perforation repair material was least with mineral trioxide aggregate. Comparing the depth of penetration of dye, 50% of the Group A samples showed less than 25% of depth penetration. While 40% of Group B cases had more than 50% dye penetration. In our study, all Group C teeth had ≥ 50% dye penetration. Conclusions: The present study indicated that GIC had the greatest dye penetration followed by CPC and MTA. Mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium phosphate cement had comparatively better sealing ability than glass ionomer cement.

  17. Significantly enhanced memory effect in metallic glass by multistep training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M. X.; Luo, P.; Sun, Y. T.; Wen, P.; Bai, H. Y.; Liu, Y. H.; Wang, W. H.

    2017-11-01

    The state of metastable equilibrium glass can carry an imprint of the past and exhibit memory effect. As a hallmark of glassy dynamics, memory effect can affect glassy behavior as it evolves further upon time. Even though the physical picture of the memory effect has been well studied, it is unclear whether a glass can recall as many pieces of information as possible, and if so, how the glass will accordingly behave. We report that by fractionizing temperature interval, inserting multistep aging protocols, and optimizing the time of each temperature step, i.e., by imposing a multistep "training" on a prototypical P d40N i10C u30P20 metallic glass, the memory of the trained glass can be significantly strengthened, marked by a pronounced augment in potential energy. These findings provide a new guide for regulating the energy state of glass by enhancing the nonequilibrium behaviors of the memory effect and offer an opportunity to develop a clearer physical picture of glassy dynamics.

  18. How deformation enhances mobility in a polymer glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Recent experiments show that deformation of a polymer glass can lead to orders-of-magnitude enhancement in the atomic level dynamics. To determine why this change in dynamics occurs, we carry out molecular dynamics simulations and energy landscape analyses. The simulations address the coarse-grained polystyrene model of Kremer and co-workers, and the dynamics, as quantified by the van Hove function, are examined as the glass undergoes shear deformation. In agreement with experiment, the simulations find that deformation enhances the atomic mobility. The enhanced mobility is shown to arise from two mechanisms: First, active deformation continually reduces barriers for hopping events, and the importance of this mechanism is modulated by the rate of thermally activated transitions between adjacent energy minima. Second, deformation moves the system to higher-energy regions of the energy landscape, characterized by lower barriers. Both mechanisms enhance the dynamics during deformation, and the second mechanism is also relevant after deformation has ceased.

  19. Characterization of a glass GEM for sealed detectors application and reduction of charging-up effects

    CERN Document Server

    Erdal, Eran

    2014-01-01

    Apart from high energy physics experiments, there has been a great effort in recent years to incorporate MPGDs in many other applications i.e. medical treatments and imaging and home land security. However, MPGDs (as most gaseous detectors) are normally operated under a constant flushing of the gas. Their use thus turns them expensive since they rely on a constant gas supply and a suitable infrastructure, but most important is the loss of their portability. These reasons have pushed the community to search for other solutions, aiming for the development of sealed detectors. The demands for such is to be made out of low outgassing rate materials and possibly the use of only noble gas to avoid aging due to chemical activity of the ionized gas of the avalanche. The default material for GEM detectors - Polyimide (Kapton), is not suitable for a sealed detector because of its high outgassing rate, thus calling for new solutions. Moreover, GEMs, being essentially made out of an insulating material, pose a problem in...

  20. In vitro mechanical stimulation facilitates stress dissipation and sealing ability at the conventional glass ionomer cement-dentin interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel; Osorio, Estrella; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the induced changes in the chemical and mechanical performance at the glass-ionomer cement-dentin interface after mechanical load application. A conventional glass-ionomer cement (GIC) (Ketac Bond), and a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) (Vitrebond Plus) were used. Bonded interfaces were stored in simulated body fluid, and then tested or submitted to the mechanical loading challenge. Different loading waveforms were applied: No cycling, 24 h cycled in sine or loaded in sustained hold waveforms. The cement-dentin interface was evaluated using a nano-dynamic mechanical analysis, estimating the complex modulus and tan δ. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging, Raman analysis and dye assisted confocal microscopy evaluation (CLSM) were also performed. The complex modulus was lower and tan delta was higher at interfaces promoted with the GIC if compared to the RMGIC unloaded. The conventional GIC attained evident reduction of nanoleakage. Mechanical loading favored remineralization and promoted higher complex modulus and lower tan delta values at interfaces with RMGIC, where porosity, micropermeability and nanoleakage were more abundant. Mechanical stimuli diminished the resistance to deformation and increased the stored energy at the GIC-dentin interface. The conventional GIC induced less porosity and nanoleakage than RMGIC. The RMGIC increased nanoleakage at the porous interface, and dye sorption appeared within the cement. Both cements created amorphous and crystalline apatites at the interface depending on the type of mechanical loading. Remineralization, lower stress concentration and resistance to deformation after mechanical loading improved the sealing of the GIC-dentin interface. In vitro oral function will favor high levels of accumulated energy and permits micropermeability at the RMGIC-dentin interface which will become remineralized. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nanocomposites biodegradable coating on BOPET films to enhance hot seal strength properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, G., E-mail: giovannibarbaro@email.it; Galdi, M. R., E-mail: mrgaldi@unisa.it; Di Maio, L., E-mail: ldimaio@unisa.it; Incarnato, L., E-mail: lincarnato@unisa.it [Industrial Engineering Department, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    The coating technology is a strategic solution to improve the properties of flexible packaging films. Indeed, additional functional layers are often designed and added as coating on the substrate, in order to improve the characteristic of the flexible packaging and to meet the requirements for the desired gas or vapour barrier, for adhesion and sealing, or for improving the film printability, its aesthetics and durability. Moreover, this technology allows to functionalize a polymeric substrate applying materials with different chemistry, rheology, thermal and structural characteristics. BOPET films are widely used for food packaging applications thanks to their good gas barrier and mechanical properties, high transparency and for the excellent printability. In regard to sealing performance, BOPET films show poor sealing properties so they are mostly submitted to lamination processes with polyethylene. Nevertheless, this solution compromises the PET recyclability and influences the gas permeability of the multilayer PET based structures. The aim of this work is to investigate on the effect of nanocomposite biodegradable coatings for BOPET substrates in enhancing the heat sealing strength of eco-compatible PET/PLA films. At this regards, different percentages of Cloisite C30B (0%, 2% and 4%{sub wt/wt}) have been added to PLA by solution intercalation technique and the nanocomposite biodegradable materials produced have been applied on BOPET commercial films by casting. The BOPET coated films have been characterized in order to evaluate the heat sealing strength and the mechanical, gas permeability and surface properties. The results have shown that the addition of nanoclay in PLA coating significantly enhance the hot tack properties of the PET/PLA system produced, while the oxygen and water vapour permeability are slightly increased if compared to pure BOPET films.

  2. Nanocomposites biodegradable coating on BOPET films to enhance hot seal strength properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, G.; Galdi, M. R.; Di Maio, L.; Incarnato, L.

    2015-01-01

    The coating technology is a strategic solution to improve the properties of flexible packaging films. Indeed, additional functional layers are often designed and added as coating on the substrate, in order to improve the characteristic of the flexible packaging and to meet the requirements for the desired gas or vapour barrier, for adhesion and sealing, or for improving the film printability, its aesthetics and durability. Moreover, this technology allows to functionalize a polymeric substrate applying materials with different chemistry, rheology, thermal and structural characteristics. BOPET films are widely used for food packaging applications thanks to their good gas barrier and mechanical properties, high transparency and for the excellent printability. In regard to sealing performance, BOPET films show poor sealing properties so they are mostly submitted to lamination processes with polyethylene. Nevertheless, this solution compromises the PET recyclability and influences the gas permeability of the multilayer PET based structures. The aim of this work is to investigate on the effect of nanocomposite biodegradable coatings for BOPET substrates in enhancing the heat sealing strength of eco-compatible PET/PLA films. At this regards, different percentages of Cloisite C30B (0%, 2% and 4% wt/wt ) have been added to PLA by solution intercalation technique and the nanocomposite biodegradable materials produced have been applied on BOPET commercial films by casting. The BOPET coated films have been characterized in order to evaluate the heat sealing strength and the mechanical, gas permeability and surface properties. The results have shown that the addition of nanoclay in PLA coating significantly enhance the hot tack properties of the PET/PLA system produced, while the oxygen and water vapour permeability are slightly increased if compared to pure BOPET films

  3. Nanocomposites biodegradable coating on BOPET films to enhance hot seal strength properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, G.; Galdi, M. R.; Di Maio, L.; Incarnato, L.

    2015-12-01

    The coating technology is a strategic solution to improve the properties of flexible packaging films. Indeed, additional functional layers are often designed and added as coating on the substrate, in order to improve the characteristic of the flexible packaging and to meet the requirements for the desired gas or vapour barrier, for adhesion and sealing, or for improving the film printability, its aesthetics and durability. Moreover, this technology allows to functionalize a polymeric substrate applying materials with different chemistry, rheology, thermal and structural characteristics. BOPET films are widely used for food packaging applications thanks to their good gas barrier and mechanical properties, high transparency and for the excellent printability. In regard to sealing performance, BOPET films show poor sealing properties so they are mostly submitted to lamination processes with polyethylene. Nevertheless, this solution compromises the PET recyclability and influences the gas permeability of the multilayer PET based structures. The aim of this work is to investigate on the effect of nanocomposite biodegradable coatings for BOPET substrates in enhancing the heat sealing strength of eco-compatible PET/PLA films. At this regards, different percentages of Cloisite C30B (0%, 2% and 4%wt/wt) have been added to PLA by solution intercalation technique and the nanocomposite biodegradable materials produced have been applied on BOPET commercial films by casting. The BOPET coated films have been characterized in order to evaluate the heat sealing strength and the mechanical, gas permeability and surface properties. The results have shown that the addition of nanoclay in PLA coating significantly enhance the hot tack properties of the PET/PLA system produced, while the oxygen and water vapour permeability are slightly increased if compared to pure BOPET films.

  4. 2014 Enhanced LAW Glass Property-Composition Models, Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Isabelle [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [Energy Solutions, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gilbo, Konstantin [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-10-28

    This report describes the results of testing specified by the Enhanced LAW Glass Property-Composition Models, VSL-13T3050-1, Rev. 0 Test Plan. The work was performed in compliance with the quality assurance requirements specified in the Test Plan. Results required by the Test Plan are reported. The te4st results and this report have been reviewed for correctness, technical adequacy, completeness, and accuracy.

  5. Enhanced Luminescent Properties in Tm3+/Dy3+ Co-doped Transparent Phosphate Glass Ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    Yao L. Q.; Chen G. H.; Zhong H. J.; Cui S. C.; Li F.; Gan J.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Novel Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glass and glass ceramic samples for white light emitting diodes were prepared by melt quenching method. Under 353 nm excitation, the colors of the luminescence of the glass and glass ceramic samples are white. The CIE chromaticity coordinates (0.338, 0.328) of the emission from the glass ceramic is close to the standard white-light illumination (0.333, 0.333). Compared to the glass, the fluorescence intensity in the glass ceramic is greatly enhanced.

  6. Enhancement of the glass corrosion in the presence of clay minerals: testing experimental results with an integrated glass dissolution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godon, N.; Vernaz, E.Y.

    1992-01-01

    Recent glass dissolution experiments, conducted at 90 deg C in the presence of potential backfill materials, indicate remarkably faster glass corrosion in the presence of clay, compared to tests where the glass is leached either alone or with alternative backfill materials. This effect correlates with the clay content in the backfill, and may be attributed to the removal of silica from solution. Scorpion, or dissolution with reprecipitation of a silica-rich clay, have been proposed as possible mechanisms for the silica consumption. The results of some experiments have been tested against a glass dissolution model, in which a widely used kinetic equation for glass corrosion is coupled with diffusive silica transport through a single porosity, linearly sorbing medium, which represents the backfilling. Because the glass corrosion rates imposed by the kinetic equation are inversely proportional to the silicic acid concentration of the leachant contacting the glass, the model predicts enhanced glass dissolution if silica is sorbed by the porous medium. The experimental data proved to be consistent with the predicted enhancement of the glass dissolution. Moreover, the model-estimated distribution coefficients for silica sorption (K d ) fall within the range of values extracted from available literature data, thus supporting the hypothesis that the observed high corrosion rates are due to sorption of silica on the clay mineral surfaces. (author)

  7. Lead recovery and glass microspheres synthesis from waste CRT funnel glasses through carbon thermal reduction enhanced acid leaching process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingfei, Xing; Yaping, Wang; Jun, Li; Hua, Xu

    2016-03-15

    In this study, a novel process for detoxification and reutilization of waste cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass was developed by carbon thermal reduction enhanced acid leaching process. The key to this process is removal of lead from the CRT funnel glass and synchronous preparation of glass microspheres. Carbon powder was used as an isolation agent and a reducing agent. Under the isolation of the carbon powder, the funnel glass powder was sintered into glass microspheres. In thermal reduction, PbO in the funnel glass was first reduced to elemental Pb by carbon monoxide and then located on the surface of glass microspheres which can be removed easily by acid leaching. Experimental results showed that temperature, carbon adding amount and holding time were the major parameters that controlled lead removal rate. The maximum lead removal rate was 94.80% and glass microspheres that measured 0.73-14.74μm were obtained successfully by setting the temperature, carbon adding amount and holding time at 1200°C, 10% and 30min, respectively. The prepared glass microspheres may be used as fillers in polymer materials and abrasive materials, among others. Accordingly, this study proposed a practical and economical process for detoxification and recycling of waste lead-containing glass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Seals and sealing handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Flitney, Robert K

    2014-01-01

    Seals and Sealing Handbook, 6th Edition provides comprehensive coverage of sealing technology, bringing together information on all aspects of this area to enable you to make the right sealing choice. This includes detailed coverage on the seals applicable to static, rotary and reciprocating applications, the best materials to use in your sealing systems, and the legislature and regulations that may impact your sealing choices. Updated in line with current trends this updated reference provides the theory necessary for you to select the most appropriate seals for the job and with its 'Failur

  9. Episodic tremor and slip explained by fluid-enhanced microfracturing and sealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaudin, M.; Gueydan, F.

    2017-12-01

    A combination of non-volcanic tremor and transient slow slip events behaviors is commonly observed at plate interface, between locked/seismogenic zone at low depths and stable/ductile creep zone at larger depths. This association defines Episodic Tremor and Slip, systematically highlighted by over-pressurized fluids and near failure shear stress conditions. Here we propose a new mechanical approach that provides for the first time a mechanical and field-based explanation of the observed association between non-volcanic tremor and slow slip events. In contrast with more classical rate-and-state models, this physical model uses a ductile rheology with grain size sensitivity, fluid-driven microfracturing and sealing (e.g. grain size reduction and grain growth) and related pore fluid pressure fluctuations. We reproduce slow slip events by transient ductile strain localization as a result of fluid-enhanced microfracturing and sealing. Moreover, occurrence of macrofracturing during transient strain localization and local increase in pore fluid pressure well simulate non-volcanic tremor. Our model provides therefore a field-based explanation of episodic tremor and slip and moreover predicts the depth and temperature ranges of their occurrence in subduction zones. It implies furthermore that non-volcanic tremor and slow slip events are physically related.

  10. Enhancing the soft tissue seal around intraosseous transcutaneous amputation prostheses using silanized fibronectin titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimutengwende-Gordon, M; Pendegrass, C; Blunn, G, E-mail: mukai.cg@mac.com [Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, University College London, Brockley Hill, Stanmore, HA7 4LP (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    The success of intraosseous transcutaneous amputation prostheses (ITAP) relies on achieving a tight seal between the soft tissues and the implant in order to avoid infection. Fibronectin (Fn) may be silanized onto titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) in order to promote soft-tissue attachment. The silanization process includes passivation with sulphuric acid, which alters surface characteristics. This study aimed to improve in vitro fibroblast adhesion to silanized fibronectin (SiFn) titanium alloy by omitting the passivation stage. Additionally, the study assessed the effects of SiFn on in vivo dermal attachment, comparing the results with adsorbed Fn, hydroxyapatite (HA), Fn adsorbed onto HA (HAFn) and uncoated controls. Surface topography was assessed using scanning electron microscopy, profilometry and contact angle measurement. Anti-vinculin antibodies were used to immunolocalize fibroblast adhesion sites. A histological assessment of soft-tissue attachment and cell alignment relative to implants in an in vivo ovine model was performed. Passivation resulted in rougher, more hydrophobic, microcracked surfaces and was associated with poorer fibroblast adhesion than unpassivated controls. SiFn and HAFn surfaces resulted in more favourable cell alignment in vivo, implying that dermal attachment was enhanced. These results suggest that SiFn and HAFn surfaces could be useful in optimizing the soft tissue seal around ITAP.

  11. The sealing of second mandibular temporary molar pits and fissure with the laser of Nd: YAG, phosphoric acid and the glass ionomer cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, Maria Aparecida

    2003-01-01

    The main of our study was to check the sealing of second mandibular temporary molar pits and fissure, in vitro, with the laser of Nd: YAG, phosphoric acid at 37% and the glass ionomer cement (CIV, Fuji IX GC).The proposal was to check the structural morphologic changes in the laser irradiation upon the enamel surface to watch the pits and fissure sealing with the glass ionomer cement use after the laser irradiation and to verify the efficiency of the 'double conditioning' (phosphoric acid + Nd: YAG). At the same time we watch the evolution of the temperature in the pulp chamber's inside. Our desire was to achieve a therapeutic alternative technic to prevent the dental caries. The Nd: YAG laser parameters were the same: 79 mJ of energy per pulse; frequency of 5 Hz; mean power of 0,4 W; optical fiber on contact of 320 μm diameter; fluency of 99,52 J/ cm 2 , assuming that the only differential was the time of the laser application on the enamel surface. The samples were prepared with this way: Laser Nd: YAG (53 second) + acid + CIV (Fuji IX); Laser Nd: YAG (53 s); Laser Nd: YAG (20 s + 20 s) + acid + CIV; Laser Nd: YAG (20 s + 20 s); Acid + CIV; Control. Through the scanning electron microscopy (MEV) we noticed fusion and resolidification regions due to the laser irradiation and a better adaptation of the glass ionomer cement when we did the 'double conditioning'. Concerning the temperature increase we can conclude that the echeloned period was the best recommended because the temperature was found in a pattern that would not cause any damage to the dental pulp. For future studies we suggest a longer relaxing time between the laser irradiation, a comparative study of this method with other lasers, the use of other sealing materials and the study with the permanent teeth. (author)

  12. Liquid nitrogen enhancement of partially annealed fission tracks in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilione, L.J.; Gold, D.P.

    1976-01-01

    It is known that the number density of fission tracks in solids is reduced if the sample is heated before chemical etching, and the effect of annealing must be allowed for before an age can be assigned to the sample. The extent of annealing can be determined by measuring the reduction of track parameters (diameter and/or length) and comparison with unannealed tracks. Correct ages can be obtained by careful calibration studies of track density reduction against track diameter or length reduction at different annealing temperatures and times. For crystallised minerals, however, the resulting correction techniques are not generally valid. In the experimental work described glass samples were partially annealed and then immersed in liquid N 2 for various periods, and it was shown that the properties of the glass and the track parameters could be altered so as to observe tracks that would normally be erased by annealing. The results of track density measurements against liquid N 2 immersion times are shown graphically. A gain of about 40% was achieved after 760 hours immersion time. The size of the tracks was not noticeably affected by the immersion. It was thought that thermal shock might be the cause of the track enhancement, but it was found that repeated immersion for about 2 hours did not lead to an increase in track density. Other studies suggest that the mechanism that erases the tracks through annealing may be partially reversed when the temperature of the sample is significantly lowered for a sufficient length of time. Further work is under way to find whether or not the process of enhancement is a reversal of the annealing process. Similar enhancement effects using liquid N 2 have been observed for d-particle tracks in polycarbonate detectors. (U.K.)

  13. Lead recovery and high silica glass powder synthesis from waste CRT funnel glasses through carbon thermal reduction enhanced glass phase separation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Mingfei [Henan Key Laboratory Cultivation Base of Mine Environmental Protection and Ecological Remediation, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 Henan China (China); Institute of Resource and Environment, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 Henan China (China); Fu, Zegang [Institute of Resource and Environment, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 Henan China (China); Wang, Yaping, E-mail: wangyp326@163.com [School of Surveying and Land Information Engineering, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000, Henan China (China); Wang, Jingyu [Institute of Resource and Environment, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 Henan China (China); Zhang, Zhiyuan [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • CRT funnel glass was remelted with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in reducing atmosphere. • A part of PbO was reduced into Pb and detached from the glass phase. • The rest of PbO and other metal oxides were mainly concentrated in the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase. • PbO enriched in the interconnected B{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase can be completely leached out by HNO{sub 3}. • High silica glass powder(SiO{sub 2} purity >95%) was obtained after the leaching process. - Abstract: In this study, a novel process for the removal of toxic lead from the CRT funnel glass and synchronous preparation of high silica glass powder was developed by a carbon-thermal reduction enhanced glass phase separation process. CRT funnel glass was remelted with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in reducing atmosphere. In the thermal process, a part of PbO contained in the funnel glass was reduced into metallic Pb and detached from the glass phase. The rest of PbO and other metal oxides (including Na{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}O, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3,} BaO and CaO) were mainly concentrated in the boric oxide phase. The metallic Pb phase and boric oxide phase were completely leached out by 5 mol/L HNO{sub 3}. The lead removal rate was 99.80% and high silica glass powder (SiO{sub 2} purity >95 wt%) was obtained by setting the temperature, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} added amount and holding time at 1000 °C, 20% and 30 mins, respectively. The prepared high silicate glass powders can be used as catalyst carrier, semipermeable membranes, adsorbents or be remelted into high silicate glass as an ideal substitute for quartz glass. Thus this study proposed an eco-friendly and economical process for recycling Pb-rich electronic glass waste.

  14. Episodic Tremor and Slip Explained by Fluid-Enhanced Microfracturing and Sealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaudin, M.; Gueydan, F.

    2018-04-01

    Episodic tremor and slow-slip events at the deep extension of plate boundary faults illuminate seismic to aseismic processes around the brittle-ductile transition. These events occur in volumes characterized by overpressurized fluids and by near failure shear stress conditions. We present a new modeling approach based on a ductile grain size-sensitive rheology with microfracturing and sealing, which provides a mechanical and field-based explanation of such phenomena. We also model pore fluid pressure variation as a function of changes in porosity/permeability and strain rate-dependent fluid pumping. The fluid-enhanced dynamic evolution of microstructures defines cycles of ductile strain localization and implies increase in pore fluid pressure. We propose that slow-slip events are ductile processes related to transient strain localization, while nonvolcanic tremor corresponds to fracturing of the whole rock at the peak of pore fluid pressure. Our model shows that the availability of fluids and the efficiency of fluid pumping control the occurrence and the P-T conditions of episodic tremor and slip.

  15. Seals and sealing handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Flitney, Robert K

    2007-01-01

    Wherever machinery operates there will be seals of some kind ensuring that the machine remains lubricated, the fluid being pumped does not leak, or the gas does not enter the atmosphere. Seals are ubiquitous, in industry, the home, transport and many other places. This 5th edition of a long-established title covers all types of seal by application: static, rotary, reciprocating etc. The book bears little resemblance to its predecessors, and Robert Flitney has re-planned and re-written every aspect of the subject. No engineer, designer or manufacturer of seals can afford to be without this uniq

  16. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  17. Enhanced glass forming ability and refrigerant capacity of a Gd55Ni22Mn3Al20 bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, L.; Chan, K.C.; Tang, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A new Gd 55 Ni 22 Mn 3 Al 20 bulk metallic glass (BMG) was synthesized by minor Mn addition. → The BMG has enhanced glass forming ability and excellent refrigerant capacity (RC). → The RC of the BMG reaches a high value of 825 J kg -1 under a field of 3979 kA/m. → Its excellent RC is related to its large effective magnetic moment. - Abstract: In this work, a small amount of Mn was added to a Gd 55 Ni 25 Al 20 glass forming alloy, as a replacement for Ni, and a Gd 55 Ni 22 Mn 3 Al 20 bulk metallic glass (BMG) was obtained by suction casting. Its glass forming ability (GFA) was characterized by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and its magnetic properties were measured using a magnetic property measurement system. It is found that the minor Mn addition can significantly improve both the GFA and the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) of the alloy. The refrigerant capacity (RC) of the BMG can reach a high value of 825 J kg -1 under a field of 3979 kA/m, which is about 29% larger than that of a Gd 55 Ni 25 Al 20 BMG. The effect of the minor Mn addition on the GFA and MCE of the BMG was investigated in the study.

  18. Commercial alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glasses for sealing solid oxide cell stacks Part II: Characterization of devitrification and glass-ceramic phase assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersted, Karsten; Balic-Zunic, T.

    2018-01-01

    The devitrification process and formation of crystalline phases from commercial alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glasses containing 48-61 mol% SiO2, 18-28 mol% CaO, 1-7 mol% MgO, 7-10 mol% Al2O3, 1-11 mol% B2O3 plus minor amounts of Na2O, K2O, FeO and TiO2 were quantified through analysis...... of phase assemblages as function of heat treatments above the glass transition temperatures using the electron microprobe and powder X-ray diffraction. Treatments at 800 °C and 850 °C lasted up to 6 weeks. Results indicate that devitrification was strongly activated through presence of heterogeneous...... nucleation, and that the growth mechanism gradually changed from three-dimensional growth at the onset of devitrification towards one-dimensional growth in later stages, when heterogeneous nucleation was absent or less dominating. Most glasses developed entangled and fibrous microstructures with little...

  19. Enhanced Corrosion Resistance of PVD-CrN Coatings by ALD Sealing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan; Zhang, Teng Fei; Ding, Ji Cheng; Kim, Chang-Min; Park, So-Won; Yang, Yang; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Kwon, Se-Hun

    2017-04-01

    Multilayered hard coatings with a CrN matrix and an Al2O3, TiO2, or nanolaminate-Al2O3/TiO2 sealing layer were designed by a hybrid deposition process combined with physical vapor deposition (PVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). The strategy was to utilize ALD thin films as pinhole-free barriers to seal the intrinsic defects to protect the CrN matrix. The influences of the different sealing layers added in the coatings on the microstructure, surface roughness, and corrosion behaviors were investigated. The results indicated that the sealing layer added by ALD significantly decreased the average grain size and improved the corrosion resistance of the CrN coatings. The insertion of the nanolaminate-Al2O3/TiO2 sealing layers resulted in a further increase in corrosion resistance, which was attributed to the synergistic effect of Al2O3 and TiO2, both acting as excellent passivation barriers to the diffusion of corrosive substances.

  20. Core disruptive accident margin seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus for sealing the annulus defined within a substantially cylindrical rotatable riser assembly and plug combination of a nuclear reactor closure head is described. The apparatus comprises an inflatable sealing mechanism disposed in one portion of the riser assembly near the annulus such that upon inflation the sealing mechanism is radially actuated against the other portion of the riser assembly thereby sealing the annulus. The apparatus further comprises a connecting mechanism which places one end of the sealing mechanism in fluid communication with the reactor cover gas so that overpressurization of the reactor cover gas will increase the radial actuation of the sealing mechanism thus enhancing sealing of the annulus

  1. The IRES electronic seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autrusson, B.; Brochard, D.; Moreau, J.F.; Martin, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the French Support Program for the IAEA Safeguards, the 'Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire' (IPSN), developed an electronic seal called Integrated and Reusable Electronic Seal (IRES) that enables independent verification by different inspectorates (IAEA, Euratom, and National Inspectorate). The seal can be remotely interrogated by radio frequency and integrated to other Containment/surveillance systems by serial line RS 485. Data are authenticated and the IRESMAG software manages in the seal reader all functionalities of the seal and records inspection data compatible with the IAEA's Seal Database. To perform this development, IPSN relies on industrial partners: SAPHYMO for the general architecture of the seal and the electronics, THALES for the authentication of data and the security of transmission. The main features of the IRES seal are the following: Interrogation by different inspectorate, allowing independent conclusions; Recording of events, including tampering, in a non-volatile memory; Authentication of data and enhanced security of the communication between the seal and the seal reader; Remote interrogation by an inspector or/and automatic for unattended systems or remote monitoring; Reusable after erasing the seal memory and replacement of the batteries

  2. Enhancement of nucleation during hanging drop protein crystallization using HF treatment of cover glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yun-Zhu; Yin, Da-Chuan; Lu, Qin-Qin; Wang, Xi-Kai; Liu, Jun [Key Laboratory for Space Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072, Shaanxi (China)

    2010-02-15

    We examined a simple approach, i.e., etching cover glasses using hydrofluoric acid (HF), to determine whether cover glass treatment enhances nucleation in hanging drop protein crystallization. Hen egg white lysozyme and proteinase K were used as the model proteins. We found that the treatment increased the success rate of crystallization. The results indicated that the simple treatment, which is easy to adopt without changing much in the hanging drop method, can be utilized as an alternative method to enhance protein crystallization screens (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Giant Enhancement of Small Photoluminescent Signals on Glass Surfaces Covered by Self-Assembled Silver Nanorings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousanis, A; Poulopoulos, P; Karoutsos, V; Trachylis, D; Politis, C

    2017-02-01

    Self-assembled nanostructures with the shape of nanospheres or nanorings were formed after annealing of ultrathin Ag films grown on glass, in a furnace with air at 460 °C. Intense localized surface plasmon resonances were recorded for these nanostructures with maxima at the green-blue light. The surface became functional in terms of enhancing the weak photoluminescence of glass between 2–400 times. This system provides an easy way of enhancing the photoluminescence emission of initially low performance materials.

  4. Research on test of alkali-resistant glass fibre enhanced seawater coral aggregate concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Leiyang; Wang, Xingquan

    2017-12-01

    It is proposed in the 13th five-year plan that reefs of the south China sea should be constructed. In the paper, an innovative thinking was proposed for the first time in order to realize local material acquisition in island construction and life dependence on sea, namely alkali-resistant glass fibre is mixed in coralaggregate concrete as reinforcing material. The glass fibre is characterized by low price, low hardness, good dispersibility and convenient construction. Reliable guarantee is provided for widely applying the material in future projects. In the paper, an orthogonal test method is firstly applied to determine the mix proportion of grade C50 coral aggregate concrete. Then, the design plan ofmix proportion of alkali-resistant glass fibre enhanced seawater coral aggregate concrete is determined. Finally, the influence law of alkali-resistant glass fibre dosageon tensile compressiveflexture strength of seawatercoralaggregate concrete is made clear.

  5. Liquid nitrogen enhancement of partially annealed fission tracks in glass; and reply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, G.A.; Carpenter, B.S.; Pilione, L.J.; Gold, D.P.

    1977-01-01

    Pilione and Gold (Nature 262: 773 (1976)) stated that it was possible to reveal partially annealed fission tracks in glass by immersion in liquid N 2 , and that it was possible to increase the total number of etchable tracks by increasing the immersion time. The present authors attempted to duplicate the work of the former authors using the same glass. They found no significant change in the number of etchable tracks after immersion in liquid N 2 , and they concluded that the latter has no effect on annealed tracks in glass. Any observed enhancement of partially annealed tracks is probably a surface effect and has no effect on the interior matrix of the glass. A reply by Pilione and Gold is appended. (U.K.)

  6. Sealing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2013-12-10

    A sealing device for sealing a gap between a dovetail of a bucket assembly and a rotor wheel is disclosed. The sealing device includes a cover plate configured to cover the gap and a retention member protruding from the cover plate and configured to engage the dovetail. The sealing device provides a seal against the gap when the bucket assemply is subjected to a centrifugal force.

  7. Plasma Surface Modification of Glass-Fibre-Reinforced Polyester Enhanced by Ultrasonic Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Bardenshtein, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    treatment can be highly enhanced by simultaneous high-power ultrasonic irradiation of the treating surface, because the delivered acoustic energy can reduce the thickness of the boundary gas layer. Here surfaces of glass-fibre-reinforced polyester (GFRP) plates were treated using an atmospheric pressure...

  8. Enhanced bioactivity, biocompatibility and mechanical behavior of strontium substituted bioactive glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arepalli, Sampath Kumar, E-mail: askumar.rs.cer11@iitbhu.ac.in [Department of Ceramic Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Tripathi, Himanshu [Department of Ceramic Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Hira, Sumit Kumar; Manna, Partha Pratim [Immunobiology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Pyare, Ram; Singh, S.P. [Department of Ceramic Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2016-12-01

    Strontium contained biomaterials have been reported as a potential bioactive material for bone regeneration, as it reduces bone resorption and stimulates bone formation. In the present investigation, the bioactive glasses were designed to partially substitute SrO for SiO{sub 2} in Na{sub 2}O–CaO–SrO–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–SiO{sub 2} system. This work demonstrates that the substitution of SrO for SiO{sub 2} has got significant benefit than substitution for CaO in the bioactive glass. Bioactivity was assessed by the immersion of the samples in simulated body fluid for different intervals. The formation of hydroxy carbonate apatite layer was identified by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The elastic modulus of the bioactive glasses was measured and found to increase with increasing SrO for SiO{sub 2}. The blood compatibility of the samples was evaluated. In vitro cell culture studies of the samples were performed using human osteosarcoma U2-OS cell lines and found a significant improvement in cell viability and proliferation. The investigation showed enhancement in bioactivity, mechanical and biological properties of the strontia substituted for silica in glasses. Thus, these bioactive glasses would be highly potential for bone regeneration. - Highlights: • The substitution of SrO was done for SiO{sub 2} in Na{sub 2}O–CaO–SrO–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–SiO{sub 2} bioactive glass. • Network connectivity significantly influenced on bioactivity and biocompatibility. • In vitro SBF studies showed enhanced HCA crystallinity on the glass surface. • The cell culture studies exhibited better cell compatibility and significant growth. • Density and elastic moduli increased with increasing concentration of strontia.

  9. Enhanced bioactivity, biocompatibility and mechanical behavior of strontium substituted bioactive glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arepalli, Sampath Kumar; Tripathi, Himanshu; Hira, Sumit Kumar; Manna, Partha Pratim; Pyare, Ram; Singh, S.P.

    2016-01-01

    Strontium contained biomaterials have been reported as a potential bioactive material for bone regeneration, as it reduces bone resorption and stimulates bone formation. In the present investigation, the bioactive glasses were designed to partially substitute SrO for SiO 2 in Na 2 O–CaO–SrO–P 2 O 5 –SiO 2 system. This work demonstrates that the substitution of SrO for SiO 2 has got significant benefit than substitution for CaO in the bioactive glass. Bioactivity was assessed by the immersion of the samples in simulated body fluid for different intervals. The formation of hydroxy carbonate apatite layer was identified by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The elastic modulus of the bioactive glasses was measured and found to increase with increasing SrO for SiO 2 . The blood compatibility of the samples was evaluated. In vitro cell culture studies of the samples were performed using human osteosarcoma U2-OS cell lines and found a significant improvement in cell viability and proliferation. The investigation showed enhancement in bioactivity, mechanical and biological properties of the strontia substituted for silica in glasses. Thus, these bioactive glasses would be highly potential for bone regeneration. - Highlights: • The substitution of SrO was done for SiO 2 in Na 2 O–CaO–SrO–P 2 O 5 –SiO 2 bioactive glass. • Network connectivity significantly influenced on bioactivity and biocompatibility. • In vitro SBF studies showed enhanced HCA crystallinity on the glass surface. • The cell culture studies exhibited better cell compatibility and significant growth. • Density and elastic moduli increased with increasing concentration of strontia.

  10. Energy transfer induced Eu{sup 3+} photoluminescence enhancement in tellurite glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stambouli, W. [Laboratoire des Materiaux Mineraux et leurs Applications, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Materiaux, B.P. 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Elhouichet, H., E-mail: habib.elhouichet@fst.rnu.tn [Laboratoire des Materiaux Mineraux et leurs Applications, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Materiaux, B.P. 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Universite de Tunis-ElManar ElManar 2092, Tunis (Tunisia); Gelloz, B. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakacho, Koganei, 184-8588 Tokyo (Japan); Ferid, M. [Laboratoire des Materiaux Mineraux et leurs Applications, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Materiaux, B.P. 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Koshida, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakacho, Koganei, 184-8588 Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    In this work, structural, thermal and optical properties of Eu{sup 3+} doped TeO{sub 2}-La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} glass were investigated. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements reveal an important stability factor {Delta}T=143.52 K, which indicates the good thermal and mechanical stabilities of tellurite glass. From the absorption spectrum, the optical band gap was found to be direct with E{sub g}=3.23 eV. The temperature dependences of photoluminescence (PL) properties of Eu-doped and Eu-Tb codoped tellurite glass are investigated. As the temperature increases from 7 to 300 K, both the PL intensity and the PL lifetime relative to the {sup 5}D{sub 2}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub 0} are nearly constant below 230 K and then an enhancement takes place. This anomalous feature is attributed to the thermally activated carrier transfer process from charged intrinsic defects states to Eu{sup 3+} energy levels. By co-doping tellurite glasses with Eu and Tb, a strong Eu{sup 3+} PL enhancement is shown due to excitation transfer from Tb{sup 3+} and intrinsic defects to Eu ions. - Highlights: > TeO{sub 2}-La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} glass doped Eu{sup 3+} with good thermal stability elaborated. > PL evolution of Eu{sup 3+} with temperature shows a non-conventional behavior. > Thermally activated carrier transfer from intrinsic defects states to Eu{sup 3+} shown. > Strong Eu{sup 3+} PL enhancement is shown in Eu-Tb codoped glass.

  11. Mechanical seals

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, E

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical Seals, Third Edition is a source of practical information on the design and use of mechanical seals. Topics range from design fundamentals and test rigs to leakage, wear, friction and power, reliability, and special designs. This text is comprised of nine chapters; the first of which gives a general overview of seals, including various types of seals and their applications. Attention then turns to the fundamentals of seal design, with emphasis on six requirements that must be considered: sealing effectiveness, length of life, reliability, power consumption, space requirements, and c

  12. Security seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobeli, Garth W.

    1985-01-01

    Security for a package or verifying seal in plastic material is provided by a print seal with unique thermally produced imprints in the plastic. If tampering is attempted, the material is irreparably damaged and thus detectable. The pattern of the imprints, similar to "fingerprints" are recorded as a positive identification for the seal, and corresponding recordings made to allow comparison. The integrity of the seal is proved by the comparison of imprint identification records made by laser beam projection.

  13. Enhanced bioactivity, biocompatibility and mechanical behavior of strontium substituted bioactive glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sampath Kumar; Tripathi, Himanshu; Hira, Sumit Kumar; Manna, Partha Pratim; Pyare, Ram; S P Singh

    2016-12-01

    Strontium contained biomaterials have been reported as a potential bioactive material for bone regeneration, as it reduces bone resorption and stimulates bone formation. In the present investigation, the bioactive glasses were designed to partially substitute SrO for SiO2 in Na2O-CaO-SrO-P2O5-SiO2 system. This work demonstrates that the substitution of SrO for SiO2 has got significant benefit than substitution for CaO in the bioactive glass. Bioactivity was assessed by the immersion of the samples in simulated body fluid for different intervals. The formation of hydroxy carbonate apatite layer was identified by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The elastic modulus of the bioactive glasses was measured and found to increase with increasing SrO for SiO2. The blood compatibility of the samples was evaluated. In vitro cell culture studies of the samples were performed using human osteosarcoma U2-OS cell lines and found a significant improvement in cell viability and proliferation. The investigation showed enhancement in bioactivity, mechanical and biological properties of the strontia substituted for silica in glasses. Thus, these bioactive glasses would be highly potential for bone regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhanced frequency upconversion study in Er3+/Yb3+ doped/codoped TWTi glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Mohd; Rai, Vineet Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Er3+/Yb3+ doped/codoped TeO2-WO3-TiO2 (TWTi) glasses have been prepared by using the melt-quenching technique. The upconversion (UC) emission spectra of the developed glasses have been recorded upon 980 nm laser excitation. Three intense UC emission bands have been observed within the green and red region centered at ˜532 nm, ˜553 nm and ˜669 nm corresponding to the 2H11/2→4I15/2, 4S3/2→4I15/2 and 4F9/2→4I15/2 transitions respectively in the singly Er3+ doped glass. On introducing Yb3+ ions in the singly Er3+ doped glass, an enhancement of about ˜ 12 times and ˜50 times in the green and red bands respectively have been observed even at low pump power ˜ 364 mW followed by two photon absorption process. Colour tunability from yellowish green to pure green colour region has been observed on varying the pump power. The prepared glass can be used to produce NIR to green upconverter and colour tunable display devices.

  15. Seal arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempsey, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    A hydraulically balanced face type shaft seal is provided in which the opening and closing seal face areas retain concentricity with each other in the event of lateral shaft displacement. The seal arrangement is for a vertical high pressure pump, indented for use in the cooling system of a nuclear reactor. (Auth.)

  16. Enhancing light reflective properties on ITO glass by plasmonic effect of silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezhong Zhang

    Full Text Available The preparation of well-defined silver (Ag nanoparticle arrays is reported in this paper. Ag nanoparticles are electrodeposited on Indium tin oxide (ITO coated glass substrates at 30 °C. The size, shape and periodicity of the Ag nanoparticle arrays are well-controlled. We study the effect of particle size and interparticle distance on reflection enhancement. The sample at the deposition potential of −0.2 V for an electrodeposition time of 3600 s exhibits an enhancement of 28% in weighted reflection in contrast with bare ITO glass. This study reports the high reflection of Ag nanoparticle arrays by electrodeposition method might be application to large-scale photovoltaic devices.

  17. Research on vitrification technology to immobilize radioactive sludge generated from Fukushima Daiichi power plant. Enhanced glass medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amamoto, Ippei; Kobayashi, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Naoto; Takebe, Hiromichi; Mitamura, Naoki; Tsuzuki, Tatsuya; Fukayama, Daigen; Nagano, Yuichi; Jantzen, Tatjana; Hack, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The search for an enhanced glass medium to immobilize the sludge at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant is our main purpose. The iron phosphate glass (IPG) is a potential candidate as we set about assessing it by means of theoretical and experimental investigation. Based on the results of this study, the IPG showed favorable characteristics as a vitrification medium for the sludge. (author)

  18. Aluminum-free glass-ionomer bone cements with enhanced bioactivity and biodegradability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Filipa O.; Pires, Ricardo A., E-mail: rpires@dep.uminho.pt; Reis, Rui L.

    2013-04-01

    Al-free glasses of general composition 0.340SiO{sub 2}:0.300ZnO:(0.250-a-b)CaO:aSrO:bMgO:0.050Na{sub 2}O:0.060P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (a, b = 0.000 or 0.125) were synthesized by melt quenching and their ability to form glass-ionomer cements was evaluated using poly(acrylic acid) and water. We evaluated the influence of the poly(acrylic acid) molecular weight and glass particle size in the cement mechanical performance. Higher compressive strength (25 ± 5 MPa) and higher compressive elastic modulus (492 ± 17 MPa) were achieved with a poly(acrylic acid) of 50 kDa and glass particle sizes between 63 and 125 μm. Cements prepared with glass formulation a = 0.125 and b = 0.000 were analyzed after immersion in simulated body fluid; they presented a surface morphology consistent with a calcium phosphate coating and a Ca/P ratio of 1.55 (similar to calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite). Addition of starch to the cement formulation induced partial degradability after 8 weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer saline containing α-amylase. Micro-computed tomography analysis revealed that the inclusion of starch increased the cement porosity from 35% to 42%. We were able to produce partially degradable Al-free glass-ionomer bone cements with mechanical performance, bioactivity and biodegradability suitable to be applied on non-load bearing sites and with the appropriate physical characteristics for osteointegration upon partial degradation. Zn release studies (concentrations between 413 μM and 887 μM) evidenced the necessity to tune the cement formulations to reduce the Zn concentration in the surrounding environment. Highlights: ► We developed partially degradable, bioactive, Al-free glass-ionomer cements (GICs). ► Enhanced mechanical behavior was achieved using 63–125 μm glass particle size range. ► The highest mechanical resistance was obtained using poly(acrylic acid) of 50 kDa. ► Biodegradation was successfully tuned to start 8 weeks after GIC preparation. ► Zn

  19. Aluminum-free glass-ionomer bone cements with enhanced bioactivity and biodegradability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Filipa O.; Pires, Ricardo A.; Reis, Rui L.

    2013-01-01

    Al-free glasses of general composition 0.340SiO 2 :0.300ZnO:(0.250-a-b)CaO:aSrO:bMgO:0.050Na 2 O:0.060P 2 O 5 (a, b = 0.000 or 0.125) were synthesized by melt quenching and their ability to form glass-ionomer cements was evaluated using poly(acrylic acid) and water. We evaluated the influence of the poly(acrylic acid) molecular weight and glass particle size in the cement mechanical performance. Higher compressive strength (25 ± 5 MPa) and higher compressive elastic modulus (492 ± 17 MPa) were achieved with a poly(acrylic acid) of 50 kDa and glass particle sizes between 63 and 125 μm. Cements prepared with glass formulation a = 0.125 and b = 0.000 were analyzed after immersion in simulated body fluid; they presented a surface morphology consistent with a calcium phosphate coating and a Ca/P ratio of 1.55 (similar to calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite). Addition of starch to the cement formulation induced partial degradability after 8 weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer saline containing α-amylase. Micro-computed tomography analysis revealed that the inclusion of starch increased the cement porosity from 35% to 42%. We were able to produce partially degradable Al-free glass-ionomer bone cements with mechanical performance, bioactivity and biodegradability suitable to be applied on non-load bearing sites and with the appropriate physical characteristics for osteointegration upon partial degradation. Zn release studies (concentrations between 413 μM and 887 μM) evidenced the necessity to tune the cement formulations to reduce the Zn concentration in the surrounding environment. Highlights: ► We developed partially degradable, bioactive, Al-free glass-ionomer cements (GICs). ► Enhanced mechanical behavior was achieved using 63–125 μm glass particle size range. ► The highest mechanical resistance was obtained using poly(acrylic acid) of 50 kDa. ► Biodegradation was successfully tuned to start 8 weeks after GIC preparation. ► Zn release should be

  20. Bioactive glass ions as strong enhancers of osteogenic differentiation in human adipose stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojansivu, Miina; Vanhatupa, Sari; Björkvik, Leena; Häkkänen, Heikki; Kellomäki, Minna; Autio, Reija; Ihalainen, Janne A; Hupa, Leena; Miettinen, Susanna

    2015-07-01

    Bioactive glasses are known for their ability to induce osteogenic differentiation of stem cells. To elucidate the mechanism of the osteoinductivity in more detail, we studied whether ionic extracts prepared from a commercial glass S53P4 and from three experimental glasses (2-06, 1-06 and 3-06) are alone sufficient to induce osteogenic differentiation of human adipose stem cells. Cells were cultured using basic medium or osteogenic medium as extract basis. Our results indicate that cells stay viable in all the glass extracts for the whole culturing period, 14 days. At 14 days the mineralization in osteogenic medium extracts was excessive compared to the control. Parallel to the increased mineralization we observed a decrease in the cell amount. Raman and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy analyses confirmed that the mineral consisted of calcium phosphates. Consistently, the osteogenic medium extracts also increased osteocalcin production and collagen Type-I accumulation in the extracellular matrix at 13 days. Of the four osteogenic medium extracts, 2-06 and 3-06 induced the best responses of osteogenesis. However, regardless of the enhanced mineral formation, alkaline phosphatase activity was not promoted by the extracts. The osteogenic medium extracts could potentially provide a fast and effective way to differentiate human adipose stem cells in vitro. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhanced Laser Cooling of Rare-Earth-Ion-Doped Glass Containing Nanometer-Sized Metallic Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Youhua; Zhong Biao; Yin Jianping

    2009-01-01

    The enhanced laser cooling performance of rare-earth-ions-doped glasses containing small particles is predicted. This is achieved by the enhancement of local field around rare earth ions, owing to the surface plasmon resonance of small metallic particles. The role of energy transfer between ions and the particle is theoretical discussed. Depending on the particle size and the ion emission quantum efficiency, the enhancement of the absorption and the fluorescence is predicted. Moreover, taking Yb 3+ -doped ZBLAN as example, the cooling power and heat-light converting efficiency are calculated. It is finally concluded that the absorption and the fluorescence are greatly enhanced in these composite materials, the cooling power is increased compared to the bulk material. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  2. Nozzle seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, having an internal hoop from which the heated coolant emerges from the reactor core and passes through to the reactor outlet nozzles, is provided with sealing members operatively disposed between the outlet nozzle and the hoop. The sealing members are biased against the pressure vessel and the hoop and are connected by a leak restraining member establishing a leak-proof condition between the inlet and outlet coolants in the region about the outlet nozzle. Furthermore, the flexible responsiveness of the seal assures that the seal will not structurally couple the hoop to the pressure vessel

  3. Nozzle seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walling, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, having an internal hoop from which the heated coolant emerges from the reactor core and passes through to the reactor outlet nozzles, is provided with sealing rings operatively disposed between the outlet nozzles and the hoop. The sealing rings connected by flexible members are biased against the pressure vessel and the hoop, establishing a leak-proof condition between the inlet and outlet coolants in the region about the outlet nozzle. Furthermore, the flexible responsiveness of the seal assures that the seal will not structurally couple the hoop to the pressure vessel. 4 claims, 2 figures

  4. Near-field enhanced femtosecond laser nano-drilling of glass substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Y.; Hong, M.H.; Fuh, J.Y.H.; Lu, L.; Lukyanchuk, B.S.; Wang, Z.B.

    2008-01-01

    Particle mask assisted near-field enhanced femtosecond laser nano-drilling of transparent glass substrate was demonstrated in this paper. A particle mask was fabricated by self-assembly of spherical 1 μm silica particles on the substrate surface. Then the samples were exposed to femtosecond laser (800 nm, 100 fs) and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). The nano-hole array was found on the glass surface. The hole sizes were measured from 200 to 300 nm with an average depth of 150 nm and increased with laser fluence. Non-linear triple-photon absorption and near-field enhancement were the main mechanisms of the nano-feature formation. Calculations based on Mie theory shows an agreement with experiment results. More debris, however, was found at high laser fluence. This can be attributed to the explosion of silica particles because the focusing point is inside the 1 μm particle. The simulation predicts that the focusing point will move outside the particle if the particle size increases. The experiment performed under 6.84 μm silica particles verified that no debris was formed. And for all the samples, no cracks were found on the substrate surface because of ultra-short pulse width of femtosecond laser. This method has potential applications in nano-patterning of transparent glass substrate for nano-structure device fabrication

  5. Enhanced Stem Cell Osteogenic Differentiation by Bioactive Glass Functionalized Graphene Oxide Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoju Mo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An unmet need in engineered bone regeneration is to develop scaffolds capable of manipulating stem cells osteogenesis. Graphene oxide (GO has been widely used as a biomaterial for various biomedical applications. However, it remains challenging to functionalize GO as ideal platform for specifically directing stem cell osteogenesis. Herein, we report facile functionalization of GO with dopamine and subsequent bioactive glass (BG to enhance stem cell adhesion, spreading, and osteogenic differentiation. On the basis of graphene, we obtained dopamine functionalized graphene oxide/bioactive glass (DGO/BG hybrid scaffolds containing different content of DGO by loading BG nanoparticles on graphene oxide surface using sol-gel method. To enhance the dispersion stability and facilitate subsequent nucleation of BG in GO, firstly, dopamine (DA was used to modify GO. Then, the modified GO was functionalized with bioactive glass (BG using sol-gel method. The adhesion, spreading, and osteoinductive effects of DGO/BG scaffold on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs were evaluated. DGO/BG hybrid scaffolds with different content of DGO could influence rBMSCs’ behavior. The highest expression level of osteogenic markers suggests that the DGO/BG hybrid scaffolds have great potential or elicit desired bone reparative outcome.

  6. Use of Google Glass to Enhance Surgical Education of Neurosurgery Residents: "Proof-of-Concept" Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhla, Jonathan; Kobets, Andrew; De la Garza Ramos, Rafeal; Haranhalli, Neil; Gelfand, Yaroslav; Ammar, Adam; Echt, Murray; Scoco, Aleka; Kinon, Merritt; Yassari, Reza

    2017-02-01

    The relatively decreased time spent in the operating room and overall reduction in cases performed by neurosurgical trainees as a result of duty-hour restrictions demands that the pedagogical content within each surgical encounter be maximized and crafted toward the specific talents and shortcomings of the individual. It is imperative to future generations that the quality of training adapts to the changing administrative infrastructures and compensates for anything that may compromise the technical abilities of trainees. Neurosurgeons in teaching hospitals continue to experiment with various emerging technologies-such as simulators and virtual presence-to supplement and improve surgical training. The authors participated in the Google Glass Explorer Program in order to assess the applicability of Google Glass as a tool to enhance the operative education of neurosurgical residents. Google Glass is a type of wearable technology in the form of eyeglasses that employs a high-definition camera and allows the user to interact using voice commands. Google Glass was able to effectively capture video segments of various lengths for residents to review in a variety of clinical settings within a large, tertiary care university hospital, as well as during a surgical mission to a developing country. The resolution and quality of the video were adequate to review and use as a teaching tool. While Google Glass harbors the potential to dramatically improve both neurosurgical education and practice in a variety of ways, certain technical drawbacks of the current model limit its effectiveness as a teaching tool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Plasmon-Assisted Efficiency Enhancement of Eu3+-Doped Tellurite Glass-Covered Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Bismarck C.; Gómez-Malagón, L. A.; Gomes, A. S. L.; Garcia, J. A. M.; Kassab, L. R. P.

    2017-12-01

    Rare-earth-doped tellurite glass containing metallic nanoparticles can be exploited to manage the solar spectrum in order to increase solar cell efficiency. It is therefore possible to modify the incident solar spectrum profile to the spectrum that optimizes the solar cell recombination process by covering the solar cell with plasmonic luminescent downshifting layers. With this approach, the losses due to thermalization are minimized and the efficiency is increased. Due to the down-conversion process that couples the plasmon resonance of the metallic nanoparticles and the rare-earth electronic energy levels, it is possible to convert photons from the ultraviolet region to the visible and near-band-gap region of the semiconductor. It is demonstrated here that plasmon-assisted efficiency enhancements of 14.0% and 34.5% can be obtained for commercial Si and GaP solar cells, respectively, covered with Eu3+-doped TeO2-ZnO glass containing silver nanoparticles.

  8. Edge sealing for low cost stability enhancement of roll-to-roll processed flexible polymer solar cell modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanenbaum, David M.; Dam, Henrik Friis; Rösch, R.

    2012-01-01

    Fully roll-to-roll processed polymer solar cell modules were prepared, characterized, and laminated. Cell modules were cut from the roll and matched pairs were selected, one module with exposed cut edges, the other laminated again with the same materials and adhesive sealing fully around the cut...... edges. The edge sealing rim was 10 mm wide. Cell modules were characterized by periodic measurements of IV curves over extended periods in a variety of conditions, as well as by a variety of spatial imaging techniques. Data show significant stability benefits of the edge sealing process. The results...

  9. Ultra-thin Glass Film Coated with Graphene: A New Material for Spontaneous Emission Enhancement of Quantum Emitter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Sun; Chun Jiang

    2015-01-01

    We propose an ultra-thin glass film coated with graphene as a new kind of surrounding material which can greatly enhance spontaneous emission rate(SER) of dipole emitter embedded in it. With properly designed parameters,numerical results show that SER-enhanced factors as high as 1.286 9 106 can be achieved. The influences of glass film thickness and chemical potential/doping level of graphene on spontaneous emission enhancement are also studied in this paper. A comparison is made between graphene and other coating materials such as gold and silver to see their performances in SER enhancement.

  10. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  11. Ceramic Seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smartt, Heidi A.; Romero, Juan A.; Custer, Joyce Olsen; Hymel, Ross W.; Krementz, Dan; Gobin, Derek; Harpring, Larry; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael; Varble, Don; DiMaio, Jeff; Hudson, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  12. Electronic seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musyck, E.

    1981-01-01

    An electronic seal is presented for a volume such as container for fissile materials. The seal encloses a lock for barring the space as well as a device for the detection and the recording of the intervention of the lock. (AF)

  13. Ferrules seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.L.

    1984-07-10

    A device is provided for sealing an inner tube and an outer tube without excessively deforming the tubes. The device includes two ferrules which cooperate to form a vacuum-tight seal between the inner tube and outer tube and having mating surfaces such that overtightening is not possible. 3 figs.

  14. Sealing devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulson, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A sealing device for minimising the leakage of toxic or radioactive contaminated environments through a biological shield along an opening through which a flexible component moves that penetrates the shield. The sealing device comprises an outer tubular member which extends over a length not less than the maximum longitudinal movement of the component along the opening. An inner sealing block is located intermediate the length of the component by connectors and is positioned in the bore of the outer tubular member to slide in the bore and effect a seal over the entire longitudinal movement of the component. The cross-section of the device may be circular and the block may be of polytetrafluoroethylene or of nylon impregnated with molybdenum or may be metallic. A number of the sealing devices may be combined into an assembly for a plurality of adjacent longitudinally movable components, each adapted to sustain a tensile load, providing the various drives of a master-slave manipulator. (author)

  15. Enhancement of plasticity of Fe-based bulk metallic glass by Ni substitution for Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, S.F. [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, N.; Zhang, C. [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Liu, L., E-mail: sfguo2005@163.co [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China)

    2010-08-15

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) (Fe{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}){sub 71}Mo{sub 5}P{sub 12}C{sub 10}B{sub 2} (x = 0, 0.1 and 0.2) with a diameter of 3 mm were synthesized by copper mold casting. The effect of Ni substitution for Fe on the structure, thermal and mechanical properties has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and compressive testing. It was found that the substitution of Ni for Fe enhances the glass forming ability, and improves the plasticity of Fe{sub 71}Mo{sub 5}P{sub 12}C{sub 10}B{sub 2} BMG as indicated by the increase in the plastic strain from 3.1% (x = 0) to 5.2% (x = 0.2). The improvement of the plasticity is discussed in term of the reduction of glass transition temperature and the supercooled liquid region due to the substitution of Ni for Fe.

  16. Annealing time dependent up-conversion luminescence enhancement in magnesium–tellurite glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amjad, Raja J., E-mail: rajajunaid25@gmail.com [Advanced Optical Material Research Group, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor bahru 81310 (Malaysia); Centre for Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, QAC, Lahore 54590 (Pakistan); Sahar, M.R.; Ghoshal, S.K.; Dousti, M.R. [Advanced Optical Material Research Group, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor bahru 81310 (Malaysia); Riaz, S. [Centre for Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, QAC, Lahore 54590 (Pakistan); Samavati, A.R.; Arifin, R. [Advanced Optical Material Research Group, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor bahru 81310 (Malaysia); Naseem, S. [Centre for Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, QAC, Lahore 54590 (Pakistan)

    2013-04-15

    Silver nanoparticles (NPs) embedded Er{sup 3+} ions doped magnesium–tellurite glasses are prepared using melt quenching technique. Heat treatment with different time intervals above the glass transition temperature is applied in order to reduce the silver ions (Ag{sup +}) to silver NPs (Ag{sup o}). The transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential thermal analyses (DTA), UV–vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy are used to examine annealing time dependent structural and optical properties. The characteristics temperatures such as glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), crystallization temperature (T{sub c}) and melting temperature (T{sub m}) obtained from DTA for an as prepared sample are 322 °C, 450 °C and 580 °C, respectively. TEM image clearly shows the homogeneous distribution of silver NPs with an average diameter ∼12 nm. The observed localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) band is evidenced at 534 nm. Furthermore, the infrared to visible frequency up-conversion (UC) emission under 786 nm excitation exhibits three emission bands centered at 532 nm, 554 nm and 634 nm corresponding to {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transitions of Er{sup 3+}, respectively. Intensity of all the bands is found to enhance by increasing the annealing time up to 24 h. However, further increase in the annealing time duration (∼40 h) reduces the intensity. Enhancement in the luminescence intensity is understood in terms of the local field effect of the silver NPs whereas the quenching is attributed to the energy transfer from Er{sup 3+} ions to silver NPs. -- Highlights: ► Er{sup 3+}-doped silver NPs embedded magnesium–tellurite glasses are prepared. ► TEM confirms the successful precipitation of spherical NPs by heat treatment (HT). ► Luminescence is enhanced due to the growth of NPs after HT up to 24 h. ► With HT>24 h (40 h

  17. Analysis of marginal seal of ProRoot MTA, MTA Angelus biodentine, and glass ionomer cement as root-end filling materials: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakshi Malhotra

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Microleakage was present in all the samples. Least amount of apical dye microleakage was seen in biodentine with mean value of 0.16 mm followed by ProRoot MTA 0.68 mm, MTA Angelus 0.74 mm, and GIC 1.53 mm. The best sealing ability was seen in biodentine, and this difference was statistically significant.

  18. A seal analyzer for testing container integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, P.; Jenkins, C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of laboratory and production seal analyzer that offers a rapid, nondestructive method of assuring the seal integrity of virtually any type of single or double sealed container. The system can test a broad range of metal cans, drums and trays, membrane-lidded vessels, flexible pouches, aerosol containers, and glass or metal containers with twist-top lids that are used in the chemical/pesticide (hazardous materials/waste), beverage, food, medical and pharmaceutical industries

  19. Titanium phosphate glass microcarriers induce enhanced osteogenic cell proliferation and human mesenchymal stem cell protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilay J Lakhkar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have developed 50- to 100-µm-sized titanium phosphate glass microcarriers (denoted as Ti5 that show enhanced proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells and MG63 osteosarcoma cells, as well as enhanced human mesenchymal stem cell expression of bone differentiation markers, in comparison with commercially available glass microspheres at all time points. We also demonstrate that these microcarriers provide superior human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation with conventional Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle medium than with a specially developed commercial stem cell medium. The microcarrier proliferative capacity is revealed by a 24-fold increase in MG63 cell numbers in spinner flask bioreactor studies performed over a 7-day period, versus only a 6-fold increase in control microspheres under the same conditions; the corresponding values of Ti5 and control microspheres under static culture are 8-fold and 7-fold, respectively. The capability of guided osteogenic differentiation is confirmed by ELISAs for bone morphogenetic protein-2 and osteopontin, which reveal significantly greater expression of these markers, especially osteopontin, by human mesenchymal stem cells on the Ti5 microspheres than on the control. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy images reveal favorable MG63 and human mesenchymal stem cell adhesion on the Ti5 microsphere surfaces. Thus, the results demonstrate the suitability of the developed microspheres for use as microcarriers in bone tissue engineering applications.

  20. Constructive interference between disordered couplings enhances multiparty entanglement in quantum Heisenberg spin glass models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Utkarsh; Rakshit, Debraj; Prabhu, R; Sen, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2016-01-01

    Disordered systems form one of the centrestages of research in many body sciences and lead to a plethora of interesting phenomena and applications. A paradigmatic disordered system consists of a one-dimensional array of quantum spin-1/2 particles, governed by the Heisenberg spin glass Hamiltonian with natural or engineered quenched disordered couplings in an external magnetic field. These systems allow disorder-induced enhancement for bipartite and multipartite observables. Here we show that simultaneous application of independent quenched disorders results in disorder-induced enhancement, while the same is absent with individual application of the same disorders. We term the phenomenon as constructive interference and the corresponding parameter stretches as the Venus regions. Interestingly, it has only been observed for multiparty entanglement and is absent for the single- and two-party physical quantities. (paper)

  1. Enhanced mechanical properties of single walled carbon nanotube-borosilicate glass composite due to cushioning effect and localized plastic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujan Ghosh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A borosilicate glass composite has been fabricated incorporating Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT in the glass matrix by melt-quench technique. Hardness and the fracture toughness of the composite, were found to increase moderately with respect to the base glass. Interestingly one can observe accumulation of SWCNT bundles around the crack zone though no such accumulation was observed in the crack free indentation zone. The enhanced hardness of the composite was discussed by correlating the cushioning as well as toughening behavior of the agglomerated SWCNT bundles. On the other hand enhanced plastic flow was proposed to be the prime reason for the accumulation of SWCNT bundles around the crack, which increases the toughness of the composite by reducing the crack length. Moreover to ascertain the enhanced plasticity of the composite than that of the glass we calculated the recovery resistance of glass and the composite where recovery resistance of composite was found to be higher than that of the glass.

  2. Glass Glimpsed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology.......Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology....

  3. An enhanced resolution of the structural environment of zirconium in borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jollivet, P.; Angeli, F.; Bergeron, B.; Gin, S.; Calas, G.; Galoisy, L.; Ruffoni, M.P.; Trcera, N.

    2013-01-01

    The short- and medium-range local environment of zirconium was determined by Zr L 2,3 -edge and K-edge XANES and by Zr K-edge EXAFS in borosilicate glasses with 1 to 8 mol% ZrO 2 . Regardless of the ZrO 2 content of the glass, Zr is six-coordinated in octahedra with Zr-O distances of 2.09 Angstroms. In the glasses containing 8 mol% ZrO 2 , the octahedra are more distorted than at lower ZrO 2 content. Enhanced resolution in the real space is achieved by recording Zr K-edge EXAFS spectra over a broad energy range, enabling to get access k-values up to 20 Angstroems -1 with a high signal to noise ratio. This allows discriminate between the various second neighbor contributions. A correct fit is based on four Si and two B. This local structure around Zr derived from that of zircono-silicates such as elpidite, in which two Si are replaced by two B. The Zr-Si distances increase from 3.63 ± 0.02 to 3.67 ± 0.01 Angstroms, as Zr-B distances remain constant within uncertainties, as ZrO 2 content increases. Two Na are situated at 3.64 ± 0.03 Angstroms from Zr, ensuring charge compensation of the ZrO 6 sites. Increasing the CaO content from 4 to 8 mol% does not lead to any structural change around Zr. (authors)

  4. Phosphate glass fibre scaffolds: Tailoring of the properties and enhancement of the bioactivity through mesoporous glass particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novajra, G; Boetti, N G; Lousteau, J; Fiorilli, S; Milanese, D; Vitale-Brovarone, C

    2016-10-01

    Novel bone glass fibre scaffolds were developed by thermally bonding phosphate glass fibres belonging to the P2O5-CaO-Na2O-SiO2-MgO-K2O-TiO2 system (TiPS2.5 glass). Scaffolds with fibres of 85 or 110μm diameter were fabricated, showing compressive strength in the range of 2-3.5MPa, comparable to that of the trabecular bone. The effect of different thermal treatments and fibre diameters and length on the final scaffold structure was investigated by means of micro-CT analysis. The change of the sintering time from 30 to 60min led to a decrease in the scaffold overall porosity from 58 to 21vol.% for the 85μm fibre scaffold and from 50 to 40vol.% when increasing the sintering temperature from 490 to 500°C for the 110μm fibre scaffold. The 85μm fibres resulted in an increase of the scaffold overall porosity, increased pore size and lower trabecular thickness; the use of different fibre diameters allowed the fabrication of a scaffold showing a porosity gradient. In order to impart bioactive properties to the scaffold, for the first time in the literature the introduction in these fibre scaffolds of a bioactive phase, a melt-derived bioactive glass (CEL2) powder or spray-dried mesoporous bioactive glass particles (SD-MBG) was investigated. The scaffold bioactivity was assessed through soaking in simulated body fluid. CEL2/glass fibre scaffold did not show promising results due to particle detachment from the fibres during soaking in simulated body fluid. Instead the use of mesoporous bioactive powders showed to be an effective way to impart bioactivity to the scaffold and could be further exploited in the future through the ability of mesoporous particles to act as systems for the controlled release of drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Surface functionalization of 3D glass-ceramic porous scaffolds for enhanced mineralization in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Sara; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Bretcanu, Oana; Cassinelli, Clara; Vernè, Enrica

    2013-04-01

    Bone reconstruction after tissue loosening due to traumatic, pathological or surgical causes is in increasing demand. 3D scaffolds are a widely studied solution for supporting new bone growth. Bioactive glass-ceramic porous materials can offer a three-dimensional structure that is able to chemically bond to bone. The ability to surface modify these devices by grafting biologically active molecules represents a challenge, with the aim of stimulating physiological bone regeneration with both inorganic and organic signals. In this research work glass ceramic scaffolds with very high mechanical properties and moderate bioactivity have been functionalized with the enzyme alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The material surface was activated in order to expose hydroxyl groups. The activated surface was further grafted with ALP both via silanization and also via direct grafting to the surface active hydroxyl groups. Enzymatic activity of grafted samples were measured by means of UV-vis spectroscopy before and after ultrasonic washing in TRIS-HCl buffer solution. In vitro inorganic bioactivity was investigated by soaking the scaffolds after the different steps of functionalization in a simulated body fluid (SBF). SEM observations allowed the monitoring of the scaffold morphology and surface chemical composition after soaking in SBF. The presence of ALP enhanced the in vitro inorganic bioactivity of the tested material.

  6. Flexible edge seal for vacuum insulating glazing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettger, Kenneth J.; Stark, David H.

    2012-12-11

    A flexible edge seal is provided for a vacuum insulating glazing unit having a first glass pane and a second glass pane spaced-apart from the first. The edge seal comprises a seal member formed of a hermetically bondable material and having a first end, a second end and a center section disposed therebetween. The first end is hermetically bondable to a first glass pane. The second end is hermetically bondable to a second glass pane. The center section comprises a plurality of convolutes.

  7. Pool gateway seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starr, J.A.; Steinert, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    A device for sealing a gateway between interconnectable pools in a nuclear facility comprising a frame supporting a liquid impermeable sheet positioned in a u-shaped gateway between the pools. An inflatable tube carried in a channel in the periphery of the frame and adjoining the gateway provides a seal therebetween when inflated. A restraining arrangement on the bottom edge of the frame is releasably engagable with an adjacent portion of the gateway to restrict the movement of the frame in the u-shaped gateway upon inflation of the tube, thereby enhancing the seal. The impermeable sheet is formed of an elastomer and thus is conformable to a liquid permeable supportive wall upon application of liquid pressure to the side of the sheet opposite the wall

  8. Interface enhancement of glass fiber reinforced vinyl ester composites with flame-synthesized carbon nanotubes and its enhancing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Lingmin; Wang, Xiao; Fang, Pengfei; Liew, Kim Meow; Pan, Chunxu

    2011-02-01

    Interface enhancement with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) provides a promising approach for improving shock strength and toughness of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composites. The effects of incorporating flame-synthesized CNTs (F-CNTs) into GFRP were studied, including on hand lay-up preparation, microstructural characterization, mechanical properties, fracture morphologies, and theoretical calculation. The experimental results showed that: (1) the impact strength of the GFRP modified by F-CNTs increased by more than 15% over that of the GFRP modified by CNTs from chemical vapor deposition; and (2) with the F-CNT enhancement, no interfacial debonding was observed at the interface between the fiber and resin matrix on the GFRP fracture surface, which indicated strong adhesive strength between them. The theoretical calculation revealed that the intrinsic characteristics of the F-CNTs, including lower crystallinity with a large number of defects and chemical functional groups on the surface, promoted their surface activity and dispersibility at the interface, which improved the interfacial bond strength of GFRP.

  9. Structural Origin of the Enhanced Glass-Forming Ability Induced by Microalloying Y in the ZrCuAl Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu-Qing Guo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the structural origin of the enhanced glass-forming ability induced by microalloying Y in a ZrCuAl multicomponent system is studied by performing synchrotron radiation experiments combined with simulations. It is revealed that the addition of Y leads to the optimization of local structures, including: (1 more Zr-centered and Y-centered icosahedral-like clusters occur in the microstructure; (2 the atomic packing efficiency inside clusters and the regularity of clusters are both enhanced. These structural optimizations help to stabilize the amorphous structure in the ZrCuAlY system, and lead to a high glass-forming ability (GFA. The present work provides an understanding of GFAs in multicomponent alloys and will shed light on the development of more metallic glasses with high GFAs.

  10. Exploring Technology-Enhanced Learning Using Google Glass to Offer Students a Unique Instructor's Point of View Live Laboratory Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Fung Fun

    2016-01-01

    Technology-enhanced learning (TEL) is fast gaining momentum among educational institutions all over the world. The usual way in which laboratory instructional videos are filmed takes the third-person view. However, such videos are not as realistic and sensorial. With the advent of Google Glass and GoPro cameras, a more personal and effective way…

  11. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability. PMID:27271435

  12. Enhancement of thermal neutron shielding of cement mortar by using borosilicate glass powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bo-Kil; Lee, Jun-Cheol; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2017-05-01

    Concrete has been used as a traditional biological shielding material. High hydrogen content in concrete also effectively attenuates high-energy fast neutrons. However, concrete does not have strong protection against thermal neutrons because of the lack of boron compound. In this research, boron was added in the form of borosilicate glass powder to increase the neutron shielding property of cement mortar. Borosilicate glass powder was chosen in order to have beneficial pozzolanic activity and to avoid deleterious expansion caused by an alkali-silica reaction. According to the experimental results, borosilicate glass powder with an average particle size of 13µm showed pozzolanic activity. The replacement of borosilicate glass powder with cement caused a slight increase in the 28-day compressive strength. However, the incorporation of borosilicate glass powder resulted in higher thermal neutron shielding capability. Thus, borosilicate glass powder can be used as a good mineral additive for various radiation shielding purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Alumimum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams-13000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-01-01

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or sulphur

  14. Spectroscopy and enhanced frequency upconversion in Nd3+-Yb3+ codoped TPO glasses: energy transfer and NIR to visible upconverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Mohd; Rai, Vineet Kumar; Mohanty, Deepak Kumar

    2017-09-01

    TeO2-Pb3O4 (TPO) glasses codoped with Nd3+ and Yb3+ ions have been fabricated by conventional melting technique. The absorption, emission and excitation spectra of the samples have been recorded. The optical band gap in both the doped/codoped glasses is found to be ˜3.31 eV. Judd-Ofelt analysis has been carried out by using the absorption spectrum of 0.8 mol% Nd3+ doped glass to determine the radiative properties viz radiative transition probabilities, branching ratios, radiative lifetimes, quality factor and emission cross sections of some emitting levels for Nd3+ ions. The radiative transition probability for the 4G7/2 → 4I9/2 transition (˜1926 Hz) is found to be maximum compared to other 4G5/2 → 4I9/2 (˜1622 Hz) and 4F5/2 → 4I9/2 (˜865 Hz) transitions. Upconversion (UC) luminescence of the samples has been examined by the 980 nm CW diode laser excitation. Effect of addition of Yb3+ ions in the Nd3+ doped glasses on UC emission intensity has been discussed. The UC emission intensity corresponding to the green, red and NIR bands in the codoped glass has been enhanced by ˜17, ˜12 and ˜42 times as compared to that of the Nd3+ singly doped glass. The quantum efficiency for the 4G7/2 level is found to be ˜32%. The nephelauxetic ratio, bonding parameter and covalency of Nd3+ ions have been found positive which represents the covalent bonding between Nd3+ ion and oxygen atom. The colour tunability from yellowish-green to dominant green region has been obtained in the optimized codoped TPO glass.

  15. Properties Of Soda/Yttria/Silica Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Paul W.; Hann, Raiford E.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental study of glass-formation compositional region of soda/ yttria/silicate system and of selected physical properties of glasses within compositional region part of continuing effort to identify glasses with high coefficients of thermal expansion and high softening temperatures, for use as coatings on superalloys and as glass-to-metal seals.

  16. Enhanced activity and stability of L-arabinose isomerase by immobilization on aminopropyl glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye-Wang; Jeya, Marimuthu; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2011-03-01

    Immobilization of Bacillus licheniformis L: -arabinose isomerase (BLAI) on aminopropyl glass modified with glutaraldehyde (4 mg protein g support⁻¹) was found to enhance the enzyme activity. The immobilization yield of BLAI was proportional to the quantity of amino groups on the surface of support. Reducing particle size increased the adsorption capacity (q(m)) and affinity (k(a)). The pH and temperature for immobilization were optimized to be pH 7.1 and 33 °C using response surface methodology (RSM). The immobilized enzyme was characterized and compared to the free enzyme. There is no change in optimal pH and temperature before and after immobilization. However, the immobilized BLAI enzyme achieved 145% of the activity of the free enzyme. Correspondingly, the catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) was improved 1.47-fold after immobilization compared to the free enzyme. The thermal stability was improved 138-fold (t₁/₂) increased from 2 to 275 h) at 50 °C following immobilization.

  17. High density liquid structure enhancement in glass forming aqueous solution of LiCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camisasca, G.; De Marzio, M.; Rovere, M.; Gallo, P.

    2018-06-01

    We investigate using molecular dynamics simulations the dynamical and structural properties of LiCl:6H2O aqueous solution upon supercooling. This ionic solution is a glass forming liquid of relevant interest in connection with the study of the anomalies of supercooled water. The LiCl:6H2O solution is easily supercooled and the liquid state can be maintained over a large decreasing temperature range. We performed simulations from ambient to 200 K in order to investigate how the presence of the salt modifies the behavior of supercooled water. The study of the relaxation time of the self-density correlation function shows that the system follows the prediction of the mode coupling theory and behaves like a fragile liquid in all the range explored. The analysis of the changes in the water structure induced by the salt shows that while the salt preserves the water hydrogen bonds in the system, it strongly affects the tetrahedral hydrogen bond network. Following the interpretation of the anomalies of water in terms of a two-state model, the modifications of the oxygen radial distribution function and the angular distribution function of the hydrogen bonds in water indicate that LiCl has the role of enhancing the high density liquid component of water with respect to the low density component. This is in agreement with recent experiments on aqueous ionic solutions.

  18. Enhancement mechanisms of graphene in nano-58S bioactive glass scaffold: mechanical and biological performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chengde; Liu, Tingting; Shuai, Cijun; Peng, Shuping

    2014-04-16

    Graphene is a novel material and currently popular as an enabler for the next-generation nanocomposites. Here, we report the use of graphene to improve the mechanical properties of nano-58S bioactive glass for bone repair and regeneration. And the composite scaffolds were fabricated by a homemade selective laser sintering system. Qualitative and quantitative analysis demonstrated the successful incorporation of graphene into the scaffold without obvious structural damage and weight loss. The optimum compressive strength and fracture toughness reached 48.65 ± 3.19 MPa and 1.94 ± 0.10 MPa · m(1/2) with graphene content of 0.5 wt%, indicating significant improvements by 105% and 38% respectively. The mechanisms of pull-out, crack bridging, crack deflection and crack tip shielding were found to be responsible for the mechanical enhancement. Simulated body fluid and cell culture tests indicated favorable bioactivity and biocompatibility of the composite scaffold. The results suggest a great potential of graphene/nano-58S composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering applications.

  19. Novel strontium-doped bioactive glass nanoparticles enhance proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, L. A.; Hild, N.; Mohn, D.; Stark, W. J.; Hoppe, A.; Gbureck, U.; Horch, R. E.; Kneser, U.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2013-07-01

    The present study investigates a new family of bioactive glass nanoparticles with and without Sr-doping focusing on the influence of the nanoparticles on human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) in vitro. The bioactive glass nanoparticles were fabricated by flame spray synthesis and a particle diameter of 30-35 nm was achieved. Glass nanoparticles were undoped (BG 13-93-0Sr) or doped with 5 wt% strontium (Sr) (BG 13-93-5Sr) and used at concentrations of 10 and 100 μg/cm² (particles per culture plate area), respectively. Cells were cultured for 14 days after which the samples were analysed regarding metabolic activity and expression of various bone-specific genes. Cell growth and morphology indicated the high cytocompatibility of the nanoparticulate bioactive glass. The presence of the nanoparticles enhanced cell growth compared to the plain polystyrene control group. At a concentration of 100 μg/cm², Sr-doped particles led to significantly enhanced gene expression of osteocalcin, collagen type 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor. Thus, Sr-doped nanoparticles showing a dose-dependent increase of osteogenic differentiation in hBMSCs are a promising biomaterial for bone regeneration purposes.

  20. Novel strontium-doped bioactive glass nanoparticles enhance proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, L. A. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg Medical Center, Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery (Germany); Hild, N.; Mohn, D.; Stark, W. J. [ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering (Switzerland); Hoppe, A. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Biomaterials (Germany); Gbureck, U. [University of Wuerzburg, Department for Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry (Germany); Horch, R. E.; Kneser, U. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg Medical Center, Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery (Germany); Boccaccini, A. R., E-mail: aldo.boccaccini@ww.uni-erlangen.de [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Biomaterials (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    The present study investigates a new family of bioactive glass nanoparticles with and without Sr-doping focusing on the influence of the nanoparticles on human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) in vitro. The bioactive glass nanoparticles were fabricated by flame spray synthesis and a particle diameter of 30-35 nm was achieved. Glass nanoparticles were undoped (BG 13-93-0Sr) or doped with 5 wt% strontium (Sr) (BG 13-93-5Sr) and used at concentrations of 10 and 100 {mu}g/cm Superscript-Two (particles per culture plate area), respectively. Cells were cultured for 14 days after which the samples were analysed regarding metabolic activity and expression of various bone-specific genes. Cell growth and morphology indicated the high cytocompatibility of the nanoparticulate bioactive glass. The presence of the nanoparticles enhanced cell growth compared to the plain polystyrene control group. At a concentration of 100 {mu}g/cm Superscript-Two , Sr-doped particles led to significantly enhanced gene expression of osteocalcin, collagen type 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor. Thus, Sr-doped nanoparticles showing a dose-dependent increase of osteogenic differentiation in hBMSCs are a promising biomaterial for bone regeneration purposes.

  1. Novel strontium-doped bioactive glass nanoparticles enhance proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobel, L. A.; Hild, N.; Mohn, D.; Stark, W. J.; Hoppe, A.; Gbureck, U.; Horch, R. E.; Kneser, U.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates a new family of bioactive glass nanoparticles with and without Sr-doping focusing on the influence of the nanoparticles on human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) in vitro. The bioactive glass nanoparticles were fabricated by flame spray synthesis and a particle diameter of 30–35 nm was achieved. Glass nanoparticles were undoped (BG 13-93-0Sr) or doped with 5 wt% strontium (Sr) (BG 13-93-5Sr) and used at concentrations of 10 and 100 μg/cm² (particles per culture plate area), respectively. Cells were cultured for 14 days after which the samples were analysed regarding metabolic activity and expression of various bone-specific genes. Cell growth and morphology indicated the high cytocompatibility of the nanoparticulate bioactive glass. The presence of the nanoparticles enhanced cell growth compared to the plain polystyrene control group. At a concentration of 100 μg/cm², Sr-doped particles led to significantly enhanced gene expression of osteocalcin, collagen type 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor. Thus, Sr-doped nanoparticles showing a dose-dependent increase of osteogenic differentiation in hBMSCs are a promising biomaterial for bone regeneration purposes

  2. Enhanced HLW glass formulations for the waste treatment and immobilization plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A. [DOE-WTP Project Office, US Department of Energy, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Current estimates and glass formulation efforts are conservative vis-a-vis achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum, chromium, bismuth, iron, phosphorous, zirconium, and sulfur compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. DOE has a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. This work has demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by 25% or more. (authors)

  3. Innovative Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Raj

    2008-06-30

    A functioning SOFC requires different type of seals such as metal-metal, metal-ceramic, and ceramic-ceramic. These seals must function at high temperatures between 600--900{sup o}C and in oxidizing and reducing environments of the fuels and air. Among the different type of seals, the metal-metal seals can be readily fabricated using metal joining, soldering, and brazing techniques. However, the metal-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic seals require significant research and development because the brittle nature of ceramics/glasses can lead to fracture and loss of seal integrity and functionality. Consequently, any seals involving ceramics/glasses require a significant attention and technology development for reliable SOFC operation. This final report is prepared to describe the progress made in the program on the needs, approaches, and performance of high temperature seals for SOFC. In particular, a new concept of self-healing glass seals is pursued for making seals between metal-ceramic material combinations, including some with a significant expansion mismatch.

  4. Field-induced cluster spin glass and inverse symmetry breaking enhanced by frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M.; Zimmer, F. M.; Magalhaes, S. G.

    2018-03-01

    We consider a cluster disordered model to study the interplay between short- and long-range interactions in geometrically frustrated spin systems under an external magnetic field (h). In our approach, the intercluster long-range disorder (J) is analytically treated to get an effective cluster model that is computed exactly. The clusters follow a checkerboard lattice with first-neighbor (J1) and second-neighbor (J2) interactions. We find a reentrant transition from the cluster spin-glass (CSG) state to a paramagnetic (PM) phase as the temperature decreases for a certain range of h. This inverse symmetry breaking (ISB) appears as a consequence of both quenched disorder with frustration and h, that introduce a CSG state with higher entropy than the polarized PM phase. The competitive scenario introduced by antiferromagnetic (AF) short-range interactions increases the CSG state entropy, leading to continuous ISB transitions and enhancing the ISB regions, mainly in the geometrically frustrated case (J1 =J2). Remarkably, when strong AF intracluster couplings are present, field-induced CSG phases can be found. These CSG regions are strongly related to the magnetization plateaus observed in this cluster disordered system. In fact, it is found that each field-induced magnetization jump brings a CSG region. We notice that geometrical frustration, as well as cluster size, play an important role in the magnetization plateaus and, therefore, are also relevant in the field-induced glassy states. Our findings suggest that competing interactions support ISB and field-induced CSG phases in disordered cluster systems under an external magnetic field.

  5. Enhanced luminescence from silver nanoparticles integrated Er{sup 3+}-doped boro-tellurite glasses: Impact of annealing temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Said Mahraz, Zahra Ashur; Sahar, M.R., E-mail: mrahim057@gmail.com; Ghoshal, S.K.

    2015-11-15

    Considerable enhancement of rare earth ions luminescence intensity stimulated via metal nanoparticles (NPs) inclusion inside inorganic glass matrix opened a new avenue to achieving efficient lasing glass media. Tuning the localised surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) band of noble metal NPs through their precise size manipulation is demonstrated to be the key for such accomplishment. We report the influences of annealing (heat treatment) temperature (AT) on the down-conversion luminescence features of erbium (Er{sup 3+}) doped zinc-boro-tellurite (ZBT) glasses containing silver NPs. The AT dependent (between 390 and 450 °C) variations in refractive index and density are ascribed to the generation of non-bridging oxygen (NBO) ions. X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed the amorphous nature of the melt-quenched synthesized glass samples. TEM micrograph revealed the nucleation of Ag NPs inside the glass matrix having average diameter between 8.4 (un-annealed sample) to 11.8 nm (annealed). The UV–Vis spectra exhibited seven absorption bands corresponding to {sup 4}f–{sup 4}f transitions of Er{sup 3+} ions. Annealed samples displayed a red shift of SPR bands positioned at 550 and 580 nm. Judd–Ofelt theory is used to evaluate the intensity parameters for radiative transitions within 4f{sup n} configuration of Er{sup 3+} ion. Annealing up to 410 °C is found to stimulate the plasmonic effect through the enlargement of NPs. Consequently, the PL intensity is enhanced by a factor of 3.23 ({sup 2}H{sub 11/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}), 4.10 ({sup 4}S{sub 3/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}), and 3.79 ({sup 4}F{sub 9/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}). This achieved excellent down-conversion luminescence efficiency of proposed glasses shows their potential implementation in photonic devices and solid state lasers. - Highlights: • The changes in the physical properties are ascribed to the generation of NBO. • TEM images confirmed the presence of Ag NPs in the glass matrix. • The achieved

  6. Mechanical Behaviour of Glassy Composite Seals for IT-SOFC Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karsten Agersted; Solvang, Mette; Nielsen, Sofie Birkedal Lund

    2007-01-01

    Glass-based sealants have been developed with emphasis on filler material and surface treatment of the sealing components in order to optimise their mechanical and functional behaviour during the initial sealing process as well as during thermal cycling of the SOFC-stack after exposure to operating...... conditions. The bonding strength and microstructure of the interfaces between composite seals and interconnect materials were investigated as a function of surface treatment of the sealing surfaces, glass matrix composition, sealing pressure and temperature. The initial sealing performance and resistance...... to thermal cycling were then investigated on selected combinations of materials after ageing. Strongest bonding between sodium aluminosilicate glass composite and steel surfaces was obtained for sealing at 850°C. For the strongest interface, having shear strength of 2.35 MPa, rupture occurred in the glass...

  7. Improved circumferential shaft seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Strom, T. N.

    1974-01-01

    Comparative tests of modified and unmodified carbon ring seals showed that addition of helical grooves to conventional segmented carbon ring seals reduced leakage significantly. Modified seal was insensitive to shaft runout and to flooding by lubricant.

  8. Hanford enhanced waste glass characterization. Influence of composition on chemical durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, K. M.; Edwards, T. B.

    2016-01-01

    This report provides a review of the complete high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) data sets for the glasses recently fabricated at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and characterized at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The review is from the perspective of relating the chemical durability performance to the compositions of these study glasses, since the characterization work at SRNL focused on chemical analysis and ASTM Product Consistency Test (PCT) performance.

  9. Effect of nanocrystallization on the electrical conductivity enhancement and Moessbauer hyperfine parameters of iron based glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Desoky, M.M., E-mail: mmdesoky@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Suez Canal University, Al-Arish 45511, North Sinaa (Egypt); Ibrahim, F.A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Suez Canal University, Al-Arish 45511, North Sinaa (Egypt); Mostafa, A.G.; Hassaan, M.Y. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Nasr City 11884, Cairo (Egypt)

    2010-09-15

    Selected glasses of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-PbO{sub 2}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} system have been transformed into nanomaterials by annealing at temperature close to crystallization temperature (T{sub c}) for 1 h. The effects of the annealing of the present samples on its structural and electrical properties were studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy, transmission electron micrograph (TEM), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and dc conductivity ({sigma}). Moessbauer spectroscopy was used in order to determine the states of iron and its hyperfine structure. The effect of nanocrystalization on the Moessbauer hyperfine parameters did not exhibit significant modifications in present glasses. However, in case of glass ceramic nanocrystals show a distinct decrease in the quadrupole splitting ({Delta}) is observed, reflecting an evident decrease in the distortion of structural units like FeO{sub 4} units. In general, the Moessbauer parameters of the nano-crystalline phase exhibit tendency to increase with PbO{sub 2} content. TEM of as-quenched glasses confirm the homogeneous and essentially featureless morphology. TEM of the corresponding glass ceramic nanocrystals indicates nanocrystals embedded in the glassy matrix with average particle size of about 32 nm. The crystallization temperature (T{sub c}) was observed to decrease with PbO{sub 2} content. The glass ceramic nanocrystals obtained by annealing at T{sub c} exhibit improvement of electrical conductivity up to four orders of magnitude than the starting glasses. This considerable improvement of electrical conductivity after nanocrystallization is attributed to formation of defective, well-conducting phases 'easy conduction paths' along the glass-crystallites interfaces.

  10. Mechanical seal having a double-tier mating ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khonsari, Michael M.; Somanchi, Anoop K.

    2005-09-13

    An apparatus and method to enhance the overall performance of mechanical seals in one of the following ways: by reducing seal face wear, by reducing the contact surface temperature, or by increasing the life span of mechanical seals. The apparatus is a mechanical seal (e.g., single mechanical seals, double mechanical seals, tandem mechanical seals, bellows, pusher mechanical seals, and all types of rotating and reciprocating machines) comprising a rotating ring and a double-tier mating ring. In a preferred embodiment, the double-tier mating ring comprises a first and a second stationary ring that together form an agitation-inducing, guided flow channel to allow for the removal of heat generated at the seal face of the mating ring by channeling a coolant entering the mating ring to a position adjacent to and in close proximity with the interior surface area of the seal face of the mating ring.

  11. Short-ranged structural rearrangement and enhancement of mechanical properties of organosilicate glasses induced by ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacopi, F.; Travaly, Y.; Eyckens, B.; Waldfried, C.; Abell, T.; Guyer, E.P.; Gage, D.M.; Dauskardt, R.H.; Sajavaara, T.; Houthoofd, K.; Grobet, P.; Jacobs, P.; Maex, K.

    2006-01-01

    The short-ranged bonding structure of organosilicate glasses can vary to a great extent and is directly linked to the mechanical properties of the thin film material. The combined action of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and thermal activation is shown to generate a pronounced rearrangement in the bonding structure of thin organosilicate glass films involving no significant compositional change or film densification. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy indicates loss of -OH groups and an increase of the degree of cross-linking of the organosilicate matrix for UV-treated films. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows a pronounced enhancement of the Si-O-Si network bond structure, indicating the formation of more energetically stable silica bonds. Investigation with x-ray reflectivity and ellipsometric porosimetry indicated only minor film densification. As a consequence, the mechanical properties of microporous organosilicate dielectric films are substantially enhanced while preserving the organosilicate nature and pristine porosity of the films. UV-treated films show an increase in elastic modulus and hardness of more than 40%, and a similar improvement in fracture energy compared to untreated films. A minor increase in material dielectric constant from 3.0 to 3.15 was observed after UV treatment. This mechanism is of high relevance for the application of organosilicate glasses as dielectric materials for microelectronics interconnects, for which a high mechanical stability and a low dielectric constant are both essential film requirements

  12. ENHANCED DOE HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER THROUGHPUT STUDIES: SRNL GLASS SELECTION STRATEGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raszewski, F; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

    2008-01-23

    The Department of Energy has authorized a team of glass formulation and processing experts at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) at Catholic University of America to develop a systematic approach to increase high level waste melter throughput (by increasing waste loading with minimal or positive impacts on melt rate). This task is aimed at proof-of-principle testing and the development of tools to improve waste loading and melt rate, which will lead to higher waste throughput. Four specific tasks have been proposed to meet these objectives (for details, see WSRC-STI-2007-00483): (1) Integration and Oversight, (2) Crystal Accumulation Modeling (led by PNNL)/Higher Waste Loading Glasses (led by SRNL), (3) Melt Rate Evaluation and Modeling, and (4) Melter Scale Demonstrations. Task 2, Crystal Accumulation Modeling/Higher Waste Loading Glasses is the focus of this report. The objective of this study is to provide supplemental data to support the possible use of alternative melter technologies and/or implementation of alternative process control models or strategies to target higher waste loadings (WLs) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)--ultimately leading to higher waste throughputs and a reduced mission life. The glass selection strategy discussed in this report was developed to gain insight into specific technical issues that could limit or compromise the ability of glass formulation efforts to target higher WLs for future sludge batches at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These technical issues include Al-dissolution, higher TiO{sub 2} limits and homogeneity issues for coupled-operations, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} solubility, and nepheline formation. To address these technical issues, a test matrix of 28 glass compositions has been developed based on 5 different sludge projections for future processing. The glasses will be fabricated and characterized based on

  13. Enhanced Mechanical Properties of MgZnCa Bulk Metallic Glass Composites with Ti-Particle Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Chun Wong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rod samples of Mg60Zn35Ca5 bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs dispersed with Ti particles have been successfully fabricated via injection casting. The glass forming ability (GFA and the mechanical properties of these Mg-based BMGCs have been systematically investigated as a function of the volume fraction (Vf of Ti particles. The results showed that the compressive ductility increased with Vf. The mechanical performance of these BMGCs, with up to 5.4% compressive failure strain and 1187 MPa fracture strength at room temperature, can be obtained for the Mg-based BMGCs with 50 vol % Ti particles, suggesting that these dispersed Ti particles can absorb the energy of the crack propagations and can induce branches of the primary shear band into multiple secondary shear bands. It follows that further propagation of the shear band is blocked, enhancing the overall plasticity.

  14. High-capacity optical long data memory based on enhanced Young's modulus in nanoplasmonic hybrid glass composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiming; Xia, Zhilin; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Gu, Min

    2018-03-22

    Emerging as an inevitable outcome of the big data era, long data are the massive amount of data that captures changes in the real world over a long period of time. In this context, recording and reading the data of a few terabytes in a single storage device repeatedly with a century-long unchanged baseline is in high demand. Here, we demonstrate the concept of optical long data memory with nanoplasmonic hybrid glass composites. Through the sintering-free incorporation of nanorods into the earth abundant hybrid glass composite, Young's modulus is enhanced by one to two orders of magnitude. This discovery, enabling reshaping control of plasmonic nanoparticles of multiple-length allows for continuous multi-level recording and reading with a capacity over 10 terabytes with no appreciable change of the baseline over 600 years, which opens new opportunities for long data memory that affects the past and future.

  15. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Aluminum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A. [WTP Engineering Division, United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 450, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or

  16. Enhanced green and red upconversion emissions in Er3+-doped boro-tellurite glass containing gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousti, M. Reza; Amjad, Raja J.; Mahraz, Zahra Ashur S.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the cross-section of upconversion emissions from the rare earth ions doped materials is a challenging issue. In this work, we report on the enhancement of the up-converted emissions of Er3+-doped boro-tellurite glasses containing gold nanoparticles which have been prepared by a conventional melt-quench technique. Seven absorption bands and three emission lines are observed using the UV-Vis-IR and photoluminescence spectroscopic techniques, respectively. Red emission is enhanced up to 30 times in a sample having 1 wt% of Au nanoparticles. The presence of the gold nanoparticles with average size of ∼5.74 nm is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and corresponding surface plasmon band is observed at 630 nm in a singly-doped Au-nanoparticles embedded glass sample. A model to determine the enhancement factor of the emissions is suggested which could not describe the phenomenon for high concentrations of nanoparticles. Enhancement is attributed to the increased local field around the metal, and the results are discussed in details.

  17. Gold nanoparticles assisted surface enhanced Raman scattering and luminescence of Er{sup 3+} doped zinc–sodium tellurite glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoshal, S.K.; Awang, Asmahani, E-mail: asmahani_awang@yahoo.com; Sahar, M.R.; Arifin, R.

    2015-03-15

    Significant enhancements in Er{sup 3+} luminescence and Raman intensity mediated via surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs) embedded zinc–sodium tellurite glass are reported. The observed modifications in the physical and spectroscopic properties are ascribed to the alterations in the glass network. XRD pattern confirms the amorphous nature of prepared glass sample. UV–vis-NIR spectra reveal seven absorption bands. Surface plasmon band is evidenced around 626–630 nm. TEM images manifest the growth of non-spherical Au NPs with average diameter between ∼7.2 nm and 8.6 nm. The visible up-conversion (UC) emission for all samples under 779 nm excitation exhibits three bands centered at 503 nm (green), 546 (green) and 637 nm (red) ascribed to {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transitions. Glass sample with 0.4 mol% Au displaying the highest luminescence intensity with enhancement factor of 3.85 and 3.56 for green bands, and 7.61 for the red band is ascribed to the NPs local field enhancement and energy transfer between rare earth (RE) ions and NPs. FTIR spectra show the vibration of ZnO{sub 4} bonds, Te-O bond in TeO{sub 3} (tp) and TeO{sub 4} (tbp) units and the hydroxyl groups. Raman spectra demonstrate the presence of Er-O and Zn-O bond, anti-symmetric vibrations of Te-O-Te bonds and stretching modes of non-bonded oxygen exists in TeO{sub 3} and TeO{sub 3+1} unit. The amplifications in Raman signals by a factor of 1.62, 1.58, 1.64, 1.68 and 1.69 corresponding to the peak centered at 262 cm{sup −1}, 382 cm{sup −1}, 521 cm{sup −1}, 670 cm{sup −1} and 725 cm{sup −1} are attributed to the contribution of a surface plasmon generating a strong, localized and secondary field. We assert that our glass compositions offer favorable potential to develop solid state lasers and other versatile nanophotonic devices. - Highlights: • Gold

  18. Enhancing the performance of Ce:YAG phosphor-in-silica-glass by controlling interface reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Beiying; Luo, Wei; Liu, Sheng; Gu, Shijia; Lu, Mengchen; Zhang, Yan; Fan, Yuchi; Jiang, Wan; Wang, Lianjun

    2017-01-01

    Dispersing the Ce"3"+ doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Ce:YAG) phosphor in the glass matrix has been widely investigated to replace conventional organic resin or silicone packaging. However, the reaction layer formed between commercial phosphors and glass matrix severely degrades the optical performance of Ce:YAG phosphor in silica glass (PiSG) materials. This paper demonstrates an ultra-fast method for preparing high performance PiSG materials. Instead of traditional melting process, the highly transparent PiSG samples can be rapidly fabricated from mixtures of commercial Ce:YAG phosphor and mesoporous SiO_2 (SBA-15) powders using spark plasma sintering (SPS) at relatively low temperature (1000 °C) within short time (10 min). Owing to the inhibition of the deleterious interface reactions between Ce:YAG phosphor and silica glass matrix, the phosphor has been perfectly preserved, and the internal relative quantum yield of the PiSG sample reaches as high as 93.5% when excited at 455 nm, which is the highest efficiency in current research. Furthermore, combining the PiSG sample, we successfully fabricate a light-emitting diode (LED) module exhibiting a superior performance with luminous efficacy of 127.9 lm/W, correlated color temperature of 5877 K and color rendering index of 69 at the operating current of 120 mA. This work on the high performance LED modules provides not only a new approach to fabricate the functional glass-based materials that is sensitive to the high temperature, but also a possibility to extend the lifetime and improve the optical performances of the glass based LEDs.

  19. Sealing materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, P.H.

    1999-02-01

    A major obstacle in the achievement of high electrical efficiency for planar solid oxide fuel cell stacks (SOFC) is the need for long term stable seals at the operational temperature between 850 and 1000 deg. C. In the present work the formation and properties of sealing materials for SOFC stacks that fulfil the necessary requirements were investigated. The work comprises analysis of sealing material properties independently, in simple systems as well as tests in real SOFC stacks. The analysed sealing materials were based on pure glasses or glass-ceramic composites having B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, P{sub 2}O{sub 5} or siO{sub 2} as glass formers, and the following four glass systems were investigated: MgO/caO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2} and BaO/Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}. (au) 32 tabs., 106 ills., 107 refs.

  20. Rotary plug seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Koji; Abiko, Yoshihiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable fuel exchange even upon failure of regular seals and also to enable safety seal exchange by the detection of the reduction in the contact pressure of a rotary plug seal. Constitution: If one of a pair of regular tube seals for the rotary plug is failed during ordinary operation of a FBR type reactor, the reduction in the contact pressure of the seal to the plug gibbousness is detected by a pressure gauge and a solenoid valve is thereby closed. Thus, a back-up-tube seal provided above or below the tube seal is press-contacted by way of argon gas to the gibbousness to enter into operation state and lubricants are supplied from an oil tank. In such a structure, the back-up-tube seal is operated before the failure of the tube seal to enable to continue the fuel exchange work, as well as safety exchange for the tube seal. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. Seal design alternatives study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Sambeek, L.L.; Luo, D.D.; Lin, M.S.; Ostrowski, W.; Oyenuga, D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results from a study of various sealing alternatives for the WIPP sealing system. Overall, the sealing system has the purpose of reducing to the extent possible the potential for fluids (either gas or liquid) from entering or leaving the repository. The sealing system is divided into three subsystems: drift and panel seals within the repository horizon, shaft seals in each of the four shafts, and borehole seals. Alternatives to the baseline configuration for the WIPP seal system design included evaluating different geometries and schedules for seal component installations and the use of different materials for seal components. Order-of-magnitude costs for the various alternatives were prepared as part of the study. Firm recommendations are not presented, but the advantages and disadvantages of the alternatives are discussed. Technical information deficiencies are identified and studies are outlined which can provide required information

  2. Mechanical seal assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    2001-01-01

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transferring it to the mechanical diode.

  3. Mechanical Seal Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    1999-06-18

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transferring it to the mechanical diode.

  4. Metal particles constraint in glass matrix composites and its impact on fracture toughness enhancement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotoul, M.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    387-389 (2004), s. 404-408 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/02/0683 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : brittle matrix composites * crack bridging * crack trapping Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  5. Ultrasound enhanced 50 Hz plasma treatment of glass-fiber-reinforced polyester at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Norrman, Kion; Singh, Shailendra Vikram

    2013-01-01

    Glass-fiber-reinforced polyester (GFRP) plates are treated using a 50Hz dielectric barrier discharge at a peak-to-peak voltage of 30 kV in helium at atmospheric pressure with and without ultrasonic irradiation to study adhesion improvement. The ultrasonic waves at the fundamental frequency...

  6. Gliding arc surface treatment of glass-fiber-reinforced polyester enhanced by ultrasonic irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Norrman, Kion; Drews, Joanna Maria

    2011-01-01

    . The efficiency of such a plasma treatment at atmospheric pressure can be further improved by ultrasonic irradiation onto the surface during the treatment. In the present work glass fiber reinforced polyester (GFRP) plates are treated using an atmospheric pressure gliding arc with and without ultrasonic...

  7. 50-Hz plasma treatment of glass fibre reinforced polyester at atmospheric pressure enhanced by ultrasonic irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Norrman, Kion; Singh, Shailendra Vikram

    2011-01-01

    Glass fibre reinforced polyester (GFRP) plates are treated using a 50-Hz dielectric barrier discharge at peak-to-peak voltage of 30 kV in helium at atmospheric pressure with and without ultrasonic irradiation to study adhesion improvement. The ultrasonic waves at the fundamental frequency of around...

  8. Silica nanoparticles on front glass for efficiency enhancement in superstrate-type amorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sonali; Banerjee, Chandan; Kundu, Avra; Dey, Prasenjit; Saha, Hiranmay; Datta, Swapan K.

    2013-10-01

    Antireflective coating on front glass of superstrate-type single junction amorphous silicon solar cells (SCs) has been applied using highly monodispersed and stable silica nanoparticles (NPs). The silica NPs having 300 nm diameter were synthesized by Stober technique where the size of the NPs was controlled by varying the alcohol medium. The synthesized silica NPs were analysed by dynamic light scattering technique and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The NPs were spin coated on glass side of fluorinated tin oxide (SnO2: F) coated glass superstrate and optimization of the concentration of the colloidal solution, spin speed and number of coated layers was done to achieve minimum reflection characteristics. An estimation of the distribution of the NPs for different optimization parameters has been done using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Subsequently, the transparent conducting oxide coated glass with the layer having the minimum reflectance is used for fabrication of amorphous silicon SC. Electrical analysis of the fabricated cell indicates an improvement of 6.5% in short-circuit current density from a reference of 12.40 mA cm-2 while the open circuit voltage and the fill factor remains unaltered. A realistic optical model has also been proposed to gain an insight into the system.

  9. Silica nanoparticles on front glass for efficiency enhancement in superstrate-type amorphous silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Sonali; Kundu, Avra; Dey, Prasenjit; Saha, Hiranmay; Datta, Swapan K; Banerjee, Chandan

    2013-01-01

    Antireflective coating on front glass of superstrate-type single junction amorphous silicon solar cells (SCs) has been applied using highly monodispersed and stable silica nanoparticles (NPs). The silica NPs having 300 nm diameter were synthesized by Stober technique where the size of the NPs was controlled by varying the alcohol medium. The synthesized silica NPs were analysed by dynamic light scattering technique and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The NPs were spin coated on glass side of fluorinated tin oxide (SnO 2 : F) coated glass superstrate and optimization of the concentration of the colloidal solution, spin speed and number of coated layers was done to achieve minimum reflection characteristics. An estimation of the distribution of the NPs for different optimization parameters has been done using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Subsequently, the transparent conducting oxide coated glass with the layer having the minimum reflectance is used for fabrication of amorphous silicon SC. Electrical analysis of the fabricated cell indicates an improvement of 6.5% in short-circuit current density from a reference of 12.40 mA cm −2 while the open circuit voltage and the fill factor remains unaltered. A realistic optical model has also been proposed to gain an insight into the system. (paper)

  10. Enhanced 99 Tc retention in glass waste form using Tc(IV)-incorporated Fe minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Luksic, Steven A.; Wang, Guohui; Saslow, Sarah; Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Bowden, Mark E.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2017-11-01

    Technetium (99Tc) immobilization by doping into iron oxide mineral phases may alleviate the problems with Tc volatility during vitrification of nuclear waste. Reduced Tc, Tc(IV), substitutes for Fe(III) in the crystal structure by a process of Tc reduction from Tc(VII) to Tc(IV) followed by co-precipitation of Fe oxide minerals. Two Tc-incorporated Fe minerals (Tc-goethite and Tc-magnetite/maghemite) were prepared and tested for Tc retention in glass melt samples at temperatures between 600 – 1,000 oC. After being cooled, the solid glass specimens prepared at different temperatures were analyzed for Tc oxidation state using Tc K-edge XANES. In most samples, Tc was partially oxidized from Tc(IV) to Tc(VII) as the melt temperature increased. However, Tc retention in glass melt samples prepared using Tc-incorporated Fe minerals were moderately higher than in glass prepared using KTcO4 because of limited and delayed Tc volatilization.

  11. Bioactive glass-ceramic coating for enhancing the in vitro corrosion resistance of biodegradable Mg alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Xinyu [Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Cai Shu, E-mail: caishu@tju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Dou Ying [Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Xu Guohua [Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Shanghai 200003 (China); Huang Kai; Ren Mengguo; Wang Xuexin [Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sol-gel derived 45S5 glass-ceramic coating was prepared on Mg alloy substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion resistance of glass-ceramic coated Mg alloy was markedly improved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion behavior of the coated sample varied due to the cracking of coating. - Abstract: In this work, a bioactive 45S5 glass-ceramic coating was synthesized on magnesium (Mg) alloy substrate by using a sol-gel dip-coating method, to improve the initial corrosion resistance of AZ31 Mg alloy. The surface morphology and phase composition of the glass-ceramic coating were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The coating composed of amorphous phase and crystalline phase Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}, with the thickness of {approx}1.0 {mu}m, exhibited a uniform and crack-free surface morphology. The corrosion behavior of the uncoated and coated Mg alloy substrates was investigated by the electrochemical measurements and immersion tests in simulated body fluid (SBF). Potentiodynamic polarization tests recorded an increase of potential (E{sub corr}) form -1.60 V to -1.48 V, and a reduction of corrosion current density (i{sub corr}) from 4.48 {mu}A cm{sup -2} to 0.16 {mu}A cm{sup -2}, due to the protection provided by the glass-ceramic coating. Immersion tests also showed the markedly improved corrosion resistance of the coated sample over the immersion period of 7 days. Moreover, after 14 days of immersion in SBF, the corrosion resistance of the coated sample declined due to the cracking of the glass-ceramic coating, which was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis. The results suggested that the 45S5 glass-ceramic coated Mg alloy could provide a suitable corrosion behavior for use as degradable implants.

  12. Enhancement of Dielectric Breakdown Strength and Energy Conversion Efficiency of Niobate Glass-Ceramics by Sc2O3 Doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shi; Xiu, Shaomei; Yang, Ke; Shen, Bo; Zhai, Jiwei

    2018-01-01

    Niobate glass-ceramics K2O-SrO-Nb2O5-B2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 (KSN-BAS) doped with different amounts of Sc2O3 have been prepared through a melt quenching/controlled crystallization method, and the influence of the Sc2O3 content on their phase composition, microstructure, dielectric performance, and charge-discharge properties investigated. X-ray powder diffraction results showed that the peak positions of the KSr2Nb5O15 phase shifted to higher angle and the glass-ceramic microstructures were significantly improved by Sc2O3 addition. Based on these results, 0.5 mol.% Sc2O3 doping was found to achieve remarkable enhancement in energy storage density, which reached 9.63 ± 0.39 J/cm3 at dielectric breakdown strength of 1450.38 ± 29.01 kV/cm with high conversion efficiency of ˜ 92.1%. For pulsed power applications, discharge speed of 17 ns and power density of 0.48 MW/cm3 were obtained in the glass-ceramic with 0.5 mol.% Sc2O3. These results could provide a new design strategy for high-performance dielectric capacitors.

  13. Bioactive glass-ceramic coating for enhancing the in vitro corrosion resistance of biodegradable Mg alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xinyu; Cai, Shu; Dou, Ying; Xu, Guohua; Huang, Kai; Ren, Mengguo; Wang, Xuexin

    2012-10-01

    In this work, a bioactive 45S5 glass-ceramic coating was synthesized on magnesium (Mg) alloy substrate by using a sol-gel dip-coating method, to improve the initial corrosion resistance of AZ31 Mg alloy. The surface morphology and phase composition of the glass-ceramic coating were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The coating composed of amorphous phase and crystalline phase Na2Ca2Si3O9, with the thickness of ∼1.0 μm, exhibited a uniform and crack-free surface morphology. The corrosion behavior of the uncoated and coated Mg alloy substrates was investigated by the electrochemical measurements and immersion tests in simulated body fluid (SBF). Potentiodynamic polarization tests recorded an increase of potential (Ecorr) form -1.60 V to -1.48 V, and a reduction of corrosion current density (icorr) from 4.48 μA cm-2 to 0.16 μA cm-2, due to the protection provided by the glass-ceramic coating. Immersion tests also showed the markedly improved corrosion resistance of the coated sample over the immersion period of 7 days. Moreover, after 14 days of immersion in SBF, the corrosion resistance of the coated sample declined due to the cracking of the glass-ceramic coating, which was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis. The results suggested that the 45S5 glass-ceramic coated Mg alloy could provide a suitable corrosion behavior for use as degradable implants.

  14. Enhanced fatigue endurance of metallic glasses through a staircase-like fracture mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gludovatz, Bernd; Demetriou, Marios D; Floyd, Michael; Hohenwarter, Anton; Johnson, William L; Ritchie, Robert O

    2013-11-12

    Bulk-metallic glasses (BMGs) are now candidate materials for structural applications due to their exceptional strength and toughness. However, their fatigue resistance can be poor and inconsistent, severely limiting their potential as reliable structural materials. As fatigue limits are invariably governed by the local arrest of microscopically small cracks at microstructural features, the lack of microstructure in monolithic glasses, often coupled with other factors, such as the ease of crack formation in shear bands or a high susceptibility to corrosion, can lead to low fatigue limits (some ~1/20 of their tensile strengths) and highly variable fatigue lives. BMG-matrix composites can provide a solution here as their duplex microstructures can arrest shear bands at a second phase to prevent cracks from exceeding critical size; under these conditions, fatigue limits become comparable with those of crystalline alloys. Here, we report on a Pd-based glass that similarly has high fatigue resistance but without a second phase. This monolithic glass displays high intrinsic toughness from extensive shear-band proliferation with cavitation and cracking effectively obstructed. We find that this property can further promote fatigue resistance through extrinsic crack-tip shielding, a mechanism well known in crystalline metals but not previously reported in BMGs, whereby cyclically loaded cracks propagate in a highly "zig-zag" manner, creating a rough "staircase-like" profile. The resulting crack-surface contact (roughness-induced crack closure) elevates fatigue properties to those comparable to crystalline alloys, and the accompanying plasticity helps to reduce flaw sensitivity in the glass, thereby promoting structural reliability.

  15. Mechanical seal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowery, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental plans and timing for completion of the mechanical seal program for both the slurry and transfer pumps are given. The slurry pump seal program will be completed by April 1984 with turnover of two seals in pumps to SRP Tank 15H. Transfer pump seal design will be released for plant use by May 1984. Also included are various other pump and seal related tests

  16. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support enhanced Hanford waste glass models: Results for the January, March, and April 2015 LAW glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, W. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Best, D. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-03

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for several simulated low activity waste (LAW) glasses (designated as the January, March, and April 2015 LAW glasses) fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions.

  17. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support Enhanced Hanford Waste Glass Models. Results for the Augusta and October 2014 LAW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Best, D. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-07

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for several simulated low activity waste (LAW) glasses (designated as the August and October 2014 LAW glasses) fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A CERAMIC TAMPER INDICATING SEAL: SRNL CONTRIBUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krementz, D.; Brinkman, K.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Weeks, G.

    2013-06-03

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are collaborating on development of a Ceramic Seal, also sometimes designated the Intrinsically Tamper Indicating Ceramic Seal (ITICS), which is a tamper indicating seal for international safeguards applications. The Ceramic Seal is designed to be a replacement for metal loop seals that are currently used by the IAEA and other safeguards organizations. The Ceramic Seal has numerous features that enhance the security of the seal, including a frangible ceramic body, protective and tamper indicating coatings, an intrinsic unique identifier using Laser Surface Authentication, electronics incorporated into the seal that provide cryptographic seal authentication, and user-friendly seal wire capture. A second generation prototype of the seal is currently under development whose seal body is of Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) construction. SRNL has developed the mechanical design of the seal in an iterative process incorporating comments from the SNL vulnerability review team. SRNL is developing fluorescent tamper indicating coatings, with recent development focusing on optimizing the durability of the coatings and working with a vendor to develop a method to apply coatings on a 3-D surface. SRNL performed a study on the effects of radiation on the electronics of the seal and possible radiation shielding techniques to minimize the effects. SRNL is also investigating implementation of Laser Surface Authentication (LSA) as a means of unique identification of each seal and the effects of the surface coatings on the LSA signature.

  19. Development of a ceramic tamper indicating seal: SRNL contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krementz, Dan; Brinkman, Kyle S.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael J.; Mendez-Torres, Adrian E.; Weeks, George E.

    2013-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are collaborating on development of a Ceramic Seal, also sometimes designated the Intrinsically Tamper Indicating Ceramic Seal (ITICS), which is a tamper indicating seal for international safeguards applications. The Ceramic Seal is designed to be a replacement for metal loop seals that are currently used by the IAEA and other safeguards organizations. The Ceramic Seal has numerous features that enhance the security of the seal, including a frangible ceramic body, protective and tamper indicating coatings, an intrinsic unique identifier using Laser Surface Authentication, electronics incorporated into the seal that provide cryptographic seal authentication, and user-friendly seal wire capture. A second generation prototype of the seal is currently under development whose seal body is of Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) construction. SRNL has developed the mechanical design of the seal in an iterative process incorporating comments from the SNL vulnerability review team. SRNL is developing fluorescent tamper indicating coatings, with recent development focusing on optimizing the durability of the coatings and working with a vendor to develop a method to apply coatings on a 3-D surface. SRNL performed a study on the effects of radiation on the electronics of the seal and possible radiation shielding techniques to minimize the effects. SRNL is also investigating implementation of Laser Surface Authentication (LSA) as a means of unique identification of each seal and the effects of the surface coatings on the LSA signature.

  20. Controllable Shrinking of Glass Capillary Nanopores Down to sub-10 nm by Wet-Chemical Silanization for Signal-Enhanced DNA Translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaolong; Li, Chuanping; Zhou, Ya; Jin, Yongdong

    2017-10-27

    Diameter is a major concern for nanopore based sensing. However, directly pulling glass capillary nanopore with diameter down to sub-10 nm is very difficult. So, post treatment is sometimes necessary. Herein, we demonstrate a facile and effective wet-chemical method to shrink the diameter of glass capillary nanopore from several tens of nanometers to sub-10 nm by disodium silicate hydrolysis. Its benefits for DNA translocation are investigated. The shrinking of glass capillary nanopore not only slows down DNA translocation, but also enhances DNA translocation signal and signal-to-noise ratio significantly (102.9 for 6.4 nm glass nanopore, superior than 15 for a 3 nm silicon nitride nanopore). It also affects DNA translocation behaviors, making the approach and glass capillary nanopore platform promising for DNA translocation studies.

  1. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support enhanced Hanford waste glass models. Results for the third set of high alumina outer layer matrix glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for 14 simulated high level waste glasses fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 96.9 to 100.8 wt %, indicating recovery of all components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %. The PCT results were normalized to both the targeted and measured compositions of the study glasses. Several of the glasses exhibited increases in normalized concentrations (NCi) after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. Five of the glasses, after the CCC heat treatment, had NCB values that exceeded that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass. These results can be combined with additional characterization, including X-ray diffraction, to determine the cause of the higher release rates.

  2. Immobilization of radwastes in glass containers and products formed thereby

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, P.B.; Litovitz, T.A.; Simmons, C.J.; Simmons, J.H.; Lagakos, N.; Tran, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    A mixture of glass packing and radioactive or other toxic material is placed in a solid glass container, and the container is heated to drive off volatile components and collapse and seal the container

  3. Seal evaluation and confinement screening criteria for beneficial carbon dioxide storage with enhanced coal bed methane recovery in the Pocahontas Basin, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, R.P.; Eriksson, K.A.; Ripepi, N.; Eble, C.; Greb, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    The geological storage of carbon dioxide in Appalachian basin coal seams is one possible sink for sequestration of greenhouse gases, with the added benefit of enhanced-coal bed methane (ECBM) recovery. The Pocahontas Basin (part of the central Appalachian Basin) of southwestern Virginia is a major coal bed methane (CBM) province with production mostly from coal beds in the Lower Pennsylvanian Pocahontas and New River formations. As part of the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's Phase II research program, a CO 2-injection demonstration well was installed into Lower Pennsylvanian coal bed-methane producing strata in southwest Virginia. Samples of siliciclastic lithologies above coal beds in this Oakwood Field well, and from several other cores in the Nora Field were taken to establish a baseline of the basic confinement properties of overlying strata to test seal competency at local and regional scales.Strata above CBM-producing coal beds in the Pocahontas and New River formations consist of dark-gray shales; silty gray shales; heterolithic siltstones, sandstones, and shales; lithic sandstones, and quartzose sandstones. Standard measurements of porosity, permeability and petrography were used to evaluate potential leakage hazards and any possible secondary storage potential for typical lithologies. Both lithic- and quartz-rich sandstones exhibit only minor porosity, with generally low permeability (Member. Analyses of 1500 geophysical logs in southwest Virginia indicate that this unit is moderately thick (>50ft, 15m), laterally continuous (>3000km 2), and a homogenous shale, which coarsens upward into siltstone and sandstone, or is truncated by sandstone. Calculations from two mercury injection capillary porosimetry tests of the shale indicate that a displacement entry pressure of 207psi (1427kPa) would generate an estimated seal capacity of 1365ft (416m) of CO 2 before buoyant leakage. Scanning electron microscopy indicates a microfabric of narrow

  4. Enhanced emission of nile red fluorescent nanoparticles embedded in hybrid sol-gel glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Maria L; del Monte, Francisco

    2005-01-13

    Highly fluorescent Nile Red (NR) nanoparticles embedded in a hybrid sol-gel glass are reported. The crystallite growth within the confined system created by the porous hybrid matrix results in NR nanoparticles of averaged dimensions below 36 nm. The preparation process allows for the control of both the conformation adopted by single NR molecules prior to aggregation (e.g., near planar) and the configuration of the aggregates (e.g., oblique with phi architecture which ultimately forms the nanoparticles. The full preservation of the fluorescent configuration of the aggregates in the nanoparticles is confirmed through the application of the exciton theory, and it is responsible for the significant increase of the fluorescence emission intensity (e.g., up to 525- and 70-fold as compared to that obtained for single NR molecules embedded in pure and hybrid silica glasses, respectively).

  5. Enhancing the Electronic Conductivity of Vanadium-tellurite Glasses by Tuning the Redox State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Transition metal oxides are used in a variety of electronic purposes, e.g., vanadium tellurite as cathode material in high-power demanding batteries. By tuning the redox state of vanadium, it is possible to achieve a lower internal resistance within the entire battery unit, thus a higher capacity....... In this work we vary the redox state of a given vanadium tellurite system by performing post heat-treatment in controlled atmosphere. This process is in theory not limited only to varying electronic conductivity, but also varying the glass structure, and hence, changing properties of the glasses, e.g, thermal...... and mechanical properties. Finally we give insight into the relation between the redox state and electronic conductivity....

  6. The sealing of second mandibular temporary molar pits and fissure with the laser of Nd: YAG, phosphoric acid and the glass ionomer cement; Selamento de fossulas e fissura de segundo molar deciduo inferior com laser de Nd: YAG, acido fosforico e cimento de ionomero de vidro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, Maria Aparecida

    2003-07-01

    The main of our study was to check the sealing of second mandibular temporary molar pits and fissure, in vitro, with the laser of Nd: YAG, phosphoric acid at 37% and the glass ionomer cement (CIV, Fuji IX GC).The proposal was to check the structural morphologic changes in the laser irradiation upon the enamel surface to watch the pits and fissure sealing with the glass ionomer cement use after the laser irradiation and to verify the efficiency of the 'double conditioning' (phosphoric acid + Nd: YAG). At the same time we watch the evolution of the temperature in the pulp chamber's inside. Our desire was to achieve a therapeutic alternative technic to prevent the dental caries. The Nd: YAG laser parameters were the same: 79 mJ of energy per pulse; frequency of 5 Hz; mean power of 0,4 W; optical fiber on contact of 320 {mu}m diameter; fluency of 99,52 J/ cm{sup 2}, assuming that the only differential was the time of the laser application on the enamel surface. The samples were prepared with this way: Laser Nd: YAG (53 second) + acid + CIV (Fuji IX); Laser Nd: YAG (53 s); Laser Nd: YAG (20 s + 20 s) + acid + CIV; Laser Nd: YAG (20 s + 20 s); Acid + CIV; Control. Through the scanning electron microscopy (MEV) we noticed fusion and resolidification regions due to the laser irradiation and a better adaptation of the glass ionomer cement when we did the 'double conditioning'. Concerning the temperature increase we can conclude that the echeloned period was the best recommended because the temperature was found in a pattern that would not cause any damage to the dental pulp. For future studies we suggest a longer relaxing time between the laser irradiation, a comparative study of this method with other lasers, the use of other sealing materials and the study with the permanent teeth. (author)

  7. The sealing of second mandibular temporary molar pits and fissure with the laser of Nd: YAG, phosphoric acid and the glass ionomer cement; Selamento de fossulas e fissura de segundo molar deciduo inferior com laser de Nd: YAG, acido fosforico e cimento de ionomero de vidro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, Maria Aparecida

    2003-07-01

    The main of our study was to check the sealing of second mandibular temporary molar pits and fissure, in vitro, with the laser of Nd: YAG, phosphoric acid at 37% and the glass ionomer cement (CIV, Fuji IX GC).The proposal was to check the structural morphologic changes in the laser irradiation upon the enamel surface to watch the pits and fissure sealing with the glass ionomer cement use after the laser irradiation and to verify the efficiency of the 'double conditioning' (phosphoric acid + Nd: YAG). At the same time we watch the evolution of the temperature in the pulp chamber's inside. Our desire was to achieve a therapeutic alternative technic to prevent the dental caries. The Nd: YAG laser parameters were the same: 79 mJ of energy per pulse; frequency of 5 Hz; mean power of 0,4 W; optical fiber on contact of 320 {mu}m diameter; fluency of 99,52 J/ cm{sup 2}, assuming that the only differential was the time of the laser application on the enamel surface. The samples were prepared with this way: Laser Nd: YAG (53 second) + acid + CIV (Fuji IX); Laser Nd: YAG (53 s); Laser Nd: YAG (20 s + 20 s) + acid + CIV; Laser Nd: YAG (20 s + 20 s); Acid + CIV; Control. Through the scanning electron microscopy (MEV) we noticed fusion and resolidification regions due to the laser irradiation and a better adaptation of the glass ionomer cement when we did the 'double conditioning'. Concerning the temperature increase we can conclude that the echeloned period was the best recommended because the temperature was found in a pattern that would not cause any damage to the dental pulp. For future studies we suggest a longer relaxing time between the laser irradiation, a comparative study of this method with other lasers, the use of other sealing materials and the study with the permanent teeth. (author)

  8. Nuclear reactor sealing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEdwards, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor sealing system is disclosed. The nuclear reactor includes a vessel sealed at its upper end by a closure head. The closure head comprises at least two components, one of which is rotatable; and the two components define an annulus therebetween. The sealing system includes at least a first and second inflatable seal disposed in series in an upper portion of the annulus. The system further includes a dip seal extending into a body of insulation located adjacent a bottom portion of the closure head. The dip seal comprises a trough formed by a lower portion of one of the components, and a seal blade pendently supported from the other component and extending downwardly into the trough. A body of liquid metal is contained in the trough which submerges a portion of the seal blade. The seal blade is provided with at least one aperture located above the body of liquid metal for providing fluid communication between the annulus intermediate the dip seal and the inflatable seals, and a body of cover gas located inside the vessel. There also is provided means for introducing a purge gas into the annulus intermediate the inflatable seals and the seal blade. The purge gas is introduced in an amount sufficient to substantially reduce diffusion of radioactive cover gas or sodium vapor up to the inflatable seals. The purge gas mixes with the cover gas in the reactor vessel where it can be withdrawn from the vessel for treatment and recycle to the vessel

  9. Inboard seal mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, John R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A regenerator assembly for a gas turbine engine has a hot side seal assembly formed in part by a cast metal engine block having a seal recess formed therein that is configured to supportingly receive ceramic support blocks including an inboard face thereon having a regenerator seal face bonded thereto. A pressurized leaf seal is interposed between the ceramic support block and the cast metal engine block to bias the seal wear face into sealing engagement with a hot side surface of a rotary regenerator matrix.

  10. Luminescence quenching versus enhancement in WO3-NaPO3 glasses doped with trivalent rare earth ions and containing silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousti, M. Reza; Poirier, Gael Y.; Amjad, Raja J.; de Camargo, Andrea S. S.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the influence of silver nanoparticles (NPs) on the luminescence behavior of trivalent rare earth (RE) ion doped tungsten-phosphate glasses. In order to induce the growth of NPs, the as-prepared glass samples containing silver atoms, are exposed to heat-treatment above the glass transition temperature. The surface plasmon resonance band of the Ag NPs is observed in the visible range around 420 and 537 nm in the glasses with low and high tungsten content, respectively. Such difference in spectral shift of the plasmon band is attributed to the difference in the refractive index of the two studied glass compositions. Heat-treatment results in the general increase in number of NPs, while in the case of glasses with low tungsten content, it also imposes a shift to the Ag plasmon band. The NPs size distribution (4-10 nm) was determined in good agreement with the values obtained by using Mie theory and by transmission electron microscopy. The observed quenching in the visible luminescence of glasses doped with Eu3+, Tb3+ or Er3+is attributed to energy transfer from the RE ions to Ag species, while an enhanced near-infrared emission in Er3+ doped glasses is discussed in terms of the chemical contribution of silver, rather than the most commonly claimed enhancement of localized field or energy transfer from silver species to Er3+. The results are supported by the lifetime measurements. We believe that this study gives further insight and in-depth exploration of the somewhat controversial discussions on the influence of metallic NPs plasmonic effects in RE-doped glasses.

  11. Silver nanoparticles enhanced luminescence properties of Er³⁺ doped tellurite glasses: Effect of heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fares, Hssen; Férid, Mokhtar [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Matériaux Minéraux et leurs Applications, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Matériaux, B.P. 95 Hammam-Lif, 2050 (Tunisia); Elhouichet, Habib, E-mail: habib.elhouichet@fst.rnu.tn [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Matériaux Minéraux et leurs Applications, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Matériaux, B.P. 95 Hammam-Lif, 2050 (Tunisia); Department of Physics, Sciences Faculty of Tunis, University Tunis ElManar 2092 (Tunisia); Gelloz, Bernard [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, 2-24-16 Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2014-09-28

    Tellurite glasses doped Er³⁺ ions and containing Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are prepared using melt quenching technique. The nucleation and growth of Ag NPs were controlled by a thermal annealing process. The X-ray diffraction pattern shows no sharp peak indicating an amorphous nature of the glasses. The presence of Ag NPs is confirmed from transmission electron microscopy micrograph. Absorption spectra show typical surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of Ag NPs within the 510–550 nm range in addition to the distinctive absorption peaks of Er³⁺ ions. The Judd-Ofelt (J-O) intensity parameters, oscillator strengths, spontaneous transition probabilities, branching ratios, and radiative lifetimes were successfully calculated based on the experimental absorption spectrum and the J-O theory. It was found that the presence of silver NPs nucleated and grown during the heat annealing process improves both of the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and the PL lifetime relative to the ⁴I13/2 → ⁴I15/2 transition. Optimum PL enhancement was obtained after 10 h of heat-treatment. Such enhancements are mainly attributed to the strong local electric field induced by SPR of silver NPs and also to energy transfer from the surface of silver NPs to Er³⁺ ions, whereas the quenching is ascribed to the energy transfer from Er³⁺ ions to silver NPs. Using the Mc Cumber method, absorption cross-section, calculated emission cross-section, and gain cross-section for the ⁴I13/2 → ⁴I15/2 transition were determined and compared for the doped and co-doped glasses. The present results indicate that the glass heat-treated for 10 h has good prospect as a gain medium applied for 1.53 μm band broad and high-gain erbium-doped fiber amplifiers.

  12. Enhancement of room-temperature plasticity in a bulk metallic glass by finely dispersed porosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Takeshi; Inoue, Akihisa; Greer, Alan Lindsay

    2005-01-01

    Melts of Pd 42.5 Cu 30 Ni 7.5 P 20 (at. %) held under pressurized hydrogen are cast into bulk metallic glass (BMG) rods with fine (20-30 μm diameter) pores uniformly dispersed. The low overall porosities ( -3 , compared to 16 MJ m -3 for the pore-free BMG. The pores force the proliferation of shear bands below the overall failure stress, a process of interest for toughening BMGs, materials for which shear localization in deformation restricts structural applications

  13. Optical enhancement of phosphor-converted wLEDs using glass beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güner, Tuğrul; Şentürk, Ufuk; Demir, Mustafa M.

    2017-10-01

    YAG:Ce3+ is a yellow-source compound commonly used in phosphor conversion layers for direct coating or remote phosphor configurations in LED illumination. This material, however, suffers from a high correlated color temperature, and low color-rendering index due to its deficiency in the red spectrum. In this study, glass beads (GB) with an average particle diameter of 10 μm were introduced to the conversion layer of a YAG:Ce3+ particulate-filled polydimethylsiloxane matrix composite structure and found to improve the optical features of the resulting composite.

  14. Nuclear waste vault sealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyenge, M.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear waste vault must be designed and built to ensure adequate isolation of the nuclear wastes from human contact. Consequently, after a vault has been fully loaded, it must be adequately sealed off to prevent radionuclide migration which may be provided by circulating groundwater. Vault sealing entails four major aspects, i.e.: (a) vault grouting; (b) borehole sealing; (c) buffer packing; and (d) backfilling. Of particular concern in vault sealing are the physical and chemical properties of the sealing material, its long-term durability and stability, and the techniques used for its emplacement. Present sealing technology and sealing materials are reviewed in terms of the particular needs of vault sealing. Areas requiring research and development are indicated

  15. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method for sealing the cold leg nozzles of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location during maintenance and inspection of associated steam generators and pumps while the pressure vessel and refueling canal are filled with water. The apparatus includes a sealing plug for mechanically sealing the cold leg nozzle from the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plugs include a primary and a secondary O-ring. An installation tool is suspended within the reactor vessel and carries the sealing plug. The tool telescopes to insert the sealing plug within the cold leg nozzle, and to subsequently remove the plug. Hydraulic means are used to activate the sealing plug, and support means serve to suspend the installation tool within the reactor vessel during installation and removal of the sealing plug

  16. Fog seal guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Fog seals are a method of adding asphalt to an existing pavement surface to improve sealing or waterproofing, prevent further stone loss by holding aggregate in place, or simply improve the surface appearance. However, inappropriate use can result in...

  17. Hermetically Sealed Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed hermetically sealed pump compresses fluid to pressure up to 4,000 atm (400 MPa). Pump employs linear electric motor instead of rotary motor to avoid need for leakage-prone rotary seals. In addition, linear-motor-powered pump would not require packings to seal its piston. Concept thus eliminates major cause of friction and wear. Pump is double-ended diaphragm-type compressor. All moving parts sealed within compressor housing.

  18. Investigation of positive shaft seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfouts, J. O.

    1970-01-01

    Welded metal bellows secondary seals prevent secondary seal leakage with a minimum number of potential leak paths. High performance seal is obtained by controlling the potentially unstable seal-face movements induced by mechanical vibrations and fluid pressure pulsations.

  19. Circumferential shaft seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A circumferential shaft seal comprising two sealing rings held to a rotating shaft by means of a surrounding elastomeric band is disclosed. The rings are segmented and are of a rigid sealing material such as carbon or a polyimide and graphite fiber composite.

  20. Seals in motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brasseur, Sophie Marie Jacqueline Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The harbour seal Phoca vitulina and the grey seal Halichoerus grypus have been inhabitants of the Wadden Sea since millennia. Prehistoric findings indicate the presence of both species around 5000 BC. This changed dramatically in the mid Middle-Ages as around 1500 AC, the grey seal disappeared from

  1. Electronic self-monitoring seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The Electronic Self-Monitoring Seal is a new type of security seal which allows continuous verification of the seal's identity and status. The identity information is a function of the individual seal, time, and seal integrity. A description of this seal and its characteristics are presented. Also described are the use cycle for the seal and the support equipment for programming and verifying the seal

  2. VAK III. Seals and sealing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    d'Agraives, B.C.; Dal Cero, G.; Debeir, R.; Mascetti, E.; Toornvliet, J.; Volcan, A.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents the VAK III seals and sealing system, which have been used over a period of two years at the Kahl nuclear facility (Federal Republic of Germany), where field tests and feasibility studies were conducted in order to offer a possible solution for the sealing of LWR fuel assemblies. It has been prepared with the aim of an assessment study to be done at the IAEA. It gives all characteristics and technical descriptions for: the sealing principle, the seal construction, the operating tools, the data processing, the drawings, the publications related to that seal. The main points of progress are: the Strong Random Internal Defects (STRID) incorporated in the seals, allowing the obtention of a good signature stability; the Integrity Check on the Seal Status (broken or not) obtained through a decisive mechanical improvement: the Double Breakage Integrity Check (DOBRIC) and with a better ultrasonic evidence of that status; the provision of new function tools, allowing the performance of Identity Measurements in dry conditions (which means also at the manufacturer plant) or in deeper water (wet storage); the study and development of a new JRC VAK 45 Compact Instrument Box, in which all the measuring functions can be grouped and incorporating an autonomous Minicomputer offering to the Inspection the possibility of performing, on the spot, Correlation and Decision processes. The general benefit of such a feasibility study should be to convince the potential users that such a Safeguards Sealing System can be studied for slightly - or largely - different other applications, provided that the Basic and Operating Functions required to the system be clearly defined, possibly after a common agreement would be stated

  3. Reinforced seal component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanson, G.M.; Odent, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    The invention concerns a seal component of the kind comprising a soft sheath and a flexible reinforcement housed throughout the entire length of the sheath. The invention enables O ring seals to be made capable of providing a radial seal, that is to say between two sides or flat collars of two cylindrical mechanical parts, or an axial seal, that is to say between two co-axial axisymmetrical areas. The seal so ensured is relative, but it remains adequately sufficient for many uses, for instance, to ensure the separation of two successive fixed blading compartments of axial compressors used in gas diffusion isotope concentration facilities [fr

  4. Glass compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, P W

    1985-05-30

    A fluoride glass for use in the production of optical fibres has an enhanced D/H ratio, preferably such that OD:OH is at least 9:1. In the example, such a glass is prepared by treating with D/sub 2/O a melt comprising 51.53 mole per cent ZrF/sub 4/, 20.47 mole per cent BaF/sub 2/, 5.27 mole per cent LaF/sub 3/, 3.24 mole per cent AlF/sub 3/, and 19.49 mole per cent LiF.

  5. Effect of severely thermal shocked MWCNT enhanced glass fiber reinforced polymer composite: An emphasis on tensile and thermal responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, K. K.; Fulmali, A. O.; Kattaguri, R.; Dutta, K.; Prusty, R. K.; Ray, B. C.

    2018-03-01

    Fiber reinforced polymeric (FRP) composite materials are exposed to diverse changing environmental temperatures during their in-service period. Current investigation is aimed to investigate the influence of thermal-shock exposure on the mechanical behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) enhanced glass fiber reinforced polymeric (GFRP) composites. The samples were exposed to +70°C for 36 hrs followed by further exposure to ‑ 60°C for the similar interval of time. Tensile tests were conducted in order to evaluate the results of thermal-shock on the mechanical behavior of the neat and conditioned samples at 1 mm/min loading rate. The polymer phase i.e. epoxy was modified with various MWCNT content. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) was raised by 15.11 % with increase in the 0.1 % MWCNT content GFRP as related to the thermal-shocked neat GFRP conditioned samples. The possible reason may be attributed to the variation in the coefficients of thermal expansion at the time of conditioning. Also, upto some extent the pre-existing residual stresses allows uniform distribution of stress and hence the reason in enhanced mechanical properties of GFRP and MWCNT filled composites. In order to access the modifications in the glass transition temperature (Tg) due to the addition of MWCNT in GFRP composite and also due to the thermal shock temperature modulated differential scanning calorimeter (TMDSC) measurements are carried out. Scanning electron microscopy(SEM) was carried out to identify different modes of failures and strengthening morphology in the composites.

  6. Severe service sealing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, R.; Wensel, R.

    1994-09-01

    Successful sealing usually requires much more than initial leak-tightness. Friction and wear must also be acceptable, requiring a good understanding of tribology at the sealing interface. This paper describes various sealing solutions for severe service conditions. The CAN2A and CAN8 rotary face seals use tungsten carbide against carbon-graphite to achieve low leakage and long lifetime in nuclear main coolant pumps. The smaller CAN6 seal successfully uses tungsten carbide against silicon carbide in reactor water cleanup pump service. Where friction in CANDU fuelling machine rams must be essentially zero, a hydrostatic seal using two silicon carbide faces is the solution. In the NRU reactor moderator pumps, where pressure is much lower, eccentric seals that prevent boiling at the seal faces are giving excellent service. All these rotary face seals rely on supplementary elastomer seals between their parts. An integrated engineering approach to high performance sealing with O-rings is described. This is epitomized in critical Space Shuttle applications, but is increasingly being applied in CANDU plants. It includes gland design, selection and qualification of material, quality assurance, detection of defects and the effects of lubrication, surface finish, squeeze, stretch and volume constraints. In conclusion, for the severe service applications described, customized solutions have more than paid for themselves by higher reliability, lower maintenance requirements and reduced outage time. (author)

  7. Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP Bars for Enhancing the Flexural Performance of RC Beams Using Side-NSM Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Akter Hosen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete (RC structures require strengthening for numerous factors, such as increased load, modification of the structural systems, structural upgrade or errors in the design and construction stages. The side near-surface mounted (SNSM strengthening technique with glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP bars is a relatively new emerging technique for enhancing the flexural capacities of existing RC elements. Nine RC rectangular beams were flexurally strengthened with this technique and tested under four-point bending loads until failure. The main goal of this study is to optimize the structural capacity of the RC beams by varying the amount of strengthening reinforcement and bond length. The experimental test results showed that strengthening with SNSM GFRP bars significantly enhanced the flexural responses of the specimens compared with the control specimen. The first cracking and ultimate loads, energy absorption capacities, ductility and stiffness were remarkably enhanced by the SNSM technique. It was also confirmed that the bond length of the strengthened reinforcement greatly influences the energy absorption capacities, ductility and stiffness. The effect of the bond length on these properties is more significant compared to the amount of strengthening reinforcement.

  8. The IRES electronic seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourlez, P.; Funk, P.; Brochard, D.; Moreau, J.F.; Martin, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the French Support Program for the IAEA Safeguards, the 'Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire' (IPSN), developed an electronic seal called Integrated and Reusable Electronic Seal (IRES) that enables independent verification by different inspectorates (IAEA, Euratom, and National Inspectorate) Furthermore, a bilateral co-ordination between Euratom and French domestic safeguards takes place in some French facilities regarding a common approach concerning the seals especially in case of crisis situation. The seal can be remotely interrogated by radio frequency and integrated to other Containment/surveillance systems by serial line RS 485. Data are authenticated and the IRESMAG software manages in the seal reader all functionalities of the seal and records inspection data compatible with the IAEA's Seal Database

  9. High pressure shaft seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinson, A.R.; Rogers, V.D.

    1980-01-01

    In relation to reactor primary coolant pumps, mechanical seal assembly for a pump shaft is disclosed which features a rotating seal ring mounting system which utilizes a rigid support ring loaded through narrow annular projections in combination with centering non-sealing O-rings which effectively isolate the rotating seal ring from temperature and pressure transients while securely positioning the ring to adjacent parts. A stationary seal ring mounting configuration allows the stationary seal ring freedom of motion to follow shaft axial movement up to 3/4 of an inch and shaft tilt about the pump axis without any change in the hydraulic or pressure loading on the stationary seal ring or its carrier. (author)

  10. Silver nanoparticles enhanced 1.53 µm band fluorescence of Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} codoped tellurite glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yawei; Zhou, Yaxun, E-mail: zhouyaxun@nbu.edu.cn; Wu, Libo; Yang, Fengjing; Peng, Shengxi; Zheng, Shichao; Yin, Dandan

    2014-09-15

    The silver nanoparticles (NPs) was introduced into the Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} codoped tellurite glasses with composition of TeO{sub 2}–ZnO to improve the 1.53 µm band fluorescence of Er{sup 3+} and the thermal stability of glass host. The UV–Vis–NIR absorption spectra, 1.53 µm band fluorescence spectra and fluorescence decaying curves, the differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) curves, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of glass samples were characterized to investigate the effect of silver NPs on the fluorescence properties of Er{sup 3+}, thermal stability and structure behavior of glass host. It is shown that the Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} codoped tellurite glass emits intense 1.53 µm band fluorescence with peak wavelength located at about 1532 nm under the 980 nm excitation. The introduction of silver NPs further improves the fluorescence intensity of Er{sup 3+} which is attributed to the enhanced local electric field effect induced by localized surface Plasmon resonance (LSPR) of silver NPs and the possible energy transfer from silver NPs to Er{sup 3+}. An improvement by about 62% of 1.5{sup 3} µm band fluorescence intensity was found in the studied Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} codoped tellurite glass containing 0.5 mol% amount of AgNO{sub 3}. In addition, the thermal stability of glass host increases with the introduction of silver NPs while the glass structure maintains the amorphous nature. The present results indicate that the prepared Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} codoped tellurite glass with an appropriate amount of silver NPs has good prospect as a gain medium applied for 1.53 µm band broad and high-gain erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs). - Highlights: • Tellurite glass with Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} and silver NPs was prepared by melt-quenching method. • Silver NPs with average size of 12 nm and Plasmon band at 560 nm was observed. • Addition of silver NPs increased the thermal stability of tellurite glass.

  11. Toward a predictive model for elastomer seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Nicola; Khawaja, Musab; Sutton, Adrian; Mostofi, Arash

    Nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) and hydrogenated-NBR (HNBR) are widely used elastomers, especially as seals in oil and gas applications. During exposure to well-hole conditions, ingress of gases causes degradation of performance, including mechanical failure. We use computer simulations to investigate this problem at two different length and time-scales. First, we study the solubility of gases in the elastomer using a chemically-inspired description of HNBR based on the OPLS all-atom force-field. Starting with a model of NBR, C=C double bonds are saturated with either hydrogen or intramolecular cross-links, mimicking the hydrogenation of NBR to form HNBR. We validate against trends for the mass density and glass transition temperature for HNBR as a function of cross-link density, and for NBR as a function of the fraction of acrylonitrile in the copolymer. Second, we study mechanical behaviour using a coarse-grained model that overcomes some of the length and time-scale limitations of an all-atom approach. Nanoparticle fillers added to the elastomer matrix to enhance mechanical response are also included. Our initial focus is on understanding the mechanical properties at the elevated temperatures and pressures experienced in well-hole conditions.

  12. Efficient enhancement of bismuth NIR luminescence by aluminum and its mechanism in bismuth doped germanate laser glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.P.; Tan, L.L.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    As a new member of laser glass family, bismuth-doped glasses have received rising interests due to the application of fiber amplifiers and laser sources in the new spectral range for the next-generation optical communication system. For practical application of the glasses, it must be considered ...

  13. Flexible ring seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbes, Claude; Gournier, Andre; Rouaud, Christian; Villepoix, Raymond de.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns a flexible metal ring seal, able to ensure a perfect seal between two bearings due to the crushing and elastic deformation properties akin to similar properties in elastomers. Various designs of seal of this kind are already known, particularly a seal made of a core formed by a helical wire spring with close-wound turns and with high axial compression ratio, closed on itself and having the shape of an annulus. This wire ring is surrounded by at least one envelope having at rest the shape of a toroidal surface of which the generating circle does not close on itself. In a particular design mode, the seal in question can include, around the internal spring, two envelopes of which one in contact with the spring is composed of a low ductility elastic metal, such as mild steel or stainless steel and the other is, on the contrary, made of a malleable metal, such as copper or nickel. The first envelope evenly distributes the partial crushing of the spring, when the seal is tightened, on the second envelope which closely fits the two surfaces between which the seal operates. The stress-crushing curve characteristic of the seal comprises two separate parts, the first with a relatively sharp slope corresponds to the start of the seal compression phase, enabling at least some of these curves to reach the requisite seal threshold very quickly, then, beyond this, a second part, practically flat, where the stress is appreciably constant for a wide operating bracket [fr

  14. Through the Looking Glass: Real-Time Video Using 'Smart' Technology Provides Enhanced Intraoperative Logistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Andrew C W; Mallidi, Hari R; Baldwin, John C; Sandoval, Elena; Cohn, William E; Frazier, O H; Singh, Steve K

    2016-01-01

    In the setting of increasingly complex medical therapies and limited physician resources, the recent emergence of 'smart' technology offers tremendous potential for improved logistics, efficiency, and communication between medical team members. In an effort to harness these capabilities, we sought to evaluate the utility of this technology in surgical practice through the employment of a wearable camera device during cardiothoracic organ recovery. A single procurement surgeon was trained for use of an Explorer Edition Google Glass (Google Inc., Mountain View, CA) during the recovery process. Live video feed of each procedure was securely broadcast to allow for members of the home transplant team to remotely participate in organ assessment. Primary outcomes involved demonstration of technological feasibility and validation of quality assurance through group assessment. The device was employed for the recovery of four organs: a right single lung, a left single lung, and two bilateral lung harvests. Live video of the visualization process was remotely accessed by the home transplant team, and supplemented final verification of organ quality. In each case, the organs were accepted for transplant without disruption of standard procurement protocols. Media files generated during the procedures were stored in a secure drive for future documentation, evaluation, and education purposes without preservation of patient identifiers. Live video streaming can improve quality assurance measures by allowing off-site members of the transplant team to participate in the final assessment of donor organ quality. While further studies are needed, this project suggests that the application of mobile 'smart' technology offers not just immediate value, but the potential to transform our approach to the practice of medicine.

  15. Seals in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The seals described are for use in a nuclear reactor where there are fuel assemblies in a vessel, an inlet and an outlet for circulating a coolant in heat transfer relationship with the fuel assemblies and a closure head on the vessel in a tight fluid relationship. The closure head comprises rotatable plugs which have mechanical seals disposed in the annulus around each plug while allowing free rotation of the plug when the seal is not actuated. The seal is usually an elastomer or copper. A means of actuating the seal is attached for drawing it vertically into the annulus for sealing. When the reactor coolant is liquid sodium, contact with oxygen must be avoided and argon cover gas fills the space between the bottom of the closure head and the coolant liquid level and the annuli in the closure head. (U.K.)

  16. Seals in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this invention is the provision of improved seals for reactor vessels in which fuel assemblies are located together with inlets and outlets for the circulation of a coolant. The object is to provide a seal arrangement for the rotatable plugs of nuclear reactor closure heads which has good sealing capacities over a wide gap during operation of the reactor but which also permits uninhibited rotation of the plugs for maintenance. (U.K.)

  17. Compliant seal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    1993-10-01

    The compliant metallic seal combines the noncontact feature of the labyrinth seal, the low leakage of a mechanical seal, and the compliant nature of the brush seal. It consists of several thin metallic elements or leaves mounted within a ring which is press fit into the housing, and in form, sort of resembles a lip seal sections wiping the shaft. A second set of overlapping cover leaves are placed on top of the shaft riding leaves which reduces leakage and provides stiffness. The leaves can be straight or angle cut. The shaft riding fingers are designed with mismatched curvature to provide lift off similar to the Rayleigh lift pads in mechanical seals with leading edge clearances nearly twice those of the trailing edge as as shown by Fleming to be optimal for gas flows in convergent seal passages. Leading edge clearances range from 300 to 500 microinches. Balance pockets beneath the leaves provide fluid film feed to the 'Rayleigh lift' surface and the proper balance ratio (mechanical seal) when combined with the static pressure and film pressure. The leaves flex in the radial direction and accommodate thermomechanical behavior as well as axial motion and angular misalignment. In the static mode, there is a net closing force on the leaves. The seals were tested to 70 psi at speeds to 16,000 rpm or surface speeds to 330 fps and temperatures from ambient to 440 F. A slow cycle through the rig critical at 10,000 rpm induced a radial vibration response of 0.004 to 0.005 inch were accommodated by the seal. Preliminary performance data are encouraging demonstrating hydrodynamic liftoff and noncontacting operation at pressure and speeds typical of gas turbine engines. The leakage performance data are significantly better than commercial labyrinth and brush seals which should be expected as this design incorporates the features of the low leakage face or mechanical seal along with the flexibility of the brush configuration.

  18. Seal containment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugler, R.W.; Gerkey, K.S.; Kasner, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    An automated system for transporting nuclear fuel elements between fuel element assembly stations without contaminating the area outside the sealed assembly stations is described. The system comprises a plurality of assembly stations connected together by an elongated horizontal sealing mechanism and an automatic transport mechanism for transporting a nuclear fuel element in a horizontal attitude between the assembly stations while the open end of the fuel element extends through the sealing mechanism into the assembly station enclosure. The sealing mechanism allows the fuel element to be advanced by the transport mechanism while limiting the escape of radioactive particles from within the assembly station enclosure. 4 claims, 6 figures

  19. Low torque hydrodynamic lip geometry for rotary seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietle, Lannie L.; Schroeder, John E.

    2015-07-21

    A hydrodynamically lubricating geometry for the generally circular dynamic sealing lip of rotary seals that are employed to partition a lubricant from an environment. The dynamic sealing lip is provided for establishing compressed sealing engagement with a relatively rotatable surface, and for wedging a film of lubricating fluid into the interface between the dynamic sealing lip and the relatively rotatable surface in response to relative rotation that may occur in the clockwise or the counter-clockwise direction. A wave form incorporating an elongated dimple provides the gradual convergence, efficient impingement angle, and gradual interfacial contact pressure rise that are conducive to efficient hydrodynamic wedging. Skewed elevated contact pressure zones produced by compression edge effects provide for controlled lubricant movement within the dynamic sealing interface between the seal and the relatively rotatable surface, producing enhanced lubrication and low running torque.

  20. Characterization and enhanced nonlinear optical limiting response in carbon nanodots dispersed in solid-state hybrid organically modified silica gel glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Zheng, Chan; Guo, Qiaohang; Huang, Dongdong; Wu, Xiukai; Chen, Ling

    2018-02-01

    Freely dispersed carbon nanodots (CNDs) were introduced into a 3-glycidoxy-propyltrimethoxysilane modified silicate gel glass (i.e. an organically modified silica or ORMOSIL) by a highly efficient and simple sol-gel process, which could be easily extended to prepare functional molecules/nanoparticles solid state optoelectronic devices. Scanning electron microscope imaging, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, pore structure measurements, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to investigate the surface characteristics, structure, texture, and linear optical properties of the CND/SiO2 ORMOSIL gel glasses. Images and UV/Vis spectra confirmed the successful dispersion of CNDs in the ORMOSIL gel glass. The surface characteristics and pore structure of the host SiO2 matrix were markedly changed through the introduction of the CNDs. The linear optical properties of the guest CNDs were also affected by the sol-gel procedure. The nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of the CNDs were investigated by a nanosecond open-aperture Z-scan technique at 532 nm both in liquid and solid matrices. We found that the NLO response of the CNDs was considerably improved after their incorporation into the ORMOSIL gel glasses. Possible enhancement mechanisms were also explored. The nonlinear extinction coefficient gradually increased while the optical limiting (OL) threshold decreased as the CND doping level was increased. This result suggests that the NLO and OL properties of the composite gel glasses can be optimized by tuning the concentration of CNDs in the gel glass matrix. Our findings show that CND/SiO2 ORMOSIL gel glasses are promising candidates for optical limiters to protect sensitive instruments and human eyes from damage caused by high power lasers.

  1. Improved cryogenic shaft seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, W. A., Jr.; Tellier, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Seals are designed for use with liquid propellant ball valves at temperatures ranging from -400 F to 130 F and 8,000 psig. Seals are capable of sustaining 90 degree rotation, with substantial amount of lateral and axial play, caused by large pressure loads and differential thermal contraction.

  2. Sealed radioactive sources toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Kenzie, C.

    2005-09-01

    The IAEA has developed a Sealed Radioactive Sources Toolkit to provide information to key groups about the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources. The key groups addressed are officials in government agencies, medical users, industrial users and the scrap metal industry. The general public may also benefit from an understanding of the fundamentals of radiation safety

  3. Rotary shaft seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langebrake, C.O.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a novel rotary shaft seal assembly which provides positive-contact sealing when the shaft is not rotated and which operates with its sealing surfaces separated by a film of compressed ambient gas whose width is independent of the speed of shaft rotation. In a preferred embodiment, the assembly includes a disc affixed to the shaft for rotation therewith. Axially movable, non-rotatable plates respectively supported by sealing bellows are positioned on either side of the disc to be in sealing engagement therewith. Each plate carries piezoelectric transducer elements which are electrically energized at startup to produce films of compressed ambient gas between the confronting surfaces of the plates and the disc. Following shutdown of the shaft, the transducer elements are de-energized. A control circuit responds to incipient rubbing between the plate and either disc by altering the electrical input to the transducer elements to eliminate rubbing

  4. Sealing a conduit end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mentz, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for sealing or blocking conduits, such as the primary nozzles of a nuclear steam generator is described. It includes an annular bracket sealingly attached to the open end of the nozzle, the bracket having a plurality of threaded holes therein. Mounted atop the bracket is a generally circular nozzle dam for covering the opening. Interposed between the nozzle dam and the bracket is an extrusion-resistant seal member having a plurality of apertures therethrough for receiving each bolt. The seal member is configured to resist extrusion by having laminated layers of differing hardnesses, so that the seal member will not laterally extrude away from each bolt in a manner that enlarges the aperture surrounding each bolt as the nozzle dam is bolted to the bracket. (author)

  5. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus is described for sealing a cold leg nozzle of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location comprising: at least one sealing plug for mechanically sealing the nozzle from the inside of the reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plug includes a plate and a cone assembly having an end part receptive in the nozzle, the plate being axially moveable relative to the cone assembly. The plate and cone assembly have confronting bevelled edges defining an opening therebetween. A primary O-ring is disposed about the opening and is supported on the bevelled edges, the plate being guidably mounted to the cone assembly for movement toward the cone assembly to radially expand the primary O-ring into sealing engagement with the nozzle. A means is included for providing relative movement between the outer plate and the cone assembly

  6. New sol-gel bioactive glass and titania composites with enhanced physico-chemical and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, Justyna; Widziołek, Magdalena; Cholewa-Kowalska, Katarzyna; Łączka, Maria; Osyczka, Anna Maria

    2014-07-01

    We developed TiO2 matrix composites modified by sol-gel bioactive glasses (SBG) of either high CaO content (A2) or high SiO2 content (S2). The latter were mixed with titanium dioxide (TiO2) at 75:25, 50:50, and 25:75 weight ratios and sintered at 1250°C for 2 h. We examined the effects of various types (A2 or S2) and compositional TiO2 :SBG ratios on the mechanical properties of resulting composites, their bioactivity and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) response. The chemistry of SBGs influenced the phase composition, mechanical and biological properties of the composites. Rutile and titanite prevailed in A2-TiO2 composites, and rutile and crystobalite in S2-TiO2 composites. Compressive strength increased significantly for 25A2-TiO2 composites (140 MPa) compared to matrix TiO2 (58 MPa). Composites containing 50-75 wt % of either SBG displayed bioactive properties as determined by simulated body fluid test. Compared to TiO2, human bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) viability was enhanced on the composites containing 25 wt % of either SBG, whereas the composites modified by 25 wt % of S2 enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization in cultures treated with osteogenic inducers-dexamethasone (Dex) or bone morphogenetic protein. Increasing amounts of A2 in TiO2 matrix decreased cell viability but increased collagen deposition and mineralized matrix production by BMSC. Considering the physico-chemical and biological properties of the presented composites, the modification of TiO2 with SBG may prove useful strategy in several bone tissue related regeneration strategies. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of Au dimer antennas on glass pillars with enhanced plasmonic response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi Pedram

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on the fabrication and dark-field spectroscopy characterization of Au dimer nanoantennas placed on top of SiO2 nanopillars. The reported process enables the fabrication of nanopillar dimers with gaps down to 15 nm and heights up to 1 μm. A clear dependence of the plasmonic resonance position on the dimer gap is observed for smaller pillar heights, showing the high uniformity and reproducibility of the process. It is shown how increasing the height of nanopillars significantly affects the recorded elastic scattering spectra from Au nanoantennas. The results are compared to finite-difference time-domain (FDTD and finite-element method (FEM simulations. Additionally, measured spectra are accompanied by dark-field microscopy images of the dimers, showing the pronounced change in color. Placing nanoantennas on nanopillars with a height comparable to the in-plane dimer dimensions results in an enhancement of the scattering response, which can be understood through reduced interaction of the near-fields with the substrate. When increasing the pillar height further, scattering by the pillars themselves manifests itself as a strong tail at lower wavelengths. Additionally, strong directional scattering is expected as a result of the interface between the nanoantennas and nanopillars, which is taken into account in simulations. For pillars of height close to the plasmonic resonance wavelength, the scattering spectra become more complex due to additional scattering peaks as a result of larger geometrical nonuniformities.

  8. Enhanced bending failure strain in biological glass fibers due to internal lamellar architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monn, Michael A; Kesari, Haneesh

    2017-12-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of biological structures, like tooth and bone, are often a consequence of their architecture. The tree ring-like layers that comprise the skeletal elements of the marine sponge Euplectella aspergillum are a quintessential example of the intricate architectures prevalent in biological structures. These skeletal elements, known as spicules, are hair-like fibers that consist of a concentric array of silica cylinders separated by thin, organic layers. Thousands of spicules act like roots to anchor the sponge to the sea floor. While spicules have been the subject of several structure-property investigations, those studies have mostly focused on the relationship between the spicule's layered architecture and toughness properties. In contrast, we hypothesize that the spicule's layered architecture enhances its bending failure strain, thereby allowing it to provide a better anchorage to the sea floor. We test our hypothesis by performing three-point bending tests on E. aspergillum spicules, measuring their bending failure strains, and comparing them to those of spicules from a related sponge, Tethya aurantia. The T. aurantia spicules have a similar chemical composition to E. aspergillum spicules but have no architecture. Thus, any difference between the bending failure strains of the two types of spicules can be attributed to the E. aspergillum spicules' layered architecture. We found that the bending failure strains of the E. aspergillum spicules were roughly 2.4 times larger than those of the T. aurantia spicules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Brush seal performance measurement system

    OpenAIRE

    Aksoy, Serdar; Akşit, Mahmut Faruk; Aksit, Mahmut Faruk; Duran, Ertuğrul Tolga; Duran, Ertugrul Tolga

    2009-01-01

    Brush seals are rapidly replacing conventional labyrinth seals in turbomachinery applications. Upon pressure application, seal stiffness increases drastically due to frictional bristle interlocking. Operating stiffness is critical to determine seal wear life. Typically, seal stiffness is measured by pressing a curved shoe to brush bore. The static-unpressurized measurement is extrapolated to pressurized and high speed operating conditions. This work presents a seal stiffness measurement syste...

  10. The use of maleic anhydride-modified polypropylene for performance enhancement in continuous glass fiber-reinforced polypropylene composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijsdijk, H.A.; Contant, M.; Peijs, A.A.J.M.; Miravete, A.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of maleic anhydride-modified polypropylene (m-PP) on static mech. properties of continuous glass fiber-reinforced polypropylene (PP) composites was studied. M-PP was added to the PP homopolymer to improve the adhesion between the matrix and the glass fiber. Three-point bending tests

  11. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, X F; Yoshida, K; Gu, N

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R a and R y values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane coupler

  12. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, X F [Department of Prosthodontics, The Stomatological Hospital Affiliated Medical School, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yoshida, K [Division of Applied Prosthodontics, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8588 (Japan); Gu, N, E-mail: mengsoar@nju.edu.c [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2010-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R{sub a} and R{sub y} values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane

  13. Reactor cavity seal ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankinson, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    A hydrostatic seal is described for sealing an annular gap between two flat substantially horizontal coplanar surfaces comprising, in combination: a generally flat annular plate of a width sufficient to span a gap between two surfaces: compressible annular sealing means disposed on the bottom surface of the flat annular plate for sealingly engaging the two flat surfaces in response to a downward force exerted on the plate; and fastening means, distributed along the center line of the plate, for releasably fastening the plate in a position to span the gap to be sealed and exert a downward force on the plate, each fastening means including a pair of elongated members of a size to fit into the gap to be sealed, means for mounting the members on the bottom surface of the plate so that at least a portion of each member is radially moveable in a direction toward a respective one of the vertical side surfaces defining the gap to be sealed to engage same and so that the plate is moveable relative to the members in a downward direction in response to hydrostatic pressure applied to the upper surface of the plate when the members are engaging the vertical side surfaces of an annular gap, and an actuating means, mounted on the plate for movement therewith in response to hydrostatic pressure, for radially moving the members, the actuating means extending through a bore in the plate to the upper surface of the plate

  14. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT W; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I; BARDAKCI T; GAN H; GONG W; CHAUDHURI M

    2010-01-04

    This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form

  15. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION. FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Kot, W.; Pegg, I.L.; Joseph, I.; Bardakci, T.; Gan, H.; Gong, W.; Chaudhuri, M.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form

  16. SEALING SIMULATED LEAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-09-01

    This report details the testing equipment, procedures and results performed under Task 7.2 Sealing Simulated Leaks. In terms of our ability to seal leaks identified in the technical topical report, Analysis of Current Field Data, we were 100% successful. In regards to maintaining seal integrity after pigging operations we achieved varying degrees of success. Internal Corrosion defects proved to be the most resistant to the effects of pigging while External Corrosion proved to be the least resistant. Overall, with limitations, pressure activated sealant technology would be a viable option under the right circumstances.

  17. Effect of different glasses in glass bonded zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.; Verma, S.

    1995-01-01

    A mineral waste form has been developed for chloride waste salt generated during the pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of salt-occluded zeolite powders bound within a glass matrix. The zeolite contains the salt and immobilizes the fission products. The zeolite powders are hot pressed to form a mechanically stable, durable glass bonded zeolite. Further development of glass bonded zeolite as a waste form requires an understanding of the interaction between the glass and the zeolite. Properties of the glass that enhance binding and durability of the glass bonded zeolite need to be identified. Three types of glass, boroaluminosilicate, soda-lime silicate, and high silica glasses, have a range of properties and are now being investigated. Each glass was hot pressed by itself and with an equal amount of zeolite. MCC-1 leach tests were run on both. Soda-lime silicate and high silica glasses did not give a durable glass bonded zeolite. Boroaluminosilicate glasses rich in alkaline earths did bind the zeolite and gave a durable glass bonded zeolite. Scanning electron micrographs suggest that the boroaluminosilicate glasses wetted the zeolite powders better than the other glasses. Development of the glass bonded zeolite as a waste form for chloride waste salt is continuing

  18. HFCVD Diamond-Coated Mechanical Seals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Simões

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A mechanical seal promotes the connection between systems or mechanisms, preventing the escape of fluids to the exterior. Nonetheless, due to extreme working conditions, premature failure can occur. Diamond, due to its excellent properties, is heralded as an excellent choice to cover the surface of these devices and extend their lifetime. Therefore, the main objective of this work was to deposit diamond films over mechanical seals and test the coated seals on a water pump, under real working conditions. The coatings were created by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD and two consecutive layers of micro- and nanocrystalline diamond were deposited. One of the main difficulties is the attainment of a good adhesion between the diamond films and the mechanical seal material (WC-Co. Nucleation, deposition conditions, and pre-treatments were studied to enhance the coating. Superficial wear or delamination of the film was investigated using SEM and Raman characterization techniques, in order to draw conclusions about the feasibility of these coatings in the WC-Co mechanical seals with the purpose of increasing their performance and life time. The results obtained gave a good indication about the feasibility of this process and the deposition conditions used, with the mechanical seals showing no wear and no film delamination after a real work environment test.

  19. Enhanced detection of single-cell-secreted proteins using a fluorescent immunoassay on the protein-G-terminated glass substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Y

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Yoon Jeong,1,2 Kwan Hong Lee,1,2 Hansoo Park,3 Jonghoon Choi1,2 1Department of Bionano Technology, Graduate School, Hanyang University, Seoul, 2Department of Bionano Engineering, Hanyang University ERICA, Ansan, 3School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: We present an evaluation of protein-G-terminated glass slides that may contain a suitable substrate for aligning the orientation of antibodies to obtain better binding moiety to the target antigen. The results of the protein-G-terminated slides were compared with those obtained with epoxy-based slides to evaluate signal enhancement for human immunoglobulin G (IgG targets, and an increase in the average fluorescence intensity was observed for the lowest measurable amount of IgG target in the assay using protein-G-terminated slides. Applying this strategy for signal amplification to single-cell assays improves the limits of detection for human IgG protein and cytokines (interleukin-2 and interferon-γ captured from hybridomas. Our data indicate that protein-G-terminated slides have a higher binding capacity for antigens and have better spot-to-spot consistency than that of traditional epoxy-based slides. These properties would be beneficial in the detection of fine amounts of single-cell-secreted proteins, which may provide key insights into cell–cell communication and immune responses. Keywords: microwell array, antibody’s orientation, single cell analysis, secreted cytokine, protein-G-terminated surface

  20. Sol-gel-derived bioactive glass nanoparticle-incorporated glass ionomer cement with or without chitosan for enhanced mechanical and biomineralization properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Ae; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Jun, Soo-Kyung; Kim, Hae-Won; Eltohamy, Mohamed; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2017-07-01

    This study investigated the mechanical and in vitro biological properties (in immortalized human dental pulp stem cells (ihDPSCs)) of bioactive glass nanoparticle (BGN)-incorporated glass ionomer cement (GIC) with or without chitosan as a binder. After the BGNs were synthesized and characterized, three experimental GICs and a control (conventional GIC) that differed in the additive incorporated into a commercial GIC liquid (Hy-bond, Shofu, Japan) were produced: BG5 (5wt% of BGNs), CL0.5 (0.5wt% of chitosan), and BG5+CL0.5 (5wt% of BGNs and 0.5wt% of chitosan). After the net setting time was determined, weight change and bioactivity were analyzed in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37°C. Mechanical properties (compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, flexural strength and modulus) were measured according to the incubation time (up to 28 days) in SBF. Cytotoxicity (1day) and biomineralization (14 days), assessed by alizarin red staining, were investigated using an extract from GIC and ihDPSCs. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's post hoc test; pproperties were increased in the BGN-incorporated GICs compared to those in the control (pproperties such as compressive, diametral tensile and flexural strength as well as in vitro biomineralization properties in ihDPSCs without cytotoxicity. Therefore, the developed BGN-incorporated GIC is a promising restorative dental material, although further in vivo investigation is needed before clinical application. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. LM2500+ Brush Seal Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaser, Fred G.

    2006-01-01

    The LM2500+ industrial aeroderivative gas turbine, a 25% enhanced power derivative of the LM2500 gas turbine, recently completed its development test program during the period 5/96 - 10/96. Early in the engine program a Quality Function Deployment (QFD) process was used to determine customer needs for this project.The feedback obtained from the QFD process showed without doubt that gas turbine customers now emphasize product reliability and availability at the top of their needs. One area of development on the LM2500+ was to investigate the use of a brush seal as a means to reduce undesirable turbine cooling leakages within the turbine mid frame in order to enhance part life. This presentation presents a case study on the factors that went into evaluating a brush seal during engine test, test results, and the ultimate decision not to implement the brush seal for cost and other reasons.

  2. Cover-gas seals: 11-LMFBR seal-test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, O.P. III; Horton, P.H.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of the Cover Gas Seal Material Development Program is to perform the engineering development required to provide reliable seals for LMFBR application. Specific objectives are to verify the performance of commercial solid cross-section and inflatable seals under reactor environments including radiation, to develop advanced materials and configurations capable of achieving significant improvement in radioactive gas containment and seal temperature capabilities, and to optimize seal geometry for maximum reliability and minimal gas permeation

  3. Rotatable seal assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibaldi, J.L.; Logan, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an oring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers

  4. Self-acting shaft seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    Self-acting seals are described in detail. The mathematical models for obtaining a seal force balance and the equilibrium operating film thickness are outlined. Particular attention is given to primary ring response (seal vibration) to rotating seat face runout. This response analysis reveals three different vibration models with secondary seal friction being an important parameter. Leakage flow inlet pressure drop and affects of axisymmetric sealing face deformations are discussed. Experimental data on self-acting face seals operating under simulated gas turbine conditions are given. Also a spiral groove seal design operated to 244 m/sec (800 ft/sec) is described.

  5. Sealing arrangement for radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, I.L.S.; Sievwright, R.W.T.; Elliott, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    A sealing arrangement for hermetically sealing two mating surfaces comprises two seals arranged to lie between the surfaces. Each seal provides hermetic sealing over a respective different temperature range and lie serially along the surfaces between the regions to be isolated. A main seal integrity test arrangement is provided in the form of a port and passage. This allows for the introduction of a fluid into or the evacuation of a region between the two seals to detect a leak. The port is also provided with at least two test port seals which seal with a plug. The plug is also provided with a test port to allow the integrity of the test port seal to be tested. (UK)

  6. Intraoral Temperature Triggered Shape-Memory Effect and Sealing Capability of A Transpolyisoprene-Based Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gakuji Tsukada

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In dentistry, pure gutta-percha (trans-1,4-polyisoprene (TPI is widely used as a main component of root canal filling materials. TPI has an interesting shape memory formed through cross-linking, and this characteristic is expected to be very effective for development of novel dental treatments; in particular, modification of the shape recovery temperature to the intraoral temperature (37 °C will enhance the applicability of the shape-memory effect of TPI in root canal filling. In this study, trial test specimens consisting of varying proportions of TPI, cis-polyisoprene, zinc oxide, stearic acid, sulfur and dicumyl peroxide were prepared and the temperature dependence of their shape recovery, recovery stress and relaxation modulus were measured. Additionally, their sealing abilities were tested using glass tubing and a bovine incisor. As the ratio of cross-linking agent in the specimens increased, a decrease in recovery temperature and an increase in recovery stress and recovery speed were observed. In addition, the test specimen containing the highest concentration of cross-linking agent showed superior sealing ability under a thermal stimulus of 37 °C in both sealing ability tests.

  7. Nuclear instrumentation cable end seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, C.P.; Brown, D.P.

    1979-01-01

    An improved coaxial end seal for hermetically sealed nuclear instrumentation cable exhibiting an improved breakdown pulse noise characteristic under high voltage, high temperature conditions is described. A tubular insulator body has metallized interior and exterior surface portions which are braze sealed to a center conductor and an outer conductive sheath. The end surface of the insulator body which is directed toward the coaxial cable to which it is sealed has a recessed surface portion within which the braze seal material terminates

  8. Development of the DWPF canister temporary shrink-fit seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelker, J.W. Jr.

    1986-04-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility is being constructed at The Savannah River Plant for the containerization of high-level nuclear waste in a wasteform for eventual permanent disposal. The waste will be incorporated in molten glass and solidified in type 304L stainless steel canisters, 2-feet in diameter x 9-feet 10-inches long, containing a flanged 6-in.-diam pipe fill-nozzle. The canisters have a minimum wall thickness of 3/8 in. Utilizing the heat from the glass filling operation, a shrink-fit seal for a plug in the end of the canister fill nozzle was developed that: will withstand the radioactive environment; will prevent the spread of contamination, and will keep moisture and water from entering the canister during storage and decontamination of the canister by wet-frit blasting to remove smearable and oxide-film fixed radioactive nuclides; is removable and can be replaced by a new oversize plug in the event the seal fails the pressure decay leakage test ( -4 atm cc/sec helium); will keep the final weld closure clean and free of nuclear contamination; will withstand being pressed into the nozzle without exposing external contamination or completely breaking the seal; is reliable; and is easily installed. The seal consists of: a removable sleeve (with a tapered bore) which is shrink-fitted into the nozzle bore during canister fabrication; and a tapered plug which is placed into the sleeved nozzle after the canister is filled with radioactive molten glass. A leak-tight shrink-fit seal is formed between the nozzle, sleeve, and plug upon temperature equilibrium. The temporarily sealed canister is transferred from the Melt cell to the Decon cell, and the surface is decontaminated. Next it is transferred to the Weld/Test cell where the temporary seal is pressed down into the nozzle, revealing a clean cavity where the canister final closure weld is made

  9. Significant degradability enhancement in multilayer coating of polycaprolactone-bioactive glass/gelatin-bioactive glass on magnesium scaffold for tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa [School of Chemical Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK 74106 (United States); Razavi, Mehdi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK 74106 (United States); Vashaee, Daryoosh [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Pothineni, Venkata Raveendra [Biomaterials and Advanced Drug Delivery Laboratory, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States); Rajadas, Jayakumar [Biomaterials and Advanced Drug Delivery Laboratory, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States); Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States); Tayebi, Lobat, E-mail: lobat.tayebi@marquette.edu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK 74106 (United States); Biomaterials and Advanced Drug Delivery Laboratory, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States); Department of Developmental Sciences, Marquette University School of Dentistry, Milwaukee, WI 53233 (United States)

    2015-05-30

    Highlights: • PCL-BaG/Gel-BaG coating was applied on the surface of Mg scaffolds. • Mg scaffold/PCL-BaG/Gel-BaG presented improved biodegradation resistance. • Mg scaffold coated with the PCL-BaG layer indicated better bioactivity. - Abstract: Magnesium (Mg) is a promising candidate to be used in medical products especially as bone tissue engineering scaffolds. The main challenge for using Mg in biomedical applications is its high degradation rate in the body. For this reason, in this study, a multilayer polymeric layer composed of polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatin (Gel) reinforced with bioactive glass (BaG) particles has been applied on the surface of Mg scaffolds. The materials characteristics of uncoated Mg scaffold, Mg scaffold coated only with PCL-BaG and Mg scaffold coated with PCL-BaG and Gel-BaG have been analyzed and compared in detail. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were utilized for microstructural studies. In vitro bioactivity and biodegradation evaluations were carried out by submerging the scaffolds in simulated body fluid (SBF) at pre-determined time points. The results demonstrated that Mg scaffold coated with PCL-BaG and Gel-BaG exhibited significant improvement in biodegradability.

  10. Significant degradability enhancement in multilayer coating of polycaprolactone-bioactive glass/gelatin-bioactive glass on magnesium scaffold for tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Razavi, Mehdi; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Pothineni, Venkata Raveendra; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Tayebi, Lobat

    2015-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is a promising candidate to be used in medical products especially as bone tissue engineering scaffolds. The main challenge for using Mg in biomedical applications is its high degradation rate in the body. For this reason, in this study, a multilayer polymeric layer composed of polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatin (Gel) reinforced with bioactive glass (BaG) particles has been applied on the surface of Mg scaffolds. The materials characteristics of uncoated Mg scaffold, Mg scaffold coated only with PCL-BaG and Mg scaffold coated with PCL-BaG and Gel-BaG have been analyzed and compared in detail. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were utilized for microstructural studies. In vitro bioactivity and biodegradation evaluations were carried out by submerging the scaffolds in simulated body fluid (SBF) at pre-determined time points. The results demonstrated that Mg scaffold coated with PCL-BaG and Gel-BaG exhibited significant improvement in biodegradability.

  11. Significant degradability enhancement in multilayer coating of polycaprolactone-bioactive glass/gelatin-bioactive glass on magnesium scaffold for tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Razavi, Mehdi; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Pothineni, Venkata Raveendra; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Tayebi, Lobat

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • PCL-BaG/Gel-BaG coating was applied on the surface of Mg scaffolds. • Mg scaffold/PCL-BaG/Gel-BaG presented improved biodegradation resistance. • Mg scaffold coated with the PCL-BaG layer indicated better bioactivity. - Abstract: Magnesium (Mg) is a promising candidate to be used in medical products especially as bone tissue engineering scaffolds. The main challenge for using Mg in biomedical applications is its high degradation rate in the body. For this reason, in this study, a multilayer polymeric layer composed of polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatin (Gel) reinforced with bioactive glass (BaG) particles has been applied on the surface of Mg scaffolds. The materials characteristics of uncoated Mg scaffold, Mg scaffold coated only with PCL-BaG and Mg scaffold coated with PCL-BaG and Gel-BaG have been analyzed and compared in detail. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were utilized for microstructural studies. In vitro bioactivity and biodegradation evaluations were carried out by submerging the scaffolds in simulated body fluid (SBF) at pre-determined time points. The results demonstrated that Mg scaffold coated with PCL-BaG and Gel-BaG exhibited significant improvement in biodegradability

  12. Pressure Actuated Leaf Seals for Improved Turbine Shaft Sealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondahl, Clayton

    2006-01-01

    This presentation introduces a shaft seal in which leaf seal elements are constructed from slotted shim material formed and layered into a frusto-conical assembly. Limited elastic deflection of seal leaves with increasing system pressure close large startup clearance to a small, non-contacting, steady state running clearance. At shutdown seal elements resiliently retract as differential seal pressure diminishes. Large seal clearance during startup and shutdown provides a mechanism for rub avoidance. Minimum operating clearance improves performance and non-contacting operation promises long seal life. Design features of this seal, sample calculations at differential pressures up to 2400 psid and benefit comparison with brush and labyrinth seals is documented in paper, AIAA 2005 3985, presented at the Advanced Seal Technology session of the Joint Propulsion Conference in Tucson this past July. In this presentation use of bimetallic leaf material will be discussed. Frictional heating of bimetallic leaf seals during a seal rub can relieve the rub condition to some extent with a change in seal shape. Improved leaf seal rub tolerance is expected with bimetallic material.

  13. Effect of Nb2O5 doping on improving the thermo-mechanical stability of sealing interfaces for solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Du, Xinhang; Tan, Shengwei; Tang, Dian; Chen, Kongfa; Zhang, Teng

    2017-07-13

    Nb 2 O 5 is added to a borosilicate sealing system to improve the thermo-mechanical stability of the sealing interface between the glass and Fe-Cr metallic interconnect (Crofer 22APU) in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The thermo-mechanical stability of the glass/metal interface is evaluated experimentally as well as by using a finite element analysis (FEA) method. The sealing glass doped with 4 mol.% Nb 2 O 5 shows the best thermo-mechanical stability, and the sealing couple of Crofer 22APU/glass/GDC (Gd 0.2 Ce 0.8 O 1.9 ) remains intact after 50 thermal cycles. In addition, all sealing couples show good joining after being held at 750 °C for 1000 h. Moreover, the possible mechanism on the thermo-mechanical stability of sealing interface is investigated in terms of stress-based and energy-based perspectives.

  14. Upgrading inflatable door seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, T.M.; Metcalfe, R.; Welch, L.A.; Josefowich, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Inflatable door seals are used for airlocks in CANDU stations. They have been a significant source of unreliability and maintenance cost. A program is underway to improve their performance and reliability, backed by environmental qualification testing. Only commercial products and suppliers existed in 1993. For historical reasons, these 'existing products' did not use the most durable material then available. In hindsight, neither had they been adapted nor optimized to combat conditions often experienced in the plants-sagging doors, damaged sealing surfaces, and many thousands of openings and closings per year. Initial attempts to involve the two existing suppliers in efforts to upgrade these seals were unsuccessful. Another suitable supplier had therefore to be found, and a 'new,' COG-owned seal developed; this was completed in 1997. This paper summarizes its testing, along with that of the two existing products. Resistance to aging has been improved significantly. Testing has shown that an accident can be safely withstood after 10 years of service or 40,000 openings-closings, whichever comes first. AECL's Fluid Sealing Technology Unit (FSTU) has invested in the special moulds, test fixtures and other necessary tooling and documentation required to begin commercial manufacture of this new quality product. Accordingly, as with FSTU's other nuclear products such as pump seals, the long-term supply of door seals to CANDU plants is now protected from many external uncertainties-e.g., commercial products being discontinued, materials being changed, companies going out of business. Manufacturing to AECL's detailed specifications is being subcontracted to the new supplier. FSTU is performing the quality surveillance, inspection, testing, and customer service activities concomitant with direct responsibility for supply to the plants. (author)

  15. Grafting Carbon Nanotubes on Glass Fiber by Dip Coating Technique to Enhance Tensile and Interfacial Shear Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahador Dastorian Jamnani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of noncovalent bonding and mechanical interlocking of carbon nanotubes (CNT coating on tensile and interfacial strength of glass fiber were investigated. CNT were coated over glass fiber by a simple dip coating method. Acid treated CNT were suspended in isopropanol solution containing Nafion as binding agent. To achieve uniform distribution of CNT over the glass fiber, an optimized dispersion process was developed by two parameters: CNT concentration and soaking time. CNT concentration was varied from 0.4 to 2 mg/mL and soaking time was varied from 1 to 180 min. The provided micrographs demonstrated appropriate coating of CNT on glass fiber by use of CNT-Nafion mixture. The effects of CNT concentration and soaking time on coating layer were studied by performing single fiber tensile test and pull-out test. The obtained results showed that the optimum CNT concentration and soaking time were 1 mg/mL and 60 min, respectively, which led to significant improvement of tensile strength and interfacial shear stress. It was found that, at other concentrations and soaking times, CNT agglomeration or acutely curly tubes appeared over the fiber surface which caused a reduction of nanotubes interaction on the glass fiber.

  16. Final Report - Enhanced LAW Glass Formulation Testing, VSL-07R1130-1, Rev. 0, dated 10/05/07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Matlack, K. S.; Joseph, I.; Muller, I. S.; Gong, W.

    2013-11-13

    The principal objective of this work was to extend the glass formulation methodology developed in the earlier work [2, 5, 6] for Envelope A, B and C waste compositions for development of compliant glass compositions targeting five high sodium-sulfur waste loading regions. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale tests, and tests on the DM10 melter system. The DM10 was used for several previous tests on LAW compositions to determine the maximum feed sulfur concentrations that can be processed without forming secondary sulfate phases on the surface of the melt pool. This melter is the most efficient melter platform for screening glass compositions over a wide range of sulfate concentrations and therefore was selected for the present tests. The tests were conducted to provide information on melter processing characteristics and off-gas data, including sulfur incorporation and partitioning. As described above, the main objective was to identify the limits of waste loading in compliant glass formulations spanning the range of expected Na{sub 2}O and SO{sub 3} concentrations in the LAW glasses.

  17. Eliminating drift of the head gesture reference to enhance Google Glass-based control of an NAO humanoid robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqian Mao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a strategy for hand-free control of an NAO humanoid robot via head gesture detected by Google Glass-based multi-sensor fusion. First, we introduce a Google Glass-based robot system by integrating the Google Glass and the NAO humanoid robot, which is able to send robot commands through Wi-Fi communications between the Google Glass and the robot. Second, we detect the operator’s head gestures by processing data from multiple sensors including accelerometers, geomagnetic sensors and gyroscopes. Next, we use a complementary filter to eliminate drift of the head gesture reference, which greatly improves the control performance. This is accomplished by the high-pass filter component on the control signal. Finally, we conduct obstacle avoidance experiments while navigating the robot to validate the effectiveness and reliability of this system. The experimental results show that the robot is smoothly navigated from its initial position to its destination with obstacle avoidance via the Google Glass. This hands-free control system can benefit those with paralysed limbs.

  18. Low temperature behaviour of elastomers in seals; Tieftemperaturverhalten von Elastomeren im Dichtungseinsatz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaunich, Matthias

    2012-04-25

    Elastomeric seals are of high importance as machine parts and construction elements, but in spite of this the low temperature limit for the use of a seal was not fully understood. Hence, the required safety relevant evaluation of the lowest acceptable operating seal temperature is difficult. Therefore the presented work was aimed to understand the temperature dependent material behaviour of representative elastomers and to conclude from this knowledge the low temperature limit down to which such seals could safely fulfil the desired requirements. Starting with the published statement that a seal can safely work below its glass transition temperature the influence of the glass-rubber-transition was investigated. At first the glass-rubber-transition temperatures of the selected elastomers were determined applying several techniques to allow a comparison with the behaviour of the seals during component tests. Furthermore a new method to characterise the low temperature behaviour of elastomers was developed that emulates the key features of the standardised compression set test used for seal materials. In comparison to the standardized test this new method allows a much faster measurement that can be automatically performed. Using a model based data analysis an extrapolation of the results to different temperatures can be performed and therefore the necessary measuring expenditure can be additionally reduced. For the temperature dependent characterisation of the failure process of real seals a measurement setup was designed and the materials behaviour was investigated. By use of the results of all applied characterisation techniques the observed dependence of the failure temperature on the degree of compression could be explained for the investigated seals under static load. Additionally information about the behaviour of such seals under dynamic load could be gained from the time dependent material behaviour by use of the time temperature superposition relationship

  19. Shaft seal assembly and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keba, John E. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A pressure-actuated shaft seal assembly and associated method for controlling the flow of fluid adjacent a rotatable shaft are provided. The seal assembly includes one or more seal members that can be adjusted between open and closed positions, for example, according to the rotational speed of the shaft. For example, the seal member can be configured to be adjusted according to a radial pressure differential in a fluid that varies with the rotational speed of the shaft. In addition, in the closed position, each seal member can contact a rotatable member connected to the shaft to form a seal with the rotatable member and prevent fluid from flowing through the assembly. Thus, the seal can be closed at low speeds of operation and opened at high speeds of operation, thereby reducing the heat and wear in the seal assembly while maintaining a sufficient seal during all speeds of operation.

  20. Enhanced microwave absorption performance of lightweight absorber based on reduced graphene oxide and Ag-coated hollow glass spheres/epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Junpeng; Sun, Yu; Chen, Wei; Wang, Tao; Xu, Renxin; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Using a combination of Ag-coated hollow glass spheres (HGS@Ag) and a small quantity of graphene sheets within the epoxy matrix, we have prepared a novel lightweight high efficiency microwave absorption composite. Compared with pure HGS@Ag and graphene composite, the −10 dB absorption bandwidth and the minimum reflection loss of the novel composite are improved. Reflection loss exceeding −20 dB is obtained for composites in a wide frequency range and the minimum reflection loss reaches −46 dB while bandwidth less than −10 dB can reach up to 4.1 GHz when an appropriate absorber thickness between 2 and 3.5 mm is chosen. The enhanced microwave absorption performance of the novel composite is due to the enhanced dielectric response, enhanced conductivity, and the trap of electromagnetic radiation with increased propagation paths by multiple reflections

  1. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Master Identification Records (seal)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records of all individually identified Hawaiian monk seals since 1981. These seals were identified by PSD personnel and cooperating scientists...

  2. Dye filled security seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    A security seal for providing an indication of unauthorized access to a sealed object includes an elongate member to be entwined in the object such that access is denied unless the member is removed. The elongate member has a hollow, pressurizable chamber extending throughout its length that is filled with a permanent dye under greater than atmospheric pressure. Attempts to cut the member and weld it together are revealed when dye flows through a rupture in the chamber wall and stains the outside surface of the member

  3. Electrochromic Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-31

    this glass and that dipole-dipole correlations contribute to the "ferroelectric-like" character of this amorphous system. The TeO2 -W03 glasses can only...shows the dielectric constant and Fig. I(b) glass from pure TeO2 ot pure WO. In addition, glass the tan 8 of the WO glass as a function of temperature... glasses containing WO, in various glass forming nitworks of LifO-B1O0, Na:O-BzO,, and TeO2 were prepared from reagent grade oxides at 800 C - 9SO C in

  4. Radiative transition, local field enhancement and energy transfer microcosmic mechanism of tellurite glasses containing Er3+, Yb3+ ions and Ag nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Lin, Jian; Cheng, Mingzhao; Zhang, Shuo; Jia, Yujie; Zhao, Junhong

    2015-01-01

    Er 3+ -doped, Er 3+ /Yb 3+ co-doped tellurite glass with and without Ag NPs were synthesized by melt-quenching method. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and selected area electron diffractions (SAED) manifest growth of Ag NPs. The UV–vis–NIR absorption spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy were measured. The optical band gap and multiphonon relaxation rate constants were calculated. The electronic band structure and local density of state (DOS) of Ag NPs are calculated. The fluorescence emission and enhancement mechanism including localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and energy transfer (ET) microcosmic mechanism were discussed. The electric field distributions of Ag NPs are emulated by FDTD solutions software. Local field enhancement (LFE) induced by LSPR and lightning rod effect was found to be responsible for the fluorescence enhancement while energy transfer from Ag NPs to rare-earth was considered ignorable in the samples without photoluminescent emission. - Highlights: • Tellurite glasses containing Er 3+ , Yb 3+ and Ag NPs are prepared. • Judd–Ofelt and multiphonon relaxation are calculated. • The electronic band structures of Ag NPs are calculated. • The energy transfer mechanism is discussed. • The plasmon resonance effect of Ag NPs is discussed

  5. Self-sealing multilayer coating for SiC/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraris, M.; Appendino Montorsi, M.; Salvo, M.; Isola, C.; Kohyama, A.

    1997-01-01

    A double layer coating for SiC/SiC for fusion applications is proposed: the first layer consists in a homogeneous, crack free, glass-ceramic with high characteristic temperatures and thermal expansion coefficient compatible to the composite one; the second layer is amorphous and shows self-sealing properties above 700degC. The glass and the glass-ceramic materials used for this double layer coating do not contain lithium and boron oxide, making them particularly interesting for thermonuclear fusion applications. The self-sealing property of the double layer coating was valued by inducing cracks on the coatings and observing their reparation after heating. (author)

  6. Enhanced 2.7 μm emission from Er3+ doped oxyfluoride tellurite glasses for a diode-pump mid-infrared laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. F. Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of fluoride and shielding gas (O2 or Ar on the physical and spectroscopic properties of Er3+ doped TeO2-ZnO-ZnF2 glass system is investigated. The larger electronegativity of F than O accounts for the gradual decrease of refractive index, density, and J-O parameters with increasing ZnF2. An analysis on Fourier transform infrared transmission spectra reveals that the absorption coefficient of OH− around 3 μm as low as 0.247 cm−1 can be achieved when 30 mol% ZnF2 containing sample is treated with Ar gas during glass melting process. The reduction of OH− groups combined with the low multiphonon relaxation rate (207 s−1 contributes to the enhanced emissions at 1.5 and 2.7 μm, along with prolonged lifetimes of 4I11/2 and 4I13/2 levels. A high branching ratio (17.95% corresponding to the Er3+: 4I11/2 → 4I13/2 transition, the large absorption and emission cross section (0.44 × 10−20 cm2 and 0.45 × 10−20 cm2, and good gain cross section demonstrate that oxyfluoride tellurite glass could be a promising material for a diode-pump 2.7 μm fiber laser.

  7. Enhanced 1.32 μm fluorescence and broadband amplifying for O-band optical amplifier in Nd3+-doped tellurite glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zi-zhong; Zhou, Ming-han; Su, Xiu-e.; Cheng, Pan; Zhou, Ya-xun

    2017-01-01

    WO3 oxides with relatively high phonon energy and different concentrations were introduced into the Nd3+-doped tellurite-based glasses of TeO2-ZnO-Na2O to improve the 1.32 μm band fluorescence emission. The absorption spectra, Raman spectra, 1.32 μm band fluorescence spectra and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) curves were measured, together with the Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters, stimulated emission and gain parameters were calculated to evaluate the effects of WO3 amount on the glass structure and spectroscopic properties of 1.32 μm band fluorescence. It is shown that the introduction of an appropriate amount of WO3 oxide can effectively improve the 1.32 μm band fluorescence intensity through the enhanced multi-phonon relaxation (MPR) processes between the excited levels of Nd3+. The results indicate that the prepared Nd3+-doped tellurite glass with an appropriate amount of WO3 oxide is a potential gain medium applied for the O-band broad and high-gain fiber amplifier.

  8. The Effect of Ag Addition on the Enhancement of the Thermal and Mechanical Properties of CuZrAl Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsan-Man Chung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the thermal and mechanical properties of Cu50−xZr43Al7Agx (x = 0, 3, 4, 5, 6 bulk metallic glasses (BMGs are investigated by using an X-ray diffractometer (XRD, a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC, differential thermal analysis (DTA, a Vickers hardness tester, a material test system (MTS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Cu50−xZr43Al7Agx (x = 0, 3, 4, 5, 6 BMGs were made by arc-melting and an injection casting process. The results revealed that the glass transition temperature (Tg and the crystallization temperature (Tx of CuZrAl alloy decreased with the Ag addition. Hence, the supercooled liquid region and γ of Cu45Zr43Al7Ag5 alloy increased to 76 K and 0.42, respectively. The thermal stability and glass forming ability of CuZrAlAg BMG alloys were enhanced by the microalloyed Ag content. The room temperature compressive fracture strength and strain measured of Cu47Zr43Al7Ag3 were about 2200 MPa and 2.1%, respectively. The distribution of vein patterns and the formation of nanocrystalline phases on the fracture surface of Cu47Zr43Al7Ag3 alloy can be observed by SEM and TEM to be significant, indicating a typical ductile fracture behavior and an improved plasticity of alloys with the addition of microalloyed Ag from 0 to 6 atom %.

  9. Application of EIS to In Situ Characterization of Hydrothermal Sealing of Anodized Aluminum Alloys: Comparison between Hexavalent Chromium-Based Sealing, Hot Water Sealing and Cerium-Based Sealing

    OpenAIRE

    Carangelo, Anna; Curioni, Michele; Acquesta, Annalisa; Monetta, Tullio; Bellucci, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Chromic acid anodizing has been used for almost a century to enhance corrosion protection of aerospace alloys. For some applications,hydrothermal sealing in hexavalent chromium-containing solution is required to enhance further the corrosion resistance but, due toenvironmental concerns, the use of hexavalent chromium must be discontinued. Good progress has been made to replace chromatesduring anodizing but comparatively less effort has focused on the sealing process. In this work, for the fir...

  10. Fabrication and sealing performance of rare-earth containing glass–ceramic seals for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdoli, H.; Alizadeh, P.; Agersted, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    The opportunity of using two rare-earth metal oxides in an aluminosilicate glass for seal applications was investigated in this work. Substitution of La2O3 with Y2O3 in the system changed thermal and physical properties such as transition temperature, flowing behavior, and thermal expansion....... The strongly bound structural unit in the network affected glass healing capability with a slower healing response. Higher activation energy (≥20%) was required for Y2O3 containing glass, consistent with in-situ XRD results which revealed its amorphous nature is maintained ~75°C above the other glass. Despite...... containing strontium in the composition, well bonded interface was obtained in contact with 8YSZ and SS430 ferritic stainless steel. The hermeticity of the glass seals was maintained after 100h isothermal aging at 800°C. Also the OCV showed insignificant fluctuations with stable average values after 24...

  11. Investigations of glass sealing and reactive air brazing materials for joining high temperature solid oxide fuel cells by dilatometric examinations; Anwendung dilatometrischer Messungen bei der Entwicklung von Glasloten und reaktiven Metallloten zum Fuegen von Hochtemperaturbrennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichle, M.S. [Parker Hannifin GmbH, Bietigheim-Bissingen (Germany); Federmann, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, ZAT, Juelich (Germany); Reisgen, U. [RWTH Aachen University, ISF, Aachen (Germany); Koppitz, T.

    2011-03-15

    The principle of operation of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is very simple. However, the fact that very different materials are used for the individual components requires advanced thermal joining techniques to join them in a functional manner. Two very distinct designs have established themselves for the two different intended applications: decentralised power generation (stationary SOFCs) on the one hand, and power converters for vehicles (mobile SOFCs) on the other hand. As a consequence, alternative techniques for joining the individual components are also required. The principal joining process for the stationary SOFC design consists of joining individual steel plates with a glass sealant in an electrically insulating way so that they form an SOFC stack. For the mobile fuel cell design, the SOFC stack consists of individual thin steel cassettes. The window frame of the cassettes, which is made of ferritic chromium steel, is brazed to the ceramic layer of the zirconium oxide solid electrolyte using a filler metal. The material used is a silver-based brazing filler metal which contains only small amounts of copper oxide (CuO) and titanium hydride (TiH{sub 2}) as wetting agents. Both joining processes must be applicable in normal atmospheric air, i. e. under oxidative conditions. R and D activities continue for improving the efficiency and long-term operational stability of the technology to such an extent that SOFCs will become ready for the energy sector market. The two joining techniques described cannot yet be considered standard processes. They, too, will require continuous improvement with respect to reproducibility, endurance and strength of the joints. The Special Joining Techniques working group at Forschungszentrum Juelich uses specially modified dilatometric techniques as suitable quick replacement methods for studying and measuring the joining characteristics of the materials without having to manufacture complex and expensive SOFC stacks. The

  12. Giant electrical conductivity enhancement in BaO-V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass by nanocrystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Desoky, M.M., E-mail: mmdesoky@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Suez Canal University, Al-Arish (Egypt)

    2010-02-15

    The effects of the annealing of 20BaO-30V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-50Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass on the structural and electrical properties were studied by scanning electron micrographs (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) density (d) and dc conductivity ({sigma}). The XRD and SEM observations have shown that the sample under study undergoes structural changes: from amorphous at the beginning, to partly crystalline after nanocrystallization at crystallization temperature (T{sub c}) for 1 h and to colossal crystallization after the annealing at the same temperature for 24 h. The average size of these grains after nanocrystallization at T{sub c} for 1 h was estimated to be about 25-35 nm. However, the glass heat treated at T{sub c} = 580 deg. C for 24 h the microstructure changes considerably. The nanomaterials obtained by nanocrystallization at T{sub c} for 1 h exhibit giant improvement of electrical conductivity up to four order of magnitude and better thermal stability than the as-received glass. The major role in the conductivity enhancement of this nanomaterial is played by the developed interfacial regions 'conduction tissue' between crystalline and amorphous phases, in which the concentration of V{sup 4+}-V{sup 5+} pairs responsible for electron hopping is higher than inside the glassy matrix. The annealing at T{sub c} for 24 h leads to decrease of the electronic conductivity. This phenomena lead to disappearance of the abovementioned 'conduction tissue' for electrons and substantial reduction of electronic conductivity. The high temperature (above {theta}/2) dependence of conductivity could be qualitatively explained by the small polaron hopping (SPH) model. The physical parameters obtained from the best fits of this model are found reasonable and consistent with the glass compositions.

  13. Cost saving synergistic shaft seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Strom, T. N.

    1976-01-01

    Segmented carbon rings, used to replace elastomeric seal lip, provide resistance to high temperatures generated in lubricating film. Machining and close manufacturing tolerances of conventional segmented seal are avoided by mounting segmented rings in elastomeric flex section.

  14. Magnetically Actuated Seal, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT proposes development of a magnetically actuated dynamic seal. Dynamic seals are used throughout the turbopump in high-performance, pump-fed, liquid rocket...

  15. Magnetically Actuated Seal, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT proposes development of a magnetically actuated dynamic seal. Dynamic seals are used throughout the turbopump in high-performance, pump-fed, liquid rocket...

  16. Continuous improvement of pump seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, W.; Eyvindson, A.; Rhodes, D.B.

    2003-01-01

    Pump seal reliability continues to be an area needing improvement and ongoing vigilance. Methods have been developed for identifying and assessing factors relating to seal performance, selecting the most relevant ones for a specific station, and then focusing on the most significant aspects and how to improve. Discussion invariably addresses maintenance practices, seal design, monitoring capabilities, operating conditions, transients, and pump and motor design. Success in reliability improvement requires ongoing dialogue among the station operators, pump manufacturers and seal designers. AECL CAN-seals lead the nuclear industry in reliability and seal life. They effectively save operators millions of dollars in outage time and person-rem. This paper describes some of the significant developments in AECL's ongoing program in seal R and D, as well as recent new installations following the most demanding seal qualification programs to date. (author)

  17. Intratracheal Seal Disc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Karen J; Moeslund, Niels; Lauridsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    . The device consisted of an intratracheal silicone seal disc fixated by a cord through the stoma to an external part. At day 14, computed tomography (CT) was performed before the device was extracted. With the pulling of a cord, the disc unraveled into a thin thread and was extracted through the stoma. At day...

  18. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  19. Shaft Seal Compensates for Cold Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, W. N.; Hein, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    Seal components easy to install. Ring seal for rotating or reciprocating shafts spring-loaded to compensate for slow yielding (cold flow) of sealing material. New seal relatively easy to install because components preassembled, then installed in one piece.

  20. Hydrophobicity attainment and wear resistance enhancement on glass substrates by atmospheric plasma-polymerization of mixtures of an aminosilane and a fluorocarbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Múgica-Vidal, Rodolfo, E-mail: rodolfo.mugica@alum.unirioja.es [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of La Rioja, c/ Luis de Ulloa 20, 26004, Logroño, La Rioja (Spain); Alba-Elías, Fernando, E-mail: fernando.alba@unirioja.es [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of La Rioja, c/ Luis de Ulloa 20, 26004, Logroño, La Rioja (Spain); Sainz-García, Elisa, E-mail: elisa.sainzg@unirioja.es [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of La Rioja, c/ Luis de Ulloa 20, 26004, Logroño, La Rioja (Spain); Pantoja-Ruiz, Mariola, E-mail: mpruiz@ing.uc3m.es [Materials Science and Engineering Department, IAAB, Materials Performance Group, University Carlos III of Madrid, Av. Universidad 30, 28911, Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • APTES and PFH were used to coat glass by non-thermal atmospheric jet plasma. • A mixture of 75% of APTES and 25% PFH produced the best sample of this work. • Hydrophobicity was achieved by changes in surface morphology and chemistry. • Wear resistance was enhanced by the formation of siloxane groups. - Abstract: Mixtures of different proportions of two liquid precursors were subjected to plasma-polymerization by a non-thermal atmospheric jet plasma system in a search for a coating that achieves a hydrophobic character on a glass substrate and enhances its wear resistance. 1-Perfluorohexene (PFH) was chosen as a low-surface-energy precursor to promote a hydrophobic character. Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) was chosen for its contribution to the improvement of wear resistance by the formation of siloxane bonds. The objective of this work was to determine which of the precursors’ mixtures that were tested provides the coating with the most balanced enhancement of both hydrophobicity and wear resistance, given that coatings deposited with fluorocarbon-based precursors such as PFH are usually low in resistance to wear and coatings deposited with APTES are generally hydrophilic. The coatings obtained were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), static Water Contact Angle (WCA) measurements, tribological ball-on-disc tests and contact profilometry. A relationship between the achievement of a hydrophobic character and the modifications to roughness and surface morphology and the incorporation of fluorocarbon groups in the surface chemistry was observed. Also, it was seen that the wear resistance was influenced by the SiOSi content of the coatings. In turn, the SiOSi content appears to be directly related to the percentage of APTES used in the mixture of precursors. The best conjunction of

  1. Fiber Optic Safeguards Sealing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    8217 or trade names does not constitute an official indorsement or approval of the use thereof. Destroy this report when it is no longer needed. Do not...an intergrity check of a seal than to photograph the seal’s fingerprints and to match positive/negative overlays. The seal identification time and

  2. Ultrasonic dip seal maintenance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poindexter, A.M.; Ricks, H.E.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for removing impurities from the surfaces of liquid dip seals and for wetting the metal surfaces of liquid dip seals in nuclear components. The system comprises an ultrasonic transducer that transmits ultrasonic vibrations along an ultrasonic probe to the metal and liquid surfaces of the dip seal thereby loosening and removing those impurities

  3. Radial lip seals, thermal aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stakenborg, M.J.L.; van Ostaijen, R.A.J.; Dowson, D.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the influence of temperature on tne seal-snarc contact is studied, using coupled temperature-stress FEH analysis. A thermal network model is used to calculate the seal-shaft contact temperature for steady-state and transient conditions. Contact temperatures were measured under the seal

  4. Cover gas seals: FFTF-LMFBR seal test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurzeka, W.; Oliva, R.; Welch, T.S.; Shimazaki, T.

    1974-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to: (1) conduct static and dynamic tests to demonstrate or determine the mechanical performance of full-size (cross section) FFTF fuel transfer machine and reactor vessel head seals intended for use in a sodium vapor-inert gas environment, (2) demonstrate that these FFTF seals or new seal configurations provide acceptable fission product and cover gas retention capabilities at Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) operating environmental conditions other than radiation, and (3) develop improved seals and seal technology for the CRBRP to support the national objective to reduce all atmospheric contaminations to low levels

  5. Investigation of Performance of SCN-1 Pure Glass as Sealant Used in SOFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-03-01

    As its name implies, self-healing glass seal has the potential of restoring its mechanical properties upon being reheated to stack operating temperature, even when it has experienced some cooling induced damage/crack at room temperature. Such a self-healing feature is desirable for achieving high seal reliability during thermal cycling. On the other hand, self-healing glass is also characterized by its low mechanical stiffness and high creep rate at the typical operating temperature of SOFCs. Therefore, from a design’s perspective, it is important to know the long term geometric stability and thermal mechanical behaviors of the self-healing glass under the stack operating conditions. These predictive capabilities will guide the design and optimization of a reliable sealing system that potentially utilizes self-healing glass as well as other ceramic seal components in achieving the ultimate goal of SOFC. In this report, we focused on predicting the effects of various generic seal design parameters on the stresses in the seal. For this purpose, we take the test cell used in the leakage test for compliant glass seals conducted in PNNL as our initial modeling geometry. The effect of the ceramic stopper on the geometry stability of the self-healing glass sealants is studied first. Then we explored the effect of various interfaces such as stopper and glass, stopper and PEN, as well stopper and IC plate, on the geometry stability and reliability of glass during the operating and cooling processes.

  6. Development of glass/glass-ceramics materials and devices and their micro-structural studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, Madhumita; Sarkar, Arjun; Shingarvelan, Shobha; Kumar, Rakesh; Ananathanarayan, Arvind; Shrikhande, V.K.; Kothiyal, G.P.

    2009-01-01

    Materials and devices based on glass and glass-ceramics (GCs) find applications in various high pressure and vacuum applications. We have prepared different glasses/glass-ceramics with requisite thermal expansion coefficient, electrical, vacuum and wetting characteristics to fabricate hermetic seals with different metals/alloys as well as components for these applications. Some of these are, SiO 2 -Na 2 O-K 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -B 2O3 (BS) for matched type of seal fabricated with Kovar alloy, SiO 2 -Na 2 O-K 2 O-BaO-PbO(LS) for fabrication of compressive type seals with stainless steel and SS 446 alloys, P 2 O 5 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -BaO-PbO(NAP) for fabrication of matched type of seal with relatively low melting metals/alloys like AI/Cu-Be and Li 2 O-ZnO-SiO 2 -P 2 O 5 -B 2 O 3 -Na 2 O (LZS) and Lithium aluminium silicate (LAS) glass-ceramics to fabricate matched and compression types feedtroughs/conductivity probes Magnesium aluminium silicate (MAS) machinable glass-ceramics is another development for high voltage and ultra high vacuum applications. Micro-structural studies have been carried out on these materials to understand the mechanism of their behaviour and have also been deployed in various systems and plants in DAE. (author)

  7. Failure analysis and seal life prediction for contacting mechanical seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J. J.; He, X. Y.; Wei, L.; Feng, X.

    2008-11-01

    Fault tree analysis method was applied to quantitatively investigate the causes of the leakage failure of mechanical seals. It is pointed out that the change of the surface topography is the main reasons causing the leakage of mechanical seals under the condition of constant preloads. Based on the fractal geometry theory, the relationship between the surface topography and working time were investigated by experiments, and the effects of unit load acting on seal face on leakage path in a mechanical seal were analyzed. The model of predicting seal life of mechanical seals was established on the basis of the relationship between the surface topography and working time and allowable leakage. The seal life of 108 mechanical seal operating at the system of diesel fuel storage and transportation was predicted and the problem of the condition monitoring for the long-period operation of mechanical seal was discussed by this method. The research results indicate that the method of predicting seal life of mechanical seals is feasible, and also is foundation to make scheduled maintenance time and to achieve safe-reliability and low-cost operation for industrial devices.

  8. Enhanced 1.53 μm emission of Er{sup 3+} ions in phosphate glass via energy transfer from Cu{sup +} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez, José A., E-mail: jose.jimenez@unf.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, Florida 32224 (United States); Sendova, Mariana [Optical Spectroscopy and Nano-Materials Lab, New College of Florida, Sarasota, Florida 34243 (United States)

    2014-07-21

    Optimizing the efficiency of Er{sup 3+} emission in the near-infrared telecommunication window in glass matrices is currently a subject of great interest in photonics research. In this work, Cu{sup +} ions are shown to be successfully stabilized at a high concentration in Er-containing phosphate glass by a single-step melt-quench method, and demonstrated to transfer energy to Er{sup 3+} thereby enhancing the near-infrared emission about 15 times. The spectroscopic data indicate an energy conversion process where Cu{sup +} ions first absorb photons broadly around 360 nm and subsequently transfer energy from the Stokes-shifted emitting states to resonant Er{sup 3+} absorption transitions in the visible. Consequently, the Er{sup 3+} electronic excited states decay and the {sup 4}I{sub 3/2} metastable state is populated, leading to the enhanced emission at 1.53 μm. Monovalent copper ions are thus recognized as sensitizers of Er{sup 3+} ions, suggesting the potential of Cu{sup +} co-doping for applications in the telecommunications, solar cells, and solid-state lasing realizable under broad band near-ultraviolet optical pumping.

  9. Enhancing the moderator effectiveness as a heat sink during loss-of-coolant accidents in CANDU-PHW reactors using glass-peened surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitheanandan, T.; Tiede, R.W.; Sanderson, D.B.; Fong, R.W.L.; Coleman, C.E.

    1998-08-01

    The horizontal fuel channel concept is a distinguishing feature of the CANDU-PHW reactor. Each fuel channel consists of a Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube and a Zircaloy-2 calandria tube, separated by a gas filled annulus. The calandria tube is surrounded by heavy-water moderator that also provides a backup heat sink for the reactor core. This heat sink (about 10 mm away from the hot pressure tube) ensures adequate cooling of fuel in the unlikely event of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). One of the ways of enhancing the use of the moderator as a heat sink is to improve the heat-transfer characteristics between the calandria tube and the moderator. This enhancement can be achieved through surface modifications to the calandria tube which have been shown to increase the tube's critical heat flux (CHF) value. An increase in CHIF could be used to reduce moderator subcooling requirements for CANDU fuel channels or increase the margin to dryout. A series of experiments was conducted to assess the benefits provided by glass-peening the outside surface of calandria tubes for postulated LOCA conditions. In particular, the ability to increase the tube's CHF, and thereby reduce moderator subcooling requirements was assessed. Results from the experiments confirm that glass-peening the outer surface of a tube increases its CHF value in pool boiling. This increase in CHF could be used to reduce moderator subcooling requirements for CANDU fuel channels by at least 5 degrees C. (author)

  10. Comparative X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and micro pressure chemical vapor deposition of phosphorus silicate glass layers after rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beshkov, G.; Krastev, V.; Gogova, D.; Talik, E.; Adamies, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the bonding state of Phosphorus Silicate Glass (PSG) layers obtained by two different technological approaches, i.e. in two types of reactors: Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and Micro Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPCVD) are investigated employing XPS and AES. The PSG layers are deposited at 380 0 C and 420 0 C in corresponding reactors. XPS and AES analyses show that Si2p peak recorded from PECVD layers are not as expected at their position characteristics of silicon dioxide but instead they are at the characteristic of elemental silicon. Plasma enhancement during deposition leads to less oxidized and more inhomogeneous layer. After rapid thermal annealing the Si2p peak is situated at position characteristic of silicon dioxide. (authors)

  11. Refrigeration system with clearance seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    In a refrigeration system such as a split Stirling system, fluid seals associated with the reciprocating displacer are virtually dragless clearance seals. Movement of the displacer relative to the pressure variations in the working volume of gas is retarded by a discrete braking element. Because it is not necessary that the brake providing any sealing action, the brake can be designed for greater durability and less dependence on ambient and operating temperatures. Similarly, the clearance seal can be formed of elements having low thermal expansion such that the seal is not temperature dependent. In the primary embodiments the braking element is a split friction brake

  12. Unification of reactor elastomeric sealing based on material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, N.K.; Raj, Baldev

    2012-01-01

    The unification of elastomeric sealing applications of Indian nuclear reactors based on a few qualified fluoroelastomer/perfluoroelastomer compounds and standardized approaches for finite element analysis (FEA) based design, manufacturing process and antifriction coatings is discussed. It is shown that the advance polymer architecture based Viton ® formulation developed for inflatable seals of 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) and its four basic variations can encompass other sealing applications of PFBR with minimum additional efforts on development and validation. Changing the blend ratio of Viton ® GBL 200S and 600S in inflatable seal formulation could extend its use to Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). The higher operating temperature of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) seals expands the choice to perfluoroelastomers. FEA based on plane-strain/axisymmetric modeling (with Mooney–Rivlin as the basic constitutive model), seal manufacture by cold feed extrusion and injection molding as well as plasma Teflon-like coating belonging to two variations obtained from the development of inflatable seals provide the necessary standardization for unification. The gains in simplification of design, development and operation of seals along with the enhancements of safety and reliability are expected to be substantial.

  13. Hermetic Seal Leak Detection Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a hermetic seal leak detection apparatus, which can be used to test for hermetic seal leaks in instruments and containers. A vacuum tight chamber is created around the unit being tested to minimize gas space outside of the hermetic seal. A vacuum inducing device is then used to increase the gas chamber volume inside the device, so that a slight vacuum is pulled on the unit being tested. The pressure in the unit being tested will stabilize. If the stabilized pressure reads close to a known good seal calibration, there is not a leak in the seal. If the stabilized pressure reads closer to a known bad seal calibration value, there is a leak in the seal. The speed of the plunger can be varied and by evaluating the resulting pressure change rates and final values, the leak rate/size can be accurately calculated.

  14. Regenerator cross arm seal assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Anthony V.

    1988-01-01

    A seal assembly for disposition between a cross arm on a gas turbine engine block and a regenerator disc, the seal assembly including a platform coextensive with the cross arm, a seal and wear layer sealingly and slidingly engaging the regenerator disc, a porous and compliant support layer between the platform and the seal and wear layer porous enough to permit flow of cooling air therethrough and compliant to accommodate relative thermal growth and distortion, a dike between the seal and wear layer and the platform for preventing cross flow through the support layer between engine exhaust and pressurized air passages, and air diversion passages for directing unregenerated pressurized air through the support layer to cool the seal and wear layer and then back into the flow of regenerated pressurized air.

  15. Glass consistency and glass performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    Glass produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will have to consistently be more durable than a benchmark glass (evaluated using a short-term leach test), with high confidence. The DWPF has developed a Glass Product Control Program to comply with this specification. However, it is not clear what relevance product consistency has on long-term glass performance. In this report, the authors show that DWPF glass, produced in compliance with this specification, can be expected to effectively limit the release of soluble radionuclides to natural environments. However, the release of insoluble radionuclides to the environment will be limited by their solubility, and not glass durability

  16. Mechanical properties of very thin cover slip glass disk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Mechanical properties of very thin cover slip glass disk. A SEAL, A K DALUI, M BANERJEE, A K MUKHOPADHYAY* and K K PHANI. Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700 032, India. Abstract. The biaxial flexural strength, Young's modulus, Vicker's microhardness and fracture toughness data for very ...

  17. Sealing wells with gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, E C

    1967-10-01

    A new system is being used in Mexico to temporarily plug producing wells. The temporary seal is a gel with a catalyst. The use of this temporary plug allows gas-lift wells to be taken off production in order to carry out emergency repairs. The gel solidifies by the action of the catalyst to a high temperature (70 - 150/sup 0/C). By locating the bottom of the tubing at the top of the production interval, the gel material will go into the permeable formation, and immediately set. When the gel has solidified, it seals off the horizon that must not be stimulated, and leaves the others exposed to the acid action. When the treatment is finished, the gel, by action of the catalyst, is liquefied and removed from the formation, being produced with the oil.

  18. Radioactive waste sealing container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozawa, S.; Kitamura, T.; Sugimoto, S.

    1984-01-01

    A low- to medium-level radioactive waste sealing container is constructed by depositing a foundation coating consisting essentially of zinc, cadmium or a zinc-aluminum alloy over a steel base, then coating an organic synthetic resin paint containing a metal phosphate over the foundation coating, and thereafter coating an acryl resin, epoxy resin, and/or polyurethane paint. The sealing container can consist of a main container body, a lid placed over the main body, and fixing members for clamping and fixing the lid to the main body. Each fixing member may consist of a material obtained by depositing a coating consisting essentially of cadmium or a zinc-aluminum alloy over a steel base

  19. Enhanced99Tc retention in glass waste form using Tc(IV)-incorporated Fe minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Um, W; Luksic, SA; Wang, G; Saslow, S; Kim, DS; Schweiger, MJ; Soderquist, CZ; Bowden, ME; Lukens, WW; Kruger, AA

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 Elsevier B.V. Technetium ( 99 Tc) immobilization by doping into iron oxide mineral phases may alleviate the problems with Tc volatility during vitrification of nuclear waste. Because reduced Tc, Tc(IV), substitutes for Fe(III) in the crystal structure by a process of Tc reduction from Tc(VII) to Tc(IV) followed by co-precipitation of Fe oxide minerals, two Tc-incorporated Fe minerals (Tc-goethite and Tc-magnetite/maghemite) were prepared and tested for Tc retention in glass melt sample...

  20. Ultrasound enhanced plasma treatment of glass-fibre-reinforced polyester in atmospheric pressure air for adhesion improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Norrman, Kion

    2011-01-01

    A glass-fibre-reinforced polyester (GFRP) plate was treated with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure in air for adhesion improvement. The effects of ultrasonic irradiation using a high-power gas-jet generator during the treatment were investigated. The optical emission...... damage of the GFRP plates. The polar component of the surface energy of the polyester plate was 21 mJ/m2 before the treatment, increased markedly to 52 mJ/m2 after 2-s plasma treatment without ultrasonic irradiation, and further increased slightly after longer treatments. In addition, the polar component...

  1. Barium boron silicate glass-ceramic for use as sealant in planar SOFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.J.; Castanho, S.R.H. Mello; Reis, S.T.

    2012-01-01

    Glass-ceramic seals play an important role in the performance of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). In this work glass-ceramic seals are discussed from the point of view of the thermal behavior of the glass and the electrochemical parameters obtained from polarization curves such as corrosion current densities (i corr ), and corrosion potential (E corr ). A seal material must have a combination of thermal-mechanical and electrochemical properties in order to seal cell components and stacks and prevent side reactions. It must be stable in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres and withstand thermal cycles between room temperature and the cell operating temperature (800 to 900°C). Glass-ceramics in the system BaO- B 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 were investigated and compared from the point of view of sealing ability. Dilatometric analysis, thermal stability against crystallization, microstructure and electrochemical durability are discussed. (author)

  2. Colloidal glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Colloidal glasses. Glassy state is attained when system fails to reach equilibrium due to crowding of constituent particles. In molecular glasses, glassy state is reached by rapidly lowering the temperature. In colloidal glasses, glassy state is reached by increasing the ...

  3. Electromagnetic shaft seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kenji.

    1994-01-01

    As an electromagnetic shaft seal, there are disposed outwarding electromagnetic induction devices having generating power directing to an electroconductive fluid as an object of sealing, and inwarding electromagnetic induction device added coaxially. There are disposed elongate rectangular looped first coils having a predetermined inner diameter, second coils having the same shape and shifted by a predetermined pitch relative to the first coil and third coil having the same shape and shifted by a predetermined pitch relative to the second coil respectively each at a predetermined inner diameter of clearance to the outwarding electromagnetic induction devices and the inwarding electromagnetic induction device. If the inwarding electromagnetic induction device and the outwarding electromagnetic induction device are operated, they are stopped at a point that the generating power of the former is equal with the sum of the generating power of the latter and a differential pressure. When three-phase AC is charged to the first coil, the second coil and the third coil successively, a force is generated in the advancing direction of the magnetic field in the electroconductive fluid by the similar effect to that of a linear motor, and the seal is maintained at high reliability. Moreover, the limit for the rotational angle of the shaft is not caused. (N.H.)

  4. Flight Deck I-Glasses, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Flight Deck i-Glasses is a color, stereoscopic 3-D display mounted on consumer style eye glass frames that will enhance operator performance and multi-modal...

  5. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Lahnalampi; J. Case

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post-closure monitoring will not

  6. TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPPING FOR IAEA SEALS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOFFHEINS,B.; ANNESE,C.; GOODMAN,M.; OCONNOR,W.; GUSHUE,S.; PEPPER,S.

    2003-07-13

    In the fall of 2002, the U.S. Support Program (USSP) initiated an effort to define a strategy or ''roadmap'' for future seals technologies and to develop a generalized process for planning safeguards equipment development, which includes seals and other safeguards equipment. The underlying objectives of the USSP include becoming more proactive than reactive in addressing safeguards equipment needs, helping the IAEA to maintain an inventory of cost-effective, reliable, and effective safeguards equipment, establishing a long-term planning horizon, and securing IAEA ownership in the process of effective requirements definition and timely transitioning of new or improved systems for IAEA use. At an initial workshop, seals, their functions, performance issues, and future embodiments were discussed in the following order: adhesive seals, metal seals, passive and active loop seals, ultrasonic seals, tamper indicating enclosures (including sample containers, equipment enclosures, and conduits). Suggested improvements to these technologies focused largely on a few themes: (1) The seals must be applied quickly, easily, and correctly; (2) Seals and their associated equipment should not unduly add bulk or weight to the inspectors load; (3) Rapid, in-situ verifiability of seals is desirable; and (4) Seal systems for high risk or high value applications should have two-way, remote communications. Based upon these observations and other insights, the participants constructed a skeletal approach for seals technology planning. The process begins with a top-level review of the fundamental safeguards requirements and extraction of required system features, which is followed by analysis of suitable technologies and identification of technology gaps, and finally by development of a planning schedule for system improvements and new technology integration. Development of a comprehensive procedure will require the partnership and participation of the IAEA. The

  7. Silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    Vitrification of liquid high-level radioactive wastes has received the greatest attention, world-wide, compared to any other HLW solidification process. The waste form is a borosilicate-based glass. The production of phosphate-based glass has been abandoned in the western world. Only in the Soviet Union are phosphate-based glasses still being developed. Vitrification techniques, equipment and processes and their remote operation have been developed and studied for almost thirty years and have reached a high degree of technical maturity. Industrial demonstration of the vitrification process has been in progress since 1978. This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e., borosilicate glasses

  8. Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, D. W.; Wang, X. D., E-mail: wangxd@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn; Lou, H. B.; Cao, Q. P.; Jiang, J. Z., E-mail: wangxd@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM), Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wang, L. W. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, D. X. [State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2014-12-14

    Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses have been measured by using the dilatometer with a self-sealed sample cell. It is demonstrated that the strong glass forming liquid not only has the small thermal expansion coefficient but also shows the slow variation rate. Moreover, the strong glass former has relatively dense atomic packing and also small density change in the liquid state. The results suggest that the high glass forming ability of La-based metallic glasses would be closely related to the slow atomic rearrangements in liquid melts.

  9. Shaft and tunnel sealing considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsall, P.C.; Shukla, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    Much of the emphasis of previous repository sealing research has been placed on plugging small diameter boreholes. It is increasingly evident that equal emphasis should now be given to shafts and tunnels which constitute more significant pathways between a repository and the biosphere. The paper discusses differences in requirements for sealing shafts and tunnels as compared with boreholes and the implications for seal design. Consideration is given to a design approach for shaft and tunnel seals based on a multiple component design concept, taking into account the requirements for retrievability of the waste. A work plan is developed for the future studies required to advance shaft and tunnel sealing technology to a level comparable with the existing technology for borehole sealing

  10. Sealed radioactive source management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Sealed radioactive sources have been used in a wide range of application in medicine, agriculture, geology, industry and other fields. Since its utilization many sources have become out of use and became waste but no proper management. This has lead to many accidents causing deaths and serious radiation injuries worldwide. Spent sources application is expanding but their management has seen little improvements. Sealed radioactive sources have become a security risk calling for prompt action. Source management helps to maintain sources in a good physical status and provide means of source tracking and control. It also provides a well documented process of the sources making any future management options safe, secure and cost effective. Last but not least good source management substantially reduces the risk of accidents and eliminates the risk of malicious use. The International Atomic Energy Agency assists Member States to build the infrastructure to properly manage sealed radioactive sources. The assistance includes training of national experts to handle, condition and properly store the sources. For Member States that do not have proper facilities, we provide the technical assistance to design a proper facility to properly manage the radioactive sources and provide for their proper storage. For Member States that need to condition their sources properly but don't have the required infrastructure we provide direct assistance to physically help them with source recovery and provide an international expert team to properly condition their sources and render them safe and secure. We offer software (Radioactive Waste Management Registry) to properly keep a complete record on the sources and provide for efficient tracking. This also helps with proper planning and decision making for long term management

  11. Sealing of rock fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Erlstroem, M.; Boergesson, L.

    1985-12-01

    The major water-bearing fractures in granite usually from fairly regular sets but the extension and degree of connectivity is varying. This means that only a few fractures that are interconnected with the deposition holes and larger water-bearing structures in a HLW repository are expected and if they can be identified and cut off through sealing it would be possible to improve the isolation of waste packages very effectively. Nature's own fracture sealing mechanisms may be simulated and a survey of the involved processes actually suggests a number of possible filling methods and substances. Most of them require high temperature and pressure and correspondingly sophisticated techniques, but some are of potential interest for immediate application with rather moderate effort. Such a technique is to fill the fractures with clayey substances which stay flexible and low-permeable provided that they remain physically and chemically intact. It is demonstrated in the report that effective grouting requires a very low viscosity and shear strength of the substance and this can be achieved by mechanical agitation as demonstrated in this report. Thus, by superimposing static pressure and shear waves induced by percussion hammering at a suitable frequency, clays and fine-grained silts as well as cement can be driven into fractures with an average aperture as small as 0.1 mm. Experiments were made in the laboratory using concrete and steel plates, and a field pilot test was also conducted under realistic conditions on site in Stripa. They all demonstrated the practicality of the 'dynamic injection technique' and that the fluid condition of the grouts yielded complete filling of the injected space to a considerable distance from the injection point. The field test indicated a good sealing ability as well as a surprisingly high resistance to erosion and piping. (author)

  12. Low-Torque Seal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattime, Scott B.; Borowski, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The EcoTurn Class K production prototypes have passed all AAR qualification tests and received conditional approval. The accelerated life test on the second set of seals is in progress. Due to the performance of the first set, no problems are expected.The seal has demonstrated superior performance over the HDL seal in the test lab with virtually zero torque and excellent contamination exclusion and grease retention.

  13. Production of sealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandi, L.N.

    2016-01-01

    Radioisotope production has been an ongoing activity in India since the sixties. Radioisotopes find wide-ranging applications in various fields, including industry, research, agriculture and medicine. Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology, an industrial unit of Department of Atomic Energy is involved in fabrication and supply of wide variety of sealed sources. The main radioisotopes fabricated and supplied by BRIT are Cobalt-60, Iridium-192. These isotopes are employed in industrial and laboratory irradiators, teletherapy machines, radiography exposure devices, nucleonic gauges. The source fabrication facilities of BRIT are located at Rajasthan Atomic Power Project Cobalt-60 Facility (RAPPCOF), Kota, Radiological Laboratories Group (RLG) and High Intensity Radiation Utilization Project (HIRUP) at Trombay

  14. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  15. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-10-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  16. Borehole sealing method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.N.; Jansen, G. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for sealing boreholes in the earth. The borehole is blocked at the sealing level, and a sealing apparatus capable of melting rock and earth is positioned in the borehole just above seal level. The apparatus is heated to rock-melting temperature and powdered rock or other sealing material is transported down the borehole to the apparatus where it is melted, pooling on the mechanical block and allowed to cool and solidify, sealing the hole. Any length of the borehole can be sealed by slowly raising the apparatus in the borehole while continuously supplying powdered rock to the apparatus to be melted and added to the top of the column of molten and cooling rock, forming a continuous borehole seal. The sealing apparatus consists of a heater capable of melting rock, including means for supplying power to the heater, means for transporting powdered rock down the borehole to the heater, means for cooling the apparatus and means for positioning the apparatus in the borehole. 5 claims, 1 figure

  17. Perspective: Highly stable vapor-deposited glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    This article describes recent progress in understanding highly stable glasses prepared by physical vapor deposition and provides perspective on further research directions for the field. For a given molecule, vapor-deposited glasses can have higher density and lower enthalpy than any glass that can be prepared by the more traditional route of cooling a liquid, and such glasses also exhibit greatly enhanced kinetic stability. Because vapor-deposited glasses can approach the bottom of the amorphous part of the potential energy landscape, they provide insights into the properties expected for the "ideal glass." Connections between vapor-deposited glasses, liquid-cooled glasses, and deeply supercooled liquids are explored. The generality of stable glass formation for organic molecules is discussed along with the prospects for stable glasses of other types of materials.

  18. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  19. Joint seal in tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colquhoun, J.; White, G.V.

    1981-01-01

    A seal for a joint or gap between edges of adjacent wall sections (e.g. of concrete) of a liquid-containing vessel, such as a nuclear reactor cooling pond, comprises a sheet metal strip having longitudinally-extending edge parts, secured to the respective vessel-section edges, and a central part which is longitudinally corrugated to provide sufficient flexibility to accommodate slight relative movements between the vessel-section edges (e.g. due to thermal expansions). The edges of the sheet metal of the strip are turned in so that the edge parts of the strip are formed as generally U-section channels. These accommodate longitudinally extending securing bars which are bolted to the vessel wall sections by bolts which pass through the bars, through the free-edged wall of the channel section and through a longitudinally extending resilient seal pad compressed between that wall of the channel section and the vessel wall section to which it is secured. The other wall of the channel section (integral with the corrugated central part of the strip) has access windows through which the bolts are inserted and tightened, the windows being then closed off in liquid-tight manner by welding closure caps over them. (author)

  20. Low torque hydrodynamic lip geometry for bi-directional rotation seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietle, Lannie L [Houston, TX; Schroeder, John E [Richmond, TX

    2009-07-21

    A hydrodynamically lubricating geometry for the generally circular dynamic sealing lip of rotary seals that are employed to partition a lubricant from an environment. The dynamic sealing lip is provided for establishing compressed sealing engagement with a relatively rotatable surface, and for wedging a film of lubricating fluid into the interface between the dynamic sealing lip and the relatively rotatable surface in response to relative rotation that may occur in the clockwise or the counter-clockwise direction. A wave form incorporating an elongated dimple provides the gradual convergence, efficient impingement angle, and gradual interfacial contact pressure rise that are conducive to efficient hydrodynamic wedging. Skewed elevated contact pressure zones produced by compression edge effects provide for controlled lubricant movement within the dynamic sealing interface between the seal and the relatively rotatable surface, producing enhanced lubrication and low running torque.

  1. Microstructure characteristics of vacuum glazing brazing joints using laser sealing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sixing; Yang, Zheng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Shanwen; Miao, Hong; Zhang, Yanjun; Zhang, Qi

    2018-05-01

    Two pieces of plate glass were brazed into a composite of glazing with a vacuum chamber using PbO-TiO2-SiO2-RxOy powder filler alloys to develop a new type of vacuum glazing. The brazing process was carried out by laser technology. The interface characteristics of laser brazed joints formed between plate glass and solder were investigated using optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The results show that the inter-diffusion of Pb/Ti/Si/O elements from the sealing solder toward the glass and O/Al/Si elements from the glass toward the solder, resulting in a reaction layer in the brazed joints. The microstructure phases of PbTiO3, AlSiO, SiO2 and PbO in the glass/solder interface were confirmed by XRD analysis. The joining of the sealing solder to the glass was realized by the reaction products like fibrous structures on interface, where the wetting layer can help improve the bonding performance and strength between the sealing solder and the plate glass during the laser brazing process.

  2. Strongly enhanced irreversibility fields and Bose-glass behaviour in bulk YBCO with discontinuous columnar irradiation defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, G; Nenkov, K; Krabbes, G; Weinstein, R; Gandini, A; Sawh, R; Mayes, B; Parks, D

    2007-01-01

    Flux pinning properties and irreversibility fields B irr (T) of melt-textured YBCO with discontinuous or multiple-in-line-damage (MILD) columnar defects produced by irradiation with high-energy U 238 ions were studied at a constant matching field of B φ = 10 T and for several energy losses between S e = 1.67 and 2.4 keV A -1 . With increasing S e and increasing length of the MILD pins, the critical current density j c (H,T) strongly increases and B irr (T) for fields along the c axis progressively shifts upwards reaching 9 T at 77 K. For S e = 2.4 keV A -1 , a pronounced kink is observed in B irr (T) at 8 T which is a strong indication of Bose-glass behaviour. The j c (H) dependence of this sample shows a peak at a low applied field B p . This peak effect is explained by the entanglement of vortices. It is argued that for MILD pins single vortices interact simultaneously with many short columnar defects in neighbouring ion trails resulting in an automatic splay in the vortex orientation. The observed decrease of B p with increasing temperature is estimated taking the increasing thermal fluctuations into account

  3. Bioactive glass in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Day, Delbert E.; Bal, B. Sonny; Fu, Qiang; Jung, Steven B.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the development and use of bioactive glass for tissue engineering applications. Despite its inherent brittleness, bioactive glass has several appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. New bioactive glasses based on borate and borosilicate compositions have shown the ability to enhance new bone formation when compared to silicate bioactive glass. Borate-based bioactive glasses also have controllable degradation rates, so the degradation of the bioactive glass implant can be more closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of elements such as Cu, Zn and Sr, which are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth. In addition to the new bioactive glasses, recent advances in biomaterials processing have resulted in the creation of scaffold architectures with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the substitution of loaded as well as non-loaded bone. While bioactive glass has been extensively investigated for bone repair, there has been relatively little research on the application of bioactive glass to the repair of soft tissues. However, recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glass to promote angiogenesis, which is critical to numerous applications in tissue regeneration, such as neovascularization for bone regeneration and the healing of soft tissue wounds. Bioactive glass has also been shown to enhance neocartilage formation during in vitro culture of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels, and to serve as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs. Methods used to manipulate the structure and performance of bioactive glass in these tissue engineering applications are analyzed. PMID:21421084

  4. Repository Closure and Sealing Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A.T. Watkins

    2000-01-01

    The scope of this analysis will be to develop the conceptual design of the closure seals and their locations in the Subsurface Facilities. The design will be based on the recently established program requirements for transitioning to the Site Recommendation (SR) design as outlined by ''Approach to Implementing the Site Recommendation Baseline'' (Stroupe 2000) and the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1999b). The objective of this analysis will be to assist in providing a description for the Subsurface Facilities System Description Document, Section 2 and finally to document any conclusions reached in order to contribute and provide support to the SR. This analysis is at a conceptual level and is considered adequate to support the SR design. The final closure barriers and seals for the ventilation shafts, and the north and south ramps will require these openings to be permanently sealed to limit excessive air and water inflows and prevent human intrusion. The major tasks identified with closure in this analysis are: (1) Developing the overall subsurface seal layout and identifying design and operational interfaces for the Subsurface Facilities. (2) Summarizing the general site conditions and general rock characteristic with respect to seal location and describing the seal selected. (3) Identify seal construction materials, methodology of construction and strategic locations including design of the seal and plugs. (4) Discussing methods to prevent human intrusion

  5. Face-Sealing Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervo, John N.

    1992-01-01

    Valve plate made to translate as well as rotate. Valve opened and closed by turning shaft and lever. Interactions among lever, spring, valve plate, and face seal cause plate to undergo combination of translation and rotation so valve plate clears seal during parts of opening and closing motions.

  6. Seals, Concrete Anchors, and Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    caulking compounds, nonhardening extruded tapes, nonhardening mastics, strippable spray coatings, pressure sensitive tapes, gaskets, adhesives, fabrics...films, etc. Although all of these materials may provide a seal, care must be taken when selecting a sealing material as to its chemical and...gaskets have performed satisfactorily. Another factor to be considered in the selection of gasketing material is its compatibility with both the

  7. Rubber contact mechanics: adhesion, friction and leakage of seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, A; Dorogin, L; Tahir, M; Stöckelhuber, K W; Heinrich, G; Espallargas, N; Persson, B N J

    2017-12-13

    We study the adhesion, friction and leak rate of seals for four different elastomers: Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR), Ethylene Propylene Diene (EPDM), Polyepichlorohydrin (GECO) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Adhesion between smooth clean glass balls and all the elastomers is studied both in the dry state and in water. In water, adhesion is observed for the NBR and PDMS elastomers, but not for the EPDM and GECO elastomers, which we attribute to the differences in surface energy and dewetting. The leakage of water is studied with rubber square-ring seals squeezed against sandblasted glass surfaces. Here we observe a strongly non-linear dependence of the leak rate on the water pressure ΔP for the elastomers exhibiting adhesion in water, while the leak rate depends nearly linearly on ΔP for the other elastomers. We attribute the non-linearity to some adhesion-related phenomena, such as dewetting or the (time-dependent) formation of gas bubbles, which blocks fluid flow channels. Finally, rubber friction is studied at low sliding speeds using smooth glass and sandblasted glass as substrates, both in the dry state and in water. The measured friction coefficients are compared to theory, and the origin of the frictional shear stress acting in the area of real contact is discussed. The NBR rubber, which exhibits the strongest adhesion both in the dry state and in water, also shows the highest friction both in the dry state and in water.

  8. Research on seal control systems for international nuclear safeguard and the vulnerability assessment on the seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongjian; Liu Tianshu; Cao Fangfang; Xu Chunyan

    2014-01-01

    Safeguard seals, also called Tamper-indicating devices (TIDs), are widely used to detect tampering or unauthorized entry in the international safeguard and security systems, Seal control systems consist of seal implementing plan, seal development and the vulnerability assessment on tbe seals, effective implementing procedures and methods of the seals. The vulnerability assessment contents of safeguard seals, thermo-shrinked film seals being as an example, and seals control systems in the implementation program are researched. The seal control systems discuss task assignment, seals management flow and seals program data flow to promote applying effectively seals. The vulnerability assessment program of seals studies assurance level to some different tampering techniques and measures. The researches must promote utilizing seals effectively for nuclear security, non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, radioactive waste management, and the nuclear material accounting and control. (authors)

  9. Immobilisation of radwastes in glass containers and products formed thereby

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, P.B.; Simmons, C.J.; Lagakos, N.; Simmons, J.H.; Tran, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    A method of preventing the dissemination of toxic material to the environment comprises forming an admixture of toxic material and glass packing in a hollow doped glass container of high silica content, or forming the admixture in a first container and then depositing at least a portion of the admixture in a hollow doped glass container of high silica content. The glass container is then heated to collapse its walls and to seal the container so that the toxic material is entrapped and sealed within the collapsed doped glass container. The thermal expansion coefficient of the container may be decreased prior to use by exchanging hydrogen ion in pores thereof with other cations followed by collapsing the pores. (author)

  10. Cosmos & Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    1996-01-01

    The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne....

  11. Airfoil seal system for gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    None, None

    2013-06-25

    A turbine airfoil seal system of a turbine engine having a seal base with a plurality of seal strips extending therefrom for sealing gaps between rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components. The seal strips may overlap each other and may be generally aligned with each other. The seal strips may flex during operation to further reduce the gap between the rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components.

  12. Tamper tape seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, B.W.; Undem, H.A.

    1994-07-01

    Tamper tapes are appealing for many applications due to their ease of use and relative robustness. Applications include seals for temporary area denial, protection of sensitive equipment, chain-of-custody audit trails, and inventory control practices. A next generation of adhesive tamper tapes is being developed that combines the best features of commercially available devices with additional state-of-the-art features in tamper indication, tamper-resistance, and counterfeit-resistance. The additional features are based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research and development (R ampersand D) activities that were originally associated with preparations for the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START). New features include rapid-set, chemical-cure adhesive systems that allow user-friendly application and layered levels of counterfeit-resistance based on unique open-quotes fingerprintclose quotes characteristics that can be accessed as desired

  13. High pressure mechanical seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, Henry W. (Inventor); Anderson, Raymond H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A relatively impervious mechanical seal is formed between the outer surface of a tube and the inside surface of a mechanical fitting of a high pressure fluid or hydraulic system by applying a very thin soft metal layer onto the outer surface of the hard metal tube and/or inner surface of the hard metal fitting. The thickness of such thin metal layer is independent of the size of the tube and/or fittings. Many metals and alloys of those metals exhibit the requisite softness, including silver, gold, tin, platinum, indium, rhodium and cadmium. Suitably, the coating is about 0.0025 millimeters (0.10 mils) in thickness. After compression, the tube and fitting combination exhibits very low leak rates on the order or 10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second or less as measured using the Helium leak test.

  14. Spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Spin glass theory is going through a stunning period of progress while finding exciting new applications in areas beyond theoretical physics, in particular in combinatorics and computer science. This collection of state-of-the-art review papers written by leading experts in the field covers the topic from a wide variety of angles. The topics covered are mean field spin glasses, including a pedagogical account of Talagrand's proof of the Parisi solution, short range spin glasses, emphasizing the open problem of the relevance of the mean-field theory for lattice models, and the dynamics of spin glasses, in particular the problem of ageing in mean field models. The book will serve as a concise introduction to the state of the art of spin glass theory, usefull to both graduate students and young researchers, as well as to anyone curious to know what is going on in this exciting area of mathematical physics.

  15. Compression-after-Impact and Bend Fatigue Results of Glass/Epoxy Composites with Compliant Interlayer and Needling Interlaminar Enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-22

    performance and durability observed in thick- section composites,14,15 the testing methodology presented for the 2-D materials was also extended to 3...Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL Bradley D Lawrence Bennett Aerospace, Inc., Cary, NC Approved for public release...interlaminar enhancements decreased the strength and stiffness of the material but improved the durability. Needling had a larger improvement in compression

  16. Turbine and Structural Seals Team Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Seals Team Facilities conceive, develop, and test advanced turbine seal concepts to increase efficiency and durability of turbine engines. Current projects include...

  17. Leak detection of KNI seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranyai, G.; Peter, A.; Windberg, P.

    1990-03-01

    In Unit 3 and 4 of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary, KNI type seals are used as lead-throughs with conical nickel sealing rings. Their failure can be critical for the operation of the reactor. An Acoustical Leak Detection System (ALDS) was constructed and tested for the operational testing of the seals. Some individual papers are presented in this collection on the calibration and testing of the ALDS intended to be placed on the top of the reactor vessels. The papers include simulation measurements of Unit 3 of NPP, laboratory experiments, evaluation of measurements, and further development needs with the ALDS. (R.P.) 50 figs.; 19 tabs

  18. Silicone foam for penetration seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Yoshikazu

    1986-01-01

    In nuclear power plants or general buildings, it is very important to form a fire-resistant seal around cables, cable trays and conduits passing through a wall or a floor. Rockwool, asbestos, glasswool and flame-retarded urethane foam have so far been used for these purposes. However, they were not satisfactory in sealing property, workability and safety. The silicone foam newly developed, ''TOSSEAL'' 300, has cleared these defects. It has now come to be used for fire resistant seal in nuclear power plants. (author)

  19. Operating experience feedback report: Experience with pump seals installed in reactor coolant pumps manufactured by Byron Jackson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, L.G.; O'Reilly, P.D.

    1992-09-01

    This report examines the reactor coolant pump (RCP) seal operating experience through August 1990 at plants with Byron Jackson (B-J) RCPs. ne operating experience examined in this analysis included a review of the practice of continuing operation with a degraded seal. Plants with B-J RCPs that have had relatively good experience with their RCP seals attribute this success to a combination of different factors, including: enhanced seal QA efforts, modified/new seal designs, improved maintenance procedures and training, attention to detail, improved seal operating procedures, knowledgeable personnel involved in seal maintenance and operation, reduction in frequency of transients that stress the seals, seal handling and installation equipment designed to the appropriate precision, and maintenance of a clean seal cooling water system. As more plants have implemented corrective measures such as these, the number of B-J RCP seal failures experienced has tended to decrease. This study included a review of the practice of continued operation with a degraded seal in the case of PWR plants with Byron Jackson reactor coolant pumps. Specific factors were identified which should be addressed in order to safety manage operation of a reactor coolant pump with indications of a degrading seal

  20. A simple method for tuning the glass transition process in inorganic phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulchiron, René; Belyamani, Imane; Otaigbe, Joshua U.; Bounor-Legaré, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    The physical modification of glass transition temperature (Tg) and properties of materials via blending is a common practice in industry and academia and has a large economic advantage. In this context, simple production of hitherto unattainable new inorganic glass blends from already existing glass compositions via blending raises much hope with the potential to provide new glasses with new and improved properties, that cannot be achieved with classical glass synthesis, for a plethora of applications such as computers screens, glass-to-metal seals, and storage materials for nuclear wastes. Here, we demonstrate that blends of the specific glass compositions studied are miscible in all proportions, an unreported phenomenon in hard condensed matter like glass. Interestingly, excellent agreement was found between the obtained data and calculated Tgs from theoretical equations (Supplementary information) for predicting the composition dependence of Tg for miscible blends with weak but significant specific interactions between the blend components. That this blending method is at present not applied to inorganic glasses reflects the fact that water and chemically resistant phosphate glasses with relatively low Tgs have become available only recently.

  1. GLASS BOX

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curtis, Laura

    2008-01-01

    The goals of this effort were to develop Glass Box capabilities to allow for the capturing of analyst activities and the associated data resources, track and log the results of automated processing...

  2. Seal coat binder performance specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Need to improve seal coat binder specs: replace empirical tests (penetration, ductility) with : performance-related tests applicable to both : unmodified and modified binders; consider temperatures that cover entire in service : range that are tied t...

  3. Alaska Harbor Seal Glacial Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Floating glacial ice serves as a haul-out substrate for a significant number (10-15%) of Alaskan harbor seals, and thus surveying tidewater glacial fjords is an...

  4. Coupled processes in repository sealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case, J.B.; Kelsall, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    The significance of coupled processes in repository sealing is evaluated. In most repository designs, shaft seals will be located in areas of relatively low temperature perturbation, in which case the coupling of temperature with stress and permeability may be less significant than the coupling between stress and permeability that occurs during excavation. Constitutive relationships between stress and permeability are reviewed for crystalline rock and rocksalt. These provide a basis for predicting the development of disturbed zones near excavations. Field case histories of the degree of disturbance are presented for two contrasting rock types - Stripa granite and Southeastern New Mexico rocksalt. The results of field investigations in both rock types confirm that hydraulic conductivity or permeability is stress dependent, and that shaft seal performance may be related to the degree that stresses are perturbed and restored near the seal

  5. Northern Fur Seal Food Habits

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains food habits samples, usually scats, collected opportunistically on northern fur seal rookeries and haulouts in Alaska from 1987 to present....

  6. Design considerations for mechanical face seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Greiner, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    Two companion reports deal with design considerations for improving performance of mechanical face seals, one of family of devices used in general area of fluid sealing of rotating shafts. One report deals with basic seal configuration and other with lubrication of seal.

  7. Seals Research at AlliedSignal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, M. Rifat

    1996-01-01

    A consortium has been formed to address seal problems in the Aerospace sector of Allied Signal, Inc. The consortium is represented by makers of Propulsion Engines, Auxiliary Power Units, Gas Turbine Starters, etc. The goal is to improve Face Seal reliability, since Face Seals have become reliability drivers in many of our product lines. Several research programs are being implemented simultaneously this year. They include: Face Seal Modeling and Analysis Methodology; Oil Cooling of Seals; Seal Tracking Dynamics; Coking Formation & Prevention; and Seal Reliability Methods.

  8. Sealing Failure Analysis on V-Shaped Sealing Rings of an Inserted Sealing Tool Used for Multistage Fracturing Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Hu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The inserted sealing tool is a critical downhole implement that is used to balance the downhole pressure in multistage fracturing operations and prevent fracturing fluid from overflow and/or backward flow. The sealing ring of an inserted sealing tool plays an important role in downhole sealing since a sealing failure would ail the fracturing operation. In order to improve the sealing performance and reduce the potential fracturing failures, this research aims to investigate the influence of V-shaped sealing ring geometries on sealing performance. Constitutive experiments of rubber materials were carried out and the parameters of the constitutive relationship of rubber materials were obtained. A two-dimensional axisymmetric model considering the sealing ring has been established and influences are investigated with considerations of various system parameters and operating conditions. It is found that the stresses concentrated at the shoulder and inner vertex of the sealing ring have direct impact on the damage of the sealing rings under operational conditions. Moreover, the sealing interference, among several other factors, greatly affects the life of the sealing ring. A new design of the sealing ring is suggested with optimized geometric parameters. Its geometric parameters are the edge height of 5 mm, the vertex angle of 90°–100°, and the interference of 0.1 mm, which show a better performance and prolonged operation life of the sealing ring.

  9. Sealed can of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a seal plug cover with a gripping portion fitted to a canning machine and a gripping portion fitted to a gripper of the same configuration as a fuel body for handling the fuel body so as to facilitate the handling work. Structure: A sealed can comprises a vessel and a seal plug cover, said cover being substantially in the form of a bottomed cylinder, which is slipped on the vessel and air-tightly secured by a fastening bolt between it and a flange. The spent fuel body is received into the vessel together with coolant during the step of canning operation. Said seal plug cover has two gripping portions, one for opening and closing the plug cover of the canning machine as an exclusive use member, the other being in the form of a hook-shaped peripheral groove, whereby the gripping portions may be effectively used using the same gripper when the spent fuel body is transported while being received in the sealed can or when the fuel body is removed from the sealed can. (Kawakami, Y.)

  10. Reusable, tamper-indicating seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    A reusable, tamper-indicating seal is comprised of a drum confined within a fixed body and rotatable in one direction therewithin, the top of the drum constituting a tray carrying a large number of small balls of several different colors. The fixed body contains parallel holes for looping a seal wire therethrough. The base of the drums carries cams adapted to coact with cam followers to lock the wire within the seal at one angular position of the drum. A channel in the fixed body, visible from outside the seal, adjacent the tray constitutes a segregated location for a small plurality of the colored balls. A spring in the tray forces colored balls into the segregated location at one angular position of the drum, further rotation securing the balls in position and the wires in the seal. A wedge-shaped plough removes the balls from the segregated location, at a different angular position of the drum, the wire being unlocked at the same postion. A new pattern of colored balls will appear in the segregated location when the seal is relocked

  11. Development of a glass GEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Mitsuya, Yuki; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Fushie, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Gas electron multipliers (GEMs) apply the concept of gas amplification inside many tiny holes, realizing robust and high-gain proportional counters. However, the polyimide substrate of GEMs prevents them from being used in sealed detector applications. We have fabricated and tested glass GEMs (G-GEMs) with substrates made of photosensitive glass material from the Hoya Corporation. We fabricated G-GEMs with several different hole diameters and thicknesses and successfully operated test G-GEMs with a 100×100 mm 2 effective area. The uniformity of our G-GEMs was good, and the energy resolution for 5.9 keV X-rays was 18.8% under uniform irradiation of the entire effective area. A gas gain by the G-GEMs of up to 6700 was confirmed with a gas mixture of Ar (70%)+CH 4 (30%). X-ray imaging using the charge division readout method was demonstrated

  12. Hydrodynamic perception in true seals (Phocidae) and eared seals (Otariidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Wolf; Wieskotten, Sven; Marshall, Christopher; Dehnhardt, Guido

    2013-06-01

    Pinnipeds, that is true seals (Phocidae), eared seals (Otariidae), and walruses (Odobenidae), possess highly developed vibrissal systems for mechanoreception. They can use their vibrissae to detect and discriminate objects by direct touch. At least in Phocidae and Otariidae, the vibrissae can also be used to detect and analyse water movements. Here, we review what is known about this ability, known as hydrodynamic perception, in pinnipeds. Hydrodynamic perception in pinnipeds developed convergently to the hydrodynamic perception with the lateral line system in fish and the sensory hairs in crustaceans. So far two species of pinnipeds, the harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) representing the Phocidae and the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) representing the Otariidae, have been studied for their ability to detect local water movements (dipole stimuli) and to follow hydrodynamic trails, that is the water movements left behind by objects that have passed by at an earlier point in time. Both species are highly sensitive to dipole stimuli and can follow hydrodynamic trails accurately. In the individuals tested, California sea lions were clearly more sensitive to dipole stimuli than harbour seals, and harbour seals showed a superior trail following ability as compared to California sea lions. Harbour seals have also been shown to derive additional information from hydrodynamic trails, such as motion direction, size and shape of the object that caused the trail (California sea lions have not yet been tested). The peculiar undulated shape of the harbour seals' vibrissae appears to play a crucial role in trail following, as it suppresses self-generated noise while the animal is swimming.

  13. SOI silicon on glass for optical MEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian Pontoppidan; Ravnkilde, Jan Tue; Hansen, Ole

    2003-01-01

    and a final sealing at the interconnects can be performed using a suitable polymer. Packaged MEMS on glass are advantageous within Optical MEMS and for sensitive capacitive devices. We report on experiences with bonding SOI to Pyrex. Uniform DRIE shallow and deep etching was achieved by a combination......A newly developed fabrication method for fabrication of single crystalline Si (SCS) components on glass, utilizing Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) of a Silicon On Insulator (SOI) wafer is presented. The devices are packaged at wafer level in a glass-silicon-glass (GSG) stack by anodic bonding...... of an optimized device layout and an optimized process recipe. The behavior of the buried oxide membrane when used as an etch stop for the through-hole etch is described. No harmful buckling or fracture of the membrane is observed for an oxide thickness below 1 μm, but larger and more fragile released structures...

  14. Approximal sealings on lesions in neighbouring teeth requiring operative treatment: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena, Alvaro; Bakhshandeh, Azam; Ekstrand, Kim Rud

    2018-02-07

    With this in vitro study we aimed to assess the possibility of precise application of sealant on accessible artificial white spot lesions (WSL) on approximal surfaces next to a tooth surface under operative treatment. A secondary aim was to evaluate whether the use of magnifying glasses improved the application precision. Fifty-six extracted premolars were selected, approximal WSL lesions were created with 15% HCl gel and standardized photographs were taken. The premolars were mounted in plaster-models in contact with a neighbouring molar with Class II/I-II restoration (Sample 1) or approximal, cavitated dentin lesion (Sample 2). The restorations or the lesion were removed, and Clinpro Sealant was placed over the WSL. Magnifying glasses were used when sealing half the study material. The sealed premolar was removed from the plaster-model and photographed. Adobe Photoshop was used to measure the size of WSL and sealed area. The degree of match between the areas was determined in Photoshop. Interclass agreement for WSL, sealed, and matched areas were found as excellent (κ = 0.98-0.99). The sealant covered 48-100% of the WSL-area (median = 93%) in Sample 1 and 68-100% of the WSL-area (median = 95%) in Sample 2. No statistical differences were observed concerning uncovered proportions of the WSL-area between groups with and without using magnifying glasses (p values ≥ .19). However, overextended sealed areas were more pronounced when magnification was used (p = .01). The precision did not differ between the samples (p = .31). It was possible to seal accessible approximal lesions with high precision. Use of magnifying glasses did not improve the precision.

  15. Oxygen minimum zone: An important oceanographic habitat for deep-diving northern elephant seals, Mirounga angustirostris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yasuhiko; Costa, Daniel P; Adachi, Taiki; Robinson, Patrick W; Peterson, Sarah H; Mitani, Yoko; Takahashi, Akinori

    2017-08-01

    Little is known about the foraging behavior of top predators in the deep mesopelagic ocean. Elephant seals dive to the deep biota-poor oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) (>800 m depth) despite high diving costs in terms of energy and time, but how they successfully forage in the OMZ remains largely unknown. Assessment of their feeding rate is the key to understanding their foraging behavior, but this has been challenging. Here, we assessed the feeding rate of 14 female northern elephant seals determined by jaw motion events (JME) and dive cycle time to examine how feeding rates varied with dive depth, particularly in the OMZ. We also obtained video footage from seal-mounted videos to understand their feeding in the OMZ. While the diel vertical migration pattern was apparent for most depths of the JME, some very deep dives, beyond the normal diel depth ranges, occurred episodically during daylight hours. The midmesopelagic zone was the main foraging zone for all seals. Larger seals tended to show smaller numbers of JME and lower feeding rates than smaller seals during migration, suggesting that larger seals tended to feed on larger prey to satisfy their metabolic needs. Larger seals also dived frequently to the deep OMZ, possibly because of a greater diving ability than smaller seals, suggesting their dependency on food in the deeper depth zones. Video observations showed that seals encountered the rarely reported ragfish ( Icosteus aenigmaticus ) in the depths of the OMZ, which failed to show an escape response from the seals, suggesting that low oxygen concentrations might reduce prey mobility. Less mobile prey in OMZ would enhance the efficiency of foraging in this zone, especially for large seals that can dive deeper and longer. We suggest that the OMZ plays an important role in structuring the mesopelagic ecosystem and for the survival and evolution of elephant seals.

  16. Enhancement of luminescence properties in Er3+ doped TeO2-Na2O-PbX (X=O and F) ternary glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kaushal; Rai, S B; Rai, D K

    2007-04-01

    An enhancement of luminescence properties in Er3+ doped ternary glasses is observed on the addition of PbO/PbF2. The infrared to visible upconversion emission bands are observed at 410, 525, 550 and 658 nm, due to the 2H9/2-->4I15/2, 2H11/2-->4I15/2, 4S3/2-->4I15/2, 4F9/2-->4I15/2 transitions respectively, on excitation with 797 nm laser line. A detailed study reveals that the 2H9/2-->4I15/2 transition arises due to three step upconversion process while other transitions arise due to two step absorption. On excitation with 532 nm radiation, ultraviolet and violet upconversion bands centered at 380, 404, 410 and 475 nm wavelengths are observed along with one photon luminescence bands at 525, 550, 658 and 843 nm wavelengths. These bands are found due to the 4G11/2-->4I15/2, 2P3/2-->4I13/2, 2H9/2-->4I15/2, 2P3/2-->4I11/2, 2H11/2-->4I15/2, 4S3/2-->4I15/2, 4F9/2-->4I15/2 and 4S3/2-->4I13/2 transitions, respectively. Though incorporation of PbO and PbF2 both enhances fluorescence intensities however, PbF2 content has an important influence on upconversion luminescence emission. The incorporation of PbF2 enhances the red emission (658 nm) intensity by 1.5 times and the violet emission (410 nm) intensity by 2.0 times. A concentration dependence study of fluorescence reveals the rapid increase in the red (4F9/2-->4I15/2) emission intensity relative to the green (4S3/2-->4I15/2) emission with increase in the Er3+ ion concentration. This behaviour has been explained in terms of an energy transfer by relaxation between excited ions.

  17. Spray sealing: A breakthrough in integral fuel tank sealing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Martin D.; Zadarnowski, J. H.

    1989-11-01

    In a continuing effort to increase readiness, a new approach to sealing integral fuel tanks is being developed. The technique seals potential leak sources by spraying elastomeric materials inside the tank cavity. Laboratory evaluations project an increase in aircraft supportability and reliability, an improved maintainability, decreasing acquisition and life cycle costs. Increased usable fuel volume and lower weight than conventional bladders improve performance. Concept feasibility was demonstrated on sub-scale aircraft fuel tanks. Materials were selected by testing sprayable elastomers in a fuel tank environment. Chemical stability, mechanical properties, and dynamic durability of the elastomer are being evaluated at the laboratory level and in sub-scale and full scale aircraft component fatigue tests. The self sealing capability of sprayable materials is also under development. Ballistic tests show an improved aircraft survivability, due in part to the elastomer's mechanical properties and its ability to damp vibrations. New application equipment, system removal, and repair methods are being investigated.

  18. Seal Related Development Activities at EG/G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Harold F.

    1991-01-01

    Seal related development activities including modeling, analysis, and performance testing are described for several current seal related projects. Among the current seal related projects are the following: high pressure gas sealing systems for turbomachinery; brush seals for gas path sealing in gas turbines; and tribological material evaluation for wear surfaces in sealing systems.

  19. Viscosity and Softening Behavior of Alkali Zinc Sulfophosphate Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da, Ning; Krolikowski, Sebastian; Nielsen, Karsten Hansgaard

    2010-01-01

    We report on the softening properties and viscosity of glasses from the system ZnO-Na2O-SO3-P2O5 for low-temperature sealing applications. Up to a ratio of network-forming ions PO(4)3-:SO(4)2- of about 2:1, a gradual substitution of P2O5 by SO3 results in decreasing glass transition and softening...

  20. Radioactive material package seal tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, M.M.; Humphreys, D.L.; Edwards, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    General design or test performance requirements for radioactive materials (RAM) packages are specified in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1983). The requirements for Type B packages provide a broad range of environments under which the system must contain the RAM without posing a threat to health or property. Seals that provide the containment system interface between the packaging body and the closure must function in both high- and low-temperature environments under dynamic and static conditions. A seal technology program, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories. Experiments were performed in this program to characterize the behavior of several static seal materials at low temperatures. Helium leak tests on face seals were used to compare the materials. Materials tested include butyl, neoprene, ethylene propylene, fluorosilicone, silicone, Eypel, Kalrez, Teflon, fluorocarbon, and Teflon/silicone composites. Because most elastomer O-ring applications are for hydraulic systems, manufacturer low-temperature ratings are based on methods that simulate this use. The seal materials tested in this program with a fixture similar to a RAM cask closure, with the exception of silicone S613-60, are not leak tight (1.0 x 10 -7 std cm 3 /s) at manufacturer low-temperature ratings. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Plasmon enhancement of Raman scattering and fluorescence for rhodamine 6G molecules in the porous glass and PVA films with nanoparticles of silver citrate hydrosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinova, E I; Zyubin, A U; Samusev, I G; Slezhkin, V A; Bryukhanov, V V

    2016-01-01

    The study of Raman and fluorescence spectra for Rhodamine 6G molecules in a film of polyvinyl alcohol on the modified by silver nanoparticles (NPs) porous glass and without the porous glass has been done. The gain of the scattering intensity and fluorescence emission has been obtained in the presence of silver nanoparticles. The gain order was obtained as ∼ 10"1"1 (paper)

  2. Spectral studies on CuO in sodium–calcium borophosphate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    linear optical devices [10] and as low-melting glass solders or glass seals [11] derived .... For S1 to S4 samples, the vitreous phase coexists with a crystalline phase and the pattern shows large maxima overlapped with the peaks characteristics ...

  3. Mechanical seal with textured sidewall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khonsari, Michael M.; Xiao, Nian

    2017-02-14

    The present invention discloses a mating ring, a primary ring, and associated mechanical seal having superior heat transfer and wear characteristics. According to an exemplary embodiment of the present invention, one or more dimples are formed onto the cylindrical outer surface of a mating ring sidewall and/or a primary ring sidewall. A stationary mating ring for a mechanical seal assembly is disclosed. Such a mating ring comprises an annular body having a central axis and a sealing face, wherein a plurality of dimples are formed into the outer circumferential surface of the annular body such that the exposed circumferential surface area of the annular body is increased. The texture added to the sidewall of the mating ring yields superior heat transfer and wear characteristics.

  4. Turbine interstage seal with self-balancing capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jacob A; Jones, Russell B; Sexton, Thomas D

    2017-09-26

    An interstage seal for a turbine of a gas turbine engine, the interstage seal having a seal carrier with an axial extending seal tooth movable with a stator of the engine, and a rotor with a seal surface that forms the interstage seal with the seal tooth, where a magnetic force produced by two magnets and a gas force produced by a gas pressure acting on the seal carrier forms a balancing force to maintain a close clearance of the seal without the seal tooth contacting the rotor seal surfaces during engine operation. In other embodiments, two pairs of magnets produce first and second magnetic forces that balance the seal in the engine.

  5. EBR-II rotating plug seal maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    The EBR-II rotating plug seals require frequent cleaning and maintenance to keep the plugs from sticking during fuel handling. Time consuming cleaning on the cover gas and air sides of the dip ring seal is required to remove oxidation and sodium reaction products that accumulate and stop plug rotation. Despite severely limited access, effective seal cleaning techniques have removed 11 800 lb (5 352 kg) of deposits from the seals since 1964. Temperature control modifications and repairs have also required major maintenance work. Suggested seal design recommendations could significantly reduce maintenance on future similar seals

  6. Self-acting and hydrodynamic shaft seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1973-01-01

    Self-acting and hydrodynamic seals are described. The analytical procedures are outlined for obtaining a seal force balance and the operating film thickness. Particular attention is given to primary ring response (seal vibration) to rotating seat face runout. This response analysis revealed three different vibration modes. Proposed applications of self-acting seals in gas turbine engines and in rocket vehicle turbopumps are described. Also experimental data on self-acting face seals operating under simulated gas turbine conditions are given; these data show the feasibility of operating the seal at conditions of 345 newtons per square centimeter (500 psi) and 152 meters per second (500 ft/sec) sliding speed.

  7. Sealed source peer review plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, Alexander; Leonard, Lee; Burns, Ron

    2009-01-01

    Sealed sources are known quantities of radioactive materials that have been encapsulated in quantities that produce known radiation fields. Sealed sources have multiple uses ranging from instrument calibration sources to sources that produce radiation fields for experimental applications. The Off-Site Source Recovery (OSR) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), created in 1999, under the direction of the Waste Management Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque has been assigned the responsibility to recover and manage excess and unwanted radioactive sealed sources from the public and private sector. LANL intends to ship drums containing qualified sealed sources to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Prior to shipping, these drums must be characterized with respect to radiological content and other parameters. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that ten radionulcides be quantified and reported for every container of waste to be disposed in the WIPP. The methods traditionally approved by the EPA include non-destructive assay (NDA) in accordance with Appendix A of the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (DOE, 2002) (CH WAC). However, because of the nature and pedigree of historical records for sealed sources and the technical infeasibility of performing NDA on these sources, LANL proposes to characterize the content of these waste drums using qualified existing radiological data in lieu of direct measurement. This plan describes the process and documentation requirements for the use of the peer review process to qualify existing data for sealed radiological sources in lieu of perfonning radioassay. The peer review process will be performed in accordance with criteria provided in 40 CFR (section) 194.22 which specifies the use of the NUREG 1297 guidelines. The plan defines the management approach, resources, schedule, and technical requirements

  8. Seismic considerations in sealing a potential high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.A.; Richardson, A.M.; Lin, Ming

    1993-01-01

    The potential repository system is intended to isolate high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain according the performance objective--10 CFR 60.112. One subsystem that may contribute to achieving this objective is the sealing subsystem. This subsystem is comprised of sealing components in the shafts, ramps, underground network of drifts, and the exploratory boreholes. Sealing components can be rigid, as in the case of a shaft seal, or can be more compressible, as in the case of drift fill comprised of mined rockfill. This paper presents the preliminary seismic response of discrete sealing components in welded and nonwelded tuff. Special consideration is given to evaluating the stress in the seal, and the behavior of the interface between the seal and the rock. The seismic responses are computed using both static and dynamic analyses. Also presented is an evaluation of the maximum seismic response encountered by a drift seal with respect to the angle of incidence of the seismic wave. Mitigation strategies and seismic design considerations are proposed which can potentially enhance the overall response of the sealing component and subsequently, the performance of the overall repository system

  9. Seismic considerations in sealing a potential high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.A.; Richardson, A.M.; Lin, Ming

    1992-01-01

    The potential repository system is intended to isolate high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain. One subsystem that may contribute to achieving this objective is the sealing subsystem. This subsystem is comprised of sealing components in the shafts, ramps, underground network of drifts, and the exploratory boreholes. Sealing components can be rigid, as in the case of a shaft seal, or can be more compressible, as in the case of drift fill comprised of mined rockfill. This paper presents the preliminary seismic response of discrete sealing components in welded and nonwelded tuff. Special consideration is given to evaluating the stress in the seal, and the behavior of the interface between the seal and the rock. The seismic responses are computed using both static and dynamic analyses. Also presented is an evaluation of the maximum seismic response encountered by a drift seal with respect to the angle of incidence of the seismic wave. Mitigation strategies and seismic design considerations are proposed which can potentially enhance the overall response of the sealing component and subsequently, the performance of the overall repository system

  10. Secondary seal effects in hydrostatic non-contact seals for reactor coolant pump shaft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, T.; Koga, T.; Tanoue, H.; Hirabayashi, H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents a seal flow analysis in a hydrostatic non-contact seal for a PWR coolant pump shaft. A description is given of the non-contact seal for the reactor coolant pump. Results are presented for a distortion analysis of the seal ring, along with the seal flow characteristics and the contact pressure profiles of the secondary seals. The results of the work confirm previously reported findings that the seal ring distortion is sensitive to the o-ring location (which was placed between the ceramic seal face and the seal ring retainer). The paper concludes that the seal flow characteristics and the tracking performance depend upon the dynamic properties of the secondary seal. (U.K.)

  11. Final Report - Melt Rate Enhancement for High Aluminum HLW Glass Formulation, VSL-08R1360-1, Rev. 0, dated 12/19/08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Gong, W.; Gan, H.; Matlack, K. S.; Bardakci, T.; Kot, W.

    2013-11-13

    The principal objective of the work reported here was to develop and identify HLW glass compositions that maximize waste processing rates for the aluminum limted waste composition specified by ORP while maintaining high waste loadings and acceptable glass properties. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale tests, confirmation tests on the DM100 melter system, and demonstration at pilot scale (DM1200). The DM100-BL unit was selected for these tests since it was used previously with the HLW waste streams evaluated in this study, was used for tests on HLW glass compositions to support subsequent tests on the HLW Pilot Melter, conduct tests to determine the effect of various glass properties (viscosity and conductivity) and oxide concentrations on glass production rates with HLW feed streams, and to assess the volatility of cesium and technetium during the vitrification of an HLW AZ-102 composition. The same melter was selected for the present tests in order to maintain comparisons between the previously collected data. These tests provide information on melter processing characteristics and off-gas data, including formation of secondary phases and partitioning. Once DM100 tests were completed, one of the compositions was selected for further testing on the DM1200; the DM1200 system has been used for processing a variety of simulated Hanford waste streams. Tests on the larger melter provide processing data at one third of the scale of the actual WTP HLW melter and, therefore, provide a more accurate and reliable assessment of production rates and potential processing issues. The work focused on maximizing waste processing rates for high aluminum HLW compositions. In view of the diversity of forms of aluminum in the Hanford tanks, tests were also conducted on the DM100 to determine the effect of changes in the form of aluminum on feed properties and production rate. In addition, the work evaluated the effect on production rate of modest increases

  12. Mechanical Properties of Stable Glasses Using Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Sarah; Liu, Tianyi; Jiang, Yijie; Ablajan, Keyume; Zhang, Yue; Walsh, Patrick; Turner, Kevin; Fakhraai, Zahra

    Glasses with enhanced stability over ordinary, liquid quenched glasses have been formed via the process of Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) by using a sufficiently slow deposition rate and a substrate temperature slightly below the glass transition temperature. These stable glasses have been shown to exhibit higher density, lower enthalpy, and better kinetic stability over ordinary glass, and are typically optically birefringent, due to packing and orientational anisotropy. Given these exceptional properties, it is of interest to further investigate how the properties of stable glasses compare to those of ordinary glass. In particular, the mechanical properties of stable glasses remain relatively under-investigated. While the speed of sound and elastic moduli have been shown to increase with increased stability, little is known about their hardness and fracture toughness compared to ordinary glasses. In this study, glasses of 9-(3,5-di(naphthalen-1-yl)phenyl)anthracene were deposited at varying temperatures relative to their glass transition temperature, and their mechanical properties measured by nanoindentation. Hardness and elastic modulus of the glasses were compared across substrate temperatures. After indentation, the topography of these films were studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in order to further compare the relationship between thermodynamic and kinetic stability and mechanical failure. Z.F. and P.W. acknowledge funding from NSF(DMREF-1628407).

  13. Cementation of Glass-Ceramic Posterior Restorations : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Breemer, Carline R. G.; Gresnigt, Marco M. M.; Cune, Marco S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this comprehensive review is to systematically organize the current knowledge regarding the cementation of glass-ceramic materials and restorations, with an additional focus on the benefits of Immediate Dentin Sealing (IDS). Materials and Methods. An extensive literature search

  14. Glass: Rotary Electric Glass Furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recca, L.

    1999-01-29

    Compared to conventional gas-fired furnaces, the new rotary electric furnace will increase energy efficiency while significantly reducing air emissions, product turnaround time, and labor costs. As this informative new fact sheet explains, the thousand different types of glass optical blanks produced for the photonics industry are used for lasers, telescopes, cameras, lights, and many other products.

  15. Knife-edge seal for vacuum bagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Cam actuated clamps pinch bagging material between long knife edge (mounted to clamps) and high temperature rubber cushion bonded to baseplate. No adhesive, tape, or sealing groove is needed to seal edge of bagging sheet against base plate.

  16. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Crittercam video

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project investigates foraging behavior of Hawaiian monk seals by conducting telemetry studies. During these studies, live seals are instrumented with dive...

  17. Film riding seals for rotary machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Sarawate, Neelesh Nandkumar; Wolfe, Christopher Edward; Ruggiero, Eric John; Raj Mohan, Vivek Raja

    2017-03-07

    A seal assembly for a rotary machine is provided. The seal assembly includes multiple sealing device segments disposed circumferentially intermediate to a stationary housing and a rotor. Each of the segments includes a shoe plate with a forward-shoe section and an aft-shoe section having one or more labyrinth teeth therebetween facing the rotor. The sealing device includes a stator interface element having a groove or slot for allowing disposal of a spline seal for preventing segment leakages. The sealing device segment also includes multiple bellow springs or flexures connected to the shoe plate and to the stator interface element. Further, the sealing device segments include a secondary seal integrated with the stator interface element at one end and positioned about the multiple bellow springs or flexures and the shoe plate at the other end.

  18. Legacy HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Ultrasound Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ultrasound images for measuring the condition of juvenile seals at Laysan Island during 2009-2010, collected when seals were handled as part of the De-Worming Project

  19. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Telemetry Tag Deployments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project investigates foraging behavior of Hawaiian monk seals by conducting telemetry studies. During these studies, live seals are instrumented with dive...

  20. Legacy HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seals Observers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set documents observers that have collected monk seal data as part of the ongoing monk seal population assessment efforts by PSD personnel and cooperating...

  1. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Handling Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records for all handling and measurement of Hawaiian monk seals since 1981. Live seals are handled and measured during a variety of events...

  2. Recent advances in magnetic liquid sealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, K.; Stahl, P.; Bottenberg, W.; True, D.; Martis, G.; Zook, C.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper recent work in design and testing of two special magnetic liquid seals extending the state-of-the-art of ferrofluidic sealing is discussed. These custom seals are a moving belt edge seal and an exclusion seal. The first seal provides a hermetic barrier to solid particulates expected to be present in enclosed nuclear environments. The second seal is used on a magnetic disk drive spindle and reduces the particulate contaminants in the memory disk pack area by up to three orders of magnitude. In addition, bearing life in the spindle is found to be doubled due to reduction of operating temperature. The fundamentals of magnetic fluid sealing are presented in terms of magnetic circuit design and physical properties of ferrofluids

  3. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Argos Location Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project investigates foraging behavior of Hawaiian monk seals by conducting telemetry studies. During these studies, live seals are instrumented with satellite...

  4. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Entanglement data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains records of all entanglements of Hawaiian monk seals in marine debris. The data set comprises records of seals entangled by derelict fishing...

  5. Seal Apparatus and Methods to Manufacture Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    In some implementations, apparatus and methods are provided through which a dynamic cryogenic seal is manufactured. In some implementations, the seal includes a retainer and a spring-seal assembly, the assembly being comprised of a main spring housing and fluorine-containing polymer seals. In some implementations, either a radial seal, or an axial (or "piston seal") is provided. In some implementations, methods of manufacturing the dynamic cryogenic seal are also provided. In some implementations, the methods include assembling the components while either heated or cooled, taking advantage of thermal expansion and contraction, such that there is a strong interference fit between the components at room temperature. In some implementations, this process ensures that the weaker fluorine-containing polymer seal is forced to expand and contract with the stronger retainer and spring and is under constant preload. In some implementations, the fluorine-containing polymer is therefore fluidized and retained, and can not lift off.

  6. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy intrinsic seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinger, C.T.; Burr, T.; Vnuk, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    We have begun to quantify the ability of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to detect the removal and replacement of the lid of a simulated special nuclear materials drum. Conceptually, the acoustic spectrum of a container establishcs a baseline fingerprint, which we refer to as an intrinsic seal, for the container. Simply removing and replacing the lid changes some of the resonant frequencies because it is impossible to exactly duplicate all of the stress patterns between the lid and container. Preliminary qualitative results suggested that the ARS intrinsic seal could discriminate between cases where a lid has or has not been removed. The present work is directed at quantifying the utility of the ARS intrinsic seal technique, including the technique's sensitivity to ''nuisance'' effects, such as temperature swings, movement of the container, and placement of the transducers. These early quantitative tests support the potential of the ARS intrinsic seal application, but also reveal a possible sensitivity to nuisance effects that could limit environments or conditions under which the technique is effective

  7. Pre-sealing risk analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensminger, D.A.; Hough, M.E.; Oston, S.G.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes studies of accidents involving high-level radioactive waste before sealing the waste into a repository. The report summarizes work done in this area during Fiscal Year 1978 and supplements previous work. Models of accident probability, severity, and consequences are refined and extended

  8. Dampers for Stationary Labyrinth Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Aini, Yehia; Mitchell, William; Roberts, Lawrence; Montgomery, Stuart; Davis, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Vibration dampers have been invented that are incorporated as components within the stationary labyrinth seal assembly. These dampers are intended to supplement other vibration-suppressing features of labyrinth seals in order to reduce the incidence of high-cycle-fatigue failures, which have been known to occur in the severe vibratory environments of jet engines and turbopumps in which labyrinth seals are typically used. A vibration damper of this type includes several leaf springs and/or a number of metallic particles (shot) all held in an annular seal cavity by a retaining ring. The leaf springs are made of a spring steel alloy chosen, in conjunction with design parameters, to maintain sufficient preload to ensure effectiveness of damping at desired operating temperatures. The cavity is vented via a small radial gap between the retaining ring and seal housing. The damping mechanism is complex. In the case of leaf springs, the mechanism is mainly friction in the slippage between the seal housing and individual dampers. In the case of a damper that contains shot, the damping mechanism includes contributions from friction between individual particles, friction between particles and cavity walls, and dissipation of kinetic energy of impact. The basic concept of particle/shot vibration dampers has been published previously; what is new here is the use of such dampers to suppress traveling-wave vibrations in labyrinth seals. Damping effectiveness depends on many parameters, including, but not limited to, coefficient of friction, mode shape, and frequency and amplitude of vibrational modes. In tests, preloads of the order of 6 to 15 lb (2.72 to 6.8 kilograms) per spring damper were demonstrated to provide adequate damping levels. Effectiveness of shot damping of vibrations having amplitudes from 20 to 200 times normal terrestrial gravitational acceleration (196 to 1,960 meters per square second) and frequencies up to 12 kHz was demonstrated for shot sizes from 0.032 to

  9. Reactor coolant pump seals: improving their performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pothier, N.E.; Metcalfe, R.

    1986-06-01

    Large CANDU plants are benefitting from transient-resistant four-year reliable reactor coolant pump seal lifetimes, a direct result of AECL's 20-year comprehensive seal improvement program involving R and D staff, manufacturers, and plant designers and operators. An overview of this program is presented, which covers seal modification design, testing, post-service examination, specialized maintenance and quality control. The relevancy of this technology to Light Water Reactor Coolant Pump Seals is also discussed

  10. Development of simplified rotating plug seal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueta, M.; Ichimiya, M.; Kanaoka, T.; Sekiya, H.; Ueda, S.; Ishibashi, S.

    1991-01-01

    We studied a compact and simplified rotating plug seal structure and conducted experiments for key elements of the concept such us the mechanical seal structure and sodium deposit prevention system. Good characteristics were confirmed for the mechanical seal structure, which utilizes an elastomer seal and thin lathe bearing. Applicability of the density barrier concept was also confirmed as the sodium deposit prevention system. This concept can be applied to actual plants. (author)

  11. Piston rod seal for a Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal for a Stirling engine, a hydrostatic bearing and differential pressure regulating valve are utilized to provide for a low pressure differential across a rubbing seal between the hydrogen and oil so as to reduce wear on the seal.

  12. 19 CFR 113.25 - Seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... signatures of principal and surety, if individuals, and the corporate seal shall be affixed close to the... law of the state in which executed. However, when the charter or governing statute of a corporation requires its acts to be evidenced by its corporate seal, such seal is required. ...

  13. Ergonomics and safety of manual bag sealing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.D. de; Bosch, T.; Eikhout, S.M.; Vink, P.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of seals is used to close bags. Each seal has advantages and disadvantages. For shop assistants sealing bags could be a repetitive physically demanding action. Opening and closing the bags again can cause some discomfort or annoyance for consumers. Besides, it is an activity which can

  14. Improved sealing for in-core systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunford, S.

    1989-01-01

    The in-core instrumentation sealing nozzles designed by Framatome have three mechanical seals in series instead of the one traditional seal, and are pressurized by simply tightening up the nozzle covers. They have been installed from the start on all Framatome PWRs, as well as having been backfitted on Belgium and Yugoslavian units and chosen for the Chinese Qinshan plant. (author)

  15. Nitrate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirilenko, I.A.; Vinogradov, E.E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental evidence on behaviour of nitrate glasses is reviewed in terms of relationships between the presence of water in vitrescent nitrate systems and the properties of the systems. The glasses considered belong to systems of Mg(NO 3 ) 2 - Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; Hg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; NaNO 3 -Mg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; M-Zn(NO 3 ) 3 , where M is a mixture of 20% mass NaNO 3 and 80% mass Mg(NO 3 ) 2 , and Zn is a rare earth ion. Nitrate glass is shown to be a product of dehydration. Vitrification may be regarded as a resusl of formation of molecular complexes in the chain due to hydrogen bonds of two types, i.e. water-water, or water-nicrate group. Chain formation, along with low melting points of the nitrates, hinder crystallization of nitrate melts. Provided there is enough water, this results in vitrification

  16. Tamper-indicating device having a glass body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R. E.

    2003-04-29

    A tamper-indicating device is described. The device has a first glass body member and a second glass body member that are attached to each other through a hasp. The glass body members of the device can be tempered. The body members can be configured with hollow volumes into which powders, microparticles, liquids, gels, or combinations thereof are sealed. The choice, the amount, and the location of these materials can produce a visible, band pattern to provide each body member with a unique fingerprint identifier, which makes it extremely difficult to repair or replace once it is damaged in order to avoid tamper detection.

  17. Comparative study on two different seal surface structure for reactor pressure vessel sealing behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jun; Xiong Guangming; Deng Xiaoyun

    2014-01-01

    The seal surface structure is very important to reactor pressure vessel (RPV) sealing behavior. In this paper, two 3-D RPV sealing analysis finite models have been established with different seal surface structures, in order to study the influence of two structures. The separation of RPV upper and lower flanges, bolt loads and etc. are obtained, which are used to evaluate the sealing behavior of the RPV. Meanwhile, the comparative analysis of safety margin of two seal surface structural had been done, which provides the theoretical basis for RPV seal structure design optimization. (authors)

  18. Choice of rotatable plug seals for prototype fast breeder reactor: Review of historical perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, N.K., E-mail: nksinha@igcar.gov.in; Raj, Baldev, E-mail: baldev.dr@gmail.com

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Choice and arrangement of elastomeric inflatable and backup seals as primary and secondary barriers. • With survey (mid-1930s onwards) of reactor, sealing, R&D and rubber technology. • Load, reliability, safety, life and economy of seals and reactors are key factors. • PFBR blends concepts and experience of MOX fuelled FBRs with original solutions. • R&D indicates inflatable seal advanced fluoroelastomer pivotal in unifying nuclear sealing. - Abstract: Choice and arrangement of elastomeric primary inflatable and secondary backup seals for the rotatable plugs (RPs) of 500 MW (e), sodium cooled, pool type, 2-loop, mixed oxide (MOX) fuelled Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is depicted with review of various historical perspectives. Static and dynamic operation, largest diameters (PFBR: ∼6.4 m, ∼4.2 m), widest gaps and variations (5 ± 2 mm) and demanding operating requirements make RP openings on top shield (TS) the most difficult to seal which necessitated extensive development from 1950s to early 1990s. Liquid metal freeze seals with life equivalent to reactor prevailed as primary barrier (France, Japan, U.S.S.R.) during pre-1980s in spite of bulk, cost and complexity due to the abilities to meet zero leakage and resist core disruptive accident (CDA). Redefinition of CDA as beyond design basis accident, tolerable leakage and enhanced economisation drive during post-1980s established elastomeric inflatable seal as primary barrier excepting in U.S.S.R. (MOX fuel, freeze seal) and U.S.A. (metallic fuel). Choice of inflatable seal for PFBR RPs considers these perspectives, inherent advantages of elastomers and those of inflatable seals which maximise seal life. Choice of elastomeric backup seal as secondary barrier was governed by reliability and minimisation as well as distribution of load (temperature, radiation, mist) to maximise seal life. The compact sealing combination brings the hanging RPs at about the same elevation to reduce

  19. Sealing performance of a magnetic fluid seal for rotary blood pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Sayaka; Kano, Kentaro; Okamoto, Eiji; Murabayashi, Shun; Nishimura, Ikuya; Higuchi, Taka-Aki

    2009-09-01

    A magnetic fluid (MF) for a rotary blood pump seal enables mechanical contact-free rotation of the shaft and, hence, has excellent durability. The performance of a MF seal, however, has been reported to decrease in liquids. We have developed a MF seal that has a "shield" mechanism and a new MF with a higher magnetization of 47.9 kA/m. The sealing performance of the MF seal installed in a rotary blood pump was studied. Under the condition of continuous flow, the MF seal remained in perfect condition against a pressure of 298 mm Hg (pump flow rate: 3.96 L/min). The seal was also perfect against a pressure of 170 mm Hg in a continuous flow of 3.9 L/min for 275 days. We have developed a MF seal that works in liquid against clinically used pressures. The MF seal is promising as a shaft seal for rotary blood pumps.

  20. New encapsulation method using low-melting-point alloy for sealing micro heat pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Congming; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Chuanpeng; Luo, Yi; Li, Zhixin; Li, Sidi [Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)

    2017-06-15

    This study proposed a method using Low-melting-point alloy (LMPA) to seal Micro heat pipes (MHPs), which were made of Si substrates and glass covers. Corresponding MHP structures with charging and sealing channels were designed. Three different auxiliary structures were investigated to study the sealability of MHPs with LMPA. One structure is rectangular and the others are triangular with corner angles of 30° and 45°, respectively. Each auxiliary channel for LMPA is 0.5 mm wide and 135 μm deep. LMPA was heated to molten state, injected to channels, and then cooled to room temperature. According to the material characteristic of LMPA, the alloy should swell in the following 12 hours to form strong interaction force between LMPA and Si walls. Experimental results show that the flow speed of liquid LMPA in channels plays an important role in sealing MHPs, and the sealing performance of triangular structures is always better than that of rectangular structure. Therefore, triangular structures are more suitable in sealing MHPs than rectangular ones. LMPA sealing is a plane packaging method that can be applied in the thermal management of high-power IC device and LEDs. Meanwhile, implanting in commercialized fabrication of MHP is easy.

  1. New encapsulation method using low-melting-point alloy for sealing micro heat pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Congming; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Chuanpeng; Luo, Yi; Li, Zhixin; Li, Sidi

    2017-01-01

    This study proposed a method using Low-melting-point alloy (LMPA) to seal Micro heat pipes (MHPs), which were made of Si substrates and glass covers. Corresponding MHP structures with charging and sealing channels were designed. Three different auxiliary structures were investigated to study the sealability of MHPs with LMPA. One structure is rectangular and the others are triangular with corner angles of 30° and 45°, respectively. Each auxiliary channel for LMPA is 0.5 mm wide and 135 μm deep. LMPA was heated to molten state, injected to channels, and then cooled to room temperature. According to the material characteristic of LMPA, the alloy should swell in the following 12 hours to form strong interaction force between LMPA and Si walls. Experimental results show that the flow speed of liquid LMPA in channels plays an important role in sealing MHPs, and the sealing performance of triangular structures is always better than that of rectangular structure. Therefore, triangular structures are more suitable in sealing MHPs than rectangular ones. LMPA sealing is a plane packaging method that can be applied in the thermal management of high-power IC device and LEDs. Meanwhile, implanting in commercialized fabrication of MHP is easy.

  2. Amphibious hearing in ringed seals (Pusa hispida): underwater audiograms, aerial audiograms and critical ratio measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Jillian M; Southall, Brandon L; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2015-07-01

    Ringed seals (Pusa hispida) are semi-aquatic marine mammals with a circumpolar Arctic distribution. In this study, we investigate the amphibious hearing capabilities of ringed seals to provide auditory profiles for this species across the full range of hearing. Using psychophysical methods with two trained ringed seals, detection thresholds for narrowband signals were measured under quiet, carefully controlled environmental conditions to generate aerial and underwater audiograms. Masked underwater thresholds were measured in the presence of octave-band noise to determine critical ratios. Results indicate that ringed seals possess hearing abilities comparable to those of spotted seals (Phoca largha) and harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), and considerably better than previously reported for ringed and harp seals. Best sensitivity was 49 dB re. 1 µPa (12.8 kHz) in water, and -12 dB re. 20 µPa (4.5 kHz) in air, rivaling the acute hearing abilities of some fully aquatic and terrestrial species in their respective media. Critical ratio measurements ranged from 14 dB at 0.1 kHz to 31 dB at 25.6 kHz, suggesting that ringed seals--like other true seals--can efficiently extract signals from background noise across a broad range of frequencies. The work described herein extends similar research on amphibious hearing in spotted seals recently published by the authors. These parallel studies enhance our knowledge of the auditory capabilities of ice-living seals, and inform effective management strategies for these and related species in a rapidly changing Arctic environment. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Turbine Seal Research at NASA GRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Delgado, Irebert R.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Low-leakage, long-life turbomachinery seals are important to both Space and Aeronautics Missions. (1) Increased payload capability (2) Decreased specific fuel consumption and emissions (3) Decreased direct operating costs. NASA GRC has a history of significant accomplishments and collaboration with industry and academia in seals research. NASA's unique, state-of-the-art High Temperature, High Speed Turbine Seal Test Facility is an asset to the U.S. Engine / Seal Community. Current focus is on developing experimentally validated compliant, non-contacting, high temperature seal designs, analysis, and design methodologies to enable commercialization.

  4. Double angle seal forming lubricant film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, William D.

    1984-01-01

    A lubricated piston rod seal which inhibits gas leaking from a high pressure chamber on one side of the seal to a low pressure chamber on the other side of the seal. A liquid is supplied to the surface of the piston rod on the low pressure side of the seal. This liquid acts as lubricant for the seal and provides cooling for the rod. The seal, which can be a plastic, elastomer or other material with low elastic modulus, is designed to positively pump lubricant through the piston rod/seal interface in both directions when the piston rod is reciprocating. The capacity of the seal to pump lubricant from the low pressure side to the high pressure side is less than its capacity to pump lubricant from the high pressure side to the low pressure side which ensures that there is zero net flow of lubricant to the high pressure side of the seal. The film of lubricant between the seal and the rod minimizes any sliding contact and prevents the leakage of gas. Under static conditions gas leakage is prevented by direct contact between the seal and the rod.

  5. Improved operation in CANDU plants with CAN8 PHT pump seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, T.; McInnes, D.; Rhodes, D.

    1997-01-01

    The CAN8 PHT pump seal is currently operating in twenty-one pumps, twelve at Bruce A, seven at Bruce B and in both pumps at Grand Gulf Nuclear Station (GGNS). The CAN8 seal has markedly improved performance over the CAN2 seal previously used at the Bruce stations and the SU seals previously used at GGNS. Details of the performance improvements are discussed. Prior to installation in Bruce B, the CAN8 seal was slightly modified and then demonstrated to be resistant to reverse pressurization failures, since this was a known failure mechanism with the CAN2 seal. Subsequent experience showed that Bruce A was also susceptible to reverse pressure incidents. A review of plant operating procedures at Bruce A showed reverse pressure was likely the initiating factor for several previously unexplained seal disturbances. The reverse pressure failure mechanism is described, as are the improved system operating procedures designed to prevent it. Preventative procedures have now been implemented across Ontario Hydro Nuclear. The ability to track down seal failure mechanisms such as this is greatly enhanced by the improved system monitoring and data retrieval now in place at Bruce A and Bruce B. (author)

  6. Air riding seal with purge cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Thomas D; Mills, Jacob A

    2017-08-15

    An air riding seal for a turbine in a gas turbine engine, where an annular piston is axial moveable within an annular piston chamber formed in a stator of the turbine and forms a seal with a surface on the rotor using pressurized air that forms a cushion in a pocket of the annular piston. A purge cavity is formed on the annular piston and is connected to a purge hole that extends through the annular piston to a lower pressure region around the annular piston or through the rotor to an opposite side. The annular piston is sealed also with inner and outer seals that can be a labyrinth seal to form an additional seal than the cushion of air in the pocket to prevent the face of the air riding seal from overheating.

  7. Insecurity of imperfect quantum bit seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, H.F.

    2006-01-01

    Quantum bit seal is a way to encode a classical bit quantum mechanically so that everyone can obtain non-zero information on the value of the bit. Moreover, such an attempt should have a high chance of being detected by an authorized verifier. Surely, a reader looks for a way to get the maximum amount of information on the sealed bit and at the same time to minimize her chance of being caught. And a verifier picks a sealing scheme that maximizes his chance of detecting any measurement of the sealed bit. Here, I report a strategy that passes all measurement detection procedures at least half of the time for all quantum bit sealing schemes. This strategy also minimizes a reader's chance of being caught under a certain scheme. In this way, I extend the result of Bechmann-Pasquinucci et al. by proving that quantum seal is insecure in the case of imperfect sealed bit recovery

  8. Development of the seal for nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Feng; Lu Zhao; Zhao Yonggang; Zhang Qixin; Xiao Xuefu

    2000-01-01

    Two kinds of double cap metallic seal and an adhesive seal are developed for the purpose of the accounting for and control of nuclear material. Two kinds of double cap metallic seal are made of stainless steel and copper, respectively and the self-locked technique is used. The number and the random pattern are carved out side and in side of a cap, respectively, for the seal. The random pattern carved inside of a cap for seal is taken a picture using numeral camera and memorized in computer. Special software is developed for verification of the random pattern memorized in computer. The adhesive seal is made of special adhesive paper for purpose of security, and a special pattern guarded against falsification is printed on seal paper using ultraviolet fluorescent light technique

  9. Quantum mechanical study of pre-dissociation enhancement of linear and nonlinear polarizabilities of (TeO2)(n) oligomers as a key to understanding the remarkable dielectric properties of TeO2 glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Mikhail; Mirgorodsky, Andrei; Masson, Olivier; Thomas, Philippe

    2012-09-20

    The effects of intermolecular interactions of TeO(2) molecules in the (TeO(2))(n) oligomers on the polarizability (α) and second hyperpolarizability (γ) are investigated by the use of a density functional method. A significant intermolecular distance dependence of both quantities is observed. The huge dissociation-induced polarizability enhancement is analyzed in terms of the molecular orbital evolution. It is shown that the obtained results can provide a new look at the microscopic origin of the extraordinary dielectric properties of TeO(2) glass.

  10. Core disruptive accident margin seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, J.; Belsick, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for sealing the annulus defined between a substantially cylindrical rotatable first riser assembly and plug combination disposed in a substantially cylindrical second riser assembly and plug combination of a nuclear reactor system. The apparatus comprises a flexible member disposed between the first and second riser components and attached to a metal member which is attached to an actuating mechanism. When the actuating mechanism is not actuated, the flexible member does not contact the riser components thus allowing the free rotation of the riser components. When desired, the actuating mechanism causes the flexible member to contact the first and second riser components in a manner to block the annulus defined between the riser components, thereby sealing the annulus between the riser components

  11. Transport of multiassembly sealed canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, R.D.; Lehnert, R.A.; Rosa, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    A significant portion of the commercial spent nuclear fuel in dry storage in the US will be stored in multiassembly sealed canisters before the DOE begins accepting fuel from utilities in 1998. This paper reports that it is desirable from economic and ALARA perspectives to transfer these canisters directly from the plant to the MRS. To this end, it is necessary that the multiassembly sealed canisters, which have been licensed for storage under 10CFR72, be qualified for shipment within a suitable shipping cask under the rules of 10CFR71. Preliminary work performed to date indicates that it is feasible to license a current canister design for transportation, and work is proceeding on obtaining NRC approval

  12. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVault, Robert C.; McConnell, Benjamin W.; Phillips, Benjamin A.

    1996-01-01

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit.

  13. Fabrication of sealed radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mars, Jean.

    1977-01-01

    The description is given for fabricating a sealed radiation source, consisting in depositing on a metal substrate a thin active coat of a radioelement, termed first coat, submitting this coated substrate to an oxidation treatment in order to obtain on the first coat an inactive coat of an oxide of the metal, termed second coat, and depositing a coat of varnish on this second inactive coat [fr

  14. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Glass Lens Molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2015-01-01

    The required accuracy for the final dimensions of the molded lenses in wafer-based precision glass molding as well as the need for elimination of costly experimental trial and error calls for numerical simulations. This study deals with 3D thermo-mechanical modeling of the wafer-based precision...... glass lens molding process. First, a comprehensive 3D thermo-mechanical model of glass is implemented into a FORTRAN user subroutine (UMAT) in the FE program ABAQUS, and the developed FE model is validated with both a well-known sandwich seal test and experimental results of precision molding of several...... glass rings. Afterward, 3D thermo-mechanical modeling of the wafer-based glass lens manufacturing is performed to suggest a proper molding program (i.e., the proper set of process parameters including preset force-time and temperature-time histories) for molding a wafer to a desired dimension...

  15. Seals for sealing a pressure vessel such as a nuclear reactor vessel or the like

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruns, H.J.; Huelsermann, K.H.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of seals for sealing a pressure vessel such as a nuclear reactor vessel, steam boiler vessel, or any other vessel which is desirably sealed against pressure of the type including a housing and a housing closure that present opposed vertical sealing surfaces which define the sides of a channel. The seals of the present invention comprise at least one sealing member disposed in the channel, having at least one stop face, a base portion and two shank portions extending from the base portion to form a groove-like recess. The shank portions are provided with sealing surfaces arranged to mate with the opposed vertical pressure vessel sealing surfaces. A shank-spreading wedge element also disposed in the channel has at least one stop face and is engaged in the groove-like recess with the sealing member and wedge element stop face adjacent to each other

  16. Diffusion in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubarak, A S

    1991-12-31

    Rutherford backscattering spectromertry technique (RBS) was used to characterize and investigate the depth distribution profiles of Ca-impurities of Ca-doped soda-time glass. The purposely added Ca-impurities were introduced inti the glass matrix by a normal ion exchange diffusion process. The measurements and analysis were performed using 2 MeV {sup 2}He{sup +} ions supplied from the University of Jordan Van de Graff acceierator (JOVAG). The normalized concetration versus depth profile distributions for the Ca-imourities were determined, both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical treatment was carried out by setting up and soiving the diffusion equation under the conditions of the experiment. The resulting profiles are characterized by a compiementary error function. the theoretical treeatment was extended to include the various methods of enhancing the diffusion process, e.g. using an electric field. The diffusion coefficient, assumed constant, of the Ca-impurities exchanged in the soda-lime glass was determined to be 1.23 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup 2}/s. A comparison between theoretically and experimentally determined profiles is made and commented at, where several conclusions are drawn and suggestions for future work are mentioned. (author). 38 refs., 21 figs., 10 Tabs.

  17. Evaluation of the viscoelastic behaviour and glass/mould interface friction coefficient in the wafer based precision glass moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    -placements, internal diameter and thickness of the rings are measured during the tests. Viscoelastic andstructural relaxation behaviour of the glass are implemented into the ABAQUS FEM software through aFORTRAN material subroutine (UMAT) and the FE model is validated with a sandwich seal test. Then, byFE simulation...... of the ring compression test and comparison of the experimental creep with the simulatedone in an iterative procedure, viscoelastic parameters of the glass material are characterized. Finally,interfacial glass/mould friction coefficients at different temperatures are determined through FEM basedfriction...... curves combined with experimental data points. The obtained viscoelastic parameters and inter-facial friction coefficients can later be employed for prediction of the final shape/size as well as the stressdistribution in the glass wafer during a real wafer based precision glass moulding process. © 2014...

  18. Steam Turbine Flow Path Seals (a Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuimin, V. M.

    2018-03-01

    Various types of shroud, diaphragm, and end seals preventing idle leak of working steam are installed in the flow paths of steam turbine cylinders for improving their efficiency. Widely known labyrinth seals are most extensively used in the Russian turbine construction industry. The category of labyrinth seals also includes seals with honeycomb inserts. The developers of seals with honeycomb inserts state that the use of such seals makes it possible to achieve certain gain due to smaller leaks of working fluid and more reliable operation of the system under the conditions in which the rotor rotating parts may rub against the stator elements. However, a positive effect can only be achieved if the optimal design parameters of the honeycomb structure are fulfilled with due regard to the specific features of its manufacturing technology and provided that this structure is applied in a goal-seeking manner in the seals of steam and gas turbines and compressors without degrading their vibration stability. Calculated and preliminary assessments made by experts testify that the replacement of conventional labyrinth seals by seals with honeycomb inserts alone, due to which the radial gaps in the shroud seal can be decreased from 1.5 to 0.5 mm, allows the turbine cylinder efficiency to be increased at the initial stage by approximately 1% with the corresponding gain in the turbine set power output. The use of rectangular-cellular seals may result, according to estimates made by their developers, in a further improvement of turbine efficiency by 0.5-1.0%. The labor input required to fabricate such seals is six to eight times smaller than that to fabricate labyrinth seals with honeycomb inserts. Recent years have seen the turbine construction companies of the United States and Germany advertising the use of abradable (sealing) coatings (borrowed from the gas turbine construction technology) in the turbine designs instead of labyrinth seals. The most efficient performance of

  19. Believing Your Eyes: Strengthening the Reliability of Tags and Seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brim, Cornelia P.; Denlinger, Laura S.

    2013-07-01

    NNSA’s Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) is working together with scientific experts at the DOE national laboratories to develop the tools needed to safeguard and secure nuclear material from diversion, theft, and sabotage--tasks critical to support future arms control treaties that may involve the new challenge of monitoring nuclear weapons dismantlement. Use of optically stimulated luminescent material is one method to enhance the security and robustness of existing tamper indicating devices such as tags and seals.

  20. Design optimization of seal structure for sealing liquid by magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tonggang; Cheng Yusheng; Yang Zhiyi

    2005-01-01

    The durability of the magnetic fluid seal clearly decreases when sealing another liquid because of the interface instability caused by the applied magnetic field and the velocity difference of the two liquids. With an intention to establish a stable interface during sealing liquid, a new magnetic fluid seal was developed in this paper. The parameters of the structure were optimized by a simulation apparatus. And the magnetic fluid seal designed based on the optimum parameters shows good performance and long life for sealing lubricating oil

  1. Vacuum sealing with a spiral grooved gas dynamic seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tadashi

    1979-01-01

    Gas dynamic seals with rectangular spiral grooves are studied theoretically taking the effects of sidewalls of the grooves and the effects of gas compressibility into account, and slip boundary conditions are employed. The results are compared with the existing experimental data and the validity of the theory is confirmed over a wide pressure range except for the extremely low pressures. Suggestions are made regarding the choice of the geometrical dimensions, i.e., aspect ratio, helix angle, clearance parameter and groove width ratio. (author)

  2. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  3. Crystallization In Multicomponent Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  4. Holes generation in glass using large spot femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Yuval; Kotler, Zvi; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate high-throughput, symmetrical, holes generation in fused silica glass using a large spot size, femtosecond IR-laser irradiation which modifies the glass properties and yields an enhanced chemical etching rate. The process relies on a balanced interplay between the nonlinear Kerr effect and multiphoton absorption in the glass which translates into symmetrical glass modification and increased etching rate. The use of a large laser spot size makes it possible to process thick glasses at high speeds over a large area. We have demonstrated such fabricated holes with an aspect ratio of 1:10 in a 1 mm thick glass samples.

  5. Factors influencing chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xiangdong; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    A short summary is given of our studies on the major factors that affect the chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses. These factors include glass composition, solution composition, SA/V (ratio of glass surface area to the volume of solution), radiation, and colloidal formation. These investigations have enabled us to gain a better understanding of the chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses and to accumulate.a data base for modeling the long-term durability of waste glass, which will be used in the risk assessment of nuclear waste disposal. This knowledge gained also enhances our ability to formulate optimal waste glass compositions

  6. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1995-07-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with a piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changes suddenly. the experimental results were compared to the predictions from the mathematical model. The model was successful in predicting the trends in leakage rate that occurred as the balance ratio and sealed pressure changed

  7. Challenges in commercial manufacture of radiation shielding glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive hot-cells employ Radiation Shielding Windows (RSWs), assembled from specialty glasses, developed exclusively for nuclear industry. RSWs serve the twin purpose of direct viewing and shielding protection to the operator and use various types of radiation resistant and optically compatible glasses, such as low-density borosilicate glass; medium-density glass with up to 45% Lead and high-density glass with over 70% lead. Some glasses are Ceria-doped for enhancing their resistance threshold to radiation browning. A clear view of future requirement, capital and environmental costs could be the driving force towards bringing about changes in melting practices, encourage melting development, and enhancing collaboration. With DAE and CGCRI working in tandem, production of the entire range of RSW glasses by an Indian glass industry participant may no longer be a distant dream

  8. Guide to optimized replacement of equipment seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleason, J.F.

    1990-03-01

    A reevaluation of current scheduled replacement intervals of polymeric seals in plant equipment can achieve significant benefits. Information is provided which has the potential for increasing replacement intervals based on better information on how seals have performed through unique nuclear industry tests to qualify equipment, improved elastomers and increased knowledge of the failure mechanisms and related performance. The research was performed by reviewing applications of elastomeric seals in nuclear plants and practice associated with defining seal replacement intervals in the nuclear power and other industries. Performance indicators and how they predict degradation of seals were evaluated. Guidelines and a flow chart for reevaluating seal replacement intervals are provided. 29 refs., 38 figs., 8 tabs

  9. Seal analysis technology for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Liangang; Zhang Liping; Yang Yu; Zang Fenggang

    2009-01-01

    There is the coolant with radiation, high temperature and high pressure in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). It is closely correlated to RPV sealing capability whether the whole nuclear system work well or not. The aim of this paper is to study the seal analysis method and technology, such as the pre-tensioning of the bolt, elastoplastic contact and coupled technology of thermal and structure. The 3 D elastoplastic seal analysis method really and generally consider the loads and model the contact problem with friction between the contact plates. This method is easier than the specialized seal program and used widely. And it is more really than the 2 D seal analysis method. This 3 D elastoplastic seal analysis method has been successfully used in the design and analysis of RPV. (authors)

  10. Folded membrane dialyzer with mechanically sealed edges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markley, F.W.

    A semipermeable membrane is folded in accordion fashion to form a stack of pleats and the edges are sealed so as to isolate the opposite surfaces of the membrane. The stack is contained within a case that provides ports for flow of blood in contact with one surface of the membrane through channels formed by the pleats and also provides ports for flow of a dialysate through channels formed by the pleats in contact with the other surface of the membrane. The serpentine side edges of the membrane are sealed by a solidified plastic material, whereas effective mechanical means are provided to seal the end edges of the folded membrane. The mechanical means include a clamping strip which biases case sealing flanges into a sealed relationship with end portions of the membrane near the end edges, which portions extend from the stack and between the sealing flanges.

  11. Management of disused sealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukauskas, D.; Skridaila, N.

    2003-01-01

    The report presents the requirements on management of disused sealed sources in Lithuania; disused sealed source disposal facilities; performed safety analysis and planed repository safety improvements. The requirements on pre-disposal management of Disused Sealed Sources (DSS) are presented. The requirements on disposal of short lived VLLW and LILW (A, B and C classes) radioactive waste approved in 2002-2003. Generic Waste Acceptance Criteria for Near Surface Disposal, P-2003-01 approved in 2003. Requirements on disposal of Low and intermediate level long lived waste do not exist (D and E classes). Requirements for the disposal of disused sealed sources (F class) do not exist. Disposal method for the F class - Near Surface or Deep geological repository, depending on the waste acceptance criteria. Only one repository for institutional radioactive waste exist in Lithuania - Maisiagala repository. It is near surface RADON type disposal facility, built in 1963 and closed in 1988. It was constructed of the monolithic reinforced concrete with the dimensions 5 m x 15 m x 3 m, the thickness of the sidewalls is about 0.25 m and the thickness of the bottom is about 0.2 m. The overall volume is about 200 m 3 . At time of closure only three fifths of the volume had been filled. The empty two fifths of the vault were filled with concrete, then with sand, then with the concrete (0.01 m), hot bitumen and the 0.05 m asphalt layers. Monolithic concrete that was covered with bitumen and 0.05 m thick layer of asphalt closed the vault. Sand layer the thickness of which was not less than 1.2 m formed the cap. Disused radioactive sources embedded in a biological shielding were buried together with their shielding, the sources without the shielding were buried in two stainless steel containers. The total activity of buried radioactive nuclides is 3.42.10 -15 Bq (calculated according the documentation). There are some uncertainties about the inventory: from 1963 to 1973. After the

  12. Recycling of Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Glass is used for many purposes, but in the waste system glass is predominantly found in terms of beverage and food containers with a relatively short lifetime before ending up in the waste. Furthermore there is a large amount of flat glass used in building materials which also ends up in the waste...... system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  13. Sealing method and sealing device for radioactive waste containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Koji; Otsuki, Akira

    1998-01-01

    A radioactive waste-containing body is hoisted down into a strong-material vessel opened upwardly, and a strong-material lid is hoisted down to the opening of the strong-material-vessel and welded. The strong material vessel is hoisted up and loaded on a corrosion resistant-material bottom plate placed horizontally. A corrosion resistant-material vessel having one opening end and having a corrosion resistant-material flange on the other end and previously agreed with the strong material-vessel main body is hoisted up by a hoisting device having an inserting device so that the opening of the corrosion resistant vessel is directed downwardly. The corrosion resistant vessel is press-fitted to the outside of the strong material-vessel by the inserting device while being heated by a preheater to shrink. Subsequently, the lower end of the corrosion resistant-material vessel and the corrosion resistant-material bottom plate are welded to constitute a corrosion resistant-material vessel. Then, the radioactive waste containing body can be sealed in a sealing vessel comprising the strong-material vessel and the corrosion resistant-material vessel. (N.H.)

  14. Comment on 'Quantum string seal is insecure'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Guangping

    2007-01-01

    An attack strategy was recently proposed by Chau [Phys. Rev. A 75, 012327 (2007)], which was claimed to be able to break all quantum string seal protocols. Here it will be shown that the attack cannot obtain nontrivial information and escape the detection simultaneously in a class of quantum string seal, including the one proposed by He [Int. J. Quantum Inf. 4, 677 (2006)]. Thus it is insufficient to conclude that all quantum string seals are insecure

  15. Ceramic blade with tip seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezer, B.; Bhardwaj, N.K.; Jones, R.B.

    1997-08-05

    The present gas turbine engine includes a disc assembly defining a disc having a plurality of blades attached thereto. The disc has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion and the plurality of blades have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the disc. A shroud assembly is attached to the gas turbine engine and is spaced from the plurality of blades a preestablished distance forming an interface there between. Positioned in the interface is a seal having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being generally equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the plurality of blades. 4 figs.

  16. The Sealed Tube Neutron Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunnell, L.N.; Beyerle, A.; Durkee, R.; Headley, G.; Hurley, P.

    1992-01-01

    A Sealed Tube Neutron Generator (STNG) has been designed and tested at Special Technologies Laboratories (STL) in Santa Barbara, California. Unlike similar tubes that have been used for years in other applications, e.g., by the oil well logging industry, the present device was designed primarily to be part of the Associated Particle Imaging (API) system. Consequently, the size and quality of the neutron spot produced by the STNG is of primary importance. Results from initial measurements indicate that performance goals are satisfied

  17. The Pharmaceutical Capping Process-Correlation between Residual Seal Force, Torque Moment, and Flip-off Removal Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathaes, Roman; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Vorgrimler, Lothar; Steinberg, Henrik; Dreher, Sascha; Roggo, Yves; Nieto, Alejandra; Brown, Helen; Roehl, Holger; Adler, Michael; Luemkemann, Joerg; Huwyler, Joerg; Lam, Philippe; Stauch, Oliver; Mohl, Silke; Streubel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The majority of parenteral drug products are manufactured in glass vials with an elastomeric rubber stopper and a crimp cap. The vial sealing process is a critical process step during fill-and-finish operations, as it defines the seal quality of the final product. Different critical capping process parameters can affect rubber stopper defects, rubber stopper compression, container closure integrity, and also crimp cap quality. A sufficiently high force to remove the flip-off button prior to usage is required to ensure quality of the drug product unit by the flip-off button during storage, transportation, and until opening and use. Therefore, the final product is 100% visually inspected for lose or defective crimp caps, which is subjective as well as time- and labor-intensive. In this study, we sealed several container closure system configurations with different capping equipment settings (with corresponding residual seal force values) to investigate the torque moment required to turn the crimp cap. A correlation between torque moment and residual seal force has been established. The torque moment was found to be influenced by several parameters, including diameter of the vial head, type of rubber stopper (serum or lyophilized) and type of crimp cap (West(®) or Datwyler(®)). In addition, we measured the force required to remove the flip-off button of a sealed container closure system. The capping process had no influence on measured forces; however, it was possible to detect partially crimped vials. In conclusion, a controlled capping process with a defined target residual seal force range leads to a tight crimp cap on a sealed container closure system and can ensure product quality. The majority of parenteral drug products are manufactured in a glass vials with an elastomeric rubber stopper and a crimp cap. The vial sealing process is a critical process step during fill-and-finish operations, as it defines the seal quality of the final product. An adequate force

  18. Upgrading primary heat transport pump seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, T.; Metcalfe, R.; Rhodes, D.; McInnes, D.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the operating environment at the Bruce-A Nuclear Generating Station created the need for an upgraded Primary Heat Transport Pump (PHTP) seal. In particular, the requirement for low pressure running during more frequent start-ups exposed a weakness of the CAN2 seal and reduced its reliability. The primary concern at Bruce-A was the rotation of the CAN2 No. 2 stators in their holders. The introduction of low pressure running exacerbated this problem, giving rapid wear of the stator back face, overheating, and thermocracking. In addition, the resulting increase in friction between the stator and its holder increased stationary-side hysteresis and thereby changed the seal characteristic to the point where interseal pressure oscillations became prevalent. The resultant increased hysteresis also led to hard rubbing of the seal faces during temperature transients. An upgraded seal was required for improved reliability to avoid forced outages and to reduce maintenance costs. This paper describes this upgraded 'replacement seal' and its performance history. In spite of the 'teething' problems detailed in this paper, there have been no forced outages due to the replacement seal, and in the words of a seal maintenance worker at Bruce-A, 'it allows me to go home and sleep at night instead of worrying about seal failures.' (author)

  19. Seal for an object containing nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuerpflug, W.; Nentwich, D.

    1977-01-01

    This seal which cannot be counterfeited, specially for sealing nuclear objects, e.g. fuel rods, not only makes any damage which has taken place obvious, but makes identification according to a key possible. For this purpose a minimum number of 'particles' or small bodies, which are identical but of different permeability, are fixed inside a short tube during 'loading' of the seal in a certain or an accidental sequence. The sequence of the spheres, which represents a key, can only be determined by special electromagnetic measuring equipment. On first opening the seal, this key sequence is irrevocably destroyed. (HP) [de

  20. Quick-sealing design for radiological containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampdla, D.S.; Speer, E.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a quick-sealing assembly and method for forming an adhesive seal on opposite sides of a mechanical seal for a flexible containment bag of the type used for working with radioactively contaminated objects. The assembly includes an elongated mechanical fastener having opposing engaging members affixed at a predetermined distance from each of the elongated edges, with an adhesive layer formed between the mechanical fastener and the elongated edge such that upon engagement of the mechanical fastener and adhesive layers to opposing containment fabric, a neat triple hermetic seal is formed

  1. Quick-sealing design for radiological containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampolia, D.S.; Speer, E.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a quick-sealing assembly and method for forming an adhesive seal on opposite sides of a mechanical seal for a flexible containment bag of the type used for working with radioactively contaminated objects. The assembly includes an elongated mechanical fastener having opposing engaging members affixed at a predetermined distance from each of the elongated edges, with an adhesive layer formed between the mechanical fastener and the elongated edge such that upon engagement of the mechanical fastener and adhesive layers to opposing containment fabric, a neat triple hermetic seal is formed

  2. Reusable tamper-indicating security seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    A reusable tamper-indicating mechanical security seal for use in safeguarding nuclear material has been developed. The high-security seal displays an unpredictable, randomly selected, five-digit code each time it is used. This five digit code serves the same purpose that the serial number does for conventional non-reusable seals - a unique identifier for each use or application. The newly developed reusable seal is completely enclosed within a seamless, tamper-indicating, plastic jacket. The jacket is designed to reveal any attempts to penetrate, section or to chemically remove and replace with a counterfeit for surreptitious purposes

  3. Ductile alloys for sealing modular component interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J.; Wessell, Brian J.; James, Allister W.; Marsh, Jan H.; Gear, Paul J.

    2017-08-08

    A vane assembly (10) having: an airfoil (12) and a shroud (14) held together without metallurgical bonding there between; a channel (22) disposed circumferentially about the airfoil (12), between the airfoil (12) and the shroud (14); and a seal (20) disposed in the channel (22), wherein during operation of a turbine engine having the vane assembly (10) the seal (20) has a sufficient ductility such that a force generated on the seal (20) resulting from relative movement of the airfoil (12) and the shroud (14) is sufficient to plastically deform the seal (20).

  4. Quick-sealing design for radiological containment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampolia, Donald S.; Speer, Elmer

    1990-01-01

    A quick-sealing assembly and method for forming an adhesive seal on opposite sides of a mechanical seal for a flexible containment bag of the type used for working with radioactively contaminated objects. The assembly includes an elongated mechanical fastener having opposing engaging members affixed at a predetermined distance from each of the elongated edges, with an adhesive layer formed between the mechanical fastener and the elongated edge such that upon engagement of the mechanical fastener and adhesive layers to opposing containment fabric, a neat triple hermetic seal is formed.

  5. Properties of Sealing Materials in Groundwater Wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köser, Claus

    pellets as sealing material in groundwater wells. The way and the pattern, in which bentonite pellets are deposited, have been shown to have an effect on the swelling pressure of the bentonite seal. During the transport phase of pellets from the terrain to a given sedimentation depth, a sorting process......) into densities for clay/water systems has been developed. This method has successfully been used to evaluate e.g., macroporosity, homogenization of the bentonite seal during the hydration of water, hydraulic conductivity and the creation of channels in the bentonite seals. Based on the results obtained...

  6. Bingham Sealing and Application in Vacuum Clamping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, S. M.; Teo, Wee Kin; Geng, Zunmin; Turner, Sam; Ridgway, Keith

    2011-12-01

    Vacuum clamping is extensively used in shell machining. In this paper a Bingham Sealing (BS) is presented and formulized based on Bingham plastic performance. The sealing capability of BS is evaluated in various cases. A new Bingham plastic is developed and the yield stress is measured. The performances of "O"ring sealing and BS with the developed Bingham plastic are compared to the static experiment. In this experiment the same vacuum is achieved and the distortion of the blade with BS is better than that with "O" ring sealing.

  7. Bingham Sealing and Application in Vacuum Clamping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, S M; Teo, Wee Kin; Geng Zunmin; Turner, Sam; Ridgway, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Vacuum clamping is extensively used in shell machining. In this paper a Bingham Sealing (BS) is presented and formulized based on Bingham plastic performance. The sealing capability of BS is evaluated in various cases. A new Bingham plastic is developed and the yield stress is measured. The performances of Or ing sealing and BS with the developed Bingham plastic are compared to the static experiment. In this experiment the same vacuum is achieved and the distortion of the blade with BS is better than that with 'O' ring sealing.

  8. Ceramic/metal seals. [refractory materials for hermetic seals for lighium-metal sulfide batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredbenner, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    Design criteria are discussed for a hermetic seal capable of withstanding the 450 C operating temperature of a lithium-metal sulfide battery system. A mechanical seal consisting of two high strength alloy metal sleeves welded or brazed to a conductor assembly and pressed onto a ceramic is described. The conductor center passes through the ceramic but is not sealed to it. The seal is effected on the outside of the taper where the tubular part is pressed down over and makes contact.

  9. 30 CFR 75.337 - Construction and repair of seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sealed areas. (b) Prior to sealing, the mine operator shall— (1) Remove insulated cables, batteries, and other potential electric ignition sources from the area to be sealed when constructing seals, unless it... after April 18, 2008, the seal at the lowest elevation shall have a corrosion-resistant, non-metallic...

  10. Thermo-physical, structural and microstructural properties of glasses containing V2O5 and P2O5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, K.; Kothiyal, G.P.; Montagne, L.; Méar, F.O.; Revel, B.

    2012-01-01

    A number of glass systems belonging to BaO-CaO-SiO 2 have been studied as prospective sealing materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). These materials should provide good bonding with cell components and satisfy the requirements for high temperature applications related to thermal expansion coefficient (TEC), reactivity at interfaces, mechanical integrity etc. The thermo- physical and sealing characteristics of glasses can be controlled by controlling the crystallization, therefore different nucleating agents such as NiO, P 2 O 5 etc is used, however, addition of P 2 O 5 may lead to increase in the sealing characteristics of glasses as it scavenges the modifier from the glass matrix

  11. Oxygen enhancement ratio for negative pi mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Astor, M.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were performed at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) to determine the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) for the clinically used beam of negative pi mesons. V79 Chinese hamster cells, cultured in vitro, were used as the biological test system; hypoxia was produced by metabolic depletion as a result of sealing 2 million cells in 1 ml glass ampules. The Bragg peak of the pion depth dose curve was spread out to cover 10 cm by using a dynamic range shifter. Cells were irradiated at the center of the spead out Bragg peak, where the dose/rate was 0.1 Gy/min over a 6 x 6 cm field. The OER obtained was 2.2, compared with 3.8 obtained for γ rays under the same conditions

  12. Albinistic common seals (Phoca vitulina) and melanistic grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) rehabilitated in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osinga, Nynke; 't Hart, Pieter; Vader, Pieter C. van Voorst

    2010-01-01

    The Seal Rehabilitation and Research Centre (SRRC) in Pieterburen, The Netherlands, rehabilitates seals from the waters of the Wadden Sea, North Sea and Southwest Delta area. Incidental observations of albinism and melanism in common and grey seals are known from countries surrounding the North Sea.

  13. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of annular seals and rotor systems in multi-stage pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Qinglei; Zhai, Lulu; Wang, Leqin; Wu, Dazhuan

    2013-01-01

    Annular seals play an important role in determining the vibrational behavior of rotors in multi-stage pumps. To determine the critical speeds and unbalanced responses of rotor systems which consider annular seals, a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) method was developed, and the numerical method was verified by experiments conducted on a model rotor. In a typical FSI process, rotor systems are modeled based on a node-element method, and the motion equations are expressed in a type of matrix. To consider the influence of annular seals, dynamic coefficients of annular seals were introduced into the motion equations through matrix transformation. The test results of the model rotor showed good agreement with the calculated results. Based on the FSI method proposed here, the governing equations of annular seals were solved in two different ways. The results showed that the Childs method is more accurate in predicting a rotor's critical speed. The critical speeds of the model rotor were calculated at different clearance sizes and length/diameter ratios. Tilting coefficients of long seals were added to the dynamic coefficients to consider the influence of tilting. The critical speeds reached their maximum value when the L/D ratio was around 1.25, and tilting enhanced the rotor's stability when long annular seals were located in either end of the shaft.

  14. Safeguards sealing systems for Zebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingram, G.; Jamieson, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    A relatively simple design has been produced for safeguards seals to be applied throughout the fuel containing areas at Zebra. It is based on the use of wire seals and regular Inspector surveillance. The application of the system would allow an Inspector to establish to a high degree of confidence that significant quantities of fuel had not been diverted during an intensive experimental programme. It would add about 5% to the time required for experiments, and careful planning would reduce this value. The inspection effort required to witness element movements during the experimental programme would average about 2 hours per day, with a further 2 hours spent each week on NDA of the fuel exposed. The Safeguards Inspector would require to spend about 25% of his time in the reactor area and would have ample time to deal with the relatively small number of fuel movements taking place in the storage area and with his duties elsewhere in the plant. During a core change, full-time inspection effort would be required for about 6 weeks each year. (author)

  15. Spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mookerjee, Abhijit

    1976-01-01

    ''Spin glasses'', are entire class of magnetic alloys of moderate dilution, in which the magnetic atoms are far enough apart to be unlike the pure metal, but close enough so that the indirect exchange energy between them (mediated by the s-d interaction between local moments and conduction electrons) dominates all other energies. Characteristic critical phenomena displayed such as freezing of spin orientation at 'Tsub(c)' and spreading of magnetic ordering, are pointed out. Anomalous behaviour, associated with these critical phenomena, as reflected in : (i) Moessbauer spectroscopy giving hyperfine splitting at Tsub(c), (ii) maxima in susceptibility and remanent magnetism, (iii) thermopower maxima and change in slope, (iv) Characteristic cusp in susceptibility and its removal by very small magnetic fields, and (v) conductivity-resistivity measurements, are discussed. Theoretical developments aimed at explaining these phenomena, in particular, the ideas from percolation and localisation theories, and the approach based on the gellations of polymers, are discussed. Finally, a new approach based on renormalisation group in disordered systems is also briefly mentioned. (K.B.)

  16. Comparative study of resin sealant and resin modified glass ionomer as pit and fissure sealant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Malek

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to compare the marginal integrity of resin modified glass ionomer cement with that of resin sealant, in vitro. Forty artificial pit and fissure cavities were prepared in occlusal surface of extracted premolar teeth by using ¼ round carbide bur. Cavities were condensed with artificial organic debris followed by cleaning with prophylaxis pumice brush and paste and then separated into two treatment groups. In Group A, 15 fissure cavities were sealed by resin sealant and in Group B, 15 fissure cavities were sealed by resin modified glass ionomer sealant. These specimens were subjected to thermo-cycling followed by dye penetration test. The remaining 5 cavities from each group were analyzed for debris score by the SEM. The results of the microleakage test showed that the efficacy of preventing microleakage of samples sealed by resin modified glass ionomer sealant was higher than the samples sealed by resin sealant. However, no significant differences were found. It can be concluded that use of resin modified glass ionomer sealant is a good alternative for sealing pits and fissures.

  17. A magnetic fluid seal for rotary blood pumps: effects of seal structure on long-term performance in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Sayaka; Amari, Shuichi; Okamoto, Eiji; Murabayashi, Shun; Nishimura, Ikuya

    2011-03-01

    A magnetic fluid (MF) seal enables mechanical contact-free rotation of the shaft and hence has excellent durability. The performance of an MF seal, however, has been reported to decrease in liquids. We developed an MF seal that has a "shield" mechanism, and a new MF with a higher magnetization of 47.9 kA/m. The sealing performance of the MF seal installed in a rotary blood pump was studied. Three types of MF seals were used. Seal A was a conventional seal without a shield. Seal B had the same structure as that of Seal A, but the seal was installed at 1 mm below liquid level. Seal C was a seal with a shield and the MF was set at 1 mm below liquid level. Seal A failed after 6 and 11 days. Seal B showed better results (20 and 73 days). Seal C showed long-term durability (217 and 275 days). The reason for different results in different seal structures was considered to be different flow conditions near the magnetic fluid. Fluid dynamics near the MF in the pump were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. We have developed an MF seal with a shield that works in liquid for >275 days. The MF seal is promising as a shaft seal for rotary blood pumps.

  18. Enhanced 3  μm luminescence properties based on effective energy transfer Yb3+ : 2F5/2→Dy3+ : 6H5/2 in fluoaluminate glass modified by TeO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Fangwei; Huang, Feifei; Wang, Tao; Tian, Ying; Lei, Ruoshan; Ye, Renguang; Zhang, Junjie; Zhang, Long; Xu, Shiqing

    2017-11-01

    Enhanced 3 μm luminescence of Dy 3+ based on the effective process of Yb 3+ :F 5/2 2→Dy 3+ :H 5/2 6 with a higher energy transfer coefficient of 7.36×10 -39   cm 6 /s in fluoaluminate glass modified by TeO 2 was obtained. The energy transfer efficiency from Yb 3+ to Dy 3+ in Dy 3+ /Yb 3+ codoped glass was as high as 80%, indicating the effective energy transfer of Yb 3+ . The higher temperature of the glass transition (T g ) and larger characteristic temperatures (ΔT,K gl ) revealed better thermal properties of the prepared glasses compared with the traditional fluoaluminate glasses, which is of great benefit to fiber drawing. The lower hydroxyl content (15.7 ppm) indicated better fluorescence properties of the glass. It was noted that the longer lifetime of 572 μs and higher emission cross section of 5.22×10 -21   cm 2 along with the bandwidth of 245 nm around 3 μm proved potential applications in mid-IR laser materials of the present glass.

  19. Stability and sealing of PEC solar cells; Stabilitet og forsegling af PEC solceller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, H.

    2009-06-15

    A requirement for success of the DSC technology on the market for building-integrated PV is visually attractive DSC panels holding a lifetime comparable to alternative facade materials and delivering electricity at reasonable prices. This project concerns the stability and durability of the DSC panel as these are decisive factors for the lifetime of the panels and the price of the produced electricity. The largest challenge of the DSC sealing is the high-performing well-documented - but also aggressive and volatile - iodine/triiodide electrolyte. The heat-sensitive Ru-dyes represent another challenge, as the dye should not be exposed to temperatures above approx. 100 deg. C during the sealing process. Despite the fact that less aggressive electrolytes and more stable dyes are highly focused R and D tasks, the work in the actual project has been carried out according to a 'worst case' strategy, i.e. the search has been for a sealing which is compatible with the iodine/triiodide electrolyte and the Ru-dyes. The rationale behind this strategy is the demanding lifetime requirement s for building-integrated products, which requires the ultimate sealing. In addition to the focus on the DSC sealing, work has been dedicated to the development of a more encapsulation-friendly electrolyte, in which the electrolyte's volatile component has been replaced by an ionic liquid. The ultimate result of the project is an improved polymer edge sealing for DSC cells. The sealant is - contrary to Surlyn and Bynel - stable in contact with the aggressive iodine/ triiodide electrolyte. The sealing is formed by lamination at elevated temperature and under controlled conditions. The robustness and capacity of the sealing process need to be further improved in order to fulfill the laboratories ambitions with regard to volume production of DSC cells and modules. Furthermore should the new sealing be compared both stability-wise and cost-wise with the lead-free solder glass

  20. Boring and Sealing Rock with Directed Energy Millimeter-Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woskov, P.; Einstein, H. H.; Oglesby, K.

    2015-12-01

    Millimeter-wave directed energy is being investigated to penetrate into deep crystalline basement rock formations to lower well costs and to melt rocks, metals, and other additives to seal wells for applications that include nuclear waste storage and geothermal energy. Laboratory tests have established that intense millimeter-wave (MMW) beams > 1 kW/cm2 can melt and/ or vaporize hard crystalline rocks. In principle this will make it possible to create open boreholes and a method to seal them with a glass/ceramic liner and plug formed from the original rock or with other materials. A 10 kW, 28 GHz commercial (CPI) gyrotron system with a launched beam diameter of about 32 mm was used to heat basalt, granite, limestone, and sandstone specimens to temperatures over 2500 °C to create melts and holes. A calibrated 137 GHz radiometer view, collinear with the heating beam, monitored real time peak rock temperature. A water load surrounding the rock test specimen primarily monitored unabsorbed power at 28 GHz. Power balance analysis of the laboratory observations shows that the temperature rise is limited by radiative heat loss, which would be expected to be trapped in a borehole. The analysis also indicates that the emissivity (absorption efficiency) in the radiated infrared range is lower than the emissivity at 28 GHz, giving the MMW frequency range an important advantage for rock melting. Strength tests on one granite type indicated that heating the rock initially weakens it, but with exposure to higher temperatures the resolidified black glassy product regains strength. Basalt was the easiest to melt and penetrate, if a melt leak path was provided, because of its low viscosity. Full beam holes up to about 50 mm diameter (diffraction increased beam size) were achieved through 30 mm thick basalt and granite specimens. Laboratory experiments to form a seal in an existing hole have also been carried out by melting rock and a simulated steel casing.

  1. Cover gas seals. 11 - FFTF-LMFBR seal-test program, January-March 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurzeka, W.; Oliva, R.; Welch, F.

    1974-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to: (1) conduct static and dynamic tests to demonstrate or determine the mechanical performance of full-size (cross section) FFTF fuel transfer machine and reactor vessel head seals intended for use in a sodium vapor - inert gas environment, (2) demonstrate that these FFTF seals or new seal configuration provide acceptable fission product and cover gas retention capabilities at LMFBR Clinch River Plant operating environmental conditions other than radiation, and (3) develop improved seals and seal technology for the LMFBR Clinch River Plant to support the national objective to reduce all atmospheric contaminations to low levels

  2. Phocine Distemper in German Seals, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlsein, Peter; Beineke, Andreas; Haas, Ludwig; Greiser-Wilke, Irene; Siebert, Ursula; Fonfara, Sonja; Harder, Timm; Stede, Michael; Gruber, Achim.D.; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 21,700 seals died during a morbillivirus epidemic in northwestern Europe in 2002. Phocine distemper virus 1 was isolated from seals in German waters. The sequence of the P gene showed 97% identity with the Dutch virus isolated in 1988. There was 100% identity with the Dutch isolate from 2002 and a single nucleotide mismatch with the Danish isolate. PMID:15200869

  3. Electron beam selectively seals porous metal filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, J. A.; Tulisiak, G.

    1968-01-01

    Electron beam welding selectively seals the outer surfaces of porous metal filters and impedances used in fluid flow systems. The outer surface can be sealed by melting a thin outer layer of the porous material with an electron beam so that the melted material fills all surface pores.

  4. Earlier pupping in harbour seals, Phoca vitulina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, P.J.H.; Brasseur, S.M.J.M.; Meesters, H.W.G.

    2010-01-01

    The annual reproductive cycle of most seal species is characterized by a tight synchrony of births. Typically, timing of birth shows little inter-annual variation. Here, however we show that harbour seals Phoca vitulina from the Wadden Sea (southeast North Sea) have shortened their yearly cycle,

  5. Performance evaluation of chip seals in Idaho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The intent of this research project is to identify a wide variety of parameters that influence the performance of pavements treated via chip seals within the State of Idaho. Chip sealing is currently one of the most popular methods of maintenance for...

  6. 39 CFR 2.4 - Seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seal. 2.4 Section 2.4 Postal Service UNITED STATES... Secretary of State, and is required by 39 U.S.C. 207 to be judicially noticed. The Seal shall be in the... description of the Postal Service emblem is described at 39 CFR 221.7. ...

  7. Floating seal system for rotary devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasiuk, H.A.

    1983-08-23

    This invention relates to a floating seal system for rotary devices to reduce gas leakage around the rotary device in a duct and across the face of the rotary device to an adjacent duct. The peripheral seal bodies are made of resilient material having a generally U-shaped cross section wherein one of the legs is secured to a support member and the other of the legs forms a contacting seal against the rotary device. The legs of the peripheral seal form an extended angle of intersection of about 10[degree] to about 30[degree] in the unloaded condition to provide even sealing forces around the periphery of the rotary device. The peripheral seal extends around the periphery of the support member except where intersected by radial seals which reduce gas leakage across the face of the rotary device and between adjacent duct portions. The radial seal assembly is fabricated from channel bars, the smaller channel bar being secured to the divider of the support member and a larger inverted rigid floating channel bar having its legs freely movable over the legs of the smaller channel bar forming therewith a tubular channel. A resilient flexible tube is positioned within the tubular channel for substantially its full length to reduce gas leakage across the tubular channel. A spacer extends beyond the face of the floating channel near each end of the floating channel a distance to provide desired clearance between the floating channel and the face of the rotary device. 5 figs.

  8. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF MAGNETIC FLUID SEAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Bashtovoi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Dependences of critical pressure drop, being held by magnetic fluid seal, on time in a static state and shaft rotation velocity in dynamics have been experimentally determined. The significant influence of particles’ redistribution in magnetic fluid on static parameters of magnetic fluid seal has been established.

  9. Sealing a Loosely Fitting Valve Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, L.; Tellier, G.

    1986-01-01

    Double-ring seal avoids expense of remachining or redesigning valve parts. Mating fittings on valve sealed by pair of rings - one O-ring and backup ring. Backup ring fills relatively large gap between parts. Prevents softer O-ring from being pushed into and through gap.

  10. 19 CFR 101.7 - Customs seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs seal. 101.7 Section 101.7 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.7 Customs seal. (a) Design. According to the design furnished by the Department...

  11. Dura Seal recommendations for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Reactor systems (BWR, PWR and Candu) are briefly reviewed with reference to the pumping services encountered in each system, to indicate the conditions imposed on mechanical seals for nuclear power plant liquid handling equipment. A description of the Dura Seals used in each service is included. (U.K.)

  12. Sealing Occlusal Dentin Caries in Permanent Molars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Vibeke; Borum, Mette Kit; Møller, Kirsten Dynes

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of postponing restorative intervention of manifest occlusal caries in young, permanent dentition by non-invasive sealing. This RCT-designed study included 521 occlusal lesions in 521 patients aged 6 to 17 y. Based on clinical and radiog......The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of postponing restorative intervention of manifest occlusal caries in young, permanent dentition by non-invasive sealing. This RCT-designed study included 521 occlusal lesions in 521 patients aged 6 to 17 y. Based on clinical...... longevity of sealings and restorations until retreatments, and 3) compare effectiveness of sealings and restorations to halt caries progression in sealed lesions and beneath restorations. Furthermore, we aimed to identify factors influencing longevity and the effectiveness of sealings and restorations.......001). The median survival time for sealings not replaced by restorations was 7.3 y (CI, 6.4 y to NA). Survival of sealings was increased in patients with low caries risk and/or excellent oral hygiene, second molars compared with first molars, and lesions not extending the middle one-third of the dentin. Survival...

  13. Influence of operating microscope in the sealing of cervical perforations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Bruna Schwingel; Zaccara, Ivana Maria; Reis Só, Marcus Vinícius; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Kopper, Patrícia Maria Poli

    2016-01-01

    Accidental root canal perforations are among the main complications of endodontic treatment. This study evaluated the influence of operating microscope (OM) in the marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) (Angelus(®)) and glass ionomer (Vitremer) inserted into cervical perforations. Perforations were made in the cervical third of the buccal wall of the root canal in mandibular incisors. Next, the teeth were divided into four groups (N = 10): MG - MTA without OM; VG - Vitremer without OM; MOMG - MTA with OM; VOMG - Vitremer with OM. The perforations were sealed according to the group and the teeth were prepared for analysis by confocal laser scanning microscope. Images of perforation region (1,024×) were made and the gap presented by the materials was measured using the Image J program. LEXT OLS4100 three dimensional (3D) measuring laser microscope measured the volumetric misfit. Data of gap were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's tests compared the volumetric misfits. The results showed lower volume and gap in the interface dentin/material in VOMG compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The use of OM improved the quality of cervical perforations sealed with Vitremer, being indicated in clinical situations of iatrogenic cervical perforations.

  14. Machine Vision Inspection of Polymeric Traypack Seal Areas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coburn, John

    2002-01-01

    .... Since entrapped matter can lead to open seals, defects, and seal anomalies, a method of measurement for seal area contamination is useful in quantifying effects of filler changes, line speeds, and product formulations...

  15. Sealing of boreholes using natural, compatible materials: Granular salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, R.E.; Zeuch, D.H.; Stormont, J.C.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1994-01-01

    Granular salt can be used to construct high performance permanent seals in boreholes which penetrate rock salt formations. These seals are described as seal systems comprised of the host rock, the seal material, and the seal rock interface. The performance of these seal systems is defined by the complex interactions between these seal system components through time. The interactions are largely driven by the creep of the host formation applying boundary stress on the seal forcing host rock permeability with time. The immediate permeability of these seals is dependent on the emplaced density. Laboratory test results suggest that careful emplacement techniques could results in immediate seal system permeability on the order of 10 -16 m 2 to 10 -18 m 2 (10 -4 darcy to 10 -6 ). The visco-plastic behavior of the host rock coupled with the granular salts ability to ''heal'' or consolidate make granular salt an ideal sealing material for boreholes whose permanent sealing is required

  16. Active Infrared Thermography for Seal Contamination Detection in Heat-Sealed Food Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlien D’huys

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Packaging protects food products from environmental influences, assuring quality and safety throughout shelf life if properly performed. Packaging quality depends on the quality of the packaging material and of the closure or seal. A common problem possibly jeopardizing seal quality is the presence of seal contamination, which can cause a decreased seal strength, an increased packaging failure risk and leak formation. Therefore, early detection and removal of seal contaminated packages from the production chain is crucial. In this work, a pulsed-type active thermography method using the heated seal bars as an excitation source was studied for detecting seal contamination. Thermal image sequences of contaminated seals were recorded shortly after sealing. The detection performances of six thermal image processing methods, based on a single frame, a fit of the cooling profiles, thermal signal reconstruction, pulsed phase thermography, principal component thermography and a matched filter, were compared. High resolution digital images served as a reference to quantify seal contamination, and processed thermal images were mapped to these references. The lowest detection limit (equivalent diameter 0.60 mm was obtained for the method based on a fit of the cooling profiles. Moreover, the detection performance of this method did not depend strongly on the time after sealing at which recording of the thermal images was started, making it a robust and generally applicable method.

  17. Sealed ion accelerator tubes (survey)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsik, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    The first publications on developing commercial models of small-scale sealed accelerator tubes in which neutrons are generated appeared in the foreign press in 1954 to 1957; they were very brief and were advertising-oriented. The tubes were designed for neutron logging of oil wells instead of ampule neutron sources (Po + Be, Ra + Be). Later, instruments of this type began to be called neutron tubes from the resulting neutron radiation that they gave off. In Soviet Union a neutron tube was developed in 1958 in connection with the development of the pulsed neutron-neutron method of studying the geological profile of oil wells. At that time the tube developed was intended, in the view of its inventors, to replace standard isotope sources with constant neutron yield. A fairly detailed survey of neutron tubes was made in the studies. 8 refs., 8 figs

  18. PWR thermocouple mechanical sealing structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Qiuping; He Youguang

    1991-08-01

    The PWR in-core temperature detection device, which is one of measures to insure reactor safety operation, is to monitor and diagnose reactor thermal power output and in-core power distribution. The temperature detection device system uses thermocouples as measuring elements with stainless steel protecting sleeves. The thermocouple has a limited service time and should be replaced after its service time has reached. A new sealing device for the thermocouples of reactor in-core temperature detection system has been developed to facilitate replacement. The structure is complete tight under high temperature and pressure without any leakage and seepage, and easy to be assembled or disassembled in radioactive environment. The device is designed to make it possible to replace the thermocouple one by one if necessary. This is a new, simple and practical structure

  19. Study on sealing of boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    A bibliographical research on the problem of the backfilling and sealing of boreholes, shafts and tunnels for radioactive waste disposal has been carried out. Various materials - both natural and artificial - like clay, industrial cement, polymer concrete, geothermical and magnesium cement have been examined. Their main physico-chemical and durability characteristics have been examined. The problem of the interaction between the sealing and the geological environment has been also dealt. The final subject discussed in the bibliography is the damage caused to the host formation by the excavation of shafts and tunnels. The laboratory tests have been performed on a natural clay and other types of material (cement grout, cement grout with expansive additive, cement mortar and remoulded clay) which have been used as plug materials. The main conclusions obtained from the tests are the following: - The permeability of the cement is lower than the permeability of the clay; - no adhesion was observed between clay and cement mortar, with or without expansive additive, when cured under different ambient conditions, but without any application of load; - When curing took place under load, good adhesion was observed between the clay and the cement mortar; - The flow of water in a specimen consisting of a clay core surrounded by remoulded clay is larger than in the natural clay. These results seem to be caused by the different permeabilities of the remoulded and undisturbed clay and not to depend on flow at the contact between the two materials. A remote instrumentation package for the in situ evaluation of the performance of a plug, has been developed. In order to get rid of the uncertainty associated with the infiltration of the cables through the plug a wireless data transmission system, based on acoustic waves, has been developed

  20. Ocean climate and seal condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crocker Daniel E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The condition of many marine mammals varies with fluctuations in productivity and food supply in the ocean basin where they forage. Prey is impacted by physical environmental variables such as cyclic warming trends. The weaning weight of northern elephant seal pups, Mirounga angustirostris, being closely linked to maternal condition, indirectly reflects prey availability and foraging success of pregnant females in deep waters of the northeastern Pacific. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of ocean climate on foraging success in this deep-diving marine mammal over the course of three decades, using cohort weaning weight as the principal metric of successful resource accrual. Results The mean annual weaning weight of pups declined from 1975 to the late 1990s, a period characterized by a large-scale, basin-wide warm decadal regime that included multiple strong or long-duration El Niños; and increased with a return to a cool decadal regime from about 1999 to 2004. Increased foraging effort and decreased mass gain of adult females, indicative of reduced foraging success and nutritional stress, were associated with high ocean temperatures. Conclusion Despite ranging widely and foraging deeply in cold waters beyond coastal thermoclines in the northeastern Pacific, elephant seals are impacted significantly by ocean thermal dynamics. Ocean warming redistributes prey decreasing foraging success of females, which in turn leads to lower weaning mass of pups. Annual fluctuations in weaning mass, in turn, reflect the foraging success of females during the year prior to giving birth and signals changes in ocean temperature cycles.

  1. Fabrication of Annealed Gold Nanostructures on Pre-Treated Glow-Discharge Cleaned Glasses and Their Used for Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS Detection of Adsorbed (Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Elena Ionescu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanoparticles are considered as active supports in the development of specific chemical or biological biosensors. Well-organized nanoparticles can be prepared either through expensive (e.g., electron beam lithography or inexpensive (e.g., thermal synthesis approaches where different shapes of nanoparticles are easily obtained over large solid surfaces. Herein, the authors propose a low-cost thermal synthesis of active plasmonic nanostructures on thin gold layers modified glass supports after 1 h holding on a hot plate (~350 °C. The resulted annealed nanoparticles proved a good reproducibility of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS optical responses and where used for the detection of low concentrations of two model (biochemical molecules, namely the human cytochrome b5 (Cyt-b5 and trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridylethylene (BPE.

  2. A hybrid floating brush seal (HFBS) for improved sealing and wear performance in turbomachinery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattime, Scott Byran

    A conceptually new type of seal has been developed for gas turbine applications which dramatically reduces wear and leakage associated with current labyrinth and brush seal technologies. The Hybrid Floating Brush Seal (HFBS) combines brush seal and film riding face seal technologies to create a hybrid seal that allows both axial and radial excursions of the sealed shaft, while simultaneously eliminating interface surface speeds (friction and heat) between the rotor and the brush material that characterize standard brush seal technology. A simple test rig was designed to evaluate feasibility of the HFBS under relatively low pressures and rotational speeds (50psig, 5krpm). A second test stand was created to study the effects of centrifugal force on bristle deflection. A third test facility was constructed for prototype development and extensive room temperature testing at moderate pressures and fairly high rotational speeds (100psig, 40krpm). This test rig also allowed the evaluation of the HFBS during axial movement of a rotating shaft. An analytical model to predict the effects of centrifugal force on the bristles of a rotating brush seal was developed. Room temperature analysis of the HFBS proved successful for relatively high operating rotational velocities at moderate pressures with very acceptable leakage rates for gas turbine engines. Brush seals were able to track rotor speeds up to 24krpm while maintaining sealing integrity. The HFBS's ability to function under axial shaft displacement and synchronous dynamic radial loading was also proven successful. Hydrodynamic performance of the face seal was proven to provide adequate stiffness and load carrying capacity to keep the brush seal from contacting the face seal at pressure drops across the brush of up to 100psi. Leakage performance over standard brush seal and labyrinth technology was quite dramatic. The HFBS showed its sealing advantage using much higher radial interference between the rotor and the bristle

  3. Does the seal licensing system in Scotland have a negative impact on seal welfare?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Nunny

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the licensing system that permits seal shooting in Scotland, which was established under Part 6 Conservation of Seals of the Marine (Scotland Act 2010. Four approaches were used: data were collated and analyzed from both the Scottish Government and Scottish Marine Animal Stranding Scheme; a survey was sent to current license holders and informal interviews were conducted with key stakeholder types. Between February 2011 and the end of October 2015, 1229 gray seals and 275 common seals were reported shot under license to the Scottish Government. The numbers of seals reported as shot has reduced year-on-year since the licensing system was put in place. While some license holders, notably fish farms, were using some non-lethal forms of deterrent to reduce seal-related damage, these were often used alongside seal shooting. Of the seals reported as shot to the Scottish Government, only a small percentage were also reported to the Scottish Marine Animal Stranding Scheme, despite this being a licensing requirement. Only 2.3% of the shot gray seals and 4.5% of the shot common seals were necropsied. There is evidence from these necropsies that some seals had not died instantly or had not been shot in the manner recommended by the Scottish Seal Management Code of Practice. These preliminary results show that more carcasses need to be recovered and necropsied if the welfare implications of current seal shooting practice are to be properly assessed. The current legislation does not specify closed seasons to protect breeding seals and thirty-five per cent of necropsied seals were pregnant gray seals. Seals have also been shot during their lactation periods when pups are dependent on their mothers. This raises significant welfare concerns. The re-introduction of closed seasons specific to each species of seal is recommended along with greater effort to deploy non-lethal methods. Independent assessment of the number of seals being killed

  4. Glass-ceramic material and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Kerry D [Richland, WA; Vienna, John D [West Richland, WA; Armstrong, Timothy R [Pasco, WA; Pederson, Larry R [Kennewick, WA

    2002-08-13

    The present invention is a glass-ceramic material and method of making useful for joining at least two solid ceramic parts. The seal is a blend of M.sub.A O--M.sub.B O.sub.y --SiO.sub.2 that substantially matches a coefficient of thermal expansion of the solid electrolyte. According to the present invention, a series of glass ceramics in the M.sub.A O--M.sub.B O.sub.y --SiO.sub.2 system can be used to join or seal both tubular and planar ceramic solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen electrolyzers, and membrane reactors for the production of syngas, commodity chemicals and other products.

  5. Interaction between clay-based shaft seal components and crystalline host rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priyanto, D.; Dixon, D.; Man, A.

    2010-01-01

    would experience smaller displacement. A linear elastic model is used to simulate mechanical behaviour of unfractured rock and concrete components. The unfractured rock has a Young's modulus (E) and Poisson's ratio (ν) of approximately 60 GPa and 0.25, respectively, while the concrete has approximately 36 GPa and 0.25, respectively. Lower E is used to describe the mechanical properties of the FZ. Based on the range of measured rock hydraulic conductivity at the URL, the distribution of the hydraulic conductivity (K) for the unfractured rock is 10 -13 to 10 -12 m/s, while the FZ has a higher K value (10 -10 to 10 -9 m/s). The concrete seals (CS) in the shaft seal to be modelled are defined as being composed of low-heat high-performance concrete (LHHPC) of the type used in the Tunnel Sealing Experiment (TSX) and the Enhanced Sealing Project (ESP). The K value of the LHHPC from the in situ measurement is approximately 10 -10 to 10 -13 m/s. This H-M numerical modelling is solved using a computer code (e.g. FLAC) and the results show the evolution of pore fluid pressure, degree of saturation, dry density, and total stress of each shaft seal component. The discussion focuses on the interaction of the clay-based sealing components (BS and DBF) and the host rock. (authors)

  6. Analysis on the Viscous Pumping in a Magnetic Fluid Seal Under a Rotating Load and the Seal Design

    OpenAIRE

    長屋, 幸助; 大沼, 浩身; 佐藤, 淳

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses effects of viscous pumping in a magnetic fluid seal under a rotating load. The Reynolds equation was presented for the seal based on magnetic fluid mechanics, and the expressions for obtaining pressures in the seal, eccentricities of the rotating shaft due to the viscous pumping and seal pressures were given. Numerical Calculations were carried out for some sample problems, and the effect of magnetic flux densities on the pressure in the seal and the seal pressures were c...

  7. lead glass brick

    CERN Multimedia

    When you look through the glass at a picture behind, the picture appears raised up because light is slowed down in the dense glass. It is this density (4.06 gcm-3) that makes lead glass attractive to physicists. The refractive index of the glass is 1.708 at 400nm (violet light), meaning that light travels in the glass at about 58% its normal speed. At CERN, the OPAL detector uses some 12000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  8. Design and development of face seal type sealing plug for advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, S.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Patel, R.J.; Agrawal, R.G.; Vaze, K.K.

    2005-09-01

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor is a vertical pressure tube type reactor having light water as its coolant and heavy water as moderator. Sealing plug is required to close the pressure boundary of main heat transport system of the reactor by preventing escape of light water/steam From the coolant channel. There are 452 coolant channels in the reactor located in square lattice pitch. Sealing plug is located at the top of each coolant channel (in the top end fitting). Top end fitting is having a stepped bore to create a sealing face. Sealing plug is held through its expanded jaws in a specially provided groove of the end fitting. The plug was designed and prototypes were manufactured considering its functional importance, intricate design and precision machining requirements. Sealing plug consists of about 20 components mostly made up of precipitation hardening stainless steel, which is suitable for water environment and meets other requirements of strength and resistance to wear and galling. Seal disc is a critical component of the sealing plug as it is the pressure-retaining component. It is a circular disc with protruded stem. One face of the seal disc is nickel plated in the peripheral area that creates the sealing by abutting against the sealing face provided in the end fitting. The typical shape and profile of seal disc provides flexibility and allows elastic deformation to assist in locking of sealing plug and creating adequate seating force for effective sealing. Design and development aspects of the sealing plug have been detailed out in this report. Also results of stress analysis and experimental studies for seal disc have been mentioned in the report. Stress analysis and experimental testing was required for the seal disc because high stresses are developed due to its exposure to high pressure and temperature environment of Main Heat Transport system. Hot testing was carried out to simulate the reactor-simulated condition. The performance was found to be

  9. Numerical Investigation of the Effect of Radial Lip Seal Geometry on Sealing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tok, G.; Parlar, Z.; Temiz, V.

    2018-01-01

    Sealing elements are often needed in industry and especially in machine design. With the change and development of machine technology from day to day, sealing elements show continuous development and change in parallel with these developments. Many factors influence the performance of the sealing elements such as shaft surface roughness, radial force, lip geometry etc. In addition, the radial lip seals must have a certain pre-load and interference in order to provide a good sealing. This also affects the friction torque. Researchers are developing new seal designs to reduce friction losses in mechanical systems. In the presented study, the effect of the lip seal geometry on sealing performance will be examined numerically. The numerical model created for this purpose will be verified with experimental data firstly. In the numerical model, shaft and seal will be modeled as hyper-elastic in 2D and 3D. NBR (Nitrile Butadiene Rubber) as seal material will be analyzed for the rotating shaft state at constant speed by applying a uniform radial force.

  10. New raw materials improve packing sealing efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igel, B.; McKeague, L.

    2012-01-01

    End-users and OEM's using or manufacturing on/off and control valves expect a permanent and effective increase in service life together with an increased sealing capability while at the same time minimizing maintenance concerns. Developing materials which provide consistency and repeatability are essential characteristics to optimizing valve performance. “New Generation” materials and yarn allow us to meet this growing demand while complying with the requirements related to chemical purity and an increased level of safety to both plant workers and equipment in the nuclear environment. Through R&D initiatives and developments in new and improved raw materials; a new mechanical packing generation which optimizes friction coefficients and extended life cycle has been introduced to the industry. Lower friction values drastically optimize actuator effort and size improving efficiency for stem operation with significant improvements in flow control of fluids. Combined with new and improved procedures (installation, torque levels and consolidation recommendations), this new packing generation has provided significant improvement in the mechanical behavior of packing materials (independent tests carried out in collaboration with AECL and CETIM) this has provided the opportunity to develop successful Valve Enhancement Programs which offer improved efficiency, valve operation and repeatability. These NEW generation yarns are available with or without wire reinforcement depending on specific operating parameters and conditions. The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate that new generation material(s). Which are available to the industry for AOV, MOV and Manual valves? - To highlight the steps taken in R&D and manufacturing contributing to the much improved yarns and finished packing products. - Comply and are designed to meet the stringent requirements in the nuclear industry - Simplify valve maintenance without risk to safety or performance - Increase service

  11. Tamper-indicating quantum optical seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humble, Travis S [ORNL; Williams, Brian P [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Confidence in the means for identifying when tampering occurs is critical for containment and surveillance technologies. Fiber-optic seals have proven especially useful for actively surveying large areas or inventories due to the extended transmission range and flexible layout of fiber. However, it is reasonable to suspect that an intruder could tamper with a fiber-optic sensor by accurately replicating the light transmitted through the fiber. In this contribution, we demonstrate a novel approach to using fiber-optic seals for safeguarding large-scale inventories with increased confidence in the state of the seal. Our approach is based on the use of quantum mechanical phenomena to offer unprecedented surety in the authentication of the seal state. In particular, we show how quantum entangled photons can be used to monitor the integrity of a fiber-optic cable - the entangled photons serve as active sensing elements whose non-local correlations indicate normal seal operation. Moreover, we prove using the quantum no-cloning theorem that attacks against the quantum seal necessarily disturb its state and that these disturbances are immediately detected. Our quantum approach to seal authentication is based on physical principles alone and does not require the use of secret or proprietary information to ensure proper operation. We demonstrate an implementation of the quantum seal using a pair of entangled photons and we summarize our experimental results including the probability of detecting intrusions and the overall stability of the system design. We conclude by discussing the use of both free-space and fiber-based quantum seals for surveying large areas and inventories.

  12. Reactor coolant pump seal leakage monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, D.M.; Spencer, J.W.; Morris, D.J.; James, W.; Shugars, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    Problems with reactor coolant pump seals have historically accounted for a large percentage of unscheduled outages. Studies performed for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have shown that the replacement of coolant pump seals has been one of the leading causes of nuclear plant unavailability over the last ten years. Failures of coolant pump seals can lead to primary coolant leakage rates of 200-500 gallons per minute into the reactor building. Airborne activity and high surface contamination levels following these failures require a major cleanup effort and increases the time and personnel exposure required to refurbish the pump seals. One of the problems in assessing seal integrity is the inability to accurately measure seal leakage. Because seal leakage flow is normally very small, it cannot be sensed directly with normal flow instrumentation, but must be inferred from several other temperature and flow measurements. In operating plants the leakage rate has been quantified with a tipping-bucket gauge, a device which indicates when one quart of water has been accumulated. The tipping-bucket gauge has been used for most rainfall-intensity monitoring. The need for a more accurate and less expensive gauge has been addressed. They have developed a drop-counter precipitation sensor has been developed and optimized. The applicability of the drop-counter device to the problem of measuring seal leakage is being investigated. If a review of system specification and known drop-counter performance indicates that this method is feasible for measuring seal leak rates, a drop-counter gauge will be fabricated and tested in the laboratory. If laboratory tests are successful the gauge will be demonstrated in a pump test loop at Ontario Hydro and evaluated under simulated plant conditions. 3 references, 2 figures

  13. Design, construction and monitoring of sealing work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischle, W.R.; Schwieger, K.

    1986-01-01

    By flooding a worked-out mine, it was possible to test the sealing work on a full scale. The aim is to erect an impermeable, statically secure seal requiring no maintenance. Apart from testing measuring equipment, data were to be obtained for later safety calculations. The measurements are also used to check the computer programs. After a dry period of over a year, flooding started at the beginning of 1985 and so did the testing of the seal and the measuring equipment in caustic soda solution. (orig./PW) [de

  14. Magnetic fluid seals for DWDM filter manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhixin

    2002-01-01

    Performance requirements of rotary magnetic fluid seals for thin film dense wavelength division multiplexing filter manufacturing are discussed. High speed, large diameter, tight tolerance for rotating accuracy and motion control are some of the technical challenges in this application. Analytical methods for studying these technical issues and experimental data are presented. Innovative design approaches are also discussed. It is shown that using the most advanced magnetic fluid technology and seal design technology, magnetic fluid seals can provide satisfactory performance in this challenging new application

  15. Pilot cryo tunnel: Attachments, seals, and insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. F.; Ware, G. D.; Ramsey, J. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Several different tests are described which simulated the actual configuration of a cryogenic wind tunnel operating at pressures up to 5 atmospheres (507 kPa) and temperatures from -320 F (78K) to 120 F (322K) in order to determine compatible bolting, adequate sealing, and effective insulating materials. The evaluation of flange attachments (continuous threaded studs) considered bolting based on compatible flanges, attachment materials, and prescribed bolt elongations. Various types of seals and seal configurations were studied to determine suitability and reusability under the imposed pressure and temperature loadings. The temperature profile was established for several materials used for structural supports.

  16. Infiltrating/sealing proximal caries lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martignon, S; Ekstrand, K R; Gomez, J

    2012-01-01

    This randomized split-mouth controlled clinical trial aimed at assessing the therapeutic effects of infiltration vs. sealing for controlling caries progression on proximal surfaces. Out of 90 adult students/patients assessed at university clinics and agreeing to participate, 39, each with 3...... differences in lesion progression between infiltration and placebo (P = 0.0012) and between sealing and placebo (P = 0.0269). The study showed that infiltration and sealing are significantly better than placebo treatment for controlling caries progression on proximal lesions. No significant difference...

  17. Scintillation and optical properties of TiO2-ZnO-Al2O3-B2O3 glasses and glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Yuki; Okada, Go; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Masai, Hirokazu; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2018-04-01

    13TiO2-xZnO-17Al2O3-(70 - x)B2O3 (x = 17, 26, and 35) glasses were prepared by a melt-quenching method, and the obtained glass samples were heated at temperatures 30 °C above the glass transition temperature of corresponding glass in order to obtain glass-ceramics. The obtained glass-ceramic samples were confirmed to have anatase (x = 17) and rutile (x = 26 and 35) phases from X-ray diffraction analysis. Then, the scintillation and optical properties were evaluated and discussed the difference between the glass-ceramic and glass samples. In the scintillation spectra under X-ray irradiation, a broad emission peak was observed around 450 nm in all the samples, and the new peak around 500 nm appeared in the anatase-precipitated glass-ceramic. The intensities of the glass-ceramic samples were enhanced in comparison with the corresponding glasses because the glass-ceramics includes TiO2 crystallites with defect centers which act as effective emission centers. The scintillation decay curves of the glass and glass-ceramic samples were approximated by one and a sum of two exponential decay functions, respectively. The faster component of glass and glass-ceramic samples would be caused by the host emission, and the slower component of glass-ceramic sample would be ascribed to the emission of Ti3+.

  18. Glass and nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.

    1982-10-01

    Glass shows interesting technical and economical properties for long term storage of solidified radioactive wastes by vitrification or embedding. Glass composition, vitrification processes, stability under irradiation, thermal stability and aqueous corrosion are studied [fr

  19. Microstructuring of glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Hülsenberg, Dagmar; Bismarck, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    As microstructured glass becomes increasingly important for microsystems technology, the main application fields include micro-fluidic systems, micro-analysis systems, sensors, micro-actuators and implants. And, because glass has quite distinct properties from silicon, PMMA and metals, applications exist where only glass devices meet the requirements. The main advantages of glass derive from its amorphous nature, the precondition for its - theoretically - direction-independent geometric structurability. Microstructuring of Glasses deals with the amorphous state, various glass compositions and their properties, the interactions between glasses and the electromagnetic waves used to modify it. Also treated in detail are methods for influencing the geometrical microstructure of glasses by mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and electrical treatment, and the methods and equipment required to produce actual microdevices.

  20. Measurement of optical glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau-Rebigan, S.

    1978-11-01

    The possibilities of measurement of the optical glasses parameters needed in building optical devices especially in lasers devices are presented. In the first chapter the general features of the main optical glasses as well as the modalities of obtaining them are given. Chapter two defines the optical glass parameters, and the third chapter describes the measuring methods of the optical glass parameters. Finally, the conclusions which point out the utilization of this paper are presented. (author)