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  1. Private Tutoring: Evidence from India

    OpenAIRE

    Azam, Mehtabul

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on the nationally representative "Participation and Expenditure in Education" surveys, we document the incidence and cost of private tutoring at different stages of schooling over the last two decades in India. As private tutoring involve two decisions: a) whether to take private tuition or not, and b) how much to spend on private tutoring conditional on positive decision in (a), we analyze the determinants of the two decisions separately using a Hurdle model. We find that private tut...

  2. Poder con poder se paga: títulos nobiliarios beneficiados en Indias (1681-1821

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruri Villanueva, Ramón

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available As occurred when granting public offices of government and justice, hidalguías, and insignias in the case of the Military Orders, etc., the Spanish Monarchy also resorted to the juridical figure of the beneficio when allowing certain persons to enter the titled nobility. With regard to America, this article refers to seventy seven nobility titles obtained in this way between 1681 and 1821, a quantity that we consider to represent practically all the beneficiaries in South America. The Crown, the highest expression of political power, rewarded in this manner those who also represented economic, social, military or political power in the American sphere.

    Al igual que ocurrió con los oficios públicos, las hidalguías, los hábitos de las Órdenes Militares, etcétera, la Monarquía hispana se sirvió también de la figura jurídica del «beneficio » en el caso de posibilitar a determinadas personas su ingreso en la nobleza titulada. Por lo que a América se refiere, en este artículo se dan cuenta de setenta y siete títulos nobiliarios obtenidos entre 1681 y 1821 por esa vía, cantidad que, estimamos, representa la práctica totalidad de los beneficiados en Indias. La Corona, expresión del poder político en su máxima instancia, pagaba así a quienes representaban también un poder económico, social, militar y político en el ámbito americano.

  3. Agriculture and nutrition in India: mapping evidence to pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiyala, Suneetha; Harris, Jody; Headey, Derek; Yosef, Sivan; Gillespie, Stuart

    2014-12-01

    In India, progress against undernutrition has been slow. Given its importance for income generation, improving diets, care practices, and maternal health, the agriculture sector is widely regarded as playing an important role in accelerating the reduction in undernutrition. This paper comprehensively maps existing evidence along agriculture-nutrition pathways in India and assesses both the quality and coverage of the existing literature. We present a conceptual framework delineating six key pathways between agriculture and nutrition. Three pathways pertain to the nutritional impacts of farm production, farm incomes, and food prices. The other three pertain to agriculture-gender linkages. After an extensive search, we found 78 research papers that provided evidence to populate these pathways. The literature suggests that Indian agriculture has a range of important influences on nutrition. Agriculture seems to influence diets even when controlling for income, and relative food prices could partly explain observed dietary changes in recent decades. The evidence on agriculture-gender linkages to nutrition is relatively weak. Sizeable knowledge gaps remain. The root causes of these gaps include an interdisciplinary disconnect between nutrition and economics/agriculture, a related problem of inadequate survey data, and limited policy-driven experimentation. Closing these gaps is essential to strengthening the agriculture sector's contribution to reducing undernutrition. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. Barriers to Household Risk Management: Evidence from India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Shawn; Giné, Xavier; Tobacman, Jeremy; Townsend, Robert; Topalova, Petia; Vickery, James

    2012-01-01

    Why do many households remain exposed to large exogenous sources of non-systematic income risk? We use a series of randomized field experiments in rural India to test the importance of price and non-price factors in the adoption of an innovative rainfall insurance product. Demand is significantly price sensitive, but widespread take-up would not be achieved even if the product offered a payout ratio comparable to U.S. insurance contracts. We present evidence suggesting that lack of trust, liquidity constraints and limited salience are significant non-price frictions that constrain demand. We suggest contract design improvements to mitigate these frictions. PMID:24765234

  5. Barriers to Household Risk Management: Evidence from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Shawn; Giné, Xavier; Tobacman, Jeremy; Townsend, Robert; Topalova, Petia; Vickery, James

    2013-01-01

    Why do many households remain exposed to large exogenous sources of non-systematic income risk? We use a series of randomized field experiments in rural India to test the importance of price and non-price factors in the adoption of an innovative rainfall insurance product. Demand is significantly price sensitive, but widespread take-up would not be achieved even if the product offered a payout ratio comparable to U.S. insurance contracts. We present evidence suggesting that lack of trust, liquidity constraints and limited salience are significant non-price frictions that constrain demand. We suggest contract design improvements to mitigate these frictions.

  6. Methane and nitrous oxide fluxes in the polluted Adyar River and estuary, SE India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirmal Rajkumar, A.; Barnes, J.; Ramesh, R.; Purvaja, R.; Upstill-Goddard, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    We measured dissolved N 2 O, CH 4 , O 2 , NH 4 + , NO 3 - and NO 2 - on 7 transects along the polluted Adyar River-estuary, SE India and estimated N 2 O and CH 4 emissions using a gas exchange relation and a floating chamber. High NO 2 - implied some nitrification of a large anthropogenic NH 4 + pool. In the lower catchment CH 4 was maximal (6.3 ± 4.3 x 10 4 nM), exceeding the ebullition threshold, whereas strong undersaturation of N 2 O and O 2 implied intense denitrification. Emissions fluxes for the whole Adyar system ∼2.5 x 10 8 g CH 4 yr -1 and ∼2.4 x 10 6 g N 2 O yr -1 estimated with a gas exchange relation and ∼2 x 10 9 g CH 4 yr -1 derived with a floating chamber illustrate the importance of CH 4 ebullition. An equivalent CO 2 flux ∼1-10 x 10 10 g yr -1 derived using global warming potentials is equivalent to total Chennai motor vehicle CO 2 emissions in one month. Studies such as this may inform more effective waste management and future compliance with international emissions agreements

  7. Cross-subsidy in electricity tariffs: evidence from India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, P.

    2004-01-01

    The recent reforms in India have been equated to the reduction of cross-subsidization in electricity tariffs. Examining the usefulness of cross subsidies in electricity tariffs in India, I have argued that they are prone to considerable inefficiencies and should be discontinued. I have also formally examined the viability of above-cost tariffs in the industrial sector to allow subsidized domestic and agricultural consumption. Finally, I have used data from a distribution company in the state of Uttar Pradesh, India to estimate industrial demand for electricity and have found that the policy of cross-subsidy may have indeed gone overboard in India. (author)

  8. The inflation-output nexus:empirical evidence from India, Brazil and South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Paresh Kumar Narayan; Seema Narayan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the relationship between output and inflation for India, Brazil, and South Africa using the EGARCH model. For India and South Africa, we find evidence for: (1) the Cukierman and Meltzer hypothesis that inflation volatility raises inflation; (2) the Friedman hypothesis that inflation raises inflation volatility; and (3) the Black hypothesis that output volatility raises output growth, and that output volatility reduces inflation. For Brazil, we do not find any evidence o...

  9. Village Level Tsunami Threat Maps for Tamil Nadu, SE Coast of India: Numerical Modeling Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    MP, J.; Kulangara Madham Subrahmanian, D.; V, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami (IOT) devastated several countries of North Indian Ocean. India is one of the worst affected countries after Indonesia and Sri Lanka. In India, Tamil Nadu suffered maximum with fatalities exceeding 8,000 people. Historical records show that tsunami has invaded the shores of Tamil Nadu in the past and has made people realize that the tsunami threat looms over Tamil Nadu and it is necessary to evolve strategies for tsunami threat management. The IOT has brought to light that tsunami inundation and runup varied within short distances and for the disaster management for tsunami, large scale maps showing areas that are likely to be affected by future tsunami are identified. Therefore threat assessment for six villages including Mamallapuram (also called Mahabalipuram) which is famous for its rock-cut temples, from the northern part of Tamil Nadu state of India has been carried out and threat maps categorizing the coast into areas of different degree of threat are prepared. The threat was assessed by numerical modeling using TUNAMI N2 code considering different tsunamigenic sources along the Andaman - Sumatra trench. While GEBCO and C-Map data was used for bathymetry and for land elevation data was generated by RTK - GPS survey for a distance of 1 km from shore and SRTM for the inland areas. The model results show that in addition to the Sumatra source which generated the IOT in 2004, earthquakes originating in Car Nicobar and North Andaman can inflict more damage. The North Andaman source can generate a massive tsunami and an earthquake of magnitude more than Mw 9 can not only affect Tamil Nadu but also entire south east coast of India. The runup water level is used to demarcate the tsunami threat zones in the villages using GIS.

  10. The properties of inflation expectations: Evidence for India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Kumar Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical inferences about particular forms of agents’ inflation expectations are crucial for the conduct of monetary policy. This paper is an attempt to explore the properties of the Reserve Bank of India’s survey data of households’ inflation expectations. The paper shows that survey respondents do not form expectations rationally, regardless of the reference measures of inflation used. Further, results indicate that inflation expectations are formed purely in backward-looking manner, suggesting that the Reserve Bank of India (RBI has a low degree of credibility within the survey respondents. The study then formulates a model to identify individual elements of the backward-looking expectations in the data. The results suggest that the respondents’ short term expectations for WPI inflation are purely naïve type of expectations, only influenced by respondents earlier period expectations. In the case of CPIIW inflation, the results however suggest that the short-term expectations are not purely naïve type, but also contain adaptive as well as a static forms of expectations. This means that respondents consider their previous forecast errors about CPIIW inflation and draw recent price developments in the CPIIW while forming their overall short-term inflation expectations. This finding provides some formal evidence that the CPI based inflation measure is better suited, than WPI inflation, as a nominal anchor in the RBI’s recent transition to inflation targeting regime. JEL classification: D84, E31, E52, E37, Keywords: Inflation, Inflation expectations, Survey data, Price index, Monetary policy, Forecasting

  11. Are the energy poor also income poor? Evidence from India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khandker, Shahidur R.; Barnes, Douglas F.; Samad, Hussain A.

    2012-01-01

    The energy poverty line is defined as the threshold point at which energy consumption begins to rise with increases in household income. This approach is applied to cross-sectional data from a comprehensive 2005 household survey representative of both urban and rural India. The objective is to determine if the energy poor are also income poor and whether and how energy policies help reduce energy poverty, independent of income. The findings suggest that in rural areas some 57% of households are energy poor, versus 22% that are income poor. But in urban areas the energy poverty rate is 28% compared to 20% that are income poor. That is, energy policies are expected to play some roles in mitigating energy poverty. We find that reducing energy poverty requires not only support for rural electrification, but also more use of modern cooking fuels such as LPG. While income growth matters, a combination of energy related programs can play an independent and substantial role in reducing energy poverty. - Highlights: ► This paper applies a new approach to measuring energy poverty to rural and urban India. ► It also compares and contrasts income poverty with energy poverty in the context of India. ► Findings suggest that income poverty tracks energy poverty in urban India, but not in rural India. ► Income growth is very important in reducing energy poverty. ► In addition, access to and reliability of modern sources (electricity, LPG) are also helpful.

  12. IDRC evidence and innovation supports India's adaptation to climate ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-02-23

    Feb 23, 2018 ... (South Asia Consortium for Interdisciplinary Water Resources Studies, $536,500) ... The project seeks to improve the management of heat stress risks in India by ... It is expected to support at least 20 early-career researchers, train 30 officials from ... (Indian Institute for Human Settlements, $3,276,920).

  13. The Impact of Information Technology Outsourcing on Productivity and Output: New Evidence from India

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Kite

    2012-01-01

    Neither the literature on outsourcing nor the literature on the impact of information technology (IT) have previously quantified the effects of IT outsourcing. This is a particularly important omission in India, which has an IT outsourcing industry that is well placed to bring world-class applications of the technology to domestic customers. This paper provides econometric evidence which shows that there is a strong positive impact of IT outsourcing on output and productivity in India. It als...

  14. Management of Coastal Erosion Using Remote Sensing and GIS Techniques (SE India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saravanan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available World wide, coastal erosion is recognized as a great threat for beach environment. Total control of coastal erosion is not feasible but it should not be ignored and needs timely management. Erosional activities have been significantly noticed along the coastal tract of Vembar and Kallar (Kallurani, South India. An attempt has been made here to delineate different zones based on their sand budget and erosion rate. Linear Imaging Self Scanning Sensor (LISS III 2001 and Linear Imaging Self Scanning Sensor III and PAN merged data of the year 2001 have been utilized to identify the coastal geomorphological features, shoreline changes and river course changes. A Geographic Information System (GIS software namely ArcGIS (9.1 has been used as a tool to delineate the coastal erosion hazard for proper planning and management of coastal developments. Beach profile studies have shown significant variation in the beach morphology. The study area has been categorized into five different zones in the GIS analysis based on the degree of coastal erosion and sediment dynamics namely (i very high - Kalaignanapuram, (ii high - Sippikulam (iii medium - Periyasamypuram (iv low - Vembar and Kallar (Kallurani (v very low - Pachayapuram.

  15. Intergenerational Transmission of Gender Attitudes: Evidence from India

    OpenAIRE

    Diva Dhar; Tarun Jain; Seema Jayachandran

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the intergenerational transmission of gender attitudes in India, a setting where discrimination against women and girls is severe. We use survey data on gender attitudes (specifically, views about the appropriate roles and rights of women and girls) collected from adolescents attending 314 schools in the state of Haryana, and their parents. We find that when a parent holds a more discriminatory attitude, his or her child is about 15 to 20 percentage points more likely to h...

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERN TO ATTITUDE TOWARDS GREEN PRODUCTS: EVIDENCES FROM INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Danish Kirmani; Mohammed Naved Khan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship of environmental concern of consumers with their attitude towards green products and also to identify the predictors of environmental concern. The data was generated from a researcher controlled sample of graduate and post-graduate students enrolled in educational institutions located in the national capital of India (New Delhi) and surrounding areas popularly known as National Capital Region (NCR). The data generated was analysed em...

  17. Addressing IT Productivity Paradox in Hotel Industry; Evidence from India

    OpenAIRE

    İlkan, Mustafa; Olya, Hossein; Rezapouraghdam, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    This study attempts to explore the moderating role of Information Technology (IT) capability on the association between the investment on the information technology and the performance outcome of the hotels. An online survey has been utilized to identify the effect of three indicators of IT capability, according to the resource based theory, on the relationship between IT investment and performance in the hotel industry of India. Findings confirmed the phenomenon of “IT productivity paradox” ...

  18. The Association between State Value-added Taxes and Tobacco Use in India- Evidence from GATS and TCP India Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Ce; Chaloupka, Frank J; Fong, Geoffrey T; Gupta, Prakash C; Pednekar, Mangesh S

    2017-08-30

    State value-added taxes (VAT) on tobacco products have been increased significantly in recent years in India. Evidence on how these VATs were associated with smoking is highly needed. State bidi and cigarette VAT rates were linked to Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) India 2009-2010 and Tobacco Control Policy (TCP) India Survey waves 1 (2010-2011) and 2 (2012-2013), respectively. These linked data were used to analyze the associations between bidi VAT rates and bidi smoking, between cigarette VAT rates and cigarette smoking, and between the two VAT rates and dual use of bidis and cigarettes. Weighted logistic regressions were employed to examine GATS cross-sectional data, whereas Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) were employed to examine longitudinal TCP data. We further stratified the analyses by gender. A 10% increase in cigarette VAT rates was associated with a 6.5% (p<0.001) decrease in dual use of cigarettes and bidis among adults and a 0.9% decrease (p<0.05) in cigarette smoking among males in TCP; and with a 21.6% decrease (p<0.05) in dual use among adults and a 17.2% decrease (p<0.001) in cigarette smoking among males in GATS. TCP analyses controlling for state fixed effects are less likely to be biased and indicate a cigarette price elasticity of - 0.44. As female smoking prevalence was extremely low, these associations were non-significant for females. Higher state cigarette VAT rates in India were significantly associated with lower cigarette smoking and lower dual use of cigarettes and bidis. Increasing state VAT rates may significantly reduce smoking in India. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Seismological evidence of the Hales discontinuity in northeast India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Aakash; Bora, Dipok K.; Borah, Kajaljyoti; Madhab Borgohain, Jayanta

    2018-04-01

    The crust and upper mantle shear wave velocity structure beneath the northeast India is estimated by joint inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocity and receiver function, calculated from teleseismic earthquakes data recorded at nine broadband seismic stations. The Assam valley and the Shillong-Mikir plateau are the two important tectonic blocks in the northeast India, which are surrounded by the Himalayan collision zone in the north, Indo-Burma subduction zone in the east and by the Bengal basin in the south. The joint inversion followed by forward modeling reveal crustal thicknesses of 30-34 km beneath the Shillong plateau, 36 km beneath the Mikir hills and 38-40 km beneath the Assam valley with an average shear wave velocity (Vs) of 3.4-3.5 km/s. The estimated low upper mantle shear wave velocity (Vsn) 4.2-4.3 km/s may be due to the rock composition or grain size or increased temperature and partial melt (<1%) in the upper mantle, or an effect of all. Also, we report for the first time, the existence of the Hales discontinuity at depths 56-74 km with Vs ∼4.4-4.6 km/s. Variable depth of the Hales discontinuity may be explained by the geotherm and/or addition of Cr3+ and Fe2+ in the spinel-garnet system.

  20. The transaction costs driving captive power generation: Evidence from India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Ranjan; Kathuria, Vinish

    2014-01-01

    The 2003 Indian Electricity Act incentivizes captive power production through open access in an attempt to harness all sources of generation. Yet, we observe that only some firms self-generate while others do not. In this paper we give a transaction cost explanation for such divergent behavior. Using a primary survey of 107 firms from India, we construct a distinct variable to measure the transaction-specificity of electricity use. The ‘make or buy’ decision is then econometrically tested using probit model. Results are highly responsive to transaction-specificity and the likelihood of captive power generation is positively related to it. At the industrial level, this explains why food and chemical firms are more likely to make their own electricity. Since the burden of poor grid supply is highest on smaller sized and high transaction-specific firms, the grid access policies need to account for firm-level characteristics if government wants to incentivize captive power generation. - Highlights: • We analyze why some firms opt for captive power generation while others do not. • We examine the role of transaction costs in this decision making using probit model. • Unique data from a primary survey of manufacturing firms in Andhra Pradesh, India. • Transaction-specificity significantly determines who installs captive power plant (CPP). • Firm-level characteristics crucial in policies incentivizing captive generation

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERN TO ATTITUDE TOWARDS GREEN PRODUCTS: EVIDENCES FROM INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Danish Kirmani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship of environmental concern of consumers with their attitude towards green products and also to identify the predictors of environmental concern. The data was generated from a researcher controlled sample of graduate and post-graduate students enrolled in educational institutions located in the national capital of India (New Delhi and surrounding areas popularly known as National Capital Region (NCR. The data generated was analysed employing Structural Equation Modelling (SEM. The study findings indicate that environmental concern has a significant and positive influence on attitude towards green products. Collectivism and eco-literacy emerged as predictors of the environmental concern of consumers. The findings of this study are expected to enhance the understanding of marketers of the role played by variables such as religiosity, collectivism, eco-literacy, and environmental concern in formation of attitude of consumers towards green products.

  2. Volatility Informed Trading in the Options Market: Evidence from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Pathak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate the trading activity in options market based on information about expected future volatility in spot market. We employ Common Implied Volatility as a measure of expected volatility and options volume and changes in Open Interests as measures of options trading activity. We first test for simultaneous information flow in the two markets using multiple regression technique. Next, we test for information based or hedge based use of options using Trivariate Vector-auto Regression framework. We further consider the classes of options moneyness and the market trends in our analysis to examine if the trader’s preference of options changes with change in description of options intrinsic value and market environment. We use daily closing data of S&P CNX Nifty Index options traded on National Stock Exchange, India. We, for the most part, find negative and significant relationship in contemporaneous regression suggesting active trading by arbitrageurs. A feedback relationship is observed in vector auto regression analysis suggesting that options are traded in India for both information based trading and hedging purposes. We also observe the relationship to be varying when market trends and classes of options moneyness are considered. This indicates that traders are not indifferent in their choice of trading venue when market conditions and factors change. The results of this study are helpful for traders in managing the risk and return of their portfolio based on volatility forecast. This study is distinctive as it examines the scarcely researched area of volatility informed trading in an emerging market set up.

  3. India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    In this discussion of India attention is directed to the following: the people; geography; history; government; political conditions; the economy; foreign relations (Pakistan and Bangladesh, China, and the Soviet Union); defense; and the relations between the US and India. In 1983 India's population was estimated at 746 million with an annual growth rate of 2.24%. The infant mortality rate was estimated at 116/1000 in 1984 with a life expectancy of 54.9 years. Although India occupies only 2.4% of the world's land area, it supports nearly 15% of the world's population. 2 major ethnic strains predominate in India: the Aryan in the north and the Dravidian in the south, although the lines between them are blurred. India dominates the South Asian subcontinent geographically. The people of India have had a continuous civilization since about 2500 B.C., when the inhabitants of the Indus River Valley developed an urban culture based on commerce, trade, and, to a lesser degree, agriculture. This civilization declined about 1500 B.C. and Aryan tribes originating in central Asia absorbed parts of its culture as they spread out over the South Asian subcontinent. During the next few centuries, India flourished under several successive empires. The 1st British outpost in South Asia was established in 1619 at Surat on the northwestern coast of India. The British gradually expanded their influence until, by the 1850s, they controlled almost the entire area of present-day India. Independence was attained on August 15, 1947, and India became a dominion within the Commonwealth of Nations with Jawaharlal Nehru as prime minister. According to its constitution, India is a "sovereign socialist secular democratic republic." Like the US, India has a federal form of government, but the central government in India has greater power in relation to its states, and government is patterned after the British parliamentary system. The Congress Party has ruled India since independence with the

  4. Horizontal Inequity in Elderly Health Care Utilization: Evidence from India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra, Shalini; Subramanian, S V

    2015-01-01

    Against the backdrop of population aging, this paper presents the analysis of need-standardised health care utilization among elderly in India. Based on nationally representative morbidity and health care survey 2004, we demonstrate that the need for health care utilization is indeed pro-poor in nature. However, the actual health care utilization is concentrated among richer sections of the population. Further, the decomposition analysis reveals that income has a very strong role in shifting the distribution of health care away from the poor elderly. The impact of income on utilization is well-demonstrated even at the ecological-level as states with higher per capita incomes have higher elderly health care utilization even as the levels of need-predicted distribution across these states are similar. We also find that the distribution of elderly across social groups and their educational achievements favours the rich and significantly contributes to overall inequality. Nevertheless, contribution of need-related self-assessed health clearly favours pro-poor inequality. In concluding, we argue that to reduce such inequities in health care utilization it is necessary to increase public investments in health care infrastructure including geriatric care particularly in rural areas and underdeveloped regions to enhance access and quality of health care for the elderly. PMID:26617450

  5. Fiscal Deficits and Stock Prices in India: Empirical Evidence

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    Pooja Joshi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aims at examining how fiscal deficits affect the performance of the stock market in India by using annual data from 1988–2012. The study makes use of Ng-Perron unit root tests to check the non-stationarity property of the series; the Auto Regressive Distributed Lag (ARDL bounds test and a Vector Error Correction Model (VECM for testing both short and long run dynamic relationships. The variance decomposition (VDC is used to predict the exogenous shocks of the variables. The findings of the bounds test reveal that the estimated equation and the series are co-integrated. The ARDL results suggest a long run negative relationship exists between budget deficit and stock prices and do not show any significant relationship in the short run. The VECM result shows that fiscal deficits influence the stock price only in the short run. The results of the Variance Decomposition show that stock price movement in the long run is mostly explained by shocks of fiscal deficits. The study implies that the government must adopt appropriate macroeconomic policies to reduce budget deficit, which will result in stock market growth and in turn will lead to the financial development of the country.

  6. In Search of a Winning Combination-Evidence from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Mishra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of Mutual funds in India in 1963, the Indian investor has shown positive response to mutual fund investments which is evidenced through increasing AUM (Assets Under Management every quarter. So far as management style is concerned the industry offers two options to the common investor- on one hand the passively managed funds with the sole objective of replicating their benchmark index and on the other the actively managed funds where the fund manager continuously puts his efforts to enhance the returns, by making frequent changes in the composition of the portfolio. The common investor with limited savings cannot be expected to hold too many funds in his portfolio. Further with limited exposure to financial concepts and complexities he is left guessing on the right combination of funds that should constitute his small portfolio. This paper is a sincere attempt to address the above mentioned situation. We have empirically tested and shown that given the restricted savings which combination, either only two passively managed funds, two actively managed funds or a portfolio comprising of one of each type will win the race for the investor. This paper will be of interest, particularly to the small investors, academicians as well as the financial advisors.

  7. Trace metal enrichments in core sediments in Muthupet mangroves, SE coast of India: Application of acid leachable technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janaki-Raman, D.; Jonathan, M.P.; Srinivasalu, S.; Armstrong-Altrin, J.S.; Mohan, S.P.; Ram-Mohan, V.

    2007-01-01

    Core sediments from Mullipallam Creek of Muthupet mangroves on the southeast coast of India were analyzed for texture, CaCO 3 , organic carbon, sulfur and acid leachable trace metals (Fe, Mn, Cr, Cu, Ni, Co, Pb, Zn and Cd). Textural analysis reveals a predominance of mud while CaCO 3 indicates dissolution in the upper half of the core, and reprecipitation of carbonates in reduction zones. Trace metals are diagenetically modified and anthropogenic processes control Pb and, to some extent, Ni, Zn and Fe. A distinct event is identified at 90 cm suggesting a change in deposition. Strong relationship of trace metals with Fe indicates that they are associated with Fe-oxyhydroxides. The role of carbonates in absorbing trace metals is evident from their positive relationship with trace metals. Comparison of acid leachable trace metals indicates increase in concentrations in the study area and the sediments act as a sink for trace metals contributed from multiple sources. - Natural and anthropogenic trace metals afeecting mangrove sediments

  8. The Effect of Media on Domestic Violence Norms: Evidence from India

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhuk Bhushan; Prakarsh Singh

    2014-01-01

    Greater access to media may influence norms about domestic violence. It may lead to greater acceptance of violence due to an increase in the incidence of violence or to lower acceptance due to a change in gender norms. Applying a difference-in-differences methodology to the National Family Health Survey, India (1998-99 and 2005-06), we find evidence that regularly accessing television and radio leads to a small but statistically significant reduction in the probability of women accepting dome...

  9. Caste Discrimination and Transaction Costs in the Labor Market: Evidence from Rural North India

    OpenAIRE

    Takahiro Ito

    2007-01-01

    This paper is an empirical attempt to quantify caste-based discrimination in thelabor market using household data taken from rural North India. In the regressionanalysis, transaction costs associated with entry into the labor market and reservationwages are estimated simultaneously along with market wages. The estimation resultsprovide evidence of the existence of transaction costs in the labor market anddiscrimination against backward classes with regard to access to regular employment. Inli...

  10. India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Interest has grown recently in the issues of third tier or emerging nuclear suppliers. These are states that could export nuclear equipment, services, or technology but are outside the export control framework of the London Nuclear Supplier Group (NSG). The concern is that they may conduct nuclear trade without adequate safeguards, thus weakening the nonproliferation regime or even contributing to nuclear proliferation. The volume of nuclear sales by emerging suppliers is still minuscule, and it is unclear how far their export practices will diverge from the NSG framework. This case study of Indian nuclear supplier capability and practice is an effort to discern the type of path India is likely to adopt. This paper examines four aspects of India's nuclear activity for clues to India's potential role as an emerging nuclear supplier: foreign transactions; nuclear decision making; policy norms; and nuclear industrial capabilities

  11. Evidences of late quaternary neotectonic activity and sea-level changes along the western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Veerayya, M.; Thamban, M.; Wagle, B.G.

    The offshore data on sea-level changes along the western margin of India have been reviewed and evidences of Late Quaternary neotectonic activity and subsidence are documented, based on the diagenetic textures of limestones from deeper submarine...

  12. Syn-sedimentary tectonics and facies analysis in a rift setting: Cretaceous Dalmiapuram Formation, Cauvery Basin, SE India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivedita Chakraborty

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The Cretaceous (Albian–Cenomanian Dalmiapuram Formation is one of the economically significant constituents in the hydrocarbon-producing Cauvery rift basin, SE India that opened up during the Late Jurassic–Early Cretaceous Gondwanaland fragmentation. The fossil-rich Dalmiapuram Formation, exposed at Ariyalur within the Pondicherry sub-basin of Cauvery Basin, rests in most places directly on the Archean basement and locally on the Lower Cretaceous (Barremian–Aptian Basal Siliciclastic Formation. In the Dalmiapuram Formation, a facies association of tectonically-disturbed phase is sandwiched between two drastically quieter phases. The early syn-rift facies association (FA 1, records the first carbonate marine transgression within the basin, comprising a bar–lagoon system with occasionally storms affecting along the shore and a sheet-like non-recurrent biomicritic limestone bed on the shallow shelf that laterally grades into pyrite–glauconite-bearing dark-colored shale in the deeper shelf. Spectacular breccias together with varied kinds of mass-flow products comprise the syn-rift facies association (FA 2. While the breccias occur at the basin margin area, the latter extend in the deeper inland sea. Clast composition of the coarse clastics includes large, even block-sized limestone fragments and small fragments of granite and sandstone from the basement. Marl beds of quieter intervals between tectonic pulses occur in alternation with them. Faulted basal contact of the formation, and small grabens filled by multiple mass-flow packages bear the clear signature of the syntectonic activity localized contortions, slump folds, and pillow beds associated with mega slump/slide planes and joints, which corroborates this contention further. This phase of tectonic intervention is followed by another relatively quieter phase and accommodates the late syn-rift facies association (FA 3. A tidal bar–interbar shelf depositional system allowed a

  13. Role of Evidence in Maternal Health Policy Processes in Vietnam, India and China: Findings from the HEPVIC Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoev, Tolib; Green, Andrew; Gerein, Nancy; Pearson, Stephen; Bird, Philippa; Ha, Bui Thi Thu; Ramani, Karaikurichi; Qian, Xu; Yang, Xiaoguang; Mukhopadhyay, Maitrayee; Soors, Werner

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the role of evidence in maternal health policy processes in Vietnam, India and China. Both formal and informal types of evidence were used; and differences were found between the stages of policy processes. Evidence used mostly covered easily quantifiable issues and clearly identifiable technical solutions. Different policy…

  14. Bank Ownership, Board Characteristics and Performance: Evidence from Commercial Banks in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayati Sarkar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the effect of board governance in state-owned and private banks by undertaking a study of commercial banks in India that has both bank groups. Covering a ten-year period from 2003 to 2012 that witnessed a large number of governance reforms in India, the results of our empirical analysis provide evidence of strong ownership effects with board independence exhibiting a significant positive correlation with the performance of private banks and a significant but negative correlation with the performance of state-owned banks. The effect of CEO duality is negative in state-owned banks where incidence of CEO duality is high. We find that a longer CEO tenure has significant positive effects on bank outcomes with these effects strengthening in the later years of CEO tenure. Our results have governance implications for strengthening the composition of board of directors and CEO tenure especially in state-owned banks.

  15. Thermochronological evidence for polyphase post-rift reactivation in SE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogné, N.; Gallagher, K.; Cobbold, P. R.; Riccomini, C.

    2012-04-01

    The continental margin of SE Brazil shows good evidence for tectonic activity well after the break-up of Western Gondwana (see Cobbold et al., 2001 for a review). Additionally, SE Brazil ranks as an HEPM (high elevation passive margin), summits reaching 2800 m. To constrain the onshore evolution of the margin, especially during the Tertiary, we did a new thermochronological and structural study. After an initial regional study, during which we found additional evidence for a major phase of exhumation during the Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary (Cogné et al., 2011), we focussed on a region that was clearly subject to Tertiary tectonics. This region includes the Tertiary Taubaté basin and the adjacent Serra do Mar and Serra da Mantiqueira. We used two thermochronolgical methods on the same samples, apatite fission tracks (AFT) and U-Th/He on apatite (AHe). AFT ages range from 129.3±4.3 Ma to 60.7±1.9 Ma with mean track lengths (MTL) from 14.31±0.24 μm to 11.41±0.23 μm, whereas AHe ages range from 519.6±16.6 to 10.1±0.1 Ma. A subset of AHe ages, selected on the basis of data consistency and geological arguments, has a smaller range (122.4±2.5 to 45.1±1.5 Ma). We have combined inverse and forward modelling to assess the range of acceptable thermal histories. Results of inverse modelling confirm our earlier study by showing a Late Cretaceous phase of cooling. Around the onshore Taubaté Basin, for a limited number of samples, another period of cooling occurred during the Early Tertiary, around the time when the basin formed. The inferred thermal histories for most of the samples also imply a later reheating, followed by a Neogene cooling. According to forward modelling, the evidence for reheating seems to be robust around the margins of the Taubaté Basin, but elsewhere the data cannot really discriminate between this and a less complex thermal history. However forward modelling and geologically independent information support the conclusion that the whole

  16. Does Public Investment Boost Economic Growth? Evidence from An Open-Economy Macro Model for India

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, Soubarna

    2008-01-01

    Using annual data for India for the period 1984-2003 and employing parametric technique (GMM), the present paper jointly determines GDP growth, real exchange rate and net foreign assets in Indian economy. There is evidence that public investment exerts a significant influence on real exchange rate and the growth rate and does so non-linearly. A comparison of the Indian estimates with those available for the UK and the USA economies is also revealing and highlights the role of governance on th...

  17. Effects of Monetary Shocks on Exchange Rate: Empirical Evidence from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Chandan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of monetary policy shocks on exchange rate in a Multiple Indicator Approach (MIA framework. This study has employed a monetary policy index of key monetary policy instruments in India (Bank rate, Cash Reserve Ratio, Repo and Reverse Repo rates. The study finds the empirical evidence for puzzling behavior of price level and exchange rate. Both price and exchange rate increase initially in response to a contractionary policy shock. Policy shocks affect output, inflation and exchange rate to an appreciable extent over a forecasting horizon of one year.

  18. India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    This discussion of India focuses on the following: the history of the country's demographic situation; the government's overall approach to population problems; population data systems and development planning; institutional arrangements for the integration of population with development planning; the government's view of the importance of population policy in achieving development objectives; population size, growth and natural increase; morbidity and mortality; fertility; international migration; and spatial distribution. India's government views the population problem in the country as extremely serious particularly in relation to the alleviation of poverty. It was the 1st country to introduce a family planning program at the national level. Development plans have consistently treated the population situation as a priority issue. A relatively comprehensive system of data collection for demographic purposes has existed in India for a long time. The 1st census was conducted in 1872. The government has continually worked to maintain the integration of population concerns within overall development planning. The government regards population growth as an impediment to development and views the slow growth in per capita income as being due largely to the rapid population increase which continues to outpace the increases in the gross national product. The government perceives the current rate of population growth as unsatisfactory because it is too high. Mortality levels have dropped considerably, but the government still considers the situation with regard to mortality as unacceptable. In 1980 the UN estimated the infant mortality rate was 128.9 infant deaths/1000 live births for the 1975-80 period. The total fertility rate, as estimated by the UN, is reported to have dropped from 6.3 births per woman in 1960 to 6.0 in 1970 and 5.0 in 1980. The government has continuously indicated concern with fertility levels, perceiving the situation as unsatisfactory because its

  19. Serological Evidence of Lyssavirus Infection among Bats in Nagaland, a North-Eastern State in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, R S; Dovih, D P; Ashwini, M A; Chattopadhyay, B; Harsha, P K; Garg, K M; Sudarshan, S; Puttaswamaiah, R; Ramakrishnan, U; Madhusudana, S N

    2017-06-01

    Bats are known to be reservoirs of several medically important viruses including lyssaviruses. However, no systematic surveillance for bat rabies has been carried out in India, a canine rabies endemic country with a high burden of human rabies. Surveillance for rabies virus (RABV) infection in bats was therefore carried out in Nagaland, a north-eastern state in India at sites with intense human-bat interfaces during traditional bat harvests. Brain tissues and sera from bats were tested for evidence of infection due to RABV. Brain tissues were subjected to the fluorescent antibody test for detection of viral antigen and real-time reverse transcriptase PCR for presence of viral RNA. Bat sera were tested for the presence of rabies neutralizing antibodies by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test. None of the bat brains tested (n = 164) were positive for viral antigen or viral RNA. However, rabies neutralizing antibodies were detected in 4/78 (5·1%) bat sera tested, suggesting prior exposure to RABV or related lyssaviruses. The serological evidence of lyssaviral infection in Indian bats may have important implications in disease transmission and rabies control measures, and warrant extensive bat surveillance to better define the prevalence of lyssaviral infection in bats.

  20. Negotiated forms of worker involvement in the European Company (SE): First empirical evidence and conclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Berndt; Werner, Frank

    2008-01-01

    This article analyses the negotiations on worker involvement in the first almost four years of the European Company SE and their outcomes. First, some basic institutional aspects of the SE itself and its current empirical situation are described and explained. Then, the focus is on questions of employee involvement in this new legal form. Again some main institutional provisions on employee involvement are assessed, before a detailed empirical analysis on specific issues is presented. A final...

  1. Gender Difference in Health-Care Expenditure: Evidence from India Human Development Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandita Saikia

    Full Text Available While the gender disparity in health and mortality in various stages of life in India is well documented, there is limited evidence on female disadvantage in health-care expenditure (HCE.Examine the gender difference in HCE in short-term and major morbidity in India, and understand the role of factors underlying the difference.Using two rounds of nationally representative panel data-the India Human Development Survey (IHDS 2004-2005 and 2011-2012 (IHDS I & II-we calculate morbidity prevalence rate and mean HCE by gender, and examine the adjusted effect of gender on major morbidity-related HCE by using a two-part regression model. Further, we performed Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition of the gender gap in HCE in major morbidity to understand the contribution of demographic and socio-economic factors.Health-care expenditure on females was systematically lower than on males across all demographic and socio-economic groups. Multivariate analysis confirms that female HCE is significantly lower than male HCE even after controlling demographic and socio-economic factors (β = -0.148, p = 0.000, CI:-0.206-0.091. For both short-term and major morbidity, a female disadvantage on HCE increased from IHDS I to IHDS II. For instance, the male-female gap in major morbidity related expenditure increased from INR 1298 to INR 4172. A decomposition analysis of gender gap in HCE demonstrates that about 48% of the gap is attributable to differences in demographic and socio-economic factors (endowment effect, whereas 50% of the gap is due to the differential effect of the determinants (coefficient effect.Indians spend less on female health care than on male health care. Most of the gender gap in HCE is not due to differential distribution of factors affecting HCE.

  2. Evidence and consensus recommendations for the pharmacological management of pain in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dureja GP

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gur Prasad Dureja,1 Rajagopalan N Iyer,2 Gautam Das,3 Jaishid Ahdal,4 Prashant Narang4 On behalf of the Pain Working Group 1Delhi Pain Management Centre, New Delhi, Delhi, 2Department of Orthopaedics, Raja Rajeswari Medical College and Hospital, Bengaluru, Karnataka, 3Daradia Pain Clinic, Kolkata, West Bengal, 4Department of Medical Affairs, Janssen India, Johnson & Johnson Pvt Ltd, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Abstract: Despite enormous progress in the field of pain management over the recent years, pain continues to be a highly prevalent medical condition worldwide. In the developing countries, pain is often an undertreated and neglected aspect of treatment. Awareness issues and several misconceptions associated with the use of analgesics, fear of adverse events – particularly with opioids and surgical methods of analgesia – are major factors contributing to suboptimal treatment of pain. Untreated pain, as a consequence, is associated with disability, loss of income, unemployment and considerable mortality; besides contributing majorly to the economic burden on the society and the health care system in general. Available guidelines suggest that a strategic treatment approach may be helpful for physicians in managing pain in real-world settings. The aim of this manuscript is to propose treatment recommendations for the management of different types of pain, based on the available evidence. Evidence search was performed by using MEDLINE (by PubMed and Cochrane databases. The types of articles included in this review were based on randomized control studies, case–control or cohort studies, prospective and retrospective studies, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, clinical practice guidelines and evidence-based consensus recommendations. Articles were reviewed by a multidisciplinary expert panel and recommendations were developed. A stepwise treatment algorithm-based approach based on a careful diagnosis and evaluation of the underlying disease

  3. Evidences Dependent Population Distribution Patterns of Tiger and Leopard in Similipal Tiger Reserve, Odisha, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Ranjan Mishra

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Tiger (Panthera tigris is an endangered carnivore with uncertain demographic status spanning 13 Asian countries. Due to its larger body size and carnivorous diet in nature it always occurs at low population densities. Further prey depletion due to overhunting (Karanth & Stith, 1998, poaching, habitat shrinkage (Kenny et al., 1995, Wcs, 1995 and direct killing altogether have also become a major factor for depletion of wild tiger populations tiger. Monitoring the abundance and its alteration is always important for the effective management of endangered species. Tiger is categorized as “Endangered” on the IUCN Red List (IUCN, 2008 and listed under Schedule-I of Wildlife (Protection Act, 1972 in India and Appendix-I of the CITES. Leopard (Panthera pardus is also included in the Schedule- I of the Indian Wildlife Protection Act, 1972 and is placed under “Least Concern” category of 2002 IUCN Red List of threatened animals. Similipal Tiger Reserve is one of the largest Tiger Reserves of India with an area of 2750 km2. Therefore we have to depend mainly on the direct sightings and evidence records of the animals to analysis the status and distribution pattern of these two big cats in the core area of this Tiger Reserve.

  4. Evidences of Significant Nonstationarity in Precipitation Extremes over Urbanizing Areas in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J.; H, V.; Karmakar, S.; Ghosh, S.

    2014-12-01

    The statistical assumption of stationarity in hydrologic extreme time/event series has been relied heavily in frequency analysis. However, due to the analytically perceivable impacts of climate change, urbanization and concomitant land use pattern, assumption of stationarity in hydrologic time series will draw erroneous results, which inturn effects the policy and decision-making. Past studies provided sufficient evidences on changes in the characteristics of Indian monsoon rainfall extremes and further it has been attributed to climate change and urbanization, which indicates the presence of significant nonstationary in the Indian monsoon extremes. Therefore, a comprehensive nonstationary frequency analysis must be conducted all over India to obtain realistic return periods. The present study aims to conduct a nonstationary frequency analysis of the precipitation extremes over India at 1o resolution for a period of 1901-2004, with the implementation of the Generalized Additive Model for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS) parameters. A cluster of 74 GAMLSS models has been developed by considering nonstationary in different combinations of distribution parameters and regression techniques (families of parametric polynomials and nonparametric/smoothing cubic spline), which overcomes the limitations of the previous studies. Further, for identification of urban, urbanizing and rural grids, an population density data has been utilized. The results showed the significant differences in the stationary and nonstationary return periods for the urbanizing grids, when compared to urbanized and rural grids. The results give implications of presence of nonstationary in the precipitation extremes more prominently in urbanizing areas compare to urbanized and rural areas.

  5. Evidence of β-antimonene at the Sb/Bi2Se3 interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammini, R.; Colonna, S.; Hogan, C.; Mahatha, S. K.; Papagno, M.; Barla, A.; Sheverdyaeva, P. M.; Moras, P.; Aliev, Z. S.; Babanly, M. B.; Chulkov, E. V.; Carbone, C.; Ronci, F.

    2018-02-01

    We report a study of the interface between antimony and the prototypical topological insulator Bi2Se3. Scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements show the presence of ordered domains displaying a perfect lattice match with bismuth selenide. Density functional theory calculations of the most stable atomic configurations demonstrate that the ordered domains can be attributed to stacks of β-antimonene.

  6. India

    CERN Multimedia

    Hagedorn,R

    1975-01-01

    Le Prof.Rolf Hagedorn est née à Wuppertal en Allemagne et a étudié la physique à Göttingen. Il a eu l'occasion de séjourner plusieurs mois en Inde et nous ramène son image avec présentation des diapositives. Il parle entre autre d'une école qui est un oeuvre social exceptionnel fondé par une Allemande et un Indien, qui se sont mariés en Allemagne et retourné en Inde pour élever leurs deux filles.

  7. Stock returns predictability and the adaptive market hypothesis in emerging markets: evidence from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiremath, Gourishankar S; Kumari, Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the question of whether the adaptive market hypothesis provides a better description of the behaviour of emerging stock market like India. We employed linear and nonlinear methods to evaluate the hypothesis empirically. The linear tests show a cyclical pattern in linear dependence suggesting that the Indian stock market switched between periods of efficiency and inefficiency. In contrast, the results from nonlinear tests reveal a strong evidence of nonlinearity in returns throughout the sample period with a sign of tapering magnitude of nonlinear dependence in the recent period. The findings suggest that Indian stock market is moving towards efficiency. The results provide additional insights on association between financial crises, foreign portfolio investments and inefficiency. G14; G12; C12.

  8. Evidence of late Palaeocene-early Eocene equatorial rain forest refugia in southern Western Ghats, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, V; Farooqui, A; Tripathi, S K M; Garg, R; Thakur, B

    2009-11-01

    Equatorial rain forests that maintain a balance between speciation and extinction are hot-spots for studies of biodiversity. Western Ghats in southern India have gained attention due to high tropical biodiversity and endemism in their southern most area. We attempted to track the affinities of the pollen fl ora of the endemic plants of Western Ghat area within the fossil palynoflora of late Palaeocene-early Eocene (approximately 55-50 Ma) sedimentary deposits of western and northeastern Indian region. The study shows striking similarity of extant pollen with twenty eight most common fossil pollen taxa of the early Palaeogene. Widespread occurrences of coal and lignite deposits during early Palaeogene provide evidence of existence of well diversified rain forest community and swampy vegetation in the coastal low lying areas all along the western and northeastern margins of the Indian subcontinent. Prevalence of excessive humid climate during this period has been seen as a result of equatorial positioning of Indian subcontinent, superimposed by a long term global warming phase (PETM and EECO) during the early Palaeogene. The study presents clear evidence that highly diversifi ed equatorial rain forest vegetation once widespread in the Indian subcontinent during early Palaeogene times, are now restricted in a small area as a refugia in the southernmost part of the Western Ghat area. High precipitation and shorter periods of dry months seem to have provided suitable environment to sustain lineages of ancient tropical vegetation in this area of Western Ghats in spite of dramatic climatic changes subsequent to the post India-Asia collision and during the Quaternary and Recent times.

  9. Fertility differentials among religious minorities: cross-national and regional evidence from India and Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahu, B.; van Wissen, L.J.G.; Hutter, I.; Bosch, A.

    2012-01-01

    The article examines the independent effect of religious minority status on fertility at two levels i.e. cross-country level of India and Bangladesh and intra-country level (district) of India. Demographic and health survey data from India (2005–2006) and Bangladesh (2006–2007) are used for the

  10. Fertility Differentials among Religious Minorities : Cross-national and Regional Evidence from India and Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahu, Biswamitra; van Wissen, L. J. G.; Hutter, Inge; Bosch, Alinda

    2012-01-01

    The article examines the independent effect of religious minority status on fertility at two levels i.e. cross-country level of India and Bangladesh and intra-country level (district) of India. Demographic and health survey data from India (20052006) and Bangladesh (20062007) are used for the

  11. Evidence of β-antimonene at the Sb/Bi2Se3 interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammini, Roberto; Colonna, Stefano; Hogan, Conor; Mahatha, Sanjoy; Papagno, Marco; Barla, Alessandro; Sheverdyaeva, Polina; Moras, Paolo; Aliev, Ziya; Babanly, M B; Chulkov, Evgueni V; Carbone, Carlo; Ronci, Fabio

    2017-12-19

    We report a study of the interface between antimony and the prototypical topological insulator Sb/Bi2Se3. Scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements show the presence of ordered domains displaying a perfect lattice match with bismuth selenide. Density functional theory calculations of the most stable atomic configurations demonstrate that the ordered domains can be attributed to stacks of β-antimonene. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. Shoreline changes during the last 2000 years on the Saurashtra coast of India: Study based on archaeological evidences

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Vora, K.H.; Sundaresh

    . In this communication an attempt is made to study shoreline and sea-level changes during the last 2000 years on the basis of archaeological evidence. Archaeological excavations undertaken at Bet Dwarka (western most part of India) revealed an interesting cultural...

  13. Knowledge of evidence-based dentistry among academic dental practitioners of Bhopal, India: a preliminary survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishwarya Singh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize the knowledge of evidence-based dentistry (EBD among dental faculty members in the city of Bhopal in central India. A cross-sectional questionnaire was administered at two dental colleges in Bhopal City. All dental faculty members who were present on the day of the study and who agreed to participate were included in the study. A total of 50 dental faculty members returned the questionnaire. Six Likert-type questions were asked, and the percentages of various responses were used for analysis. Sixteen faculty members (32.0% strongly agreed that EBD is a process of making decisions based on scientifically proven evidence. Fifteen faculty members (30.0% strongly disagreed or disagreed with the item stating that the best and quickest way to find evidence is by reading textbooks or asking experienced colleagues. Thirteen faculty members (26.0% strongly agreed that EBD allows dentists to improve their scientific knowledge and clinical skills. It is recommended that EBD be included in undergraduate and postgraduate curricula and in intensive continuing dental education programs that are conducted for dental faculty members.

  14. Sedimentary Characteristics of Marine Events from se Coast of India: Case Studies of 2004 Tsunami and 2013 Phailin Cyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, A.

    2015-12-01

    its preservations potential are helpful to identify the paleo tsunami sediment characteristics the along east coast of India. The present study can be used as the background for distinguishing the tsunami and cyclone sediments. Keywords: 2004 Tsunami preservation, 2013 phailin cylcone, sedimentology, Topography.

  15. First evidence of epithermal gold occurrences in the SE Afar Rift, Republic of Djibouti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, N.; Fouquet, Y.; Le Gall, B.; Caminiti, A. M.; Rolet, J.; Bohn, M.; Etoubleau, J.; Delacourt, C.; Jalludin, M.

    2012-06-01

    The geology of the Republic of Djibouti, in the SE Afar Triangle, is characterized by intense tectonic and bimodal volcanic activity that began as early as 25-30 Ma. Each magmatic event was accompanied by hydrothermal activity. Mineralization generally occurs as gold-silver bearing chalcedony veins and is associated with felsic volcanism. Eighty samples from mineralized hydrothermal chalcedony, quartz ± carbonate veins and breccias were studied from ten sites representing four major volcanic events that range in age from early Miocene to the present. The most recent veins are controlled by fractures at the edges of grabens established during the last 4 Myr. Gold in excess of 200 ppb is present in 30% of the samples, with values up to 16 ppm. Mineralogical compositions allowed us to identify different types of mineralization corresponding to different depths in the hydrothermal system: (1) surface and subsurface mineralization characterized by carbonate chimneys, gypsum, silica cap and quartz ± carbonate veins that are depleted in metals and Au; (2) shallow banded chalcedony ± adularia veins related to boiling that contain up to 16 ppm Au, occurring as native gold and electrum with pyrite, and tetradymite; (3) quartz veins with sulfides, and (4) epidote alteration in the deepest hydrothermal zones. Samples in which pyrite is enriched in As tend to have a high Au content. The association with bimodal volcanism, the occurrence of adularia and the native Au and electrum in banded chalcedony veins are typical of epithermal systems and confirm that this type of mineralization can occur in a young intracontinental rift system.

  16. Religious Fragmentation, Social Identity and Conflict: Evidence from an Artefactual Field Experiment in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surajeet Chakravarty

    Full Text Available We examine the impact of religious identity and village-level religious fragmentation on behavior in Tullock contests. We report on a series of two-player Tullock contest experiments conducted on a sample of 516 Hindu and Muslim participants in rural West Bengal, India. Our treatments are the identity of the two players and the degree of religious fragmentation in the village where subjects reside. Our main finding is that the effect of social identity is small and inconsistent across the two religious groups in our study. While we find small but statistically significant results in line with our hypotheses in the Hindu sample, we find no statistically significant effects in the Muslim sample. This is in contrast to evidence from Chakravarty et al. (2016, who report significant differences in cooperation levels in prisoners' dilemma and stag hunt games, both in terms of village composition and identity. We attribute this to the fact that social identity may have a more powerful effect on cooperation than on conflict.

  17. Religious Fragmentation, Social Identity and Conflict: Evidence from an Artefactual Field Experiment in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Surajeet; Fonseca, Miguel A; Ghosh, Sudeep; Marjit, Sugata

    2016-01-01

    We examine the impact of religious identity and village-level religious fragmentation on behavior in Tullock contests. We report on a series of two-player Tullock contest experiments conducted on a sample of 516 Hindu and Muslim participants in rural West Bengal, India. Our treatments are the identity of the two players and the degree of religious fragmentation in the village where subjects reside. Our main finding is that the effect of social identity is small and inconsistent across the two religious groups in our study. While we find small but statistically significant results in line with our hypotheses in the Hindu sample, we find no statistically significant effects in the Muslim sample. This is in contrast to evidence from Chakravarty et al. (2016), who report significant differences in cooperation levels in prisoners' dilemma and stag hunt games, both in terms of village composition and identity. We attribute this to the fact that social identity may have a more powerful effect on cooperation than on conflict.

  18. Improving student learning via mobile phone video content: Evidence from the BridgeIT India project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennersten, Matthew; Quraishy, Zubeeda Banu; Velamuri, Malathi

    2015-08-01

    Past efforts invested in computer-based education technology interventions have generated little evidence of affordable success at scale. This paper presents the results of a mobile phone-based intervention conducted in the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu in 2012-13. The BridgeIT project provided a pool of audio-visual learning materials organised in accordance with a system of syllabi pacing charts. Teachers of Standard 5 and 6 English and Science classes were notified of the availability of new videos via text messages (SMS), which they downloaded onto their phones using an open-source application and showed, with suggested activities, to students on a TV screen using a TV-out cable. In their evaluation of this project, the authors of this paper found that the test scores of children who experienced the intervention improved by 0.36 standard deviations in English and 0.98 standard deviations in Science in Andhra Pradesh, relative to students in similar classrooms who did not experience the intervention. Differences between treatment and control schools in Tamil Nadu were less marked. The intervention was also cost-effective, relative to other computer-based interventions. Based on these results, the authors argue that is possible to use mobile phones to produce a strong positive and statistically significant effect in terms of teaching and learning quality across a large number of classrooms in India at a lower cost per student than past computer-based interventions.

  19. Achieving polio eradication: a review of health communication evidence and lessons learned in India and Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obregón, Rafael; Chitnis, Ketan; Morry, Chris; Feek, Warren; Bates, Jeffrey; Galway, Michael; Ogden, Ellyn

    2009-08-01

    Since 1988, the world has come very close to eradicating polio through the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, in which communication interventions have played a consistently central role. Mass media and information dissemination approaches used in immunization efforts worldwide have contributed to this success. However, reaching the hardest-to-reach, the poorest, the most marginalized and those without access to health services has been challenging. In the last push to eradicate polio, Polio Eradication Initiative communication strategies have become increasingly research-driven and innovative, particularly through the introduction of sustained interpersonal communication and social mobilization approaches to reach unreached populations. This review examines polio communication efforts in India and Pakistan between the years 2000 and 2007. It shows how epidemiological, social and behavioural data guide communication strategies that have contributed to increased levels of polio immunity, particularly among underserved and hard-to-reach populations. It illustrates how evidence-based and planned communication strategies - such as sustained media campaigns, intensive community and social mobilization, interpersonal communication and political and national advocacy combined - have contributed to reducing polio incidence in these countries. Findings show that communication strategies have contributed on several levels by: mobilizing social networks and leaders; creating political will; increasing knowledge; ensuring individual and community-level demand; overcoming gender barriers and resistance to vaccination; and reaching out to the poorest and marginalized populations. The review concludes with observations about the added value of communication strategies in polio eradication efforts and implications for global and local public health communication interventions.

  20. Seaward dipping reflectors along the SW continental margin of India: Evidence for volcanic passive margin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ajay, K.K.; Chaubey, A.K.; Krishna, K.S.; Rao, D.G.; Sar, D.

    Multi-channel seismic reflection profiles across the southwest continental margin of India (SWCMI) show presence of westerly dipping seismic reflectors beneath sedimentary strata along the western flank of the Laccadive Ridge-northernmost part...

  1. Climatic aridity over India 11,000 years ago: Evidence from feldspar distribution in shelf sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hashimi, N.H.; Nair, R.R.

    Feldspars and quartz contents of sand and silt fractions of forty three samples from the western continental shelf of India were determined by the X-ray diffraction method. The results indicate that the feldspar content in the relict (9000...

  2. Import demand of crude oil and economic growth. Evidence from India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sajal

    2009-01-01

    This study establishes a long-run equilibrium relationship among quantity of crude oil import, income and price of the imported crude in India for the time span 1970-1971 to 2005-2006 using autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) bounds testing approach of cointegration. Empirical results show that the long-term income elasticity of imported crude in India is 1.97 and there exists a unidirectional long-run causality running from economic growth to crude oil import. So reduction of crude oil import will not affect the future economic growth in India in the long-run. India should take various energy efficiency and demand side management measures in transport sector along with other measures like expanding and strengthening indigenous resource-base, substituting imported fuels by domestic fuels and de-controlling the price of petroleum products to reduce its import dependence. (author)

  3. Income related inequality in financial inclusion and role of banks: Evidence on financial exclusion in India

    OpenAIRE

    Rama Pal; Rupayan Pal

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes income related inequality in financial inclusion in India using a representative household level survey data, linked to State-level factors. It shows that (a) the extent of financial exclusion is quite severe among households across all income groups, (b) income related inequality in financial inclusion varies widely across sub-national regions in India, but it is quite high in most of the cases, (c) income related inequality in financial inclusion cannot be considered as ...

  4. Achieving polio eradication: a review of health communication evidence and lessons learned in India and Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitnis, Ketan; Morry, Chris; Feek, Warren; Bates, Jeffrey; Galway, Michael; Ogden, Ellyn

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Since 1988, the world has come very close to eradicating polio through the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, in which communication interventions have played a consistently central role. Mass media and information dissemination approaches used in immunization efforts worldwide have contributed to this success. However, reaching the hardest-to-reach, the poorest, the most marginalized and those without access to health services has been challenging. In the last push to eradicate polio, Polio Eradication Initiative communication strategies have become increasingly research-driven and innovative, particularly through the introduction of sustained interpersonal communication and social mobilization approaches to reach unreached populations. This review examines polio communication efforts in India and Pakistan between the years 2000 and 2007. It shows how epidemiological, social and behavioural data guide communication strategies that have contributed to increased levels of polio immunity, particularly among underserved and hard-to-reach populations. It illustrates how evidence-based and planned communication strategies – such as sustained media campaigns, intensive community and social mobilization, interpersonal communication and political and national advocacy combined – have contributed to reducing polio incidence in these countries. Findings show that communication strategies have contributed on several levels by: mobilizing social networks and leaders; creating political will; increasing knowledge; ensuring individual and community-level demand; overcoming gender barriers and resistance to vaccination; and reaching out to the poorest and marginalized populations. The review concludes with observations about the added value of communication strategies in polio eradication efforts and implications for global and local public health communication interventions. PMID:19705014

  5. Secular trends in menarcheal age in India-evidence from the Indian human development survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kumar Pathak

    Full Text Available Evidence from a number of countries in Europe and North America point towards the secular declining trend in menarcheal age with considerable spatial variations over the past two centuries. Similar trends were reported in several developing countries from Asia, Africa and Latin America. However, data corroborating any secular trend in the menarcheal age of the Indian population remained sparse and inadequately verified.We examined secular trends, regional heterogeneity and association of socioeconomic, anthropometric and contextual factors with menarcheal age among ever-married women (15-49 years in India. Using the pseudo cohort data approach, we fit multiple linear regression models to estimate secular trends in menarcheal age of 91394 ever-married women using the Indian Human Development Survey.The mean age at menarche among Indian women was 13.76 years (95 % CI: 13.75, 13.77 in 2005. It declined by three months from 13.83 years (95% CI: 13.81, 13.85 among women born prior to 1955-1964, to nearly 13.62 years (95% CI: 13.58, 13.67 among women born during late 1985-1989. However, these aggregate national figures mask extensive spatial heterogeneity as mean age at menarche varied from 15.0 years in Himachal Pradesh during 1955-1964 (95% CI: 14.89-15.11 to about 12.1 years in Assam (95% CI: 11.63-12.56 during 1985-1989.The regression analysis established a reduction of nearly one month per decade, suggesting a secular decline in age at menarche among Indian women. Notably, the menarcheal age was significantly associated with the area of residence, geographic region, linguistic groups, educational attainment, wealth status, caste and religious affiliations among Indian women.

  6. Trends, prospects and deprivation index of disability in India: Evidences from census 2001 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Ashish; Pandey, C M; Dubey, Manisha; Rastogi, Sanjay

    2017-04-01

    Since the dawn of civilization, disabilities have existed in various dimensions of human life. World Health Organization (WHO) defines disability as an umbrella term, covering impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions. Globally, approximately 1 billion people have some form of disability, and approximately 20% have significant functioning impairments. This study aims to estimate the level, trends and prospects of disability in 640 districts of India. Data for the present study has been taken from Census of India, 2001 and 2011. A Disability Index was calculated at the district level, and state level indexing was done using the Disability Deprivation Index. The population for the year 2021 was projected using the exponential growth rate method. The Disability Deprivation Index was calculated using child labor, adult unemployment, illiteracy, and the ratio of beggars in the disabled population. The study reveals that the proportion of the disabled population in India was 2.10% in 2001, which increased to 2.21% in 2011. According to the Disability Deprivation Index, Maharashtra was the best-performing state in 2011. There were 4.90 million new cases of disability in India during 2001-11, out of which 1.52 million cases belonged to non-congenital disability. There is a rise in the disabled population in India, which needs special attention. The working status of the disabled is gloomy. The majority of the disabled people are non-working and need adequate rehabilitation measures that would facilitate employment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Electricity supply, employment and real GDP in India: evidence from cointegration and Granger-causality tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sajal

    2009-01-01

    This study probes nexus between electricity supply, employment and real GDP for India within a multivariate framework using autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) bounds testing approach of cointegration. Long-run equilibrium relationship has been established among these variables for the time span 1970-71 to 2005-06. The study further establishes long- and short-run Granger causality running from real GDP and electricity supply to employment without any feedback effect. Thus, growth in real GDP and electricity supply are responsible for the high level of employment in India. The absence of causality running from electricity supply to real GDP implies that electricity demand and supply side measures can be adopted to reduce the wastage of electricity, which would not affect future economic growth of India.

  8. Women's autonomy and experience of physical violence within marriage in rural India: evidence from a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabarwal, Shagun; Santhya, K G; Jejeebhoy, Shireen J

    2014-01-01

    Evidence regarding the relationship between married women's autonomy and risk of marital violence remains mixed. Moreover, studies examining the contribution of specific aspects of women's autonomy in influencing the risk of marital violence using measures of autonomy that incorporate its dynamic nature are rare. We investigated the relationship between women's autonomy and their experience of marital violence in rural India using prospective data. We used data on 4,904 rural women drawn from two linked studies: the NFHS-2, conducted during 1998-1999 and a follow-up study for a subgroup of women carried out during 2002-2003. Three dimensions of autonomy were used: financial autonomy, freedom of movement, and household decision-making. Marital violence was measured as experience of physical violence in the year prior to the follow-up survey. Findings indicate the protective effects of financial autonomy and freedom of movement in reducing the risk of marital violence in the overall model. Furthermore, region-wise analysis revealed that in the more gender equitable settings of south India, financial autonomy exerted a protective influence on risk of marital violence. However, in the more gender-stratified settings of north India, none of the dimensions of autonomy were found to have any protective effect on women's risk of marital violence. Results argue for an increased focus on strategies aimed at improving women's financial status through livelihood skill-building opportunities, development of a strong savings orientation, and asset-building options.

  9. The importance of considering the evidence in the MTP 2014 Amendment debate in India – unsubstantiated arguments should not impede improved access to safe abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandira Paul

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available With the objective to improve access to safe abortion services in India, the Ministry of Health and Welfare, with approval of the Law Ministry, published draft amendments of the MTP Act on October 29, 2014. Instead of the expected support, the amendments created a heated debate within professional medical associations of India. In this commentary, we review the evidence in response to the current discourse with regard to the amendments. It would be unfortunate if unsubstantiated one-sided arguments would impede the intention of improving access to safe abortion care in India.

  10. No K/T boundary at Anjar, Gujarat, India: Evidence from magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan, Krishtel eMaging Solutions

    1996, Courtillot et al 2000) does not contradict a placement of the sediments in ..... et al 1995b; Courtillot et al 2000), while flows V– .... tive work involving Geological Survey of India and .... the eastern Tethys (eds) W C Sweet, Zunyi Yang, J. M..

  11. Effectiveness of a Business Communication Course: Evidence from a Business School in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayathridevi, K. Sri; Deepa, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to show the effectiveness of a business communication course offered in a business school in India. All students who enrolled for the Master of Business Administration program in the school were considered for the study. The study adapted a pretest and posttest approach to find the effectiveness of the course. It also describes the…

  12. The financing and growth of firms in China and India : evidence from capital markets

    OpenAIRE

    Didier, Tatiana; Schmukler, Sergio L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the extent to which firms in China and India use capital markets to obtain financing and grow. Using a unique data set on domestic and international capital raising activity and firm performance, it finds that the expansion of financial market activity since the 1990s has been more limited than what the aggregate figures suggest. Relatively few firms raise capital. Even ...

  13. Evidence for Indo-Roman trade from Bet Dwarka waters, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh; Tripati, S.

    India had a very active maritime trade contact with the Roman world between the 4th century BC and the 4th century AD. In this context recent finds of stone anchors, potsherds, lead anchors and a lead ingot from 5 to 8 m water-depth near Bet Dwarka...

  14. Choosing and Changing Schools in India's Private and Government Sectors: Young Lives Evidence from Andhra Pradesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Zoe; Woodhead, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The growth and increasing popularity of 'low-fee' private schooling across many parts of India has attracted much research and policy attention. This paper broadens the discussion by drawing attention to the increasing heterogeneity of the educational landscape in many communities. Our specific focus is on the consequences for school choices made…

  15. Synthesizing evidences for policy translation: a public health discourse on rotavirus vaccine in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Samiran; Das, Aritra; Samanta, Saheli

    2014-08-11

    The debate on the relevance of rotavirus vaccine to immunization program in India, where 27 million children are born every year, rages on. We synthesized the issues raised during these debates and reviewed the current literature to identify themes that could inform public health policy decision. The paradigm we used integrated disease burden data, host and environmental factors, vaccine efficacy, immunization program issues, and economic considerations. Our synthesis reveals that substantive country specific information on disease burden and economic impact of rotavirus illness in India is constrained by lack of public discussion and qualitative studies on mothers' perceptions of the vaccine in concern. The need to improve the performance of current immunization program against six major vaccine preventable diseases (tuberculosis, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, and measles) is often cited as a priority over introduction of rotavirus vaccine. Health in India being a state subject, we emphasize that the states which are in a position to reap the benefit of rotavirus vaccine, due to their good immunization program performance, should not be restrained from doing so. Meanwhile, the poorly performing states should step up their vaccination program and increase immunization coverage. Scientific, ethical and societal concerns captured through multiple sources indicate that the introduction of rotavirus vaccine would be a good investment for India. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. India's Proposed Universal Health Coverage Policy: Evidence for Age Structure Transition Effect and Fiscal Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Muttur Ranganathan

    2016-12-01

    India's High Level Expert Group on Universal Health Coverage in 2011 recommended a universal, public-funded and national health coverage policy. As a plausible forward-looking macroeconomic reform in the health sector, this policy proposal on universal health coverage (UHC) needs to be evaluated for age structure transition effect and fiscal sustainability to strengthen its current design and future implementation. Macroeconomic analyses of the long-term implications of age structure transition and fiscal sustainability on India's proposed UHC policy. A new measure of age-specific UHC is developed by combining the age profile of public and private health consumption expenditure by using the National Transfer Accounts methodology. Different projections of age-specific public health expenditure are calculated over the period 2005-2100 to account for the age structure transition effect. The projections include changes in: (1) levels of the expenditure as gross domestic product grows, (2) levels and shape of the expenditure as gross domestic product grows and expenditure converges to that of developed countries (or convergence scenario) based on the Lee-Carter model of forecasting mortality rates, and (3) levels of the expenditure as India moves toward a UHC policy. Fiscal sustainability under each health expenditure projection is determined by using the measures of generational imbalance and sustainability gap in the Generational Accounting methodology. Public health expenditure is marked by age specificities and the elderly population is costlier to support for their healthcare needs in the future. Given the discount and productivity growth rates, the proposed UHC is not fiscally sustainable under India's current fiscal policies except for the convergence scenario. However, if the income elasticity of public expenditure on social welfare and health expenditure is less than one, fiscal sustainability of the UHC policy is attainable in all scenarios of projected public

  17. Education and gender bias in the sex ratio at birth: evidence from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echávarri, Rebeca A; Ezcurra, Roberto

    2010-02-01

    This article investigates the possible existence of a nonlinear link between female disadvantage in natality and education. To this end, we devise a theoretical model based on the key role of social interaction in explaining people's acquisition of preferences, which justifies the existence of a nonmonotonic relationship between female disadvantage in natality and education. The empirical validity of the proposed model is examined for the case of India, using district-level data. In this context, our econometric analysis pays particular attention to the role of spatial dependence to avoid any potential problems of misspecification. The results confirm that the relationship between the sex ratio at birth and education in India follows an inverted U-shape. This finding is robust to the inclusion of additional explanatory variables in the analysis, and to the choice of the spatial weight matrix used to quantify the spatial interdependence between the sample districts.

  18. Prenatal sex selection and girls' well-being: Evidence from India

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Luojia; Schlosser, Analia

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the impact of prenatal sex selection on the well-being of girls by analyzing changes in children's nutritional status and mortality during the years since the diffusion of prenatal sex determination technologies in India. We further examine various channels through which prenatal sex selection might affect girls’ outcomes. Using repeated cross-sections from a rich survey dataset, we show that high sex ratios at birth reflect the practice of sex selective abortion. We t...

  19. "Determining Gender Equity in Fiscal Federalism-- Analytical Issues and Empirical Evidence from India"

    OpenAIRE

    Lekha S. Chakraborty

    2010-01-01

    Despite the policy realm’s growing recognition of fiscal devolution in gender development, there have been relatively few attempts to translate gender commitments into fiscal commitments. This paper aims to engage in this significant debate, focusing on the plausibility of incorporating gender into financial devolution, with the Thirteenth Finance Commission of India as backdrop. Given the disturbing demographics--the monotonous decline in the juvenile sex ratio, especially in some of the pro...

  20. Inpatient treatment of diabetic patients in Asia: evidence from India, China, Thailand and Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber-Fiebert, J D; Li, H; Ratanawijitrasin, S; Vidyasagar, S; Wang, X Y; Aljunid, S; Shah, N; Wang, Z; Hirunrassamee, S; Bairy, K L; Wang, J; Saperi, S; Nur, A M; Eggleston, K

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) has grown rapidly, but little is known about the drivers of inpatient spending in low- and middle-income countries. This study aims to compare the clinical presentation and expenditure on hospital admission for inpatients with a primary diagnosis of Type 2 DM in India, China, Thailand and Malaysia. We analysed data on adult, Type 2 DM patients admitted between 2005 and 2008 to five tertiary hospitals in the four countries, reporting expenditures relative to income per capita in 2007. Hospital admission spending for diabetic inpatients with no complications ranged from 11 to 75% of per-capita income. Spending for patients with complications ranged from 6% to over 300% more than spending for patients without complications treated at the same hospital. Glycated haemoglobin was significantly higher for the uninsured patients, compared with insured patients, in India (8.6 vs. 8.1%), Hangzhou, China (9.0 vs. 8.1%), and Shandong, China (10.9 vs. 9.9%). When the hospital admission expenditures of the insured and uninsured patients were statistically different in India and China, the uninsured always spent less than the insured patients. With the rising prevalence of DM, households and health systems in these countries will face greater economic burdens. The returns to investment in preventing diabetic complications appear substantial. Countries with large out-of-pocket financing burdens such as India and China are associated with the widest gaps in resource use between insured and uninsured patients. This probably reflects both overuse by the insured and underuse by the uninsured.

  1. Gender and caste-based wage discrimination in India : some recent evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Tushar

    2014-01-01

    "This paper examines gender and social groups wage discrimination in India using a nationally representative survey. We examine the wage gaps between different sub-groups of population separately in the rural and urban sectors using the Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition method. To account for possibility of the sample selection bias, the Heckman correction model is employed. We find a large wage differential between gender groups and between different social groups. The decomposition analysis reve...

  2. Gender and caste-based wage discrimination in India: some recent evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Tushar

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines gender and social groups wage discrimination in India using a nationally representative survey. We examine the wage gaps between different sub-groups of population separately in the rural and urban sectors using the Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition method. To account for possibility of the sample selection bias, the Heckman correction model is employed. We find a large wage differential between gender groups and between different social groups. The decomposition analysis revea...

  3. Intrahousehold Health Care Financing Strategy and the Gender Gap: Empirical Evidence from India

    OpenAIRE

    Abay Asfaw; Stephan Klasen; Francesca Lamanna

    2008-01-01

    The 'missing women' dilemma in India has sparked interest in investigating gender discrimination in the provision of health care in the country. No studies, however, have directly examined this discrimination in relation to household behavior in health care financing. We hypothesize that households who face tight budget constraints are more likely to spend their meager resources on hospitalization of boys rather than girls. We use the 60th Indian National Sample Survey and a multinomial logit...

  4. Worker’s remittances as stable financial flows: some evidence from India

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Bhupal

    2006-01-01

    This paper dwells upon the financial dimension of workers’ remittances as this issue has assumed significant policy attention across the spectrum of developing countries. Specifically, it addresses the following: i) Literature on workers’’ remittances in a macro economic framework; ii) Stability of workers’ remittances as a sustainable source of external finance; iii) Channels through the workers’ remittances flows into India and the issue of high transaction cost entailed in transmitting fun...

  5. Economics of household technology adoption in developing countries: evidence from solar technology adoption in rural India

    OpenAIRE

    Aklin, M.; Bayer, P.; Harish, S.P.; Urpelainen, J.

    2018-01-01

    Innovation is one of the most important drivers of economic development. Even in developing countries, households have access to a wide array of new technologies. However, factors affecting households’ technology adoption decisions remain poorly understood. Using data on solar microgrid adoption from rural India, we investigate the determinants of household technology adoption. We offer all households identical solar products to avoid bias from product differentiation. Households pay a monthl...

  6. Access to Formal Banking and Household Finances: Experimental Evidence from India

    OpenAIRE

    Somville, Vincent; Vandewalle, Lore

    2017-01-01

    Access to formal banking is spreading across the world. Obtaining a bank account may transform how people manage their finances, and affect their savings and consumption. We report from a field experiment that randomly provides access to a bank account to a representative sample of villagers in rural India. The treated keep relatively important savings on their account, but reduce their other savings by a similar amount. Their household’s overall savings and expenditures do not change. We ide...

  7. Human trafficking for organ removal in India: a victim-centered, evidence-based report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiani-Saberi, Debra A; Raja, Kallakurichi Rajendiran; Findley, Katie C; Kerketta, Ponsian; Anand, Vijay

    2014-02-27

    Enhancements in the national transplant law to prohibit commercial transplants in India have curbed the trade. Yet, the human rights abuse of human trafficking for organ removal (HTOR) continues in various transplant centers throughout India. Beginning in September 2010 until May 2012, in-depth interviews were conducted with 103 victims of HTOR in India in which victims described their experiences of a commercial kidney removal in compelling detail. Victims were located in Tamil Nadu, and reference is made to the broader study that included 50 additional victims in small towns and villages in West Bengal and Karnataka. Fourteen cases (14%) in Tamil Nadu and an additional 20 cases (40%) from West Bengal and Karnataka occurred between 2009 to May 2012. The cases in Tamil Nadu ranged in age from 19 to 55 years, with an average age of 33 years in Erode and 36 years in Chennai. Fifty-seven percent of the victims in Erode are female, and 87% of the victims in Chennai are female. Twelve percent of the individuals were widowed or abandoned, 79% were married, and 91% were parents with an average of two kids. Of those interviewed, 28% had no formal education, 19% had some primary schooling, 22% had some secondary schooling, and no individuals reported schooling above high school. All victims interviewed lived in abject poverty with monthly income levels well below the national average. The majority of victims reported long lasting health, economic, social, and psychological consequences. No matter the reason expressed for an organ sale, all victims reported that they would not have agreed to the organ removal if their economic circumstances were not so dire. One hundred percent of the victims interviewed expressed that they need assistance to cope with these consequences. Human trafficking for an organ removal continues in private transplant centers throughout India, service to foreign patients is ongoing, and victims' consequences are long lasting. A rights-based response

  8. Is the practice of public or private sector doctors more evidence-based? A qualitative study from Vellore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemi, Oluwaseun O; Martineau, Tim; Tharyan, Prathap

    2015-06-01

    The literature on the use of evidence-based practice is sparse, both in the public and private sectors in middle-and low-income countries, and the present literature shows that physician understanding and use of evidence-based practice is poor. The study aimed to explore the perception of medical practitioners in the private for-profit, private not-for-profit and government sectors in Vellore, India, on evidence-based practice, in order to explain the factors affecting the use of evidence-based practice among the practitioners and to inform local policy and management decisions for improvement in quality of care. Qualitative methodology was employed in the study. Sixteen in-depth and two key informant interviews were carried out with medical practitioners selected by purposive sampling in the private for-profit, private not-for-profit and government sectors. The interviews explored participants' knowledge of evidence-based practice, factors affecting its use and possible ways of improving the use of evidence-based practice among physicians in all the health sectors. Data from the in-depth and key informant interviews were analyzed with the NVIVO (version 8) software package using the framework approach. Although most practitioners interviewed have heard of evidence-based practice, knowledge about evidence-based practice seems inadequate. However, doctors in the private not-for-profit sector seem to be more familiar with the concept of evidence-based practice. Also, practitioners in the private not-for profit sector appear to use medical evidence more in their practices compared to government practitioners or doctors in the private for-profit sector. Perceived factors affecting physician use of evidence-based practice include lack of personal time for literature appraisal as a result of high case load, weak regulatory system, pressure from patients, caregivers and pharmaceutical companies, as well as financial considerations. Opinions of the respondents are that use

  9. Women's reproductive health in slum populations in India: evidence from NFHS-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Indrajit

    2010-03-01

    The urban population in India is one of the largest in the world. Its unprecedented growth has resulted in a large section of the population living in abject poverty in overcrowded slums. There have been limited efforts to capture the health of people in urban slums. In the present study, we have used data collected during the National Family Health Survey-3 to provide a national representation of women's reproductive health in the slum population in India. We examined a sample of 4,827 women in the age group of 15-49 years to assess the association of the variable slum with selected reproductive health services. We have also tried to identify the sociodemographic factors that influence the utilization of these services among women in the slum communities. All analyses were stratified by slum/non-slum residence, and multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze the strength of association between key reproductive health services and relevant sociodemographic factors. We found that less than half of the women from the slum areas were currently using any contraceptive methods, and discontinuation rate was higher among these women. Sterilization was the most common method of contraception (25%). Use of contraceptives depended on the age, level of education, parity, and the knowledge of contraceptive methods (p women, the proportion of deliveries conducted by skilled attendants was low, and the percentage of home deliveries was high. The use of skilled delivery care was found to be significantly associated with age, level of education, economic status, parity, and prior antenatal visits (p women from slum areas depended on the government facilities for reproductive health services. Our findings suggest that significant differences in reproductive health outcomes exist among women from slum and non-slum communities in India. Efforts to progress towards the health MDGs and other national or international health targets may not be achieved without a focus on the

  10. Does sex-selective abortion improve girls' well-being? Evidence from India

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Luojia; Schlosser, Analía

    2010-01-01

    The paper studies the impact of prenatal sex selection on the well-being of girls by analyzing changes in children's nutritional status and mortality during the years since the diffusion of prenatal sex determination technologies in India. We use the ratio of male to female births in the year and state in which a child was born as a proxy for parental access to prenatal sex-selection. We find that an increase in the practice of prenatal sex selection appears to be associated with a reduction ...

  11. Do non-monetary prices target the poor? Evidence from a field experiment in India

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    This paper uses willingness to pay (WTP) data from a field experiment in Hyderabad, India in 2013 to determine whether non-monetary prices better target health products to the poor than monetary prices. Monetary WTP is increasing in income and non-monetary WTP is weakly decreasing in income. Household fixed effects in a pooled sample of monetary WTP and non-monetary WTP are used to compare the correlation of income and WTP across price types. It is found that non-monetary WTP falls relative t...

  12. Cost and cost-effectiveness of PPM-DOTS for tuberculosis control: evidence from India.

    OpenAIRE

    Floyd, Katherine; Arora, V. K.; Murthy, K. J. R.; Lonnroth, Knut; Singla, Neeta; Akbar, Y.; Zignol, Matteo; Uplekar, Mukund

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the cost and cost-effectiveness of the Public-Private Mix DOTS (PPM-DOTS) strategy for tuberculosis (TB) control in India. METHODS: We collected data on the costs and effects of pilot PPM-DOTS projects in Delhi and Hyderabad using documentary data and interviews. The cost of PPM-DOTS was compared with public sector DOTS (i.e. DOTS delivered through public sector facilities only) and non-DOTS treatment in the private sector. Costs for 2002 in US$ were assessed for the publ...

  13. Reactivation of precambrian faults on the southwestern continental margin of India: Evidence from gravity anomalies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subrahmanyam, V.; Ramana, M.V.; Rao, D.G.

    con- fi~ration of the western continental margin, with various structural styles, has been considered as a single unit, even though there exists a difference of opinion about the origin and evolution of the Chagos-Laccadive Ridge complex...’tVATION OF PRECAMBRIAN FAULTS ON THE SW CON~~E~AL MARGIN OF INDIA 337 shelf break due to the steep topographic relief of shelf. Furthermore, the gradients might have played a dominant role in shaping the bathymetry when the block movement took place along the pre...

  14. Household electricity access, availability and human well-being: Evidence from India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Sohail; Mathai, Manu V.; Parayil, Govindan

    2014-01-01

    According to the 2011 Census of India, over 31% of India's 1.2 billion people lived in nearly 8000 towns and cities; the remaining 830 million people lived in over 638,000 villages. About 55% of rural households and 93% of urban households had access to electricity. The 2005 Indian Human Development Survey showed that on average, electricity availability (hours of supply per day) in rural and urban households were 14 and 19 h, respectively (Desai et al., 2007). Using nationally representative data from Indian Human Development Survey, this study estimated the impact of electricity access and availability on two attributes of human well-being, viz. education and health attainment. It found a significant positive relationship between electricity availability and well-being in rural and urban households. Electricity accessibility, revealed a significant positive relationship only for rural households. The paper concludes with implications for electricity policy and infrastructure choices. - Graphical abstract: Impact of electricity security on the attributes of human well-being. - Highlights: • Nexus between well-being, and electricity access and availability is quantified. • Electricity access is positively associated with well-being in rural but not urban. • Electricity availability negatively associates with morbidity and absenteeism. • Electricity security as human well-being enabler seeks nuanced policy attention. • Decentralized rapidly deployable modular technologies and microgrids are advocated

  15. Post-tsunami relocation of fisher settlements in South Asia: evidence from the Coromandel Coast, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavinck, Maarten; de Klerk, Leo; van der Plaat, Felice; Ravesteijn, Jorik; Angel, Dominique; Arendsen, Hendrik; van Dijk, Tom; de Hoog, Iris; van Koolwijk, Ant; Tuijtel, Stijn; Zuurendonk, Benjamin

    2015-07-01

    The tsunami that struck the coasts of India on 26 December 2004 resulted in the large-scale destruction of fisher habitations. The post-tsunami rehabilitation effort in Tamil Nadu was directed towards relocating fisher settlements in the interior. This paper discusses the outcomes of a study on the social effects of relocation in a sample of nine communities along the Coromandel Coast. It concludes that, although the participation of fishing communities in house design and in allocation procedures has been limited, many fisher households are satisfied with the quality of the facilities. The distance of the new settlements to the shore, however, is regarded as an impediment to engaging in the fishing profession, and many fishers are actually moving back to their old locations. This raises questions as to the direction of coastal zone policy in India, as well as to the weight accorded to safety (and other coastal development interests) vis-à-vis the livelihood needs of fishers. © 2015 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2015.

  16. Freshwater fish for nutrition security in India: Evidence from FAO data

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    Nagesh Kumar Barik

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional dimension is integral to the concept of food security. A wide range of food commodities are required to fulfill nutritional security need of the people. Animal proteins which include milk, fish, meat and egg are essentially required for nutritionally balanced diets which are available from diverse food commodities. The fish in general and freshwater fish in particular are among the fast growing sectors with increasing contributions in the nutrition security of Indian consumers. The present paper analyses relative role of fish in the nutritional security of India based on the food balance sheet data of FAO available for the period 1961–2013. The apparent fish consumption per capita per year in India has increased primarily due to increase in freshwater fish availability from 0.7 kg/cap/year in 1961–3.48 kg/cap/year in 2013, enabling increase in the overall fish availability from 1.9 to 5.04 kg/cap/year during this period. During 1961–2013, contributions of freshwater fish to non-vegetarian protein, animal protein and total protein increased from 9.1 to 27.2, 3.3–8.7 and 0.4–1.7%, respectively

  17. Alcohol Use and STI among men in India: Evidences from a national household survey

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    Arvind Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alcohol use has been found to correlate with risky sexual behavior as well as with sexually transmitted infections (STI among populations with high-risk behavior in India. Objective: To examine the correlates of alcohol use and its association with STI among adult men in India. Materials and Methods: Data from a national representative large-scale household sample survey in the country were used. It included information on sociodemographic characteristics and alcohol use as a part of substance use. Clinical as well laboratory testing was done to ascertain the STI. Results: The overall STI prevalence among adult males was found to be 2.5% (95% confidence interval (CI: 1.9-3.1. Over 26% adult men were found to have been using alcohol in the study population. It was higher among men who were illiterate and unskilled industrial workers/drivers. The men who consumed alcohol had higher prevalence of STI (3.6%; 95% CI: 2.9-5.1 than those who did not consume alcohol (2.1%; 95% CI: 1.5-2.6. The degree of association between alcoholism and STI was slightly reduced after adjusting for various sociodemographic characteristics (adjusted odds ratio: 1.5; 95% CI: 0.9-2.3; P=0.06. Conclusions: The findings of present study suggest integrating alcohol risk reduction into STI/HIV prevention programmes.

  18. Molecular and phylogenetic evidence of chikungunya virus circulating in Assam, India

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    Prafulla Dutta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Northeast Region of India possesses an abundant number of Aedes mosquitoes, the common vector for Dengue and Chikungunya (CHIK. Dengue is reported every year from Assam, but active surveillance for CHIK virus (CHIKV infection is lacking in this part of India. Therefore, this present study has been undertaken to detect any CHIKV infection during a dengue outbreak in Assam. Materials and Methods: A total of 42 dengue negative samples collected from Guwahati were screened for the presence of CHIK IgM antibodies. Further, all the samples were processed for CHIKV RNA detection by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis was done by Maximum Likelihood method using Kimura-2 parameter model. Results: No IgM positivity was found in the processed samples; however, 7 samples were positive for CHIKV by RT-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the circulating CHIKV belonged to Eastern, Central and Southern African genotype. Sequence analysis showed two uniform nucleotide substitutions and very less amino acid substitution. Conclusion: Silent existence of CHIKV beside dengue is reported from this study. Therefore, CHIKV diagnosis should be included as a regular practice for active surveillance of the disease and its accomplishment before commencing an outbreak.

  19. Petrographic, geochemical and isotopic evidence of crustal assimilation processes in the Ponte Nova alkaline mafic-ultramafic massif, SE Brazil

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    Azzone, Rogério Guitarrari; Montecinos Munoz, Patricio; Enrich, Gaston Eduardo Rojas; Alves, Adriana; Ruberti, Excelso; Gomes, Celsode Barros

    2016-09-01

    Crustal assimilation plus crystal fractionation processes of different basanite magma batches control the evolution of the Ponte Nova cretaceous alkaline mafic-ultramafic massif in SE Brazil. This massif is composed of several intrusions, the main ones with a cumulate character. Disequilibrium features in the early-crystallized phases (e.g., corrosion and sieve textures in cores of clinopyroxene crystals, spongy-cellular-textured plagioclase crystals, gulf corrosion texture in olivine crystals) and classical hybridization textures (e.g., blade biotite and acicular apatite crystals) provide strong evidence of open-system behavior. All samples are olivine- and nepheline-normative rocks with basic-ultrabasic and potassic characters and variable incompatible element enrichments. The wide ranges of whole-rock 87Sr/86Sri and 143Nd/144Ndi ratios (0.70432-0.70641 and 0.512216-0.512555, respectively) are indicative of crustal contribution from the Precambrian basement host rocks. Plagioclase and apatite 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70422-0.70927) obtained for the most primitive samples of each intrusion indicate disequilibrium conditions from early- to principal-crystallization stages. Isotope mixing-model curves between the least contaminated alkaline basic magma and heterogeneous local crustal components indicate that each intrusion of the massif is differentiated from the others by varied degrees of crustal contribution. The primary mechanisms of crustal contribution to the Ponte Nova massif involve the assimilation of host rock xenoliths during the development of the chamber environment and the assimilation of partial melts from the surrounding host rocks. Thermodynamic models using the melts algorithm indicate that parental alkaline basic magmas can be strongly affected by contamination processes subsequently to their initial stages of crystallization when there is sufficient energy to assimilate partial melts of crustal host rocks. The assimilation processes are considered to

  20. Utilization of maternal healthcare among adolescent mothers in urban India: evidence from DLHS-3.

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    Singh, Aditya; Kumar, Abhishek; Pranjali, Pragya

    2014-01-01

    Background. Low use of maternal healthcare services is one of the reasons why maternal mortality is still considerably high among adolescents mothers in India. To increase the utilization of these services, it is necessary to identify factors that affect service utilization. To our knowledge, no national level study in India has yet examined the issue in the context urban adolescent mothers. The present study is an attempt to fill this gap. Data and Methods. Using information from the third wave of District Level Household Survey (2007-08), we have examined factors associated with the utilization of maternal healthcare services among urban Indian married adolescent women (aged 13-19 years) who have given live/still births during last three years preceding the survey. The three outcome variables included in the analyses are 'full antenatal care (ANC)', 'safe delivery' and 'postnatal care within 42 days of delivery'. We have used Chi-square test to determine the difference in proportion and the binary logistic regression to understand the net effect of predictor variables on the utilization of maternity care. Results. About 22.9% of mothers have received full ANC, 65.1% of mothers have had at least one postnatal check-up within 42 days of pregnancy. The proportion of mother having a safe delivery, i.e., assisted by skilled personnel, is about 70.5%. Findings indicate that there is considerable amount of variation in use of maternity care by educational attainment, household wealth, religion, parity and region of residence. Receiving full antenatal care is significantly associated with mother's education, religion, caste, household wealth, parity, exposure to healthcare messages and region of residence. Mother's education, full antenatal care, parity, household wealth, religion and region of residence are also statistically significant in case of safe delivery. The use of postnatal care is associated with household wealth, woman's education, full antenatal care, safe

  1. Utilization of maternal healthcare among adolescent mothers in urban India: evidence from DLHS-3

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    Aditya Singh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Low use of maternal healthcare services is one of the reasons why maternal mortality is still considerably high among adolescents mothers in India. To increase the utilization of these services, it is necessary to identify factors that affect service utilization. To our knowledge, no national level study in India has yet examined the issue in the context urban adolescent mothers. The present study is an attempt to fill this gap.Data and Methods. Using information from the third wave of District Level Household Survey (2007–08, we have examined factors associated with the utilization of maternal healthcare services among urban Indian married adolescent women (aged 13–19 years who have given live/still births during last three years preceding the survey. The three outcome variables included in the analyses are ‘full antenatal care (ANC’, ‘safe delivery’ and ‘postnatal care within 42 days of delivery’. We have used Chi-square test to determine the difference in proportion and the binary logistic regression to understand the net effect of predictor variables on the utilization of maternity care.Results. About 22.9% of mothers have received full ANC, 65.1% of mothers have had at least one postnatal check-up within 42 days of pregnancy. The proportion of mother having a safe delivery, i.e., assisted by skilled personnel, is about 70.5%. Findings indicate that there is considerable amount of variation in use of maternity care by educational attainment, household wealth, religion, parity and region of residence. Receiving full antenatal care is significantly associated with mother’s education, religion, caste, household wealth, parity, exposure to healthcare messages and region of residence. Mother’s education, full antenatal care, parity, household wealth, religion and region of residence are also statistically significant in case of safe delivery. The use of postnatal care is associated with household wealth, woman

  2. Do emerging markets matter in the world oil pricing system? Evidence of imported crude by China and India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Li; Lin Xiaowen, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides empirical evidence on the changing structure of world oil price system by identifying an additional driver-emerging market factor. We choose China and India as a representative of emerging markets to examine if the quantity of crude oil imported by China and India is significant in the existing oil pricing system (. Our data starts from January 2002 and ends in March 2010, which includes the oil shock of 2007-2008. We utilize cointegration and error correction model framework developed by and in the analysis. Our results indicate that demand from emerging markets has become a significant factor in the world oil pricing system since 2003. This result is significant as it lends empirical support to the widely held conjecture that the oil shock of 2007-2008 is a demand-led shock (). Our result also has significant policy implications that go beyond the oil shock. The emerging market factor is there to stay and reflects the changing power between emerging and developed economies in the world economic system as a result of decades of fast economic development in the former. It will certainly influence policy issues related to oil and beyond. - Highlights: → We test the existing oil price modelling with data from 2002-2010. → We find evidence of structural breaks in the world oil pricing model. → We find that emerging market factor is a new driver in the world oil pricing system since 2003. → The emerging market factor lends empirical support to 'consumption-led' conjecture of oil shock. → New factor reflects significant changes of oil demand landscape following shifting economic power.

  3. Is migration status a determinant of urban nutrition insecurity? Empirical evidence from Mumbai city, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Neetu; Parthasarathy, D

    2009-09-01

    From an economic perspective that understood it as a spillover of development, migration is now also the subject of socioeconomic investigation incorporating the problems of assimilation, relative deprivation and isolation. The corollary is an increased emphasis on economic and social understanding of migration and its consequences. This entails studying migration or migrants in terms of factors beyond income. Health outcome is important among these non-income factors but at the same time remains less studied. Although there have been a few influential studies on health issues as linked to migration status, the issue of malnutrition in this context continues to be under-researched. This paper explores, theoretically and empirically, migration status and malnutrition in Mumbai in India. An econometric analysis of Demographic and Health Survey data gives insight into the dynamics of child and maternal undernutrition as mediated by migration status in Mumbai.

  4. Petrology and geochemistry of greywackes of Middle Aravalli supergroup, NW India: evidence for active margin processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absar, Nurul; Sreenivas, B.

    2013-01-01

    Aravalli Mountain Belt (AMB) of Northwestern, India represents one of the major Proterozoic accretionary orogens of the world, preserving two Wilson cycles; viz. Paleoproterozoic Aravalli Supergroup and Mesoproterozoic Delhi Supergroup. Although two gross Wilson cycles involving opening and closing of Paleoproterozoic Aravalli ocean and Mesoproterozoic Delhi ocean are recognized, the finer details of the evolution of the orogen are still poorly understood. We have carried out geochemical and petrological study of the well-preserved greywacke horizon of the 'Middle Aravalli Supergroup' in order to place constraints on early evolution of the Aravalli basin. These greywackes are enriched in Fe, Mg and K; and depleted in Na in comparison to normal greywackes and can be classified as ferroan potassic sandstone. Petrographic examination indicate that the greywacke samples contain about 30 to 50% matrix that is mainly composed of biotite/chlorite and interspersed with fine Fe-Ti rich opaque mineral phases

  5. Agricultural growth and "trickle-down" reconsidered: evidence from rural India.

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    Sharma, S D

    1997-08-01

    This examination of the "green revolution" in India considers the totality of State-guided development strategies on the lives of ordinary people through an analysis of data collected during field work in 1990-91, 1993-94, and 1995 in a typical north Indian village. The first part of the report situates the "green revolution" strategy in its larger political-economic context, reviewing the circumstances under which it was launched, the nature of the implementation process, and macrolevel trends. After this introduction, the paper presents the village case study with a description of the physical attributes of the village, its social composition, and patterns of land tenure. This highlights the fact that the larger land-owing interests have been the primary beneficiaries of the "green revolution." Wealthy land-owners have been able to diversify their income sources through the purchase of threshing machinery for their own use and for rental to others, the construction of storage facilities where grain can be withheld until top prices are offered in the market, the processing of sugar cane, and dairy farming. Farmers owning less than 1.5 hectares of irrigated land, however lack the resource base to invest in new agricultural technologies. They either go in debt (with little hope of ever producing enough to eliminate the need for borrowing) to purchase the higher-yielding seeds, fertilizers, and chemical pesticides required by the new methods or they retreat into subsistence farming and hire themselves out as labor. This strategy is seldom resorted to, however, because of the pressures of meeting minimal subsistence needs in a cash economy. The top-down strategies that accompanied agricultural modernization have led to a deterioration in the standard of living of the poor. In addition, the "green revolution" is environmentally unsustainable and, ultimately, will have tragic ramifications for India.

  6. Computational and biological evidences on the serotonergic involvement of SeTACN antidepressant-like effect in mice.

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    Mariana G Fronza

    Full Text Available A series of phenylselanyl-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-carbonitriles with different substituents were screened for their binding affinity with serotonin transporter (SERT and dopamine transporter (DAT by docking molecular. 5-(4methoxyphenyl-1-(2-(phenylselanylphenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-carbonitrile (SeTACN exhibited the best conformation with SERT even higher than fluoxetine and serotonin, suggesting a competitive inhibition. SeTACN demonstrated additional affinity to other serotonergic receptors involved in antidepressant effects: 5HT1a, 5HT2a and 5HT3. In another set of experiments, SeTACN led to significant reductions in the immobility time of mice submitted to forced swimming test (FST in the dose range of 0.1- 20mg/kg, suggesting an antidepressant-like effect. The possible mechanism of action was investigated using serotonergic and dopaminergic antagonists. The antidepressant-like effect of SeTACN (0.1mg/kg i.g. was prevented by the pretreatment with WAY100635 (a selective 5HT1a antagonist, ketanserin (a 5HT2a/c antagonist and ondansetron (a selective 5ht3 antagonist, PCPA (an inhibitor of serotonin synthesis but not with SCH23390 (dopaminergic D1 antagonist and sulpiride (D2 antagonist. Sub-effective dose of fluoxetine was able to potentiate the effects of a sub-effective dose of SeTACN in FST. None of the treatments affected locomotor activity in open field test (OFT. These results together, suggest that the SeTACN antidepressant-like effect is mediate, at least in parts, by serotonergic system.

  7. Translating India

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    Kothari, Rita

    2014-01-01

    The cultural universe of urban, English-speaking middle class in India shows signs of growing inclusiveness as far as English is concerned. This phenomenon manifests itself in increasing forms of bilingualism (combination of English and one Indian language) in everyday forms of speech - advertisement jingles, bilingual movies, signboards, and of course conversations. It is also evident in the startling prominence of Indian Writing in English and somewhat less visibly, but steadily rising, activity of English translation from Indian languages. Since the eighties this has led to a frenetic activity around English translation in India's academic and literary circles. Kothari makes this very current phenomenon her chief concern in Translating India.   The study covers aspects such as the production, reception and marketability of English translation. Through an unusually multi-disciplinary approach, this study situates English translation in India amidst local and global debates on translation, representation an...

  8. School Corporal Punishment, Family Tension, and Students' Internalizing Problems: Evidence from India

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    Deb, Sibnath; Kumar, Aneesh; Holden, George W.; Simpson Rowe, Lorelei

    2017-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that parental corporal punishment (CP) is positively associated with children's behavioral and mental health problems. However, there is very little evidence addressing whether CP perpetrated by teachers or school staff is similarly associated with problematic student functioning. To address this gap in the research…

  9. Evidence for long term deep CO2 confinement below thick Jurassic shales at Montmiral site (SE Basin of France)

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    Rubert, Y.; Ramboz, C.; Le Nindre, Y. M.; Lerouge, C.; Lescanne, M.

    2009-04-01

    Studies of natural CO2 analogues bring key information on the factors governing the long term (>1My) stability/instability of future anthropogenic CO2 storages. The main objective of this work is to trace the deep-origin CO2 migrations in fractures in the Montmiral CO2 deep natural occurrence (Valence Basin, SE France). The final objective is to document the reservoir feeding and the possible leakages through overlying series. The CO2 reservoir is hosted within a horst controlled by a N-S fault network. From the Triassic to Eocene, the Montmiral area was part of the South-East Basin of France. This period is marked by the Tethysian extension phase (Triassic-Cretaceous) followed by the closure of the basin which culminated during the Pyrenean compressive phase (Eocene). Then, from the late Eocene, the Valence Basin was individualised in particular during the Oligocene E-W rifting affecting the West of Europe. Finally the eastern border of the Basin was overthrusted by Mesozoic formations during the Alpine orogenesis (Miocene). The Montmiral CO2 reservoir is intersected by the currently productive V.Mo.2 well, drilled through Miocene to Triassic sedimentary formations, and reaching the Palaeozoic substratum at a depth of 2771 meters. The CO2 is trapped below a depth of 2340 meters, at the base of sandy, evaporitic and calcareous formations (2340-2771m), Triassic to Sinemurian in age. These units are overlain by a 575 m-thick Domerian to Oxfordian marly sequence which seals the CO2 reservoir. Above these marls, calcareous strata (1792-1095 m), Oxfordian to Cretaceous in age, and sandy clayey formations (1095-0 m), Oligocene and Miocene in age, are deposited. The various stratigraphic levels from the Miocene to the basement were cored over a total length of ~100m. From bottom to top, three lithological units, which exhibit well characterised contrasted diagenetic evolution, record various stages and effects of the CO2 migration: - Lower unit: Palaeozoic metamorphic

  10. Promoting universal financial protection: evidence from the Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY) in Gujarat, India.

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    Devadasan, Narayanan; Seshadri, Tanya; Trivedi, Mayur; Criel, Bart

    2013-08-20

    India's health expenditure is met mostly by households through out-of-pocket (OOP) payments at the time of illness. To protect poor families, the Indian government launched a national health insurance scheme (RSBY). Those below the national poverty line (BPL) are eligible to join the RSBY. The premium is heavily subsidised by the government. The enrolled members receive a card and can avail of free hospitalisation care up to a maximum of US$ 600 per family per year. The hospitals are reimbursed by the insurance companies. The objective of our study was to analyse the extent to which RSBY contributes to universal health coverage by protecting families from making OOP payments. A two-stage stratified sampling technique was used to identify eligible BPL families in Patan district of Gujarat, India. Initially, all 517 villages were listed and 78 were selected randomly. From each of these villages, 40 BPL households were randomly selected and a structured questionnaire was administered. Interviews and discussions were also conducted among key stakeholders. Our sample contained 2,920 households who had enrolled in the RSBY; most were from the poorer sections of society. The average hospital admission rate for the period 2010-2011 was 40/1,000 enrolled. Women, elderly and those belonging to the lowest caste had a higher hospitalisation rate. Forty four per cent of patients who had enrolled in RSBY and had used the RSBY card still faced OOP payments at the time of hospitalisation. The median OOP payment for the above patients was US$ 80 (interquartile range, $16-$200) and was similar in both government and private hospitals. Patients incurred OOP payments mainly because they were asked to purchase medicines and diagnostics, though the same were included in the benefit package. While the RSBY has managed to include the poor under its umbrella, it has provided only partial financial coverage. Nearly 60% of insured and admitted patients made OOP payments. We plea for better

  11. A Perspective on Industry Classification and Market Reaction to Corporate News: Evidence from India

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    Bhattacharjee Nayanjyoti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we provide a cross-industry perspective on the market reaction to different corporate news in the context of Indian stock market. We have studied the price and volume movements associated with eight broadly defined news categories namely Analyst Calls, Earnings, Earnings Forecasts, Finance, Legal and Regulatory, Management, Operations and Restructuring. We have employed the standard event study methodology on a sample of stocks listed on the National Stock Exchange of India for the purpose of our study. We observe that the market reaction to firm specific corporate news varies according to the type of news across different industry groups. We also observe that the sentiment of the news is a critical factor which influences the market reaction to such news flow across industry groups. We also provide a cross-industry perspective on the relative importance of different corporate news categories after taking into account the sentiment of the news in the context of Indian stock market.

  12. Timing of first sex before marriage and its correlates: evidence from India.

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    Santhya, K G; Acharya, Rajib; Jejeebhoy, Shireen J; Ram, Usha

    2011-03-01

    While several studies have documented the extent of pre-marital sexual experience among young people in India, little work has been done to explore the factors that are correlated with the timing of pre-marital sexual initiation. This paper examines age at initiation of pre-marital sex, circumstances in which first sex was experienced, nature of first sexual experience and correlates of age at initiation of pre-marital sex. Life table estimates suggest that pre-marital sexual initiation occurred in adolescence for 1 in 20 young women and 1 in 10 young men. For the majority of these young people, their first sex was with an opposite-sex romantic partner. First sex, moreover, was unprotected for the majority and forced for sizeable proportion of young women. A number of individual, family-, peer- and community-level factors were correlated with age at first pre-marital sex. Moreover, considerable gender differences were apparent in the correlates of age at first pre-marital sex, with peer- and parent-level factors found more often to be significant for young women than men.

  13. Speleothems from Mawsmai and Krem Phyllut caves, Meghalaya, India: some evidences on biogenic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskar, Sushmitha; Baskar, R.; Lee, Natuschka; Theophilus, P. K.

    2009-05-01

    The Mawsmai cave and Krem Phyllut caves, East Khasi hills, Meghalaya, India has so far not yet attracted the attention of geomicrobiologists. Observations and hypotheses on the possible influence of identified microorganisms for speleothem formations in Meghalaya are reported for the first time. XRD studies identified calcite in speleothems and gypsum in cave wall deposits as the dominant minerals. SEM-EDAX showed interesting microfabric features showing strong resemblance with fossilised bacteria, calcified filaments, needle calcite and numerous nano scale calcite crystals, highly weathered and disintegrated crystals of calcite, that point towards a significant microbial influence in its genesis. Thin section petrography showed laminated stromatolitic features. The microorganisms identified by conventional isolation and further evaluation of isolates by molecular techniques include Bacillus cereus, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus licheniformis, Micrococcus luteus, and Actinomycetes. Microscopic observations also showed unidentifiable cocci and four unidentifiable strains of CaSO4 (gypsum) precipitating bacteria. Experimental studies confirmed that these bacteria are able to precipitate calcium minerals (calcite, gypsum, minor amounts of dolomite) in the laboratory. These results allow us to postulate that species like these may contribute to active biogenic influence in the cave formations at Meghalaya.

  14. 'Eating, eating is always there': food, consumerism and cardiovascular disease. Some evidence from Kerala, south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Caroline

    2010-12-01

    The state of Kerala, south India, has particularly high prevalence rates for cardiovascular disease (20%, Sugathan, Soman and Sankaranarayanan 2008) and Type II diabetes (16.3%, Kutty, Joseph, and Soman 1999). Although so-called 'lifestyle' diseases can be prevented and symptoms controlled by diet, exercise, and medicines, heart disease and diabetes have become the most common causes of suffering, disability and death. This article explores the social dynamics transforming consumer lifestyles as increased food consumption, reduced physical activity and social stress contribute to the burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD). It examines the centrality of food to ideas of the 'good life', to nurture social relationships and strengthen weak modern bodies, as the principle source of embodied pleasure and health. It explores the micro and macro politics of eating and feasting, limiting the extent to which 'individuals' (can) control food habits. Thus, despite widespread recognition of the relationship between diet, exercise and heart disease, the flow of food, the immediacy of pleasure, and associations between appetite and health override latent concerns about the negative impacts of dietary excesses on long-term health and chronic illness. Findings are discussed to highlight the inherent limitations of public health interventions focusing on education and individual choice.

  15. Gender gap in parents' financing strategy for hospitalization of their children: evidence from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaw, Abay; Lamanna, Francesca; Klasen, Stephan

    2010-03-01

    The 'missing women' dilemma in India has sparked great interest in investigating gender discrimination in the provision of health care in the country. No studies, however, have directly examined discrimination in health-care financing strategies in the case of severe illness of sons versus daughters. In this paper, we hypothesize that households who face tight budget constraints are more likely to spend their meager resources on hospitalization of boys rather than girls. We use the 60th round of the Indian National Sample Survey (2004) and a multinomial logit model to test this hypothesis and to throw some light on this important but overlooked issue. The results reveal that boys are much more likely to be hospitalized than girls. When it comes to financing, the gap in the usage of household income and savings is relatively small, while the gender gap in the probability of hospitalization and usage of more onerous financing strategies is very high. Ceteris paribus, the probability of boys to be hospitalized by financing from borrowing, sale of assets, help from friends, etc. is much higher than that of girls. Moreover, in line with our theoretical framework, the results indicate that the gender gap intensifies as we move from the richest to poorest households. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Impact of caregiver incentives on child health: Evidence from an experiment with Anganwadi workers in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prakarsh; Masters, William A

    2017-09-01

    This paper tests the effectiveness of performance pay and bonuses among government childcare workers in India. In a controlled study of 160 ICDS centers serving over 4000 children, we randomly assign workers to either fixed bonuses or payments based on the nutritional status of children in their care, and also collect data from a control group receiving only standard salaries. In all three study arms mothers receive nutrition information. We find that performance pay reduces underweight prevalence by about 5 percentage points over 3 months, and height improves by about one centimeter. Impacts on weight continue when incentives are renewed and return to parallel trends thereafter. Fixed bonuses are less expensive but lead to smaller and less precisely estimated effects than performance pay, especially for children near malnutrition thresholds. Both treatments improve worker effort and communication with mothers, who in turn feed a more calorific diet to children at home. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk factors for HIV-1 infection in India: evidence from the National Family Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, I

    2012-10-01

    To study demographic, social, behavioural and biological variables as risk factors for HIV infection among men and women in India, we used data from the cross-sectional, population-based National Family Health Survery (NFHS)-3 2005-06. During the survey, 52,853 women aged 15-49 years and 50,093 men aged 15-54 years gave consent to anonymous HIV testing. HIV serostatus data for men and women were analysed for their relationships to key characteristics using bivariate and multivariate techniques. In the analysis of the study sample, in both men and women the ages of highest risk for HIV were between 25 and 34 years. Married, widowed, divorced women and men had higher odds of being HIV-positive; employed individuals also had a higher risk of being HIV-positive (odds ratio [OR] = 1.89 and 2.89, respectively). Muslim women had a lower risk (OR 0.23). Wealth was not found to be associated with HIV serostatus among men in our study sample. In women, a history of genital ulcer or sore significantly increased their risk. Circumcised men were found to be at a lower risk for HIV infection. HIV is a multi-dimensional epidemic, with demographic, residential, social, biological and behavioural factors exerting influence on individual probability of becoming infected with HIV.

  18. A first possible chameleon from the late Miocene of India (the hominoid site of Haritalyangar): a tentative evidence for an Asian dispersal of chameleons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankhyan, Anek R; Čerňanský, Andrej

    2016-12-01

    Miocene rare fossils from India, tentatively attributed to chameleons, are described for the first time. The material consists of a fragment of the left squamosal and an element interpreted as a posterodorsal process of the parietal. The specimens come from a late Miocene site of the Nagri Formation (Middle Siwaliks, ~ 9 Mya) at Haritalyangar, North India. This material presents a possible evidence for a chameleon dispersal to Asia. Based on molecular data, the dispersion of an Asian chamaeleonid lineage from Africa to Arabia/Asia is dated at approximately 13 Mya and its diversification in situ at around 6-8 Mya. However, till now, no Miocene-age fossil record has been described to support crown chamaeleonid presence in this area. The material described herein is very fragmented. If correctly allocated, the Haritalyangar chameleons show the oldest known occurrence of this clade in India, at least approximately 9 Mya ago.

  19. Geological activity of humans represented in the world heritage sites of India, Italy, and Russia: Evidence of the anthropocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansari M K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The idea of the Anthropocene attracts attention of scientists, policy-makers, and broad public to the geological activity of humans and poses new important questions for the modern stratigraphy. The growth of the Anthropocene-related knowledge and its promotion can be based potentially on the UNESCO World Heritage Sites (WHS. On the one hand, many of these sites provide spectacular evidence of the human activity. On the other hand, these are remarkable tourist attractions. The WHSs of three heritage-rich countries, namely India, Italy, and Russia, have been assessed with regard to how these reflect the geological activity of humans. It is established that 65-90% of all WHSs in each country provide direct and indirect evidence of such an activity (artificial caves, terrace building, etc., which appears to be enough for the general discussion of the idea of the Anthropocene. However, the distribution of the WHSs by their age allows focusing only on the “early” (before 1800 AD start of the Anthropocene, which is not enough for full discussion of the lower limit of this unit. The examples considered in the present study imply that some WHSs alone provide very important pieces of the Anthropocene-related knowledge.

  20. What are the Evidence Based Public Health Interventions for Prevention and Control of NCDs in Relation to India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The accelerating epidemics of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs in India call for a comprehensive public health response which can effectively combat and control them before they peak and inflict severe damage in terms of unaffordable health, economic, and social costs. To synthesize and present recent evidences regarding the effectiveness of several types of public health interventions to reduce NCD burden. Interventions influencing behavioral risk factors (like unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, tobacco and alcohol consumption through policy, public education, or a combination of both have been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the NCD risk in populations as well as in individuals. Policy interventions are also effective in reducing the levels of several major biological risk factors linked to NCDs (high blood pressure; overweight and obesity; diabetes and abnormal blood cholesterol. Secondary prevention along the lines of combination pills and ensuring evidenced based clinical care are also critical. Though the evidence for health promotion and primary prevention are weaker, policy interventions and secondary prevention when combined with these are likely to have a greater impact on reducing national NCD burden. A comprehensive and integrated response to NCDs control and prevention needs a "life course approach." Proven cost-effective interventions need to be integrated in a NCD prevention and control policy framework and implemented through coordinated mechanisms of regulation, environment modification, education, and health care responses.

  1. Cash transfers, maternal depression and emotional well-being: Quasi-experimental evidence from India's Janani Suraksha Yojana programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell-Jackson, Timothy; Pereira, Shreya K; Dutt, Varun; Tougher, Sarah; Haldar, Kaveri; Kumar, Paresh

    2016-08-01

    Maternal depression is an important public health concern. We investigated whether a national-scale initiative that provides cash transfers to women giving birth in government health facilities, the Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY), reduced maternal depression in India's largest state, Uttar Pradesh. Using primary data on 1695 women collected in early 2015, our quasi-experimental design exploited the fact that some women did not receive the JSY cash due to administrative problems in its disbursement - reasons that are unlikely to be correlated with determinants of maternal depression. We found that receipt of the cash was associated with an 8.5% reduction in the continuous measure of maternal depression and a 36% reduction in moderate depression. There was no evidence of an association with measures of emotional well-being, namely happiness and worry. The results suggest that the JSY had a clinically meaningful effect in reducing the burden of maternal depression, possibly by lessening the financial strain of delivery care. They contribute to the evidence that financial incentive schemes may have public health benefits beyond improving uptake of targeted health services. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Socioeconomic gradients in child development in very young children: evidence from India, Indonesia, Peru, and Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Lia C H; Kariger, Patricia; Hidrobo, Melissa; Gertler, Paul J

    2012-10-16

    Gradients across socio-economic position exist for many measures of children's health and development in higher-income countries. These associations may not be consistent, however, among the millions of children living in lower- and middle-income countries. Our objective was to examine child development and growth in young children across socio-economic position in four developing countries. We used cross-sectional surveys, child development assessments, measures of length (LAZ), and home stimulation (Family Care Index) of children in India, Indonesia, Peru, and Senegal. The Extended Ages and Stages Questionnaire (EASQ) was administered to parents of all children ages 3-23 mo in the household (n =8,727), and length measurements were taken for all children 0-23 mo (n = 11,102). Household wealth and maternal education contributed significantly and independently to the variance in EASQ and LAZ scores in all countries, while controlling for child's age and sex, mother's age and marital status, and household size. Being in the fifth wealth quintile in comparison with the first quintile was associated with significantly higher EASQ scores (0.27 to 0.48 of a standardized score) and higher LAZ scores (0.37 to 0.65 of a standardized score) in each country, while controlling for maternal education and covariates. Wealth and education gradients increased over the first two years in most countries for both EASQ and LAZ scores, with larger gradients seen in 16-23-mo-olds than in 0-7 mo-olds. Mediation analyses revealed that parental home stimulation activities and LAZ were significant mediating variables and explained up to 50% of the wealth effects on the EASQ.

  3. Are self-reports of health and morbidities in developing countries misleading? Evidence from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, S V; Subramanyam, Malavika A; Selvaraj, Sakthivel; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Self-reported measures of poor health and morbidities from developing countries tend to be viewed with considerable skepticism. Examination of the social gradient in self-reported health and morbidity measures provides a useful test of the validity of self-reports of poor health and morbidities. The prevailing view, in part influenced by Amartya Sen, is that socially disadvantaged individuals will fail to perceive and report the presence of illness or health-deficits because an individual's assessment of their health is directly contingent on their social experience. In this study, we tested whether the association between self-reported poor health/morbidities and socioeconomic status (SES) in India follows the expected direction or not. Cross-sectional logistic regression analyses were carried out on a nationally representative population-based sample from the 1998 to 1999 Indian National Family Health Survey (INFHS); and 1995-1996 and 2004 Indian National Sample Survey (INSS). Four binary outcomes were analyzed: any self-reported morbidity; self-reported sickness in the last 15 days; self-reported sickness in the past year; and poor self-rated health. In separate adjusted models, individuals with no education reported higher levels of any self-reported, self-reported sickness in the last 15 days, self-reported sickness in the last year, and poor self-rated health compared to those with most education. Contrary to the prevailing thesis, we find that the use of self-rated ill-health has face validity as assessed via its relationship to SES. A less dismissive and pessimistic view of health data obtained through self-reports seems warranted.

  4. Implementation of Double Fortified Salt in India is based on Low Scientific Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Kapil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Micronutrient malnutrition (MNM can affect all age groups, but young children and women of reproductive age are most at risk of developing micronutrient deficiencies. Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD and Iron Deficiency Anaemia (IDA are two important Public Health problems. Out of 342 districts surveyed, so far IDD is a major public health problem in 286 districts. No state in India is free from iodine deficiency (1. Iron Deficiency Anaemia is reported in about 70% of the population across all age groups (2. The magnitude of Vitamin B12 deficiency is documented to be about 73.5% in the adolescents (3 and Zinc deficiency is reported in about 49.4% amongst children (4. In addition, there are deficiencies of other micronutrients and minerals like Folic Acid, Vitamin D which are of public health concern. Fortification of food is one of three primary strategies to combat micronutrient deficiencies. Fortification is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO and Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO as "the practice of deliberately increasing the content of an essential micronutrient, i.e. Vitamins and minerals (including trace elements in a food irrespective of whether the nutrients were originally present in the food before processing or not, so as to improve the nutritional quality of the food supply and to provide a public health benefit with minimal risk to health”. Food fortification is one of the most cost effective ways to make up for the deficient vitamins and minerals in low quality diets. The edible salt is the most widely used food vehicle for fortification with micronutrients (5. Fortification of salt with iodine, to prevent IDD, under the National Iodine Deficiency Disorders Control Programme, is in operation since 1962 (1. This intervention has led to significant prevention and control of IDD (6. Recently, the technology has been developed for fortification of salt with iron and iodine commonly known as DFS, to simultaneously

  5. Are work demands associated with mental distress? Evidence from women in rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Robin A; Nandi, Arijit; Jaswal, Surinder; Harper, Sam

    2017-12-01

    High work demands might be a determinant of poor mental health among women in low- and middle-income countries, especially in rural settings where women experience greater amounts of labor-intensive unpaid work. Research originating from such settings is lacking. We estimated the cross-sectional association between work demands and mental distress among 3177 women living in 160 predominantly tribal communities in southern Rajasthan, India. A structured questionnaire captured the number of minutes women spent on various activities in the last 24 h, and we used this information to measure women's work demands, including the total work amount, nature of work (e.g., housework), and type of work (e.g., cooking). Mental distress was measured with the Hindi version of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. We used negative binomial regression models to estimate the association between work demands (amount, nature, and type) and mental distress. On average, women spent more than 9.5 h a day on work activities. The most time, intensive work activity was caring for children, the elderly, or disabled (149 min). In adjusted models, we found a U-shaped association between work amount and mental distress. High amounts of housework were associated with higher distress, whereas paid work and farmwork amount were not. Certain types of housework, including collecting water and cleaning, were associated with increased distress scores. We found an association between aspects of work demands and mental distress. Research in other contexts where women perform high amounts of unpaid work, particularly within the home or farm, is warranted.

  6. Are Slum Children at High Risk of Under Nutrition, Anemia and Childhood Morbidity? Evidence from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natrajan Kavitha

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urban population growth in developing countries especially in India is at a rapid pace in the past few decades. Growth of urban population is always accompanied by the growth of population in urban slums, which poses threat to the health of urban population, particularly, the health of the children. Objective: The present study aims to study whether the slum dwelling affects the child morbidity, low weight at birth, infant mortality, child malnutrition and anemia.  Methods: Until NFHS-3, there was paucity of data on slums to analyze for a larger area and compare it with non-slum population. However, NFHS-3 provides data from slums in eight cities and is used for the present study. The child health aspects considered here are: prevalence of diarrhea among children, prevalence of fever among children, prevalence of cough among children, infant death, low birth weight, malnutrition among children and anemia among children. Results: Slum children belong to lower socioeconomic strata than children from non-slum areas. Children living in slum areas are 1.3 times, 1.5 times and 1.2 times more likely to suffer from diarrhea, cough and fever respectively than children living in non-slum areas. Multivariate results also showed that slum children have higher odds for low weight at birth (1.4 times and child anemia (1.2 times compared to non-slum children. Conclusion: Slum dwelling children are at a disadvantageous side in terms of child morbidity, anemia and weight at the time of birth. 

  7. Stock Market Linkages: Evidence From The US, China And India During The Subprime Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Amanjot

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Subprime crisis spillovered the returns and volatility from the US stock market to the other integrated economies. The present study attempts to analyze the stock market linkages between the US, India and China, especially during the US subprime Crisis. The technique of Tri-Variate Vector Autoregression and the Spillover Index has been employed so as to analyze the relations during the time period 2007 to 2009. To estimate the time varying risk parameters, the technique of Threshold Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedastic [TGARCH (1,1] model has been used. A uni-directional causality has been observed from the US market to the Indian and Chinese market, whereas another unidirectional causality has also been spotted running from the Chinese market to the Indian market in the context of stock market returns during the crisis period. A unidirectional volatility spillover from the US to the Indian market and from the Indian to the Chinese market has been found to be significant. As per the volatility Spillover Index, the cross market impact on the volatility reduces over a time period 2007-2009, due to the increased impact of the past volatility and the presence of 'leverage effect'. The falling returns added to the volatility in the respective markets. The efficient tests of causality inspired by Hill (2007 reported an indirect impact of the US market volatility on the Chinese market via Indian. The portfolio managers should discount this information well ahead of time to maintain the portfolio values by taking positions in futures and options market.

  8. Maternal depressive symptoms are negatively associated with child growth and development: Evidence from rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong Hong; Friedman, Jed; Kak, Mohini; Menon, Purnima; Alderman, Harold

    2018-05-17

    Maternal depression has been suggested as a risk factor for both poor child growth and development in many low- and middle-income countries, but the validity of many studies is hindered by small sample sizes, varying cut-offs used in depression diagnostics, and incomplete control of confounding factors. This study examines the association between maternal depressive symptoms (MDSs) and child physical growth and cognitive development in Madhya Pradesh, India, where poverty, malnutrition, and poor mental health coexist. Data were from a baseline household survey (n = 2,934) of a randomized controlled trial assessing an early childhood development programme. Multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted, adjusting for socio-economic factors to avoid confounding the association of mental health and child outcomes. MDS (measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Short Depression Scale) was categorized as low, medium, and high in 47%, 42%, and 10% of mothers, respectively. The prevalence of child developmental delay ranged from 16% to 27% for various development domains. Compared with children of mothers with low MDS, those of high MDS mothers had lower height-for-age, weight-for-age, and weight-for-height z-scores (0.22, 0.21, and 0.15, respectively), a higher rate of stunting and underweight (~1.5 times), and higher rate of developmental delay (partial adjusted odds ratio ranged from 1.3-1.8 for different development domains and fully adjusted odds ratio = 1.4 for fine motor). Our results-that MDS is significantly associated with both child undernutrition and development delay-add to the call for practical interventions to address maternal depression to simultaneously address multiple outcomes for both women and children. © 2018 The Authors. Maternal & Child Nutrition Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Improving Student Learning via Mobile Phone Video Content: Evidence from the BridgeIT India Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennersten, Matthew; Quraishy, Zubeeda Banu; Velamuri, Malathi

    2015-01-01

    Past efforts invested in computer-based education technology interventions have generated little evidence of affordable success at scale. This paper presents the results of a mobile phone-based intervention conducted in the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu in 2012-13. The BridgeIT project provided a pool of audio-visual learning…

  10. Direct evidence of superconductivity and determination of the superfluid density in buried ultrathin FeSe grown on SrTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, P. K.; Salman, Z.; Song, Q.; Peng, R.; Zhang, J.; Shu, L.; Feng, D. L.; Prokscha, T.; Morenzoni, E.

    2018-05-01

    Bulk FeSe is superconducting with a critical temperature Tc≅8 K and SrTiO3 is insulating in nature, yet high-temperature superconductivity has been reported at the interface between a single-layer FeSe and SrTiO3. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy measurements observe a gap opening at the Fermi surface below ≈60 K. Elucidating the microscopic properties and understanding the pairing mechanism of single-layer FeSe is of utmost importance as it is a basic building block of iron-based superconductors. Here, we use the low-energy muon spin rotation/relaxation technique to detect and quantify the supercarrier density and determine the gap symmetry in FeSe grown on SrTiO3 (100). Measurements in applied field show a temperature-dependent broadening of the field distribution below ˜60 K, reflecting the superconducting transition and formation of a vortex state. Zero-field measurements rule out the presence of magnetism of static or fluctuating origin. From the inhomogeneous field distribution, we determine an effective sheet supercarrier density ns2 D≃6 ×1014cm-2 at T →0 K, which is a factor of 4 larger than expected from ARPES measurements of the excess electron count per Fe of 1 monolayer FeSe. The temperature dependence of the superfluid density ns(T ) can be well described down to ˜10 K by simple s -wave BCS, indicating a rather clean superconducting phase with a gap of 10.2(1.1) meV. The result is a clear indication of the gradual formation of a two-dimensional vortex lattice existing over the entire large FeSe/STO interface and provides unambiguous evidence for robust superconductivity below 60 K in ultrathin FeSe.

  11. Evidence of Human Health Impacts from Uncontrolled Coal Fires in Jharia, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, U.; Balogun, A. H.; Finkelman, R.; Chakraborty, S.; Olanipekun, O.; Shaikh, W. A.

    2017-12-01

    Uncontrolled coal fires and burning coal waste piles have been reported from dozens of countries. These fires can be caused by spontaneous combustion, sparks from machinery, lightning strikes, grass or forest fires, or intentionally. Both underground and surface coal fires mobilize potentially toxic elements such as sulfur, arsenic, selenium, fluorine, lead, and mercury as well as dangerous organic compounds such as benzene, toluene, xylene, ethylbenzene and deadly gases such as CO2 and CO. Despite the serious health problems that can be caused by uncontrolled coal fires it is rather surprising that there has been so little research and documentation of their health impacts. Underground coal fires in the Jharia region of India where more than a million people reside, have been burning for 100 years. Numerous villages exist above the underground fires exposing the residents daily to dangerous emissions. Local residents near the fire affected areas do their daily chores without concern about the intensity of nearby fires. During winter children enjoy the heat of the coal fires oblivious to the potentially harmful emissions. To determine if these uncontrolled coal fires have caused health problems we developed a brief questionnaire on general health indices and administered it to residents of the Jharia region. Sixty responses were obtained from residents of two villages, one proximal to the coal fires and one about 5 miles away from the fires. The responses were statistically analyzed using SAS 9.4. It was observed that at a significance level of 5%, villagers who lived more than 5 miles away from the fires had a 98.3% decreased odds of having undesirable health outcomes. This brief survey indicates the risk posed by underground coal fires and how it contributes to the undesirable health impacts. What remains is to determine the specific health issues, what components of the emissions cause the health problems, and what can be done to minimize these problems

  12. EVIDENCE FROM THE VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY THAT J1502SE/SW ARE DOUBLE HOTSPOTS, NOT A SUPERMASSIVE BINARY BLACK HOLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrobel, J. M.; Walker, R. C.; Fu, H.

    2014-01-01

    SDSS J150243.09+111557.3 is a merging system at z = 0.39 that hosts two confirmed active galactic nuclei (AGNs), one unobscured and one dust-obscured, offset by several kiloparsecs. Deane et al. recently reported evidence from the European VLBI Network (EVN) that the dust-obscured AGN exhibits two flat-spectrum radio sources, J1502SE/SW, offset by 26 mas (140 pc), with each source being energized by its own supermassive black hole (BH). This intriguing interpretation of a close binary BH was reached after ruling out a double-hotspot scenario, wherein both hotspots are energized by a single, central BH, a configuration occurring in the well-studied compact symmetric objects. When observed with sufficient sensitivity and resolution, an object with double hotspots should have an edge-brightened structure. We report evidence from the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) for just such a structure in an image of the obscured AGN with higher sensitivity and resolution than the EVN images. We thus conclude that a double-hotspot scenario should be reconsidered as a viable interpretation for J1502SE/SW, and suggest further VLBA tests of that scenario. A double-hotspot scenario could have broad implications for feedback in obscured AGNs. We also report a VLBA detection of high-brightness-temperature emission from the unobscured AGN that is offset several kiloparsecs from J1502SE/SW

  13. Electric transport of a single-crystal iron chalcogenide FeSe superconductor: Evidence of symmetry-breakdown nematicity and additional ultrafast Dirac cone-like carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, K. K.; Tanabe, Y.; Urata, T.; Oguro, H.; Heguri, S.; Watanabe, K.; Tanigaki, K.

    2014-10-01

    An SDW antiferromagnetic (SDW-AF) low-temperature phase transition is generally observed and the AF spin fluctuations are considered to play an important role for the superconductivity pairing mechanism in FeAs superconductors. However, a similar magnetic phase transition is not observed in FeSe superconductors, which has caused considerable discussion. We report on the intrinsic electronic states of FeSe as elucidated by electric transport measurements under magnetic fields using a high quality single crystal. A mobility spectrum analysis, an ab initio method that does not make assumptions on the transport parameters in a multicarrier system, provides very important and clear evidence that another hidden order, most likely the symmetry broken from the tetragonal C4 symmetry to the C2 symmetry nematicity associated with the selective d -orbital splitting, exists in the case of superconducting FeSe other than the AF magnetic order spin fluctuations. The intrinsic low-temperature phase in FeSe is in the almost compensated semimetallic states but is additionally accompanied by Dirac cone-like ultrafast electrons ˜104cm2(VS) -1 as minority carriers.

  14. Clinical events in a large prospective cohort of children with sickle cell disease in Nagpur, India: evidence against a milder clinical phenotype in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Dipty; Arjunan, Aishwarya; Sarathi, Vijaya; Jain, Harshwardhan; Bhandarwar, Amol; Vuga, Marike; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan

    2016-10-01

    The clinical phenotype of sickle cell disease (SCD) has been reported to be milder in India than in the United States. The objective of this large single-center study was to examine the rate of complications to define the phenotype of SCD in India. The rate of complications per 100 person-years in 833 pediatric SCD patients for 1954 person-years in Nagpur, India including those diagnosed on newborn screen (NBS) and those presenting later in childhood (non-NBS) was compared to those reported in the cooperative study of sickle cell disease (CSSCD). Event rates were also compared between patients belonging to scheduled castes (SCs), scheduled tribes (STs), and other backward classes (OBC). Comparison of CSSCD versus Nagpur NBS versus Nagpur non-NBS for rates of pain (32.4 vs. 85.2 vs. 62.4), severe anemia (7.1 vs. 27 vs. 6.6), stroke (0.7 vs. 0.8 vs. 1.4), splenic sequestration (3.4 vs. 6.7 vs. 1.6), acute chest syndrome (24.5 vs. 23.6 vs. 1.0), and meningitis (0.8 vs. 0 vs. 0.1) revealed more frequent complications in Nagpur compared to CSSCD. Comparison of ST, SC, and OBC for rates of pain (84.6 vs. 71.9 vs. 63.5), acute chest syndrome (3.6 vs. 2.8 vs. 2.2), severe anemia (5.4 vs. 9.5 vs. 11.4), stroke (1.2 vs. 0.4 vs. 0.3), splenic sequestration (0.6 vs. 2.4 vs. 1.9), and meningitis (0.8 vs. 0 vs. 0.1) revealed significantly more frequent complications among ST. SCD-related complications are more frequent in Indian children than that observed in CSSCD. Further study is indicated to define SCD phenotype in India. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Zanclean/Piacenzian transition on Cyprus (SE Mediterranean): calcareous nannofossil and Sea Surface Temperatures evidence of sapropel formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Maria; Triantaphyllou, Maria; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Dimiza, Margarita; Gogou, Alexandra; Klein, Vincent; Parinos, Constantine; Theodoroyu, George

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative analyses of calcareous nannofossils in the sediments of Pissouri South section on the island of Cyprus have produced a paleoceanographic record reflecting the paleoclimatic conditions during Zanclean/Piacenzian transition. According to the performed calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy the studied section is correlated with MNN14/15 and MNN16 calcareous nannofossil biozones and is astronomically dated between 4.065 and 3.217 Ma. Intervals of increased organic carbon content along with the positive values of Florisphaera profunda, Helicosphaera sellii, Discoaster spp. and the subsequent increase of stratification S-index correspond to the sapropel deposition during periods of wetter climate and intense continental runoff especially from the river Nile. These layers are alternating with grey marly intervals, featured by the increased values of small placoliths of Reticulofenestra and Gephyrocapsa species, which are indicative of eutrophic conditions during intense surface waters mixing. Pissouri South section comprises a SSTs sequence using alkenone unsaturation index (Uk 37) providing with the first continuous record from SE Mediterranean covering the Zanclean/Piacenzian (Pliocene) transition (~ 4.1-3.2 Ma). Correlation of the total alkenone concentration to the calcareous nannofossil assemblage and especially representatives among Noelaerhabdaceae family revealed that Pseudoemiliania lacunosa probably had similar temperature sensitivity to that of Emiliania huxleyi, currently producing alkenones in present day oceans.Our data support the prevalence of a generally warm phase characterized by the absence of high-frequency climate variations in the southeastern Mediterranean during the Zanclean/Piacenzian (Early/Late Pliocene) transition.

  16. Measurement of the sign of the spectroscopic quadrupole moment for the 2$_{1}^{+}$ state in $^{70}$Se no evidence for oblate shape

    CERN Document Server

    Hurst, A M

    2007-01-01

    Using a method whereby molecular and atomic ions are independently selected, an isobarically pure beam of 70Se ions was postaccelerated to an energy of 206 MeV using REX-ISOLDE. Coulomb-excitation yields for states in the beam and target nuclei were deduced by recording deexcitation γ rays in the highly segmented MINIBALL γ-ray spectrometer in coincidence with scattered particles in a silicon detector. At these energies, the Coulomb-excitation yield for the first 2+ state is expected to be strongly sensitive to the sign of the spectroscopic quadrupole moment through the nuclear reorientation effect. Experimental evidence is presented here for a prolate shape for the first 2+ state in 70Se, reopening the question over whether there are, as reported earlier, deformed oblate shapes near to the ground state in the light selenium isotopes.

  17. An Empirical Investigation to Analyze the Brand Equity and Resonance of Banking Services: Evidence from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Gautam

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to verify the determinants of brand equityof services based on consumers’ perception of a banking service.The present study is based on customer-based brand equity calledthe Brand Resonance model suggested by Keller (2001, whichcomprises six brand equity constructs, such as: brand resonance;brand judgements; brand feelings; brand performance; brand imagery;brand salience. Exploratory factor analysis was performedto reduce the total number of items to a small number of underlyingfactors, and the results produced six factors, namely: brandresonance; brand judgements; brand feelings; brand performance;brand imagery; brand salience. These alpha coefficients ofthe reliability test were found to be ranging from 0.781 to 0.912for all of the brand equity constructs individually, and for the entirescale the value of alpha was found to be 0.837. Correlationanalysis was performed to find out relationships among variouscomponents of brand equity. From the findings of multiple regressionanalysis it is evident that brand performance emergedas the most important determinant of brand resonance, followedby brand feelings (0.427 and brand judgements (0.306.

  18. Charge trapping and de-trapping in isolated CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals under an external electric field: indirect evidence for a permanent dipole moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Huidong; Cristea, Mihail; Shen, Xuan; Liu, Mingzhao; Camino, Fernando; Cotlet, Mircea

    2015-09-28

    Single nanoparticle studies of charge trapping and de-trapping in core/shell CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals incorporated into an insulating matrix and subjected to an external electric field demonstrate the ability to reversibly modulate the exciton dynamics and photoluminescence blinking while providing indirect evidence for the existence of a permanent ground state dipole moment in such nanocrystals. A model assuming the presence of energetically deep charge traps physically aligned along the direction of the permanent dipole is proposed in order to explain the dynamics of nanocrystal blinking in the presence of a permanent dipole moment.

  19. Social class related inequalities in household health expenditure and economic burden: evidence from Kerala, south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Delampady

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Indian context, a household's caste characteristics are most relevant for identifying its poverty and vulnerability status. Inadequate provision of public health care, the near-absence of health insurance and increasing dependence on the private health sector have impoverished the poor and the marginalised, especially the scheduled tribe population. This study examines caste-based inequalities in households' out-of-pocket health expenditure in the south Indian state of Kerala and provides evidence on the consequent financial burden inflicted upon households in different caste groups. Methods Using data from a 2003-2004 panel survey in Kottathara Panchayat that collected detailed information on health care consumption from 543 households, we analysed inequality in per capita out-of-pocket health expenditure across castes by considering households' health care needs and types of care utilised. We used multivariate regression to measure the caste-based inequality in health expenditure. To assess health expenditure burden, we analysed households incurring high health expenses and their sources of finance for meeting health expenses. Results The per capita health expenditures reported by four caste groups accord with their status in the caste hierarchy. This was confirmed by multivariate analysis after controlling for health care needs and influential confounders. Households with high health care needs are more disadvantaged in terms of spending on health care. Households with high health care needs are generally at higher risk of spending heavily on health care. Hospitalisation expenditure was found to have the most impoverishing impacts, especially on backward caste households. Conclusion Caste-based inequality in household health expenditure reflects unequal access to quality health care by different caste groups. Households with high health care needs and chronic health care needs are most affected by this inequality

  20. A unique late bronze age copper fish-hook from Bet Dwarka Island, Gujarat, west coast of India: Evidence on the advance fishing technology in ancient India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh

    role in phosphate transport. A fall in s e rum phosphate level has been reported 9 in patients of meta - static pro s tate cancer treated with high dose of diethyl sti l bo esterol, a synthetic estrogen. Testoste r one seems to enhance calciu m.... Exp . Biol. , 2002, 40 , 780 ? 784. Received 30 October 2003; accepted 3 D e cem - ber 2003 M ARY V INCENT C HIRAYATH J. P RAKASA R AO * Department of Physiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore 632 002, India *For...

  1. Assessing the extent and intensity of energy poverty using Multidimensional Energy Poverty Index: Empirical evidence from households in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadath, Anver C.; Acharya, Rajesh H.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we have made a comprehensive assessment of the extent and various socio-economic implications of energy poverty in India. Amartya Sens's capability approach to development underpins the analysis of household-level data taken from the India Human Development Survey-II (IHDS-II), 2011-12 using the Multidimensional Energy Poverty Index (MEPI). The overall results show that energy poverty is widespread in India and the existence of energy poverty also coincides with the other forms of deprivations such as income poverty and social backwardness. For example, Dalits (Lower Caste) and Adivasis (Tribal) are found to be extremely energy poor compared to the other social groups in India. The results also reveal that it is the responsibility of women to manage the domestic chores such as collection of firewood and making of dung cake in traditional Indian households. Inefficient use of such biomass fuels is found to cause health hazards. - Highlights: • Energy poverty in India is assessed based on Multidimensional Energy Poverty Index (MEPI). • Energy poverty is widespread in India with large geographical variation across states. • Energy poverty coincides with socioeconomic backwardness of people. • Energy poverty is associated with health hazards like Asthma and Tuberculosis. • Access to energy may increase labor market participation of women.

  2. Adequacy of clinical trial evidence of metformin fixed-dose combinations for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Valerie; Roderick, Peter; Pollock, Allyson M

    2018-01-01

    There is growing national and international concern about the drug regulatory system in India. Parliamentary reports have highlighted the presence of high numbers of unapproved medicines and irrational combinations of both approved and unapproved drugs in the Indian market-place. Fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) are a peculiar feature of the Indian pharmaceutical landscape. Although metformin is a first-line treatment, FDCs for diabetes in India account for two-thirds of all diabetes medicine sales, and some have not been approved by the Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO). This study examines the basis of efficacy and safety of top-selling metformin FDCs in India against four WHO criteria from clinical trials guidelines for the approval of FDCs. Data from a commercial drug sales database (PharmaTrac) were combined with searches through published literature, clinical trial registries, and published and unpublished trial websites of metformin FDCs in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Five metformin FDCs in India from November 2011 to October 2012 accounted for 80% of all metformin FDC sales by value and volume. Although all five had obtained CDSCO approval, three had been sold and marketed prior to receiving this approval. Evaluation of published and unpublished clinical trials of these five FDCs found none provided robust evidence of safety and efficacy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Recommendations are made for publishing evidence that underpins drug approvals, marketing bans, greater transparency through updated clinical trials databases and legislative reform in order to prevent irrational FDCs from entering the market.

  3. When Indian crabs were not yet Asian - biogeographic evidence for Eocene proximity of India and Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Sebastian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The faunal and floral relationship of northward-drifting India with its neighboring continents is of general biogeographic interest as an important driver of regional biodiversity. However, direct biogeographic connectivity of India and Southeast Asia during the Cenozoic remains largely unexplored. We investigate timing, direction and mechanisms of faunal exchange between India and Southeast Asia, based on a molecular phylogeny, molecular clock-derived time estimates and biogeographic reconstructions of the Asian freshwater crab family Gecarcinucidae. Results Although the Gecarcinucidae are not an element of an ancient Gondwana fauna, their subfamily Gecarcinucinae, and probably also the Liotelphusinae, evolved on the Indian Subcontinent and subsequently dispersed to Southeast Asia. Estimated by a model testing approach, this dispersal event took place during the Middle Eocene, and thus before the final collision of India and the Tibet-part of Eurasia. Conclusions We postulate that the India and Southeast Asia were close enough for exchange of freshwater organisms during the Middle Eocene, before the final Indian-Eurasian collision. Our data support geological models that assume the Indian plate having tracked along Southeast Asia during its move northwards.

  4. Spatial prediction of landslide susceptibility in parts of Garhwal Himalaya, India, using the weight of evidence modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri, Pardeep Kumar; Ray, P K Champati; Patel, Ramesh Chandra

    2015-06-01

    Garhwal Himalaya in northern India has emerged as one of the most prominent hot spots of landslide occurrences in the Himalaya mainly due to geological causes related to mountain building processes, steep topography and frequent occurrences of extreme precipitation events. As this region has many pilgrimage and tourist centres, it is visited by hundreds of thousands of people every year, and in the recent past, there has been rapid development to provide adequate roads and building infrastructure. Additionally, attempts are also made to harness hydropower by constructing tunnels, dams and reservoirs and thus altering vulnerable slopes at many places. As a result, the overall risk due to landslide hazards has increased many folds and, therefore, an attempt was made to assess landslide susceptibility using 'Weights of Evidence (WofE)', a well-known bivariate statistical modelling technique implemented in a much improved way using remote sensing and Geographic Information System. This methodology has dual advantage as it demonstrates how to derive critical parameters related to geology, geomorphology, slope, land use and most importantly temporal landslide distribution in one of the data scarce region of the world. Secondly, it allows to experiment with various combination of parameters to assess their cumulative effect on landslides. In total, 15 parameters related to geology, geomorphology, terrain, hydrology and anthropogenic factors and 2 different landslide inventories (prior to 2007 and 2008-2011) were prepared from high-resolution Indian remote sensing satellite data (Cartosat-1 and Resourcesat-1) and were validated by field investigation. Several combinations of parameters were carried out using WofE modelling, and finally using best combination of eight parameters, 76.5 % of overall landslides were predicted in 24 % of the total area susceptible to landslide occurrences. The study has highlighted that using such methodology landslide susceptibility assessment

  5. Subaqueous early eruptive phase of the late Aptian Rajmahal volcanism, India: Evidence from volcaniclastic rocks, bentonite, black shales, and oolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh C. Ghose

    2017-07-01

    of grey and black shale/mudstone in the lower one-third of the succession across the entire Rajmahal basin provides unequivocal evidence of a shallow-marine continental shelf-type environment. Alignment of the Rajmahal eruptive centers with a major N–S mid-Neoproterozoic lineament and the presence of a gravity high on the RVP suggest a tectonic control for the eruption of melts associated with the Kerguelen plume that was active in a post-Gondwana rift between India and Australia-Antarctica.

  6. The Gondwana Orogeny in northern North Patagonian Massif: Evidences from the Caita Có granite, La Seña and Pangaré mylonites, Argentina

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    Daniel A. Gregori

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Structural analyses in the northern part of the North Patagonia Massif, in the foliated Caita Có granite and in La Seña and Pangaré mylonites, indicate that the pluton was intruded as a sheet-like body into an opening pull-apart structure during the Gondwana Orogeny. Geochronological studies in the massif indicate a first, lower to middle Permian stage of regional deformation, related to movements during indentation tectonics, with emplacement of foliated granites in the western and central areas of the North Patagonian Massif. Between the upper Permian and lower Triassic, evidence indicates emplacement of undeformed granitic bodies in the central part of the North Patagonian Massif. A second pulse of deformation between the middle and upper Triassic is related to the emplacement of the Caita Có granite, the development of mylonitic belts, and the opening of the Los Menucos Basin. During this pulse of deformation, compression direction was from the eastern quadrant.

  7. Late-Quaternary variations in clay minerals along the SW continental margin of India: Evidence of climatic variations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chauhan, O.S.; Sukhija, B.S.; Gujar, A.R.; Nagabhushanam, P.; Paropkari, A.L.

    Down-core variations in illite, chlorite, smectite and kaolinite (the major clays) in two sup(14)C-dated cores collected along the SW continental margin of India show that illite and chlorite have enhanced abundance during 20-17, 12.5, 11-9.5, and 5...

  8. Pox outbreaks in sheep and goats at Makhdoom (Uttar Pradesh), India: evidence of sheeppox virus infection in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanuprakash, V; Venkatesan, G; Balamurugan, V; Hosamani, M; Yogisharadhya, R; Chauhan, R S; Pande, A; Mondal, B; Singh, R K

    2010-10-01

    Sheeppox and goatpox outbreaks occur often in India incurring huge economic loss to the small ruminant industry. This paper describes two sheeppox outbreaks, of which one occurred in an organized sheep breeding farm at Makhdoom (Uttar Pradesh), India, during 2007 and another in goats at the Central Institute of Research on Goats, Makhdoom (Uttar Pradesh), India during 2008. In the first outbreak, a local Muzaffarnagari sheep breed was affected (n=477) with morbidity and mortality rates, respectively, of 100% and 53.9% accompanied by significant productivity losses. In the 2008 outbreaks, a small number of goats were affected without any mortality. The tissue and swabs collected from both the outbreaks were processed and inoculated onto Vero cells, and the causative agent of the outbreaks, capripox virus (CaPV), was isolated. The identity of the virus was confirmed as CaPV based on electron microscopy, experimental pathogenesis in sheep, capripox-specific conventional and real-time PCRs. Sequence analysis of the P32 envelope protein gene revealed that the causative agent of both outbreaks was confirmed as sheeppox virus (SPPV) implying SPPV infection not only in sheep but also goats in India. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Variability of Emaravirus Species Associated with Sterility Mosaic Disease of Pigeonpea in India Provides Evidence of Segment Reassortment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Basavaprabhu L.; Dangwal, Meenakshi; Mishra, Ritesh

    2017-01-01

    Sterility mosaic disease (SMD) of pigeonpea is a serious constraint for cultivation of pigeonpea in India and other South Asian countries. SMD of pigeonpea is associated with two distinct emaraviruses, Pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus 1 (PPSMV-1) and Pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus 2 (PPSMV-2), with genomes consisting of five and six negative-sense RNA segments, respectively. The recently published genome sequences of both PPSMV-1 and PPSMV-2 are from a single location, Patancheru from the state of Telangana in India. However, here we present the first report of sequence variability among 23 isolates of PPSMV-1 and PPSMV-2, collected from ten locations representing six states of India. Both PPSMV-1 and PPSMV-2 are shown to be present across India and to exhibit considerable sequence variability. Variability of RNA3 sequences was higher than the RNA4 sequences for both PPSMV-1 and PPSMV-2. Additionally, the sixth RNA segment (RNA6), previously reported to be associated with only PPSMV-2, is also associated with isolates of PPSMV-1. Multiplex reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analyses show that PPSMV-1 and PPSMV-2 frequently occur as mixed infections. Further sequence analyses indicated the presence of reassortment of RNA4 between isolates of PPSMV-1 and PPSMV-2. PMID:28696402

  10. Heterogeneity in the background and earnings of nurses in India: evidence from a cross-sectional study in Gujarat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Katyayni

    2017-11-01

    It is important to understand the service conditions of nurses because these influence nurses' motivations and ability to provide care. Although nurses are estimated to constitute 30% of India's health workforce, limited empirical information is available about them. This paper attempts to address this gap in research. A cross-sectional survey of 266 nurses in the state of Gujarat was conducted to understand the demographic characteristics, qualifications and employment features of nurses working in India's private and public health sectors. Descriptive and univariate analyses were performed using the collected information. A multivariate regression model was also estimated with monthly earnings as the dependent variable, and workplace, type of employment contract, caste background and years in the nursing workforce as independent variables. The three main findings presented in this article highlight considerable heterogeneity in the background and employment of nurses in India. First, 49% of nurses working in private hospitals and as temporary employees in public facilities belonged to historically disadvantaged social groups (deemed Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes) and were estimated to earn 9% less than similarly qualified and practiced nurses from general caste categories (P = 0.02). Second, 18% of nurses working in private hospitals did not have formal nursing qualifications. Third, nurses working in private hospitals and as temporary employees in public facilities earned less than the minimum wage stipulated by the Government of India. Permanent public sector nurses were estimated to earn 105% more than private sector nurses with the same qualifications, years of work and caste background (P nursing workforce, coupled with the failure of governmental agencies to regulate the health sector, might help explain the low wages and lack of job security that most nurses in India contend with. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in

  11. Tree ring evidence of a 20th century precipitation surge in the monsoon shadow zone of the western Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ram R.

    2011-01-01

    The present study is the first attempt to develop an annual (August-July) precipitation series back to AD 1330 using a tree ring data network of Himalayan cedar (Cedrus deodara (Roxb.) G. Don) from the Lahaul-Spiti region in the western Himalaya, India. The rainfall reconstruction reveals high magnitude multidecadal droughts during the 14th and 15th centuries and thenceforth a gradual increase in precipitation. Increasingly wet conditions during the 20th century are consistent with other long-term precipitation reconstructions from high Asia and reflect a large-scale intensification of the hydrological cycle, coincident with what is anticipated due to global warming. Significant relationships between reconstructed precipitation and precipitation records from central southwest Asia, east of the Caspian Sea, ENSO (NINO4-SST) variability and summer monsoon rainfall over central northeast India underscore the utility of our data in synoptic climatology.

  12. IS HEMOGLOBIN E GENE WIDELY SPREAD IN THE STATE OF MADHYA PRADESH IN CENTRAL INDIA? EVIDENCE FROM FIVE TYPICAL FAMILIES

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    R S Balgir

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Red cell inherited hemoglobin anomalies are commonly encountered in the central region of India. These cause a public health concern due to high degree of morbidity, mortality, and fetal loss in the backward, underprivileged, and vulnerable people. Purpose: To report five typical families of hemoglobin E disorders identified for the first time in the state of Madhya Pradesh from central India. Methods: Out of a total of 445 couples/families (excluding the present study with 1526 persons (848 males and 678 females referred from a tertiary hospital in central India for investigations of anemia/hemoglobinopathies during the period from March 2010 to February 2014, we came across five typical rare couples/families of hemoglobin E disorders worthy of detailed investigations. Laboratory investigations were carried out following the standard procedures after cross checking for quality control from time to time. Results: For the first time, we have encountered nine cases of heterozygous hemoglobin E trait, two members with hemoglobin E-β-thalassemia (double heterozygosity, two cases of sickle cell-hemoglobin E disease (double heterozygosity, and none with homozygous hemoglobin E. Cases  of hemoglobin E trait, hemoglobin E-β-thalassemia, sickle cell-β-thalassemia and sickle cell-E disease showed moderate to severe anemia, and target cells, and reduced values of red cell indices like RBC, Hb level, HCT, MCV, MCH and MCHC, representing abnormal hematological profile and clinical manifestations before blood transfusion. Conclusions: Double heterozygosity for hemoglobinopathies such as occurrence of β-thalassemia mutation with structurally abnormal hemoglobins (Hb S and Hb E is a rare entity, but occurs with severe clinical manifestations only in those areas or communities where these are highly prevalent, testifying the migrations and genetic admixture. Distribution of hemoglobin E and β-thalassemia in different districts of Madhya Pradesh

  13. Surficial clay mineral distribution on the southwestern continental margin of India: Evidence of input from the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chauhan, O.S.; Gujar, A.R.

    LATERITE 3922 MIOCENE SANDSTONE (~) ARCHEANS ( GRANITE GNEISS I' --J CHARNOKITES ~ KHONOALITES) ~J 3940 -t- -4- -t- -t- ~ .. t Jr -4- + + + + Jr -t- Jr + Jr -t- -t- 4- -t- 4- Jre" + -t- + 4- + -t-.. + + 4- WADGE BANK INDIA -~ + + + + *4 t... et al., 1990). In the southern region, the shelf is marked by a low gradient physiographic feature, i.e. Wadge Bank (gradient 1:756), which has considerably enhanced the width of the shelf. The shelf break is shallowest in this region...

  14. Public and Private Sector Jobs, Unreported Income and Consumption Gap in India: Evidence from Micro-Data

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Saibal; Roy, Poulomi; Saha, Sarani

    2012-01-01

    This paper tries to document the presence of unreported income among public sector employees in India. We investigate empirically the wage gap as well as consumption expenditure parity between public and private sector workers. It tests the hypothesis that despite a lower level of public sector income in some of the quantiles, if the level of durable goods consumption between the private and the public sector employees are similar, then it might be indicative of the presence of unreported inc...

  15. Utilization of alternative systems of medicine as health care services in India: Evidence on AYUSH care from NSS 2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Rudra

    Full Text Available AYUSH, an acronym for Ayurveda, Yoga and Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha, Sowa-Rigpa and Homeopathy represents the alternative systems of medicine recognized by the Government of India. Understanding the patterns of utilization of AYUSH care has been important for various reasons including an increased focus on its mainstreaming and integration with biomedicine-based health care system. Based on a nationally representative health survey 2014, we present an analysis to understand utilization of AYUSH care across socioeconomic and demographic groups in India. Overall, 6.9% of all patients seeking outpatient care in the reference period of last two weeks have used AYUSH services without any significant differentials across rural and urban India. Importantly, public health facilities play a key role in provisioning of AYUSH care in rural areas with higher utilization in Chhattisgarh, Kerala and West Bengal. Use of AYUSH among middle-income households is lower when compared with poorer and richer households. We also find that low-income households display a greater tendency for AYUSH self-medication. AYUSH care utilization is higher among patients with chronic diseases and also for treating skin-related and musculo-skeletal ailments. Although the overall share of AYUSH prescription drugs in total medical expenditure is only about 6% but the average expenditure for drugs on AYUSH and allopathy did not differ hugely. The discussion compares our estimates and findings with other studies and also highlights major policy issues around mainstreaming of AYUSH care.

  16. Utilization of alternative systems of medicine as health care services in India: Evidence on AYUSH care from NSS 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    AYUSH, an acronym for Ayurveda, Yoga and Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha, Sowa-Rigpa and Homeopathy represents the alternative systems of medicine recognized by the Government of India. Understanding the patterns of utilization of AYUSH care has been important for various reasons including an increased focus on its mainstreaming and integration with biomedicine-based health care system. Based on a nationally representative health survey 2014, we present an analysis to understand utilization of AYUSH care across socioeconomic and demographic groups in India. Overall, 6.9% of all patients seeking outpatient care in the reference period of last two weeks have used AYUSH services without any significant differentials across rural and urban India. Importantly, public health facilities play a key role in provisioning of AYUSH care in rural areas with higher utilization in Chhattisgarh, Kerala and West Bengal. Use of AYUSH among middle-income households is lower when compared with poorer and richer households. We also find that low-income households display a greater tendency for AYUSH self-medication. AYUSH care utilization is higher among patients with chronic diseases and also for treating skin-related and musculo-skeletal ailments. Although the overall share of AYUSH prescription drugs in total medical expenditure is only about 6% but the average expenditure for drugs on AYUSH and allopathy did not differ hugely. The discussion compares our estimates and findings with other studies and also highlights major policy issues around mainstreaming of AYUSH care. PMID:28472197

  17. Diversification of rhacophorid frogs provides evidence for accelerated faunal exchange between India and Eurasia during the Oligocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia-Tang; Li, Yang; Klaus, Sebastian; Rao, Ding-Qi; Hillis, David M; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2013-02-26

    The accretion of the Indian subcontinent to Eurasia triggered a massive faunal and floral exchange, with Gondwanan taxa entering into Asia and vice versa. The traditional view on the Indian-Asian collision assumes contact of the continental plates during the Early Eocene. Many biogeographic studies rely on this assumption. However, the exact mode and timing of this geological event is still under debate. Here we address, based on an extensive phylogenetic analysis of rhacophorid tree frogs, if there was already a Paleogene biogeographic link between Southeast Asia and India; in which direction faunal exchange occurred between India and Eurasia within the Rhacophoridae; and if the timing of the faunal exchange correlates with one of the recently suggested geological models. Rhacophorid tree frogs showed an early dispersal from India to Asia between 46 and 57 Ma, as reconstructed from the fossil record. During the Middle Eocene, however, faunal exchange ceased, followed by increase of rhacophorid dispersal events between Asia and the Indian subcontinent during the Oligocene that continued until the Middle Miocene. This corroborates recent geological models that argue for a much later final collision between the continental plates. We predict that the Oligocene faunal exchange between the Indian subcontinent and Asia, as shown here for rhacophorid frogs, also applies for other nonvolant organisms with an Indian-Asian distribution, and suggest that previous studies that deal with this faunal interchange should be carefully reinvestigated.

  18. Case Based Measles Surveillance in Pune: Evidence to Guide Current and Future Measles Control and Elimination Efforts in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Anindya Sekhar; Jafari, Hamid; Sosler, Stephen; Narula, Arvinder Pal Singh; Kulkarni, V. M.; Ramamurty, Nalini; Oommen, John; Jadi, Ramesh S.; Banpel, R. V.; Henao-Restrepo, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background According to WHO estimates, 35% of global measles deaths in 2011 occurred in India. In 2013, India committed to a goal of measles elimination by 2020. Laboratory supported case based measles surveillance is an essential component of measles elimination strategies. Results from a case-based measles surveillance system in Pune district (November 2009 through December 2011) are reported here with wider implications for measles elimination efforts in India. Methods Standard protocols were followed for case identification, investigation and classification. Suspected measles cases were confirmed through serology (IgM) or epidemiological linkage or clinical presentation. Data regarding age, sex, vaccination status were collected and annualized incidence rates for measles and rubella cases calculated. Results Of the 1011 suspected measles cases reported to the surveillance system, 76% were confirmed measles, 6% were confirmed rubella, and 17% were non-measles, non-rubella cases. Of the confirmed measles cases, 95% were less than 15 years of age. Annual measles incidence rate was more than 250 per million persons and nearly half were associated with outbreaks. Thirty-nine per cent of the confirmed measles cases were vaccinated with one dose of measles vaccine (MCV1). Conclusion Surveillance demonstrated high measles incidence and frequent outbreaks in Pune where MCV1 coverage in infants was above 90%. Results indicate that even high coverage with a single dose of measles vaccine was insufficient to provide population protection and prevent measles outbreaks. An effective measles and rubella surveillance system provides essential information to plan, implement and evaluate measles immunization strategies and monitor progress towards measles elimination. PMID:25290339

  19. Geochemical characterization of two distinctive systems with evidence of chemosynthetic activity, explored at the SE Pacific margin off Chile (46°S and 33°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Práxedes; Cárdenas, Lissette J.; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Sellanes, Javier; Dezileau, Laurent; Melville, Ives; Mendes, Stephanie D.

    2016-11-01

    This study presents the geochemical composition of superficial sediment under oxic and suboxic bottom water conditions along the Chilean continental margin (SE Pacific), where evidence for benthic chemosynthetic activity associated with diffuse seeping of chemically reduced fluids has been reported. The exploration was carried out at: (1) the Chilean Triple Junction (CTJ), at a water depth of ∼2900 m, with the additional indication of hydrothermal activity near a methane-rich cold-seep area (46°S) (German et al., 2010); and (2) the El Quisco methane seep site (EQSS), at ∼340 m water depth (33°S) (Melo et al., 2007; Krylova et al., 2014). While the deeper CTJ is located within an oxic environment (dissolved oxygen in the bottom waters: 164 μM), the shallower EQSS lies within a suboxic environment (dissolved oxygen in bottom water: 23 μM), located within the lower limit of the SE Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Pore water from short cores was analyzed for dissolved major, minor, and trace elements (Cl, Na, Mg, K, Ca, Sr, Si, B, P, Ba, Pb, Mn, Fe, Cd, U, and Mo), δ13DIC, sulfide, sulfate, and methane. The solid sediment fraction was likewise analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC), metals, and redox potential. Elevated sediment temperatures were found in superficial sediments (5-13 °C) at the CTJ site, which could be due to warm fluids associated with the proximity of the ridge, where hydrothermal vents may occur. Reduced fluids were also present here, indicated by higher Mn fluxes toward the water column even in oxidized sediments (RPD > 8 cm), which contrasted with the lower fluxes in reduced sediments of the EQSS site (RPD ∼ 2 cm). 13C-depleted DIC, anomalously low pore water Cl (∼15 ppb), and low concentrations of other major elements may be the result of dilution by fluid seeping and precipitation of major elements, producing authigenic enrichment (Ca, Mg, Sr). The fluid could also: (a) be diluted by pure water produced during methane hydrate

  20. SE PREVENINDO?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Débora Assis Moura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio tuvo como objetivo verificar el comportamiento de las prostitutas en relación a la prevención de enfermedades de transmisión sexual y del Síndrome de Inmunodeficiencia Adquirida-SIDA, así como investigar cómo se previenen de esas enfermedades. Se trata de una investigación exploratoria, con enfoque cualitativo, llevada a cabo en la Asociación de las Prostitutas en Ceará, Brazil, en septiembre de 2008, a través de una encuesta con 25 prostitutas. El análisis de los datos se hizo según el análisis de contenido, después de ser agrupados en cuatro categorías: conocimiento sobre las enfermedades de transmisión sexual/SIDA; convivencia con la(s enfermedad(es; prevención de la enfermedad de transmisión sexual/SIDA; y el uso de drogas. Se concluyó que las prostitutas no usan preservativos en todas las relaciones sexuales, por lo tanto, las enfermedades de transmisión sexual representan una realidad; la desinformación sobre la(s enfermedad(es es notable; el consumo de drogas lícitas e ilícitas es frecuente entre ellas, factor que las expone a situaciones más vulnerables con relación al VIH/SIDA.

  1. Disparities in child mortality trends: what is the evidence from disadvantaged states in India? the case of Orissa and Madhya Pradesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim-Huong; Jimenez-Soto, Eliana; Dayal, Prarthna; Hodge, Andrew

    2013-06-27

    The Millennium Development Goals prompted renewed international efforts to reduce under-five mortality and measure national progress. However, scant evidence exists about the distribution of child mortality at low sub-national levels, which in diverse and decentralized countries like India are required to inform policy-making. This study estimates changes in child mortality across a range of markers of inequalities in Orissa and Madhya Pradesh, two of India's largest, poorest, and most disadvantaged states. Estimates of under-five and neonatal mortality rates were computed using seven datasets from three available sources--sample registration system, summary birth histories in surveys, and complete birth histories. Inequalities were gauged by comparison of mortality rates within four sub-state populations defined by the following characteristics: rural-urban location, ethnicity, wealth, and district. Trend estimates suggest that progress has been made in mortality rates at the state levels. However, reduction rates have been modest, particularly for neonatal mortality. Different mortality rates are observed across all the equity markers, although there is a pattern of convergence between rural and urban areas, largely due to inadequate progress in urban settings. Inter-district disparities and differences between socioeconomic groups are also evident. Although child mortality rates continue to decline at the national level, our evidence shows that considerable disparities persist. While progress in reducing under-five and neonatal mortality rates in urban areas appears to be levelling off, policies targeting rural populations and scheduled caste and tribe groups appear to have achieved some success in reducing mortality differentials. The results of this study thus add weight to recent government initiatives targeting these groups. Equitable progress, particularly for neonatal mortality, requires continuing efforts to strengthen health systems and overcome barriers

  2. Ancient shorelines of Gujarat, India, during the Indus civilization (Late Mid-Holocene): A study based on archaeological evidences

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Vora, K.H.

    or production of salt, etc. as indicators of palaeo-shorelines. As of today, these sites are located away from the present shoreline. Lothal, believed to be the oldest dockyard in the world, is located at the head of the Gulf of Khambhat, now situated about... shorelines of Gujarat, India, during the Indus civilization (Late Mid-Holocene): A study ... 16-Nov-06http://www.ias.ac.in/currsci/jul10/articles29.htm centre for acquiring and processing raw materials for manufacturing articles for export. Discovery of two...

  3. Below Replacement-Level Fertility in Conditions of slow Social and Economic Development: A Review of the Evidence from South-India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Säävälä

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Demographic interest in the explanations of the first fertility transition has receded considerably during the last decade. Despite the empirical evidence of global convergence in fertility, there is still no consensus on the factors which explain the swiftness of the change in some contexts and its deceleration in some others. From the policy perspective, it remains pivotal to locate the factors that affect the momentum of fertility transition. In this essay the fast decline to below replacement-level period Total Fertility Rate in South India will be examined as an example of fertility transition despite slow social and/or economic development. The analysis is based on a literature review of empirical studies on the determinants of regional fertility differentials in India. Some southern states, most particularly Andhra Pradesh, manifest below replacement-level fertility (TFR 1.79 despite low average age at marriage even in Indian terms, the resilience of womens universal marriage, and heavy reliance on a terminal family planning method, female sterilization. The case of Andhra Pradesh shows that below-replacement level fertility can occur despite slow social development, widespread poverty and gender asymmetries. Geographical and social diffusion effects are partly responsible of the speed of the decline, although they are difficult to measure or test in the level of fertility decision-making.

  4. How do People in Rural India Perceive Improved Stoves and Clean Fuel? Evidence from Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasundhara Bhojvaid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improved cook stoves (ICS have been widely touted for their potential to deliver the triple benefits of improved household health and time savings, reduced deforestation and local environmental degradation, and reduced emissions of black carbon, a significant short-term contributor to global climate change. Yet diffusion of ICS technologies among potential users in many low-income settings, including India, remains slow, despite decades of promotion. This paper explores the variation in perceptions of and preferences for ICS in Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand, as revealed through a series of semi-structured focus groups and interviews from 11 rural villages or hamlets. We find cautious interest in new ICS technologies, and observe that preferences for ICS are positively related to perceptions of health and time savings. Other respondent and community characteristics, e.g., gender, education, prior experience with clean stoves and institutions promoting similar technologies, and social norms as perceived through the actions of neighbours, also appear important. Though they cannot be considered representative, our results suggest that efforts to increase adoption and use of ICS in rural India will likely require a combination of supply-chain improvements and carefully designed social marketing and promotion campaigns, and possibly incentives, to reduce the up-front cost of stoves.

  5. Barriers to use of oral rehydration salts for child diarrhea in the private sector: evidence from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Zachary; Shah, Manan; Sood, Neeraj

    2015-02-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of child mortality in India. Most deaths are cheaply preventable with the use of oral rehydration salts (ORS), yet many health providers still fail to provide ORS to children seeking diarrheal care. In this study, we use survey data to assess whether children visiting private providers for diarrheal care were less likely to use ORS than those visiting public providers. Results suggest that children who visited private providers were 9.5 percentage points less likely to have used ORS than those who visited public providers (95% CI 5-14). We complimented these results with in-depth interviews of 21 public and 17 private doctors in Gujarat, India, assessing potential drivers of public-private disparities in ORS use. Interview results suggested that lack of direct medication dispensing in the private sector might be a key barrier to ORS use in the private sector. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Factors Attributing to Outwards Direct Investments from Developing Countries to Developed Countries: Evidence from China and India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diyah Ayu Amalia Avina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to explore the growing trend of outward foreign direct investments (OFDIs from developing countries to developed countries. Market-seeking and strategic asset explorations are the main motivations for conducting OFDIs in developed countries. Meanwhile, cross-border greenfield investments and cross-border mergers and acquisitions are the main entry strategies used by developing countries when penetrating the developed markets. Finally, this paper reveals mixed results about the explaining ability of John Dunning’s International Development Path (IDP theory on the patterns of selected developing markets' OFDIs to developed countries. On the one hand, China’s OFDIs follow the paths in the IDP theory. On the other hand, those of India do not confirm so.

  7. Evident?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plant, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Quality assurance and evidence in career guidance in Europe are often seen as self-evident approaches, but particular interests lie behind......Quality assurance and evidence in career guidance in Europe are often seen as self-evident approaches, but particular interests lie behind...

  8. Lack of cross-shelf transport of sediments on the western margin of India: Evidence from clay mineralogy

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Nair, R.R.

    transported long distances along the shelf, cross-shelf transport appears to be minimal. Confirmatory evidence of qualitative differences in outer and inner shelf clays is provided by sediment trap clay mineralogy on the outer shelf. Clay bound pollutant...

  9. Role of Private Sector in Providing Tuberculosis Care: Evidence from a Population-based Survey in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Indrajit

    2011-01-01

    In India, a large segment of the population seeks health care services from individual or institutional private health-care providers for health care. We analyzed a nationally representative data to identify the role of private providers in delivering health care for patients with tuberculosis. The primary data source for the present analysis was the 60(th) round of the National Sample Survey. Distribution frequencies were used to analyze the distribution of key sociodemographic variables and multiple logistic regression was used to analyze the association between these variables and healthcare seeking behavior. A sample of 2203 respondents who had received ambulatory care for tuberculosis, and 4568 respondents who had received inpatient treatment were analyzed. About half of the respondents had attended private facilities for TB care. Sociodemographic variables such as paediatric age group, females, higher level of education, and economic groups were associated with attendance at private sector. Dissatisfaction with services in government facilities was cited as the main reason for preferring private facilities. Private providers play an important role in providing health care services to a large proportion of patients with tuberculosis. There is a need for innovative measures to increase participation of the private sector in the national TB control program and to improve the quality of services in government facilities.

  10. Role of private sector in providing tuberculosis care: Evidence from a population-based survey in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrajit Hazarika

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, a large segment of the population seeks health care services from individual or institutional private health-care providers for health care. We analyzed a nationally representative data to identify the role of private providers in delivering health care for patients with tuberculosis. Materials and Methods: The primary data source for the present analysis was the 60 th round of the National Sample Survey. Distribution frequencies were used to analyze the distribution of key sociodemographic variables and multiple logistic regression was used to analyze the association between these variables and healthcare seeking behavior. Results: A sample of 2203 respondents who had received ambulatory care for tuberculosis, and 4568 respondents who had received inpatient treatment were analyzed. About half of the respondents had attended private facilities for TB care. Sociodemographic variables such as paediatric age group, females, higher level of education, and economic groups were associated with attendance at private sector. Dissatisfaction with services in government facilities was cited as the main reason for preferring private facilities. Conclusions: Private providers play an important role in providing health care services to a large proportion of patients with tuberculosis. There is a need for innovative measures to increase participation of the private sector in the national TB control program and to improve the quality of services in government facilities.

  11. Molecular evidence for the occurrence of tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus on chayote (Sechium edule) in southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagendran, K; Mohankumar, S; Mohammed Faisal, P; Bagewadi, B; Karthikeyan, G

    2017-12-01

    During 2012-2014, mosaic disease on chayote in the farmers field of Kodaikanal region (high altitude zone) of Tamil Nadu was observed. The disease was characterized with severe mosaic, cupping and enation on leaves with reduced fruit size. Disease was found to causes an yield loss of more than 60% with the maximum disease incidence of 100% for the past 5 years consecutively. Preliminary serological and molecular screening indicated the association of begomovirus with the disease. Complete nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic analysis of DNA A revealed the identity of the virus as tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV). In recombination analysis study, the major parent was identified as ToLCNDV from Pakistan infecting tomato. Thus the present finding confirms expansion of new geographical region and host for ToLCNDV causing mosaic disease on chayote from Tamil Nadu. To our knowledge this is the first confirmed report for the occurrence of ToLCNDV on chayote in southern India.

  12. Use of the Internet and its Impact on Productivity and Sales Growth in Female-Owned Firms: Evidence from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Gosavi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has completely transformed our lives on an individual basis in many ways, ranging from the way we communicate through the way we socialize to the way we shop and travel. Businesses are no excepton to this premise. This paper studies the adopton of the Internet by female-owned frms in India. It uses the World Bank’s Enterprise Surveys Program data set for the year 2014 to study the adopton of the Internet by more than 10,000 frms in the country. Afer controlling for a large number of frm-level characteristcs, empirical results obtained indicate that femaleowned frms are more likely to use the Internet than their male counterparts. However, further empirical analysis shows that more intensive adopton of the Internet by these female-owned frms does not necessarily translate into beter performance. Specifcally, the adopton of the Internet does not make female-owned frms more or less likely to have beter productvity and sales growth in contrast to that of their male counterparts.

  13. Adherence to evidence based care practices for childbirth before and after a quality improvement intervention in health facilities of Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Kirti; Jain, Motilal; Thomas, Sunil; Dashora, Kalpana; Liu, William; Saini, Paramsukh; Dattatreya, Rajesh; Parker, Indrani; Iyengar, Sharad

    2014-08-13

    After the launch of Janani Suraksha Yojana, a conditional cash transfer scheme in India, the proportion of women giving birth in institutions has rapidly increased. However, there are important gaps in quality of childbirth services during institutional deliveries. The aim of this intervention was to improve the quality of childbirth services in selected high caseload public health facilities of 10 districts of Rajasthan. This intervention titled "Parijaat" was designed by Action Research & Training for Health, in partnership with the state government and United Nations Population Fund. The intervention was carried out in 44 public health facilities in 10 districts of Rajasthan, India. These included district hospitals (9), community health centres (32) and primary health centres (3). The main intervention was orientation training of doctors and program managers and regular visits to facilities involving assessment, feedback, training and action. The adherence to evidence based practices before, during and after this intervention were measured using structured checklists and scoring sheets. Main outcome measures included changes in practices during labour, delivery or immediate postpartum period. Use of several unnecessary or harmful practices reduced significantly. Most importantly, proportion of facilities using routine augmentation of labour reduced (p = 0), episiotomy for primigravidas (p = 0.0003), fundal pressure (p = 0.0003), and routine suction of newborns (0 = 0.0005). Among the beneficial practices, use of oxytocin after delivery increased (p = 0.0001) and the practice of listening foetal heart sounds during labour (p = 0.0001). Some practices did not show any improvements, such as dorsal position for delivery, use of partograph, and hand-washing. An intervention based on repeated facility visits combined with actions at the level of decision makers can lead to substantial improvements in quality of childbirth practices at health facilities.

  14. Journey of DNA Evidence in Legal Arena: An Insight on Its Legal Perspective Worldwide and Highlight on Admissibility in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakant Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA profiling is one of the powerful breakthroughs in forensics. This specialized technique has made the identification of an individual possible even by a tiny shred of tissue or drop of blood thus, has strongly revolutionized various criminal investigations. Rape, paternity, and murder cases are the type of criminal cases commonly solved by the use of this technique. It has been recently introduced to forensic odontology and is also used frequently. Although this is a powerful and reliable scientific technique but its forensic use is a major contribution to the debate on law reform. The application of DNA profiling in the criminal justice system, i.e., the admissibility of DNA evidence in court of law is an important issue which is being faced by the courts and forensic experts worldwide today. Thus, a proper legal outlook is required while dealing with this kind of scientific evidence. Therefore, this review intends to make forensic experts/odontologists aware about the admissibility of DNA evidence in court, with a highlight on the laws related to the admissibility of evidence worldwide, having a special focus on the laws related to admissibility of evidence in Indian judicial system. For this review, the literature was overviewed from articles on DNA evidence and admissibility retrieved by searches on electronic databases such as Google, PubMed, and EMBASE from 1975 through July 2015.

  15. Integrating evidence-based treatments for common mental disorders in routine primary care: feasibility and acceptability of the MANAS intervention in Goa, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sudipto; Chowdhary, Neerja; Pednekar, Sulochana; Cohen, Alex; Andrew, Gracy; Andrew, Gracy; Araya, Ricardo; Simon, Gregory; King, Michael; Telles, Shirley; Verdeli, Helena; Clougherty, Kathleen; Kirkwood, Betty; Patel, Vikram

    2008-02-01

    Common mental disorders, such as depression and anxiety, pose a major public health burden in developing countries. Although these disorders are thought to be best managed in primary care settings, there is a dearth of evidence about how this can be achieved in low resource settings. The MANAS project is an attempt to integrate an evidence based package of treatments into routine public and private primary care settings in Goa, India. Before initiating the trial, we carried out extensive preparatory work, over a period of 15 months, to examine the feasibility and acceptability of the planned intervention. This paper describes the systematic development and evaluation of the intervention through this preparatory phase. The preparatory stage, which was implemented in three phases, utilized quantitative and qualitative methods to inform our understanding of the potential problems and possible solutions in implementing the trial and led to critical modifications of the original intervention plan. Investing in systematic formative work prior to conducting expensive trials of the effectiveness of complex interventions is a useful exercise which potentially improves the likelihood of a positive result of such trials.

  16. No evidence for a role of Ile587Val polymorphism of EIF2B5 gene in multiple sclerosis in Kashmir Valley of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, Insha; Asimi, Ravouf; Haq, Ehtishamul

    2015-12-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory neurodegenerative disease of the nervous system with a profound genetic element. It is already known that alterations in Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 2B (EIF2B) gene encoding the five subunits of eIF2B complex cause Vanishing White Matter (VWM) disease of the brain and emerging evidences have advocated certain resemblances between MS and VWM in terms of clinical and epidemiological characteristics, thus validating the association study between EIF2B and MS. Moreover, a recent study has implicated EIF2B5 Ile587Val (rs843358) polymorphism as a susceptibility factor for MS. In order to investigate the association of EIF2B5 Ile587Val polymorphism with MS susceptibility in Kashmir region in India, we screened EIF2B5 Exon 13 in 30 MS patients and 65 controls (a total of 95 participants). During the present course of study, we could not find statistically significant difference in the frequency of Ile587Val between MS patients and controls, thus indicating that such alteration does not appear to influence MS development in Kashmiri population. Our results provide evidence against a major role for Ile587Val polymorphism in MS susceptibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic Evidence of Tiger Population Structure and Migration within an Isolated and Fragmented Landscape in Northwest India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavanishankar, Maradani; Jaggi, Kanika; Hussain, Shaik Mohammed; Harika, Katakam; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2012-01-01

    Background Majority of the tiger habitat in Indian subcontinent lies within high human density landscapes and is highly sensitive to surrounding pressures. These forests are unable to sustain healthy tiger populations within a tiger-hostile matrix, despite considerable conservation efforts. Ranthambore Tiger Reserve (RTR) in Northwest India is one such isolated forest which is rapidly losing its links with other tiger territories in the Central Indian landscape. Non-invasive genetic sampling for individual identification is a potent technique to understand the relationships between threatened tiger populations in degraded habitats. This study is an attempt to establish tiger movement across a fragmented landscape between RTR and its neighboring forests, Kuno-Palpur Wildlife Sanctuary (KPWLS) and Madhav National Park (MNP) based on non-invasively obtained genetic data. Methods Data from twelve microsatellite loci was used to define population structure and also to identify first generation migrants and admixed individuals in the above forests. Results Population structure was consistent with the Central Indian landscape and we could determine significant gene flow between RTR and MNP. We could identify individuals of admixed ancestry in both these forests, as well as first generation migrants from RTR to KPWLS and MNP. Conclusions Our results indicate reproductive mixing between animals of RTR and MNP in the recent past and migration of animals even today, despite fragmentation and poaching risk, from RTR towards MNP. Substantial conservation efforts should be made to maintain connectivity between these two subpopulations and also higher protection status should be conferred on Madhav National Park. PMID:22253791

  18. Genetic evidence of tiger population structure and migration within an isolated and fragmented landscape in Northwest India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patlolla Anuradha Reddy

    Full Text Available Majority of the tiger habitat in Indian subcontinent lies within high human density landscapes and is highly sensitive to surrounding pressures. These forests are unable to sustain healthy tiger populations within a tiger-hostile matrix, despite considerable conservation efforts. Ranthambore Tiger Reserve (RTR in Northwest India is one such isolated forest which is rapidly losing its links with other tiger territories in the Central Indian landscape. Non-invasive genetic sampling for individual identification is a potent technique to understand the relationships between threatened tiger populations in degraded habitats. This study is an attempt to establish tiger movement across a fragmented landscape between RTR and its neighboring forests, Kuno-Palpur Wildlife Sanctuary (KPWLS and Madhav National Park (MNP based on non-invasively obtained genetic data.Data from twelve microsatellite loci was used to define population structure and also to identify first generation migrants and admixed individuals in the above forests.Population structure was consistent with the Central Indian landscape and we could determine significant gene flow between RTR and MNP. We could identify individuals of admixed ancestry in both these forests, as well as first generation migrants from RTR to KPWLS and MNP.Our results indicate reproductive mixing between animals of RTR and MNP in the recent past and migration of animals even today, despite fragmentation and poaching risk, from RTR towards MNP. Substantial conservation efforts should be made to maintain connectivity between these two subpopulations and also higher protection status should be conferred on Madhav National Park.

  19. Socio-economic disparities in tobacco consumption in rural India: evidence from a health and demographic surveillance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Anamitra; Rai, Rajesh Kumar; Gorain, Ashoke; Majumdar, Saikat; Chowdhury, Abhijit

    2016-09-01

    India houses over 275 million tobacco users, with 164 million users of only smokeless tobacco, 69 million exclusive smokers, and 42 million users of both smoking and smokeless tobacco. This study aims to examine the socio-economic factors associated with types of tobacco use in a selected rural Indian population. A cross-sectional study was conducted with surveillance data from the Birbhum Population Project (BIRPOP). Total respondents of 29,783 individuals (16,038 men and 13,745 women) aged ≥15 years were surveyed between October 2010 and January 2011. Apart from bivariate analyses, a binary logistic regression was applied to estimate the adjusted odds ratio for socio-economic factors (religion, social group, education, occupation, and wealth quintile) associated with current tobacco use, current smokeless tobacco use, and current bidi use among men and women. Nearly 22% of men and 26% of women were using smokeless tobacco. While 46% of men were smoking bidi, only 4% of women reported smoking bidi. Overall, men are more likely to use tobacco. Irrespective of gender, with increasing years of education, people are less inclined to use tobacco, and unemployed people are less likely to use tobacco. With increasing income, the odds of smokeless tobacco use and the odds of smoking bidi are higher among women and men, respectively. The BIRPOP study indicates that irrespective of gender and income, raising the level of awareness through household-based health education could be an effective intervention to minimise the level of tobacco use. © Royal Society for Public Health 2015.

  20. Social stratification in the Sikh population of Punjab (India) has a genetic basis: evidence from serological and biochemical markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Sukh Mohinder Singh; Virk, Rupinder Kaur; Kaur, Sukhvir; Bansal, Rupinder

    2011-01-01

    The present study was planned to assess whether social stratification in the Sikh population inhabiting the northwest border Indian state of Punjab has any genetic basis. Blood samples were collected randomly from a total of 2851 unrelated subjects belonging to 21 groups of two low-ranking Sikh scheduled caste populations, viz. Mazhabi and Ramdasi, and a high-ranking Jat Sikh caste population of Punjab. The genetic profile of Sikh groups was investigated using a total of nine serobiochemical genetic markers, comprising two blood groups (ABO, RH(D)) and a battery of seven red cell enzyme polymorphisms (ADA, AK1, ESD, PGM1, GLO1, ACP1, GPI), following standard serological and biochemical laboratory protocols. Genetic structure was studied using original allele frequency data and statistical measures of heterozygosity, genic differentiation, genetic distance, and genetic admixture. Great heterogeneity was observed between Sikh scheduled caste and Jat Sikh populations, especially in the RH(D) blood group system, and distribution of ESD, ACP1, and PGM1 enzyme markers was also found to be significantly different between many of their groups. Genetic distance trees demonstrated little or no genetic affinities between Sikh scheduled caste and Jat Sikh populations; the Mazhabi and Ramdasi also showed little genetic relationship. Genetic admixture analysis suggested a higher element of autochthonous tribal extraction in the Ramdasi. The present study revealed much genetic heterogeneity in differently ranking Sikh caste populations of Punjab, mainly attributable to their different ethnic backgrounds, and provided a genetic basis to social stratification present in this religious community of Punjab, India.

  1. India Emerging

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Traditionally, India has had an extremely poor collection of direct taxes, not least due to ...... Economic Impact of Mobile in Bangladesh, Malaysia, Pakistan, Serbia, ...... in India owes its origin to Gandhian principles, philosophy and practices.

  2. Interaction of Se and GaSe with Si(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Shuang; Schroeder, B. R.; Olmstead, Marjorie A.

    2000-01-01

    Deposition of Se and GaSe on Si(111)7x7 surfaces was studied with low-energy electron diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron diffraction to probe initial nucleation and interface structure for GaSe/Si(111) heteroepitaxy. Room-temperature deposition of Se on Si(111)7x7 results in an amorphous film. Subsequent annealing leads to Se evaporation without ordering or interdiffusion. Se deposition at 450 degree sign C saturates at submonolayer coverage with no diffusion of Se into the substrate. There is no clear evidence of ordered sites for the Se. Growth of GaSe on Si(111)7x7 above 500 degree sign C results in a pseudomorphic bilayer, with Si-Ga-Se bonding. Additional GaSe does not stick to the bilayer above 525 degree sign C. The resulting Se lone pair at the surface leads to an ideally passivated surface similar to As/Si(111). This stable surface is similar to the layer termination in bulk GaSe. The single domain bilayer is oriented with the Ga-Se bond parallel to the substrate Si-Si bond. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  3. A systematic review of air pollution as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in South Asia: limited evidence from India and Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, S S; Phalkey, R; Malik, A A

    2014-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are major contributors to mortality and morbidity in South Asia. Chronic exposure to air pollution is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, although the majority of studies to date have been conducted in developed countries. Both indoor and outdoor air pollution are growing problems in developing countries in South Asia yet the impact on rising rates of CVD in these regions has largely been ignored. We aimed to assess the evidence available regarding air pollution effects on CVD and CVD risk factors in lower income countries in South Asia. A literature search was conducted in PubMed and Web of Science. Our inclusion criteria included peer-reviewed, original, empirical articles published in English between the years 1990 and 2012, conducted in the World Bank South Asia region (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka). This resulted in 30 articles. Nine articles met our inclusion criteria and were assessed for this systematic review. Most of the studies were cross-sectional and examined measured particulate matter effects on CVD outcomes and indicators. We observed a bias as nearly all of the studies were from India. Hypertension and CVD deaths were positively associated with higher particulate matter levels. Biomarkers of oxidative stress such as increased levels of P-selection expressing platelets, depleted superoxide dismutase and reactive oxygen species generation as well as elevated levels of inflammatory-related C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 were also positively associated with biomass use or elevated particulate matter levels. An important outcome of this investigation was the evidence suggesting important air pollution effects regarding CVD risk in South Asia. However, too few studies have been conducted. There is as an urgent need for longer term investigations using robust measures of air pollution with different population groups that include a wider

  4. A 300 kyr record of aridity and wind strength in southwestern Africa: evidence from grain-size distributions of sediments on Walvis Ridge, SE Atlantic.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuut, J.-B. W.; Prins, M.A.; Schneider, R.S.; Weltje, G.J.; Jansen, J.H.F.; Postma, G.

    2002-01-01

    The terrigenous fraction of sediments recovered from Walvis Ridge, SE Atlantic Ocean, reveals a history of southwestern African climate of the last 300 kyr. End-member modelling of a data set of grain-size distributions (n = 428) results in three end members. The two coarsest end members are

  5. Causes of and contributors to infant mortality in a rural community of North India: evidence from verbal and social autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Sanjay Kumar; Kant, Shashi; Srivastava, Rahul; Gupta, Priti; Misra, Puneet; Pandav, Chandrakant Sambhaji; Singh, Arvind Kumar

    2017-08-11

    To identify the medical causes of death and contribution of non-biological factors towards infant mortality by a retrospective analysis of routinely collected data using verbal and social autopsy tools. The study site was Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS), Ballabgarh, North India PARTICIPANTS: All infant deaths during the years 2008-2012 were included for verbal autopsy and infant deaths from July 2012 to December 2012 were included for social autopsy. Cause of death ascertained by a validated verbal autopsy tool and level of delay based on a three-delay model using the INDEPTH social autopsy tool were the main outcome measures. The level of delay was defined as follows: level 1, delay in identification of danger signs and decision making to seek care; level 2, delay in reaching a health facility from home; level 3, delay in getting healthcare at the health facility. The infant mortality rate during the study period was 46.5/1000 live births. Neonatal deaths contributed to 54.3% of infant deaths and 39% occurred on the first day of life. Birth asphyxia (31.5%) followed by low birth weight (LBW)/prematurity (26.5%) were the most common causes of neonatal death, while infection (57.8%) was the most common cause of post-neonatal death. Care-seeking was delayed among 50% of neonatal deaths and 41.2% of post-neonatal deaths. Delay at level 1 was most common and occurred in 32.4% of neonatal deaths and 29.4% of post-neonatal deaths. Deaths due to LBW/prematurity were mostly followed by delay at level 1. A high proportion of preventable infant mortality still exists in an area which is under continuous health and demographic surveillance. There is a need to enhance home-based preventive care to enable the mother to identify and respond to danger signs. Verbal autopsy and social autopsy could be routinely done to guide policy interventions aimed at reduction of infant mortality. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text

  6. Institutional and Regulatory Economics of Electricity Market Reforms: the Evidence from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bipulendu

    Five South Asian countries-- India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka -- embarked on electricity market reforms in the 1990's. The dissertation uses the framework of New Institutional Economics to assess the effects on electricity sector performance of both observables elements of reform (i.e. privatization, unbundling, establishment of independent regulatory agencies etc.) as well as the unobservable elements (informal beliefs, habit, norms and culture of the actors involved in reforms). The first part of the dissertation -- econometric analysis of the relationship between observable electricity market reform measures and performance indicators -- finds that for the most part electricity market reforms in South Asia are having a positive impact on the performance of the sector. This is particularly the case for reforms that have increased private sector participation in generation and distribution and have vertically unbundled utilities into generation, transmission and distribution entities. Many of the reforms are positively correlated with higher tariffs, indicating a cost to the consumers from the reforms. The relationship between independent regulation and performance indicators , however, is not established. The second part of the dissertation - analytical narrative of the reform experiences of Gujarat and Nepal -- examines the informal elements (such as beliefs, norms, culture) that motivate behavior and explains how and why reform outcomes differed in these two places. The dissertation finds that the strength of formal institutions rules and the nature of social norms and customs have a significant influence on the outcome of reforms. Aided by the strength of its formal institutional framework and more evolved social norms and customs that encouraged people to follow formal rules, reforms in the Indian state of Gujarat were a success. The weakness of the formal institutional framework and the predominance of relation-based norms and customs in

  7. Holocene extreme hydrological events and their climatic implications: evidence from the middle Satluj valley, western Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shubhra; Shukla, Anil; Marh, Bhupinder; Bartarya, Sukesh; Juyal, Navin

    2016-04-01

    Extreme hydrological events and associated climatic processes are investigated and inferred through palaeoflood deposits preserved in the middle Satluj valley, India. Satluj River is the largest tributary of the Indus River having third largest catchment area in the Himalaya. Both Indian summer monsoon (ISM) and the mid-latitude westerlies contribute to the hydrological budget of the river. The steep southern orographic front prevents the northward penetration of ISM, while the mid-latitude westerlies bring moisture in form of winter snow to the orogenic interiors. It has been observed that the floods in the Himalaya are intimately associated with the variability in the above climate systems. The optical chronology indicates that floods were clustered around three time domains. The oldest flood phase-1 is dated to ˜14-12 ka which climatically occurred during the initiation of the ISM after the Last Glacial Maximum. The second phase-2 is dated between 8-5 ka and is attributed to the moderate ISM. Whereas, the youngest phase-3 is assigned the Little Ice Age (LIA) and were associated with the variability in the mid-latitude westerlies. Geochemical analyses suggest that floods were generated in higher Himalayan crystalline (HHC) zone, as the extreme precipitation destabilised the precipitous slopes creating Landslide induced Lake Outbursts Floods (LLOFs). Further, the average interval between floods has decreased since 14 ka from 500 years, to 250 years and 100 years during respective flood phases. The southern slopes of Himalaya are influenced by both the monsoon and mid-latitude westerlies and any abrupt changes in the circulation pattern were found to associate with heavy rainfall events in this region. Although an interaction between the westerlies and the monsoon is implicated for extreme floods in the western Himalaya. However, exact mechanism of these interactions is still illusive except for the observational based studies which state that extreme floods

  8. Is India the Exception?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Klaus; Storm, Rasmus K.

    2013-01-01

    in international sport events a similar impact of extraordinary growth rates has been almost totally absent in the case of India. Is India an exception? Several econometric studies have shown that income per capita is a significant variable explaining elite sport results such as results in the Olympic Games. From...... in the sports of the Olympic Summer Games. The findings show only a very weak correlation, if any at all. However, a detailed analysis of country evidence shows interesting trends and details. The paper concludes with tentative explanations for the findings including the contradictory country evidence....

  9. A structural VAR analysis of renewable energy consumption, real GDP and CO2 emissions: Evidence from India

    OpenAIRE

    Aviral Kumar Tiwari

    2011-01-01

    This study has attempted to analyze the dynamics of renewable energy consumption, economic growth, and CO2 emissions. For the analysis, we used structural VAR approach. Results of unit root tests show that all variables are non-stationary at their level form and stationary in first difference form and cointegration analysis, analyzed through Johansen-Juselius (1990), shows that there is no evidence of cointegration among the test variables. The innovations analysis of study reveals that a pos...

  10. The Reform and Design of Commodity Taxes in the Presence of Tax Evasion with Illustrative Evidence from India

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, R.

    1994-01-01

    The literature on tax evasion and its implication for optimal tax theory has concentrated on income tax evasion. The issue of commodity tax evasion has received relatively little attention even though it is important in many cases, especially in developing countries. This paper proposes a theory of marginal reform of indirect taxes that recognises the presence of commodity tax evasion. Illustrative evidence from Indian data confirm the sensitivity of the Pareto improving direction of marginal...

  11. Experimental evidence for s-wave pairing symmetry in superconducting Cu(x)Bi2Se3 single crystals using a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Niv; Zhang, Tong; Ha, Jeonghoon; Sharifi, Fred; Talin, A Alec; Kuk, Young; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2013-03-15

    Topological superconductors represent a newly predicted phase of matter that is topologically distinct from conventional superconducting condensates of Cooper pairs. As a manifestation of their topological character, topological superconductors support solid-state realizations of Majorana fermions at their boundaries. The recently discovered superconductor Cu(x)Bi(2)Se(3) has been theoretically proposed as an odd-parity superconductor in the time-reversal-invariant topological superconductor class, and point-contact spectroscopy measurements have reported the observation of zero-bias conductance peaks corresponding to Majorana states in this material. Here we report scanning tunneling microscopy measurements of the superconducting energy gap in Cu(x)Bi(2)Se(3) as a function of spatial position and applied magnetic field. The tunneling spectrum shows that the density of states at the Fermi level is fully gapped without any in-gap states. The spectrum is well described by the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory with a momentum independent order parameter, which suggests that Cu(x)Bi(2)Se(3) is a classical s-wave superconductor contrary to previous expectations and measurements.

  12. Evidence for surface-generated photocurrent in (Bi,Sb)2Se3and(Bi,Sb)2Te3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yu; Richardella, Anthony; Yao, Bing; Lee, Joon Sue; Flanagan, Thomas; Kandala, Abhinav; Samarth, Nitin; Yeats, Andrew; Mintun, Peter; Awschalom, David

    2015-03-01

    Illumination with circularly polarized light is known produce a helicity-dependent photocurrent in topological insulators such as Bi2Se3 [e.g. Nature Nanotech. 7, 96 (2012)]. However, the exact origin of this effect is still unclear since it is observed with photons well above the bulk band gap. We report measurements of the polarization-dependent photocurrent in a series of (Bi,Sb)2Se3 thin films with different carrier concentrations and find that the photocurrent is enhanced as we increase the population of the surface states. This finding is supported by a study of helicity-dependent photocurrents in back-gated (Bi,Sb)2Te3 thin films, where the chemical potential is varied electrostatically. By illuminating our samples at different wavelengths, we show that the helicity-dependent photocurrent is enhanced when the photon energy approaches the energy difference between the lowest and first excited (unoccupied) topological surface states. This leads us to attribute the helicity-dependent photocurrent in topological insulators to optical excitations between these two spin-textured surface states. We will also discuss experiments imaging the spatial variation of these helicity-dependent photocurrents. This work is supported by ONR.

  13. of Manipur, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is the first record of perissodactyl footprints from the Lower Oligocene of India and the first evidence of mammals in the. Barail Group of the age. Remarkable is the occurrence in a marginal marine setting, whereas other known perissodactyl footprints from the Eocene–Oligocene in particular from North America, Europe.

  14. Evidence for Chemical and Electronic Nonuniformities in the Formation of the Interface of RbF-Treated Cu(In,Ga)Se2 with CdS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoara, Nicoleta; Kunze, Thomas; Jackson, Philip; Hariskos, Dimitrios; Duarte, Roberto Félix; Wilks, Regan G; Witte, Wolfram; Bär, Marcus; Sadewasser, Sascha

    2017-12-20

    We report on the initial stages of CdS buffer layer formation on Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGSe) thin-film solar cell absorbers subjected to rubidium fluoride (RbF) postdeposition treatment (PDT). A detailed characterization of the CIGSe/CdS interface for different chemical bath deposition (CBD) times of the CdS layer is obtained from spatially resolved atomic and Kelvin probe force microscopy and laterally integrating X-ray spectroscopies. The observed spatial inhomogeneity in the interface's structural, chemical, and electronic properties of samples undergoing up to 3 min of CBD treatments is indicative of a complex interface formation including an incomplete coverage and/or nonuniform composition of the buffer layer. It is expected that this result impacts solar cell performance, in particular when reducing the CdS layer thickness (e.g., in an attempt to increase the collection in the ultraviolet wavelength region). Our work provides important findings on the absorber/buffer interface formation and reveals the underlying mechanism for limitations in the reduction of the CdS thickness, even when an alkali PDT is applied to the CIGSe absorber.

  15. Evidence for Time-Reversal Symmetry Breaking of the Superconducting State near Twin-Boundary Interfaces in FeSe Revealed by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Watashige

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Junctions and interfaces consisting of unconventional superconductors provide an excellent experimental playground to study exotic phenomena related to the phase of the order parameter. Not only does the complex structure of unconventional order parameters have an impact on the Josephson effects, but it also may profoundly alter the quasiparticle excitation spectrum near a junction. Here, by using spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy, we visualize the spatial evolution of the LDOS near twin boundaries (TBs of the nodal superconductor FeSe. The π/2 rotation of the crystallographic orientation across the TB twists the structure of the unconventional order parameter, which may, in principle, bring about a zero-energy LDOS peak at the TB. The LDOS at the TB observed in our study, in contrast, does not exhibit any signature of a zero-energy peak, and an apparent gap amplitude remains finite all the way across the TB. The low-energy quasiparticle excitations associated with the gap nodes are affected by the TB over a distance more than an order of magnitude larger than the coherence length ξ_{ab}. The modification of the low-energy states is even more prominent in the region between two neighboring TBs separated by a distance ≈7ξ_{ab}. In this region, the spectral weight near the Fermi level (≈±0.2  meV due to the nodal quasiparticle spectrum is almost completely removed. These behaviors suggest that the TB induces a fully gapped state, invoking a possible twist of the order parameter structure, which breaks time-reversal symmetry.

  16. What is the cause of the decline in maternal mortality in India? Evidence from time series and cross-sectional analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goli, Srinivas; Jaleel, Abdul C P

    2014-05-01

    Summary Studies on the causes of maternal mortality in India have focused on institutional deliveries, and the association of socioeconomic and demographic factors with the decline in maternal mortality has not been sufficiently investigated. By using both time series and cross-sectional data, this paper examines the factors associated with the decline in maternal mortality in India. Relative effects estimated by OLS regression analysis reveal that per capita state net domestic product (-1.49611, ppoverty ratio (0.02426, prate (-0.05905, prate and total fertility rate (0.11755, pIndia. The Barro-regression estimate reveals that improvements in economic and demographic conditions such as growth in state income (β=0.35020, ppoverty (β=0.01867, pIndia than institutional deliveries (β=0.00305). The negative β-coefficient (β=-0.69578, pIndia. Quality of services provided by the health facility, birth preparedness and avoiding delay in reaching health facility are also important. Deliveries in health facilities will not necessarily translate into increased survival chances of mothers unless women receive full antenatal care services and delays in reaching health facility are avoided.

  17. Socio-Economic Differentials in Impoverishment Effects of Out-of-Pocket Health Expenditure in China and India: Evidence from WHO SAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kaushalendra; Singh, Ashish; Kumar, Santosh; Ram, Faujdar; Singh, Abhishek; Ram, Usha; Negin, Joel; Kowal, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives The provision of affordable health care is generally considered a fundamental goal of a welfare state. In addition to its role in maintaining and improving the health status of individuals and households, it impacts the economic prosperity of a society through its positive effects on labor productivity. Given this context, this paper assesses socioeconomic-differentials in the impact of out-of-pocket-health-expenditure (OOPHE) on impoverishment in China and India, two of the fastest growing economies of the world. Data and Methods The paper uses data from the World Health Organisation’s Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (WHO SAGE), and Bivariate as well as Multivariate analyses for investigating the socioeconomic-differentials in the impact of out-of-pocket-health-expenditure (OOPHE) on impoverishment in China and India. Results and Conclusions Annually, about 7% and 8% of the population in China and India, respectively, fall in poverty due to OOPHE. Also, the percentage shortfall in income for the population from poverty line due to OOPHE is 2% in China and 1.3% in India. Further, findings from the multivariate analysis indicate that lower wealth status and inpatient as well as outpatient care increase the odds of falling below poverty line significantly (with the extent much higher in the case of in-patient care) due to OOPHE in both China and India. In addition, having at least an under-5 child in the household, living in rural areas and having a household head with no formal education increases the odds of falling below poverty line significantly (compared to a head with college level education) due to OOPHE in China; whereas having at least an under-5 child, not having health insurance and residing in rural areas increases the odds of becoming poor significantly due to OOPHE in India. PMID:26270049

  18. Socio-Economic Differentials in Impoverishment Effects of Out-of-Pocket Health Expenditure in China and India: Evidence from WHO SAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kaushalendra; Singh, Ashish; Kumar, Santosh; Ram, Faujdar; Singh, Abhishek; Ram, Usha; Negin, Joel; Kowal, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    The provision of affordable health care is generally considered a fundamental goal of a welfare state. In addition to its role in maintaining and improving the health status of individuals and households, it impacts the economic prosperity of a society through its positive effects on labor productivity. Given this context, this paper assesses socioeconomic-differentials in the impact of out-of-pocket-health-expenditure (OOPHE) on impoverishment in China and India, two of the fastest growing economies of the world. The paper uses data from the World Health Organisation's Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (WHO SAGE), and Bivariate as well as Multivariate analyses for investigating the socioeconomic-differentials in the impact of out-of-pocket-health-expenditure (OOPHE) on impoverishment in China and India. Annually, about 7% and 8% of the population in China and India, respectively, fall in poverty due to OOPHE. Also, the percentage shortfall in income for the population from poverty line due to OOPHE is 2% in China and 1.3% in India. Further, findings from the multivariate analysis indicate that lower wealth status and inpatient as well as outpatient care increase the odds of falling below poverty line significantly (with the extent much higher in the case of in-patient care) due to OOPHE in both China and India. In addition, having at least an under-5 child in the household, living in rural areas and having a household head with no formal education increases the odds of falling below poverty line significantly (compared to a head with college level education) due to OOPHE in China; whereas having at least an under-5 child, not having health insurance and residing in rural areas increases the odds of becoming poor significantly due to OOPHE in India.

  19. Establishing a learned-helplessness effect paradigm in C57BL/6 mice: behavioural evidence for emotional, motivational and cognitive effects of aversive uncontrollability per se.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryce, Christopher R; Azzinnari, Damiano; Sigrist, Hannes; Gschwind, Tilo; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Seifritz, Erich

    2012-01-01

    Uncontrollability of major life events has been proposed to be central to depression onset and maintenance. The learned helplessness (LH) effect describes a deficit in terminating controllable aversive stimuli in individuals that experienced aversive stimuli as uncontrollable relative to individuals that experienced the same stimuli as controllable. The LH effect translates across species and therefore can provide an objective-valid readout in animal models of depression. Paradigms for a robust LH effect are established and currently applied in rat but there are few reports of prior and current study of the LH effect in mouse. This includes the C57BL/6 mouse, typically the strain of choice for application of molecular-genetic tools in pre-clinical depression research. The aims of this study were to develop a robust paradigm for the LH effect in BL/6 mice, provide evidence for underlying psychological processes, and study the effect of a depression-relevant genotype on the LH effect. The apparatus used for in/escapable electro-shock exposure and escape test was a two-way shuttle arena with continuous automated measurement of locomotion, compartment transfers, e-shock escapes, vertical activity and freezing. Brother-pairs of BL/6 mice were allocated to either escapable e-shocks (ES) or inescapable e-shocks (IS), with escape latencies of the ES brother used as e-shock durations for the IS brother. The standard two-way shuttle paradigm was modified: the central gate was replaced by a raised divider and e-shock escape required transfer to the distal part of the safe compartment. These refinements yielded reduced superstitious, pre-adaptive e-shock transfers in IS mice and thereby increased the LH effect. To obtain a robust LH effect in all brother pairs, pre-screening for minor between-brother ES differences was necessary and did not confound the LH effect. IS mice developed reduced motor responses to e-shock, consistent with a motivational deficit, and absence of a

  20. Yoga en la India antigua

    OpenAIRE

    María Teresa Román López

    1998-01-01

    Las orientaciones precisas de la religión hindú para desarrollar las capacidades del hombre se hallan bajo el nombre de Yoga. El yoga es un conjunto de técnicas de dominio de sí mismo y meditación, que en el hinduismo adopta distintas modalidades; se puede hablar del yoga hindú, budista, jainista, etc. En sentido más restringido, el término se refiere a una de las seis escuelas ortodoxas de la filosofía india. Asimismo, se designa con la palabra yoga toda instrucción o disciplina encaminada h...

  1. Can evidence-based health policy from high-income countries be applied to lower-income countries: considering barriers and facilitators to an organ donor registry in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vania, Diana K; Randall, Glen E

    2016-01-13

    Organ transplantation has become an effective means to extend lives; however, a major obstacle is the lack of availability of cadaveric organs. India has one of the lowest cadaver organ donation rates in the world. If India could increase the donor rate, the demand for many organs could be met. Evidence from high-income countries suggests that an organ donor registry can be a valuable tool for increasing donor rates. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the implementation of an organ donor registry is a feasible and appropriate policy option to enhance cadaver organ donation rates in a lower-income country. This qualitative policy analysis employs semi-structured interviews with physicians, transplant coordinators, and representatives of organ donation advocacy groups in Mumbai. Interviews were designed to better understand current organ donation procedures and explore key informants' perceptions about Indian government health priorities and the likelihood of an organ donor registry in Mumbai. The 3-i framework (ideas, interests, and institutions) is used to examine how government decisions surrounding organ donation policies are shaped. Findings indicate that organ donation in India is a complex issue due to low public awareness, misperceptions of religious doctrines, the need for family consent, and a nation-wide focus on disease control. Key informants cite social, political, and infrastructural barriers to the implementation of an organ donor registry, including widely held myths about organ donation, competing health priorities, and limited hospital infrastructure. At present, both the central government and Maharashtra state government struggle to balance international pressures to improve overall population health with the desire to also enhance individual health. Implementing an organ donor registry in Mumbai is not a feasible or appropriate policy option in India's current political and social environment, as the barriers, identified through

  2. Implications of private sector Hib vaccine coverage for the introduction of public sector Hib-containing pentavalent vaccine in India: evidence from retrospective time series data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Abhishek; Kaplan, Warren A; Chokshi, Maulik; Hasan Farooqui, Habib; Zodpey, Sanjay P

    2015-02-23

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine has been available in India's private sector market since 1997. It was not until 14 December 2011 that the Government of India initiated the phased public sector introduction of a Hib (and DPT, diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus)-containing pentavalent vaccine. Our objective was to investigate the state-specific coverage and behaviour of Hib vaccine in India when it was available only in the private sector market but not in the public sector. This baseline information can act as a guide to determine how much coverage the public sector rollout of pentavalent vaccine (scheduled April 2015) will need to bear in order to achieve complete coverage. 16 of 29 states in India, 2009-2012. Retrospective descriptive secondary data analysis. (1) Annual sales of Hib vaccines, by volume, from private sector hospitals and retail pharmacies collected by IMS Health and (2) national household surveys. State-specific Hib vaccine coverage (%) and its associations with state-specific socioeconomic status. The overall private sector Hib vaccine coverage among the 2009-2012 birth cohort was low (4%) and varied widely among the studied Indian states (minimum 0.3%; maximum 4.6%). We found that private sector Hib vaccine coverage depends on urban areas with good access to the private sector, parent's purchasing capacity and private paediatricians' prescribing practices. Per capita gross domestic product is a key explanatory variable. The annual Hib vaccine uptake and the 2009-2012 coverage levels were several times higher in the capital/metropolitan cities than the rest of the state, suggesting inequity in access to Hib vaccine delivered by the private sector. If India has to achieve high and equitable Hib vaccine coverage levels, nationwide public sector introduction of the pentavalent vaccine is needed. However, the role of private sector in universal Hib vaccine coverage is undefined as yet but it should not be neglected as a useful complement to

  3. India's population in transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visaria, L; Visaria, P

    1995-10-01

    This demographic profile of India addresses fertility, family planning, and economic issues. India is described as a country shifting from economic policies of self-reliance to active involvement in international trade. Wealth has increased, particularly at higher educational levels, yet 25% still live below the official poverty line and almost 66% of Indian women are illiterate. The government program in family planning, which was instituted during the early 1950s, did not change the rate of natural increase, which remained stable at 2.2% over the past 30 years. 1993 marked the first time the growth rate decline to under 2%. The growth rate in 1995 was 1.9%. The total population is expected double in 36 years. Only Nigeria, Pakistan, and Bangladesh had a higher growth rate and higher fertility in 1995. India is geographically diverse (with the northern Himalayan mountain zone, the central alluvial plains, the western desert region, and the southern peninsula with forest, mountains, and plains). There are regional differences in the fertility rates, which range from replacement level in Kerala and Goa to 5.5 children in Uttar Pradesh. Fertility is expected to decline throughout India due to the slower pace of childbearing among women over the age of 35 years, the increase in contraceptive use, and increases in marriage age. Increased educational levels in India and its state variations are related to lower fertility. Literacy campaigns are considered to be effective means of increasing the educational levels of women. Urbanization is not expected to markedly affect fertility levels. Urban population, which is concentrated in a few large cities, remains a small proportion of total population. Greater shifts are evident in the transition from agriculture to other wage labor. Fertility is expected to decline as women's share of labor force activity increases. The major determinant of fertility decline in India is use of family planning, which has improved in access

  4. Molecular Evidence for Occurrence of Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus in Ash Gourd (Benincasa hispida) Germplasm Showing a Severe Yellow Stunt Disease in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anirban; Spoorthi, P; Panwar, G; Bag, Manas Kumar; Prasad, T V; Kumar, Gunjeet; Gangopadhyay, K K; Dutta, M

    2013-06-01

    An evaluation of 70 accessions of ash gourd germplasm grown at National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, New Delhi, India during Kharif season (2010) showed natural occurrence of a yellow stunt disease in three accessions (IC554690, IC036330 and Pusa Ujjwal). A set of begomovirus specific primers used in PCR gave expected amplicon from all the symptomatic plants; however no betasatellite was detected. Complete genome of the begomovirus (DNA-A and DNA-B), amplified through rolling circle amplification, was cloned and sequenced. The begomovirus under study shared high sequence identities to different isolates of Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) and clustered with them. Among those isolates, the DNA-A and DNA-B of the present begomovirus isolate showed highest 99.6 and 96.8 % sequence identities, respectively with an isolate reported on pumpkin from India (DNA-A: AM286433, DNA-B: AM286435). Based on the sequence analysis, the begomovirus obtained from ash gourd was considered as an isolate of ToLCNDV. Thus, the present findings constitute the first report of occurrence of a new yellow stunt disease in ash gourd from India and demonstrated the association of ToLCNDV with the symptomatic samples. Occurrence of ToLCNDV in ash gourd germplasm not only adds up a new cucurbitaceous host of this virus but also raises the concern about the perpetuation of this virus in absence of its main host tomato and thus has an epidemiological relevance for understanding the rapid spread of this virus in tomato and other hosts in Indian sub-continent.

  5. India Emerging

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-12-13

    Dec 13, 2017 ... It is telling that in a famous paper authored by the Nobel Prize winner, Robert ..... Examples are the steam engine, railroad, electricity, electronics, the ...... According to Gartner's Senior Research Analyst 'India's domestic IT services .... in new areas such as engineering services and product development.

  6. India Emerging

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Here Veena Jha surveys the history of philanthropic giving in India going back to the ...... claim that ICTs produced benefits go beyond those pertaining to investors and owners. ...... Anti-migration policies include restricted access to public services by below poverty ...... Which medicines and vaccinations are not available?

  7. Role of the private sector in vaccination service delivery in India: evidence from private-sector vaccine sales data, 2009-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Abhishek; Kaplan, Warren A; Chokshi, Maulik; Zodpey, Sanjay P

    2016-09-01

    India's Universal Immunization Programme (UIP) provides basic vaccines free-of-cost in the public sector, yet national vaccination coverage is poor. The Government of India has urged an expanded role for the private sector to help achieve universal immunization coverage. We conducted a state-by-state analysis of the role of the private sector in vaccinating Indian children against each of the six primary childhood diseases covered under India's UIP. We analyzed IMS Health data on Indian private-sector vaccine sales, 2011 Indian Census data and national household surveys (DHS/NFHS 2005-06 and UNICEF CES 2009) to estimate the percentage of vaccinated children among the 2009-12 birth cohort who received a given vaccine in the private sector in 16 Indian states. We also analyzed the estimated private-sector vaccine shares as function of state-specific socio-economic status. Overall in 16 states, the private sector contributed 4.7% towards tuberculosis (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)), 3.5% towards measles, 2.3% towards diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DPT3) and 7.6% towards polio (OPV3) overall (both public and private sectors) vaccination coverage. Certain low income states (Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Orissa, Assam and Bihar) have low private as well as public sector vaccination coverage. The private sector's role has been limited primarily to the high income states as opposed to these low income states where the majority of Indian children live. Urban areas with good access to the private sector and the ability to pay increases the Indian population's willingness to access private-sector vaccination services. In India, the public sector offers vaccination services to the majority of the population but the private sector should not be neglected as it could potentially improve overall vaccination coverage. The government could train and incentivize a wider range of private-sector health professionals to help deliver the vaccines, especially in the low

  8. Evidence of Recombinant Citrus tristeza virus Isolate Occurring in Acid Lime cv. Pant Lemon Orchard in Uttarakhand Terai Region of Northern Himalaya in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaywant Kumar; Tarafdar, Avijit; Sharma, Susheel Kumar; Biswas, Kajal Kumar

    2013-06-01

    The present study for the first time describes biological and molecular characterization of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) occurring in the Terai area of Uttarakhand State in Northern Himalaya region of India. Direct antigen coated-ELISA and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detected the CTV infection in Acid lime cv. Pant lemon (Citrus aurantifolia) orchards of Pantnagar with an estimated disease incidence of 16.6-20.5 %. To know the biological and genetic properties, an isolate, CTV Pant 4 was characterized. Isolate Pant 4 could be graft transmitted to Kinnow, Nagpur and Darjeeling mandarins, Mosambi sweet orange, Kagzi lime, Sweet lime, Sour orange but not to Rough lemon. The sequence analyses of the 5'ORF1a (3038 nucleotides) of LPro domain and 3'end (2058 nt) covering ORF7-ORF10 regions of the CTV genome revealed that Pant 4 was closely related to the previously reported Indian CTV isolate, Kpg3 from Northeastern Himalaya region with 97 and 98 % sequence identity, respectively. Whereas, it differed from the previously reported CTV isolate B165 from Southern India with 79 and 92 % identity, respectively for 5'ORF1a and 3' end regions. Recombination and SplitsTree decomposition analyses indicated that CTV isolate Pant 4 was a recombinant isolate originating from Kpg3 as a major and B165 as a minor donor.

  9. Petrology and geochemistry of charnockites (felsic ortho-granulites) from the Kerala Khondalite Belt, Southern India: Evidence for intra-crustal melting, magmatic differentiation and episodic crustal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra Kumar, G. R.; Sreejith, C.

    2016-10-01

    The Kerala Khondalite Belt (KKB) of the southern India encompasses volumetrically significant magmatic components. Among these, orthopyroxene-bearing, felsic ortho-granulites, popularly known as charnockites in Indian context, constitute an important lithology. In contrast to the well-known phenomena of arrested charnockitization, the geochemical characteristics and petrogenesis of these ortho-granulite suites remain poorly studied, leaving geodynamic models envisaged for the KKB highly conjectural. In this paper, we try to bridge this gap with detailed results on orthopyroxene-bearing, felsic ortho-granulites spread over the entire KKB and propose a new petrogenetic and crustal evolution model. Based on geochemical characteristics, the orthopyroxene-bearing, felsic ortho-granulites (charnockites sensu lato) of KKB are classified into (1) tonalitic (TC), (2) granitic (GC), and (3) augen (AC) suites. Members of the TC follow sodic (characterized by decreasing CaO/Na2O), whereas those of the GC and AC follow calc-alkaline trends of differentiation. Geochemical patterns of the TC resemble those of the Archaean tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) suites, with slightly magnesian character (average Mg# = 33), moderate LREE (average LaN = 154), low HREE (average YbN = 6) and Y (1-53 ppm; average 11 ppm). The TC is also characterized by positive to slightly negative europium anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.7 to 1.67). The GC and AC suites, on the other hand, resemble post-Archaean arc-related granites. The GC displays ferroan nature (average Mg# = 22), low to moderate degrees of REE fractionation (average [La/Yb]N = 34.84), high contents of Y (5-128 ppm; average 68), and low Sr/Y (1-98) ratios. Significant negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.18-0.91; average 0.50) and low Sr (65-690 ppm) are also noted in the GC. Similar chemical characteristics are shown by the AC, with ferroan nature (average Mg# = 21), low to moderate degrees of REE fractionation (average [La/Yb]N = 26), high

  10. Community Collectivization and Consistent Condom Use Among Female Sex Workers in Southern India: Evidence from Two Rounds of Behavioral Tracking Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vejella, Shanti; Patel, Sangram Kishor; Saggurti, Niranjan; Prabhakar, Parimi

    2016-04-01

    Community collectivization is an integral part of condom use and HIV risk reduction interventions among key population. This study assesses community collectivization among female sex workers (FSWs), and explores its relationship with sex workers' consistent condom use (CCU) with different partners considering the interaction effect of time and collectivization. Data were drawn from two rounds of cross-sectional surveys collected during 2010 (N1 = 1986) and 2012 (N2 = 1973) among FSWs in Andhra Pradesh, India. Results of the multiple logistic regression analysis show that, CCU with regular and occasional clients increased over the inter-survey period among FSWs with a high collective efficacy (AOR 2.9 and 6.1) and collective agency (AOR 14.4 and 19.0) respectively. The association of high levels of collectivization with CCU and self-efficacy for condom use are central to improve the usefulness and sustainability of HIV prevention programs worldwide.

  11. The energy-irrigation nexus and its impact on groundwater markets in eastern Indo-Gangetic basin: Evidence from West Bengal, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherji, Aditi

    2007-01-01

    South Asia in general and India in particular is heavily dependent on groundwater for supporting its largely agrarian population. Informal pump irrigation services markets have played an important role in providing access to irrigation to millions of small and marginal farmers and had positive equity, efficiency and sustainable impacts in water-abundant regions such as West Bengal. Quite predictably, in such pump lift-based economy, fortunes of energy and irrigation sectors are closely entwined. This has often been called the 'energy-irrigation' nexus. There are two major sources of energy for pumping groundwater, viz. electricity and diesel. Most of the current discourse in the field has looked only at the 'electricity-irrigation' nexus to the exclusion of the 'diesel-irrigation nexus'. This paper looks at both these aspects. In doing so, it makes two propositions. First, high flat-rate electricity tariff encourages development of water markets whereby the water buyers-who are mostly small and marginal farmers-benefit through access to irrigation. Second, low rate of rural electrification has forced majority of farmers to depend on diesel for groundwater pumping and the steep increase in diesel prices over the last few years has resulted in economic scarcity of groundwater. This in turn has had serious negative impacts on crop production and farm incomes. Using primary field data from West Bengal, India, this paper makes a case for rapid rural electrification and continuation of high flat-rate tariff, which would in turn support developed groundwater markets and provide access to irrigation to the poor and marginal farmers

  12. Radhealth in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear power programme in India is considered to be expensive and dangerous. This view is based on an independent case study into occupational radiation exposure published in 1985. This looked at the workers of the Indian Rare Earth Ltd. (IRE) thorium plant in Kerala. The aims of the study are listed. The results are tabulated. They show that the incidence of cancer deaths at IRE is nearly five times as high as the control population of workers in a chemical plant. The evidence regarding heart disease is less clearcut. The Indian Department of Atomic Energy is considered to be secretive and unwilling to recognise the radiation hazards at IRE. (UK)

  13. Multiple sources of selenium in ancient seafloor hydrothermal systems: Compositional and Se, S, and Pb isotopic evidence from volcanic-hosted and volcanic-sediment-hosted massive sulfide deposits of the Finlayson Lake District, Yukon, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton-Matthews, Daniel; Leybourne, Matthew I.; Peter, Jan M.; Scott, Steven D.; Cousens, Brian; Eglington, Bruce M.

    2013-09-01

    Volcanic-hosted massive sulfide (VHMS) and volcanic-sediment-hosted massive sulfide (VSHMS; i.e., hosted by both volcanic and sedimentary rocks) deposits in the Finlayson Lake District, Yukon, Canada, provide a unique opportunity to study the influence of seafloor and sub-seafloor hydrothermal processes on the formation of Se-poor (GP4F VHMS deposit; 7 ppm Se average), intermediate (Kudz Ze Kayah—KZK VHMS deposit; 200 ppm Se average), and Se-enriched (Wolverine VSHMS deposit; 1100 ppm Se average) mineralization. All three deposits are hosted by mid-Paleozoic (˜360-346 Ma) felsic volcanic rocks, but only the Wolverine deposit has voluminous coeval carbonaceous argillites (black shales) in the host rock package. Here we report the first application of Se isotope analyses to ancient seafloor mineralization and use these data, in conjunction with Pb and S isotope analyses, to better understand the source(s) and depositional process(es) of Se within VHMS and VSHMS systems. The wide range of δ82Se (-10.2‰ to 1.3‰, relative to NIST 3149), δ34S (+2.0‰ to +12.8‰ CDT), and elevated Se contents (up to 5865 ppm) within the Wolverine deposit contrast with the narrower range of δ82Se (-3.8‰ to -0.5‰), δ34S (9.8‰ to 13.0‰), and lower Se contents (200 ppm average) of the KZK deposit. The Wolverine and KZK deposits have similar sulfide depositional histories (i.e., deposition at the seafloor, with concomitant zone refining). The Se in the KZK deposit is magmatic (leaching or degassing) in origin, whereas the Wolverine deposit requires an additional large isotopically negative Se source (i.e. ˜-15‰ δ82Se). The negative δ82Se values for the Wolverine deposit are at the extreme light end for measured terrestrial samples, and the lightest observed for hypogene sulfide minerals, but are within calculated equilibrium values of δ82Se relative to NIST 3149 (˜30‰ at 25 °C between SeO4 and Se2-). We propose that the most negative Se isotope values at the

  14. India emerging: New financial architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankarshan Basu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The global financial crisis of 2007–2008 highlighted the need to re-evaluate several well established tenets in the world of finance. Questions have been raised the world over about the existing paradigm, leading to an acceptance that new financial architecture needed to be evolved and that new models need to emerge, keeping in mind the multiplicity of socio-economic realities that exist round the globe. In this context, the imperative for a new financial architecture in India is quite evident, and the ensuing panel discussion throws up some India-specific issues that need to be explored by the various stakeholders involved in this attempt.

  15. Deeply concealed half-graben at the SW margin of the East European Craton (SE Poland — Evidence for Neoproterozoic rifting prior to the break-up of Rodinia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Krzywiec

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Baltica was one of continents formed as a result of Rodinia break-up 850–550 Ma. It was separated from Amazonia(? by the Tornquist Ocean, the opening of which was preceded by Neoproterozoic extension in a network of continental rifts. Some of these rifts were subsequently aborted whereas the Tornquist Rift gave rise to splitting of Rodinia and formation of the Tornquist Ocean. The results of 1-D subsidence analysis at the fossil passive margin of Baltica provided insight in the timing and kinematics of continental rifting that led to break-up of Rodinia. Rifting was associated with Neoproterozoic syn-rift subsidence accompanied by deposition of continental coarse-grained sediments and emplacement of continental basalts. Transition from a syn-rift to post-rift phase in the latest Ediacaran to earliest early Cambrian was concomitant with deposition of continental conglomerates and arkoses, laterally passing into mudstones. An extensional scenario of the break-up of Rodinia along the Tornquist Rift is based on the character of tectonic subsidence curves, evolution of syn-rift and post-rift depocenters in time, as well as geochemistry and geochronology of the syn-rift volcanics. It is additionally reinforced by the high-quality deep seismic reflection data from SE Poland, located above the SW edge of the East European Craton. The seismic data allowed for identification of a deeply buried (11–18 km, well-preserved extensional half-graben, developed in the Palaeoproterozoic crystalline basement and filled with a Neoproterozoic syn-rift volcano-sedimentary succession. The results of depth-to-basement study based on integration of seismic and gravity data show the distribution of local NE–SW elongated Neoproterozoic depocenters within the SW slope of the East European Craton. Furthermore, they document the rapid south-eastwards thickness increase of the Neoproterozoic succession towards the NW–SE oriented craton margin. This provides evidence

  16. India : State of Development Evaluation Report 2010 | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Anecdotal evidence from India suggests that the quantity and quality of development evaluation is declining. However, there is little if any documented evidence on the state of evaluation in India or of the factors underlying the current situation. This project will therefore document and carry out a diagnostic analysis of the ...

  17. India : State of Development Evaluation Report 2010 | CRDI - Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Anecdotal evidence from India suggests that the quantity and quality of development evaluation is declining. However, there is little if any documented evidence on the state of evaluation in India or of the factors underlying the current situation. This project will therefore document and carry out a diagnostic analysis of the ...

  18. Impact of health insurance for tertiary care on postoperative outcomes and seeking care for symptoms: quasi-experimental evidence from Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Neeraj; Wagner, Zachary

    2016-01-06

    To evaluate the effects of a government insurance programme covering tertiary care for the poor in Karnataka, India--Vajpayee Arogyashree Scheme (VAS)--on treatment seeking and postoperative outcomes. Geographic regression discontinuity. 572 villages in Karnataka, India. 3478 households in 300 villages where VAS was implemented and 3486 households in 272 neighbouring matched villages ineligible for VAS. A government insurance programme that provided free tertiary care to households below the poverty line in half of villages in Karnataka from February 2010 to August 2012. Seeking treatment for symptoms, posthospitalisation well-being, occurrence of infections during hospitalisation and need for rehospitalisation. The prevalence of symptoms was nearly identical for households in VAS-eligible villages compared with households in VAS-ineligible villages. However, households eligible for VAS were 4.96 percentage points (95% CI 1 to 8.9; p=0.014) more likely to seek treatment for their symptoms. The increase in treatment seeking was more pronounced for symptoms of cardiac conditions, the condition most frequently covered by VAS. Respondents from VAS-eligible villages reported greater improvements in well-being after a hospitalisation in all categories assessed and they were statistically significant in 3 of the 6 categories (walking ability, pain and anxiety). Respondents eligible for VAS were 9.4 percentage points less likely to report any infection after their hospitalisation (95% CI -20.2 to 1.4; p=0.087) and 16.5 percentage points less likely to have to be rehospitalised after the initial hospitalisation (95% CI -28.7 to -4.3; p<0.01). Insurance for tertiary care increased treatment seeking among eligible households. Moreover, insured patients experienced better posthospitalisation outcomes, suggesting better quality of care received. These results suggest that there are several pathways through which tertiary care insurance could improve health, aside from

  19. Strategies for reducing police arrest in the context of an HIV prevention programme for female sex workers: evidence from structural interventions in Karnataka, South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Parinita; Isac, Shajy; McClarty, Leigh M; Mohan, Haranahalli L; Maddur, Srinath; Jagannath, Sunitha B; Venkataramaiah, Balasubramanya K; Moses, Stephen; Blanchard, James F; Gurnani, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    Female sex workers (FSWs) frequently experience violence in their work environments, violating their basic rights and increasing their vulnerability to HIV infection. Structural interventions addressing such violence are critical components of comprehensive HIV prevention programmes. We describe structural interventions developed to address violence against FSWs in the form of police arrest, in the context of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation's India AIDS Initiative (Avahan) in Karnataka, South India. We examine changes in FSW arrest between two consecutive time points during the intervention and identify characteristics that may increase FSW vulnerability to arrest in Karnataka. Structural interventions with police involved advocacy work with senior police officials, sensitization workshops, and integration of HIV and human rights topics in pre-service curricula. Programmes for FSWs aimed to enhance collectivization, empowerment and awareness about human rights and to introduce crisis response mechanisms. Three rounds of integrated behavioural and biological assessment surveys were conducted among FSWs from 2004 to 2011. We conducted bivariate and multivariate analyses using data from the second (R2) and third (R3) survey rounds to examine changes in arrests among FSWs over time and to assess associations between police arrest, and the sociodemographic and sex work-related characteristics of FSWs. Among 4110 FSWs surveyed, rates of ever being arrested by the police significantly decreased over time, from 9.9% in R2 to 6.1% in R3 (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) [95% CI]=0.63 [0.48 to 0.83]). Arrests in the preceding year significantly decreased, from 5.5% in R2 to 2.8% in R3 (AOR [95% CI]=0.59 [0.41 to 0.86]). FSWs arrested as part of arbitrary police raids also decreased from 49.6 to 19.5% (AOR [95% CI]=0.21 [0.11 to 0.42]). Certain characteristics, including financial dependency on sex work, street- or brothel-based solicitation and high client volumes, were found

  20. Contenha-se, se for capaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Feitoza Pereira

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Em O Instinto da Linguagem, Steven Pinker discorre sobre sua célebre tese: a linguagem não é a mais prodigiosa invenção cultural humana. Ela é uma peça da constituição biológica do cérebro. A linguagem é uma habilidade complexa e especializada, que se desenvolve espontaneamente na criança, sem qualquer esforço consciente ou instrução formal, que se manifesta sem que se perceba sua lógica subjacente, que é qualitativamente a mesma em todo indiví­duo, e que difere de capacidades mais gerais de processamento de informações ou de comportamento inteligente. Para Pinker, a concepção de linguagem como um tipo de instinto transmite a idéia de que as pessoas sabem falar mais ou menos da mesma maneira que as aranhas sabem tecer suas teias. Ele apóia suas idéias em Darwin e Chomsky. Palavras-chave linguagem, gramática universal, evolução Abstract In Language Instinct, Steven Pinker argues about his famous thesis: language is not the most prodigious human cultural invention. It is a distinct piece of the biological constitution of the brain. Language is a complex, specialized skill, which develops spontaneously in the child, without conscious effort or formal instruction. It reveals itself without awareness of its underlying logic, which is qualitatively the same in every individual, and which is distinct from more general abilities of information processing of intelligent behavior. According to Pinker, the conception of language as a kind of instinct conveys the idea that people know how to talk in more or less the same way as spiders know how to spin webs. His thesis is founded in Darwin and Chomsky-s theories. Keywords language, universal grammar, evolution

  1. Rb-Sr and K-Ar isotopic evidence for neoproterozoic (Pan-African) granulite metamorphism from the basement of Mumbai offshore basin, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathore, S.S.; Vijan, A.R.; Singh, M.P.; Misra, K.N.; Prabhu, B.N.

    2000-01-01

    Precambrian basement from well HBM-1 in the Heera oil field of Mumbai offshore basin has been dated by Rb-Sr and K-Ar methods. Five granulitic basement samples from three conventional drill cores have yielded Rb-Sr isochron age of 502±25 Ma with an initial Sr ratio of 0.70855±0.00013. This age has been interpreted as the time of granulite facies metamorphism of the basement rocks in the region. Two whole rock samples from the basement of this well have yielded mutually concordant K-Ar ages of 505±16 Ma and 507±17 Ma. The K-Ar ages are significantly similar to Rb-Sr age obtained from this well, suggesting complete isotopic reequilibration around 500 Ma ago. The time of secondary thermal heating around 500 Ma ago in the basement of Heera field coincides with the widespread neoproterozoic (Pan-African) thermo-tectonic event extending from the Arabian Peninsula and eastern Africa covering Madagascar, southern India. Sri Lanka and East Antarctica. This study widens the limit of the Pan-African zone, which hitherto was thought to be confined to the western part (presently southern part) of the Indian subcontinent, towards further east. (author)

  2. Morphological and genetic evidence for multiple evolutionary distinct lineages in the endangered and commercially exploited red lined torpedo barbs endemic to the Western Ghats of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Lijo; Philip, Siby; Dahanukar, Neelesh; Anvar Ali, Palakkaparambil Hamsa; Tharian, Josin; Raghavan, Rajeev; Antunes, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    Red lined torpedo barbs (RLTBS) (Cyprinidae: Puntius) endemic to the Western Ghats Hotspot of India, are popular and highly priced freshwater aquarium fishes. Two decades of indiscriminate exploitation for the pet trade, restricted range, fragmented populations and continuing decline in quality of habitats has resulted in their 'Endangered' listing. Here, we tested whether the isolated RLTB populations demonstrated considerable variation qualifying to be considered as distinct conservation targets. Multivariate morphometric analysis using 24 size-adjusted characters delineated all allopatric populations. Similarly, the species-tree highlighted a phylogeny with 12 distinct RLTB lineages corresponding to each of the different riverine populations. However, coalescence-based methods using mitochondrial DNA markers identified only eight evolutionarily distinct lineages. Divergence time analysis points to recent separation of the populations, owing to the geographical isolation, more than 5 million years ago, after the lineages were split into two ancestral stocks in the Paleocene, on north and south of a major geographical gap in the Western Ghats. Our results revealing the existence of eight evolutionarily distinct RLTB lineages calls for the re-determination of conservation targets for these cryptic and endangered taxa.

  3. Isolation and molecular characterization of Chikungunya virus from the Andaman and Nicobar archipelago, India: evidence of an East, Central, and South African genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandam, N; Chaaithanya, I K; Senthil, G S; Shriram, A N; Bhattacharya, D; Jeevabharathi, G S; Sudeep, A B; Pradeepkumar, N; Vijayachari, P

    2011-12-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an Alphavirus belonging to the family Togaviridae. In 2006, CHIKV infection struck the Andaman and Nicobar archipelago, with an attack rate of 60%. There were more than 10 cases with acute flaccid paralysis simulating the Guillian Barre Syndrome. The majority of the patients presented severe joint pain. The cause for such an explosive nature of the outbreak with increased morbidity was not known. The isolation of CHIKV was attempted and succeeded from nine subjects presenting clinical symptoms of Chikungunya fever. The cDNA of all the isolates was sequenced for partial E1 and nsP1 genes. Sequences were aligned based on the double locus sequence typing concept. The phylogenetic analysis shows that sequences of Andaman isolates grouped with the East, Central, and South African genotype of virus isolates from India, Sri Lanka, and Réunion. The genetic distance between Andaman isolates and the Réunion isolates was very small. The phylogenetic analysis confirmed the origin of the isolates responsible for the first ever confirmed CHIKV outbreak in these islands to be the East, Central, and South African genotype. In this manuscript, we discuss the involvement of the East, Central, and South African strain with the Chikungunya fever outbreak in this archipelago and double locus sequence typing as a first time approach.

  4. THE INFLUENCE OF WAITING TIME SATISFACTION ON CUSTOMER LOYALTY TOWARDS MULTI-STAGE SERVICES IN A FULL-SERVICE RESTAURANT: EVIDENCE FROM INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mittal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Research shows waiting time in services is an important source of service evaluation by the customer. In fact, time is one component of the total 'cost' that the customer bears and cost is a core component of the perceived cost-benefit equation that the customer uses to evaluate her or his sustained patronage of a particular service. In most services, customers consider waiting as a waste of time. However, from the customer perspective, in the case of a full-service restaurant, waiting is expected and sometimes desirable also. Prior research, mainly in the west, suggests that when customers think that a wait for service is too long, they become less satisfied with overall service quality. Based on a research setting in a full-scale restaurant in India, this paper seeks answers to two research questions: First, what are the determinants of overall waiting-time satisfaction and second, what is the influence of waiting-time satisfaction on customer loyalty.

  5. Mangrove associated lignite beds of Malvan, Konkan: Evidence for higher sea-level during the Late Tertiary (Neogene) along the west coast of India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran, K.P.N.; Shindikar, M.; Limaye, R.B. [Agharkar Research Inst., Pune (India)

    2004-01-25

    Fossil pneumatophores (breathing roots) of Avicennia are recovered and reported from the lignite beds exposed in Kolamb well-section near Malvan, Konkan area of western Maharashtra. The accrued palynoflora is dominated by mangroves (Avicennia, Aegialitis, Excoecaria, Rhizophora and Sonneratia). The spores of mangrove fern (Acrostichum aureum) an estuarine fungus Cirrenalia indicate that these lignites are autochthonous and deposited in a near-shore environment. Presence of foraminiferal linings (= microforaminifera), dinoflagellate cysts, a few calcareous nannofossils and scolecodonts is an irrefutable proof of marine and brackish water influence during the deposition of lignites under intertidal/tidal swampy condition (mangrove influenced) with fair input from freshwater swamps and hinterland. Freshwater-related forms, viz. Ceratopteris thalictroides, Nymphaeaceae, Ctenolophonaceae and hinterland taxa (Cullenia/Durio) of Bombacaceae along with abundance of microthyriaceous fungi in the palynoflora imply a warm humid tropical climate with high precipitation during the depositional period. The presence of Ctenolophon englerianus (= Ctenolophonidites costatus) in Kolamb lignites suggests the Late Neogene (Late Miocene-Early Pliocene) age. The occurrence of pneumatophores and associated lignite deposits about 37 m above the present mean sea-level, and much inland, clearly indicates the higher sea-level strand during Late Neogene along the west coast of India.

  6. Morphological and genetic evidence for multiple evolutionary distinct lineages in the endangered and commercially exploited red lined torpedo barbs endemic to the Western Ghats of India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijo John

    Full Text Available Red lined torpedo barbs (RLTBS (Cyprinidae: Puntius endemic to the Western Ghats Hotspot of India, are popular and highly priced freshwater aquarium fishes. Two decades of indiscriminate exploitation for the pet trade, restricted range, fragmented populations and continuing decline in quality of habitats has resulted in their 'Endangered' listing. Here, we tested whether the isolated RLTB populations demonstrated considerable variation qualifying to be considered as distinct conservation targets. Multivariate morphometric analysis using 24 size-adjusted characters delineated all allopatric populations. Similarly, the species-tree highlighted a phylogeny with 12 distinct RLTB lineages corresponding to each of the different riverine populations. However, coalescence-based methods using mitochondrial DNA markers identified only eight evolutionarily distinct lineages. Divergence time analysis points to recent separation of the populations, owing to the geographical isolation, more than 5 million years ago, after the lineages were split into two ancestral stocks in the Paleocene, on north and south of a major geographical gap in the Western Ghats. Our results revealing the existence of eight evolutionarily distinct RLTB lineages calls for the re-determination of conservation targets for these cryptic and endangered taxa.

  7. FDI Climate in India

    OpenAIRE

    Khandelwal, Varun

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since 1991, after the external payment crisis in India, there has been liberalization of various policies by the Government of India. Due to this there has been rapid surge of FDI inflows in India. The current investment climate has attracted many foreign investors to India in various sectors. India is considered as one of the favorable destination of FDI. However the country also suffers from few weaknesses and constraints in terms of policy and regulatory framework, which rest...

  8. Risk factors for HIV infection in injection drug users and evidence for onward transmission of HIV to their sexual partners in Chennai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Samiran; Kumar, M Suresh; Lokabiraman, S; Jayashree, K; Satagopan, M C; Solomon, Suniti; Rao, Usha Anand; Rangaiyan, Gurumurthy; Flessenkaemper, Sabine; Grosskurth, Heiner; Gupte, Mohan D

    2005-05-01

    Determining HIV prevalence in injection drug users (IDUs) and their regular sex partners in Chennai, India. A total of 226 IDUs and their regular sex partners were enrolled during April-July 2003. After informed consent was obtained, a semistructured questionnaire was administered and serum was tested for HIV antibody. The HIV seroprevalence was 30% (68/226) in IDUs and 5% in their regular sex partners (11/226). While in 25% of couples only the male partner was HIV positive, 5% of the couples were concordant for HIV infection and 70% were HIV negative. Fifty-seven percent of the HIV-positive IDUs and 45% of the HIV-infected women thought that they had "no chance" or "very little chance" of getting HIV, reflecting low HIV risk perception. More than 20% IDUs reported borrowing or lending of injection equipment. In univariate analyses "sex" and "condom use" with sex workers had no bearing but "more than twice a day injecting frequency," "history of incarceration," "tattoos," "recruitment from northern part of the city," and ever-injecting drugs in drug-selling places had significant association with HIV infection in IDUs. In an adjusted model, the odds of HIV infection were 2 times higher among IDUs who had ever injected drugs in drug-selling places and 6 times higher in those who were recruited from the northern part of central Chennai. Reducing sharing of injection equipment and unsafe tattooing through targeted and environmental interventions, increasing HIV risk perception, and promoting safer sex practices among IDUs and their sex partners are urgent program needs.

  9. Evidences of methane-derived authigenic carbonates from the sediments of the Krishna–Godavari Basin, eastern continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kocherla, M.; Mazumdar, A.; Karisiddaiah, S.M.; Borole, D.V.; Rao, B.R.

    ents from the Gulf of Mexico . Earth Planet. Sci. Lett ., 1988, 88 , 263 ? 272. 2. Rodriguez, N. M., Paull, C. K. and Borowski, W. S., Zonation of authigenic carbonates within gas hydrate - bearing sedimentary se c- tions on the Blake Ridge.... H., Di s solved carbon and de lta c - 13 anomalies in the water column caused by hydroca r- bon seeps on the northwestern Gulf of Mexico slope. Geo - Mar. Lett ., 1992, 12 , 33 ? 40. 30. Berner, R. A., Sedimentary pyrite formation. Am. J...

  10. Female married illiteracy as the most important continual determinant of total fertility rate among districts of Empowered Action Group States of India: Evidence from Annual Health Survey 2011–12

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Kumar; Vishal Dogra; Khushbu Rani; Kanti Sahu

    2017-01-01

    Background: District level determinants of total fertility rate in Empowered Action Group states of India can help in ongoing population stabilization programs in India. Objective: Present study intends to assess the role of district level determinants in predicting total fertility rate among districts of the Empowered Action Group states of India. Material and Methods: Data from Annual Health Survey (2011-12) was analysed using STATA and R software packages. Multiple linear regression models...

  11. Future strategy of SE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcelli, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this presentation author (General Director of Slovenske elektrarne, a. s.) presents structure and investment plans of SE. The feasibility study of construction of the blocks 3 and 4 of the Mochovce NPP is presented

  12. SE-VYZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2004-01-01

    On this CD compact disc 6 video-films (A-1 NPP; Bituminization; Cementation; Pressing; The Interim spent fuel storage facility; Transport into the National radioactive waste repository Mochovce; Ignition; and Vitrification). In these films process of radioactive waste treatment in the Bohunice Radioactive Waste Processing Center (SE-VYZ) is presented. 2 presentations about radioactive wastes treatment in the SE-VYZ are included

  13. SE debt restructuring plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janoska, J.

    2003-01-01

    Slovenske elektrarne, a.s. (SE) plans to restructure one's own debts in 2003-2005. Debt restructuring plan is following: 2003: Collection of pre-payment on electricity - 60 million Euro (2.5 billion Slovak crowns), consumer unknown. Own promissory notes in total value of 100 million US$ (3.5 billion Slovak crowns) - in process. Sale of claims worth 2.4 billion Slovak crowns (57.21 million Euro) - negotiations in process. 2003/2004: Restructuring of loans payable IV. quarter 2003 and at the beginning of 2004 in value of 200 million Euro (8.3 billion Slovak crowns). Aim of SE is a new credit payable within 7 years, with instalments payable in the last two to three without any state subsidies. 2005: Loans worth 460 million Euro (189 billion Slovak crowns) will still remain. SE want to negotiate them with banks without state support

  14. Understanding the transmission dynamics of Leishmania donovani to provide robust evidence for interventions to eliminate visceral leishmaniasis in Bihar, India the LCNTDR Collection : Advances in scientific research for NTD control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Cameron (Mary M.); A. Acosta-Serrano (Alvaro); C. Bern (Caryn); M. Boelaert (Marleen); M. Den Boer (Margriet); S. Burza (Sakib); L.A.C. Chapman (Lloyd A. C.); A. Chaskopoulou (Alexandra); M. Coleman (Michael); O. Courtenay (Orin); S. Croft (Simon); P.K. Das (P.); E. Dilger (Erin); G. Foster (Geraldine); R. Garlapati (Rajesh); L. Haines (Lee); A. Harris (Angela); J. Hemingway (Janet); T.D. Hollingsworth (T. Déirdre); S. Jervis (Sarah); G.F. Medley (Graham F.); M. Miles (Michael); M. Paine (Mark); A. Picado (Albert); R. Poché (Richard); P. Ready (Paul); M. Rogers (Matthew); M. Rowland (Mark); S. Sundar (Shyam); S.J. de Vlas (Sake); D. Weetman (David)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractVisceral Leishmaniasis (VL) is a neglected vector-borne disease. In India, it is transmitted to humans by Leishmania donovani-infected Phlebotomus argentipes sand flies. In 2005, VL was targeted for elimination by the governments of India, Nepal and Bangladesh by 2015. The elimination

  15. Autismos que se 'curan'

    OpenAIRE

    Artigas, Josep, 1948-; Paula Pérez, Isabel, 1970-

    2016-01-01

    Introducción. La investigación sobre el autismo, basada principalmente en el modelo categórico del Manual diagnóstico y estadístico de los trastornos mentales, se ha centrado de forma preferente en la epidemiología, las manifestaciones clínicas, los mecanismos cognitivos y los determinantes biológicos y ambientales; sin embargo, se ha prestado escaso interés a las trayectorias evolutivas, las cuales son decisivas de cara al pronóstico a medio y largo plazo. Objetivo. Revisar el curso evolutiv...

  16. A systematic review on the prevalence and utilization of health care services for reproductive tract infections/sexually transmitted infections: Evidence from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarkar, Aarti; Mhaskar, Pallavi

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have reported prevalence rate of reproductive tract infections (RTIs) but very few studies have described health seeking behavior of patients. This paper critically looks at and summarizes the available evidence, systematically. A structured search strategy was used to identify relevant articles, published during years 2000-2012. Forty-one full-text papers discussing prevalence and treatment utilization pattern were included as per PRISMA guidelines. Papers examining prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases used biochemical methods and standard protocol for diagnosis while studies on RTIs used different methods for diagnosis. The prevalence of RTIs has not changed much over the years and found to vary from 11% to 72% in the community-based studies. Stigma, embarrassment, illiteracy, lack of privacy, cost of care found to limit the use of services, but discussion on pathways of nonutilization remains unclear. Lack of methodological rigor, statistical power, specificity in case definitions as well as too little discussion on the limitation of selected method of diagnosis and reliance on observational evidence hampered the quality of studies on RTIs. Raising awareness among women regarding symptoms of RTIs and sexually transmitted infections and also about appropriate treatment has remained largely a neglected area and, therefore, we observed absence of health system studies in this area.

  17. Preparing States in India for Universal Health Coverage | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This expanded access has the potential to become a financial burden on households. This project aims to provide the evidence needed to support the rollout of universal health care in India. The Public Health Foundation of India, in collaboration with state-level institutions and decision-makers, will carry out the research.

  18. India's Unfinished Telecom Tasks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    India's Telecom Story is now well known · Indian Operators become an enviable force · At the same time · India Amongst the Leaders · Unfinished Tasks as Operators · LightGSM ON: Innovation for Rural Area from Midas · Broadband Access Options for India · Broadband driven by DSL: still too slow · Is Wireless the answer?

  19. Se comunican los investigadores

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Roncagliolo

    2015-01-01

    En Brasil se reunieron los investigadores de la comunicación de América Latina y del mundo (1992) El encuentro Latinoamericano fue en Embú-Guacú, poblado de la periferia de Sao Paulo, y el encuentro Mundial en Guarujá, balneario cercano al Puerto de Santos. La amplitud de la participación y la diversidad de temas y enfoques son indicios del desarrollo y dinamismo de la profesión.

  20. Se comunican los investigadores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Roncagliolo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available En Brasil se reunieron los investigadores de la comunicación de América Latina y del mundo (1992 El encuentro Latinoamericano fue en Embú-Guacú, poblado de la periferia de Sao Paulo, y el encuentro Mundial en Guarujá, balneario cercano al Puerto de Santos. La amplitud de la participación y la diversidad de temas y enfoques son indicios del desarrollo y dinamismo de la profesión.

  1. Evidences for the Formation of Chromium in the Unusual Oxidation State Cr(IV). I. Chemical Reactivity, Microhomogeneity, and Crystal Structures of the Nonstoichiometric Channel Compounds Tl xCr 5Se 8(0 ≤ x≤ 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, W.; Helmer, O.; Näther, C.

    1996-11-01

    The topotactic redox reaction between TlCr 5Se 8and bromine in acetonitrile leads to the formation of metastable samples with 0 ≤ xtransition metal chalcogenide crystallizing in the TlV 5S 8type structure with a Tl content xtopotactic redox reaction does not follow simple kinetics but is rather explained on the basis of the superposition of at least three different fundamental steps. EDAX investigations conducted on selected single crystals reveal that dependent on the deintercalation temperature, Tl is laterally inhomogeneous distributed along the needle axis which coincides with the crystallographic baxis. A pronounced maximum is observed at the middle of the crystals. In stoichiometric TlCr 5Se 8the detailed analysis of the anisotropic displacement parameters of the Tl atoms reveal that the Tl atoms are displaced from the central position by about 0.26 Å. As a consequence the Tl atoms are coordinated by seven Se atoms in an irregular coordination polyhedron. Since the positions x0 zare related by a center of symmetry they cannot be occupied simultaneously. Hence it must be assumed that TlCr 5Se 8has a domain structure with local symmetry Cm. In the Tl poorer phases the refinement of the Tl atoms at the central position leads to unusual high U22components. The observed microinhomogenity as well as an enhanced mobility and/or static disorder of the Tl atom within the channel may be responsible for this. The value for U11decreases with decreasing Tl content whereas U33is not affected. This observation is indicative for a different displacement of the Tl atoms from the central position. With respect to the possible reaction mechanisms, according to our structural investigations, the oxidation of monovalent Tl to trivalent Tl can be excluded. With decreasing Tl content the lattice parameters exhibit very anisotropic behavior, which is a direct consequence of the large changes of the interatomic Cr-Cr distances. The average as well as the nonbonding Se-Se distances

  2. La Edad Se Correlaciona Directamente con la Fuerza de los Estereotipos de Género: Evidencia Obtenida en una Tarea de Memoria de Reconocimiento Age Correlates Directly With Gender Stereotype Strength: Evidence From a Recognition Memory Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio E Chaigneau

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Varias teorías predicen una correlación directa entre edad y estereotipos. Sin embargo, los estudios que muestran este efecto típicamente comparan adultos mayores (> 55-60 años con adultos jóvenes. Por contraste, en el estudio que se reporta participaron 79 individuos de 18 a 60 años de nivel socioeconómico alto, alumnos y profesores de una universidad privada en Santiago de Chile que respondieron a una invitación masiva. El trabajo se enfoca en los estereotipos de género, preguntando si los adultos medios (k 40 años también muestran un nivel más elevado de estereotipos que los jóvenes. Se utilizó una tarea de memoria en la que los participantes leían listas de oraciones que describían a hombres y mujeres realizando actividades estereotipadas y neutras, y debían luego reconocerlas en listas que incluían además oraciones distractoras. Los datos se analizaron con ANOVAs mixtos, revelando que la muestra como un todo exhibía un mejor rendimiento de memoria para estímulos estereotipados para género que para estímulos neutros y que, como se predijo, los adultos medios mostraron un efecto casi 2 veces mayor que los jóvenes.Several theories predict a direct correlation between age and stereotypes. However, studies that show this effect typically compare older adults (> 55-60 years of age with young adults. Contrastingly, in the current study participants were 79 high-SES individuals between 18 and 60 years of age, students and professors of a private university in Santiago de Chile, who responded to a mass email. The work reported here focuses on gender stereotypes and asks whether middle aged adults (k 40 years of age also show a higher level of stereotypes than adolescents and young adults. A recognition memory task was used, in which participants read lists of sentences describing men and women carrying out stereotyped and neutral daily activities, and then had to recognize them intermixed with distractor sentences. Data were

  3. ZnSe/ZnSeTe Superlattice Nanotips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young SJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The authors report the growth of ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips on oxidized Si(100 substrate. It was found the nanotips exhibit mixture of cubic zinc-blende and hexagonal wurtzite structures. It was also found that photoluminescence intensities observed from the ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips were much larger than that observed from the homogeneous ZnSeTe nanotips. Furthermore, it was found that activation energies for the ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips with well widths of 16, 20, and 24 nm were 76, 46, and 19 meV, respectively.

  4. Search for evidence of lepton number violation by neutrinoless double beta decay process from 82Se and 150Nd in NEMO-3 experiment: Bi-Po decay study from thoron chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemiere, Y.

    2008-09-01

    The NEMO-3 experiment searches for a neutrinoless double beta decay signal (ββ0ν) with an expected sensitivity in terms of the half-life limit of the order of 10 24 years. The discovery of this signal, forbidden in the Standard Model, would imply the violation of leptonic number conservation and would allow to determine the nature of this particle (Dirac or Majorana) and measure the neutrino mass scale. The goal of this work is to study high energy events from 82 Se and 150 Nd ββ decay used in NEMO-3 detector. The first part of this work consists in the elaboration of a background model using NEMO-3 data. In the second part, the ββ2ν half-life and a lower limit of the ββ0ν half-life are computed using massive Majorana neutrino exchange hypothesis, we have got: T(0ν) > 1.44*10 22 years for 150 Nd and T(0ν) > 1.82*10 23 years for 82 Se. The upper limits for the effective mass of the Majorana neutrinos are also computed, we obtain: m ββ 150 Nd and m ββ 82 Se. In the last part, the measurement of some specific thallium contamination is performed thanks to the NEMO-3 capability to detect the 212 Bi-Po decay. The measured value of the surface contamination of the calorimeter is about (150 ± 30) μBq/m 3 . So the surface contamination is too low to intervene in the data analysis of NEMO-3 but appears important for next generation scintillators

  5. Política oriental de India: Mitos y realidades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidyanathan Shivkumar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available La política exterior de la India desde su independencia el 15 agosto de 1947, ha sido de cooperación y conciliación, y no de confrontación. Ésta podría haber sido ampliada cuando los infiltrados pakistaníes entraron en el territorio de la India en 1948, ya que el entonces Primer Ministro instó a que este asunto se remitiera al recién formado Consejo Mundial de Naciones Unidas. Si se recorre la historia, encontraríamos que las tres guerras entre India y Pakistán fueron iniciadas por Pakistán ante lo cual la India tuvo que defender su territorio. Similar situación surgió cuando China rompió unilateralmente el acuerdo de Pancha Sheel, invadiendo el territorio de la India. Este artículo hace un modesto intento de trazar la política de la India hacia el cercano oriente o hacia las naciones del sureste. Describe los vínculos históricos y culturales entre la India y las naciones del sur de Asia oriental y la consolidación definitiva de la “política hacia el oriente de la India”. En este artículo se toman en consideración los intereses económicos y estratégicos de la región y se espera que pudiera permitir a los lectores entender la política de la India hacia las naciones del sudeste de Asia.

  6. Nuclear India. Vol. II. [India's nuclear policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, J P

    1974-01-01

    The book contains 186 documents on India's nuclear policy covering a period from November 1948 to May 1974. It thus forms a comprehensive documentary account of India's nuclear policy. They include: texts of India's agreements for cooperation on the peaceful uses of atomic energy with the USA and Canada, the summary conclusions of India's atomic energy program for the decade 1970-80, the resolutions and amendments moved by India, the communications sent and the statements made by Indian representatives in various international forums--the conference of the IAEA statute, the Annual General Conference of the IAEA and its committees and the Board of Governors, the UN General Assembly and its First Committee, the conference of the Committee on Disarmaments etc. It also contains texts or extracts from the papers presented, statements made, and addresses and talks delivered by H. J. Bhabha, V. A. Sarabhai, H. N. Sethna and other eminent scientists at the international conferences on the peaceful uses of atomic energy, IAEA discussions on PNE, etc. Policy statements by India's Prime Ministers Nehru, Shastri and (Mrs.) Gandhi, and Foreign Ministers Chagla and Swaran Singh, made from time to time in the Lok Sabha and the Rajya Sabha--the two houses of the Indian parliaments--are also included. The sources of these documents are listed at the end. (MCB)

  7. Nurse migration from India: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Shelby L; Conroy, Shelley F; Bader, Susan Gerding

    2015-12-01

    A profound nursing shortage exists in India where nurses are increasingly outmigrating to practice nursing in surrounding countries and abroad. This is important globally because countries with the lowest nursing and healthcare workforce capacities have the poorest health outcomes. This review sought to synthesize and unify the evidence about nurse migration from India and includes a look at nurse retention within India. A comprehensive literature review was performed to synthesize and unify both qualitative and quantitative research. Bibliographic databases searched included CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and EconLit using associated keywords for empirical and descriptive literature published between January 2004 and May 2014. Hand searches of the Nursing Journal of India from 2004 to February 2014 and the Journal of Nursing Research Society of India from its inception in 2007-February 2014 were also completed. 29 studies were selected and analyzed for the review. Data were appraised for quality; reduced through sub-categorization; extracted; and coded into a framework. Thematic interpretation occurred through comparing and contrasting performed by multiple reviewers. Findings included an exponential growth in nurse recruitment efforts, nurse migration, and a concomitant growth in educational institutions within India with regional variations in nurse migration patterns. Decision-making factors for migration were based on working conditions, salience of family, and the desire for knowledge, skill, technology, adventure and personal enrichment. Challenges associated with migration included questionable recruiting practices, differing scopes of practice encountered after migration and experiences of racism and cultural differences. A shift toward a positive transformation of nursing status in India has resulted in an increased respect for individual nurses and the profession of nursing. This was attributed to the increased globalization of nursing. Results from this

  8. India, Octavio Paz y los retos de la multiculturalidad. Un ensayo sobre la diversidad cultural en India

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe Arocena

    2013-01-01

    Solo India y China pasan la barrera de los mil millones de habitantes y el siglo XXI los tendrá a ambos como protagonistas centrales. La transformación de la economía india y la modernización social incrementaron su velocidad en las últimas décadas, pero visibles rasgos de su cultura y su pobreza resultan difíciles de comprender para la mirada occidental. La exuberante multiculturalidad de la India se expresa en la coexistencia a veces explosiva de varias religiones (hindúes 81%, musulmanes 1...

  9. Palaeogene to Early Miocene sedimentary history of the Sierra Espuña (Malaguide complex, internal zone of the Betic cordilleras, SE Spain. Evidence for extra-Malaguide (Sardinian? provenance of oligocene conglomerates: Palaeogeographic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geel, T.

    1996-12-01

    discussed. It is shown that this large figure is at variance with geological data and partly due to erroneous field observations.La Sierra Espuña está situada al margen norte de la Zona Interna en la parte oriental de las Cordilleras Béticas y forma parte del Complejo Maláguide no metamórfico. Análisis paleontológico y sedimentológico de sedimentos de edad Eoceno al Aquitaniense del lado noroeste del Espuña han producido información nueva y de inesperada importancia respecto a la reconstrucción de la historia de la misma Sierra Espuña y del Maláguide en general. Los depósitos considerados del Eoceno superior (Auversiall son de edad Oligoceno inferior (P20 y contienen materiales supermaduros procedentes de fuera del dominio Maláguide. Los conglomerados con cantos calizos de Sierra Espuña (cientos de metros de espesor son de edad Oligoceno medio (P21 y representan un complejo de «fan deltas» en retroceso en el margen de una plataforma calcárea situada al nordeste de Sierra Espuña. Análisis de cantos podrían indicar que esta plataforma haya sido formada por parte del bloque del Norte de Cerdeña dado el predominio de fragmentos procedentes de una plataforma interior de edad Jurásico superior (calizas y dolomías con Clypeina y Trocholinu. Al contrario de los puntos de vista anteriores (Paquet, 1966; Lonergan, 1993, los conglomerados no pueden ser considerados como productos de erosión de unidades maláguides imbricadas. Por lo cual, uno de los argumentos más importantes en favor de una imbricación y colocación de mantos de corrimiento temprano (Eoceno superior-Oligoceno en Espuña es inválido. Se discuten otros argumentos en favor de movimientos tempranos, entre otros la sedimentación supuestamente continua del Eoceno hasta el Langhiense al noroeste de Sierra Espuña. Nuestros datos han demostrado la existencia de una interrupción estratigráfica desde el Aquitaniense medio hasta el Burdigaliense medio. Se presenta un modelo nuevo para la

  10. Comparing Development Trajectories in India and China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    This presentation intends to explore why the two development models in India and China differ fundamentally but also why they share a number of similarities. The aim is to entangle the internal dynamics and mutual relations between the two countries by utilizing a critical comparative political...... economy framework as the theoretical point of departure. The focus is whether regime form per se impacts development outcomes ie whether democracy vs authoritarianism impedes or promotes wealth creation, social order and inequality....

  11. Demand for healthcare in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh C. Purohit

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In a developing country like India, allocation of scarce fiscal resources has to be based on a clear understanding of how investments in the heath sector are going to affect demand. Three aspects like overall healthcare demand, consumer decisions to use public and/or private care and role of price/quality influencing poor/rich consumer’s decisions are critical to assessing the equity implications of alternative policies. Our paper addresses these aspects through examining the pattern of healthcare demand in India. Data from the National Family Health Survey are used to model the healthcare choices that individuals make. We consider what these behavioral characteristics imply for public policy. This analysis aims to study disparities between rural and urban areas from all throughout India to five Indian states representing three levels of per capita incomes (all-India average, rich and poor. Results evidence that healthcare demand both in rural and urban areas is a commodity emerging as an essential need. Choices between public or private provider are guided by income and quality variables mainly with regard to public healthcare denoting thus a situation of very limited alternatives in terms of availing private providers. These results emphasize that existing public healthcare facilities do not serve the objective of providing care to the poor in a satisfactory manner in rural areas. Thus, any financing strategy to improve health system and reduce disparities across rich-poor states and rural-urban areas should also take into account not only overcoming inadequacy but also inefficiency in allocation and utilization of healthcare inputs.

  12. Fossil wood evidences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Climate has played a crucial role in assigning a different kind of topography to Rajasthan and Gujarat since the Cenozoic time. Evidently, three genera, namely, Dipterocarpus Gaert. f., Hopea Roxb. And Shorea Roxb. of the Dipterocarpaceae are described from the Neogene sediments of western India (Rajasthan and ...

  13. Anochece en la India: una road movie vital

    OpenAIRE

    Zarzuela Lucea, Alba

    2016-01-01

    Chema Rodríguez ha conseguido que Anochece en la India nos atrape y emocione. Esta película canta a la vida, paradójicamente, y a la superación personal. Los espectadores se pueden ver movidos a reflexiones personales, a recorridos y viajes interiores. Todo ello lo consigue con un gran trabajo, muy arriesgado y poético, cuidando la historia y los aspectos que le dan vida en la pantalla. Nominada en los premios Goya al mejor guion adaptado, Anochece en la India se basa en la novela Anochece en...

  14. The Myths of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Frederick A.

    1988-01-01

    Stating that superficial stereotypes hinder the understanding of people and places, Day presents several well-known over-generalizations about India. Attempts to update readers about recent changes within the country while dispelling some popular myths. Discusses India's large population, poverty, economic growth, women's roles, and culture, along…

  15. African Journals Online: India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online: India. Home > African Journals Online: India. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free to read Titles This Journal is Open Access. Afghanistan ...

  16. HEALTH SCENARIO IN INDIA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. HEALTH SCENARIO IN INDIA. Health Doctor / Hospital Infant expenditure 1000 beds / 1000 mortality / % GDP 1000. India 0.8 0.47 0.8 71. World 2.6 1.5 3.3 54. Developed 6.1 2.8 7.2 6 Countries.

  17. Hydropower development in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Praveen [Govt. of India, New Delhi (India). Ministry of New and Renewable Energy], E-mail: psaxena_98@yahoo.com; Kumar, Arun [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand (India). Alternate Hydro Energy Centre], E-mail: aheciitr@gmail.com

    2011-04-15

    India is posed for large deployment of hydropower in present conducive policy and investment environment. Growing energy demand and concern for carbon emission is making hydropower development more favorable. The Government of India is ensuring a good performance of the new SHP stations by linking the incentives to the SHP developers with the performance of the station. (author)

  18. AREVA in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    India is the sixth largest energy consumer in the world and its demand is rising rapidly. To support its economic growth, estimated to be 8% on average over the last three years and to ensure access to electricity for all, the country foresees massive investments in its power sector over the next five years. India is therefore an essential market for the AREVA Group, where its Transmission and Distribution division plays a leading role on the strategic grid modernization market. This document presents: 1 - the economic situation in India: Key figures, Growth, India's growing need for electricity, India's energy sources and policy: current mix, driving role of the State, the financial reorganization of the SEBs, the 'Mega-Power' projects, the electricity act, the rural electrification program, the Investments. 2 - Civil nuclear energy: a strong potential for development; 3 - India's transmission and distribution network: the power challenge of the transmission network, the efficiency challenge of the distribution network. 4 - AREVA T and D in India: AREVA T and D profile, Areva's presence in India, market share, T and D customers and flagship projects

  19. ADULT EDUCATION IN INDIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    STYLER, W.E.

    AGAINST A BACKGROUND OF MASS ILLITERACY, POOR PAY AND STATUS OF TEACHERS, AND AN ALIEN EDUCATION PATTERN, THE STATE GOVERNMENTS OF INDIA HAVE PROVIDED SOCIAL EDUCATION FOR CITIZENSHIP AS WELL AS LITERACY. INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP METHODS HAVE BEEN USED, VIDYAPEETHS (RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES) AND EDUCATIONAL CENTERS HAVE BEEN SET UP, AND ALL INDIA RADIO…

  20. 'Whatever She May Study, She Can't Escape from Washing Dishes': Gender Inequity in Secondary Education--Evidence from a Longitudinal Study in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Renu; Mukherjee, Protap

    2018-01-01

    Using unique panel data from Young Lives study conducted in undivided Andhra Pradesh, India, this mixed-method paper analyses gender differentials in completion of secondary education. Results show biased secondary school completion rates in favor of boys. Probit regression results highlight certain variables such as mothers' education, wealth,…

  1. Molecular Evidence of Increased Resistance to Anti-Folate Drugs in Plasmodium falciparum in North-East India: A Signal for Potential Failure of Artemisinin Plus Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Pradyumna Kishore; Sarma, Devojit Kumar; Prakash, Anil; Bora, Khukumoni; Ahmed, Md. Atique; Sarma, Bibhas; Goswami, Basanta Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Dibya Ranjan; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2014-01-01

    North-east India, being a corridor to South-east Asia, is believed to play an important role in transmitting drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria to India and South Asia. North-east India was the first place in India to record the emergence of drug resistance to chloroquine as well as sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine. Presently chloroquine resistance is widespread all over the North-east India and resistance to other anti-malarials is increasing. In this study both in vivo therapeutic efficacy and molecular assays were used to screen the spectrum of drug resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in the circulating P. falciparum strains. A total of 220 P. falciparum positives subjects were enrolled in the study for therapeutic assessment of chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and assessment of point mutations conferring resistances to these drugs were carried out by genotyping the isolates following standard methods. Overall clinical failures in sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and chloroquine were found 12.6 and 69.5% respectively, while overall treatment failures recorded were 13.7 and 81.5% in the two arms. Nearly all (99.0%) the isolates had mutant pfcrt genotype (76T), while 68% had mutant pfmdr-1 genotype (86Y). Mutation in dhps 437 codon was the most prevalent one while dhfr codon 108 showed 100% mutation. A total of 23 unique haplotypes at the dhps locus and 7 at dhfr locus were found while dhps-dhfr combined loci revealed 49 unique haplotypes. Prevalence of double, triple and quadruple mutations were common while 1 haplotype was found with all five mutated codons (F/AGEGS/T) at dhps locus. Detection of quadruple mutants (51I/59R/108N/164L) in the present study, earlier recorded from Car Nicobar Island, India only, indicates the presence of high levels of resistance to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in north-east India. Associations between resistant haplotypes and the clinical outcomes and emerging resistance in sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in

  2. Nuclear policy for India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, B.M.

    1977-01-01

    Changes in India's nuclear policy from time to time are discussed. Though firmly wedded to the principle of peaceful uses of nuclear energy, India did not sign in 1965 the NPT as it discriminated between nuclear weapons powers and non-nuclear weapon powers as regards the safeguards. India wanted to keep open the option of conducting peaceful nuclear explosions (PNEs). In May 1974, India did conduct a PNE which, however, resulted into the stoppage of Canadian aid for India's nuclear power programme and created difficulties in obtaining enriched uranium for the Tarapur Atomic Power Station from the U.S.. The new Indian Government formed after the March 1977 general electtions has endorsed the earlier government's policy of opposing manufacture of nuclear weapons and has gone a step further by declearing 'If it (PNE) not necessary it should never be done'. (M.G.B.)

  3. Geomorphic and Structural Evidence for Rolling Hinge Style Deformation in the Footwall of an Active Low Angle Normal Fault, Mai'iu Fault, Woodlark Rift, SE Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizera, M.; Little, T.; Norton, K. P.; Webber, S.; Ellis, S. M.; Oesterle, J.

    2016-12-01

    While shown to operate in oceanic crust, rolling hinge style deformation remains a debated process in metamorpic core complexes (MCCs) in the continents. The model predicts that unloading and isostatic uplift during slip causes a progressive back-tilting in the upper crust of a normal fault that is more steeply dipping at depth. The Mai'iu Fault in the Woodlark Rift, SE Papua New Guinea, is one of the best-exposed and fastest slipping (probably >7 mm/yr) active low-angle normal faults (LANFs) on Earth. We analysed structural field data from this fault's exhumed slip surface and footwall, together with geomorphic data interpreted from aerial photographs and GeoSAR-derived digital elevation models (gridded at 5-30 m spacing), to evaluate deformational processes affecting the rapidly exhuming, domal-shaped detachment fault. The exhumed fault surface emerges from the ground at the rangefront near sea level with a northward dip of 21°. Up-dip, it is well-preserved, smooth and corrugated, with some fault remnants extending at least 29 km in the slip direction. The surface flattens over the crest of the dome, beyond where it dips S at up to 15°. Windgaps perched on the crestal main divide of the dome, indicate both up-dip tectonic advection and progressive back-tilting of the exhuming fault surface. We infer that slip on a serial array of m-to-km scale up-to-the-north, steeply S-dipping ( 75°) antithetic-sense normal faults accommodated some of the exhumation-related, inelastic bending of the footwall. These geomorphically well expressed faults strike parallel to the main Mai'iu fault at 110.9±5°, have a mean cross-strike spacing of 1520 m, and slip with a consistent up-to-the-north sense of throw ranging from <5 m to 120 m. Apparently the Mai'iu Fault was able to continue slipping despite having to negotiate this added fault-roughness. We interpret the antithetic faulting to result from bending stresses, and to provide the first clear examples of rolling hinge

  4. India's baseline plan for nuclear energy self-sufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucher, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    India's nuclear energy strategy has traditionally strived for energy self-sufficiency, driven largely by necessity following trade restrictions imposed by the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) following India's 'peaceful nuclear explosion' of 1974. On September 6, 2008, the NSG agreed to create an exception opening nuclear trade with India, which may create opportunities for India to modify its baseline strategy. The purpose of this document is to describe India's 'baseline plan,' which was developed under constrained trade conditions, as a basis for understanding changes in India's path as a result of the opening of nuclear commerce. Note that this treatise is based upon publicly available information. No attempt is made to judge whether India can meet specified goals either in scope or schedule. In fact, the reader is warned a priori that India's delivery of stated goals has often fallen short or taken a significantly longer period to accomplish. It has been evident since the early days of nuclear power that India's natural resources would determine the direction of its civil nuclear power program. It's modest uranium but vast thorium reserves dictated that the country's primary objective would be thorium utilization. Estimates of India's natural deposits vary appreciably, but its uranium reserves are known to be extremely limited, totaling approximately 80,000 tons, on the order of 1% of the world's deposits; and nominally one-third of this ore is of very low uranium concentration. However, India's roughly 300,000 tons of thorium reserves account for approximately 30% of the world's total. Confronted with this reality, the future of India's nuclear power industry is strongly dependent on the development of a thorium-based nuclear fuel cycle as the only way to insure a stable, sustainable, and autonomous program. The path to India's nuclear energy self-sufficiency was first outlined in a seminal paper by Drs. H. J. Bhabha and N. B. Prasad presented at the Second

  5. India's future: it's about jobs

    OpenAIRE

    Geoffrey N. Keim; Beth Anne Wilson

    2007-01-01

    Projections of sustained strong growth in India depend importantly on the utilization of the huge increase in India's working-age population projected over the next two decades. To date, however, India's economic growth has been concentrated in high-skill and capital-intensive sectors, and has not generated strong employment growth. In this paper, we highlight the tension between India's performance in output and employment, describe the characteristics of India's demographic dividend, and di...

  6. Smokeless tobacco use in India: Role of prices and advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostova, Deliana; Dave, Dhaval

    2015-08-01

    Although the primary form of tobacco use worldwide is cigarette smoking, the large majority of users in India consume smokeless forms of tobacco. There is little evidence on the role of policy-related factors in shaping the demand for smokeless tobacco (ST) in India. This study evaluates the relationship between two such factors, prices and advertising, and ST use in India, using data on 67,737 individuals from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) India 2009. We find that ST advertising is more likely to influence ST consumption in women than men, while men are more likely to respond to changes in ST price. We estimate that among adult males in India, the total price elasticity of ST demand is -0.212, which is close to estimates reported for males in the U.S. We do not find strong direct evidence on the economic substitutability or complementarity of smoked and smokeless products. However, the positive association between former smoking and current smokeless use may point to temporal substitutability at the individual level. The findings have implications on the relative effectiveness of policy tools across genders in India - increasing the prices of ST products may discourage ST use particularly among men, and advertising restrictions may play a relatively larger role in the consumption behavior of women in India. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Clinical trials in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Rituparna; M, Raghavendra

    2007-07-01

    The concept of outsourcing for the development and global studies on new drugs has become widely accepted in the pharmaceutical industry due to its cost and uncertainty. India is going to be the most preferred location for contract pharma research and development due to its huge treatment naïve population, human resources, technical skills, adoption/amendment/implementation of rules/laws by regulatory authorities, and changing economic environment. But still 'miles to go' to fulfill the pre-requisites to ensure India's success. In spite of all the pitfalls, the country is ambitious and optimist to attract multinational pharmaceutical companies to conduct their clinical trials in India.

  8. Reconsidering Gender Bias in Intra-Household Allocation in India

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Detecting gender discrimination among children in the intra-household allocation of goods from household surveys has often proven to be difficult. This paper uses some of the commonly used techniques in this field to analyze education expenditures in India. Contrary to most previous research, I find evidence of discrimination against girls. Results at the all-India level are robust to the statistical method and the education expenditure measure, while they are more sensitive to changes in the...

  9. Female married illiteracy as the most important continual determinant of total fertility rate among districts of Empowered Action Group States of India: Evidence from Annual Health Survey 2011–12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: District level determinants of total fertility rate in Empowered Action Group states of India can help in ongoing population stabilization programs in India. Objective: Present study intends to assess the role of district level determinants in predicting total fertility rate among districts of the Empowered Action Group states of India. Material and Methods: Data from Annual Health Survey (2011-12 was analysed using STATA and R software packages. Multiple linear regression models were built and evaluated using Akaike Information Criterion. For further understanding, recursive partitioning was used to prepare a regression tree. Results: Female married illiteracy positively associated with total fertility rate and explained more than half (53% of variance. Under multiple linear regression model, married illiteracy, infant mortality rate, Ante natal care registration, household size, median age of live birth and sex ratio explained 70% of total variance in total fertility rate. In regression tree, female married illiteracy was the root node and splits at 42% determined TFR = 2.7. The next left side branch was again married illiteracy with splits at 23% to determine TFR = 2.1. Conclusion: We conclude that female married illiteracy is one of the most important determinants explaining total fertility rate among the districts of an Empowered Action Group states. Focus on female literacy is required to stabilize the population growth in long run.

  10. Female married illiteracy as the most important continual determinant of total fertility rate among districts of Empowered Action Group States of India: Evidence from Annual Health Survey 2011-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Dogra, Vishal; Rani, Khushbu; Sahu, Kanti

    2017-01-01

    District level determinants of total fertility rate in Empowered Action Group states of India can help in ongoing population stabilization programs in India. Present study intends to assess the role of district level determinants in predicting total fertility rate among districts of the Empowered Action Group states of India. Data from Annual Health Survey (2011-12) was analysed using STATA and R software packages. Multiple linear regression models were built and evaluated using Akaike Information Criterion. For further understanding, recursive partitioning was used to prepare a regression tree. Female married illiteracy positively associated with total fertility rate and explained more than half (53%) of variance. Under multiple linear regression model, married illiteracy, infant mortality rate, Ante natal care registration, household size, median age of live birth and sex ratio explained 70% of total variance in total fertility rate. In regression tree, female married illiteracy was the root node and splits at 42% determined TFR illiteracy with splits at 23% to determine TFR illiteracy is one of the most important determinants explaining total fertility rate among the districts of an Empowered Action Group states. Focus on female literacy is required to stabilize the population growth in long run.

  11. Female married illiteracy as the most important continual determinant of total fertility rate among districts of Empowered Action Group States of India: Evidence from Annual Health Survey 2011–12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Dogra, Vishal; Rani, Khushbu; Sahu, Kanti

    2017-01-01

    Background: District level determinants of total fertility rate in Empowered Action Group states of India can help in ongoing population stabilization programs in India. Objective: Present study intends to assess the role of district level determinants in predicting total fertility rate among districts of the Empowered Action Group states of India. Material and Methods: Data from Annual Health Survey (2011-12) was analysed using STATA and R software packages. Multiple linear regression models were built and evaluated using Akaike Information Criterion. For further understanding, recursive partitioning was used to prepare a regression tree. Results: Female married illiteracy positively associated with total fertility rate and explained more than half (53%) of variance. Under multiple linear regression model, married illiteracy, infant mortality rate, Ante natal care registration, household size, median age of live birth and sex ratio explained 70% of total variance in total fertility rate. In regression tree, female married illiteracy was the root node and splits at 42% determined TFR illiteracy with splits at 23% to determine TFR illiteracy is one of the most important determinants explaining total fertility rate among the districts of an Empowered Action Group states. Focus on female literacy is required to stabilize the population growth in long run. PMID:29416999

  12. Rapid growth within India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Indian government has published (in Hydrocarbon Vision 2025) its ideas for a long term strategy for its oil industry which is currently growing at an unprecedented rate. Increasing domestic production and investment in oil exploration and production overseas figure strongly in the plan. At present, India has a refining surplus but with an annual growth of 8-10%, this will disappear in the next 2-3 years. The report recommends that India should maintain 90% self-sufficiency in refining. The report sees development of the domestic oil industry as globally competitive and helping safeguard India's assets. The capability of India's refineries, current upgrading, the newer refineries and plans for new projects are all mentioned

  13. India's nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    India made an early commitment to being as self-sufficient as possible in nuclear energy and has largely achieved that goal. The country operates eight nuclear reactors with a total capacity of 1,304 MWe, and it remains committed to an aggressive growth plan for its nuclear industry, with six reactors currently under construction, and as many as twelve more planned. India also operates several heavy water production facilities, fabrication facilities, reprocessing works, and uranium mines and mills. Due to India's decision not to sign the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the country has had to develop nearly all of its nuclear industry and infrastructure domestically. Overall, India's nuclear power program is self-contained and well integrated, with plans to expand to provide up to ten percent of the country's electrical generating capacity

  14. Energy India 'dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygler, C.

    2007-01-01

    India has an economic growth between 8 to 10 % by year. To become a great country of the twenty first century and to stop poverty it is necessary to keep this growth but the growth of India is dependant of its ability to supply electric power necessary to increase the industrial production. The country has to multiply by four its energy production. The electric production comes from thermal power plants for 65%, 26% from hydroelectric power plants, 6% from renewable energy sources and 3% from nuclear energy. Between solar energy ( India has three hundred solar days by years) and nuclear energy using thorium that can be increased India has to choose an energy policy to answer its energy demand and independence need. (N.C.)

  15. IDRC in India

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    challenges facing India. The Centre's past support ... are tackling some pressing problems in wireless ... policymakers improve workers' earnings and working ... since 1974. Many of the telecentre managers that IDRC helps to train are women.

  16. Women Scientists in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    participate in large numbers not just in learning ... earlier reports and give a summary of the situation .... noting best practices and recommendations that ..... service. This certainly has helped women working in organizations. In fact India has ...

  17. PRESENT STATUS IN INDIA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. PRESENT STATUS IN INDIA. FIXED LINES – 36 MILLION. MOBILE CONNECTIONS – 14 MILLION. TELEDENSITY APPROXIMATELY 5. INTERNET CONNECTIONS – 5 MILLION. INTERNET USERS NEARLY – 25 MILLION.

  18. IDRC in India

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    India has experienced impressive economic growth over the ... and those still living in poverty is widening. ... IDRC supports research to improve women's security, access to justice, and economic ... viction rates for offenders remain low. This.

  19. India : the new China?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanavaty, K. [Reliance Industries Ltd., Mumbai (India). Cracker and Polymer Div.

    2006-07-01

    India is emerging as a strong force in the global economy. The population of China is 1.2 times that of India, and its gross domestic product is 2.5 times that of India. However, analyses of per capita gross domestic product (GDP) indicate that if India continues its rate of growth, its' consumption and production will reach China's current levels in less than 15 years. This represents a significant investment opportunity in basic industry, particularly since a growing middle class will ensure a boom in consumer products consumption. This presentation compared India and China, in terms of economic approaches and challenges for India. Implications for the petrochemical industry were also discussed with reference to Reliance Industries Ltd. and its full integration in the value chain with petroleum refining. Reliance Industries Ltd. claims that India's captive utilities and labour productivity provide the company with conversion costs that are among the lowest in the industry. In terms of agriculture, India is one of the largest producers of agricultural commodities in the world and is well supported by varying agro-climates and fertile land. This presentation also included an agro-commodities yield comparison for rice, wheat and cereal. The Indian manufacturing industry is also competitive, focusing on cutting cost, increasing productivity and innovation. It was noted that although China has the advantage of a well established infrastructure on a global and domestic scale as well as job opportunities and quick policy implementation, it has lax labour laws, poor pollution laws and a challenging banking system. In contrast, India has the entrepreneurial advantage as well as global scale information technology, a globally competitive manufacturing industry, an independent regulatory framework and world class capital markets and banking system. India's challenge lies in its lack of a world-class infrastructure, complicated tax structure and slow

  20. Extended analyses of Se VII and Se VIII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vankleef, Th.A.M.; Joshi, Y.N.

    1984-01-01

    Joshi et al. (1984) have conducted an analysis of the 3d8 4s-3d8 4p transitions in As VII. The present investigation is concerned with an analysis of similar transitions in Se VIII. The selenium spectrum was photographed in the 400-1200-A wavelength region on a variety of normal-incidence spectrographs. Attention is given to least-squares-fit (LSF) and Hartree-Fock (HF) parameter values for the 3d9 4d configuration of Se VII, LSF and HF parameter values for the 3d8 4s and 3d8 4p configurations of Se VIII, the energy and composition of the levels of the 3d9 4d configuration of Se VII, classified lines in Se VII, energy levels and composition of the 3d8 4s configuration and the revised and newly determined levels of the 3d8 4p configuration of Se VIII, and newly classified lines of Se VIII. 15 references

  1. Gestational surrogacy in India

    OpenAIRE

    Rozée , Virginie; Unisa , Sayeed; De La Rochebrochard , Elise

    2016-01-01

    International audience; While gestational surrogacy is illegal in France, it is authorized in other countries, such as India. Drawing upon a study of Indian surrogates, Indian and foreign intended parents pursuing surro­gacy, as well as physicians, lawyers and Indian clinic and agency managers, Virginie Rozée, Sayeed Unisa and Elise de La Rochebrochard describe how surrogacy services are organized in India and examine the expectations and rationales of the protagonists.

  2. India's Downstream Petroleum Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This study provides a holistic examination of pricing and investment dynamics in India's downstream petroleum sector. It analyses the current pricing practices, highlights the tremendous fiscal cost of current pricing and regulatory arrangements, and examines the sectoral investment dynamics. It also looks at potential paths towards market-based reform along which the Indian government may move, while at the same time protecting energy market access for India's large poor population.

  3. Girl child in rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendra, K

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the status of the girl child in rural India. Rural children lack the advantages of modern amenities and facilities, such as transportation, electricity, media, hygiene, health care, and access to education. A young girl's status is related to her mother's status. Women are valued the most when a son is born. Girl children are considered an economic liability in child care costs, dowry costs, and marriage support. Since the 1970s, dowry demands have increased. Daughters must meet the demands of prospective in-law for education and dowry even after marriage. The attitudes of parents, families, and society encourage sex-selective abortion, infanticide, abuse in childhood, and domestic violence in adulthood. It was reported in 1994 that a woman is molested every 26 minutes and raped every 52 minutes. The government of India developed an action plan in 1992 for developing the girl child. Rural girl children spend their time cooking, cleaning, fetching wood and water, caring for children, and working in the fields sowing, transplanting, and weeding. Girl children contribute over 20% of total work at home. The only advantage a girl child has in rural areas is visibility. The greatest disadvantage is that her mother, who faced neglect herself, discriminates against her. Increasingly girl children contribute income to their household from Beedi making, gem polishing, embroidering, or paper bag making. Sometimes girls and boys work in hazardous occupations. Gender disparity is evident in school enrollment, drop out rates, literacy, and employment. In 1994, India passed a universal female education bill that offers parents incentives for access and punishment for keeping a girl out of school. Communities need to create a demand for rural girl children's education.

  4. PHEIFFER SE TAALPOLITIEK JC Steyn

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sigself maak tog nie Chomsky se teorie oor n aangebore taalaanleg en die konsekwensie daarvan nl. dat elke taal opgebou moet wees volgens dieselfde grondprinsipes, ongeldig nie? Taalpolitieke oortuigingskrag het hierdie argument nog minder. Sal jy in alle erns vir mense kan se: "Ons moet aanhou om die taal te praat ...

  5. History of Nuclear India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Ram

    2000-04-01

    India emerged as a free and democratic country in 1947, and entered into the nuclear age in 1948 by establishing the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), with Homi Bhabha as the chairman. Later on the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) was created under the Office of the Prime Minister Jawahar Lal Nehru. Initially the AEC and DAE received international cooperation, and by 1963 India had two research reactors and four nuclear power reactors. In spite of the humiliating defeat in the border war by China in 1962 and China's nuclear testing in 1964, India continued to adhere to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. On May 18, 1974 India performed a 15 kt Peaceful Nuclear Explosion (PNE). The western powers considered it nuclear weapons proliferation and cut off all financial and technical help, even for the production of nuclear power. However, India used existing infrastructure to build nuclear power reactors and exploded both fission and fusion devices on May 11 and 13, 1998. The international community viewed the later activity as a serious road block for the Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty; both deemed essential to stop the spread of nuclear weapons. India considers these treaties favoring nuclear states and is prepared to sign if genuine nuclear disarmament is included as an integral part of these treaties.

  6. India's nuclear security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Raju G.C.; Gupta, Amit

    2000-01-01

    The nuclear weapons and ballistic missile tests conducted by India and Pakistan in the late 1990s substantially altered the security environment, both in the region and globally. Examining the complexities, and dynamics of this new strategic context, this timely and significant book examines the claim of many Indian strategists that stability in the region is better served under conditions of declared-rather than covertly developed-nuclear weapons. Bringing together original essays by a diverse group of scholars, this volume discusses a number of important issues such as: the political considerations that caused India and Pakistan to go nuclear; the type of nuclear doctrine that is likely to emerge and its implications for the safety of nuclear weapons, the potential for an arms race in the region, and the likelihood of war; the political and economic consequences for India after Pokhran-II and the impact of economic sanctions; the technological ramifications of the nuclear program on India's defence science scenario; the impact of these tests on the future of India's relationship with the United States, the main bulwark against nuclear weapons proliferation, also, the changed role that India sees for itself in international fora; the possible arms control measures that might succeed in stabilizing the South Asian nuclear rivalry. This insightful, comprehensive and topical volume is a must-read for all those in the fields of political science, international relations, strategic affairs, conflict/peace studies, economics, and policy studies

  7. Structural and optical properties of electron beam evaporated CdSe ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    ECMS Division, Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630 006, India. † ... (0 0 2) direction of films has been confirmed by the X-ray diffraction analysis. The films ... CdSe is a direct band gap semiconductor belonging to the.

  8. Limits to Economic Growth: Why Direct Investments Are Needed to Address Child Undernutrition in India

    OpenAIRE

    Subramanian, S V; Subramanyam, Malavika A

    2015-01-01

    About two of every five undernourished young children of the world live in India. These high levels of child undernutrition have persisted in India for several years, even in its relatively well-developed states. Moreover, this pattern was observed during a period of rapid economic growth. Evidence from India and other developing countries suggests that economic growth has little to no impact on reducing child undernutrition. We argue that a growth-mediated strategy is unlikely to be effectiv...

  9. Sample Set (SE): SE10 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE10 Effect of phosphorus nutrition for cabbage metabolites Investigation of Brassi...ca oleracea var. capitata Hatukoi leaf metabolites. 3 growth conditions (high, low and no phosphorus nutrition

  10. Sample Set (SE): SE30 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE30 Comparison of seed metabolites among soybean varieties Investigation of Glycine max. green seed metabol...ites. 3 varieties (Kamogawashichiri, Koitozairai, Tanbakuro) data are examined. Tak

  11. Sample Set (SE): SE13 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE13 Comparison of leaf metabolites among spinach varieties Investigation of Spinacia oleracea leaf metaboli...tes. 4 cultivers (Nihon, Kanaji, Kurohaminstarland and Wasesaradaakari) and 3 repli

  12. Sample Set (SE): SE31 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE31 Comparison of seed metabolites among eggplant fruit tissues Investigation of S...olanum melongena Senryounigou metabolites. 3 tissues (flesh, fruit, peel) data are examined. Takeshi Ara 1,

  13. Sample Set (SE): SE28 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE28 Comparison of leaf metabolites among developmental stages of Hevea brasiliensi...s Investigation of Hevea brasiliensis leaf metabolites. 4 developmental stages and 6 replicates data are exa

  14. Sample Set (SE): SE53 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE53 Covering chemical diversity of genetically-modified tomatoes using metabolomics...signature. We conclude that multi-platform metabolomics is an approach that is both sensitive and robust and

  15. Sample Set (SE): SE26 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE26 Effect of compost for cabbage metabolites Investigation of Brassica oleracea v...ar. capitata YR Seisyun leaf metabolites. 2 growth conditions (with or without 6t compost treatment) and 3 r

  16. Sample Set (SE): SE20 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE20 Arabidopsis thaliana leaf metabolite analysis for a software test Investigatio...es that were investigated to optimize the parameters of PowerGet software for better metabolite annotation i

  17. Sample Set (SE): SE16 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE16 Effect of agricultural films for spinach leaf metabolites 2 Investigation of S...pinacia oleracea leaf metabolites. 3 growth conditions (covered with normal or UV cut agricultural film or no agricultura

  18. Sample Set (SE): SE14 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE14 Effect of agricultural films for tomato fruit metabolites Investigation of Sol...anum lycopersicum fruit metabolites. 3 growth conditions (covered with normal or UV cut agricultural film or no agricultura

  19. Sample Set (SE): SE18 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available in by Orbitrap MS and automated search engine Lipid Search A comprehensive and precise identification of pho...SE18 Global identification of phospholipid molecular species in mouse liver and bra

  20. Cyclic Activity of Mud Volcanoes: Evidences from Trinidad (SE Caribbean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, E.

    2007-12-01

    Fluid and solid transfer in mud volcanoes show different phases of activity, including catastrophic events followed by periods of relative quiescence characterized by moderate activity. This can be notably shown by historical data onshore Trinidad. Several authors have evoked a possible link between the frequencies of eruption of some mud volcanoes and seismic activity, but in Trinidad there is no direct correlation between mud eruptions and seisms. It appears that each eruptive mud volcano has its own period of catastrophic activity, and this period is highly variable from one volcano to another. The frequency of activity of mud volcanoes seems essentially controlled by local pressure regime within the sedimentary pile. At the most, a seism can, in some cases, activate an eruption close to its term. The dynamics of expulsion of the mud volcanoes during the quiescence phases has been studied notably from temperature measurements within the mud conduits. The mud temperature is concurrently controlled by, either, the gas flux (endothermic gas depressurizing induces a cooling effect), or by the mud flux (mud is a vector for convective heat transfer). Complex temperature distribution was observed in large conduits and pools. Indeed, especially in the bigger pools, the temperature distribution characterizes convective cells with an upward displacement of mud above the deep outlet, and ring-shaped rolls associated with the burial of the mud on the flanks of the pools. In simple, tube-like shaped, narrow conduits, the temperature is more regular, but we observed different types of profiles, with either downward increasing or decreasing temperatures. If the upward flow of mud would be regular, we should expect increasing temperatures and progressively decreasing gradient with depth within the conduits. However, the variable measured profiles from one place to another, as well as time-variable measured temperatures within the conduits and especially, at the base of the conduits, shows that the fluid flow expelled by the studied mud volcanoes is not constant but highly variable through short time-periods. We notably observed very short time-period cyclic variations with a frequency of about 10 minutes. These high frequencies temperature changes could be related to the dynamics of two-phase flows (gas and mud) through the mud volcano conduits. We also observed locally a significant daily changes of the temperature of the expelled mud which shows also that the mud flux is changing very rapidly from one day to another.

  1. Kinematics and 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology of the Gaoligong and Chongshan shear systems, western Yunnan, China: Implications for early Oligocene tectonic extrusion of SE Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuejun; Fan, Weiming; Zhang, Yanhua; Peng, Touping; Chen, Xinyue; Xu, Yigang

    2006-06-01

    The Gaoligong and Chongshan shear systems (GLSS and CSSS) in western Yunnan, China, have similar tectonic significance to the Ailaoshan-Red River shear system (ASRRSS) during the Cenozoic tectonic development of the southeastern Tibetan syntaxis. To better understand their kinematics and the Cenozoic tectonic evolution of SE Asia, this paper presents new kinematic and 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronological data for these shear systems. All the structural and microstructural evidence indicate that the GLSS is a dextral strike-slip shear system while the CSSS is a sinistral strike-slip shear system, and both were developed under amphibolite- to greenschist-grade conditions. The 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of synkinematic minerals revealed that the strike-slip shearing on the GLSS and CSSS at least began at ˜ 32 Ma, possibly coeval with the onset of other major shear systems in SE Asia. The late-stage shearing on the GLSS and CSSS is dated at ˜ 27-29 Ma by the biotite 40Ar/ 39Ar ages, consistent with that of the Wang Chao shear zone (WCSZ), but ˜ 10 Ma earlier than that of the ASRRSS. The dextral Gaoligong shear zone within the GLSS may have separated the India plate from the Indochina Block during early Oligocene. Combined with other data in western Yunnan, we propose that the Baoshan/Southern Indochina Block escaped faster southeastward along the CSSS to the east and the GLSS to the west than the Northern Indochina Block along the ASRRSS, accompanying with the obliquely northward motion of the India plate during early Oligocene (28-36 Ma). During 28-17 Ma, the Northern Indochina Block was rotationally extruded along the ASRRSS relative to the South China Block as a result of continuously impinging of the India plate.

  2. Señas Mexicano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. García Mejía

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se muestra un sistema que permite el estudio y práctica del Lenguaje de Señas Mexicano (LMS, el cual es el método de comunicación de las personas que padecen un trastorno de procesamiento auditivo. El sistema propuesto en este artículo consta de un guante de tela instrumentado con sensores de flexión, una etapa de acondicionamiento de señales y una tarjeta de adquisición de datos; que en su conjunto constituyen el Hardware. El software esta formado por un programa de adquisición de datos y una interfaz de usuario, ambos codificados en Visual Basic Net. El sistema propuesto se modela por medio del lenguaje de modelado unificado (UML, ya que Visual Basic es un lenguaje orientado a eventos.

  3. Porøse materialer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place

    2000-01-01

    Dette undervisningsnotat er en samling af noter, der refererer til den indledende del af kurset Materialmekanik og Porøse materailer på Insitut for Bærende Konstruktiner og Materialer (BKM).......Dette undervisningsnotat er en samling af noter, der refererer til den indledende del af kurset Materialmekanik og Porøse materailer på Insitut for Bærende Konstruktiner og Materialer (BKM)....

  4. Apolipoprotein E polymorphism in India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, P; Singh, M; Gerdes, Lars Ulrik

    2001-01-01

    to be the highest (0.913) in Ramgarhia in comparison to forty-one populations of the world. A decreasing cline from south to north was evident for *E2 and *E4 allele frequencies (y = -0.002x + 0.141, r = 0.78 and y = -0.004x + 0.229, r = 0.83, respectively, and an increasing cline for the *E3 allele towards north......, India. Three alleles APOE*E2, APOE*E3 and APOE*E4 were observed in Ramgarhia and Ramdasia with the frequencies of 0.031, 0.913, 0.056 and 0.043, 0.886 and 0.071, respectively. Higher heterozygosity (20.8%) in Ramdasia reflects greater variation at the APOE locus. The APOE*E3 allele is found...

  5. India's nuclear spin-off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, Ravi.

    1974-01-01

    After examining world-wide reactions of the foreign governments and news media to the India's peaceful nuclear experiment (PNE) in the Rajasthan Desert on 18 May 1974, development of nuclear technology in India is assessed and its economic advantages are described. Implications of the Non-Proliferation Treaty are explained. Psychological impact of India's PNE on India's neighbours and superpowers and associated political problems in context of proliferation of nuclear weapons are discussed in detail. (M.G.B.)

  6. Technical vocational education in India

    OpenAIRE

    溝上, 智恵子

    1999-01-01

    In India, several efforts have been made for the development of skilled manpower during the last twenty years since the launch of formal technical vocational education at school. A huge education infrastructure has developed in India. However, 45~50 percent of the population of India is still illiterate. To solve the mismatch between education and employment, a revolution in education is really needed. Additionally, there is a need for a system of National Vocational Qualifications in India a...

  7. Fiscal Discipline in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanhita SUCHARITA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study broadly attempts to analyze the role of Fiscal Responsibility and Budget Management Act in restoring fiscal balance in India. It analyses the need for fiscal rules and constraints in India. The study aims at finding out the major factor behind rising fiscal imbalance in India and to examine whether there is an electoral motive towards high fiscal deficit to GDP ratio or not. It also analyzes the effectiveness of various measures undertaken at the central and state level to inculcate fiscal discipline in the fiscal management. The study also makes an attempt to do a critical in depth reviews of the Fiscal Responsibility and Budget Management Act and make an attempt at examining effectiveness and suitability of FRBM Act through a quantitative analysis. It also makes an attempt to suggest improvements in the fiscal monitoring mechanism in India. We employ Ordinary Least Square (OLS method to examine the impact of Fiscal Responsibility and Budget Management Act on fiscal deficit in India using the data for the period 1980-81 to 2008-09. The regression results indicates that FRBM Act does not have a significant effect on the Gross Fiscal Deficit (GFD to GDP ratio where as GDP (at factor cost growth rate has a significant negative effect on the GFD to GDP ratio.

  8. Venereology in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devinder Mohan Thappa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Venereology-the study of venereal diseases or more recently, the sexually transmitted infections (STI includes a variety of pathogens namely viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoa for which the common factor is the mode of transmission and acquisition: Sexual relations between human beings. Medical and other historians have often suggested that well-known diseases such as syphilis, gonorrhea, chancroid and lymphogranuloma venereum have existed since earliest times. However, it is difficult to identify modern disease entities based on written historical record. Studying the origin of STIs helps us to learn the political, economic and moral conditions that led to the disease. Effective management of STI rests on three pillars of diagnosis, prevention and treatment. For most of past 50 years in India, the diagnostic pillar has been the least well-supported. Until well into present century, diagnosis of STI in India was clinical. Treatment of STIs in India followed the methods used in England. Of course in the 19th century, in many parts of the world, only a few had access to modern methods of treatment; in India, there was extensive use of Ayurvedic treatment with traditional medicines. This article thus gives just an overview and evolution of venereology in India with regard to venereal diseases (now more often known as STIs/disease, control measures, academic, association and journal development and finally future perspective.

  9. Se-Se isoelectronic centers in high purity CdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najjar, Rita; Andre, Regis; Mariette, Henri [CEA-CNRS, Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs, Institut Neel, 25 rue des martyrs, 38042 Grenoble (France); Golnik, Andrzej; Kossacki, Piotr; Gaj, Jan A. [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-06-15

    We evidence zero-dimensional exciton states trapped on isoelectronic Se centers in CdTe quantum wells, {delta}-doped with Se. Thanks to special precautions taken to have very high purity CdTe heterostructures, it is possible to observe, in photoluminescence spectra, sharp discrete lines arising from individual centers related to the Se doping. These emission lines appear at about 40 meV below the CdTe band gap energy. The most prominent lines are attributed to the recombination of excitons bound to nearest-neighbor selenium pairs in a tetrahedral CdTe environment. This assignment is confirmed by a common linear polarization direction of the emitted light, parallel to <110>. These excitons localized on individual isoelectronic traps are good candidates as single photon emitters (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Renewable Energy Education in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Shrish; Kidwai, Naimur Rahman

    2017-01-01

    The issue of renewable energy sources that have great potential to give solutions to the longstanding energy problems of India has been considered. It has been stated that renewable energy sources are an important part of India's plan to increase energy security and provide new generation with ample job opportunities. India's plans to move towards…

  11. Atomic Defects and Doping of Monolayer NbSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lan; Komsa, Hannu-Pekka; Khestanova, Ekaterina; Kashtiban, Reza J; Peters, Jonathan J P; Lawlor, Sean; Sanchez, Ana M; Sloan, Jeremy; Gorbachev, Roman V; Grigorieva, Irina V; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V; Haigh, Sarah J

    2017-03-28

    We have investigated the structure of atomic defects within monolayer NbSe 2 encapsulated in graphene by combining atomic resolution transmission electron microscope imaging, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and strain mapping using geometric phase analysis. We demonstrate the presence of stable Nb and Se monovacancies in monolayer material and reveal that Se monovacancies are the most frequently observed defects, consistent with DFT calculations of their formation energy. We reveal that adventitious impurities of C, N, and O can substitute into the NbSe 2 lattice stabilizing Se divacancies. We further observe evidence of Pt substitution into both Se and Nb vacancy sites. This knowledge of the character and relative frequency of different atomic defects provides the potential to better understand and control the unusual electronic and magnetic properties of this exciting two-dimensional material.

  12. Is India the Exception?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Klaus; Storm, Rasmus K.

    India is still the extreme under-achiever in international sport competitions. Whereas in China high growth rates have been accompanied by a huge improvement in its ranking in international sport events a similar impact of extraordinary growth rates is seemingly totally absent in the case of India....... Is India an exception? Several econometric studies have shown that income per capita is a significant variable explaining elite sport results such as results in the Olympic Games. From this stylized fact follows the hypothesis that 'above/below average' growth rates lead to relative improvements...... between growth in GNP per capita and growth in medal points (no. 1: five points, no. 2: three points, no.3: two points) in Olympic Summer Games. The findings show no correlation and in a few calculations a very weak correlation. Among the countries behaving in accordance with the hypothesis in the most...

  13. Nuclear power in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    India has now nine years of experience with her in nuclear power generation. The system has been acclaimed on various grounds by the authority concerned with its organization in the country. The present paper intends to examine critically the claim for economic superiority of the nuclear power over the thermal power which is asserted often by the spokesmen for the former. Information about the cost of nuclear power that is available to researchers in India is very meagre. Whatever appears in official publications is hardly adequate for working out reasonable estimates for scrutiny. One is therefore left to depend on the public statements made by dignitaries from time to time to form an idea about the economics of nuclear power. Due to gaps in information we are constrained to rely on the foreign literature and make careful guesses about possible costs applicable to India

  14. Ecosystem degradation in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, B.N.

    1990-01-01

    Environmental and ecosystem studies have assumed greater relevance in the last decade of the twentieth century than even before. The urban settlements are becoming over-crowded and industries are increasingly polluting the air, water and sound in our larger metropolises. Degradation of different types of ecosystem are discussed in this book, Ecosystem Degradation in India. The book has been divided into seven chapters: Introduction, Coastal and Delta Ecosystem, River Basin Ecosystem, Mountain Ecosystem, Forest Ecosystem, Urban Ecosystem and the last chapter deals with the Environmental Problems and Planning. In the introduction the environmental and ecosystem degradation problems in India is highlighted as a whole while in other chapters mostly case studies by experts who know their respective terrain very intimately are included. The case study papers cover most part of India and deal with local problems, stretching from east coast to west coast and from Kashmir to Kanyakumari. (author)

  15. From Hair in India to Hair India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2017-01-01

    In all cultures, human hair and hairdo have been a powerful metaphor. Tracing back the importance and significance of human hair to the dawn of civilization on the Indian subcontinent, we find that all the Vedic gods are depicted as having uncut hair in mythological stories as well as in legendary pictures. The same is true of the Hindu avatars, and the epic heroes of the Ramayana, and the Mahabharata. Finally, there are a number of hair peculiarities in India pertinent to the creed and religious practices of the Hindu, the Jain, and the Sikh. Shiva Nataraja is a depiction of the Hindu God Shiva as the cosmic dancer who performs his divine dance as creator, preserver, and destroyer of the universe and conveys the Indian conception of the never-ending cycle of time. The same principle manifests in the hair cycle, in which perpetual cycles of growth, regression, and resting underly the growth and shedding of hair. Finally, The Hair Research Society of India was founded as a nonprofit organisation dedicated to research and education in the science of hair. Notably, the HRSI reached milestones in the journey of academic pursuit with the launch of the International Journal of Trichology, and with the establishment of the Hair India conference. Ultimately, the society aims at saving the public from being taken for a ride by quackery, and at creating the awareness that the science of hair represents a subspecialty of Dermatology. In analogy again, the dwarf on which the Nataraja dances represents the demon of egotism, and thus symbolizes Shiva's, respectively, the HRSI's victory over ignorance.

  16. PV opportunities in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jack L.; Ullal, Harin S.

    1996-01-01

    The growing middle class in India, coupled with a need for electricity to provide basic services to the masses, provides an opportunity to deploy photovoltaic systems in cost-effective applications ranging from grid-connected to isolated location requirements. This need is being satisfied by aggressive government programs, the availability of funds from agencies such as the World Bank, and the desire of Indian industries to form joint ventures for in-country manufacturing. The relaxed restrictions on doing business in India makes today's opportunities timely indeed.

  17. Energies in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gama, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Based on information gathered during a mission in India, and also from reports and local newspapers and magazines, the author gives an overview of the energy issue in India: population, energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, electricity consumption, economic activities and life conditions, biomass production, potential for solar energy production, hydraulic energy production and operators, situation regarding coal, oil and natural gas as primary energies, situation of the nuclear industry and sector (international agreements and cooperation, reactor fleet, research centres). A table indicates the level and percentage of the different produced and imported consumed primary and final energies

  18. India's African Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Peter

    was addressed. This kicked off a quest among donor agencies, think tanks and researchers alike to identify and establish the doings of these ‘emerging’ donors. To date, however, China has received most attention while the doings of other donors like India, Brazil and South Africa have remained virtually......The exceptionally fast growth of big economies like China and India has resulted in a new-found interest in the economic and political consequences of this growth for the developed economies. Recently, traditional donors’ concern that ‘emerging’ donors were re-emerging on the development scene...

  19. Urology in ancient India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakti Das

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The practice of medical and surgical measures in the management of urological ailments prevailed in ancient India from the Vedic era around 3000 BC. Subsequently in the Samhita period, the two stalwarts - Charaka in medicine and Susruta in surgery elevated the art of medicine in India to unprecedented heights. Their elaboration of the etiopathological hypothesis and the medical and surgical treatments of various urological disorders of unparalleled ingenuity still remain valid to some extent in our contemporary understanding. The new generation of accomplished Indian urologists should humbly venerate the legacy of the illustrious pioneers in urology of our motherland.

  20. India's energy needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, N. B.

    1980-03-15

    Only a small portion (15%) of India's commerical energy requirements is imported, but this import accounts for nearly 75% of total imports. Noncommercial energy (firewood, agricultural waste, cow dung) will still have an important role in the future. The major thrust of India's energy policy should be to ensure that energy will not be a constraint to economic growth, and to increase the per capita energy consumption. In the future, hydroelectric and nuclear power will become increasingly important. Solar energy will also be utilized. (DLC)

  1. Sample Set (SE): SE50 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available oids We report that flavonoids with radical scavenging activity mitigate against ox...ress. These data confirm the usefulness of flavonoids for enhancing both biotic and abiotic stress tolerance...SE50 Enhancement of oxidative and drought tolerance in arabidopsis by overaccumulation of antioxidant flavon

  2. Sample Set (SE): SE59 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available idopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). However, the behavior of flavonoids during drough...t stress is still not well documented. Herein we investigated the time-series alternation of flavonoids in t...vonoids, a class of specialized metabolites, including flavonols and anthocyanins w...SE59 Alternation of flavonoid accumulation under drought stress in Arabidopsis thaliana We reported that fla

  3. Sample Set (SE): SE27 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE27 Effect of agricultural films for cabbage leaf metabolites Investigation of Bra...ssica oleracea var. capitata YR Tenkuu leaf metabolites. 3 growth conditions (covered with normal or UV cut agricultura...l film or no agricultural film), 3 replicates data are examined. Takeshi Ara 1, Naoki Yamamoto 1,

  4. Sample Set (SE): SE52 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE52 Mass spectra-based framework for automated structural elucidation of metabolom...e data to explore phytochemical diversity A novel framework for automated elucidation of metabolite structur...te ontology system was also introduced to attain putative characterization of the metabolite signals.The automate

  5. An assessment of EIA system in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panigrahi, Jitendra K.; Amirapu, Susruta

    2012-01-01

    Environmental impact assessment (EIA) was first introduced in India based on the Environmental Protection Act (EPA), 1986. But formally it came in to effect, when Ministry of Environment and Forest (MoEF) has passed a major legislative measure under EPA in January 1994 for Environmental Clearance (EC) known as EIA Notification, 1994. Subsequently, EIA processes have been strengthened by MoEF by a series of amendments. The current practice is adhering to EIA Notification, 2006 and its amendments. The pieces of evidence collected and analysis in the present assessment suggest that, despite a sound legislative, administrative and procedural set-up EIA has not yet evolved satisfactorily in India. An appraisal of the EIA system against systematic evaluation criteria, based on discussions with various stakeholders, EIA expert committee members, approval authorities, project proponents, NGOs and consulting professionals, reveals various drawbacks of the EIA system. These mainly include; inadequate capacity of EIA approval authorities, deficiencies in screening and scoping, poor quality EIA reports, inadequate public participation and weak monitoring. Overall, EIA is used presently as a project justification tool rather than as a project planning tool to contribute to achieving sustainable development. While shortcomings are challenging, Government of India is showing a high degree of commitment. The EIA system in the country is undergoing progressive refinements by steadily removing the constraints. The paper identifies opportunities for taking advantage of the current circumstances for strengthening the EIA process. - Highlights: ► An assessment has been carried out on Environmental Clearance under EIA Notification, 2006, MoEF, Government of India. ► EIA system is appraised against systematic evaluation criteria proposed by Ahmad and Wood (2002), Wood (2003), Fuller (1999). ► The analysis reveals reveals various drawbacks of the EIA system. ► The paper identifies

  6. An assessment of EIA system in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panigrahi, Jitendra K., E-mail: Jitu@scientist.com [Department of Marine Sciences, Berhampur University, Berhampur-760007 (India); Amirapu, Susruta, E-mail: susrutaa@gmail.com [EIA Department, L and T-RAMBOLL, Hyderabad-500029 (India)

    2012-07-15

    Environmental impact assessment (EIA) was first introduced in India based on the Environmental Protection Act (EPA), 1986. But formally it came in to effect, when Ministry of Environment and Forest (MoEF) has passed a major legislative measure under EPA in January 1994 for Environmental Clearance (EC) known as EIA Notification, 1994. Subsequently, EIA processes have been strengthened by MoEF by a series of amendments. The current practice is adhering to EIA Notification, 2006 and its amendments. The pieces of evidence collected and analysis in the present assessment suggest that, despite a sound legislative, administrative and procedural set-up EIA has not yet evolved satisfactorily in India. An appraisal of the EIA system against systematic evaluation criteria, based on discussions with various stakeholders, EIA expert committee members, approval authorities, project proponents, NGOs and consulting professionals, reveals various drawbacks of the EIA system. These mainly include; inadequate capacity of EIA approval authorities, deficiencies in screening and scoping, poor quality EIA reports, inadequate public participation and weak monitoring. Overall, EIA is used presently as a project justification tool rather than as a project planning tool to contribute to achieving sustainable development. While shortcomings are challenging, Government of India is showing a high degree of commitment. The EIA system in the country is undergoing progressive refinements by steadily removing the constraints. The paper identifies opportunities for taking advantage of the current circumstances for strengthening the EIA process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An assessment has been carried out on Environmental Clearance under EIA Notification, 2006, MoEF, Government of India. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EIA system is appraised against systematic evaluation criteria proposed by Ahmad and Wood (2002), Wood (2003), Fuller (1999). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The analysis

  7. Status of solar desalination in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arjunan, T.V. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Adhiyamaan College of Engineering, Hosur, Krishnagiri 635109, Tamilnadu (India); Aybar, H.S. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Eastern Mediterranean University, G. Magosa, KKTC, Mersin 10 (Turkey); Nedunchezhian, N. [Automobile Engineering, Institute of Road and Transport Technology, Erode, Tamilnadu (India)

    2009-12-15

    The work was motivated by the increasing awareness of the need for enhancing water supplies schemes in arid lands featuring an appropriate technology for solar energy use in the desalination field in India. The fresh water crisis is already evident in many parts of India, varying in scale and intensity at different times of the year. India's rapidly rising population and changing lifestyles also increases the need for fresh water. Fresh water is increasingly taking centre stage on the economic and political agenda, as more and more disputes between and within states, districts, regions, and even at the community level arises. The conventional desalination technologies like multi stage flash, multiple effect, vapor compression, iron exchange, reverse osmosis, electro dialysis are expensive for the production of small amount of fresh water, also use of conventional energy sources has a negative impact on the environment. Solar distillation represents a most attractive and simple technique among other distillation processes, and it is especially suited to small-scale units at locations where solar energy is considerable. India, being a tropical country is blessed with plenty of sunshine. The average daily solar radiation varies between 4 and 7 kWh per square meter for different parts of the country. There are on an average 250-300 clear sunny days in a year, thus it receives about 5000 trillion kWh of solar energy in a year. In spite of the limitations of being a dilute source and intermittent in nature, solar energy has the potential for meeting and supplementing various energy requirements. Solar energy systems being modular in nature could be installed in any capacity as per the requirement. This paper consists of an overall review and technical assessments of various passive and active solar distillation developments in India. This review also recommended some research areas in this field leading to high efficiency are highlighted. (author)

  8. Ud at se med Erasmus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Pernille

    2009-01-01

    Få lidt luft under vingerne, kom ud at møde udenlandske kolleger og se, hvordan man også kan lave uddannelsesbibliotek. Med begejstring fortæller tre bibliotekarer om deres oplevelser i det store udland – alt sammen finansieret af Erasmus.......Få lidt luft under vingerne, kom ud at møde udenlandske kolleger og se, hvordan man også kan lave uddannelsesbibliotek. Med begejstring fortæller tre bibliotekarer om deres oplevelser i det store udland – alt sammen finansieret af Erasmus....

  9. Altered cropping pattern and cultural continuation with declined prosperity following abrupt and extreme arid event at ~4,200 yrs BP: Evidence from an Indus archaeological site Khirsara, Gujarat, western India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Pokharia

    Full Text Available Archaeological sites hold important clues to complex climate-human relationships of the past. Human settlements in the peripheral zone of Indus culture (Gujarat, western India are of considerable importance in the assessment of past monsoon-human-subsistence-culture relationships and their survival thresholds against climatic stress exerted by abrupt changes. During the mature phase of Harappan culture between ~4,600-3,900yrsBP, the ~4,100±100yrsBP time slice is widely recognized as one of the major, abrupt arid-events imprinted innumerous well-dated palaeo records. However, the veracity of this dry event has not been established from any archaeological site representing the Indus (Harappan culture, and issues concerning timing, changes in subsistence pattern, and the likely causes of eventual abandonment (collapse continue to be debated. Here we show a significant change in crop-pattern (from barley-wheat based agriculture to 'drought-resistant' millet-based crops at ~4,200 yrs BP, based on abundant macrobotanical remains and C isotopes of soil organic matter (δ13CSOM in an archaeological site at Khirsara, in the Gujarat state of western India. The crop-change appears to be intentional and was likely used as an adaptation measure in response to deteriorated monsoonal conditions. The ceramic and architectural remains of the site indicate that habitation survived and continued after the ~4,200yrsBP dry climatic phase, but with declined economic prosperity. Switching to millet-based crops initially helped inhabitants to avoid immediate collapse due to climatic stresses, but continued aridity and altered cropping pattern led to a decline in prosperity levels of inhabitants and eventual abandonment of the site at the end of the mature Harappan phase.

  10. An Alternative view of Earth's Tectonics : The Moon's explosive origin out of SE Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, P. F.

    2017-12-01

    A lunar birth scar is typically considered untenable, under the standard paradigm (GTS-4.6-0 Ga, Giant Impact/Plate Tectonics), since it would have been erased by a combination of Wilson recycling, and erosion. This paradigm, while supported by robust, absolute dating, is still provisional, and, like all scientifc paradigms, is nonetheless open to refutation. It cannot, a priori, rule out such a scar. If empirical evidence were to be discovered, in favor of a lunar birthmark, it would have profound implications for the standard view. Coleman (2015) proposed an alternative paradigm based on an internal explosion of Proto-Earth (PE) that ejected the Moon into orbit and left coeval global signatures, such as; ocean-continent antipodality, the global geoid, origin of water, continents, trenches, fault lines, LIPs, hotspots, seamount chains, from the high TP shock/seismic waves. The abrupt deceleration also led to inertial effects of PE's crustal layers, possibly explaining subduction/obduction and fold and thrust fold belts. One major, first order, line of evidence is the actual fission signature ( 4000+ km long) where the Moon was explosively thrust tangentially (to the core) through ductile mantle (see Fig B) to escape into orbit. The proposed path, (locus Moon's center) is from (0°, 78.5°E) (Fig A), near present day India, to (+14.4°, 119°E) out of SE Asia (See Fig C). Possible evidence in favor of this path (but not limited to) include: the Indian Geoid Anomaly Low ( Moon's exhumation?), the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (generated by the Moon's NE collisional movement and temporary hole and mantle rebound), SE Asia with many minor plates and back arc basins ( the Moon's exit zone), the East African Rifts (EARs) form a NE-directed pull apart region (explained as a set explosive crustal fragments or "plates") moving towards this relic unconsolidated Asian sink hole (See Fig D). The existence of a fossilised lunar birth points to a recent Earth-Moon, since

  11. The Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India, development and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vinod Kumar; Joshi, Apurva; Dhiman, Kartar Singh

    2017-02-02

    The Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India (API) is a unique book of standards describing the quality, purity and strength of selected drugs that are manufactured, distributed, and sold by the licensed manufacturers in pan India. It is developed in two parts; the part one comprises of mono-monographs of medicinal substances of natural origin and part two includes selected compound formulations sourced from the schedule - I books under the Drugs and Cosmetics Act, 1940 comprising of popular Ayurvedic classics of different period of times. The first part of the Ayurvedic Formulary of India was published in 1978 and thereafter, the Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India (mono-monograph) Part-I, Vol. I was published in the year 1989 and subsequently, the other volumes were published with their legalized status under Drugs and Cosmetics Act, 1940. The study was aimed to bring out the existing knowledge on the Ayurvedic pharmacopoeia with its chronological development reviewed from the ancient Vedic Compendia with its continuum in Ayurvedic classics of different period of time till recent past. A literary search based on the ancient origin of Ayurveda was carried out. The drug making from the natural resources and utility of the knowledge exist in classical Ayurvedic works of different period of time till composition of the Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India and its importance as official documents of Govt. of India for Standards of Ayurvedic Drugs and its perspectives have been discussed. The present paper reviews on the systemic development and different aspects of drug-making (Pharmacopoeia) with evidence lying in the 5000 years old work of India. During the systematic review of the various works of different period of times (ancient, medieval and modern), it was found that the Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India has its development during 20th Century as an official document of Govt. of India comprising of single drugs monograph and compound formulations. In India, the development of

  12. Ud & se - med Claude Monet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    Udstillingen 'Claude Monet - Lost in Translation - på ARoS stiller ind på Claud Monet og hans samtidige malerkolleger. Udstillingen forsøger at "genlæse" Monet fra et samtidskunstnerisk perspektiv - og vurderer hans indsats, inden hans værker er blevet reproduceret ihjel....

  13. X = S, Se, Te) heterostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Qingyun; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2018-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the electronic properties of the two-dimensional GaX/MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te) heterostructures. Orbital hybridization between GaX and MX2 is found to result in Rashba splitting at the valence

  14. Reisverslag India 2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuijsen, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Verslag van een bezoek in mei 2009 aan India als onderdeel van een delegatie van KPN. In een week werden bezoeken gebracht aan 7 IT leveranciers van KPN, 3 universiteiten en waren er gesprekken met diverse andere partijen. Daarbij zijn de steden Mumbai, Pune, Bangalore en Chennai aangedaan. Dit

  15. Healthcare biotechnology in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, L M

    2005-01-01

    Biotechnology in India has made great progress in the development of infrastructure, manpower, research and development and manufacturing of biological reagents, biodiagnostics, biotherapeutics, therapeutic and, prophylactic vaccines and biodevices. Many of these indigenous biological reagents, biodiagnostics, therapeutic and prophylactic vaccines and biodevices have been commercialized. Commercially when biotechnology revenue has reached $25 billions in the U.S. alone in 2000 excluding the revenues of biotech companies that were acquired by pharmaceutical companies, India has yet to register a measurable success. The conservative nature and craze of the Indian Industry for marketing imported biotechnology products, lack of Government support, almost non-existing national healthcare system and lack of trained managers for marketing biological and new products seem to be the important factors responsible for poor economic development of biotechnology in India. With the liberalization of Indian economy, more and more imported biotechnology products will enter into the Indian market. The conditions of internal development of biotechnology are not likely to improve in the near future and it is destined to grow only very slowly. Even today biotechnology in India may be called to be in its infancy.

  16. Pursuing Mathematics in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    2012-09-07

    Sep 7, 2012 ... of public–private partnership in research and education in India. The Institute receives major private funding, side by side with substantial .... We are writing this to say that students who fail to do well in Mathematics Olympiad have no reason to get disheartened and to think that they are not good enough to ...

  17. CAPTURED India Country Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Donoghue, R.; Brouwers, J.H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides the findings of the India Country Evaluation and is produced as part of the overall CAPTURED End Evaluation. After five years of support by the CAPTURED project the End Evaluation has assessed that results are commendable. I-AIM was able to design an approach in which health

  18. Women's Work in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, D. Radha; Ravindran, M.

    1983-01-01

    The proportion of women in paid employment in India is very low, and working women tend to be concentrated in low-wage, low-status, unskilled jobs, especially in agriculture. Even for the few women working in the modern sector, discrimination is pervasive, and change seems unlikely to occur soon. (IS)

  19. Natural gas in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, Thierry; Todoc, Jessie L.

    1999-11-01

    Contains Executive Summary and Chapters on: Country background; Overview of the energy sector; Natural gas supply; Natural gas infrastructure; Natural gas infrastructure; Natural gas demand; Outlook-government policy reform and industry development, and Appendices on Global and regional energy and gas trends; Overview of India's investment policy, incentives and regulation; The ENRON Dabhol power project. (Author)

  20. Healthcare biotechnology in India

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, L. M.

    2005-01-01

    Biotechnology in India has made great progress in the development of infrastructure, manpower, research and development and manufacturing of biological reagents, biodiagnostics, biotherapeutics, therapeutic and, prophylactic vaccines and biodevices. Many of these indigenous biological reagents, biodiagnostics, therapeutic and prophylactic vaccines and biodevices have been commercialized. Commercially when biotechnology revenue has reached $25 billions in the U.S. alone in 2000 excluding the r...

  1. Cotton trends in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Cotton trends in India. A crop of significant economic importance, valued at over Rs. 15000 Crs. Provides income to 60 million people. Crucial raw material for Rs 83000 Crores textile industry out of which Rs 45754 crores is exports. Approx. 20 Million acres of cotton provides ...

  2. Muslim education in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Pietkiewicz-Pareek

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Madrasa education is a very important part of the History of Muslim education and Islamic studies in India. As many as 25 per cent of Muslim children in the 6-14 year age group have either never attended school or have dropped out, so madrasa school is the only choice for them.

  3. AIDS in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreedhar, J

    1995-01-01

    A major HIV epidemic is underway in India, home to 900 million people and the world's second largest population. The director-general of the Indian Council of Medical Research expects India by the year 2000 to be the country with the largest number of HIV infections, with some experts predicting 5 million people to be infected with HIV in India by the year 2000. Others predict 30-55 million to be infected. Although HIV is increasingly spreading to typically low-risk group populations, it is the female sex workers and their clients, long distance truck drivers, men who have sex with men, blood transfusion donors and recipients, and IV drug users throughout the country who are both the reservoirs of HIV and vectors of transmission to the general population. For example, 52% of sex workers in Bombay in 1994 were found to be infected with HIV. Studies indicate that India's long-distance truck drivers average 200 sexual encounters per year; at any given time, 70% of them have STDs. Preliminary surveys estimate that almost 33% are infected with HIV. HIV seroprevalence among truckers in Madras requesting HIV testing because they have STDs increased from almost 60% in 1993 to 91% in 1995. Moreover, the illegal status of homosexuality in India has created an underground culture in which HIV and STDs are rampant; one 1995 study in the Sangli district of Maharashtra found 50% of men who have sex with men to be infected with HIV. Half of India's blood for transfusion is drawn from commercial donors. A Bombay study, however, found 86% of such donors screened in 1992 to be HIV-seropositive and not all blood banks comply with mandatory screening laws. As widespread HIV infection evolves into a multitude of AIDS cases, India's health care system and economy will be heavily taxed, and the number of tuberculosis (TB) cases greatly increased. More than half the population carries the TB bacillus. The government by 1992 had drafted a national prevention and control plan and formed the

  4. Sample Set (SE): SE47 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE47 Metabolomic correlation-network modules in Arabidopsis based on a graph-cluste...as a system. Typical metabolomics data show a few but significant correlations among metabolite levels when ...itions. Although several studies have assessed topologies in metabolomic correlation networks, it remains un... (mto1), and transparent testa4 (tt4) to compare systematically the metabolomic correlation...s in samples of roots and aerial parts. We then applied graph clustering to the constructed correlation

  5. Female feticide in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nehaluddin

    2010-01-01

    Women are murdered all over the world. But in India a most brutal form of killing females takes place regularly, even before they have the opportunity to be born. Female feticide--the selective abortion of female fetuses--is killing upwards of one million females in India annually with far-ranging and tragic consequences. In some areas, the sex ratio of females to males has dropped to less than 8000:1000. Females not only face inequality in this culture, they are even denied the right to be born. Why do so many families selectively abort baby daughters? In a word: economics. Aborting female fetuses is both practical and socially acceptable in India. Female feticide is driven by many factors, but primarily by the prospect of having to pay a dowry to the future bridegroom of a daughter. While sons offer security to their families in old age and can perform the rites for the souls of deceased parents and ancestors, daughters are perceived as a social and economic burden. Prenatal sex detection technologies have been misused, allowing the selective abortions of female offspring to proliferate. Legally, however, female feticide is a penal offence. Although female infanticide has long been committed in India, feticide is a relatively new practice, emerging concurrently with the advent of technological advancements in prenatal sex determination on a large scale in the 1990s. While abortion is legal in India, it is a crime to abort a pregnancy solely because the fetus is female. Strict laws and penalties are in place for violators. These laws, however, have not stemmed the tide of this abhorrent practice. This article will discuss the socio-legal conundrum female feticide presents, as well as the consequences of having too few women in Indian society.

  6. Surface circulation over the shelf off the east coast of India during the south west monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Sastry, J.S.

    upwelling in the southern regions off the East Coast of India. Vertical temperature and salinity structures north of Visakhapatnam show a predominant estuarine character and upwelling is not evident. In the northern regions, the flow is directed south...

  7. Food as pharma: marketing nutraceuticals to India?s rural poor

    OpenAIRE

    Street, Alice

    2014-01-01

    This commentary sketches out the politics of the expansion of affordable, fast-moving nutraceutical products into rural India, with a focus on fortified foods and beverages. It examines the relationships between industry, government and humanitarian organisations that are being forged alongside the development of markets for nutraceuticals; the production of evidence and the harnessing of science to support nutraceutical companies’ claims; the ways in which nutraceuticals are being marketed a...

  8. Has the Janani Suraksha Yojana (a conditional maternity benefit transfer scheme) succeeded in reducing the economic burden of maternity in rural India? Evidence from the Varanasi district of Uttar Pradesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Saradiya; Singh, Aditya

    2018-02-05

    One of the constraints in the utilisation of maternal healthcare in India is the out-of-pocket expenditure. To improve the utilisation and to reduce the out-of-pocket expenditure, India launched a cash incentive scheme, Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY), which provides monetary incentive to the mothers delivering in public facility. However, no study has yet examined the extent to which the JSY payments reduce the maternal healthcare induced catastrophic out-of-pocket expenditure burden of the households. This paper therefore attempts to examine the extent to which the JSY reduces the catastrophic expenditure estimate household expenditure on maternity, i.e. , all direct and indirect expenditure. The study used data on 396 mothers collected through a primary survey conducted in the rural areas of the Varanasi district of Uttar Pradesh state in 2013-2014. The degree and variation in the catastrophic impact of households' maternity spending was computed as share of out-of-pocket payment in total household income in relation to specific thresholds, across socioeconomic categories. Logistic regression was used to understand the determinants of catastrophic expenditure and whether the JSY has any role in influencing the expenditure pattern. Results revealed that the JSY beneficiaries on an average spent about 8.3% of their Annual Household Consumption Expenditure on maternity care. The JSY reimbursement could reduce this share only by 2.1%. The study found that the expenditure on antenatal and postnatal care made up a significant part of the direct medical expenditure on maternity among the JSY beneficiaries. The indirect or non-medical expenditure was about four times higher than the direct expenditure on maternity services. The out-of-pocket expenditure across income quintiles was found to be regressive i.e. the poor paid a greater proportion of their income towards maternity care than the rich. Results also showed that the JSY reimbursement helped only about 8% households

  9. Development of a Smartphone-Enabled Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus Management Package to Facilitate Evidence-Based Care Delivery in Primary Healthcare Facilities in India: The mPower Heart Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajay, Vamadevan S; Jindal, Devraj; Roy, Ambuj; Venugopal, Vidya; Sharma, Rakshit; Pawar, Abha; Kinra, Sanjay; Tandon, Nikhil; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

    2016-12-21

    The high burden of undetected and undertreated hypertension and diabetes mellitus is a major health challenge worldwide. The mPower Heart Project aimed to develop and test a feasible and scalable intervention for hypertension and diabetes mellitus by task-sharing with the use of a mobile phone-based clinical decision support system at Community Health Centers in Himachal Pradesh, India. The development of the intervention and mobile phone-based clinical decision support system was carried out using mixed methods in five Community Health Centers. The intervention was subsequently evaluated using pre-post evaluation design. During intervention, a nurse care coordinator screened, examined, and entered patient parameters into mobile phone-based clinical decision support system to generate a prescription, which was vetted by a physician. The change in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) over 18 months of intervention was quantified using generalized estimating equations models. During intervention, 6797 participants were enrolled. Six thousand sixteen participants had hypertension (mean systolic blood pressure: 146.1 mm Hg, 95% CI: 145.7, 146.5; diastolic blood pressure: 89.52 mm Hg, 95% CI: 89.33, 89.72), of which 3152 (52%) subjects were newly detected. Similarly, 1516 participants had diabetes mellitus (mean FPG: 177.9 mg/dL, 95% CI: 175.8, 180.0), of which 450 (30%) subjects were newly detected. The changes in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and FPG observed at 18 months of follow-up were -14.6 mm Hg (95% CI: -15.3, -13.8), -7.6 mm Hg (CI: -8.0, -7.2), and -50.0 mg/dL (95% CI: -54.6, -45.5), respectively, and were statistically significant even after adjusting for age, sex, and Community Health Center. A nurse-facilitated, mobile phone-based clinical decision support system-enabled intervention in primary care was associated with improvements in blood pressure and blood glucose control

  10. Hablando se entiende la gente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mila Crespo Picó

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Habiendo observado que muchos cursos centrados en el desarrollo de la competencia comunicativa oral se limitan a ofrecer actividades inconexas que suponen un gran esfuerzo por parte de los participantes para situarse ante cada actividad y dificultan el establecimiento de relaciones profundas entre los exponentes nociofuncionales, los objetivos comunicativos y los recursos lingüísticos necesarios para realizarlas por contar con un tiempo limitado en el aula para ello, se presentó, bajo el mismo título que esta comunicación, una propuesta didáctica para un curso de conversación que pretende paliar estos aspectos en el I Foro de Profesores de E/LE en la Universitat de València.

  11. Die verpleegster se terapeutiese funksie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.C. Harrington

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available Ons sou hierdie praatjie graag wou inlei met Virginia Henderson se definisie van verpleging: “ The unique function of the nurse is to assist the individual, sick or well, in the performance of those activities contributing to health or its recovery (or to a peaceful death that he would perform unaided if he had the necessary will, strength or knowledge. And to do this in such a way as to help him gain independence as rapidly as possible.”

  12. Rifting to India-Asia Reactivation: Multi-phase Structural Evolution of the Barmer Basin, Rajasthan, northwest India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M. J.; Bladon, A.; Clarke, S.; Najman, Y.; Copley, A.; Kloppenburg, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Barmer Basin, situated within the West Indian Rift System, is an intra-cratonic rift basin produced during Gondwana break-up. Despite being a prominent oil and gas province, the structural evolution and context of the rift within northwest India remains poorly understood. Substantial subsurface datasets acquired during hydrocarbon exploration provide an unrivalled tool to investigate the tectonic evolution of the Barmer Basin rift and northwest India during India-Asia collision. Here we present a structural analysis using seismic datasets to investigate Barmer Basin evolution and place findings within the context of northwest India development. Present day rift structural architectures result from superposition of two non-coaxial extensional events; an early mid-Cretaceous rift-oblique event (NW-SE), followed by a main Paleocene rifting phase (NE-SW). Three phases of fault reactivation follow rifting: A transpressive, Late Paleocene inversion along localised E-W and NNE-SSW-trending faults; a widespread Late Paleocene-Early Eocene inversion and Late Miocene-Present Day transpressive strike-slip faulting along NW-SE-trending faults and isolated inversion structures. A major Late Eocene-Miocene unconformity in the basin is also identified, approximately coeval with those identified within the Himalayan foreland basin, suggesting a common cause related to India-Asia collision, and calling into question previous explanations that are not compatible with spatial extension of the unconformity beyond the foreland basin. Although, relatively poorly age constrained, extensional and compressional events within the Barmer Basin can be correlated with regional tectonic processes including the fragmentation of Gondwana, the rapid migration of the Greater Indian continent, to subsequent collision with Asia. New insights into the Barmer Basin development have important implications not only for ongoing hydrocarbon exploration but the temporal evolution of northwest India.

  13. Business groups, financing constraints, and investment : the case of India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gangopadhyay, Shubashis; Lensink, Robert; Molen, Remco van der

    2002-01-01

    Abstract We examine the effect of business group affiliation on corporate investment behavior in India. We use a data set containing 684 Indian listed companies for the 1989-1997 period. We estimate a simple investment equation and find evidence that cash flow has a positive effect on investment

  14. Dispelling disaster myths about dead bodies and disease: the role of scientific evidence and the media Se despejan los mitos sobre la relación de los cadáveres con las enfermedades en situaciones de desastre: el papel de las pruebas científicas y de los medios de comunicación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Morgan

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available For decades, after nearly every natural disaster, fear of disease has encouraged communities, local authorities, and governments to rapidly dispose of the bodies of the victims without first identifying them. In May 2004 this journal published the first-ever review article to comprehensively assess the scientific evidence on the infectious disease risks of dead bodies following natural disasters, along with an editorial commenting on the persistence of myths concerning the dangers allegedly posed by dead bodies. This paper assesses the impact that the review article and the editorial have had on the way that health risks from dead bodies have been reported by the media over the following year, especially focusing on the South Asian tsunami disaster of December 2004. While some media outlets have reported erroneous information, hundreds of other news stories have accurately reported that dead bodies pose no public health risk, and have explained the priority for properly identifying the deceased. Nevertheless, publication of scientific evidence alone is insufficient to bring about public health action. International agencies need to continue their work on producing standards, guidelines, and practical guidance on managing dead bodies. There needs to be a community-centered approach to informing communities about the management of the dead following disasters and the rights of individuals to be treated respectfully after death. Nongovernmental organizations should be encouraged to provide expertise and technical support in identifying and burying large numbers of dead. There also needs to be ongoing assessment of the technical processes involved in the recovery, identification, and disposal of dead bodies, as well as the effectiveness of disaster preparedness plans and communication with the affected population.A lo largo de varios decenios se ha visto que, a raíz de casi todos los desastres naturales, el temor a la propagación de enfermedades

  15. Traditional grains boost nutrition in rural India

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    India, particularly among vulnerable women and children. The research ... This approach will improve the quality of life for farmers, and is part of a long-term solution to rural poverty in India. ... Traditional grains boost nutrition in rural India.

  16. India dokfilmide paremik jõuab taaralinna

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Tartus täna algavatest India dokumentaalfilmide päevadest, mida korraldavad Maailmafilmi festival, Eesti Rahva Muuseum ja organisatsioon Films For Freedom India. Lisatud nimekiri "India dokfilmi päevad"

  17. WATER: EMERGING CHALLENGE FOR INDIA'S BRIGHTEST A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. N. Narasimhan

    2009-08-25

    Aug 25, 2009 ... of science, technology, and management will lead the way. • Justifiably so. Alumni of ... INDIA'S WATER CRISIS. • Water availability in India is ... developments stress India's already stressed water systems. • Economy drives ...

  18. [History of acupuncture in India].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xinghua

    India and China are both featured with ancient civilization. During the communication between the two countries, the communication from Indian culture, especially Buddhism, to China was predominant, while communication from Chinese culture to India was rare. So it was with medical communication until the end of 1950s when acupuncture was introduced to India. In this article, the medical communication between India and China as well as the introduction of acupuncture to India were discussed, and the resulting phenomenon was analyzed. The introduction of acupuncture to India proved personnel exchange was not necessary to acupuncture communication, and several invisible factors, such as language, religion and culture tradition might be the reasons for foreign nations to accept acupuncture. Therefore, these factors should be valued in the future international communication of acupuncture.

  19. Exploring Emerging India - Eight Essays

    OpenAIRE

    Müller-Brandeck-Bocquet, Gisela; Gieg, Philipp; Lowinger, Timo; Gsänger, Matthias; Becker, Michael; Kundu, Amitabh; Valerian, Rodrigues; S, Shaji; Schömbucher-Kusterer, Elisabeth; Biswas, Aparajita

    2015-01-01

    India's economic rise since the 1990s has been followed by a more prominent global role for the country. Despite economic setbacks in recent years and huge domestic challenges like poverty, caste issues, and gender inequality, India today is almost universally characterised as an “emerging power”. At the same time, the country continues to show an enormous diversity. Thus, exploring emerging India can surely not be confined to economic analysis only. Instead, it is vital to take current devel...

  20. Hemovigilance Program-India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanksha Bisht

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A centralized hemovigilance program to assure patient safety and to promote public health has been launched for the first time in India on Dec 10, 2012 in 60 medical colleges in the first phase along with a well-structured program for monitoring adverse reactions associated with blood transfusion and blood product administration. National Institute of Biologicals (NIB will be the National Coordinating Centre for Hemovigilance. This program will be implemented under overall ambit of Pharmacovigilance Program of India (PvPI, which is being coordinated by Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission (IPC. All medical colleges of the country will be enrolled in this program by the year 2016 in order to have a National Centre of Excellence for Hemovigilance at NIB, which will act as a global knowledge platform.

  1. Fighting corrosion in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, K S; Rangaswamy, N S

    1979-03-01

    A survey covers the cost of corrosion in India; methods of preventing corrosion in industrial plants; some case histories, including the prevention of corrosion in pipes through which fuels are pumped to storage and the stress-corrosion cracking of evaporators in fertilizer plants; estimates of the increase in demand in 1979-89 for anticorrosion products and processes developed by the Central Electrochemical Research Institute (CECRI) at Karaikudi, India; industries that may face corrosion problems requiring assistance from CECRI, including the light and heavy engineering structural, and transport industries and the chemical industry; and some areas identified for major efforts, including the establishment of a Corrosion Advisory Board with regional centers and the expansion of the Tropical Corrosion Testing Station at Mandapam Camp, Tamil Nadu.

  2. Oil in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diab, E.; Raimbault, C. [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1995-12-01

    India is a country that is rich in energy resources. Concerning oil, proven reserves are already abundant, but there are some who think that a very large potential remains to be discovered, since the country is one of the least thoroughly explored in the world. The recent opening up of energy industries to private and foreign capital should speed up the development of exploration, refining and petrochemicals. However, even if numerous projects were to be approved by the Government, actually carrying them out does not always ensure because of conditions that are not always judged to be attractive by potential investors. Despite all this, there are some who think that India will be a power equal to if not greater than China and one that is already upholding the comparison with the Southeast Asian dragons. (authors). 8 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. The North-South divide in snake bite envenomation in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Chauhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Snake bite envenomations are common in rural areas and the incidence peaks during monsoons in India. Prominent venomous species have been traditionally labeled as the ′big four′ that includes Cobra, Krait, Russel′s viper and Saw scaled viper. Systematic attempts for identification and classification of prevalent snakes in various states of India are missing till now and there is no concrete data on this aspect. The published literature however shows that some species of snakes are more prevalent in a particular region than the other parts of India e.g. Saw scaled vipers in Rajasthan. We reviewed the published literature from various parts of India and found that there is a North-South divide in the snake bite profile from India. Neurotoxic envenomations are significantly higher in North India compared to South India where Hematotoxic envenomations are prevalent. Russel′s viper causes local necrosis, gangrene and compartment syndrome. These manifestations have never been reported in North Indian snake bite profile in the published literature. Early morning neuroparalysis caused by Krait is a common problem in North India leading to high mortality after snake bite. This review presents supporting evidence for the North-South divide and proposes a way forward in formulation and revision of guidelines for snake bite in India.

  4. Biogas energy in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulik, T K

    1982-01-01

    A socio-economic study of India's biogas energy program, a response to the oil crisis of the 1970's, reviews the impact of promoting large-scale community biogas plants as a way to reach the lowest income groups. A case study draws on the experiences of the community plant in Gujarat village, and explores the program's secondary benefits and impacts on life styles. 15 references, 5 figures, 37 tables. (DCK)

  5. Medical tourism in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vijay; Das, Poonam

    2012-06-01

    The term 'medical tourism' is under debate because health care is a serious business and rarely do patients combine the two. India is uniquely placed by virtue of its skilled manpower, common language, diverse medical conditions that doctors deal with, the volume of patients, and a large nonresident Indian population overseas. Medical tourism requires dedicated services to alleviate the anxiety of foreign patients. These include translation, currency conversion, travel, visa, posttreatment care system,and accommodation of patient relatives during and after treatment.

  6. OUTSOURCING TO INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Sancheti, Mayur

    2007-01-01

    Topic selected by me for dissertation is of outsourcing to India. Outsourcing is generally done from countries like United Kingdom and United States. I have discussed each and every aspect which is related to Outsourcing in detail. Outsourcing is gaining more and more attention because it enables organizations to cut the cost and improve efficiency of work which results in to overall increase in profitability and competitiveness of the organization. I tried to cove what is Outsourcing, w...

  7. Military Strategy Of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Zaitsev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the evolution of military strategy of the Republic of India and key factors that influences its development. New Delhi keeps an eye on the balance of power in South Asia to create favorable conditions for its economic and social development, yet the remaining threats and new challenges still undermine the security and stability in India. The ambitions of China aspiring to power in Asia-Pacific region, combined with its immense military build-up and territorial disputes, cause disturbance in New Delhi. The remaining tensions between India and Pakistan also cause often border skirmishes and medium-scale conflicts. Close relations between China and Pakistan, labeled as “all-weather friendship”, are a source of major concern for India. The fact that both Beijing and Islamabad wield nuclear weapons means that without effective mechanisms of nuclear deterrence any military conflict may turn into a full-scale nuclear war. Terrorist activities and insurgency in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir and in the North-Eastern regions of the country, along with maritime piracy and illicit drug trafficking contribute to the complicated nature of the challenges to the Indian security. Indian military strategy is considered as a combination of the army doctrine, maritime doctrine and nuclear doctrine. The Indian political and military leadership wants to meet the challenges of changing geopolitical environment and thus continuously adapts its strategy. However, there is still a gap between theory and practice: Indian armed forces lack the capacity to implement the declared goals because of bulky bureaucratic system, outdated military equipment and insufficient level of command and control. The government needs to mobilize political will and administrative resources to upgrade its defense sector to counter its security threats and challenges.

  8. India's misconceived family plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, J L

    1991-01-01

    India's goal of reducing the national birth rate by 50% by the year 2000 is destined to failure in the absence of attention to poverty, social inequality, and women's subordination--the factors that serve to perpetuate high fertility. There is a need to shift the emphasis of the population control effort from the obligation of individual women to curtail childbearing to the provision of the resources required for poor women to meet their basic needs. Female children are less likely to be educated or taken for medical care than their male counterparts and receive a lower proportion of the family's food supply. This discrimination stems, in large part, from parents' view that daughters will not be able to remunerate their families in later life for such investments. The myth of female nonproductivity that leads to the biased allocation of family resources overlooks the contribution of adult women's unpaid domestic labor and household production. Although government statistics state that women comprise 46% of India's agricultural labor force (and up to 90% of rural women participate in this sector on some basis), women have been excluded systematically from agricultural development schemes such as irrigation projects, credit, and mechanization. In the field of family planning, the Government's virtually exclusive focus on sterilization has excluded younger women who are not ready to terminate childbearing but would like methods such as condoms, diaphragms, IUDs, and oral contraceptives to space births. More general maternal-child health services are out of reach of the majority of poor rural women due to long distances that must be travelled to clinics India's birth rate could be reduced by 25% by 2000 just by filling the demand for quality voluntary family planning services. Without a sustained political commitment to improve the status of women in India, however, such gains will not be sustainable.

  9. Energy planning in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venu, S.

    1982-01-01

    A review is presented of India's planning for energy requirements in coal, oil, gas and nuclear power and in the fields of solar energy and the extension of forest areas to provide firewood. Coal and natural gas supplies will be increased to reduce oil demand. There will be an accelerated programme of development of bio-gas, an exploration of solar energy potential and extensive afforestation to provide additional energy sources. (author)

  10. India, Octavio Paz y los retos de la multiculturalidad. Un ensayo sobre la diversidad cultural en India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Arocena

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Solo India y China pasan la barrera de los mil millones de habitantes y el siglo XXI los tendrá a ambos como protagonistas centrales. La transformación de la economía india y la modernización social incrementaron su velocidad en las últimas décadas, pero visibles rasgos de su cultura y su pobreza resultan difíciles de comprender para la mirada occidental. La exuberante multiculturalidad de la India se expresa en la coexistencia a veces explosiva de varias religiones (hindúes 81%, musulmanes 13%, cristianos 2%, sikhs 2%, budistas 1%, otros 1%; una multiplicidad de lenguajes (hay 22 lenguajes reconocidos oficialmente que reflejan la fuerza de minorías culturales a nivel regional; y desigualdades económicas y sociales muy agudas (42% vive en situación de pobreza extrema con menos de 1,25 dólares diarios y el sistema milenario de castas está en plena vigencia. En particular este trabajo analiza el desafío enorme de la diversidad cultural en la sociedad india, interpreta la manera cómo Octavio Paz entendió ese problema y explora qué se puede aportar hoy desde la teoría de la cultura.

  11. India, Octavio Paz y los retos de la multiculturalidad. Un ensayo sobre la diversidad cultural en India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Arocena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Solo India y China pasan la barrera de los mil millones de habitantes y el siglo XXI los tendrá a ambos como protagonistas centrales. La transformación de la economía india y la modernización social incrementaron su velocidad en las últimas décadas, pero visibles rasgos de su cultura y su pobreza resultan difíciles de comprender para la mirada occidental. La exuberante multiculturalidad de la India se expresa en la coexistencia a veces explosiva de varias religiones (hindúes 81%, musulmanes 13%, cristianos 2%, sikhs 2%, budistas 1%, otros 1%; una multiplicidad de lenguajes (hay 22 lenguajes reconocidos oficialmente que reflejan la fuerza de minorías culturales a nivel regional; y desigualdades económicas y sociales muy agudas (42% vive en situación de pobreza extrema con menos de 1,25 dólares diarios y el sistema milenario de castas está en plena vigencia. En particular este trabajo analiza el desafío enorme de la diversidad cultural en la sociedad india, interpreta la manera cómo Octavio Paz entendió ese problema y explora qué se puede aportar hoy desde la teoría de la cultura.

  12. Origin of low thermal conductivity in SnSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yu; Chang, Cheng; Pei, Yanling; Wu, Di; Peng, Kunling; Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Gong, Shengkai; He, Jiaqing; Zhang, Yongsheng; Zeng, Zhi; Zhao, Li-Dong

    2016-09-01

    We provide direct evidence to understand the origin of low thermal conductivity of SnSe using elastic measurements. Compared to state-of-the-art lead chalcogenides Pb Q (Q =Te , Se, S), SnSe exhibits low values of sound velocity (˜1420 m /s ) , Young's modulus (E ˜27.7 GPa ) , and shear modulus (G ˜9.6 GPa ) , which are ascribed to the extremely weak Sn-Se atomic interactions (or bonds between layers); meanwhile, the deduced average Grüneisen parameter γ of SnSe is as large as ˜3.13, originating from the strong anharmonicity of the bonding arrangement. The calculated phonon mean free path (l ˜ 0.84 nm) at 300 K is comparable to the lattice parameters of SnSe, indicating little room is left for further reduction of the thermal conductivity through introducing nanoscale microstructures and microscale grain boundaries. The low elastic properties indicate that the weak chemical bonding stiffness of SnSe generally causes phonon modes softening which eventually slows down phonon propagation. This work provides insightful data to understand the low lattice thermal conductivity of SnSe.

  13. Framework for a National STEMI Program: Consensus document developed by STEMI INDIA, Cardiological Society of India and Association Physicians of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The health care burden of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI in India is enormous. Yet, many patients with STEMI can seldom avail timely and evidence based reperfusion treatments. This gap in care is a result of financial barriers, limited healthcare infrastructure, poor knowledge and accessibility of acute medical services for a majority of the population. Addressing some of these issues, STEMI India, a not-for-profit organization, Cardiological Society of India (CSI and Association Physicians of India (API have developed a protocol of “systems of care” for efficient management of STEMI, with integrated networks of facilities. Leveraging newly-developed ambulance and emergency medical services, incorporating recent state insurance schemes for vulnerable populations to broaden access, and combining innovative, “state-of-the-art” information technology platforms with existing hospital infrastructure, are the crucial aspects of this system. A pilot program was successfully employed in the state of Tamilnadu. The purpose of this article is to describe the framework and methods associated with this programme with an aim to improve delivery of reperfusion therapy for STEMI in India. This programme can serve as model STEMI systems of care for other low-and-middle income countries.

  14. Energy for rural India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, Frauke; Benders, Rene M.J.; Moll, Henri C.

    2009-01-01

    About 72 million households in rural India do not have access to electricity and rely primarily on traditional biofuels. This research investigates how rural electrification could be achieved in India using different energy sources and what the effects for climate change mitigation could be. We use the Regional Energy Model (REM) to develop scenarios for rural electrification for the period 2005-2030 and to assess the effects on greenhouse gas emissions, primary energy use and costs. We compare the business-as-usual scenario (BAU) with different electrification scenarios based on electricity from renewable energy, diesel and the grid. Our results indicate that diesel systems tend to have the highest CO 2 emissions, followed by grid systems. Rural electrification with primarily renewable energy-based end-uses could save up to 99% of total CO 2 emissions and 35% of primary energy use in 2030 compared to BAU. Our research indicates that electrification with decentralised diesel systems is likely to be the most expensive option. Rural electrification with renewable energy tends to be the most cost-effective option when end-uses are predominantly based on renewable energy, but turns out to be more costly than grid extensions when electric end-use devices are predominantly used. This research therefore elaborates whether renewable energy is a viable option for rural electrification and climate change mitigation in rural India and gives policy recommendations.

  15. Medicine in South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Malcolm M.

    1978-01-01

    A three-month sabbatical allowed a superficial overview of Indian medical history and practice. As in Western nations, cost is a major determinant of health care delivery in India; poverty and fiscal shortages, however, deny care to many. The education of Indian physicians is similar to that in Western nations and a high level of clinical competence is seen. However, physician compensation is woefully low by Western standards. India possesses its own indigenous medical systems, purported to be the oldest in the world and predating Hippocrates by several millenia. Most Indians are cared for by native practitioners whose medical techniques are intricately related to the Hindu and Islamic religions. Many of their herbal medicines have been assimilated into contemporary Western practice. Diseases unknown to us except by textbooks are commonly seen and effectively treated. On the other hand, Western diseases such as coronary arteriosclerosis are not uncommon in a land of massive overpopulation and malnutrition. The humbling aspect of this experience is the realization that medical practice dating back several millenia can be made more modern and carried out competently by contemporary physicians. A Western physician working in India finds an unparalleled variety of disease in a totally different medical-religious environment allowing him to reorganize his priorities and to rediscover himself in the world within which he lives. PMID:716392

  16. Medicine in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, M M

    1978-10-01

    A three-month sabbatical allowed a superficial overview of Indian medical history and practice. As in Western nations, cost is a major determinant of health care delivery in India; poverty and fiscal shortages, however, deny care to many. The education of Indian physicians is similar to that in Western nations and a high level of clinical competence is seen. However, physician compensation is woefully low by Western standards. India possesses its own indigenous medical systems, purported to be the oldest in the world and predating Hippocrates by several millenia. Most Indians are cared for by native practitioners whose medical techniques are intricately related to the Hindu and Islamic religions. Many of their herbal medicines have been assimilated into contemporary Western practice. Diseases unknown to us except by textbooks are commonly seen and effectively treated. On the other hand, Western diseases such as coronary arteriosclerosis are not uncommon in a land of massive overpopulation and malnutrition. The humbling aspect of this experience is the realization that medical practice dating back several millenia can be made more modern and carried out competently by contemporary physicians. A Western physician working in India finds an unparalleled variety of disease in a totally different medical-religious environment allowing him to reorganize his priorities and to rediscover himself in the world within which he lives.

  17. India's draft nuclear doctrine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapur, A.

    2000-01-01

    India's draft nuclear doctrine and its nuclear and missile testing are a response to recent international, regional and domestic developments. Nehru's policy of nuclear disarmament, non-discriminatory international arrangements and unilateral restraint has been overturned in favour of self-reliant security and negotiated nuclear restraints. The draft nuclear doctrine is aimed at transparency and formalization of existing capacities. It is anchored in the United Nations Charter, based on the legitimacy of self-defence and espouses minimum nuclear deterrence. After the launching of Pokhran II, the debate in India has been settled on weaponization and deployment. The doctrine is not country-specific with respect to threat perceptions, but the author posits that the long-term focus is on China and the short-term on Pakistan. The doctrine emphasizes civilian command and control. India's decision to test incurred diplomatic and other economic costs, but afforded new opportunities for the country to assert itself militarily and politically in Asia and in the world. There were no diplomatic costs in issuing the draft nuclear doctrine, but the author estimates the economic costs of a full-blown (triad) Indian nuclear deterrent. (author)

  18. Optical studies of CdSe/HgSe and CdSe/Ag2Se core/shell nanoparticles embedded in gelatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhniuk, Yu M; Dzhagan, V M; Valakh, M Ya; Raevskaya, A E; Stroyuk, A L; Kuchmiy, S Ya; Zahn, D R T

    2008-01-01

    CdSe/HgSe and CdSe/Ag 2 Se core-shell nanoparticles are obtained by colloidal synthesis from aqueous solutions in the presence of gelatin. Optical absorption, luminescence, and Raman spectra of the nanoparticles obtained are measured. The variation of the optical spectra of CdSe/HgSe and CdSe/Ag 2 Se core-shell nanoparticles with the shell thickness is discussed. Sharp non-monotonous variation of the photoluminescence spectra at low shell coverage is observed.

  19. More evidence on the impact of India's conditional cash transfer program, Janani Suraksha Yojana: quasi-experimental evaluation of the effects on childhood immunization and other reproductive and child health outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Carvalho

    Full Text Available In 2005, India established a conditional cash transfer program called Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY, to increase institutional delivery and encourage the use of reproductive and child health-related services.To assess the effect of maternal receipt of financial assistance from JSY on childhood immunizations, post-partum care, breastfeeding practices, and care-seeking behaviors.We use data from the latest district-level household survey (2007-2008 to conduct a propensity score matching analysis with logistic regression. We conduct the analyses at the national level as well as separately across groups of states classified as high-focus and non-high-focus. We carry out several sensitivity analyses including a subgroup analysis stratified by possession of an immunization card.Receipt of financial assistance from JSY led to an increase in immunization rates ranging from 3.1 (95%CI 2.2-4.0 percentage points for one dose of polio vaccine to 9.1 (95%CI 7.5-10.7 percentage points in the proportion of fully vaccinated children. Our findings also indicate JSY led to increased post-partum check-up rates and healthy early breastfeeding practices around the time of childbirth. No effect of JSY was found on exclusive breastfeeding practices and care-seeking behaviors. Effect sizes were consistently larger in states identified as being a key focus for the program. In an analysis stratified by possession of an immunization card, there was little to no effect of JSY among those with vaccination cards, while the effect size was much larger than the base case results for those missing vaccination cards, across nearly all immunization outcomes.Early results suggest the JSY program led to a significant increase in childhood immunization rates and some healthy reproductive health behaviors, but the structuring of financial incentives to pregnant women and health workers warrants further review. Causal interpretation of our results relies on the assumption that

  20. Selenium Se and tellurium Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busev, A.I.; Tiptsova, V.G.; Ivanov, V.M.

    1978-01-01

    The basic methods for determining selenium and tellurium in various objects are presented. The bichromatometric determination of Te in cadmium, zinc and mercury tellurides is based on oxidation of Te(4) to (6) in H 2 SO 4 with potassium bichromate. In steels, Te is determined photometrically with the aid of KI. The determination is hindered by Fe(3), Cu(2), Bi(3) and Se(4) ions, which must be separated. The extraction-photometric determination of Te in native sulfur is carried out with the aid of 5-mercapto-3-(naphthyl-2)-1,3,4-thiadiazolthione-2 (pH=4.8-5.0). The dyed complex is readily extracted with chloroform and benzene. The spectrophotometric determination of Te in selenium is performed with the aid of 3,5-diphenylpyrazoline-1-dithiocarbamate of sodium. Te is determined in commercial indium, arsenic and their semiconductor compounds photometrically with the aid of copper diethyldithiocarbamate. The method permits determining 5x10 -5 % Te in a weighed amount of 0.5 g. The chloride complex of Te(4) with diantipyriodolpropylmethane is quantitatively extracted with dichloroethane from hydrochloric acid solutions. Thus, any amounts of Te can be separated from Se and determined photometrically. The extraction-photometric determination of Te in commercial lead and bismuth is carried out with the aid of pyrazolone derivatives, in commercial copper with the aid of diantipyridolpropylmethane, and in ores (more than 0.01% Te) with the aid of bismuthol 2. Also described is the extraction-polarographic determination of Te in sulfide ores

  1. LIDERAZGO MULTICULTURAL: ESTUDIO COMPARATIVO INDIA-MÉXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BERTA ERMILA MADRIGAL TORRES

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta un estudio de caso de una empresa donde colaboran directivos de dos culturas: México e India; se plantean preguntas de investigación como: ¿cuáles son los valores, actitudes y habilidades que ambas culturas esperan de sus líderes?, ¿cuáles son las habilidades del líder y sus estilos de liderazgo? y ¿cuál es la distancia y dimensión del poder de los líderes de ambas culturas? Se diseñó un instrumento con las cinco características de la descripción de la personalidad enumeradas por Goldberg (1990, la aproximación de estilo de liderazgo de Madrigal (2009, y dimensión de la incertidumbre y distancia del poder con la teoría de Northouse (2012. Para poder llevar a cabo este estudio se encuestaron a 102 directivos de cultura india y mexicana en diferentes aspectos relacionados con la percepción de liderazgo. Los resultados demuestran que tanto los mexicanos como los indios tienden a preferir un estilo de liderazgo democrático. Finalmente se presentan como hallazgos las diferencias existentes en el colectivismo institucional y en la orientación al futuro de ambas culturas.

  2. CDM Country Guide for India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Under the Integrated Capacity Strengthening for the CDM (ICS-CDM) programme, IGES presents the CDM Country Guides, a series of manuals on CDM project development for Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Thailand. These guidebooks aim at facilitating CDM project developments in Asia by providing essential information to both project developers and potential investors. This volume is on India

  3. India's Trade in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shailendra

    2015-01-01

    India has had an extremely adverse balance of trade in education. Though only a minor education exporter through Mode 2, India is the world's second largest student-sending country. Nevertheless, given English as the medium of instruction especially in apex institutions, low tuition and cost of living, quite a few world-class institutions, and a…

  4. The Hanze-India Connection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuijsen, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    Hanze India connection. Presentatie gehouden op 09-06-2010. Bestaat uit foto's. Op uitnodiging van KPN, sponsor van het lectoraat New Business & ICT, bezocht Hugo Velthuijsen een aantal steden in India. Het doel was om ter plekke een beeld te krijgen van de mogelijkheden van IT en Business

  5. Worldwide WANO biennial in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrubelova, A.

    2010-01-01

    At the turn of January and February 2010, there was an annual general conference of the World Association of Nuclear Operators - WANO held in Delhi, India. One of the representatives, participating on behalf of Slovenske elektrarne, was also Mr. Robert Guns, a former Director of Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant. After his return from India, he was approached by Anna Vrubelova. (author)

  6. A Tale of Two Indias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    The latest battle between India's increasingly successful haves and left-behind have-nots is playing out in the country's educational system. India's Supreme Court recently upheld a stay against a quota system for low-caste and historically oppressed Indians, who are officially called Other Backward Classes. The decision could halt quotas for…

  7. India hiilgav viletsus / Andrei Hvostov

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hvostov, Andrei, 1963-

    2006-01-01

    Hiinat nimetatakse maailma töökojaks, Indiat aga bürooks (back office), võrdlus põhineb India IT-firmade edul - kõik tegevused, mida saab teha arvutite abil, kipuvad kolima Indiasse. Tulevikuriik India on hädas keskaegsete tavadega

  8. A woman ecologist in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lawrence

    in India. Priya Davidar. 28. As one of the first women to become a professor of eco- ogy in India, I ... gender as being of any significance to research involving fieldwork. This gave ... indifference. Looking back, I can see that having support from estab- ... Smithsonian Institution and Harvard University, among others, and had ...

  9. The Danish East India Company

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karsten Engsig

    2005-01-01

    The article analysis the first Danish East India Company incorporated in 1616, which was the first Danish Stock Company and which has impacts even on modern Danish company la......The article analysis the first Danish East India Company incorporated in 1616, which was the first Danish Stock Company and which has impacts even on modern Danish company la...

  10. Indigenisation of Psychology in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Ajit K.

    2011-01-01

    Academic psychology which made a new beginning in India in the early part of 20th century was modelled on the Western scientific tradition. The teaching of psychology was very much on the British pattern since the colonial rule, whereas the research was mostly an extension of the Western work in India. Psychology went through massive expansion…

  11. Adult Education in India & Abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nikhil Ranjan

    A survey is made of various aspects of adult education in India since 1947, together with comparative accounts of the origin, development, and notable features of adult education in Denmark, Great Britain, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Needs and objectives in India, largely in the eradication of illiteracy, are set forth, and pertinent…

  12. Initial drug resistance in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Initial drug resistance in India. There is gradual increase in primary MDR all over India : Pondi= Pondicherry 1985; Bangalore =1986; Jaipur = 1991; Jaipur =2000. Overall the MDR is less than 3% (TRC studies).

  13. India, Genomic diversity & Disease susceptibility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. India, Genomic diversity & Disease susceptibility · India, a paradise for Genetic Studies · Involved in earlier stages of Immune response protecting us from Diseases, Responsible for kidney and other transplant rejections Inherited from our parents · PowerPoint Presentation · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7.

  14. India-U.S. Relations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kronstadt, K. A

    2006-01-01

    The end of the Cold War freed India-U.S. relations from the constraints of global bipolarity, but interactions continued for a decade to be affected by the burden of history, most notably the longstanding India-Pakistan rivalry and nuclear...

  15. Se metallomics during lactic fermentation of Se-enriched yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, María; Gutiérrez, Ana M; Pérez-Conde, M Concepción; Cámara, Carmen; Madrid, Yolanda

    2014-12-01

    Selenium biotransformation by lactic acid bacteria during the preparation of Se-enriched yogurt was evaluated. The study focused on the distribution of selenium in the aqueous soluble protein fraction and the detection of selenoamino acids. Screening of selenium in Tris-buffer-urea soluble fraction was carried out by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after pre-fractionating with asymmetric field flow fractionation using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry as the detector. Selenium-containing fractions were identified by peptide mapping using nano LC-ESI/LTQMS. Proteins such as thioredoxin, glutaredoxin, albumin, β-lactoglobulin, and lactoperoxidase were identified in the selenium-containing fraction. All these proteins were detected in both the control and the selenium-enriched yogurt except chaperones, which were only detected in the control samples. Chaperones are heat-shock proteins expressed in response to elevated temperature or other cellular stresses. Selenium may have an effect on chaperones expression in Lactobacillus. For the amino acids analysis, selenocysteine was the primary seleno-containing species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. "Can we walk?" Environmental supports for physical activity in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlakha, Deepti; Hipp, J Aaron; Brownson, Ross C; A Eyler, Amy; K Lesorogol, Carolyn; Raghavan, Ramesh

    2017-10-01

    India is currently facing a non-communicable disease epidemic. Physical activity (PA) is a preventative factor for non-communicable diseases. Understanding the role of the built environment (BE) to facilitate or constrain PA is essential for public health interventions to increase population PA. The objective of this study was to understand BEs associations with PA occurring in two major life domains or life areas-travel and leisure-in urban India. Between December 2014 and April 2015, in-person surveys were conducted with participants (N=370; female=47.2%) in Chennai, India. Perceived BE characteristics regarding residential density, land use mix-diversity, land use mix-access, street connectivity, infrastructure for walking and bicycling, aesthetics, traffic safety, and safety from crime were measured using the adapted Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale-India (NEWS-India). Self-reported PA was measured the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. High residential density was associated with greater odds of travel PA (aOR=1.9, 95% CI=1.2, 3.2). Land use mix-diversity was positively related to travel PA (aOR=2.1, 95%CI=1.2, 3.6), but not associated with leisure or total PA. The aggregate NEWS-India score predicted a two-fold increase in odds of travel PA (aOR=1.9, 95% CI=1.1, 3.1) and a 40% decrease in odds of leisure PA (aOR=0.6, 95% CI=0.4, 1.0). However, the association of the aggregated score with leisure PA was not significant. Results suggest that relationships between BE and PA in low-and-middle income countries may be context-specific, and may differ markedly from higher income countries. Findings have public health implications for India suggesting that caution should be taken when translating evidence across countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prospective registration of clinical trials in India: strategies, achievements & challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharyan, Prathap

    2009-02-01

    This paper traces the development of the Clinical Trial Registry-India (CTRI) against the backdrop of the inequities in healthcare and the limitations in the design, conduct, regulation, oversight and reporting of clinical trials in India. It describes the scope and goals of the CTRI, the data elements it seeks and the process of registering clinical trials. It reports progress in trial registration in India and discusses the challenges in ensuring that healthcare decisions are informed by all the evidence. A descriptive survey of developments in clinical trial registration in India from publications in the Indian medical literature supplemented by first hand knowledge of these developments and an evaluation of how well clinical trials registered in the CTRI up to 10 January, 2009 comply with the requirements of the CTRI and the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trial Registry (WHO ICTRP). Considerable inequities exist within the Indian health system. Deficiencies in healthcare provision and uneven regulation of, and access to, affordable healthcare co-exists with a large private health system of uneven quality. India is now a preferred destination for outsourced clinical trials but is plagued by poor ethical oversight of the many trial sites and scant information of their existence. The CTRI's vision of conforming to international requirements for transparency and accountability but also using trial registration as a means of improving trial design, conduct and reporting led to the selection of registry-specific dataset items in addition to those endorsed by the WHO ICTRP. Compliance with these requirements is good for the trials currently registered but these trials represent only a fraction of the trials in progress in India. Prospective trial registration is a reality in India. The challenges facing the CTRI include better engagement with key stakeholders to ensure increased prospective registration of clinical trials and utilization of

  18. Epilepsy surgery: Recommendations for India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The following article recommends guidelines for epilepsy surgery for India. This article reviews the indications, the various surgical options available and the outcome of surgery for drug resistant epilepsy based on current evidence. Epilepsy surgery is a well-established option for patients who have been diagnosed to have drug resistant epilepsy (DRE (on at least two appropriate, adequate anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs (either in monotherapy or in combination with continuing seizures, where the presurgical work-up has shown concordance of structural imaging (magnetic resonance imaging and electrical mapping data (electroencephalography (EEG, video EEG. There may be a requirement of functional imaging techniques in a certain number of DRE like positron emission tomography (PET, single photon emission tomography, (SPECT. Invasive monitoring should be restricted to a few when all noninvasive investigations are inconclusive, there is a dual pathology or there is a discordance of noninvasive data. The types of surgery could be curative (resective surgeries: amygdalo hippocampectomy, lesionectomy and multilobar resections; functional surgeries: hemispherotomy and palliative (multiple subpial transaction, corpus callosotomy, vagal nerve stimulation. Epilepsy surgery in indicated cases has a success range from 50 to 86% in achieving seizure freedom as compared with < 5% success rate with AEDs only in persons with DRE. Centers performing surgery should be categorized into Level I and Level II.

  19. Viewing India from Religious Angle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu Yonghui

    2004-01-01

    @@ It would be impossible to understand India without any knowledge about the religions of this country. India is a developing country with many religions, nationalities and languages. This nation has long been noted for its democratic politics and multiculture. India was founded on the principle of secularism, but at the same time it has suffered from religions. Therefore, to have a clear idea about the basic conditions of India's multiple religious beliefs is the foundation for studies of its religions of the country, and is also one key to grasping Indian social politics. In early September 2004, the Indian government published religious data from the 2001 census. Accordingly, we can make some basic judgments about the religions in today's India.

  20. Understanding Color Risk Appropriateness: Influence of Color on a User’s Decision to Comply with the IT Security Policy—Evidence from the U.S. and India

    OpenAIRE

    Silic, Mario; Njavro, Mato; Oblakovic, Goran

    2017-01-01

    Color is a complex visual and design element that can produce various emotional, psychological and physical outcomes that can be expressed through religious, cultural, political or social meanings. Past studies have confirmed that culture is an important and integral part of the decision-making process in which color appeal is a salient antecedent to behavioral intentions in culturally distinct countries. However, in the context of computer warning messages, we are lacking clear evidence of h...

  1. Biodiesel scenario in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taj, S. [Bangalore Univ., Al-Ameen College, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Prasad, H. [Bangalore Univ., Central College, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Ramesh, N. [Reva College, Bangladore (India); Papavinasam, S. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Materials Technology Lab

    2009-08-15

    This article presented an overview of biodiesel production in India. Biodiesel has gained widespread acceptance in the United States and the European Union as a substitute for diesel. In early 2003, the Indian National Planning Commission launched a program to also foster development of vegetable oil based biofuels in order to address the energy challenges facing India. Approximately 57 per cent of rural Indian households are still not connected to the power grid, and India imports 75 per cent of its total petroleum. The National Planning Commission advocated widespread planting of an inedible, but high-yielding tree-born oilseed known as jatropha curcas that would serve as the primary feedstock for the production of vegetable oil based biofuels. Jatropha and pongamia are widely recognized as the most economically viable and environmentally neutral feedstock options. Both of these tree-borne oilseeds are adaptable to reasonably harsh climatic and growing conditions, enabling them to be cultivated on wastelands that are not currently used in agricultural production. The Commission recommended that 11.2 million hectares of jatropha be cultivated on marginal waste lands which would, over time, replace 20 per cent of total national diesel consumption with biodiesel. Both public and private sector players have begun to act on the Commission's plan. More than a hundred thousand hectares of jatropha have been planted and private firms have begun to build biodiesel processing plants. State-owned petroleum product marketing firms have committed to distributing biodiesel through some existing distribution channels. 8 refs., 6 tabs., 3 figs.

  2. Electricity supply in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, H.J.

    1993-09-01

    This briefing deals with the electricity supply industry in India in two parts. In the first, the structure and organization of the industry is described under sections dealing with national government involvement, energy policy, state electricity boards, regional electricity boards, state corporations, the private sector and private investment in the power sector including foreign investment. Secondly, the power supply system is described covering generation, plant load factor, non-utility generation, nuclear power, transmission and distribution, system losses and electricity consumption. (8 tables) (UK)

  3. Astronomical Instruments in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Sreeramula Rajeswara

    The earliest astronomical instruments used in India were the gnomon and the water clock. In the early seventh century, Brahmagupta described ten types of instruments, which were adopted by all subsequent writers with minor modifications. Contact with Islamic astronomy in the second millennium AD led to a radical change. Sanskrit texts began to lay emphasis on the importance of observational instruments. Exclusive texts on instruments were composed. Islamic instruments like the astrolabe were adopted and some new types of instruments were developed. Production and use of these traditional instruments continued, along with the cultivation of traditional astronomy, up to the end of the nineteenth century.

  4. Securing India's energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghuraman, V.

    2009-01-01

    India's development aspirations are challenged by energy security and climate change considerations. The integrated energy policy clearly deliberates the need to intensify all energy options with emphasis on maximizing indigenous coal production, harnessing hydropower, increasing adoption of renewables, intensifying hydrocarbon exploration and production and anchoring nuclear power development to meet the long-term requirements. The report also emphasizes the need to secure overseas hydrocarbon and coal assets. Subsequently the National Action Plan on climate change has underscored the need to wean away from fossil fuels, the ambitious National Solar Mission is a case in point. Ultimately securing India's energy future lies in clean coal, safe nuclear and innovative solar. Coal is the key energy option in the foreseeable future. Initiatives are needed to take lead role in clean coal technologies, in-situ coal gasification, tapping coal bed methane, coal to liquids and coal to gas technologies. There is need to intensify oil exploration by laying the road-map to open acreage to unlock the hydrocarbon potential. Pursue alternate routes based on shale, methane from marginal fields. Effectively to use oil diplomacy to secure and diversify sources of supply including trans-national pipelines and engage with friendly countries to augment strategic resources. Technologies to be accessed and developed with international co-operation and financial assistance. Public-Private Partnerships, in collaborative R and D projects need to be accelerated. Nuclear share of electricity generation capacity to be increased 6 to 7% of 63000 MW by 2031-32 and further to 25% (300000 MW) capacity by 2050 is to be realized by operationalizing the country's thorium programme. Nuclear renaissance has opened up opportunities for the Indian industry to meet not only India's requirements but also participate in the global nuclear commerce; India has the potential to emerge as a manufacturing hub

  5. Mathematics in India

    CERN Document Server

    Plofker, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Based on extensive research in Sanskrit sources, Mathematics in India chronicles the development of mathematical techniques and texts in South Asia from antiquity to the early modern period. Kim Plofker reexamines the few facts about Indian mathematics that have become common knowledge--such as the Indian origin of Arabic numerals--and she sets them in a larger textual and cultural framework. The book details aspects of the subject that have been largely passed over in the past, including the relationships between Indian mathematics and astronomy, and their cross-fertilizations with Islamic sc

  6. Encuentros entre la India y Occidente en el mundo antiguo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Román López

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Hay diversos testimonios sobre relaciones comerciales y culturales que, mucho antes de la caída de Babilonia y hasta el siglo vi de nuestra Era, tenían lugar entre el Próximo Oriente y Occidente, por un lado, y la India por otro. La expedición de Alejandro Magno en la India dio lugar no sólo a contactos militares, sino a debates filosófico-religiosos. Se halla una descripción casi completa de la flora en los autores griegos, y no es posible ignorar el arte grecobúdico que floreció después de la muerte de Alejandro en los reinos helénicos de la frontera. Está demostrado que misioneros budistas fueron enviados por el emperador Ashoka a Siria, Egipto, IVIacedonia, etc. En la época del Imperio romano las relaciones entre la India y el mundo occidental fueron muy frecuentes.There are several testimonies about comercial and cultural relationships that, after the falling of Babilonia and unta the VI century of our edge, were made between next Orient and Occident in one side, and India on the other side. The expedition of Alexander the Great to India made, note only military relations but philosophie and religious debates. It has been found a mostly complete description of the Flora on the greek authors, and it's not posible to ignore the grecobudie art that bloomed after Alexander death at the Helenio Kingdoms on the border. It's preved that budist missioners were send by the Ashoka emperor to Siria, Egipt, Macedonie, etc. On the Román Empire edge the relationships between India and the Occident worid were so frecuent.

  7. Energy in India's Future: Insights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesourne, J.; Ramsay, W.C.; Jaureguy-Naudin, Maite; Boillot, Jean-Joseph; Autheman, Nicolas; Ruet, Joel; Siddiqui, Zakaria; Zaleski, C. Pierre; Cruciani, Michel

    2009-01-01

    In the decades following India's independence from British rule in 1947, the West's image of India was summarized in three simple cliches: the world's largest democracy, an impoverished continent, and economic growth hampered by a fussy bureaucracy and the caste system, all in a context of a particular religion. These cliches are perhaps one of the reasons that the success of India's green revolution was recognized so late, a revolution that allowed the country to develop its agricultural sector and to feed its population. Since the 1990's, the easing of planning constraints have liberated the Indian economy and allowed it to embark on a more significant path of growth. New cliches have begun to replace the old: India will become a second China and, lagging by 10 to 20 years, will follow the same trajectory, with its development marked more by services and the use of renewable energy. However, these trends will not prevent primary energy demand from exploding. On the contrary, India faces difficult choices on how it increases clean, secure, affordable energy to all its citizens. Many of the choices are the same as found elsewhere, but on a scale matched only by China. The IFRI European Governance and Geopolitics of Energy Project intends this study to deepen public understanding of the magnitude of India's challenges. Various aspects of the serious energy problems are studied throughout this monograph. The authors have written freely on these matters without attempting to reconcile their different viewpoints. The first chapter, by Maite Jaureguy-Naudin and Jacques Lesourne, presents an overview of India's present and future energy system. The authors follow a prudent but realistic view of India's future. The second chapter, by Jean-Joseph Boillot, a French expert on India who has published several books and articles on this subject, and Nicolas Autheman, research fellow, describes in greater detail the specifics of India's economy and the actors who are now present

  8. Bio-fortification and isotopic labelling of Se metabolites in onions and carrots following foliar application of Se and 77Se

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kápolna, Emese; Laursen, Kristian H.; Husted, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Se. The 77Se- labelled metabolites in onions were predominantly γ-glutamyl-77Se-selenomethyl-selenocysteine (γ-glu-Me77SeCys), 77Se-methylselenocysteine (Me77SeCys) and 77Se-selenomethionine (77SeMet). Furthermore, we report here for the first time the finding in carrots of the bioactive Me77SeCys...

  9. Rusia, China, India y Asia Central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Blank

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available La próxima entrada de India en la Organización de Cooperación de Shanghái puede ser importante para Delhi pero no puede deshacer el factor crítico de que China se está convirtiendo cada vez más en el actor extranjero más relevante en Asia Central y que Rusia está dependiendo de China hasta el punto de que su Ministerio de Defensa ha buscado formalmente una alianza con China en contra del terrorismo, «las revoluciones de colores» y los Estados Unidos. China está ganando en la competición por la influencia sobre Asia Central, India apenas es competitiva allí y Rusia está perdiendo terreno paulatinamente, principalmente debido a sus propios fracasos para acrecentar su capacidad económica-política, incluso antes de invadir Ucrania. Las consecuencias de esa jugada tan solo han acelerado el proceso de su creciente dependencia de China.

  10. Holocene aridification of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponton, C.; Giosan, L.; Eglinton, T.I.; Fuller, D.Q.; Johnson, J.E.; Kumar, P.; Collett, T.S.

    2012-01-01

    Spanning a latitudinal range typical for deserts, the Indian peninsula is fertile instead and sustains over a billion people through monsoonal rains. Despite the strong link between climate and society, our knowledge of the long-term monsoon variability is incomplete over the Indian subcontinent. Here we reconstruct the Holocene paleoclimate in the core monsoon zone (CMZ) of the Indian peninsula using a sediment core recovered offshore from the mouth of Godavari River. Carbon isotopes of sedimentary leaf waxes provide an integrated and regionally extensive record of the flora in the CMZ and document a gradual increase in aridity-adapted vegetation from ???4,000 until 1,700 years ago followed by the persistence of aridity-adapted plants after that. The oxygen isotopic composition of planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber detects unprecedented high salinity events in the Bay of Bengal over the last 3,000 years, and especially after 1,700 years ago, which suggest that the CMZ aridification intensified in the late Holocene through a series of sub-millennial dry episodes. Cultural changes occurred across the Indian subcontinent as the climate became more arid after ???4,000 years. Sedentary agriculture took hold in the drying central and south India, while the urban Harappan civilization collapsed in the already arid Indus basin. The establishment of a more variable hydroclimate over the last ca. 1,700 years may have led to the rapid proliferation of water-conservation technology in south India. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Neuropsychology in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J Keshav; Sadasivan, Akila

    2016-11-01

    This is an invited paper for a special issue with the objective to provide information on neuropsychology in India. Information was gathered from a literature search and personal communication with professionals working in the field of neuropsychology. Neuropsychology as a specialization started in India approximately 40 years ago. The early years witnessed the use of Western tools for assessing patients with organic brain damage. Subsequent years saw the development of indigenous tools for use with the vast majority of the Indian population and also a few Western tests adapted to suit the needs of the unique Indian clientele. The starting of the Neuropsychology unit at the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS) in Bangalore in 1975 resulted in changing of the course of training and practice of Neuropsychology. The field of assessments has witnessed indigenous tests being developed, while rehabilitation programs have brought about a decline in cognitive deficits in several clinical conditions. Currently, work within the field of neuropsychology has focused on child, geriatric, acquired brain injury, and forensic populations with a development of unique rehabilitations to suit needs of several clinical conditions. However, there are very few neuropsychologists in the country, and only one nodal training center, which limits the availability of training to the large population of the country. Despite the shortcomings, the field of neuropsychology has received much attention in the recent years with the number of referrals and professionals increasing.

  12. Carbon taxes and India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher-Vanden, K.A.; Pitcher, H.M.; Edmonds, J.A.; Kim, S.H.; Shukla, P.R.

    1994-07-01

    Using the Indian module of the Second Generation Model 9SGM, we explore a reference case and three scenarios in which greenhouse gas emissions were controlled. Two alternative policy instruments (carbon taxes and tradable permits) were analyzed to determine comparative costs of stabilizing emissions at (1) 1990 levels (the 1 X case), (2) two times the 1990 levels (the 2X case), and (3) three times the 1990 levels (the 3X case). The analysis takes into account India's rapidly growing population and the abundance of coal and biomass relative to other fuels. We also explore the impacts of a global tradable permits market to stabilize global carbon emissions on the Indian economy under the following two emissions allowance allocation methods: (1) open-quotes Grandfathered emissionsclose quotes: emissions allowances are allocated based on 1990 emissions. (2) open-quotes Equal per capita emissionsclose quotes: emissions allowances are allocated based on share of global population. Tradable permits represent a lower cost method to stabilize Indian emissions than carbon taxes, i.e., global action would benefit India more than independent actions

  13. Yoga en la India antigua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Román López

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Las orientaciones precisas de la religión hindú para desarrollar las capacidades del hombre se hallan bajo el nombre de Yoga. El yoga es un conjunto de técnicas de dominio de sí mismo y meditación, que en el hinduismo adopta distintas modalidades; se puede hablar del yoga hindú, budista, jainista, etc. En sentido más restringido, el término se refiere a una de las seis escuelas ortodoxas de la filosofía india. Asimismo, se designa con la palabra yoga toda instrucción o disciplina encaminada hacia la liberación. Existen en el hinduismo numerosas denominaciones para las diferentes sendas del yoga. Las más conocidas en Occidente son: bhakti-yoga o «yoga de la correcta actitud religiosa»; rája-yoga o «yoga del desarrollo de la conciencia»; karma-yoga o «yoga de las acciones correctas»; jñána-yoga o «yoga del conocimiento» y hatha-yoga o «yoga del poder sobre el cuerpo». La doctrina clásica sobre el yoga está recogida en los Yoga-Sütra de Patañjali. A partir de una cierta época el sistema Yoga fue combinado eclécticamente con el sistema Samkhya.The precise orientations of the Hindú religión to develop men abilities are under the ñame of Yoga. The yoga is a join of techniques of meditation and self-domination, in which Hinduism have different modalities; it can be talk about Hindú yoga, Buddhist yoga, janist yoga, etc.. In a more restricted way, the word refers to one of the six orthodox schools of the Indian philosophy. It's desing, as well, with the word yoga, every instruction or discipline direct to liberation. There are so many denominations in Hinduism for the different yoga ways. The most known in Occident are bhakti-yoga or «yoga of the ríght religious actitude»; rája-yoga or «yoga of the conscience develop»; Karmayoga or «yoga of the corred action», jñána-yogsa or «yoga of the knowledge» and hatha-yoga or «yoga of ttie power on tlie body». The classic yoga doctrine is collect in the yoga

  14. Problem Etnisitas India Dalam Cerita Pendek Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    M. Shoim Anwar

    2015-01-01

    Karya sastra adalah dokumen kemanusiaan dan kebudayaan. Kumpulan cerita pendek Menara 7 (1998), terutama enam cerpen yang ditulis oleh pengarang Malaysia beretnis India, memberi gambaran problem kehidupan etnis India di Malaysia. Dengan meminjam teori etnisitas sebagai landasan, tulisan ini bertujuan mengungkap problem etnisitas India di Malaysia. Problem etnis India terkait dengan kemiskinan, pendidikan, gender, religi, budaya, dan persatuan. Keberadaan etnis India di Malaysia secara histori...

  15. A deep structural ridge beneath central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, P. K.; Thakur, N. K.; Negi, J. G.

    A joint-inversion of magnetic satellite (MAGSAT) and free air gravity data has been conducted to quantitatively investigate the cause for Bouguer gravity anomaly over Central Indian plateaus and possible fold consequences beside Himalayan zone in the Indian sub-continent due to collision between Indian and Eurasian plates. The appropriate inversion with 40 km crustal depth model has delineated after discriminating high density and magnetisation models, for the first time, about 1500 km long hidden ridge structure trending NW-SE. The structure is parallel to Himalayan fold axis and the Indian Ocean ridge in the Arabian Sea. A quantitative relief model across a representative anomaly profile confirms the ridge structure with its highest point nearly 6 km higher than the surrounding crustal level in peninsular India. The ridge structure finds visible support from the astro-geoidal contours.

  16. Phase diagram of Se-CaIn4Se7 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musaeva, R.I.; Aliev, I.I; Ismailova, F.I; Aliev, A.A

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The Se-CaIn 4 Se 7 system has been studied using methods of differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, micro structural analysis, density measurements and its phase diagram has been constructed. It has been established that the section Se-CaIn 4 Se 7 is a quasibinary section of the ternary system Ca-In-Se. At room temperature, on the basis of CaIn 2 Se 4 and Se no solid solution has been found

  17. Die kerk se korporatiewe identiteit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Buitendag

    2003-10-01

    This article investigates the rather unknown theme of “corporate identity and corporate image” as applied to the church. Starting from the premise that corporate identity enables us to communicate change, direction and a church’s point of difference, it is evident that proper strategic and visionary management is a prerequisite for the church today. “Corporate image is in the eyes of the world” and this urges the church to regard this undertaking in a serious light. Thus, a church's unique selling proposition has to be identified, not necessarily to compete, but to add specific value for its members. The concept of “sur/petition” of Edward de Bono (vis-à-vis competition is pursued in an integrated value system. The article addresses the distortion between the intended and the received image of the church.

  18. Variational approach to 68 Se

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovici, A.; Schmid, K.W.; Faessler, A.; Baktash, C.; Shashi, P.

    1999-01-01

    . Furthermore, our results concerning the pair structure of the wave functions of the even-spin states in chains of even-even and odd-odd N = Z nuclei in the A 60 - 80 mass region revealed a clear interplay between isovector neutron-proton and like-nucleon pairing correlations. Nevertheless, detailed aspects of these properties are sensitive to the renormalization of the effective interaction in the pairing channels. Taking advantage of our microscopic investigations on the coexistence phenomena in this mass region, which have already past many experimental tests, we address the problem of the structure of the lowest few even-spin positive-parity states in 68 Se. Also we present details of the results obtained using a few slightly different prescriptions for the effective interaction in order to illustrate the above mentioned problems. The theoretical spectrum of 68 Se for even spin positive parity states is compared with the experimental results. (authors)

  19. Aerosol Optical Depth Over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Liji Mary; Ravishankara, A. R.; Kodros, John K.; Venkataraman, Chandra; Sadavarte, Pankaj; Pierce, Jeffrey R.; Chaliyakunnel, Sreelekha; Millet, Dylan B.

    2018-04-01

    Tropospheric aerosol optical depth (AOD) over India was simulated by Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS)-Chem, a global 3-D chemical-transport model, using SMOG (Speciated Multi-pOllutant Generator from Indian Institute of Technology Bombay) and GEOS-Chem (GC) (current inventories used in the GEOS-Chem model) inventories for 2012. The simulated AODs were 80% (SMOG) and 60% (GC) of those measured by the satellites (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer). There is no strong seasonal variation in AOD over India. The peak AOD values are observed/simulated during summer. The simulated AOD using SMOG inventory has particulate black and organic carbon AOD higher by a factor 5 and 3, respectively, compared to GC inventory. The model underpredicted coarse-mode AOD but agreed for fine-mode AOD with Aerosol Robotic Network data. It captured dust only over Western India, which is a desert, and not elsewhere, probably due to inaccurate dust transport and/or noninclusion of other dust sources. The calculated AOD, after dust correction, showed the general features in its observed spatial variation. Highest AOD values were observed over the Indo-Gangetic Plain followed by Central and Southern India with lowest values in Northern India. Transport of aerosols from Indo-Gangetic Plain and Central India into Eastern India, where emissions are low, is significant. The major contributors to total AOD over India are inorganic aerosol (41-64%), organic carbon (14-26%), and dust (7-32%). AOD over most regions of India is a factor of 5 or higher than over the United States.

  20. Limits to Economic Growth: Why Direct Investments Are Needed to Address Child Undernutrition in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, S V; Subramanyam, Malavika A

    2015-11-01

    About two of every five undernourished young children of the world live in India. These high levels of child undernutrition have persisted in India for several years, even in its relatively well-developed states. Moreover, this pattern was observed during a period of rapid economic growth. Evidence from India and other developing countries suggests that economic growth has little to no impact on reducing child undernutrition. We argue that a growth-mediated strategy is unlikely to be effective in tackling child undernutrition unless growth is pro-poor and leads to investment in programs addressing the root causes of this persistent challenge.

  1. India-EU relations in health services: prospects and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background India and the EU are currently negotiating a Trade and Investment Agreement which also covers services. This paper examines the opportunities for and constraints to India-EU relations in health services in the context of this agreement, focusing on the EU as a market for India's health services exports and collaboration. The paper provides an overview of key features of health services in the EU and India and their bearing on bilateral relations in this sector. Methods Twenty six semi-structured, in-person, and telephonic interviews were conducted in 2007-2008 in four Indian cities. The respondents included management and practitioners in a variety of healthcare establishments, health sector representatives in Indian industry associations, health sector officials in the Indian government, and official representatives of selected EU countries and the European Commission based in New Delhi. Secondary sources were used to supplement and corroborate these findings. Results The interviews revealed that India-EU relations in health services are currently very limited. However, several opportunity segments exist, namely: (i) Telemedicine; (ii) Clinical trials and research in India for EU-based pharmaceutical companies; (iii) Medical transcriptions and back office support; (iv) Medical value travel; and (v) Collaborative ventures in medical education, research, training, staff deployment, and product development. However, various factors constrain India's exports to the EU. These include data protection regulations; recognition requirements; insurance portability restrictions; discriminatory conditions; and cultural, social, and perception-related barriers. The interviews also revealed several constraints in the Indian health care sector, including disparity in domestic standards and training, absence of clear guidelines and procedures, and inadequate infrastructure. Conclusions The paper concludes that although there are several promising areas for India

  2. India-EU relations in health services: prospects and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanda Rupa

    2011-02-01

    promising areas for India-EU relations in health services, it will be difficult to realize these opportunities given the pre-dominance of public healthcare delivery in the EU and sensitivities associated with commercializing healthcare. Hence, a gradual approach based on pilot initiatives and selective collaboration would be advisable initially, which could be expanded once there is demonstrated evidence on outcomes. Overall, the paper makes a contribution to the social science and health literature by adding to the limited primary evidence base on globalization and health, especially from a developing-developed country and regional perspective.

  3. Monitoring misuse of the WHO name and emblem in medicine promotion in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thawani, Vijay; Gharpure, Kunda

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organisation has called for the ethical promotion of medicines. This study to monitor the misuse of the WHO name and emblem in medicine promotion in India found that the name or emblem of WHO has been used extensively for unethical promotion of drugs, nutritional supplements and consumer products in India. This unethical promotion is evident in advertisements, pharmaceutical indices and other publicity material.

  4. The absolute age of SE-RF-6 (Ngamanie) and its relation to SE-RF-2 (Nenumbo) : two decorated lapita sites in the southeast Solomon Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R.C.; Jones, M.

    2007-01-01

    The relative age of SE-RF-6, SE-RF-2 and SE-SZ-8, three decorative phase Lapita sites in the Reef/Santa Cruz region of the Outer Easter Islands of Solomon Islands, has been the subject of dispute. A review of the evidence recovered from SE-RF-6 (Ngamanie), in conjunction with a Bayesian calibration model, supports the notion that it postdates the nearby site of SE-RF-2 (Nenumbo). We conclude that the SE-RF-6 represents an occupation of 50 to 100 years duration (compared with 50 or less for SE-RF-2), beginning some time in the interval 2470-2910 BP. (author). 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  5. The Ag2Se-HgSe-GeSe2 system and crystal structures of the compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parasyuk, O.V.; Gulay, L.D.; Romanyuk, Ya.E.; Olekseyuk, I.D.; Piskach, L.V.

    2003-01-01

    The phase diagram of the quasi-ternary Ag 2 Se-HgSe-GeSe 2 system at 298 K was investigated using X-ray phase analysis and metallography. The formation of five intermediate quaternary phases β (Ag ∼7.12-∼6.32 Hg ∼0.44-∼0.82 GeSe 6 ), γ (Ag ∼6.08-∼4.00 Hg ∼0.96-∼2.00 GeSe 6 ), δ (Ag 3.4 Hg 2.3 GeSe 6 ), ε (Ag ∼2.24-∼2.00 Hg ∼2.88-∼3.00 GeSe 6 ) and ∼Ag 1.4 Hg 1.3 GeSe 6 was established. The crystal structure of the β-phase (for the Ag 6.504 Hg 0.912 GeSe 6 composition) was determined using X-ray single crystal diffraction. It crystallizes in a cubic structure (space group F4-bar 3m) with the lattice parameter a=1.09026(4) nm. The crystal structure of the δ-phase (Ag 3.4 Hg 2.3 GeSe 6 ) was determined using X-ray powder diffraction (space group F4-bar 3m, a=1.07767(8) nm). The crystal structure determination of the γ-phase (space group Pmn2 1 ) was performed for the compositions Ag 5.6 Hg 1.2 GeSe 6 , Ag 4.8 Hg 1.6 GeSe 6 and Ag 4 Hg 2 GeSe 6 using X-ray powder diffraction. The crystal structure of the LT-Hg 2 GeSe 4 compound (space group I4-bar , a=0.56786(2), c=1.12579(5) nm) was confirmed by powder diffraction also.

  6. India and the CTBT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Jasjit

    1996-01-01

    In trying to understand the Indian position with regard to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) negotiated at the Conference on Disarmament (CD), it is necessary to note that this is a position for which extensive widespread consensus exists in the country. Two factors have been responsible for the evolution of this consensus. One concerns some core fundamental issues where nuclear disarmament is central to the Indian position; and the second relates to the technical and operational aspects of the treaty in terms of its comprehensiveness and verification means and methods. India's position that it will not sign the treaty in its present form is based on what it sees as central issues related to both aspects, although the issue of binding commitments to nuclear disarmament is more central. 15 refs

  7. East India Company Logbooks - Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection consists of images of 1,235 ship logbooks created during British East India Company voyages. Period of record 1786-1834, peaking in 1804. The...

  8. India's Approaching Expeditionary Armed Forces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liermann, Christopher R

    2008-01-01

    .... As the world's fastest growing population with an enormous capitalist appetite, India finds itself a strategic partner of the United States, and yet a global competitor interested in agreements...

  9. Marine archaeological research in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.; Sundaresh; Vora, K.H.; Bandodkar, S.N.

    of this activity. All the developed countries have made tremendous progress in this field and substantial progress has been made in India in marine archaeology. Over the years the National Institute of Oceanography in collaboration with other Government agencies...

  10. Assessment of India's Research Literature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kostoff, Ronald N; Johnson, Dustin; Bowles, Christine A; Dodbele, Simha

    2006-01-01

    .... A representative database of technical articles was extracted from the Science Citation Index for the years 1991, 2002, and 2005, with each article containing at least one author with an India address...

  11. The Wildlife Institute of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 9. Careers in Nature Conservation: The Wildlife Institute of India. T R Shankar Raman. Information and Announcements Volume 1 Issue 9 September 1996 pp 89-93 ...

  12. Women's cardiovascular health in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Clara K; Patel, Anushka A

    2012-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death among adult women in many parts of India and a major cause of morbidity. In some parts of the world, gender inequities have been observed in cardiovascular healthcare and cardiovascular outcomes. The authors discuss the data for potential disparities in cardiovascular healthcare for women in India. Data on cardiovascular healthcare provision and CVD outcomes among women in India are generally lacking. The little available data suggest that women in rural areas, younger women and girl children with CVD are less likely to receive appropriate management than men, with this disparity most apparent in those of lower socioeconomic status and education. However, there is a particular lack of information about the prevention and management of atherosclerotic heart disease in women from a range of communities that comprise the extremely diverse population of India.

  13. India: Project Control. Annex 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavan, V.

    1999-01-01

    This annex deals with project control. India is a country with a long history of nuclear power development, mostly based on indigenous technology and resources. The nuclear power programme has suffered considerable delays due to technical and financial. (author)

  14. Multivariate Granger causality between CO2 emissions, energy consumption, FDI (foreign direct investment) and GDP (gross domestic product): Evidence from a panel of BRIC (Brazil, Russian Federation, India, and China) countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pao, Hsiao-Tien; Tsai, Chung-Ming

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the impact of both economic growth and financial development on environmental degradation using a panel cointegration technique for the period between 1980 and 2007, except for Russia (1992-2007). In long-run equilibrium, CO 2 emissions appear to be energy consumption elastic and FDI inelastic, and the results seem to support the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) hypothesis. The causality results indicate that there exists strong bidirectional causality between emissions and FDI and unidirectional strong causality running from output to FDI. The evidence seems to support the pollution haven and both the halo and scale effects. Therefore, in attracting FDI, developing countries should strictly examine the qualifications for foreign investment or to promote environmental protection through the coordinated know-how and technological transfer with foreign companies to avoid environmental damage. Additionally, there exists strong output-emissions and output-energy consumption bidirectional causality, while there is unidirectional strong causality running from energy consumption to emissions. Overall, the method of managing both energy demand and FDI and increasing both investment in the energy supply and energy efficiency to reduce CO 2 emissions and without compromising the country's competitiveness can be adopted by energy-dependent BRIC countries.

  15. What's the best place for me? : location‐choice for S&E students in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hercog, M.; van de Laar, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines how national migration policies and country‐specific factors in receiving countries attend to a potential highly‐skilled migrant when one is deciding among several possible locations. While continental European countries recognize the need to attract migrants as a key component

  16. India : tous les projets | Page 10 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Région: India, Far East Asia, Philippines, Thailand, Central Asia, South Asia ... Ces dernières, en effet, ont privilégié les cultures de rente et les céréales ... à la vie politique en Inde - utilisent-elles la voie parlementaire pour se faire entendre ?

  17. India : tous les projets | Page 17 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sujet: SOCIAL PARTICIPATION, CIVIL SOCIETY, DEFENCE POLICY, MILITARY EXPENDITURE, WEAPON PROCUREMENT. Région: South Asia, Central Asia, Far East Asia, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Afghanistan. Programme: Gouvernance et justice. Financement total : CA$ 76,500.00. Synthèse de ...

  18. Mental Hospitals in India: Reforms for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daund, Muktesh; Sonavane, Sushma; Shrivastava, Amresh; Desousa, Avinash; Kumawat, Sanjay

    2018-02-01

    Mental hospitals are an integral part of mental health services in India. It is an interesting story how mental hospitals have responded to the challenges of contemporary period they were built in. It is beyond doubt that it is a progressive journey along with advances in mental health both in India and internationally. As in other countries, mental hospitals in India have responded to the social challenges, disparities, and poor resources of workforce and fiscal investment. Historically, there have been changes and three major reforms are needed, namely attempt to facilitate discharge and placing patients back into the family, introducing teaching and research in mental hospitals, and accountability to civil rights as per the requirements of the National Human Rights Commission. In this review, we explore the brief history of mental hospitals in India and examine the reforms in the clinical, administrative, and psychosocial areas of these hospitals and progress in teaching and research. We finally summarize and conclude the necessity and the relevance of mental hospitals in India akin to modern psychiatric practice. We believe that mental hospitals have an important and perhaps a central role in mental health services in India. Its modernization to address issues of long-term stay, burden on caregivers, stigma, research and teaching including undergraduate and postgraduate training, new curriculum, and training for nonpsychiatric professionals and primary care physicians are necessary components of the role of mental hospitals and responsibilities of both government and nongovernmental sectors. Last but not the least, it is obligatory for mental hospitals to ensure that evidence-based treatments are implemented and that the standard of care and respect of civil and human rights of the patients and families are provided while involving the people's participation in its functioning.

  19. Challenges in India and Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, W

    1997-12-01

    While India is making overall progress in maternal and child health and reproductive health (MCH/RH), all states are not moving ahead. In fact, it is the states with the larger populations which are lagging behind. Primary education, women's status, and literacy remain problematic. UNFPA has worked in India for a long time, helping to realize the decline in total fertility rate from 6 to 3.5 over the past 20-30 years. India's population, however, is still growing at the annual rate of 1.8%. UNFPA's program in India for the period 1997-2001 will stress women's health as a matter of overall reproductive health, a new approach in India which has long relied upon sterilization. Attention must be given to meeting the needs of the poor in India as the country continues to grow in size and wealth. While Bhutan's estimated population is just over 1 million, the annual population growth rate of 3.1% threatens development over the long term. With a mountainous terrain and a low resource base, Bhutan cannot sustain a high population growth rate. Significant improvements have been made and women's status is good, the infant mortality rate has been reduced, and the health infrastructure is not bad. UNFPA's 5-year program beginning in 1998 will mainly address RH, especially adolescent RH.

  20. Contract Labour (Regulation and Abolition) Act 1970 and labour market flexibility: An exploratory assessment of contract labour use in India's formal manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Deb Kusum; Choudhury, Homagni; Singh, Jaivir

    2015-01-01

    One particularly significant piece of labour legislation in India is the Contract Labour (Regulation and Abolition) Act, 1970 (CLA,1970), which regulates labour hired by firms through the offices of a labour contractor - such labour being referred to as 'contract' labour in India. This paper seeks to examine this Act and its implication for manufacturing employment in India. While empirical evidence seems to indicate the presence of large number of 'contract' workers in the Indian manufacturi...

  1. Aspiring Pain Practitioners in India: Assessing Challenges and Building Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Sushma; Patel, Anuradha; Raja, Srinivasa N

    2018-01-01

    Background: Pain medicine is a developing specialty, aimed at relieving pain and suffering, enhancing function, and improving the quality of life of patients. Pain is often ignored, under-reported and mismanaged by health-care providers. Aspiring pain physicians in India face many challenges and barriers in advancing their specialty. Objectives: The objective of this study is to determine the challenges in establishing a pain practice in India and to discuss the opportunities and strategies to overcome these barriers. Subjects and Methods: Face-to-face interactive sessions were held with 60 aspiring pain physicians of India who were chosen as registrants to an International Association for the Study of Pain-Indian Society for Study of Pain multidisciplinary evidence-based pain management program conducted at Delhi and Mumbai. The available opportunities, practical issues and the hurdles in becoming a pain specialist were analyzed and summarized in this commentary. Results: The major barriers identified were: (1) Inadequate knowledge and absence of structured, educational and training courses, (2) bureaucratic hurdles, and (3) concerns of opioid misuse and addiction. The opportunities for personal growth and that of the specialty that could be utilized include the creation of a pain resource team, increasing community awareness, changing attitudes of other physicians toward pain specialty, and research and evidence building of the effectiveness of pain management strategies. Conclusion: India needs a structured teaching and training program in the area of pain medicine that is affiliated by the Medical Council of India or other reputed boards of medical education and certification. There is an urgent need to include pain management in the undergraduate and postgraduate medical curriculum. Enhancing community level awareness by public health education campaigns, developing networks of pain physicians, and appropriate marketing of the specialty is needed to make pain

  2. Aspiring Pain Practitioners in India: Assessing Challenges and Building Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Sushma; Patel, Anuradha; Raja, Srinivasa N

    2018-01-01

    Pain medicine is a developing specialty, aimed at relieving pain and suffering, enhancing function, and improving the quality of life of patients. Pain is often ignored, under-reported and mismanaged by health-care providers. Aspiring pain physicians in India face many challenges and barriers in advancing their specialty. The objective of this study is to determine the challenges in establishing a pain practice in India and to discuss the opportunities and strategies to overcome these barriers. Face-to-face interactive sessions were held with 60 aspiring pain physicians of India who were chosen as registrants to an International Association for the Study of Pain-Indian Society for Study of Pain multidisciplinary evidence-based pain management program conducted at Delhi and Mumbai. The available opportunities, practical issues and the hurdles in becoming a pain specialist were analyzed and summarized in this commentary. The major barriers identified were: (1) Inadequate knowledge and absence of structured, educational and training courses, (2) bureaucratic hurdles, and (3) concerns of opioid misuse and addiction. The opportunities for personal growth and that of the specialty that could be utilized include the creation of a pain resource team, increasing community awareness, changing attitudes of other physicians toward pain specialty, and research and evidence building of the effectiveness of pain management strategies. India needs a structured teaching and training program in the area of pain medicine that is affiliated by the Medical Council of India or other reputed boards of medical education and certification. There is an urgent need to include pain management in the undergraduate and postgraduate medical curriculum. Enhancing community level awareness by public health education campaigns, developing networks of pain physicians, and appropriate marketing of the specialty is needed to make pain medicine recognized and utilized as a valuable specialty.

  3. Aspiring pain practitioners in India: Assessing challenges and building opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Bhatnagar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain medicine is a developing specialty, aimed at relieving pain and suffering, enhancing function, and improving the quality of life of patients. Pain is often ignored, under-reported and mismanaged by health-care providers. Aspiring pain physicians in India face many challenges and barriers in advancing their specialty. Objectives: The objective of this study is to determine the challenges in establishing a pain practice in India and to discuss the opportunities and strategies to overcome these barriers. Subjects and Methods: Face-to-face interactive sessions were held with 60 aspiring pain physicians of India who were chosen as registrants to an International Association for the Study of Pain-Indian Society for Study of Pain multidisciplinary evidence-based pain management program conducted at Delhi and Mumbai. The available opportunities, practical issues and the hurdles in becoming a pain specialist were analyzed and summarized in this commentary. Results: The major barriers identified were: (1 Inadequate knowledge and absence of structured, educational and training courses, (2 bureaucratic hurdles, and (3 concerns of opioid misuse and addiction. The opportunities for personal growth and that of the specialty that could be utilized include the creation of a pain resource team, increasing community awareness, changing attitudes of other physicians toward pain specialty, and research and evidence building of the effectiveness of pain management strategies. Conclusion: India needs a structured teaching and training program in the area of pain medicine that is affiliated by the Medical Council of India or other reputed boards of medical education and certification. There is an urgent need to include pain management in the undergraduate and postgraduate medical curriculum. Enhancing community level awareness by public health education campaigns, developing networks of pain physicians, and appropriate marketing of the specialty is

  4. Cricket’s Contribution to India’s National Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    much of the institutions and behaviors from British colonialism. “The British in India created the basic state architecture : political unity and...my thesis, doing so through the medium of the other great pillar of Indian popular culture, cinema . Having shown a variety of material evidence...the confluence of two central pillars of Indian popular culture; cinema and cricket. Set in 1893, the fictional story of Lagaan tells the tale of an

  5. The evolution of alcohol use in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, H K; Tripathi, B M; Pelto, Pertti J

    2010-08-01

    This paper traces the role of alcohol production and use in the daily lives of people in India, from ancient times to the present day. Alcohol use has been an issue of great ambivalence throughout the rich and long history of the Indian subcontinent. The behaviors and attitudes about alcohol use in India are very complex, contradictory and convoluted because of the many different influences in that history. The evolution of alcohol use patterns in India can be divided into four broad historical periods (time of written records), beginning with the Vedic era (ca. 1500-700 BCE). From 700 BCE to 1100 CE, ("Reinterpretation and Synthesis") is the time of emergence of Buddhism and Jainism, with some new anti-alcohol doctrines, as well as post-Vedic developments in the Hindu traditions and scholarly writing. The writings of the renowned medical practitioners, Charaka and Susruta, added new lines of thought, including arguments for "moderate alcohol use." The Period of Islamic Influence (1100-1800 CE), including the Mughal era from the 1520s to 1800, exhibited a complex interplay of widespread alcohol use, competing with the clear Quranic opposition to alcohol consumption. The fourth period (1800 to the present) includes the deep influence of British colonial rule and the recent half century of Indian independence, beginning in 1947. The contradictions and ambiguities-with widespread alcohol use in some sectors of society, including the high status caste of warriors/rulers (Kshatriyas), versus prohibitions and condemnation of alcohol use, especially for the Brahmin (scholar-priest) caste, have produced alcohol use patterns that include frequent high-risk, heavy and hazardous drinking. The recent increases in alcohol consumption in many sectors of the general Indian population, coupled with the strong evidence of the role of alcohol in the spread of HIV/STI infections and other health risks, point to the need for detailed understanding of the complex cross

  6. Energy use in rural India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revelle, R

    1976-06-01

    The methods are described by which human and animal energies have been calculated for India. From an energy standpoint, rural India can be thought of as a partially closed ecosystem in which energy derived by people and animals from the photosynthetic products of plants is used to grow and prepare food for humans which in turn provides an essential energy input to grow more food, resulting in an endless cycle. The ecosystem is being disrupted by rapid population growth in India. The extent of the use of non-commercial fuels in villages and towns was determined by the Energy Survey of India Committee in the early 1960's. The committee reported utilization of about 120 million metric tons of wood, 50 million tons of dried dung, and 30 million tons of vegetable waste each year in villages and in urban areas. In terms of U.N. coal equivalents, the energy derived from burning wood, dung, and crop residues adds up to 227 kg per capita per year, or a total for rural India of 100 million tons, with an energy content of 7.53 x 10/sup 14/ kcal. It is projected that 90 percent of this is utilized for cooking and space heating and 10 percent for pottery and brickmaking, metalworking and blacksmithing, and sugar making. In terms of U.N. coal equivalents, the commercial energy use per capita in rural India in 1971 was 37 kg, and the total use in rural population was 16.3 million tons. It is projected here that 12 percent was used for cooking and space heating, 40 percent for lighting, and 48 percent for agriculture. A comparison of U.S. and Indian energy consumption is made. The conclusion that more energy will be needed to support the populace in India is discussed. (MCW)

  7. Transient and modulated charge separation at CuInSe{sub 2}/C{sub 60} and CuInSe{sub 2}/ZnPc hybrid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morzé, Natascha von, E-mail: natascha.von_morze@helmholtz-berlin.de; Dittrich, Thomas, E-mail: dittrich@helmholtz-berlin.de; Calvet, Wolfram, E-mail: wolfram.calvet@helmholtz-berlin.de; Lauermann, Iver, E-mail: iver.lauermann@helmholtz-berlin.de; Rusu, Marin, E-mail: rusu@helmholtz-berlin.de

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Surface physical properties of non- and Na-treated CuInSe{sub 2} layers studied. • Evidence of exciton dissociation and charge separation at CuInSe{sub 2}/ZnPc interface. • Strong band bending at the CuInSe{sub 2} surface in contact with C{sub 60} observed. • No evidence for exciton dissociation at the CuInSe{sub 2}/C{sub 60} interface found. • Cu-poor phase at CuInSe{sub 2}/organic interface crucial for charge separation. - Abstract: Spectral dependent charge transfer and exciton dissociation have been investigated at hybrid interfaces between inorganic polycrystalline CuInSe{sub 2} (untreated and Na-conditioned) thin films and organic C{sub 60} as well as zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) layers by transient and modulated surface photovoltage measurements. The stoichiometry and electronic properties of the bare CuInSe{sub 2} surface were characterized by photoelectron spectroscopy which revealed a Cu-poor phase with n-type features. After the deposition of the C{sub 60} layer, a strong band bending at the CuInSe{sub 2} surface was observed. Evidence for dissociation of excitons followed by charge separation was found at the CuInSe{sub 2}/ZnPc interface. The Cu-poor layer at the CuInSe{sub 2} surface was found to be crucial for transient and modulated charge separation at CuInSe{sub 2}/organic hybrid interfaces.

  8. Institutionalising health technology assessment: establishing the Medical Technology Assessment Board in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Laura E; Mehndiratta, Abha; Grover, Ashoo; Gauba, Vijay; Sheikh, Kabir; Prinja, Shankar; Singh, Ravinder; Cluzeau, Francoise A; Dabak, Saudamini; Teerawattananon, Yot; Kumar, Sanjiv; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2017-01-01

    India is at crossroads with a commitment by the government to universal health coverage (UHC), driving efficiency and tackling waste across the public healthcare sector. Health technology assessment (HTA) is an important policy reform that can assist policy-makers to tackle inequities and inefficiencies by improving the way in which health resources are allocated towards cost-effective, appropriate and feasible interventions. The equitable and efficient distribution of health budget resources, as well as timely uptake of good value technologies, are critical to strengthen the Indian healthcare system. The government of India is set to establish a Medical Technology Assessment Board to evaluate existing and new health technologies in India, assist choices between comparable technologies for adoption by the healthcare system and improve the way in which priorities for health are set. This initiative aims to introduce a more transparent, inclusive, fair and evidence-based process by which decisions regarding the allocation of health resources are made in India towards the ultimate goal of UHC. In this analysis article, we report on plans and progress of the government of India for the institutionalisation of HTA in the country. Where India is home to one-sixth of the global population, improving the health services that the population receives will have a resounding impact not only for India but also for global health.

  9. What is India speaking? Exploring the "Hinglish" invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshad, Rana D.; Bhowmick, Suman; Chand, Vineeta; Kumari, Nitu; Sinha, Neha

    2016-05-01

    Language competition models help understand language shift dynamics, and have effectively captured how English has outcompeted various local languages, such as Scottish Gaelic in Scotland, and Mandarin in Singapore. India, with a 125 million English speakers boasts the second largest number of English speakers in the world, after the United States. The 1961-2001 Indian censuses report a sharp increase in Hindi/English Bilinguals, suggesting that English is on the rise in India. To the contrary, we claim supported by field evidence, that these statistics are inaccurate, ignoring an emerging class who do not have full bilingual competence and switch between Hindi and English, communicating via a code popularly known as "Hinglish". Since current language competition models occlude hybrid practices and detailed local ecological factors, they are inappropriate to capture the current language dynamics in India. Expanding predator-prey and sociolinguistic theories, we draw on local Indian ecological factors to develop a novel three-species model of interaction between Monolingual Hindi speakers, Hindi/English Bilinguals and Hinglish speakers, and explore the long time dynamics it predicts. The model also exhibits Turing instability, which is the first pattern formation result in language dynamics. These results challenge traditional assumptions of English encroachment in India. More broadly, the three-species model introduced here is a first step towards modeling the dynamics of hybrid language scenarios in other settings across the world.

  10. India | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC-supported research in India has also focused on women's rights, security, and access ... Other IDRC employment-oriented research includes an initiative to help women ... enhance research quality at 43 public policy institutions in India.

  11. Decriminalising homosexuality in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Geetanjali

    2009-11-01

    This paper examines the successful fight against the provision in Section 377 of the Penal Code of India that criminalised private consensual sex between adults of the same sex. This law had led to serious discrimination against people engaging in homosexual acts, who were subjected to frequent beatings and blackmail attempts by police, who used the threat of prosecution against them. NGOs working with sexual minorities have also been harassed and sometimes charged under Section 377. By stigmatising homosexuality and threatening gay men with prison, the law is also likely to have impeded the battle against HIV. The provision was read down in July 2009 after an innovative, sustained, mass media campaign by activists. The Voices Against 377 coalition brought together sexuality and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) organisations, who were previously marginalised, with groups working in areas such as children's rights and feminist groups, showing that support for non-discrimination towards sexual minorities was broad-based. Further legal and social changes are needed for LGBT individuals to gain full acceptance and equality within Indian society. However, the judgement transcended the LGBT issue with the implication of protection for all minorities and introduced for the first time in South Asia the idea of sexual citizenship.

  12. Energy alternatives in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, V.S.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1973, the oil prices have increased tenfold. Currently we are already short by 7% in energy demand which is increasing in an exponential order. Also environmental problems associated with conventional energy generation need a serious consideration as a concept of clean energy. Various sources available are as follows. 1) coal energy 2) hydroelectric 3) nuclear energy. In India, thermal power obtained from amounts to 72.8%, hydroelectric amounts to 25.3% and nuclear about 2 to 3%. Non-conventional energy sources are mostly non-polluting except for the fact that no economically viable methods are invented to harness the power effectively. Following are the non-conventional energy resources. 1) solar energy:- this can be applied in different ways. 1) photothermal, 2) photovoltaics, 3) photosynthesis, 4) bio-energy. ii) wind energy, iii) ocean energy iv) geothermal energy. It can be concluded that nuclear energy is the only way out to current situation. Energy conservation and energy consciousness should also be implemented. (author)

  13. Country watch: India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhende, A A

    1996-01-01

    An acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) education program sponsored by World Vision of India was effective in reaching low-income adolescent girls in Bombay. During the preparatory phase, household surveys, interviews, and focus group discussions were conducted to gain insight into the daily lives, interests, sexual activities, and health problems of female adolescents. These activities identified a need for support and cooperation of the parents of these girls and the broader community, services such as child care for younger siblings to facilitate attendance, promotion of self-confidence and self-expression, and discussion of AIDS within the broader context of women's status and rights. The curriculum covered topics such as being a woman, puberty, sexuality, sexual exploitation and harassment, the human immune system, and protection against AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. These messages were communicated through lectures, videos, plays, puppet shows, quizzes, story telling, role plays, and group discussions. The course was supplemented by a community awareness program involving community leaders, mothers of adolescent females, young men, and adolescent boys. A total of 76 girls (average age, 14 years) attended the 7-session course. A follow-up survey indicated that knowledge about AIDS, menstruation, and reproduction increased significantly over baseline; 62% of participants reported they had talked to others about AIDS since the course. World Vision has since expanded its Women and AIDS project to male and female adolescents and adults in 21 slums and two industrial complexes in Bombay.

  14. A Genomic View of the Peopling and Population Structure of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Partha P.; Basu, Analabha

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular and statistical genetics have enabled the reconstruction of human history by studying living humans. The ability to sequence and study DNA by calibrating the rate of accumulation of changes with evolutionary time has enabled robust inferences about how humans have evolved. These data indicate that modern humans evolved in Africa about 150,000 years ago and, consistent with paleontological evidence, migrated out of Africa. And through a series of settlements, demographic expansions, and further migrations, they populated the entire world. One of the first waves of migration from Africa was into India. Subsequent, more recent, waves of migration from other parts of the world have resulted in India being a genetic melting pot. Contemporary India has a rich tapestry of cultures and ecologies. There are about 400 tribal groups and more than 4000 groups of castes and subcastes, speaking dialects of 22 recognized languages belonging to four major language families. The contemporary social structure of Indian populations is characterized by endogamy with different degrees of porosity. The social structure, possibly coupled with large ecological heterogeneity, has resulted in considerable genetic diversity and local genetic differences within India. In this essay, we provide genetic evidence of how India may have been peopled, the nature and extent of its genetic diversity, and genetic structure among the extant populations of India. PMID:25147176

  15. Followings of nuclear cooperation with India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahla, Nasr

    2009-01-01

    This article speaks about the agreements of nuclear cooperation between India and USA,France and Russia. The Nuclear Suppliers Group,NSG, opened the door to the civil nuclear commercial with India, with the support of Canada, after 35 years of forbidden. The responsibility of NSG and any country enters in new arrangements for nuclear civil cooperation with India to assure the action of India towards its commitments to support world efforts for non-nuclear proliferation

  16. Production of Se-methylselenocysteine in transgenic plants expressing selenocysteine methyltransferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Hugh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has become increasingly evident that dietary Se plays a significant role in reducing the incidence of lung, colorectal and prostate cancer in humans. Different forms of Se vary in their chemopreventative efficacy, with Se-methylselenocysteine being one of the most potent. Interestingly, the Se accumulating plant Astragalus bisulcatus (Two-grooved poison vetch contains up to 0.6% of its shoot dry weight as Se-methylselenocysteine. The ability of this Se accumulator to biosynthesize Se-methylselenocysteine provides a critical metabolic shunt that prevents selenocysteine and selenomethionine from entering the protein biosynthetic machinery. Such a metabolic shunt has been proposed to be vital for Se tolerance in A. bisulcatus. Utilization of this mechanism in other plants may provide a possible avenue for the genetic engineering of Se tolerance in plants ideally suited for the phytoremediation of Se contaminated land. Here, we describe the overexpression of a selenocysteine methyltransferase from A. bisulcatus to engineer Se-methylselenocysteine metabolism in the Se non-accumulator Arabidopsis thaliana (Thale cress. Results By over producing the A. bisulcatus enzyme selenocysteine methyltransferase in A. thaliana, we have introduced a novel biosynthetic ability that allows the non-accumulator to accumulate Se-methylselenocysteine and γ-glutamylmethylselenocysteine in shoots. The biosynthesis of Se-methylselenocysteine in A. thaliana also confers significantly increased selenite tolerance and foliar Se accumulation. Conclusion These results demonstrate the feasibility of developing transgenic plant-based production of Se-methylselenocysteine, as well as bioengineering selenite resistance in plants. Selenite resistance is the first step in engineering plants that are resistant to selenate, the predominant form of Se in the environment.

  17. China and India, 2025: A Comparative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    in China, see Banister, Bloom, and Rosenberg (2010). 13 For a discussion of inequality in India, see Bardhan (2003). population trends in China and...WorkingPapers/2010/PGDA_WP_53.pdf 132 China and India, 2025: A Comparative Assessment Bardhan , Pranab, “Crouching Tiger, Lumbering Elephant: A China-India

  18. Preferencia por hijos varones y escasez de mujeres en India

    OpenAIRE

    Arun Kumar Acharya; Adriana Salas Stevanato

    2006-01-01

    El objetivo del presente trabajo es abordar algunos de los principales aspectos que han provocado un desequilibrio en el índice del sexo femenino en la India debido a la preferencia de género, pues según datos del censo de 2001 hay un déficit de 35 millones de mujeres en comparación con el número total de hombres. Para constatar dicha preferencia se han considerado los índices de la tasa de natalidad y mortalidad, así como los aspectos socioculturales que contribuyen y agravan la ...

  19. La no violencia en la tradición india

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Polo Santillán

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available La concepción india de la no-violencia (ahimsâ tiene una larga historia, que surge como una forma de contrarrestar las condiciones violentas personales y sociales. Al respecto, las teorizaciones más importantes han sido las ofrecidas por el jainismo, el budismo y el yoga. Su más alto significadoradica en que se ha convertido en un medio necesario para el logro de una finalidad superior. Palabras clave: No-violencia, ahimsâ, jainismo, budismo, yoga, virtud.

  20. Participation in India's oil industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhasin, A.

    1995-01-01

    The way a small company the size of Niko Resources Ltd. was able to enter the Indian oil patch was described. India was chosen because it presented many indicators of success, including an overall economic growth of 5.3 % in 1994, foreign currency reserves standing at over US $20 billion, exports increase of 20 %, and the introduction of a dramatic program of economic, industrial and trade liberalization. According to most estimates, India's energy demand is likely to increase significantly, and the energy sector will need over US $18 billion worth of expansion by the year 2000. Niko was the first Canadian company to enter the oil and gas exploration and development sector in India, but the competition is becoming fierce. There are two rounds of bidding for exploration each year, and foreign companies are welcome to participate in the existing joint ventures

  1. India joins the ISOLDE collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    On 18 April India signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the ISOLDE collaboration, thus strengthening its links with CERN. Three experiments led by Indian scientists at ISOLDE have been recommended by the Research Board and will be performed in the coming months, and more projects are being designed for the future HIE-ISOLDE scientific programme.   Shaking hands: Rüdiger Voss (left), adviser for India in CERN’s International Relations Office, and SINP Director Milan Kumar Sanyal (right). Also photographed: ISOLDE spokesperson Yorick Blumenfeld, (centre left) and Sunanda Banerjee, head of high-energy at SINP (centre right).  The new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed in Kolkata at the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics (SINP). India thus becomes the 15th member of the ISOLDE collaboration, after having signed similar collaboration documents with the CMS and ALICE experiments. “This agreement will a...

  2. Migration from India to Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, S P; Chandra, A

    1994-01-01

    "The article examines the contemporary trends and future prospects of migration from India to Australia. The focus is on Indian Settlers and Temporary Entrants admitted to Australia for employment and Indian students admitted to Australia for higher studies. The volume of emigration for permanent residence during the early 1990s has made India one of the leading source countries of migration to Australia. A majority of Indians admitted as Settlers every year join the labor force. Recent data indicate that, among Indian Settlers, there is a preponderance of unsponsored Independent Skilled Migrants. Given the anticipated growth in the number of Indian students, the coming years are likely to witness a spurt in Skilled Temporary Workers from India." excerpt

  3. Semiconductor-metal transition of Se in Ru-Se Catalyst Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, P. K.; Lewera, Adam; Oldfield, Eric; Wieckowski, Andrzej

    2009-03-01

    Ru-Se composite nanoparticles are promising catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. Though the role of Se in enhancing the chemical stability of Ru nanoparticles is well established, the microscopic nature of Ru-Se interaction was not clearly understood. We carried out a combined investigation of ^77Se NMR and XPS on Ru-Se nanoparticles and our results indicate that Se, a semiconductor in elemental form, becomes metallic when interacting with Ru. ^77Se spin-lattice relaxation rates are found to be proportional to T, the well-known Korringa behavior characteristic of metals. The NMR results are supported by the XPS binding energy shifts which suggest that a possible Ru->Se charge transfer could be responsible for the semiconductor->metal transition of Se which also makes Ru less susceptible to oxidation during ORR.

  4. One-step synthesis of PbSe-ZnSe composite thin film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abe Seishi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study investigates the preparation of PbSe-ZnSe composite thin films by simultaneous hot-wall deposition (HWD from multiple resources. The XRD result reveals that the solubility limit of Pb in ZnSe is quite narrow, less than 1 mol%, with obvious phase-separation in the composite thin films. A nanoscale elemental mapping of the film containing 5 mol% PbSe indicates that isolated PbSe nanocrystals are dispersed in the ZnSe matrix. The optical absorption edge of the composite thin films shifts toward the low-photon-energy region as the PbSe content increases. The use of a phase-separating PbSe-ZnSe system and HWD techniques enables simple production of the composite package.

  5. Cs2UPd3Se6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George N. Oh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Dicaesium uranium(IV tripalladium(II hexaselenide, Cs2UPd3Se6, crystallizes in the space group Fmmm in the Ba2NaCu3O6 structure type. The asymmetric unit comprises the following atoms with site symmetries as shown: U1 (mm2, Cs1 (222, Cs2 (m2m, Pd1 (.m., Pd2 (2mm, Se1 (m.., and Se2 (1. This layered structure contains six edge-sharing square-planar [PdSe4] units that form a hexagon. These, in turn, edge-share with [USe6] trigonal–prismatic units, forming an extended layer parallel to (010. The layers are stacked along [010]. They are staggered, and are separated by the Cs atoms. The Cs atoms are either coordinated in a square antiprism of Se atoms or are ten-coordinate, with one square face and the opposite face hexagonal.

  6. C-type Nd2Se3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, neodymium sesquiselenide, is isotypic with the other known rare-earth metal(III selenides M2Se3 (M = La–Pr and Sm–Lu with the cubic C-type structure. It adopts a cation-defective Th3P4-type arrangement with close to 8/9 of the unique neodymium-cation site occupied, leading to the composition Nd2.667Se4 (Z = 4 or Nd2Se3 (Z = 5.333, respectively. The Nd3+ cations are thus surrounded by eight selenide anions, forming trigonal [NdSe8]13− dodecahedra, whereas the Se2− anions exhibit a sixfold coordination, but due to the under-occupation of neodymium, each one is statistically surrounded by only 5.333 cations. The crystal studied was a merohedral twin with a 0.31 (6:0.69 (6 domain ratio.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of ZnSe:Fe/ZnSe core/shell nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lin; Zhu, Jianguo, E-mail: yanglin_1028@163.com; Xiao, Dingquan

    2014-04-15

    High-quality ZnSe:Fe/ZnSe core/shell nanocrystals were prepared via a hydrothermal microemulsion technique. Effective surface passivation of monodisperse ZnSe:Fe nanocrystals is achieved by overcoating them with a ZnSe shell. The samples were characterized by means of XRD, EDX, TEM, PSD, XPS, photoluminescence, and Raman spectrum. The results show that the as-synthesized nanocrystals are cubic zinc blende ZnSe structure with high purity and the average particle size of ZnSe:Fe/ZnSe core/shell nanocrystal is larger than that of ZnSe:Fe core. The growth of ZnSe shell causes a small red shift in PL spectra, and then the PL quantum yield (QY) increases from 16% before shell growth to the maximum of 37% after increasing shell thickness up to 1.2 monolayers (ML). Moreover, both transverse optic (TO) and longitudinal optic (LO) phonon modes of ZnSe are shifted toward lower frequency as compared with the reported ones. -- Highlights: • ZnSe:Fe/ZnSe core/shell QDs were prepared by a hydrothermal microemulsion method. • ZnSe shell efficiently passivates surface defects by serving as a physical barrier. • The particle size and PL properties can be turned with the growth of ZnSe shell. • The luminescence efficiency and stability of QDs could be improved in this manner.

  8. Country watch: India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, A; Sehgal, P N

    1995-01-01

    Linking more than 3000 health and development organizations, the Voluntary Health Association of India (VHAI) is one of the largest networks in the country. In 1990 VHAI began incorporating HIV/STD-related activities into its broader programs. An existing infrastructure for intersectoral collaboration in the areas of community health promotion, public policy, information and documentation, and communications facilitated inclusion of the new activities. Several VHAI departments collaborate in offering training courses, workshops, and seminars at the state and community levels to involve nongovernmental organizations and professional groups in HIV/STD prevention and counseling. More than 950 persons have been trained so far, including trainers of primary health care workers, family physicians, medical practitioners, social scientists, teachers, community volunteer workers, and youth leaders. Local experts act as training resource persons; materials produced locally, abroad, and by VHAI itself are used. Training facilities are offered free of charge to member organizations; VHAI also awards fellowships for field training and financial support for approved projects. VHAI suggests intervention measures to governmental and nongovernmental organizations related to drug users, youth, truck drivers, blood donors, and people living with HIV/AIDS. The information, documentation, and communications departments provide members with a wide variety of information, education, and communication (IEC) materials that can be translated into local languages: posters, folders, flip charts, stickers, and folk songs. VHAI advocacy issues that have been highlighted through the press include: confidentiality, protection against discrimination, the right of all persons to health care, and the need to make properly-equipped STD clinics available. VHAI has established sub-networks in Tamil Nadu (155 organizations) and Manipur (55 organizations) states. VHAI has found that incorporating HIV

  9. Girl prostitution in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, K K

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the nature, magnitude, causes, and consequences of female child prostitution in India and offers measures for control and prevention of girl prostitution. Data are obtained from the 6-city study of prostitution and the author's own research. An estimated 85% of all prostitutes in Calcutta and Delhi entered the work at an early age. The numbers are rising. The promotion of tourism is linked with prostitution. Girl prostitutes are primarily located in low-middle income areas and business districts and are known by officials. Brothel keepers regularly recruit young girls. An estimated 33% of prostitutes are young girls. In Bangalore, Calcutta, Delhi, and Hyderabad, there are an estimated 10,000 girl prostitutes. UNICEF estimates about 300,000 child prostitutes. Girl prostitutes are grouped as common prostitutes, singers and dancers, call girls, religious prostitutes or devdasi, and caged brothel prostitutes. Religious prostitutes are mainly found in the South. Caged ones are found in Bombay. A little over 50% of prostitutes come from other countries, such as Nepal and Bangladesh. The girls tend to come from urban slums and poor rural areas. High prostitute supply regions include Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra, Uttar Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, and West Bengel states. About 85% are Hindus, and about 66% are from scheduled castes and tribes. Bangalore and Bombay have a higher proportion of girl prostitutes. The causes of prostitution include ill treatment by parents, bad company, family prostitutes, social customs, inability to arrange marriage, lack of sex education, media, prior incest and rape, early marriage and desertion, lack of recreational facilities, ignorance, and acceptance of prostitution. Economic causes include poverty and economic distress. Psychological causes include desire for physical pleasure, greed, and dejection. Most enter involuntarily. A brief profile is given of the life of a prostitute.

  10. SOLAR ENERGY FOR GREEN INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    D. P. Jesudoss Manohar; Dr. T. Jayaprakasam

    2016-01-01

    India a rapidly growing economy with more than 1 billion people is facing a huge also energy demand. The electricity production has expanded over the years but we cannot deny the fact that the population of the country is also expanding. More than 72% of population living in villages and half of the villages remain without electricity. It’s high time that our country should concentrate more on energy efficiency, conservation and renewable energy to fulfill the energy needs of India and bri...

  11. India and the Tokyo round

    OpenAIRE

    André Sapir; Robert Baldwin

    1983-01-01

    The paper attempts to quantify the gains and the losses for India from the changes in import tariffs decided during the Tokyo Round of Multilateral Trade Negotiations. The study focuses on exports to the ECCC, Japan, and the US. It is conducted at the tariff line level and uses the actual tariffs resulting from the Tokyo Round. The evaluation is in terms of the static effect of the tariff changes. The results indicate that the gains for India from most-favoured nation tariff cuts far outweigh...

  12. India and the CTBT: implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uday Bhaskar, C.

    1998-01-01

    The more sensitive issue for India is regarding the national value strand outlined earlier- the abiding commitment to nuclear disarmament. The preamble to the CTBT contains as many as seven references to disarmament but this formulation was obviously derived from the prevailing Big Five exclusively on the nuclear weapon which sought to prioritize nuclear non-proliferation and arms control as opposed to time bound disarmament- the Indian plea. In agreeing to sign the CTBT, in as much as India agreed to sign the PTBT (Partial Test Ban Treaty) three decades ago, devoid of this temporal linkage, there would have to be considerable clarity about how the core national interest is being nurtured

  13. Incredible India: the inconvenient truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundkur, Bal

    2011-01-01

    The author's objective is to correct many of the misconceptions about India and to combat mistaken analysis. He highlights the hundreds of millions who live in poverty, the rampant corruption and the incompetence of the administration. He asserts that comparisons with China are always to the disadvantage of India, except in the field of democracy, and suggests that the Indian Space Programme is symptomatic of a wide-spread misallocation of resources. And to suggest that the traffic problems in Delhi and Mumbai are being caused by more motor vehicles is a misdiagnosis. The real cause is an increase in the number of bullock carts.

  14. India RE Grid Integration Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, Jaquelin M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-08

    The use of renewable energy (RE) sources, primarily wind and solar generation, is poised to grow significantly within the Indian power system. The Government of India has established a target of 175 gigawatts (GW) of installed RE capacity by 2022, including 60 GW of wind and 100 GW of solar, up from 29 GW wind and 9 GW solar at the beginning of 2017. Thanks to advanced weather and power system modeling made for this project, the study team is able to explore operational impacts of meeting India's RE targets and identify actions that may be favorable for integration.

  15. Overview of ENSDF activities in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the evaluation of nuclear structure and decay data has been emphasized in this presentation. Some of the details of the ENSDF evaluation have been discussed. India has been included as one of the centres of NSDD network and several evaluators from India have contributed significantly to the ENSDF evaluation. The interest of the researchers from India in the nuclear structure data evaluation include the mass chain evaluations, decay data evaluation, horizontal evaluation as well as specific measurements related to important nuclear data. There have been several significant contributions in these fields from India. The interest in the ENSDF evaluation and measurements among the nuclear physicists in India is growing. (author)

  16. India - Mahabharata. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminar Abroad 1994 (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVito, Carole; DeVito, Pasquale

    This lecture is accompanied by slides of India. The lecture is used an introduction to the first of the three videotapes of Peter Brook's "Mahabharata," providing students with preliminary background on Hinduism and on the Hindu epic. The objective is also to have students think about the basic values of ancient and modern Hindus. (EH)

  17. Genetic Evidence for Recent Population Mixture in India

    OpenAIRE

    Moorjani, Priya; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Patterson, Nick; Lipson, Mark; Loh, Po-Ru; Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Berger, Bonnie; Reich, David; Singh, Lalji

    2013-01-01

    Most Indian groups descend from a mixture of two genetically divergent populations: Ancestral North Indians (ANI) related to Central Asians, Middle Easterners, Caucasians, and Europeans; and Ancestral South Indians (ASI) not closely related to groups outside the subcontinent. The date of mixture is unknown but has implications for understanding Indian history. We report genome-wide data from 73 groups from the Indian subcontinent and analyze linkage disequilibrium to estimate ANI-ASI mixture ...

  18. Child Gender and Parental Borrowing: Evidence from India

    OpenAIRE

    Agier, Isabelle; Guérin, Isabelle; Szafarz, Ariane

    2011-01-01

    The unequal treatment of children is not gender neutral from the parent side. Our results show that women try to compensate through debt for the unbalanced situation faced by their daughters compared to their sons. However, the lack of symmetry between mothers' and fathers' financial situations leads to the perpetuation of gender inequality through generations.

  19. Monetary policy and bank behavior: Empirical evidence from India

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Saibal

    2006-01-01

    The paper develops an empirical model to explore the role that bank characteristics play in influencing the monetary transmission process. Employing data on Indian commercial banks for the period 1992-2004, the findings indicate that for banks classified according to size and capitalization, a monetary contraction lowers bank lending, although large and well-capitalized banks are able to shield their loan portfolio from monetary shocks.

  20. Exchange rate regimes and inflation: Evidence from India.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanty, Biswajit; Bhanumurthy, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    Exchange rate stability is crucial for inflation management as a stable rate is expected to reduce domestic inflation pressures through a `policy discipline effect'- restricting money supply growth, and a `credibility effect'- inducing higher money demand and reduced velocity of money. Alternatively, the impossibility trillema predicts that in the presence of an open capital account, a stable exchange rate may lead to lack of control on monetary policy and, hence, higher inflation. Using a mo...

  1. Gender Discrimination and Growth: Theory and Evidence from India

    OpenAIRE

    Berta Esteve-Volart

    2004-01-01

    Gender inequality is an acute and persistent problem, especially in developing countries. This paper argues that gender discrimination is an inefficient practice. We model gender discrimination as the complete exclusion of females from the labor market or as the exclusion of females from managerial positions. The distortions in the allocation of talent between managerial and unskilled positions, and in human capital investment, are analyzed. It is found that both types of discrimination lower...

  2. The properties of inflation expectations: Evidence for India

    OpenAIRE

    Naresh Kumar Sharma; Motilal Bicchal

    2018-01-01

    Empirical inferences about particular forms of agents’ inflation expectations are crucial for the conduct of monetary policy. This paper is an attempt to explore the properties of the Reserve Bank of India’s survey data of households’ inflation expectations. The paper shows that survey respondents do not form expectations rationally, regardless of the reference measures of inflation used. Further, results indicate that inflation expectations are formed purely in backward-looking manner, sugge...

  3. EPR of SeO2- and SeO3- radicals in alkaline borate glasses with 77Se isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galimov, D.G.; Tarzimanov, K.D.

    1977-01-01

    Alkaline borate glasses with 77 Se were investigated in order to establish the nature of selenium compounds and radicals in glasses. The relationship between alkali ions and the oxygen radical of selenium was determined by decoding the hyperfine structure of the alkaline borate glass EPR spectra obtained before and after γ-irradiation. The irradiated and non-irradiated glasses were characterized by hyperfine splitting of the EPR lines from the α- and β centres. Moreover, the irradiated samples were noted to have a line doublet (signal phi). With intenser reduction conditions of glass fusion, the intensities of α, β, and phi signals were noted to decline. This confirmes the suggestion that these centres were caused by oxygen compouds. The authors concluded that α and β signals were due to the paramagnetic centres of SeO 2 - and [SeO 2 - ]R + , and phi signal to the SeO 3 - radicals

  4. Speciation of Se and DOC in soil solution and their relation to Se bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Liping; Vega, Flora Alonso; Supriatin, Supriatin; Bussink, Wim; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2011-01-01

    A 0.01 M CaCl(2) extraction is often used to asses the bioavailability of plant nutrients in soils. However, almost no correlation was found between selenium (Se) in the soil extraction and Se content in grass. The recently developed anion Donnan membrane technique was used to analyze chemical speciation of Se in the 0.01 M CaCl(2) extractions of grassland soils and fractionation of DOC (dissolved organic carbon). The results show that most of Se (67-86%) in the extractions (15 samples) are colloidal-sized Se. Only 13-34% of extractable Se are selenate, selenite and small organic Se (<1 nm). Colloidal Se is, most likely, Se bound to or incorporated in colloidal-sized organic matter. The dominant form of small Se compounds (selenate, selenite/small organic compounds) depends on soil. A total of 47-85% of DOC is colloidal-sized and 15-53% are small organic molecules (<1 nm). In combination with soluble S (sulfur) and/or P (phosphor), concentration of small DOC can explain most of the variability of Se content in grass. The results indicate that mineralization of organic Se is the most important factor that controls Se availability in soils. Competition with sulfate and phosphate needs to be taken into account. Further research is needed to verify if concentration of small DOC is a good indicator of mineralization of soil organic matter.

  5. Tests of pancreatic function using /sup 75/Se--Selenomethionine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasner, N; Brodie, M J; Sumner, D J; Thomson, T J

    1976-04-01

    Pancreatic function was investigated in 43 patients using a combination of conventional and subtraction scans of the pancreas and duodenal aspiration of the /sup 75/Se-Selenomethionine injected, in the time periods 60 to 150 minutes, 90 to 120 minutes and 105 to 150 minutes after injection. Patients with chronic alcoholism, chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, extrahepatic biliary obstruction and liver disease were included. Seven patients with no evidence of gastro-intestinal disease served as controls. Pancreatic scanning provided eight false positive and two false negative results (23.3 percent) and with /sup 75/Se-Selenomethionine excretion at 105 to 150 minutes, six false results were obtained (14 percent). In only one patient was a false positive result obtained with both scans and the /sup 75/Se-Selenomethionine test. The performance of conventional and subtraction scans of the pancreas with measurement of /sup 75/Se-Selenomethionine activity in the duodenal aspirate collected from 105 to 150 minutes after injection provides a convenient means of testing pancreatic exocrine function in a single three hour session.

  6. Social and Economic Implications of Noncommunicable diseases in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J S Thakur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs have become a major public health problem in India accounting for 62% of the total burden of foregone DALYs and 53% of total deaths. In this paper, we review the social and economic impact of NCDs in India. We outline this impact at household, health system and the macroeconomic level. Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs figure at the top among the leading ten causes of adult (25-69 years deaths in India. The effects of NCDs are inequitable with evidence of reversal in social gradient of risk factors and greater financial implications for the poorer households in India. Out-of-pocket expenditure associated with the acute and long-term effects of NCDs is high resulting in catastrophic health expenditure for the households. Study in India showed that about 25% of families with a member with CVD and 50% with cancer experience catastrophic expenditure and 10% and 25%, respectively, are driven to poverty. The odds of incurring catastrophic hospitalization expenditure were nearly 160% higher with cancer than the odds of incurring catastrophic spending when hospitalization was due to a communicable disease. These high numbers also pose significant challenge for the health system for providing treatment, care and support. The proportion of hospitalizations and outpatient consultations as a result of NCDs rose from 32% to 40% and 22% to 35%, respectively, within a decade from 1995 to 2004. In macroeconomic term, most of the estimates suggest that the NCDs in India account for an economic burden in the range of 5-10% of GDP, which is significant and slowing down GDP thus hampering development. While India is simultaneously experiencing several disease burdens due to old and new infections, nutritional deficiencies, chronic diseases, and injuries, individual interventions for clinical care are unlikely to be affordable on a large scale. While it is clear that "treating our way out" of the NCDs may not be the efficient way, it has

  7. Traditional Practices of Mothers in the Postpartum Period: Evidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    In various cultures, the postpartum period is a sensitive time and various ... femmes au cours des huit premières semaines du post-partum qui se sont ..... For instance, in cultures such as those in India,. China ..... Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical.

  8. On Some Physical Properties of GeSe3-Sb2Se3-ZnSe Thin Films and Their Radiation Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosni, H.M.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Thin films of the chalcogenides GeSe 3 , Sb 2 Se 3 , ZnSe, (GeSe 3 )80(Sb 2 Se 3 )20 and (GeSe 3 )70(Sb 2 Se 3 )10(ZnSe)20, are prepared by thermal evaporation onto glass substrates. The effect of ZnSe incorporation with both GeSe 3 , Sb 2 Se 3 results in amorphous (GeSe 3 )70(Sb 2 Se 3 )10(ZnSe)20 composition as obtained from the X-ray analysis. Electrical measurements reveal a decrease in dc activation energy, ΔEdc, and an increase in ac activation energy, ΔEac, for (GeSe 3 )70(Sb 2 Se 3 )10(ZnSe)20 as compared with (GeSe 3 )80(Sb 2 Se 3 )20. Optical energy gap, Eg, and band tail width, Ee, are estimated in UV/VIS spectral region for fresh and γ-irradiated films, revealing a decrease in Eg and an increase in Ee for ZnSe and (GeSe 3 )70(Sb 2 Se 3 )10(ZnSe)20 compositions, with irradiation dose.

  9. INDIA: Photon multiplicity detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: The team of Indian scientists from Calcutta's Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Bhubaneswar Institute of Physics, Panjab (Chandigarh), Rajasthan (Jaipur) and Jammu in collaboration with GSI Darmstadt have contributed a large and highly granular preshower photon multiplicity detector (PMD) for the WA98 experiment at the CERN SPS proton synchrotron. This experiment studies high energy collisions of lead ions and will measure both charged particle and photon multiplicity in a large overlap region. The motivation for measuring photon multiplicity in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions stems from theoretical predictions of changes in the relative production of photons and charged particles in the phase transition of hadronic matter to quarkgluon plasma and its subsequent hadronization. The photon multiplicity detector consists of a matrix of scintillator pads placed in light-tight boxes and mounted behind the lead converter plates. The light from the scintillator pads is transported to the readout system using wavelength shifting (WLS) fibres. Developing on the team's earlier experience with a smaller version for the WA93 experiment (September 1991, page 16), several modifications were incorporated to improve light collection and transport. Use of improved WLS fibres, short WLS pieces to minimize self-absorption, and thermal splicing with long clear fibres were some of the important changes incorporated. Tests showed signficantly improved light collection. The scintillator pads were fabricated at all the five collaborating centres in India and the complicated assembly in the detector box modules carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta. More than 400 lead converter plates were machined in Calcutta to rigorous tolerances of 0.2 mm. The assembled detector box modules and lead plates were shipped to CERN in spring 1994 for tests and installation. The WA98 PMD consists of over 50,000 scintillator pads of sizes varying from 15 to

  10. INDIA: Photon multiplicity detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-01-15

    Full text: The team of Indian scientists from Calcutta's Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Bhubaneswar Institute of Physics, Panjab (Chandigarh), Rajasthan (Jaipur) and Jammu in collaboration with GSI Darmstadt have contributed a large and highly granular preshower photon multiplicity detector (PMD) for the WA98 experiment at the CERN SPS proton synchrotron. This experiment studies high energy collisions of lead ions and will measure both charged particle and photon multiplicity in a large overlap region. The motivation for measuring photon multiplicity in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions stems from theoretical predictions of changes in the relative production of photons and charged particles in the phase transition of hadronic matter to quarkgluon plasma and its subsequent hadronization. The photon multiplicity detector consists of a matrix of scintillator pads placed in light-tight boxes and mounted behind the lead converter plates. The light from the scintillator pads is transported to the readout system using wavelength shifting (WLS) fibres. Developing on the team's earlier experience with a smaller version for the WA93 experiment (September 1991, page 16), several modifications were incorporated to improve light collection and transport. Use of improved WLS fibres, short WLS pieces to minimize self-absorption, and thermal splicing with long clear fibres were some of the important changes incorporated. Tests showed signficantly improved light collection. The scintillator pads were fabricated at all the five collaborating centres in India and the complicated assembly in the detector box modules carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta. More than 400 lead converter plates were machined in Calcutta to rigorous tolerances of 0.2 mm. The assembled detector box modules and lead plates were shipped to CERN in spring 1994 for tests and installation. The WA98 PMD consists of over 50,000 scintillator pads of sizes varying from 15 to 25 mm

  11. Food as pharma: marketing nutraceuticals to India's rural poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Alice

    2015-05-27

    This commentary sketches out the politics of the expansion of affordable, fast-moving nutraceutical products into rural India, with a focus on fortified foods and beverages. It examines the relationships between industry, government and humanitarian organisations that are being forged alongside the development of markets for nutraceuticals; the production of evidence and the harnessing of science to support nutraceutical companies' claims; the ways in which nutraceuticals are being marketed and distributed in rural areas; and the concepts of health and well-being that are being promulgated through those marketing campaigns. Lastly, it asks what kinds of impact fast-moving nutraceuticals are likely to have on the lives of India's rural poor. It concludes by questioning how smooth a transition to nutraceutical consumption Big Food marketing strategies can really facilitate and how readily low-income families seeking to feed their families and safeguard health will actually adopt concepts of wellness and internalise micro-nutrient associated risks.

  12. Hydropower and environment in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganathan, V.

    1997-01-01

    Hydroelectric power is the cheapest source of energy, renewable and environmentally benign during running. Yet environmental activitism has obstructed hydrodevelopment throughout the world, and more so in India. The paper calls for a realistic economic-environmental trade-off and improvements in environmental decision making apparatus. (author)

  13. History of Cardiology in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mrinal Kanti; Kumar, Soumitra; Deb, Pradip Kumar; Mishra, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga and transcendental meditation in curing cardiovascular diseases were known in India. Only recently there has been resurgence of the same globally. There have been very few innovations in Cardiology in India. The cause of this paucity possibly lie in the limited resources. This has a vicious effect on the research mentality of the population who are busy in meeting their daily requirements. This socio-scientific aspect needs a thorough study and is beyond the scope of the present documentation. Present is the future of past and so one must not forget the history which is essentially past that give the present generation the necessary fulcrum to stand in good stead. The present article essentially aims to pay tribute to all the workers and pioneers in the field of Cardiology in India, who in spite of limited resources ventured in an unchartered arena. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Child mortality in rural India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Klaauw, B.; Wang, L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on infant and child mortality in rural areas of India. We construct a flexible duration model, which allows for frailty at multiple levels and interactions between the child's age and individual, socioeconomic, and environmental characteristics. The model is estimated using the

  15. Child mortality in rural India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van der Klaauw (Bas); L. Wang (Lihong)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis paper focuses on infant and child mortality in rural areas of India. We construct a flexible duration model, which allows for frailty at multiple levels and interactions between the child's age and individual, socioeconomic, and environmental characteristics. The model is estimated

  16. Schools and Languages in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Brian

    1968-01-01

    A brief review of Indian education focuses on special problems caused by overcrowded schools, insufficient funding, and the status of education itself in the Indian social structure. Language instruction in India, a complex issue due largely to the numerous official languages currently spoken, is commented on with special reference to the problem…

  17. ICT Innovation in Contemporary India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Sudhanshu; Chatterjee, Sutirtha; Sarker, Suprateek

    2010-01-01

    The paper we present here discusses ICT innovation in India using a narrative framework. We argue that ICT innovation has not really been a subject matter sufficiently researched in information systems from the perspective of innovation in developing countries. We use a grounded theory inspired...

  18. ICT Innovation in Contemporary India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Sudhanshu; Chatterjee, Sutirtha; Sarker, Suprateek

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses ICT innovation in India using a narrative framework. We argue that ICT innovation has not been a subject sufficiently researched in information systems from the perspective of innovation in developing countries. We use a grounded theory inspired approach. There are three...

  19. India: een keizer zonder kleren

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieten, K.

    2011-01-01

    Kristoffel Lieten concentrates on India, which since the 1990s has been referred to as the rising giant in Asia, together with China. The GNP growth indeed has accelerated and ICT-related exports have risen sharply. At the same time, however, many of the problems which have disturbed the Indian

  20. Prehistoric human colonization of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    J. Biosci. | Vol. 26 | No. 4 | Suppl. | November 2001. V N Misra. 492 ... humans differ from the other apes in their upright posture, ... characterized by Levallois flakes and blades and by the ... and the coastal region running parallel to them, northeast ..... November 2001. Prehistoric human colonization of India. 497. Figure 1.