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Sample records for sct barrel arrives

  1. First SCT Barrel arrives at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Apsimon, R

    Mid-January saw the arrival at CERN of Barrel #3, the first of four SCT barrels. The barrels are formed as low-mass cylinders of carbon fibre skins on a honeycomb carbon core. They are manufactured in industry and then have all the final precision supports added and the final geometric metrology carried out at Geneva University. Barrel #3, complete with its 384 silicon detector modules, arrived by road from Oxford University in England where the modules were mounted using a purpose-built robot. The modules had been selected from the output of all four barrel module building clusters (in Japan, Scandinavia, USA and the UK). Since Barrel #3 will be exposed to high radiation levels within the tracker volume, these modules, representing over half a million readout channels, have been extensively tested at their operational temperature of around -25 degrees Celcius and at voltages of up to 500V. The dangers of shipping such a fragile component of ATLAS were apparent to all and considerable attention was focused...

  2. SCT Barrel Assembly Complete

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Batchelor

    As reported in the April 2005 issue of the ATLAS eNews, the first of the four Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) barrels, complete with modules and services, arrived safely at CERN in January of 2005. In the months since January, the other three completed barrels arrived as well, and integration of the four barrels into the entire barrel assembly commenced at CERN, in the SR1 building on the ATLAS experimental site, in July. Assembly was completed on schedule in September, with the addition of the innermost layer to the 4-barrel assembly. Work is now underway to seal the barrel thermal enclosure. This is necessary in order to enclose the silicon tracker in a nitrogen atmosphere and provide it with faraday-cage protection, and is a delicate and complicated task: 352 silicon module powertapes, 352 readout-fibre bundles, and over 400 Detector Control System sensors must be carefully sealed into the thermal enclosure bulkhead. The team is currently verifying the integrity of the low mass cooling system, which must be d...

  3. TRT and SCT barrels merge

    CERN Multimedia

    Wells, P S

    2006-01-01

    The SCT barrel was inserted in the TRT on 17 February, just missing Valentine's day. This was a change of emphasis for the two detectors. In the preceeding months there had been a lot of focus on testing their performance. The TRT had been observing cosmic rays through several sectors of the barrel, and all the modules on each of the four layers of the SCT had been characterised prior to integration. In parallel, the engineering teams, lead by Marco Olcese, Andrea Catinaccio, Eric Perrin, Neil Dixon, Iourii Gusakov, Gerard Barbier and Takashi Kohriki, had been preparing for this critical operation. Figure 1: Neil Dixon and Marco Olcese verifying the final alignment The two detectors had to be painstakingly aligned to be concentric to within a millimetre. The SCT was held on a temporary cantilever stand, and the TRT in the ID trolley had to inch over it. Finally the weight of the SCT was transferred to the rails on the inside of the TRT itself. The SCT services actually protruded a little outside the oute...

  4. Functional testing of the ATLAS SCT barrels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Peter W.

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS SCT (semiconductor tracker) comprises 2112 barrel modules mounted on four concentric barrels of length 1.6m and up to 1m diameter, and 1976 endcap modules supported by a series of nine wheels at each end of the barrel region, giving a total silicon area of 60m 2 . The assembly of modules onto each of the four barrel structures has recently been completed. In addition to functional tests made during the assembly process, each completed barrel was operated in its entirety. In the case of the largest barrel, with an active silicon area of approximately 10m 2 , this corresponds to more than one million instrumented channels. This paper documents the electrical performance of the four individual SCT barrels. An overview of the readout chain is also given

  5. Robotic mounting of ATLAS barrel SCT modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickerson, R.B.; Viehhauser, G.; Wastie, R.; Terada, S.; Unno, Y.; Kohriki, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Hara, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Barbier, G.; Clark, A.G.; Perrin, E.; Carter, A.A.; Mistry, J.; Morris, J.

    2006-01-01

    The 2112 silicon detector modules of the barrel part of the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) have been mounted on their carbon fibre support structure. Module insertion, placement and fixing were performed by robotic assembly tooling. We report on our experience with this assembly method. Part of the mounting sequence involves a partial survey of elements of the support structure which is needed to align the modules properly during insertion. An analysis of these data is used to estimate the positional accuracy of the robots

  6. Liquid Argon Barrel Cryostat Arrived

    CERN Multimedia

    Pailler, P

    Last week the first of three cryostats for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter arrived at CERN. It had travelled for 46 days over several thousand kilometers from Japan to CERN. During three years it has been fabricated by Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. at Harima, close to Kobe, under contract from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the U.S.. This cryostat consists of two concentric cylinders made of aluminium: the outer vacuum vessel with a diameter of 5.5 m and a length of 7 m, and the inner cold vessel which will contain the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter immersed in liquid argon. The total weight will be 270 tons including the detectors and the liquid argon. The cryostat is now located in building 180 where it will be equipped with 64 feed-throughs which serve for the passage of 122,880 electrical lines which will carry the signals of the calorimeter. After integration of the calorimeter, the solenoidal magnet of ATLAS will be integrated in the vacuum vessel. A final cold test of the cryostat inc...

  7. Design and development of a work robot to place ATLAS SCT modules onto barrel cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Sengoku, H.; Kato, Y.; Hara, K.; Honma, F.; Ikegami, Y.; Iwata, Y.; Kohriki, T.; Kondo, T.; Nakano, I.; Takashima, R.; Tanaka, R.; Ujiie, N.; Unno, Y.; Yasuda, S.

    2005-01-01

    More than 2000 silicon modules need to be placed and fastened on the ATLAS SCT barrel tracker. A semi-automatic pick-and-place work robot was designed and developed to cope with the module placement for the SCT barrel assembly. We found that this robot could place modules to a mechanical precision of better than 25 μm

  8. Design and development of a work robot to place ATLAS SCT modules onto barrel cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Terada, S; Honma, F; Ikegami, Y; Iwata, Y; Kato, Y; Kobayashi, H; Kohriki, T; Kondo, T; Nakano, I; Sengoku, H; Takashima, R; Tanaka, R; Ujiie, N; Unno, Y; Yasuda, S

    2005-01-01

    More than 2000 silicon modules need to be placed and fastened on the ATLAS SCT barrel tracker. A semi-automatic pick-and-place work robot was designed and developed to cope with the module placement for the SCT barrel assembly. We found that this robot could place modules to a mechanical precision of better than 25 mum.

  9. Study of a twisted ATLAS SCT Barrel deformation as revealed by a photogrammetric survey

    CERN Document Server

    Dobson, E; Heinemann, F; Karagoz-Unel, M

    2007-01-01

    A photogrammetry survey on the SCT barrels was performed as an engineering check on the structure of the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) shortly after construction. Analysis of the data obtained revealed small scale elliptical deformation as well as a twist of the structure. The results of the survey are presented as well as interpolation of the measured targets to the module positions and a comparison with track based alignment measurements.

  10. Construction and Performance of the ATLAS SCT Barrels and Cosmic Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Demirkoz, Bilge Melahat

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector for the LHC and will detect proton-proton collisions with center of mass energy of $14$TeV. Part of the central inner detector, the Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) barrels, were assembled and tested at Oxford University and later integrated at CERN with the TRT (Transition Radiation Tracker) barrel. The barrel SCT is composed of 4 layers of silicon strip modules with two sensor layers with $80 \\mu$m channel width. The design of the modules and the barrels has been optimized for low radiation length while maintaining mechanical stability, bringing services to the detector, and ensuring a cold and dry environment. The high granularity, high detector efficiency and low noise occupancy ($ < 5 \\times 10^{-4}$) of the SCT will enable ATLAS to have an efficient pattern recognition capability. Due to the binary nature of the SCT read-out, a stable read-out system and the calibration system is of critical importance. SctRodDaq is the online software framework for the calibration and a...

  11. Application of advanced thermal management technologies to the ATLAS SCT barrel module baseboards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apsimon, R.J. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 OQX (United Kingdom); Batchelor, L.E. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 OQX (United Kingdom); Beck, G.A. [Department of Physics, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Canard, P. [European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carter, A.A. [Department of Physics, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: a.a.carter@qmul.ac.uk; Carter, J.R. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Davis, V.R. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 OQX (United Kingdom); Oliveira, R. de [European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Gibson, M.D. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 OQX (United Kingdom); Hominal, L. [European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Ilie, D.M. [Department of Physics, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Ilie, S.D. [European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Leboube, C.G. [European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Mistry, J. [Department of Physics, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Morin, J. [Department of Physics, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Morris, J.; Nagai, K. [Department of Physics, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Sexton, I.; Thery, X. [European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Tyndel, M. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 OQX (United Kingdom)

    2006-09-15

    The paper describes the application of advanced thermal management technologies to the design and production of the barrel module baseboard of the SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The barrel modules contain silicon microstrip sensors and readout ASICs for tracking charged particles, and the baseboard forms the central element of the module, providing both its necessary thermal management and its mechanical structure. The baseboard requirements and specifications are given, and design and fabrication details are described. The properties of the 3000 baseboards successfully produced for the SCT are summarised.

  12. Estimating induced-activation of SCT barrel-modules in the ATLAS radiation environment.

    CERN Document Server

    Buttar, C M; Dawson, I; Mandic, I; Moraes, A

    2002-01-01

    One of the consequences of operating detector systems in the harsh radiation environments of the ATLAS inner-detector will be radioactivation of the components. If the levels of radioactivity and corresponding dose rates are significant, then there will be implications for any access or maintenance operations. Given in this note are predictions for the radioactivation of SCT barrel-modules in the expected radiation environment of the inner-detector, based on both calculations and measurements. It is shown that both neutron-capture and high-energy hadron reactions must be taken into account. The predictions show that, from a radiological point of view, the SCT barrel-modules should not pose any serious problems.

  13. First ATLAS Barrel Toroid coil casing arrives at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The first of eight 25-metre long coil casings for the ATLAS experiment's barrel toroid magnet system arrived at CERN on Saturday 2 March by road from Heidelberg. This structure will be part of the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever made.   The first coil casing for the toroidal magnets of Atlas arrives at Building 180. This is the start of an enormous three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle. Each of the eight sets of double pancake coils will be housed inside aluminium coil casings, which in turn will be held inside a stainless steel vacuum vessel. A huge construction, the casing that arrived at CERN measures 25 metres in length and 5 metres in width. It weighs 20 tones. And this is just the beginning of the toroid jigsaw: by early April a batch of four double pancake coils, which altogether weighs 65 tones, will arrive from Ansaldo in Italy. The first vacuum vessel will also be arriving from Felguera in Spain this month. It will take about two years for all these 25 m long structures of casings, coils a...

  14. Application of Cu-polyimide flex circuit and Al-on-glass pitch adapter for the ATLAS SCT barrel hybrid

    CERN Document Server

    Unno, Y; Ikegami, Y; Iwata, Y; Kohriki, T; Kondo, T; Nakano, I; Ohsugi, T; Takashima, R; Tanaka, R; Terada, S; Ujiie, N

    2005-01-01

    We applied the surface build-up Cu-polyimide flex-circuit technology with laser vias to the ATLAS SCT barrel hybrid to be made in one piece from the connector to the electronics sections including cables. The hybrids, reinforced with carbon-carbon substrates, provide mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, low-radiation length, and stability in application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) operation. By following the design rules, we experienced little trouble in breaking the traces. The pitch adapter between the sensor and the ASICs was made of aluminum traces on glass substrate. We identified that the generation of whiskers around the wire-bonding feet was correlated with the hardness of metallized aluminum. The appropriate hardness has been achieved by keeping the temperature of the glasses as low as room temperature during the metallization. The argon plasma cleaning procedure cleaned the contamination on the gold pads of the hybrids for successful wire bonding, although it was unsuccessful in the alu...

  15. Cosmic tests and performance of the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker Barrels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirkoez, Bilge M.

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is a multi-purpose particle detector for the LHC and will detect proton collisions with center of mass energy of 14TeV. Part of the central inner detector, the SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) barrel, is now fully integrated with the Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) barrel. The SCT module performance has been measured after module production, after macro-assembly of modules onto barrels, after arrival at CERN and again partially after integration with the TRT. The module noise average per channel has been stable and is 4.5x10 -5 , well below the design specification of 5x10 -4 . There is no evidence for common mode noise problems and 99.8% of the 3.2 million channels of the SCT barrels are functional. The cosmics running of the SCT and TRT was the first large scale test of the physics mode of the SCT online software framework. A large sector, 468 SCT modules, has been timed in and read out during the cosmic tests. Tracks have been reconstructed through the SCT and the TRT sectors. Present residuals from tracks (without alignment) are better than the specified building tolerances of the SCT

  16. The ATLAS semiconductor tracker (SCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS detector (CERN,LHCC,94-43 (1994)) is designed to study a wide range of physics at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at luminosities up to 10 34 cm -2 s -1 with a bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz. The Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) forms a key component of the Inner Detector (vol. 1, ATLAS TDR 4, CERN,LHCC 97-16 (1997); vol. 2, ATLAS TDR 5, CERN,LHCC 97-17 (1997)) which is situated inside a 2 T solenoid field. The ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) utilises 4088 silicon modules with binary readout mounted on carbon fibre composite structures arranged in the forms of barrels in the central region and discs in the forward region. The construction of the SCT is now well advanced. The design of the SCT modules, services and support structures will be briefly outlined. A description of the various stages in the construction process will be presented with examples of the performance achieved and the main difficulties encountered. Finally, the current status of the construction is reviewed

  17. ATLAS silicon microstrip detector system (SCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unno, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The S CT together with the pixel and the transition radiation tracker systems and with a central solenoid forms the central tracking system of the ATLAS detector at LHC. Series production of SCT Silicon microstrip sensors is near completion. The sensors have been shown to be robust against high voltage operation to the 500 V required after fluences of 3x10 14 protons/cm 2 . SCT barrel modules are in series production. A low-noise CCD camera has been used to debug the onset of leakage currents

  18. A snap-shot of a cosmic ray event seen in the different layers of both the SCT and TRT detectors.

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Clean tracks of cosmic rays were detected in the completed semiconductor tracker (SCT) and transition radiation tracker (TRT) barrels. These tracking tests come just months after the successful insertion of the SCT into the TRT

  19. Recent test results on the ATLAS SCT detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernegger, H.

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) will be a central part of the tracking system of the ATLAS experiment. The SCT, which is currently under construction, will consist of four concentric barrels of silicon detectors as well as two silicon endcap detectors formed by nine disks each. After an overview of the SCT and the detector module layout, the paper will summarize recent test results obtained from silicon detector modules, which have been extensively tested before starting their large series production. The tests presented here cover electrical performance of individual modules, their performance after irradiation, as well as system tests in a multi-module setup

  20. Cosmic Ray Data in TRT Barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Hance

    "I had a great day in August when I went into SR1," said Daniel Froidevaux, former project leader of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker, "not only had all SCT barrels arrived at CERN, but there were cosmic ray tracks seen in the TRT!" Daniel's excitement was mirrored by the rest of the TRT collaboration when, on July 29, the first cosmic ray tracks were seen in the barrel. Along with many others in the community, Daniel was quick to point out that this is the cumulative result of years of R&D, test beam work, and an intense installation and integration schedule. Indeed, the cosmic ray readout is only possible through the coordination of many efforts, from detector mechanics to module assembly, power and high voltage control, cooling, gas systems, electronics and cabling, data acquisition, and monitoring. "Many people have worked very hard on the the TRT, some of them for more than 10 years," said Brig Williams, the leader of the UPenn group responsible for much of the TRT front end electronics. He ...

  1. First Combined SCT/TRT Cosmics Seen in SR1

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Jose Costa; H. Pernegger

    A major milestone for the Inner Detector project has been accomplished in early May as cosmic rays going through both the barrel Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) and Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) have been successfully recorded in the SR1 building on the ATLAS experimental site at CERN. A cosmic-ray track in the combined SCT-TRT barrel As reported also in this issue of the eNews, in February of this year the SCT barrel was inserted into the TRT in the SR1 building. One eighth of the TRT barrel and a quarter of the SCT barrel were then cabled to power supplies and to the data acquisition system in order to verify the good operation of the detector before installation in the ATLAS cavern. After first checks of noise levels in the final detectors, a critical goal was to study its response to cosmic rays using a set of scintillators to give the external trigger, thus undertaking the enormous challenge of integrating the full chain of the detectors, the DAQ, and the reconstruction and monitoring software. A ...

  2. Commissioning of the SCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, Helen

    2010-01-01

    In September 2008, the large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN was switched on with successful tests of circulating beam in both directions of the ring. The ATLAS semiconductor tracker (SCT) has been installed in the ATLAS cavern since summer 2007 and then integrated with the rest of the ATLAS subdetectors, in preparation for this event. After the SCT was assembled on the surface, the process of being commissioned using cosmic ray events began, and continued after the SCT was installed in the cavern with the rest of the ATLAS detector. Performance results will be given for the recent cosmic runs.

  3. EVAPORATIVE COOLING - CONCEPTUAL DESIGN FOR ATLAS SCT

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, T O

    1998-01-01

    The conceptual design of an evaporative two-phase flow cooling system for the ATLAS SCT detector is described, using perfluorinated propane (C3F8) as a coolant. Comparison with perfluorinated butane (C4F10) is made, although the detailed design is presented only for C3F8. The two-phase pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient are calculated in order to determine the dimensions of the cooling pipes and module contacts for the Barrel SCT. The region in which the flow is homogeneous is determined. The cooling cycle, pipework, compressor, heat exchangers and other main elements of the system are calculated in order to be able to discuss the system control, safety and reliability. Evaporative cooling appears to be substantially better than the binary ice system from the point of view of safety, reliability, detector thickness, heat transfer coefficient, cost and simplicity.

  4. Construction and performance of the ATLAS silicon microstrip barrel modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, T.; Apsimon, R.; Beck, G.A.; Bell, P.; Brenner, R.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Charlton, D.; Dabrowski, W.; Dorholt, O.; Ekelof, T.; Eklund, L.; Gibson, M.; Gadomski, S.; Grillo, A.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Haber, C.; Hara, K.; Hill, J.C.; Ikegami, Y.; Iwata, Y.; Johansen, L.G.; Kohriki, T.; Macpherson, A.; McMahon, S.; Moorhead, G.; Morin, J.; Morris, J.; Morrissey, M.; Nagai, K.; Nakano, I.; Pater, J.; Pernegger, H.; Perrin, E.; Phillips, P.; Robinson, D.; Skubic, B.; Spencer, N.; Stapnes, S.; Stugu, B.; Takashima, R.; Terada, S.; Tyndel, M.; Ujiie, N.; Unno, Y.; Vos, M.

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) consists of four barrel cylinders and 18 end-cap disks. This paper describes the SCT modules of the barrel region, of which more than 2000 are about to be constructed. The module design is fixed. Its design concept is given together with the electrical, thermal and mechanical specifications. The pre-series production of the barrel modules is underway using mass-production procedures and jigs. The pre-series modules have given satisfactory performances on noise, noise occupancy, electrical as well as mechanical and thermal properties. In addition, irradiated modules were demonstrated to work successfully. Also first results from a 10-module system test are given

  5. Barrels XXIX: Barrels go Hollywood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Mathew H; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2017-03-01

    Barrels XXIX brought together researchers focusing on the rodent barrel cortex and associated systems. The meeting revolved around three themes: thalamocortical interactions in motor control, touch in rodent, monkey, and humans, and the nature of the multisensory computations the brain makes. Over two days these topics were covered as well as many more presentations that focused on the physiology, behavior, and development of the rodent whisker-to-barrel cortex system.

  6. The integration and engineering of the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker Barrel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdesselam, A; Barr, A J [Department of Physics, Oxford University, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Allport, P P; Austin, N [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, P.O. Box 147, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Anastopoulos, C [University of Sheffield, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Anderson, B; Attree, D J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom); Andricek, L; Bangert, A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Muenchen (Germany); Anghinolfi, F [CERN, CH - 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Apsimon, R; Barclay, P; Batchelor, L E [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Atkinson, T [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Barbier, G [Universite de Geneve, Section de Physique, 24 rue Ernest Ansermet, CH - 1211 Geneve 4 (Switzerland); Bates, R L; Bell, W H [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Batley, J R [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Beck, G A [Department of Physics, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Bell, P J [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] (and others)

    2008-10-15

    The ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) was built in three sections: a barrel and two end-caps. This paper describes the design, construction and final integration of the barrel section. The barrel is constructed around four nested cylinders that provide a stable and accurate support structure for the 2112 silicon modules and their associated services. The emphasis of this paper is directed at the aspects of engineering design that turned a concept into a fully-functioning detector, as well as the integration and testing of large sub-sections of the final SCT barrel detector. The paper follows the chronology of the construction. The main steps of the assembly are described with the results of intermediate tests. The barrel service components were developed and fabricated in parallel so that a flow of detector modules, cooling loops, opto-harnesses and Frequency-Scanning-Interferometry (FSI) alignment structures could be assembled onto the four cylinders. Once finished, each cylinder was conveyed to the next site for the mounting of modules to form a complete single barrel. Extensive electrical and thermal function tests were carried out on the completed single barrels. In the next stage, the four single barrels and thermal enclosures were combined into the complete SCT barrel detector so that it could be integrated with the Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) barrel to form the central part of the ATLAS inner detector. Finally, the completed SCT barrel was tested together with the TRT barrel in noise tests and using cosmic rays.

  7. A crystal barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The production of crystals for the barrel of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter has been completed. This is an important milestone for the experiment, which received the last of its 62,960 crystals on 9 March. The members of the team responsible for the crystal acceptance testing at CERN display the last crystal for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel. From left to right: Igor Tarasov, Etiennette Auffray and Hervé Cornet.One of the six machines specially developed to measure 67 different parameters on each crystal. Igor Tarasov is seen inserting the last batch of crystals into the machine. The last of the 62,960 CMS barrel crystals arrived at CERN on 9 March. Once removed from its polystyrene protection, this delicate crystal, like thousands of its predecessors, will be inserted into the last of the 36 supermodules of the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter in a few days' time. This marks the end of an important chapter in an almost 15-year-long journey by the CMS crystals team, some of whose member...

  8. Performance and operation of the semiconductor tracker (SCT)

    CERN Document Server

    Dervan, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    After more than 3 years of successful operation at the LHC, we report on the operation and performance of the ATLAS Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) functioning in a high luminosity, high radiation environment. The SCT is constructed of 4088 silicon detector modules, for a total of 6.3 million strips. Each module is designed, constructed and tested to operate as a stand-alone unit, mechanically, electrically, optically and thermally. The modules are mounted into two types of structures: one barrel (4 cylinders) and two end-cap systems (9 disks on each end of the barrel). The SCT silicon micro-strip sensors are processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The signals are processed in the front-end ABCD3TA ASICs, which use a binary readout architecture. Data is transferred to the off-detector readout electronics via optical fibres. We find 99.3% of the SCT modules are operational and the hit efficiency exceeds the design specifications. We will report on the operation and performance of the detector, including an ove...

  9. ID Barrel installed in cryostat

    CERN Multimedia

    Apsimon, R.; Romaniouk, A.

    Wednesday 23rd August was a memorable day for the Inner Detector community as they witnessed the transport and installation of the central part of the inner detector (ID-barrel) into the ATLAS detector. Many members of the collaboration gathered to witness this moment at Point 1. After years of design, construction and commissioning, the outer two detectors (TRT and SCT) of the ID barrel were moved from the SR1 cleanroom to the ATLAS cavern. The barrel was moved across the car park from building 2175 to SX1. Although only a journey of about 100 metres, this required weeks of planning and some degree of luck as far as the weather was concerned. Accelerometers were fitted to the barrel to provide real-time monitoring and no values greater than 0.1 g were recorded, fully satisfying the transport specification for this extremely precise and fragile detector. Muriel, despite her fear of heights, bravely volunteered to keep a close eye on the detector. Swapping cranes to cross the entire parking lot, while Mur...

  10. The barrel modules of the ATLAS semiconductor tracker

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abdesselam, A.; Akimoto, T.; Allport, P.; Böhm, Jan; Šťastný, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 568, - (2006), s. 642-671 ISSN 0168-9002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : ATLAS * SCT * silicon * microstrip * module * LHC * barrel Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.185, year: 2006

  11. Electrical performance of ATLAS-SCT KB end-cap modules

    CERN Document Server

    D'Onofrio, M; Donegà, M; Ferrère, D; Mangin-Brinet, M; Mikulec, B; Weber, M; Ikegami, Y; Kohriki, T; Kondo, T; Terada, S; Unno, Y; Pernegger, H; Roe, S; Wallny, R; Moorhead, G F; Taylor, G; García, J E; Gonzáles, S; Vos, M A; Toczek, B

    2003-01-01

    The Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) is one of the ATLAS Inner Detector elements which aims to track charged particles in the ATLAS experiment. It consists of four cylindrical layers (barrels) of silicon strip detectors, with nine disks in each of the forward and backward directions. Carbon fibre structures will support a total of 4088 modules, which are the basic functional sub-unit of the SCT. Each module consists of single sided silicon micro-strip detectors glued back to back with a 40 mrad stereo-angle, and attached to a hybrid. The scope of this document is to present the electrical performances of prototype end-cap modules proposed for the ATLAS-SCT, as an alternative to the baseline. The layout of these modules is based on the implementation of the barrel module hybrid in the end-cap geometry. A complete set of electrical measurements is summarized in this paper, including irradiated module tests and beam tests.

  12. Beamtest results of ATLAS SCT Modules in 2002

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, A J; Dolezal, Z; Donega, M; D'Onofrio, M; García, J E; González, S; Horazdovsky, T; Kazi, S; Kodys, P; Moorhead, G F; Reznicek, P; Solar, M; Vos, M; Wallny, R

    2004-01-01

    Beamtests of ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) modules carried out at the ATLAS testbeam facility at the CERN SPS H8. During 2002, three beam runs were carried out in May/June, July and August. In the August 2002 beam test period four irradiated modules, two ``K5'' end-cap and two barrel, with the final design were tested. Module propierties (efficiency, charge collection, signal/noise, pulse shape) and the dependence of them for a particle high incidence angle was studied. A comparison with previous testbeam results was also performed. Time-stamping performance of SCT modules and specially, the effect of irradiation on the time characteristics of the Front End was investigated more closely. On this note we show a summary of these studies.

  13. ATLAS SCT - Progress on the Silicon Modules

    CERN Multimedia

    Tyndel, M.

    The ATLAS SCT consists of 4088 silicon modules. Each module is made up of 4 silicon sensors with 1536 readout strips. Individual strips are connected to FE amplifiers, discriminators and pipelines on the module, i.e. there are 12 radiation hard ASICs, each containing 128 channels on the module. The sensors and the ASICs were developed for the ATLAS experiment and production is proceeding smoothly with over half the components delivered. The components of a module - 4 silicon sensors, a Cu/polyimide hybrid and pitch adaptor, and 12 ASICs - need to be carefully and precisely assembled onto a carbon and ceramic framework, which supports the module and removes the heat. Eleven production clusters are preparing to carry this out over the next two years. An important milestone for the barrel modules has been passed with the first cluster (KEK) now in production (~40 modules produced). A second cluster UK-B has qualified by producing five modules within specification (see below) and is about to start production. T...

  14. Hot off the press - First Combined SCT/TRT Endcap Cosmics Seen in SR1

    CERN Multimedia

    Christian Schmitt

    Following the successful combined SCT/TRT barrel test in the Spring 2006 (see ATLAS eNews from May 2006), a similar combined SCT/TRT endcap test is currently being performed in the SR1 building on the ATLAS experimental site at CERN. One quadrant of the SCT and two sectors of the TRT have been cabled up and are used in this test. The picture shows one of the first combined tracks seen in the cosmics runs. The data taking and combined testing is expected to last until December 11th. The event display below shows one of the first combined tracks seen in the cosmics run. There are three different views of the same event: the top left part shows a x-y view of the event where the track can be seen in red, the SCT spacepoints in green, and the SCT strips in grey. On the right is the z-phi view, where also the TRT DriftCircles can be seen as white dots. In the bottom window, the TRT wheels are on top and the SCT disks are shown below with the hits corresponding to those shown in the top window. The TRT DriftCircl...

  15. Udgravningerne i Sct. Nicolaj Gade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrø Jensen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ved renoveringen af Sct. Nicolaj Gade i 2010 og 2011 blev et af de hidtil største sammenhængende arealer (190m²) af Ribes markedsplads afdækket umiddelbart under eksisterende gadeniveau. Ved den efterfølgende undersøgelse kunne den allerede kendte parcelstruktur iagttages, og der blev udtaget...

  16. Barrels XXX meeting report: Barrels in Baltimore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyeyoung; Bitzidou, Malamati; Palaguachi, Fernando; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2018-03-01

    The Barrels meeting annually brings together researchers focused on the rodent whisker to cortical barrel system prior to the Society for Neuroscience meeting. The 2017 meeting focused on the classification of cortical interneurons, the role interneurons have in shaping brain dynamics, and finally on the circuitry underlying oral sensations. The meeting highlighted the latest advancements in this rapidly advancing field.

  17. Engineering for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) End-cap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdesselam, A; Barr, A [Department of Physics, Oxford University, Oxford (United Kingdom); Allport, P P [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Anderson, B [Department of Physics, University College, University of London, London (United Kingdom); Andricek, L; Becker, H [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Anghinolfi, F [European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Apsimon, R J; Austin, A; Barclay, P; Batchelor, L E; Benes, J [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica de Barcelona, CNM-IMB, CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Atkinson, T [University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Band, H [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bates, R L; Bell, W H [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Batley, J R [Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Beck, G; Belymam, A [Department of Physics, Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London, London (United Kingdom); Bell, P [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)], E-mail: S.J.Haywood@rl.ac.uk (and others)

    2008-05-15

    The ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) is a silicon-strip tracking detector which forms part of the ATLAS inner detector. The SCT is designed to track charged particles produced in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN at an energy of 14 TeV. The tracker is made up of a central barrel and two identical end-caps. The barrel contains 2112 silicon modules, while each end-cap contains 988 modules. The overall tracking performance depends not only on the intrinsic measurement precision of the modules but also on the characteristics of the whole assembly, in particular, the stability and the total material budget. This paper describes the engineering design and construction of the SCT end-caps, which are required to support mechanically the silicon modules, supply services to them and provide a suitable environment within the inner detector. Critical engineering choices are highlighted and innovative solutions are presented - these will be of interest to other builders of large-scale tracking detectors. The SCT end-caps will be fully connected at the start of 2008. Further commissioning will continue, to be ready for proton-proton collision data in 2008.

  18. ATLAS silicon microstrip Semiconductor Tracker (SCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unno, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Silicon microstrip semiconductor tracking system (SCT) will be in operation in the ATLAS detector in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Challenging issues in the SCT are the radiation tolerance to the fluence of 2x10 14 1-MeV-neutron-equivalent particles/cm 2 at the designed luminosity of 1x10 34 cm -2 /s of the proton-proton collisions and the speed of the electronics to identify the crossing bunches at 25 ns. The developments and the status of the SCT are presented from the point of view of these issues. Series production of the SCT will start in the year 2001 and the SCT will be installed into the ATLAS detector during 2003-2004

  19. Second auto-SCT for treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, W I; Gertz, M A; Lacy, M Q; Dispenzieri, A; Hayman, S R; Buadi, F K; Dingli, D; Hogan, W J; Kumar, S K

    2013-04-01

    High-dose therapy and auto-SCT remain integral in the initial treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), and are increasingly being applied for management of relapsed disease. We examined the outcomes in 98 patients undergoing salvage auto-SCT (auto-SCT2) for relapsed MM after receiving an initial transplant (auto-SCT1) between 1994 and 2009. The median age at auto-SCT2 was 60 years (range: 35-74). The median time between auto-SCT1 and auto-SCT2 was 46 months (range: 10-130). Treatment-related mortality was seen in 4%. The median PFS from auto-SCT2 was 10.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 7-14) months and the median OS from auto-SCT2 was 33 months (95% CI: 28-51). In a multivariable analysis, shorter time to progression (TTP) after auto-SCT1, not achieving a CR after auto-SCT2, higher number of treatment regimens before auto-SCT2 and a higher plasma cell labeling index at auto-SCT2 predicted for shorter PFS. However, only a shorter TTP after auto-SCT1 predicted for a shorter OS post auto-SCT2. Hence, auto-SCT2 is an effective and feasible therapeutic option for MM patients relapsing after other treatments, especially in patients who had a TTP of at least 12 months after their auto-SCT1.

  20. Prototyping the PANDA Barrel DIRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, C., E-mail: C.Schwarz@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Kalicy, G.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Dodokhov, V.Kh. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A. [Friedrich Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); and others

    2014-12-01

    The design of the Barrel DIRC detector for the future PANDA experiment at FAIR contains several important improvements compared to the successful BABAR DIRC, such as focusing and fast timing. To test those improvements as well as other design options a prototype was build and successfully tested in 2012 with particle beams at CERN. The prototype comprises a radiator bar, focusing lens, mirror, and a prism shaped expansion volume made of synthetic fused silica. An array of micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes measures the location and arrival time of the Cherenkov photons with sub-nanosecond resolution. The development of a fast reconstruction algorithm allowed to tune construction details of the detector setup with test beam data and Monte-Carlo simulations.

  1. Performance And Radiation Hardness Of The Atlas/sct Detector Module

    CERN Document Server

    Eklund, L

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is a general purpose experiment being constructed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at FERN, Geneva. ATLAS is designed to exploit the full physics potential of LHC, in particular to study topics concerning the Higgs mechanism, Super-symmetry and CP violation. The cross sections for the processes under study are extremely small, requiring very high luminosity colliding beams. The Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) is an essential part of the Inner Detector tracking system of ATLAS. The active elements of the SCT is 4088 detector modules, tiled on four barrel cylinders and eighteen endcap disks. As a consequence of the high luminosity, the detector modules will operate in a harsh radiation environment. This thesis describes work concerning radiation hardness, beam test performance and methods for production testing of detector modules. The radiation hardness studies have been focused on the electrical performance of the front-end ASIC and the detector module. The results have identified features ...

  2. New frontiers in pediatric Allo-SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talano, J M; Pulsipher, M A; Symons, H J; Militano, O; Shereck, E B; Giller, R H; Hancock, L; Morris, E; Cairo, M S

    2014-09-01

    The inaugural meeting of 'New Frontiers in Pediatric Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation' organized by the Pediatric Blood and Transplant Consortium (PBMTC) was held at the American Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Annual Meeting. This meeting provided an international platform for physicians and investigators active in the research and utilization of pediatric Allo-SCT in children and adolescents with malignant and non-malignant disease (NMD), to share information and develop future collaborative strategies. The primary objectives of the conference included: (1) to present advances in Allo-SCT in pediatric ALL and novel pre and post-transplant immunotherapy; (2) to highlight new strategies in alternative allogeneic stem cell donor sources for children and adolescents with non-malignant hematological disorders; (3) to discuss timing of immune reconstitution after Allo-SCT and methods of facilitating more rapid recovery of immunity; (4) to identify strategies of utilizing Allo-SCT in pediatric myeloproliferative disorders; (5) to develop diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to hematological complications post pediatric Allo-SCT; (6) to enhance the understanding of new novel cellular therapeutic approaches to pediatric malignant and non-malignant hematological disorders; and (7) to discuss optimizing drug therapy in pediatric recipients of Allo-SCT. This paper will provide a brief overview of the conference.

  3. TRT Barrel milestones passed

    CERN Multimedia

    Ogren, H

    2004-01-01

    The barrel TRT detector passed three significant milestones this spring. The Barrel Support Structure (BSS) was completed and moved to the SR-1 building on February 24th. On March 12th the first module passed the quality assurance testing in Building 154 and was transported to the assembly site in the SR-1 building for barrel assembly. Then on April 21st the final production module that had been scanned at Hampton University was shipped to CERN. TRT Barrel Module Production The production of the full complement of barrel modules (96 plus 9 total spares) is now complete. This has been a five-year effort by Duke University, Hampton University, and Indiana University. Actual construction of the modules in the United States was completed in the first part of 2004. The production crews at each of the sites in the United States have now completed their missions. They are shown in the following pictures. Duke University: Production crew with the final completed module. Indiana University: Module producti...

  4. Barrelled locally convex spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez Carreras, P

    1987-01-01

    This book is a systematic treatment of barrelled spaces, and of structures in which barrelledness conditions are significant. It is a fairly self-contained study of the structural theory of those spaces, concentrating on the basic phenomena in the theory, and presenting a variety of functional-analytic techniques.Beginning with some basic and important results in different branches of Analysis, the volume deals with Baire spaces, presents a variety of techniques, and gives the necessary definitions, exploring conditions on discs to ensure that they are absorbed by the barrels of the sp

  5. Barrel Module0 Autopsy

    CERN Document Server

    Cobal, M; Nessi, Marzio; Blanch, O; Zamora, Y

    1999-01-01

    Using the information from the Cs calibration runs, many of the problems affecting the response of the barrel Module0 prototype have been spotted out. These can be bad fibre-tile couplings, light losses from fibres bundling, broken fibres, not transparent tiles etc. After a visual inspection, most of these problems have been repaired.

  6. Second myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) using cord blood for leukemia relapsed after initial allogeneic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konuma, Takaaki; Ooi, Jun; Takahashi, Satoshi; Tomonari, Akira; Tsukada, Nobuhiro; Kato, Seiko; Sato, Aki; Monma, Fumihiko; Kasahara, Senji; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Iseki, Tohru; Tojo, Arinobu; Asano, Shigetaka

    2009-06-01

    There are many reports of second allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) using cord blood (CB) for graft failure after initial allo-SCT. However, the efficacy of second allo-SCT using CB for patients with leukemia relapsed after initial allo-SCT is unknown. We report the results of second allo-SCT using CB in seven adult patients with leukemia relapsed after initial allo-SCT. All patients received a myeloablative conditioning regimen including oral busulfan 16 mg/kg, intravenously fludarabine 100mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide 120 mg/kg. All but one patient had myeloid reconstitution and four patients remain alive at between 4 and 40 months after second SCT. We conclude that second myeloablative allo-SCT using CB may be feasible in selected patients with the relatively younger age, less organ damage and longer time interval between first and second allo-SCT.

  7. The PANDA Barrel DIRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiening, J.; Ali, A.; Belias, A.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Lehmann, D.; Nerling, F.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Traxler, M.; Böhm, M.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kreutzfeld, K.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Schmidt, M.; Wasem, T.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.

    2018-03-01

    The PANDA experiment at the international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) near GSI, Darmstadt, Germany will address fundamental questions of hadron physics. Excellent Particle Identification (PID) over a large range of solid angles and particle momenta will be essential to meet the objectives of the rich physics program. Charged PID for the barrel region of the PANDA target spectrometer will be provided by a DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) detector. The Barrel DIRC will cover the polar angle range of 22o-140o and cleanly separate charged pions from kaons for momenta between 0.5 GeV/c and 3.5 GeV/c with a separation power of at least 3 standard deviations. The design is based on the successful BABAR DIRC and the SuperB FDIRC R&D with several important improvements to optimize the performance for PANDA, such as a focusing lens system, fast timing, a compact fused silica prism as expansion region, and lifetime-enhanced Microchannel-Plate PMTs for photon detection. This article describes the technical design of the PANDA Barrel DIRC and the result of the design validation using a "vertical slice" prototype in hadronic particle beams at the CERN PS.

  8. Construction of the ATLAS SCT Endcap modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snow, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) uses silicon strip detectors to measure trajectories of charged particles coming from 14 TeV proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The SCT provides at least four space points, in the radial range of 27-50 cm from the beam, for tracks within the angular acceptance vertical bar η vertical bar <2.5. The SCT is built up of 4088 modules, each consisting of two or four silicon detectors, a hybrid carrying several readout ASICS, and other components to support, cool and align the detectors. We report on construction of over 2000 end-cap modules of the SCT by a group of 14 institutes from seven countries. A key aspect of the project was to fully standardise the final module tests and to insist that test data from all institutes was stored in a single central database, while leaving institutes flexibility to vary their module assembly methods to suit local circumstances. First the module specifications and tests used for quality control are summarised, then we describe the main test results. Finally, we report our experience in terms of component quality, assembly and testing rates, yield of good modules and causes of lost modules. At the outset we assumed losses during assembly of 15% and procured components accordingly; in fact, losses were around 7%

  9. Silicon microstrip detectors for the ATLAS SCT

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Robinson, D.; Allport, P.; Andricek, L.; Böhm, Jan; Buttar, C.; Carter, J. R.; Chilingarov, A.; Clark, A. G.; Feriere, D.; Fuster, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 485, 1-2 (2002), s. 84-88 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MPO RP-4210/69 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010920 Keywords : ATLAS SCT * silicon microstrip detectors * irradiation * quality control Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.167, year: 2002

  10. Second allogeneic hematopoietic SCT for relapsed ALL in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, M; Horikoshi, Y; Okamoto, Y; Takahashi, Y; Hasegawa, D; Koh, K; Takita, J; Inoue, M; Kigasawa, H; Ogawa, A; Sasahara, Y; Kawa, K; Yabe, H; Sakamaki, H; Suzuki, R; Kato, K

    2012-10-01

    A second SCT is generally accepted as the only potentially curative approach for ALL patients that relapse after SCT, but the role of second SCT for pediatric ALL is not fully understood. We performed a retrospective analysis of 171 pediatric patients who received a second allo-SCT for relapsed ALL after allo-SCT. OS at 2 years was 29.4 ± 3.7%, the cumulative incidence of relapse was 44.1 ± 4.0% and non-relapse mortality was 18.8 ± 3.5%. Relapse occurred faster after the second SCT than after the first SCT (117 days vs 164 days, P=0.04). Younger age (9 years or less), late relapse (180 days or more after first SCT), CR at the second SCT, and myeloablative conditioning were found to be related to longer survival. Neither acute GVHD nor the type of donor influenced the outcome of second SCT. Multivariate analysis showed that younger age and late relapse were associated with better outcomes. Our analysis suggests that second SCT for relapsed pediatric ALL is an appropriate treatment option for patients that have achieved CR, which is associated with late relapse after the first SCT.

  11. Modelling of performance of the ATLAS SCT detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The ATLAS detector being built at LHC will use the SCT (semiconductor tracking) module for particle tracking in the inner core of the detector. An analytical/numerical model of the discriminator threshold dependence and the temperature dependence of the SCT module was derived. Measurements were conducted on the performance of the SCT module versus temperature and these results were compared with the predictions made by the model. The affect of radiation damage of the SCT detector was also investigated. The detector will operate for approximately 10 years so a study was carried out on the effects of the 10 years of radiation exposure to the SCT

  12. Simulation of the ATLAS SCT barrel module response to LHC beam loss scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Fadeyev, V; Spencer, E; Wilder, M; Domingo, M

    2014-01-01

    In the event of beam loss at the LHC, ATLAS Inner Detector components nearest the beam line may be subjected to unusually large amounts of radiation. Understanding their behavior in such an event is important in determining whether they would still function properly. We built a SPICE model of the silicon strip module electrical system to determine the behavior of its elements during a realistic beam loss scenario. We found that the power supply and bias filter characteristics strongly affect the module response in such scenarios. In particular, the following self-limiting phenomena were observed: there is a finite amount of charge initially available on the bias filter capacitors for collection by the strips; the power supply current limit reduces the rate at which the bias filter capacitors' charge can be replenished; the reduced bias voltage leads to a smaller depletion depth in the sensors which results in less collected charge. These effects provide a larger measure of safety during beam loss events than ...

  13. Simulation of the ATLAS SCT Barrel Module Response to LHC Beam Loss Scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Fadeyev, V; Spencer, E; Wilder, M; Domingo, M

    2013-01-01

    In the event of beam loss at the LHC, ATLAS Inner Detector components nearest the beamline may be subjected to unusually large amounts of radiation. Understanding their behavior in such an event is important in determining whether they would still function properly. We built a SPICE model of the silicon strip module electrical system to determine the behavior of its elements during a realistic beam loss scenario. We found that the power supply and bias filter characteristics strongly affect the module response in such scenarios. In particular, the following self-limiting phenomena were observed: there is a finite amount of charge initially available on the bias filter capacitors for collection by the strips; the power supply current limit reduces the rate at which the bias filter capacitors' charge can be replenished; the reduced bias voltage leads to a smaller depletion depth which results in less collected charge. These effects provide a larger measure of safety during beam loss events than we have previous...

  14. The hatfield SCT lunar atlas photographic atlas for Meade, Celestron and other SCT telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    Schmitt-Cassegrain Telescopes (SCT) and Schmitt-Maksutov telescopes - which include the best-selling models from Meade, Celestron, and other important manufacturers - reverse the visual image left for right, giving a "mirror image". This makes it extremely difficult for observers to identify lunar features at the eyepiece of one of these instruments, using conventional atlases which show the Moon "upside-down" with south at the top. The human brain just doesn't cope well with trying to compare the real thing with a map that is a mirror-image of it!The Hatfield SCT Lunar Atlas solves the problem. Photographs and the detailed key maps are exactly as the Moon appears through the eyepiece of an SCT or Maksutov telescope. Smaller IAU-standard reference photographs are included on each page, to make it simple to compare the mirrored SCT photographs and maps with those that appear in other conventional atlases.Every owner of an SCT - and that's most amateur astronomers - will want this!.

  15. Weapons barrel life cycle determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebojša Pene Hristov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the dynamic processes within the gun barrel during the firing process in exploitation. It generally defines the basic principles of constructing tube elements, and shows the distortion of the basic geometry of the tube interior due to wear as well as the impact it causes during exploitation. The article also defines basic empirical models as well as a model based on fracture mechanics for the calculation of a use-life of the barrel, and other elements essential for the safe use of the barrel as the basic weapon element. Erosion causes are analysed in order to control and reduce wear and prolong the lifetime of the gun barrel. It gives directions for the reparation of barrels with wasted resources. In conclusion, the most influential elements of tube wear are given as well as possible modifications of existing systems, primarily propellant charges, with a purpose of prolonging lifetime of gun barrels. The guidelines for a proper determination of the lifetime based on the barrel condition assessment are given as well. INTRODUCTION The barrel as the basic element of each weapon is described as well as the processes occurring during the firing that have impulsive character and are accompanied by large amounts of energy. The basic elements of barrel and itheir constructive characteristics are descibed. The relation between Internal ballistics, ie calculation of the propellant gas pressure in the firing process, and structural elements defined by the barrel material resistance is shown. In general, this part of the study explains the methodology of the gun barrel structural elements calculation, ie. barrel geometry, taking into account the degrees of safety in accordance with Military Standards.   TUBE WEAR AND DEFORMATIONS The weapon barrel gradually wears out during exploitation due to which it no longer satisfies the set requirements. It is considered that the barrel has experienced a lifetime when it fails to fulfill the

  16. The oil barrel price

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondy, J.; Papon, P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes an overview and a prospective glance on the oil barrel price. It indicates the relevant indicators: Brent quotation, euro/dollar parity, economic activity indicators, world oil consumption distribution, crude oil production, refining capacity. It briefly presents the involved stake holders: crude oil producers, oil refiners, refined product dealers, and the OPEC. It discusses the major retrospective trends: evolution in relationship with geopolitical events and energy policies, strong correlation between oil demand and economic growth, prevalence of OPEC, growing importance of national oil companies. An emerging trend is noticed: growing role of emerging countries on the crude market. Some prospective issues are discussed: duration and intensity of economic recession, separation between economic growth and energy consumption, pace and ambition level of policies of struggle against climate change, exploitable resources, and geopolitical hazards. Four evolution hypotheses are discussed

  17. Core barrel inner tube lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffers, J P

    1968-07-16

    A core drill with means for selectively lifting a core barrel inner tube consists of a lifting means connected to the core barrel inner tube assembly. It has a closable passage to permit drilling fluid normally to pass through it. The lifting means has a normally downward facing surface and a means to direct drilling fluid pressure against that surface so that on closure of the passage to fluid flow, the pressure of the drilling fluid is caused to act selectively on it. This causes the lifting means to rise and lift the core barrel. (7 claims)

  18. CMS Barrel Pixel Detector Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Kästli, H C; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Hörmann, C; Horisberger, Roland Paul; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Meier, B; Robmann, P; Rohe, T; Streuli, S

    2007-01-01

    The pixel detector is the innermost tracking device of the CMS experiment at the LHC. It is built from two independent sub devices, the pixel barrel and the end disks. The barrel consists of three concentric layers around the beam pipe with mean radii of 4.4, 7.3 and 10.2 cm. There are two end disks on each side of the interaction point at 34.5 cm and 46.5 cm. This article gives an overview of the pixel barrel detector, its mechanical support structure, electronics components, services and its expected performance.

  19. Core barrel plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolino, R.W.; Hopkins, R.J.; Congleton, R.L.; Popalis, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    A plug is described for preventing flow through a port in a core barrel of a pressurized water nuclear reactor which consists of: a substantially cylindrical body formed with a cylindrical portion and a flange and defining a tapered leading open end with the other end being closed by an end plug attached to the flange, the body defining a bore therein extending from the open end to the end plug with the bore having a smaller diameter near the open end than near the end plug, the cylindrical portion having a lip near the open end and being formed with longitudinal slots extending from the open end toward the flange and extending entirely through the thickness of the cylindrical portion, the cylindrical portion having a circumferential first groove on the outer surface thereof located near the forwardmost portion of the cylindrical portion but not in the section of the cylindrical portion that has the slots therein, and a plurality of circumferential second grooves on the outer surface thereof located in the section of the cylindrical portion that has the slots therein, the first and second grooves establishing a seal between the cylindrical portion and the inside surface of the port when the cylindrical portion is expanded, and the flange and the end plug having a passageway defined therein for introducing a fluid into the body; a metal ring disposed in each of the second grooves; a mandrel slidably disposed and captured in the body and capable of being moved toward the open end of the body when the fluid is introduced through the passageway, thereby causing the cylindrical portion to be expanded into contact with the inside surface of the port; and a locking mechanism disposed in the end plug for preventing inadvertent movement of the mandrel

  20. Lung transplantation for bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome after allo-SCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, A M; Riise, Gerdt; Hansson, Leif Helmuth

    2013-01-01

    and Finland were recorded and compared with survival data from the Scandiatransplant registry. In total, LTx after allo-SCT had been performed in 13 patients. Allo-SCT was done because of AML (n=6), CML (n=3), ALL (n=2), immunodeficiency (n=1) and aplastic anemia (n=1). All developed clinical c...

  1. SUPPORT CARD FOR THE FORWARD SCT MODULE

    CERN Document Server

    Greenall, A

    2002-01-01

    Previously in the development and testing stage of ATLAS SCT Forward modules support cards have been used which interface the module to the DAQ by using only the Redundant inputs for the module configuration and the 'spying' of the ABCD Master chip(s) data. As module development has matured there is now a necessity to be able to test modules in the laboratory using also their Primary input/output data routes i.e. using the optical chips DORIC [1] and VDC [2] but without the need of optical fibres. A Forward Kapton Support Card, FKSC, has been developed so that both Primary and Redundant data routes can be used for module testing.

  2. The role of hematopoietic SCT in adult Burkitt lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S O; Sureda, A; Aljurf, M

    2013-05-01

    Adult Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive disease characterized by frequent extranodal presentation, bulky disease and a rapid clinical course. Although intensive chemotherapeutic regimes result in long-term disease-free survival in most patients, a significant proportion of patients will have high-risk disease that may be refractory or that will relapse. In these patients, the role of hematopoietic SCT is not well defined, especially in the era of modern chemoimmunotherapy. Upfront auto-SCT has been reported to be feasible in patients who have high-risk features at presentation, and in whom it is a clinical option. In patients with relapsed disease, auto-SCT can result in a PFS of 30-40%. Allo-SCT is an option in relapsing patients with a sibling or matched related donor who may not be eligible for, or may have previously received, an auto-SCT; the role of RIC and T-cell depletion is not well defined. Disease status at transplant is the most significant predictor of outcome in patients undergoing SCT. Here we review the available evidence pertaining to SCT in patients with BL, including in those who are HIV positive (HIV+) and those with B-cell lymphoma unclassified (BCLU). Prospective studies in the era of modern intensive chemoimmunotherapeutic regimes are required to delineate the precise role of transplantation for BL. Developments in molecular diagnostics, incorporation of FDG-PET and minimal residual disease monitoring along with new therapies may further assist in refining treatment algorithms.

  3. Outcome of poor response Paediatric AML using early SCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wareham, Neval E; Heilmann, Carsten; Abrahamsson, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    ) or > 5% blasts after AM (n = 14, refractory disease). Poor response patients received intensively timed induction and proceeded to SCT when a donor was available. RESULTS: Thirty-one of 267 evaluable patients (12%) had a poor response. SCT was performed in 25; using matched unrelated donors in 13......BACKGROUND: Children with poor response acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) generally have a very poor outcome. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is often recommended for these children but the benefit is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate survival for poor response AML patients...... treated with SCT. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Treatment was given according to the NOPHO-AML 2004 protocol. All patients received AIET (Cytarabine, Idarubicin, Etoposide, Thioguanine) and AM (Cytarabine, Mitoxantrone) as induction. We included poor response defined as > 15% blasts on day 15 after AIET (n = 17...

  4. ICD-11 (JLMMS) and SCT Inter-Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamou, Marzouk; Rector, Alan; Schulz, Stefan; Campbell, James; Solbrig, Harold; Rodrigues, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work is to contribute to a smooth and semantically sound inter-operability between the ICD-11 (International Classification of Diseases-11th revision Joint Linearization for Mortality, Morbidity and Statistics) and SNOMED CT (SCT). To guarantee such inter-operation between a classification, characterized by a single hierarchy of mutually exclusive and exhaustive classes, as is the JLMMS successor of ICD-10 on the one hand, and the multi-hierarchical, ontology-based clinical terminology SCT on the other hand, we use ontology axioms that logically express generalizable truths. This is expressed by the compositional grammar of SCT, together with queries on axiomsof SCT. We test the feasibility of the method on the circulatory chapter of ICD-11 JLMMS and present limitations and results.

  5. Work on a ATLAS tile calorimeter Barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter is designed as one barrel and two extended barrel hadron parts. The calorimeter consists of a cylindrical structure with inner and outer radius of 2280 and 4230 mm respectively. The barrel part is 5640 mm in length along the beam axis, while each of the extended barrel cylinders is 2910 mm long. Each detector cylinder is built of 64 independent wedges along the azimuthal direction. Between the barrel and the extended barrels there is a gap of about 600 mm, which is needed for the Inner Detector and the Liquid Argon cables, electronics and services. The barrel covers the region -1.0barrels cover the region 0.8<|h|<1.7.

  6. Lung transplantation for bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome after allo-SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, A M; Riise, G C; Hansson, L; Brinch, L; Bjørtuft, O; Iversen, M; Simonsen, S; Fløisand, Y

    2013-05-01

    Chronic GVHD (cGVHD) associated bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) is a serious complication after allo-SCT, and lung transplantation (LTx) may be the ultimate treatment option. To evaluate this treatment, data on all patients with LTx after allo-SCT ever performed in Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland were recorded and compared with survival data from the Scandiatransplant registry. In total, LTx after allo-SCT had been performed in 13 patients. Allo-SCT was done because of AML (n=6), CML (n=3), ALL (n=2), immunodeficiency (n=1) and aplastic anemia (n=1). All developed clinical cGVHD, with median interval from allo-SCT to LTx of 8.2 (0.7-16) years. Median age at LTx was 34 (16-55) years, and the median postoperative observation time was 4.2 (0.1-15) years. Two patients died, one due to septicemia, the other of relapsing leukemia, after 2 and 14 months, respectively. Four developed BOS, one of these was retransplanted. The survival did not significantly differ from the survival in matched LTx controls, being 90% 1 year and 75% 5 years after LTx compared with 85% and 68% in the controls. We therefore suggest that LTx may be considered in carefully selected patients with BOS due to cGVHD after allo-SCT.

  7. The Hatfield SCT lunar atlas photographic atlas for Meade, Celestron, and other SCT telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    In a major publishing event for lunar observers, the justly famous Hatfield atlas is updated in even more usable form. This version of Hatfield’s classic atlas solves the problem of mirror images, making identification of left-right reversed imaged lunar features both quick and easy. SCT and Maksutov telescopes – which of course include the best-selling models from Meade and Celestron – reverse the visual image left to right. Thus it is extremely difficult to identify lunar features at the eyepiece of one of the instruments using a conventional Moon atlas, as the human brain does not cope well when trying to compare the real thing with a map that is a mirror image of it. Now this issue has at last been solved.   In this atlas the Moon’s surface is shown at various sun angles, and inset keys show the effects of optical librations. Smaller non-mirrored reference images are also included to make it simple to compare the mirrored SCT plates and maps with those that appear in other atlases. This edition s...

  8. The PANDA Barrel DIRC detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoek, M.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.

    2014-01-01

    The PANDA experiment at the new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) at GSI, Darmstadt, will study fundamental questions of hadron physics and QCD using high-intensity cooled antiproton beams with momenta between 1.5 and 15 GeV/c. Efficient Particle Identification for a wide momentum range and the full solid angle is required for reconstructing the various physics channels of the PANDA program. Hadronic Particle Identification in the barrel region of the detector will be provided by a DIRC counter. The design is based on the successful BABAR DIRC with important improvements, such as focusing optics and fast photon timing. Several of these improvements, including different radiator geometries and optics, were tested in particle beams at GSI and at CERN. The evolution of the conceptual design of the PANDA Barrel DIRC and the performance of complex prototypes in test beam campaigns will be discussed

  9. The PANDA Barrel DIRC detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, M., E-mail: matthias.hoek@uni-mainz.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Dodokhov, V. Kh. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Britting, A.; Eyrich, W. [Friedrich Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); and others

    2014-12-01

    The PANDA experiment at the new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) at GSI, Darmstadt, will study fundamental questions of hadron physics and QCD using high-intensity cooled antiproton beams with momenta between 1.5 and 15 GeV/c. Efficient Particle Identification for a wide momentum range and the full solid angle is required for reconstructing the various physics channels of the PANDA program. Hadronic Particle Identification in the barrel region of the detector will be provided by a DIRC counter. The design is based on the successful BABAR DIRC with important improvements, such as focusing optics and fast photon timing. Several of these improvements, including different radiator geometries and optics, were tested in particle beams at GSI and at CERN. The evolution of the conceptual design of the PANDA Barrel DIRC and the performance of complex prototypes in test beam campaigns will be discussed.

  10. Completion of the TRT Barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Gagnon, P

    On February 3, the US-TRT team proudly completed the installation of the 96th barrel TRT module on its support structure in the SR building at CERN. This happy event came after many years of R&D initiated in the nineties by the TA1 team at CERN, followed by the construction of the modules in three American institutes (Duke, Hampton and Indiana Universities) from 1996 to 2003. In total, the 96 barrel modules contain 52544 kapton straws, each 4 mm in diameter and strung with a 30 micron gold-plated tungsten wire. Each wire was manually inserted, a feat in itself! The inner layer modules contain 329 straws, the middle layer modules have 520 straws and the outer layer, 793 straws. Thirty- two modules of each type form a full layer. Their special geometry was designed such as to leave no dead region. On average, a particle will cross 36 straws. Kirill Egorov, Chuck Mahlon and John Callahan inserted the last module in the Barrel Support Structure. After completion in the US, all modules were transferred...

  11. Prototype test for the PANDA barrel DIRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhygadlo, Roman; Gerhardt, Andreas; Kalicy, Grzegorz; Krebs, Marvin; Lehmann, Dorothe; Schwarz, Carsten; Schwiening, Jochen; Belias, Anastasios; Traxler, Michael [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Peters, Klaus [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Barrel DIRC (Detector of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) is designed to provide particle identification (PID) for the PANDA experiment at the new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) at GSI, Darmstadt. It is based on the successful BABAR DIRC detector with several key improvements, such as focusing optics, fast timing, and a compact expansion volume. A large prototype was constructed and tested in a hadronic particle beam at CERN during the summer of 2015 to test the PID performance of different design options. The prototype included a fused silica radiator (either a narrow bar or a wide plate), an optional focusing lens, and a prism-shaped fused silica expansion volume. An array of microchannel-plate photomultiplier tubes measured the location and arrival time of the Cherenkov photons on 960 pixels. Data were collected for two radiator geometries and several types of focusing lenses at different beam momenta and polar angles. Results of the analysis as well as a comparison to the Geant4 simulation are presented.

  12. Outcome of poor response paediatric AML using early SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareham, Neval E; Heilmann, Carsten; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik; Gustafsson, Britt; Ha, Shau-Yin; Heldrup, Jesper; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Jónsson, Ólafur G; Lausen, Birgitte; Palle, Josefine; Zeller, Bernward; Hasle, Henrik

    2013-03-01

    Children with poor response acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) generally have a very poor outcome. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is often recommended for these children but the benefit is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate survival for poor response AML patients treated with SCT. Treatment was given according to the NOPHO-AML 2004 protocol. All patients received AIET (Cytarabine, Idarubicin, Etoposide, Thioguanine) and AM (Cytarabine, Mitoxantrone) as induction. We included poor response defined as > 15% blasts on day 15 after AIET (n = 17) or > 5% blasts after AM (n = 14, refractory disease). Poor response patients received intensively timed induction and proceeded to SCT when a donor was available. Thirty-one of 267 evaluable patients (12%) had a poor response. SCT was performed in 25; using matched unrelated donors in 13, matched sibling donors in 6, cord blood donor in 4, and haploidentical donor in two. The median follow-up for the 31 poor responding patients was 2.6 years (range 0.4 - 8.1 years) and 3-year probability of survival 70% (95% CI 59-77%). The poor responders in the NOPHO-AML 2004 protocol had a favourable prognosis treated with time-intensive induction followed by SCT. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. The ATLAS SCT: Commissioning Experience and SLHC Upgrade

    OpenAIRE

    Mitrevski, J

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) has been installed, and fully connected to electrical, optical and cooling services. Commissioning has been performed both with calibration data and cosmic ray events. The cosmics were used to align the detector, measure the hit efficiency and set the timing. The SCT is now ready to take data when the LHC turns on this autumn. At the same time, it is clear that the present ATLAS tracker will need to be renewed for projected luminosity upgrade of the LHC, ...

  14. SCT-4800T whole body X-ray CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Yoshitaka; Sato, Yukio; Kuwahara, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    A whole body X-ray CT scanner, the SCT-4800T (trade name: INTELLECT series), has been developed. This system is the first CT scanner that is combined with general radiographic functions. The general radiographic functions include a patient couch with film casette and several tube support systems along with the CT scanner. This newly designed CT scanner also features a compact and light-weight gantry with a 700 mm diameter apperture and user-friendly operater's console. The SCT-4800T brings a new level of patient and operator comfort to the emergency radiology examination site. (author)

  15. Development of the Shimadzu computed tomographic scanner SCT-200N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Hiroshi; Yamaoka, Nobuyuki; Saito, Masahiro

    1982-01-01

    The Shimadzu Computed Tomographic Scanner SCT-200N has been developed as an ideal CT scanner for diagnosing the head and spine. Due to the large aperture, moderate scan time and the Zoom Scan Mode, any part of the body can be scanned. High quality image can be obtained by adopting the precisely stabilized X-ray unit and densely packed array of 64-detectors. As for its operation, capability of computed radiography (CR) prior to patient positioning and real time reconstruction ensure efficient patient through-put. Details of the SCT-200N are described in this paper. (author)

  16. DELPHI Barrel Muon Chamber Module

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The module was used as part of the muon identification system on the barrel of the DELPHI detector at LEP, and was in active use from 1989 to 2000. The module consists of 7 individual muons chambers arranged in 2 layers. Chambers in the upper layer are staggered by half a chamber width with respect to the lower layer. Each individual chamber is a drift chamber consisting of an anode wire, 47 microns in diameter, and a wrapped copper delay line. Each chamber provided 3 signal for each muon passing through the chamber, from which a 3D space-point could be reconstructed.

  17. The OPAL muon barrel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, R.J.; Allison, J.; Ashton, P.; Bahan, G.A.; Baines, J.T.M.; Banks, J.N.; Barlow, R.J.; Barnett, S.; Beeston, C.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Clowes, S.G.; Davies, O.W.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Hinde, P.S.; Hughes-Jones, R.E.; Lafferty, G.D.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McGowan, R.F.; Moss, M.W.; Murphy, P.G.; Nijjhar, B.; O'Dowd, A.J.P.; Pawley, S.J.; Phillips, P.D.; Richards, G.E.; Skillman, A.; Stephens, K.; Tresillian, N.J.; Wood, N.C.; Wyatt, T.R.

    1995-01-01

    The barrel part of the OPAL muon detector consists of 110 drift chambers forming four layers outside the hadron absorber. Each chamber covers an area of 1.2 m by up to 10.4 m and has two cells with wires parallel to the beam and a drift distance of 297 mm. A detailed description of the design, construction, operation and performance of the sub-detector is given. The system has been operating successfully since the start of LEP in 1989. ((orig.))

  18. The ATLAS SCT: Commissioning experience and SLHC upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrevski, J. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)], E-mail: Jovan.Mitrevski@cern.ch

    2009-06-01

    The ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) has been installed, and fully connected to electrical, optical and cooling services. Commissioning has been performed both with calibration data and cosmic ray events. The cosmics were used to align the detector, measure the hit efficiency and set the timing. The SCT is now ready to take data when the LHC turns on this autumn. At the same time, it is clear that the present ATLAS tracker will need to be renewed for projected luminosity upgrade of the LHC, the SLHC. This is mainly driven by occupancy and radiation hardness issues. The new tracker will likely be entirely made of silicon, with the space of the present SCT largely taken up by detectors with much shorter strips. Several large-scale R and D projects on the sensors and module concepts for this upgrade are running, including sensor and module prototyping. We will report upon the commissioning experience from the SCT, use it to extract valuable lessons for future silicon tracker projects, and give an up-to-date overview of the status and results of the R and D efforts for the ATLAS tracker upgrade.

  19. The ATLAS SCT: Commissioning experience and SLHC upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrevski, J.

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) has been installed, and fully connected to electrical, optical and cooling services. Commissioning has been performed both with calibration data and cosmic ray events. The cosmics were used to align the detector, measure the hit efficiency and set the timing. The SCT is now ready to take data when the LHC turns on this autumn. At the same time, it is clear that the present ATLAS tracker will need to be renewed for projected luminosity upgrade of the LHC, the SLHC. This is mainly driven by occupancy and radiation hardness issues. The new tracker will likely be entirely made of silicon, with the space of the present SCT largely taken up by detectors with much shorter strips. Several large-scale R and D projects on the sensors and module concepts for this upgrade are running, including sensor and module prototyping. We will report upon the commissioning experience from the SCT, use it to extract valuable lessons for future silicon tracker projects, and give an up-to-date overview of the status and results of the R and D efforts for the ATLAS tracker upgrade.

  20. Outcomes after autologous SCT in lymphoma patients grouped by weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, J E; Weber, C; Earl, M; Rybicki, L A; Carlstrom, K D; Wenzell, C M; Hill, B T; Majhail, N S; Kalaycio, M

    2015-05-01

    Obesity continues to be an increasing global health issue contributing to the complexity of chemotherapy dosing in the field of SCT. Investigation into the optimal dosing weight used to calculate chemotherapy doses in obese patients undergoing SCT is limited and inconclusive. Our single-center, retrospective study compared safety and efficacy outcomes by body mass index (BMI) for 476 adult lymphoma patients who underwent auto-SCT with a myeloablative chemotherapeutic regimen of BU, CY and etoposide dosed using adjusted body weight. Three weight groups categorized based on BMI were defined: normal/underweight ⩽24.9 kg/m(2), overweight 25-29.9 kg/m(2) and obese ⩾30 kg/m(2). Severity of mucositis, incidence of secondary malignancy, incidence of bacteremia and median hospital length of stay did not differ among the groups. The median times to absolute neutrophil count and platelet recovery were 10 days (P=0.75) and 14 days (P=0.17), respectively. Obese patients had a lower 100-day mortality compared with other weight groups, although this did not translate into an OS benefit. OS and disease relapse were similar among the groups. Our study demonstrates that use of adjusted body weight to calculate chemotherapy doses does not negatively have an impact on outcomes in obese patients undergoing auto-SCT with BU, CY and etoposide.

  1. Report on the SCT Forward Electrical Module Program

    CERN Document Server

    Benes, J; Feld, L; Hornung, M; Joos, D; Ketterer, C; Kodys, P; Kubik, P; Ludwig, J; Modesto, P; Rieth, G; Runge, K; Smith, T; Snow, S W; Taylor, G; Webel, M

    1999-01-01

    IN THE CONTEXT OF THE ATLAS SCT FORWARD HYBRID PROGRAM, THREEELECTRICAL DETECTOR MODULES HAVE BEEN BUILT. THIS NOTE DESCRIBES THEASSEMBLY AND SUMMARISES THE MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OFTHESE MODULES. SOME COMMENTS ON THE SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS OF THEPRODUCTION OF A REAL MODULE AS COMPARED TO DUMMY MODULES ARE GIVEN.A LIST OF OPEN QUESTIONS ARISING FROM THIS ASSEMBLY RUN IS APPENDED.

  2. Core barrel motion calibration factor calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahrokhi, F.; Robinson, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    Neutron transport theory calculations were performed to obtain a calibration factor for inferring core-barrel motion from spectral density data using excore ionization chambers in PWRs. The analysis of core-barrel movement was based on the postulate that the movement is a cantilevered type, with the preferred direction x-x'

  3. Incidence of extramedullary relapse after haploidentical SCT for advanced AML/myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, S; Ikegame, K; Kaida, K; Taniguchi, K; Kato, R; Inoue, T; Fujioka, T; Tamaki, H; Okada, M; Soma, T; Ogawa, H

    2012-05-01

    Extramedullary (EM) relapse of leukemia after allo-SCT in patients with AML/myelodysplastic syndrome has been increasingly reported. The reduced effectiveness of the GVL effect in EM sites, as compared with BM, has been suggested to underlie this problem. We retrospectively analyzed the pattern of relapse after haploidentical SCT (haplo-SCT), performed as the first or second SCT. Among 38 patients who received haplo-SCT as their first SCT, the cumulative incidences of BM and EM relapse at 3 years were 40.5 and 10.9%, respectively. Among 19 patients who received haplo-SCT as their second SCT, the cumulative incidences of BM and EM relapse were 30.9 and 31.9%, respectively. Moreover, most of the patients who underwent repeat haplo-SCT for the treatment of EM relapse had further EM relapse at other sites. Post-relapse survival did not differ significantly with different patterns of relapse. The frequent occurrence of EM relapse after haplo-SCT, particularly when performed as a second SCT, suggests that the potent GVL effect elicited by an HLA disparity also occurs preferentially in BM. Our findings emphasize the need for a treatment strategy for EM relapse that recognizes the reduced susceptibility of EM relapse to the GVL effect.

  4. Longitudinal health-related quality of life outcomes and related factors after pediatric SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, M; Atenafu, E; Hancock, K

    2009-08-01

    Our purpose was to investigate longitudinally health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes and related factors up to 2 years post-pediatric SCT. A total of 99 mothers of patients, aged 1.5-17 years, completed two standardized HRQOL questionnaires, generic and disease specific (DS), about the child, and reported on their own symptoms of depression and family function pre-SCT, 12 and 24 months post-SCT. Clinical (diagnosis, radiation), child (age) and family (maternal depression) information was also obtained. Significant improvement in physical and psychosocial HRQOL from pre-SCT to 1 or 2 years post-SCT was reported. Survivors of ALL were reported to have poorer physical and psychosocial HRQOL than survivors of solid tumors on the DS measure. Maternal depression was negatively associated with physical and psychosocial HRQOL. Maternal education (higher) at pre-SCT predicted improvements in physical domains 2 years post-SCT; mother's age (older) and child's age (younger) also predicted improvements of physical and emotional HRQOL. We conclude that survivors of pediatric SCT improved physical and psychosocial HRQOL by 1 and 2 years post-SCT. Older survivors whose mothers are younger and distressed, with lower education at SCT have compromised HRQOL compared to other survivors. This study has important implications for the care of SCT survivors and their families.

  5. The ATLAS SCT grounding and shielding concept and implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, RL; Bernabeu, J; Bizzell, J; Bohm, J; Brenner, R; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Catinaccio, A; Cindro, V; Ciocio, A; Civera, J V; Chouridou, S; Dervan, P; Dick, B; Dolezal, Z; Eklund, L; Feld, L; Ferrere, D; Gadomski, S; Gonzalez, F; Gornicki, E; Greenhall, A; Grillo, A A; Grosse-Knetter, J; Gruwe, M; Haywood, S; Hessey, N P; Ikegami, Y; Jones, T J; Kaplon, J; Kodys, P; Kohriki, T; Kondo, T; Koperny, S; Lacasta, C; Lozano Bahilo, J; Malecki, P; Martinez-McKinney, F; McMahon, S J; McPherson, A; Mikulec, B; Mikus, M; Moorhead, G F; Morrissey, M C; Nagai, K; Nichols, A; O'Shea, V; Pater, J R; Peeters, S J M; Pernegger, H; Perrin, E; Phillips, P W; Pieron, J P; Roe, S; Sanchez, J; Spencer, E; Stastny, J; Tarrant, J; Terada, S; Tyndel, M; Unno, Y; Wallny, R; Weber, M; Weidberg, A R; Wells, P S; Werneke, P; Wilmut, I

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of the grounding and shielding system for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). The mitigation of electromagnetic interference and noise pickup through power lines is the critical design goal as they have the potential to jeopardize the electrical performance. We accomplish this by adhering to the ATLAS grounding rules, by avoiding ground loops and isolating the different subdetectors. Noise sources are identified and design rules to protect the SCT against them are described. A rigorous implementation of the design was crucial to achieve the required performance. This paper highlights the location, connection and assembly of the different components that affect the grounding and shielding system: cables, filters, cooling pipes, shielding enclosure, power supplies and others. Special care is taken with the electrical properties of materials and joints. The monitoring of the grounding system during the installation period is also discussed. Finally, after con...

  6. The ATLAS SCT grounding and shielding concept and implementation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bates, R.L.; Bell, P.J.; Bernabeu, J.; Böhm, Jan; Šťastný, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, MAR (2012), 1-31 ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : ATLAS * LHC * SCT * Si microstrip and pad detectors * large detector systems for particle and astroparticle physics * detector grounding Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.869, year: 2011

  7. Thermal performance measurements on ATLAS-SCT KB forward modules

    CERN Document Server

    Donegà, M; D'Onofrio, M; Ferrère, D; Hirt, C; Ikegami, Y; Kohriki, T; Kondo, T; Lindsay, S; Mangin-Brinet, M; Niinikoski, T O; Pernegger, H; Perrin, E; Taylor, G; Terada, S; Unno, Y; Wallny, R; Weber, M

    2003-01-01

    The thermal design of the KB module is presented. A Finite Elements Analysis (FEA) has been used to finalize the module design. The thermal performance of an outer irradiated KB module has been measured at different cooling conditions. The thermal runaway of the module has been measured. The FEA model has been compared with the measurements and has been used to predict the thermal performance in a realistic SCT scenario.

  8. Radiation damage status of the ATLAS silicon strip detectors (SCT)

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, Takahiko; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Silicon microstrip detector system (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment at LHC has been working well for about 7 years since 2010. The innermost layer has already received a few times of 10**13 1-MeV neutron-equivalent fluences/cm2. The evolutions of the radiation damage effects on strip sensors such as leakage current and full depletion voltages will be presented.

  9. Celebrating the Barrel Toroid commissioning

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Jenni

    ATLAS invited Funding Agency representatives and Laboratory Heads directly related to the funding and construction of the Barrel Toroid for a small ceremony on 13th December 2006 at Point 1, in order to mark the successful first full excitation of the BT (see last eNews). On that date, which was during the December CERN Council week, several of the Funding Agency Heads or their representatives could be present, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. Speeches were delivered by the ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni thanking the Funding Partners in the name of the Collaboration, by Magnet Project Leader Herman ten Kate tracing the BT construction history, and by the CERN Director-General Robert Aymar congratulating all those who have contributed to the successful project. Herman ten Kate addressing the delegates. The text of the introductory address by Peter Jenni is reproduced here. "It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you all here...

  10. Charge deposition in the SCT due to beamloss

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the distribution of charge collected by the strips 6 of ATLAS SCT modules in a 25ns window under two LHC proton beam scrape scenarios. 7 This was done in order to see whether this charge would be greater than the nominal amount 8 above which damage to the modules is expected to occur, which is 5nC/strip over 25ns. 9 Specifically, the damage is expected to occur to the channels of the front-end ABCD3T 10 binary readout chips of the SCT modules. Due to limited numbers of fully simulated single 11 proton collisions with the beam pipe (at 450 GeV) and the TAS collimator (at 7 TeV) a 12 method of sampling SCT hits-with-replacement is developed to obtain an upper limit on the 13 charge per strip for a 108 proton scrape over 25ns. Under this assumption the maximum 14 charge collected per strip is determined to be less than 0.4nC for the 450 GeV beam pipe 15 scrape scenario and less than 1.9nC for the 7 TeV TAS collimator scrape scenario, within 16 the damage threshold in bot...

  11. Distress, problems and supportive care needs of patients treated with auto- or allo-SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braamse, A M J; van Meijel, B; Visser, O; Huijgens, P C; Beekman, A T F; Dekker, J

    2014-02-01

    Hematological malignancies and treatment with hematopoietic SCT are known to affect patients' quality of life. The problem profile and care needs of this patient group need clarification, however. This study aimed to assess distress, problems and care needs after allo- or auto-SCT, and to identify risk factors for distress, problems or care needs. In this cross-sectional study, patients treated with allo-SCT or auto-SCT for hematological malignancies completed the Distress Thermometer and Problem List. Three patient groups were created: 0-1, 1-2.5 and 2.5-5.5 years after transplantation. After allo-SCT, distress and the number of problems tended to be lower with longer follow-up. After auto-SCT, distress was highest at 1-2.5 year(s). Patients mainly reported physical problems, followed by cognitive-emotional and practical problems. A minority reported care needs. Risk factors for distress as well as problems after allo-SCT included younger age, shorter time after transplantation and GVHD. A risk factor for distress as well as problems after auto-SCT was the presence of comorbid diseases. Up to 5 years after auto-SCT or allo-SCT, patients continue to experience distress and problems. Judged by prevalence, physical problems are first priority in supportive care, followed by cognitive-emotional and practical problems.

  12. Understanding and Predicting Gun Barrel Erosion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnston, Ian A

    2005-01-01

    The Australian Defence Force will soon have to contend with gun barrel erosion issues arising from the use of new low-vulnerability gun propellants, the acquisition of new ammunition and gun systems...

  13. Work on the ATLAS semiconductor tracker barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    Precision work is performed on the semiconductor tracker barrel of the ATLAS experiment. All work on these delicate components must be performed in a clean room so that impurities in the air, such as dust, do not contaminate the detector. The semiconductor tracker will be mounted in the barrel close to the heart of the ATLAS experiment to detect the path of particles produced in proton-proton collisions.

  14. The TileCal Barrel Test Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Leitner, R

    On 30th October, the mechanics test assembly of the central barrel of the ATLAS tile hadronic calorimeter was completed in building 185. It started on 23rd June and is the second wheel for the Tilecal completely assembled this year. The ATLAS engineers and technicians are quick: instead of the 27 weeks initially foreseen for assembling the central barrel of the tile hadronic calorimeter (Tilecal) in building 185, they inserted the last of the 64 modules on 30th October after only 19 weeks. In part, this was due to the experience gained in the dry run assembly of the first extended barrel, produced in Spain, in spring this year (see Bulletin 23/2003); however, the central barrel is twice as long - and twice as heavy. With a length of 6.4 metres, an outer diameter of 8.5 metres and an inner diameter of 4.5 metres, the object weight is 1300 tonnes. The whole barrel cylinder is supported by the stainless steel support structure weighing only 27 tons. The barrel also has to have the right shape: over the whole 8...

  15. Processing of Niobium-Lined M240 Machine Gun Barrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Fig. 5 Finished niobium-lined M240 machine gun barrel with flash suppressor attached ..........11 Fig. 6 End of barrel 1 showing small amount of...the finished barrel is shown in Fig. 5. 11 Fig. 5 Finished niobium-lined M240 machine gun barrel with flash suppressor attached Firing tests

  16. Stiffened Composite Fuselage Barrel Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movva, R. G.; Mittal, A.; Agrawal, K.; Upadhyay, C. S.

    2012-07-01

    In a typical commercial transport aircraft, Stiffened skin panels and frames contribute around 40% of the fuselage weight. In the current study a stiffened composite fuselage skin panel optimization engine is developed for optimization of the layups of composite panels and stringers using Genetic Algorithm (GA). The skin and stringers of the fuselage section are optimized for the strength and the stability requirements. The selection of the GA parameters considered for the optimization is arrived by performing case studies on selected problems. The optimization engine facilitates in carrying out trade studies for selection of the optimum ply layup and material combination for the configuration being analyzed. The optimization process is applied on a sample model and the results are presented.

  17. Parental stress and perceived vulnerability at 5 and 10 years after pediatric SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijmoet-Wiersma, C M J; Egeler, R M; Koopman, H M; Bresters, D; Norberg, A L; Grootenhuis, M A

    2010-06-01

    With the aim of assessing parental stress after SCT, 73 parents of children and adolescents who underwent SCT 5 or 10 years ago responded to questionnaires on general distress (General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)), disease-related stress (Pediatric Inventory for Parents-short form (PIP-SF)) and perceptions of child vulnerability (Child Vulnerability Scale (CVS)). General distress scores were comparable with the reference groups, but 40% of the mothers at 5 years after SCT reported increased stress levels as compared with 26% in the community-based reference group. Disease-related stress was comparable with the reference group of parents of children who were just off cancer treatment, 5 years after SCT. At 10 years after SCT, scores were lower than the reference group. Perceived child vulnerability did diminish over time, but remained high in parents of SCT survivors, compared with parents of healthy children: 96% of the parents at 5 years after SCT and 76% of the parents at 10 years after SCT scored above the cutoff point. Perceived vulnerability was found to be a predictor for parental disease-related stress. To conclude, although most parents of SCT survivors are resilient, the majority of parents perceive their child to be much more vulnerable as compared with parents of healthy children. This perception is associated with disease-related stress and may induce overprotective parenting.

  18. Differences in mothers' and fathers' psychological distress after pediatric SCT: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, M; Atenafu, E; Doyle, J; Berlin-Romalis, D; Hancock, K

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine longitudinally psychological distress and its correlates in mothers and fathers of children who undergo SCT, up to 2 years post SCT. A total of 111 parents of patients diagnosed mainly with leukemia completed standardized measures of depression and anxiety symptoms as indicators of psychological distress, 85 at 1 year pre-SCT and 81 at 2 years post SCT. Parents' age and gender, child's age, diagnosis, radiation history, behavior and physical health were examined as potential related factors. Linear mixed models for repeated measures with appropriate covariance structure were used in the analysis. Depression and anxiety scores significantly decreased by 2 years for mothers and fathers. Mothers reported significantly more depression symptoms than did fathers, but reported comparable symptoms of anxiety. Pre-SCT depression and anxiety scores, mother's age (younger), child's behavior problems, radiation history and diagnosis of neuroblastoma predicted maternal distress 2 years post SCT; pre-SCT depression and anxiety scores, father's age (older) and child's diagnosis predicted father's distress. This study highlights differences and similarities in mothers' and fathers' psychological distress and identifies related risk factors. The results can guide interventions for mothers and fathers whose children undergo SCT based on their pre-SCT psychosocial risk.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of SCT800, a new recombinant FVIII, in hemophilia A mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ruo-lan; Liu, Liang; Xie, Liang-zhi; Gai, Wen-lin; Cao, Si-shuo; Meng, Zhi-yun; Gan, Hui; Wu, Zhuo-na; Li, Jian; Zheng, Ying; Zhu, Xiao-xia; Dou, Gui-fang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: SCT800 is a new third-generation recombinant FVIII agent that is undergoing promising preclinical study. This study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of SCT800 in hemophilia A mice. Methods: After hemophilia A mice were intravenously injected with single dose of SCT800 (80, 180, and 280 IU/kg) or the commercially available product Xyntha (280 IU/kg), pharmacokinetics profiles were evaluated based on measuring plasma FVIII: C. For pharmacodynamics study, dose-response curves of SCT800 and Xyntha (1–200 IU/kg) were constructed using a tail bleeding model monitoring both bleeding time and blood loss. Results: Pharmacokinetics profile analysis showed a dose independency of SCT800 ranging from 80 to 280 IU/kg and comparable pharmacokinetic profiles between SCT800 and Xyntha at the doses tested. Pharmacodynamics study revealed comparable ED50 values of SCT800 and Xyntha in the tail bleeding model: 14.78 and 15.81 IU/kg for bleeding time, respectively; 13.50 and 13.58 IU/kg for blood loss, respectively. Moreover, at the doses tested, the accompanying dose-related safety evaluation in the tail bleeding model showed lower hypercoagulable tendency and wider dosage range potential for SCT800 than Xyntha. Conclusion: In hemophilia A mice, SCT800 shows comparable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics to Xyntha at the doses tested, and possibly with better safety properties. PMID:26806305

  20. Beam tests of ATLAS SCT silicon strip detector modules

    CERN Document Server

    Campabadal, F; Key, M; Lozano, M; Martínez, C; Pellegrini, G; Rafí, J M; Ullán, M; Johansen, L; Pommeresche, B; Stugu, B; Ciocio, A; Fadeev, V; Gilchriese, M G D; Haber, C; Siegrist, J; Spieler, H; Vu, C; Bell, P J; Charlton, D G; Dowell, John D; Gallop, B J; Homer, R J; Jovanovic, P; Mahout, G; McMahon, T J; Wilson, J A; Barr, A J; Carter, J R; Fromant, B P; Goodrick, M J; Hill, J C; Lester, C G; Palmer, M J; Parker, M A; Robinson, D; Sabetfakhri, A; Shaw, R J; Anghinolfi, F; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Chouridou, S; Fortin, R; Grosse-Knetter, J; Gruwé, M; Ferrari, P; Jarron, P; Kaplon, J; MacPherson, A; Niinikoski, T O; Pernegger, H; Roe, S; Rudge, A; Ruggiero, G; Wallny, R; Weilhammer, P; Bialas, W; Dabrowski, W; Grybos, P; Koperny, S; Blocki, J; Brückman, P; Gadomski, S; Godlewski, J; Górnicki, E; Malecki, P; Moszczynski, A; Stanecka, E; Stodulski, M; Szczygiel, R; Turala, M; Wolter, M; Ahmad, A; Benes, J; Carpentieri, C; Feld, L; Ketterer, C; Ludwig, J; Meinhardt, J; Runge, K; Mikulec, B; Mangin-Brinet, M; D'Onofrio, M; Donega, M; Moêd, S; Sfyrla, A; Ferrère, D; Clark, A G; Perrin, E; Weber, M; Bates, R L; Cheplakov, A P; Saxon, D H; O'Shea, V; Smith, K M; Iwata, Y; Ohsugi, T; Kohriki, T; Kondo, T; Terada, S; Ujiie, N; Ikegami, Y; Unno, Y; Takashima, R; Brodbeck, T; Chilingarov, A G; Hughes, G; Ratoff, P; Sloan, T; Allport, P P; Casse, G L; Greenall, A; Jackson, J N; Jones, T J; King, B T; Maxfield, S J; Smith, N A; Sutcliffe, P; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Beck, G A; Carter, A A; Lloyd, S L; Martin, A J; Morris, J; Morin, J; Nagai, K; Pritchard, T W; Anderson, B E; Butterworth, J M; Fraser, T J; Jones, T W; Lane, J B; Postranecky, M; Warren, M R M; Cindro, V; Kramberger, G; Mandic, I; Mikuz, M; Duerdoth, I P; Freestone, J; Foster, J M; Ibbotson, M; Loebinger, F K; Pater, J; Snow, S W; Thompson, R J; Atkinson, T M; Bright, G; Kazi, S; Lindsay, S; Moorhead, G F; Taylor, G N; Bachindgagyan, G; Baranova, N; Karmanov, D; Merkine, M; Andricek, L; Bethke, Siegfried; Kudlaty, J; Lutz, Gerhard; Moser, H G; Nisius, R; Richter, R; Schieck, J; Cornelissen, T; Gorfine, G W; Hartjes, F G; Hessey, N P; de Jong, P; Muijs, A J M; Peeters, S J M; Tomeda, Y; Tanaka, R; Nakano, I; Dorholt, O; Danielsen, K M; Huse, T; Sandaker, H; Stapnes, S; Bargassa, Pedrame; Reichold, A; Huffman, T; Nickerson, R B; Weidberg, A; Doucas, G; Hawes, B; Lau, W; Howell, D; Kundu, N; Wastie, R; Böhm, J; Mikestikova, M; Stastny, J; Broklová, Z; Broz, J; Dolezal, Z; Kodys, P; Kubík, P; Reznicek, P; Vorobel, V; Wilhelm, I; Chren, D; Horazdovsky, T; Linhart, V; Pospísil, S; Sinor, M; Solar, M; Sopko, B; Stekl, I; Ardashev, E N; Golovnya, S N; Gorokhov, S A; Kholodenko, A G; Rudenko, R E; Ryadovikov, V N; Vorobev, A P; Adkin, P J; Apsimon, R J; Batchelor, L E; Bizzell, J P; Booker, P; Davis, V R; Easton, J M; Fowler, C; Gibson, M D; Haywood, S J; MacWaters, C; Matheson, J P; Matson, R M; McMahon, S J; Morris, F S; Morrissey, M; Murray, W J; Phillips, P W; Tyndel, M; Villani, E G; Dorfan, D E; Grillo, A A; Rosenbaum, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Seiden, A; Spencer, E; Wilder, M; Booth, P; Buttar, C M; Dawson, I; Dervan, P; Grigson, C; Harper, R; Moraes, A; Peak, L S; Varvell, K E; Chu Ming Lee; Hou Li Shing; Lee Shih Chang; Teng Ping Kun; Wan Chang Chun; Hara, K; Kato, Y; Kuwano, T; Minagawa, M; Sengoku, H; Bingefors, N; Brenner, R; Ekelöf, T J C; Eklund, L; Bernabeu, J; Civera, J V; Costa, M J; Fuster, J; García, C; García, J E; González-Sevilla, S; Lacasta, C; Llosa, G; Martí i García, S; Modesto, P; Sánchez, J; Sospedra, L; Vos, M; Fasching, D; González, S; Jared, R C; Charles, E

    2005-01-01

    The design and technology of the silicon strip detector modules for the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment have been finalised in the last several years. Integral to this process has been the measurement and verification of the tracking performance of the different module types in test beams at the CERN SPS and the KEK PS. Tests have been performed to explore the module performance under various operating conditions including detector bias voltage, magnetic field, incidence angle, and state of irradiation up to 3 multiplied by 1014 protons per square centimetre. A particular emphasis has been the understanding of the operational consequences of the binary readout scheme.

  1. Operational experience of ATLAS SCT and Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kocian, Martin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector based on silicon sensors is consisting of a strip detector (SCT) and a pixel detector. It is the crucial component for vertexing and tracking in the ATLAS experiment. With the excellent performance of the LHC well beyond the original specification the silicon tracking detectors are facing substantial challenges in terms of data acquisition, radiation damage to the sensors, and SEUs in the readout ASICs. The approaches on how the detector systems cope with the demands of high luminosity operation while maintaining excellent performance through hardware upgrades, software and firmware algorithms, and operational settings, are presented.

  2. Accurate and log g of δ Sct stars using Asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, García Hernández; Monteiro, Mário J. P. F. G.; Guo, Zhao; Reese, Daniel R.; Suárez, Juan Carlos; Martín, Susana; Pascual-Granado, Javier; Moya, Andrés; Garrido, Rafael

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we present a new method to determine the surface gravity of δ Sct stars. We used a refined relation and the stellar parallaxes or luminosities to determine their masses and radii. A comparison with the data obtained from the binary analysis, has shown that the values found by both methods are equivalent, within the uncertainties. Moreover, thanks to the refined relation, the uncertainties in log g are of the order of those usually estimated with high-resolution spectroscopy. Because of that, this new method to determine the surface gravity is an important step forward to break the degeneracy problem in the spectroscopic analysis.

  3. Single Event Upset Studies Using the ATLAS SCT

    CERN Document Server

    Weidberg, A R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Single Event Upsets (SEU) are expected to occur during high luminosity running of the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). The SEU cross sections were measured in pion beams with momenta in the range 200 to 465 MeV/c and proton test beams at 24 GeV/c but the extrapolation to LHC conditions is non-trivial because of the range of particle types and momenta. The SEUs studied occur in the \\emph{p-i-n} photodiode and the registers in the ABCD chip. Comparisons between predicted SEU rates and those measured from ATLAS data are presented. The implications for ATLAS operation are discussed.

  4. Single Event Upset Studies Using the ATLAS SCT

    CERN Document Server

    Dafinca, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Weidberg, A R

    2014-01-01

    Single Event Upsets (SEU) are expected to occur during high luminosity running of the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). The SEU cross sections were measured in pion beams with momenta in the range 200 to 465 MeV/c and proton test beams at 24 GeV/c but the extrapolation to LHC conditions is non-trivial because of the range of particle types and momenta. The SEUs studied occur in the p-i-n photodiode and the registers in the ABCD chip. Comparisons between predicted SEU rates and those measured from ATLAS data are presented. The implications for ATLAS operation are discussed

  5. Amplitude Modulation in the δ Sct star KIC 7106205

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowman Dominic. M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The δ Sct star KIC 7106205 showed amplitude modulation in a single p mode, whilst all other p and g modes remained stable in amplitude and phase over 1470 d of the Kepler dataset. The data were divided into 30 time bins of equal length and a series of consecutive Fourier transforms was calculated. A fixed frequency, calculated from a least-squares fit of all data, allowed amplitude and phase for every mode in each time bin to be tracked. The missing p mode energy was not transferred to any other visible modes.

  6. Thermal performance of the Atlas SCT forward modules

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, A; Nasteva, I; Snow, S W; Wallny, R; Wilmut, I

    2003-01-01

    We describe the thermal design of the Atlas SCT forward modules and their cooling blocks. We report on the performance of the $C_3 F_8$ evaporative cooling system and the blocks alone, then on the performance of an irradiated inner module mounted on two alternative prototype cooling blocks (baseline and PEEK split). Runs are presented at different cooling conditions, representative of those expected to be used in the final experiment. We have also measured thermal runaway, with the module mounted on the PEEK split block and cooled with liquid cooling.

  7. Arrival at CERN of the first MB4 DT chambers from Turin

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcos Fernandez Garcia

    2005-01-01

    The largest DT chambers to be installed into the outermost station of the CMS barrel muon detector (MB4) are built by INFN-Turin. The first batch of four chambers, out of 40, arrived at the CERN ISR area on February 2005.

  8. The CMS Barrel Muon trigger upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triossi, A.; Sphicas, P.; Bellato, M.; Montecassiano, F.; Ventura, S.; Ruiz, J.M. Cela; Bedoya, C. Fernandez; Tobar, A. Navarro; Fernandez, I. Redondo; Ferrero, D. Redondo; Sastre, J.; Ero, J.; Wulz, C.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Loukas, N.; Mallios, S.; Paradas, E.; Guiducci, L.; Masetti, G.

    2017-01-01

    The increase of luminosity expected by LHC during Phase1 will impose tighter constraints for rate reduction in order to maintain high efficiency in the CMS Level1 trigger system. The TwinMux system is the early layer of the muon barrel region that concentrates the information from different subdetectors: Drift Tubes, Resistive Plate Chambers and Outer Hadron Calorimeter. It arranges the slow optical trigger links from the detector chambers into faster links (10 Gbps) that are sent in multiple copies to the track finders. Results from collision runs, that confirm the satisfactory operation of the trigger system up to the output of the barrel track finder, will be shown.

  9. Parental stress and perceived vulnerability at 5 and 10 years after pediatric SCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijmoet-Wiersma, C. M. J.; Egeler, R. M.; Koopman, H. M.; Bresters, D.; Norberg, A. L.; Grootenhuis, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    With the aim of assessing parental stress after SCT, 73 parents of children and adolescents who underwent SCT 5 or 10 years ago responded to questionnaires on general distress (General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)), disease-related stress (Pediatric Inventory for Parents-short form (PIP-SF)) and

  10. Distress, problems and supportive care needs of patients treated with auto- or allo-SCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annemarie Braamse; prof Berno van Meijel; O. Visser; P.C. Huijgens; A.T.F. Beekman; J. Dekker

    2013-01-01

    Hematological malignancies and treatment with hematopoietic SCT are known to affect patients’ quality of life. The problem profile and care needs of this patient group need clarification, however. This study aimed to assess distress, problems and care needs after allo- or auto-SCT, and to identify

  11. Distress, problems and supportive care needs of patients treated with auto- or allo-SCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braamse, A.M.J.; van Meijel, B.; Visser, O.; Huijgens, P.C.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Dekker, J.

    2014-01-01

    Hematological malignancies and treatment with hematopoietic SCT are known to affect patients' quality of life. The problem profile and care needs of this patient group need clarification, however. This study aimed to assess distress, problems and care needs after allo-or auto-SCT, and to identify

  12. Infections by carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in SCT recipients: a nationwide retrospective survey from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girmenia, C; Rossolini, G M; Piciocchi, A; Bertaina, A; Pisapia, G; Pastore, D; Sica, S; Severino, A; Cudillo, L; Ciceri, F; Scimè, R; Lombardini, L; Viscoli, C; Rambaldi, A

    2015-02-01

    Infections by carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKp) represent a challenging problem after SCT. A retrospective survey (January 2010 to July 2013) involving 52 Italian centers was performed to assess the epidemiology and the prognostic factors of CRKp infections in auto- and allo-SCT. Cases of CRKp infection were reported in 53.4% of centers. CRKp infections were documented in 25 auto-SCTs and 87 allo-SCTs, with an incidence of 0.4% (from 0.1% in 2010 to 0.7% in 2013) and 2% (from 0.4% in 2010 to 2.9% in 2013), respectively. A CRKp colonization documented before or after transplant was followed by an infection in 25.8% of auto-SCT and 39.2% of allo-SCT patients. The infection-related mortality rates were 16% and 64.4%, respectively. A pre-transplant CRKp infection (hazard ratio (HR) 0.33, 95% confidence intervals (CIs) 0.15-0.74; P=0.007) and a not CRKp-targeted first-line treatment (HR 2.67, 95% CI 1.43-4.99; P=0.002) were independent factors associated with an increased mortality in allo-SCT patients who developed a CRKp infection. Our study shows challenging findings of CRKp infections in SCT patients in Italy particularly after allo-SCT. The detection of carriers and the definition of early therapeutic strategies represent critical aspects of the management of CRKp infections after SCT.

  13. Etoposide-containing conditioning regimen reduces the occurrence of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis after SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, R; Tanaka, J; Hashino, S; Ota, S; Torimoto, Y; Kakinoki, Y; Yamamoto, S; Kurosawa, M; Hatakeyama, N; Haseyama, Y; Sakai, H; Sato, K; Fukuhara, T

    2014-02-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare life-threatening disease of severe hyperinflammation caused by uncontrolled proliferation of activated lymphocytes and macrophages that secrete high amounts of inflammatory cytokines. HLH occurring after SCT is difficult to diagnose. It is characterized by severe clinical manifestations and high mortality. Despite current therapeutic approaches, outcomes remain poor. We analyzed the incidence and risk factors of HLH after SCT and the response to treatment and prognosis of 554 patients with HLH after SCT. The cumulative incidence of HLH after SCT was 4.3% (24/554). Use of etoposide in the conditioning regimen was only factor that reduced HLH after SCT (P=0.027). All patients who received autologous transplantation were successfully treated. Patients with liver dysfunction (for example, high total bilirubin level, prolonged prothrombin time and high level of fibrinogen degradation products) had a poor response to treatment for HLH. Physicians should be cautious of HLH, while not using etoposide for conditioning regimen.

  14. CMS : the first barrel ring completed !

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    On 14 November, the CMS collaboration and the German firm DWE celebrated the successful construction of the detector's first yoke barrel ring. To mark the occasion, those in charge of the construction at CERN and DWE posed for the camera in the middle of the giant component.

  15. Iron Blocks of CMS Magnet Barrel Yoke.

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    On the occasion of presenting the CMS Award 2000 to Deggendorfer Werft und Eisenbau GmbH the delivered blocks were inspected at CERN Point 5. From left to right: H. Gerwig (CERN, CMS Magnet Barrel Yoke Coordinator), G. Waurick (CERN), F. Leher (DWE, Project Engineer) and W. Schuster (DWE, Project Manager).

  16. ATLAS semiconductor tracker installed into its barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS silicon tracker is installed in the silicon tracker barrel. Absolute precision was required in this operation to ensure that the tracker was inserted without damage through minimal clearance. The installation was performed in a clean room on the CERN site so that no impurities in the air would contaminate the tracker's systems.

  17. Building CMS Pixel Barrel Detectur Modules

    CERN Document Server

    König, S; Horisberger, R.; Meier, B.; Rohe, T.; Streuli, S.; Weber, R.; Kastli, H.Chr.; Erdmann, W.

    2007-01-01

    For the barrel part of the CMS pixel tracker about 800 silicon pixel detector modules are required. The modules are bump bonded, assembled and tested at the Paul Scherrer Institute. This article describes the experience acquired during the assembly of the first ~200 modules.

  18. Celebration for the ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Representatives from Funding Agencies and Barrel Toroid Magnet Laboratories during the ceremony. From left to right: Jean Zinn-Justin (Head of DAPNIA/CEA/Saclay), CERN Director-General Robert Aymar, and Roberto Petronzio (President INFN).Allan Clark (DPNC University Geneva) and Enrique Fernandez (IFAE Barcelona) were among the guests visiting the ATLAS cavern. The barrel toroid is visible in the background. A celebration took place at Point 1 on 13 December to toast the recent powering-up of the ATLAS barrel toroid magnet to full field (Bulletin No. 47-48/06). About 70 guests were invited to attend, mainly composed of representatives from funding partners and key members of the laboratory management teams of the barrel toroid magnet, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. An introductory speech by ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni the scene for evening. This was followed by the ATLAS magnet system project leader Herman Ten Kate's account of the...

  19. Last Few Metres for the Barrel Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Nyman, T.

    On Friday 4th November, the ATLAS Barrel Calorimeter was moved from its assembly point at the side of the ATLAS cavern to the centre of the toroidal magnet system. The detector was finally aligned, to the precision of within a millimetre, on Wednesday 9th November. The ATLAS installation team, led by Tommi Nyman, after having positioned the Barrel Calorimeter in its final location in the ATLAS experimental cavern UX15. The Barrel Calorimeter which will absorb and measure the energy of photons, electrons and hadrons at the core of the ATLAS detector is 8.6 meters in diameter, 6.8 meters long, and weighs over 1600 Tonnes. It consists of two concentric cylindrical detector elements. The innermost comprises aluminium pressure vessels containing the liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter and the solenoid magnet. The outermost is an assembly of 64 hadron tile calorimeter sectors. Assembled 18 meters away from its final position, the Barrel Calorimeter was relocated with the help of a railway, which allows ...

  20. ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet reached nominal field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

     On 9 November the barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas, with an electrical current of 21 000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils as shown on this graph

  1. Validations of SCT Methylation as a Hallmark Biomarker for Lung Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Junya; Wistuba, Ignacio; Lam, Stephen; Yatabe, Yasushi; Wang, Yi-Wei; Stastny, Victor; Gao, Boning; Larsen, Jill E; Girard, Luc; Liu, Xiaoyun; Song, Kai; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Xie, Yang; Zhang, Michael Q; Minna, John D; Gazdar, Adi F

    2016-01-01

    Background The human secretin (SCT) gene encodes secretin, a hormone with limited tissue distribution. Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) 450K methylation array data indicated that the SCT promoter region is differentially hypermethylated in lung cancer. Our purpose was to validate SCT methylation as a potential cancer biomarker for lung cancer. Methods We analyzed TCGA data, and developed and applied SCT-specific bisulfite DNA sequencing and quantitative methylation specific PCR (qMSP) assays. Results The analyses of TCGA 450K data of 801 samples showed that SCT hypermethylation has an area under curve (AUC) value >0.98 to distinguish lung adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas from non-malignant lung. We confirmed the highly discriminative SCT methylation by bisulfite sequencing of lung cancer cell lines and normal blood cells. By applying qMSP, we found that SCT hypermethylation was frequently detected in all major subtypes of malignant NSCLC (AUC=0.92, n=108) and SCLC cancers (AUC=0.93, n=40) but less frequently present in lung carcinoids (AUC=0.54, n=20). SCT hypermethylation appeared in lung carcinoma in situ samples during multistage pathogenesis and increased in invasive samples. Further analyses of TCGA 450K data showed that SCT hypermethylation is highly discriminative in most types of other malignant tumors but less frequently present in low-grade malignant tumors. The only normal tissue with high methylation was the placenta. Conclusions Our findings demonstrated that SCT methylation is a highly discriminative biomarker for lung and other malignant tumors, and less frequently present in low-grade malignant tumors including lung carcinoids, and appears at the carcinoma in situ stage. PMID:26725182

  2. Validation of SCT Methylation as a Hallmark Biomarker for Lung Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-An; Ma, Xiaotu; Sathe, Adwait; Fujimoto, Junya; Wistuba, Ignacio; Lam, Stephen; Yatabe, Yasushi; Wang, Yi-Wei; Stastny, Victor; Gao, Boning; Larsen, Jill E; Girard, Luc; Liu, Xiaoyun; Song, Kai; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Xie, Yang; Zhang, Michael Q; Minna, John D; Gazdar, Adi F

    2016-03-01

    The human secretin gene (SCT) encodes secretin, a hormone with limited tissue distribution. Analysis of the 450k methylation array data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) indicated that the SCT promoter region is differentially hypermethylated in lung cancer. Our purpose was to validate SCT methylation as a potential biomarker for lung cancer. We analyzed data from TCGA and developed and applied SCT-specific bisulfite DNA sequencing and quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction assays. The analyses of TCGA 450K data for 801 samples showed that SCT hypermethylation has an area under the curve (AUC) value greater than 0.98 that can be used to distinguish lung adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas from nonmalignant lung tissue. Bisulfite sequencing of lung cancer cell lines and normal blood cells allowed us to confirm that SCT methylation is highly discriminative. By applying a quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction assay, we found that SCT hypermethylation is frequently detected in all major subtypes of malignant non-small cell lung cancer (AUC = 0.92, n = 108) and small cell lung cancer (AUC = 0.93, n = 40) but is less frequent in lung carcinoids (AUC = 0.54, n = 20). SCT hypermethylation appeared in samples of lung carcinoma in situ during multistage pathogenesis and increased in invasive samples. Further analyses of TCGA 450k data showed that SCT hypermethylation is highly discriminative in most other types of malignant tumors but less frequent in low-grade malignant tumors. The only normal tissue with a high level of methylation was the placenta. Our findings demonstrated that SCT methylation is a highly discriminative biomarker for lung and other malignant tumors, is less frequent in low-grade malignant tumors (including lung carcinoids), and appears at the carcinoma in situ stage. Copyright © 2015 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Optical data links for the ATLAS SCT and Pixel Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregor, I.M.; Weidberg, A.R.; Lee, S.C.; Chu, M.L.; Teng, P.K.

    2001-01-01

    ATLAS (The ATLAS Technical Proposal, CERN/LHCC 94-33) is one of the large electronic particle detectors at LHC (The LHC Conceptual Design, Report- The Yellow Book, CERN/AC/95-05(LHC)) which will become operational in 2005. It is planned to use radiation tolerant optical links for the data transfer from the SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) (ATLAS Inner Detector Technical Proposal, CERN/LHCC 97-16 and CERN/LHCC 97-17). and Pixel Detector (ATLAS Pixel Detector Technical Proposal, CERN/LHCC 98-13) systems to the acquisition electronics over a distance up to 140m. The overall architecture and the performance of these optical data links are described. One of the three candidate designs for an on-detector Opto-Package is presented

  4. Pitch adaptors of the ATLAS-SCT Endcap detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullan, M; Lozano, M; Campabadal, F; Fleta, C; Pellegrini, G; Garcia, C; Gonzalez, F

    2007-01-01

    Interconnection between detectors and electronics in modern High Energy Physics has become an issue of difficult solution due to the need to integrate both parts in the same module and the need for a low mass, simple connection. The Endcap section of the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment at CERN has adopted the solution of using interface devices called pitch adaptors or fan-ins that, mounted on the modules, and using automatic wire bonding, connect the detector's multiple channels to the front-end electronics, adapting their different designs (pad pitch, dimensions, position). This paper describes the characteristics of these devices, the qualification tests that they have been submitted to, and the final results of their fabrication including quality assurance procedures

  5. Value of liver elastography and abdominal ultrasound for detection of complications of allogeneic hemopoietic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlas, T; Weber, J; Nehring, C; Kronenberger, R; Tenckhoff, H; Mössner, J; Niederwieser, D; Tröltzsch, M; Lange, T; Keim, V

    2014-06-01

    Hepatic complications contribute to morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hemopoietic SCT. Liver Doppler ultrasound and elastography represent promising methods for pretransplant risk assessment and early detection of complications. Ultrasound (liver and spleen size, liver perfusion) and elastography (transient elastography (TE); right liver lobe acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (r-ARFI); left liver lobe ARFI (l-ARFI)) were prospectively evaluated in patients with indications for allo-SCT. Measurements were performed before and repeatedly after SCT. Results were compared with the incidence of life-threatening complications and death during the first 150 days after SCT. Of 59 included patients, 16 suffered from major complications and 9 of them died within the follow-up period. At baseline, liver and spleen size, liver perfusion, TE and r-ARFI did not differ significantly between patients with and without severe complications. In contrast, l-ARFI was significantly elevated in patients who later developed severe complications (1.58±0.30 m/s vs 1.37±0.27 m/s, P=0.030). After SCT, l-ARFI values remained elevated and TE showed increasing liver stiffness in patients with complications. The value of conventional liver ultrasound for prediction of severe SCT complications is limited. Increased values for TE and l-ARFI are associated with severe SCT complications and demand further evaluation.

  6. BDNF Overexpression Exhibited Bilateral Effect on Neural Behavior in SCT Mice Associated with AKT Signal Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Rong; Dai, Ping; Wang, Shu-Fen; Song, Shu-Hua; Wang, Hang-Ping; Zhao, Ya; Wang, Ting-Hua; Liu, Jia

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI), a severe health problem in worldwide, was commonly associated with functional disability and reduced quality of life. As the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was substantial event in injured spinal cord, we hypothesized whether BDNF-overexpression could be in favor of the recovery of both sensory function and hindlimb function after SCI. By using BDNF-overexpression transgene mice [CMV-BDNF 26 (CB26) mice] we assessed the role of BDNF on the recovery of neurological behavior in spinal cord transection (SCT) model. BMS score and tail-flick test was performed to evaluate locomotor function and sensory function, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was employed to detect the location and the expression of BDNF, NeuN, 5-HT, GAP-43, GFAP as well as CGRP, and the level of p-AKT and AKT were examined through western blot analysis. BDNF overexpressing resulted in significant locomotor functional recovery from 21 to 28 days after SCT, compared with wild type (WT)+SCT group. Meanwhile, the NeuN, 5-HT and GAP-43 positive cells were markedly increased in ventral horn in BDNF overexpression animals, compared with WT mice with SCT. Moreover, the crucial molecular signal, p-AKT/AKT has been largely up-regulated, which is consistent with the improvement of locomotor function. However, in this study, thermal hyperpathia encountered in sham (CB26) group and WT+SCT mice and further aggravated in CB26 mice after SCT. Also, following SCT, the significant augment of positive-GFAP astrocytes and CGRP fibers were found in WT+SCT mice, and further increase was seen in BDNF over-expression transgene mice. BDNF-overexpression may not only facilitate the recovery of locomotor function via AKT pathway, but also contributed simultaneously to thermal hyperalgesia after SCT.

  7. Barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shebalin, V. E., E-mail: V.E.Shebalin@inp.nsk.su; Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Bashtovoy, N. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Epifanov, D. A. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Epshteyn, L. B.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Ignatov, F. V.; Erofeev, A. L.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Ruban, A. A.; Shwartz, B. A.; Talyshev, A. A.; Titov, V. M.; Yudin, Yu. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The structure of the barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector is presented in this work. The procedure of energy calibration of the calorimeter and the method of photon energy restoration are described. The distinctive feature of this barrel calorimeter is its combined structure; it is composed of two coaxial subsystems: a liquid xenon calorimeter and a crystalline CsI calorimeter. The calorimeter spatial resolution of the photon conversion point is about 2 mm, which corresponds to an angular resolution of ∼6 mrad. The energy resolution of the calorimeter is about 8% for photons with energy of 200 MeV and 4% for photons with energy of 1 GeV.

  8. Barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shebalin, V. E.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Ignatov, F. V.; Erofeev, A. L.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Ruban, A. A.; Shwartz, B. A.; Talyshev, A. A.; Titov, V. M.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector is presented in this work. The procedure of energy calibration of the calorimeter and the method of photon energy restoration are described. The distinctive feature of this barrel calorimeter is its combined structure; it is composed of two coaxial subsystems: a liquid xenon calorimeter and a crystalline CsI calorimeter. The calorimeter spatial resolution of the photon conversion point is about 2 mm, which corresponds to an angular resolution of ∼6 mrad. The energy resolution of the calorimeter is about 8% for photons with energy of 200 MeV and 4% for photons with energy of 1 GeV

  9. Enhanced transbuccal salmon calcitonin (sCT) delivery: effect of chemical enhancers and electrical assistance on in vitro sCT buccal permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dong-Ho; Chun, Kyeung-Hwa; Jeon, Sang-Ok; Kang, Jeong-Won; Lee, Sangkil

    2011-10-01

    This study investigates the combined effect of absorption enhancers and electrical assistance on transbuccal salmon calcitonin (sCT) delivery, using fresh swine buccal tissue. We placed 200 IU (40 μg/mL) of each sCT formulation--containing various concentrations of ethanol, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), and sodium deoxyglycocholate (SDGC)--onto the donor part of a Franz diffusion cell. Then, 0.5 mA/cm(2) of fixed anodal current was applied alone or combined with chemical enhancers. The amount of permeated sCT was analyzed using an ELISA kit, and biophysical changes of the buccal mucosa were investigated using FT-IR spectroscopy, and hematoxylin-eosin staining methods were used to evaluate histological alteration of the buccal tissues. The flux (J(s)) of sCT increased with the addition of absorption enhancer groups, but it was significantly enhanced by the application of anodal iontophoresis (ITP). FT-IR study revealed that all groups caused an increase in lipid fluidity but only the groups containing SDGC showed statistically significant difference. Although the histological data of SDGC groups showed a possibility for tissue damage, the present enhancing methods appear to be safe. In conclusion, the combination of absorption enhancers and electrical assistance is a potential strategy for the enhancement of transbuccal sCT delivery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: barrel medic [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available barrel medic Medicago truncatula Medicago_truncatula_L.png Medicago_truncatula_NL.png Medi...cago_truncatula_S.png Medicago_truncatula_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Medi...cago+truncatula&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Medicago+truncatula&t=NL http://biosci...encedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Medicago+truncatula&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Medicago+truncatula&t=NS ...

  11. First half of CMS inner tracker barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The first half of the CMS inner tracker barrel is seen in this image consisting of three layers of silicon modules which will be placed at the centre of the CMS experiment at the LHC in CERN. Laying close to the interaction point of the 14 TeV proton-proton collisions, the silicon used here must be able to survive high doses of radiation and a 4 T magnetic field without damage.

  12. Outcome of relapse after allogeneic HSCT in children with ALL enrolled in the ALL-SCT 2003/2007 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlen, Michaela; Willasch, Andre M; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Wachowiak, Jacek; Yaniv, Isaac; Ifversen, Marianne; Sedlacek, Petr; Guengoer, Tayfun; Lang, Peter; Bader, Peter; Sufliarska, Sabina; Balduzzi, Adriana; Strahm, Brigitte; von Luettichau, Irene; Hoell, Jessica I; Borkhardt, Arndt; Klingebiel, Thomas; Schrappe, Martin; von Stackelberg, Arend; Glogova, Evgenia; Poetschger, Ulrike; Meisel, Roland; Peters, Christina

    2018-01-01

    Relapse remains the major cause of treatment failure in children with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Prognosis is considered dismal but data on risk factors and outcome are lacking from prospective studies. We analysed 242 children with recurrence of ALL after first allo-SCT enrolled in the Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster (BFM) ALL-SCT-BFM 2003 and ALL-SCT-BFM international 2007 studies. Median time from allo-SCT to relapse was 7·7 months; median follow-up from relapse after allo-SCT until last follow-up was 3·4 years. The 3-year event-free survival (EFS) was 15% and overall survival (OS) was 20%. The main cause of death was disease progression or relapse (86·5%). The majority of children (48%) received salvage therapy without second allo-SCT, 26% of the children underwent a second allo-SCT and 25% received palliative treatment only. In multivariate analyses, age, site of relapse, time to relapse and type of salvage therapy were identified as significant prognostic factors for OS and EFS, whereas factors associated with first SCT were not statistically significant. Combined approaches incorporating novel immunotherapeutic treatment options and second allo-SCT hold promise to improve outcome in children with post allo-SCT relapse. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The second therapeutic trial for children with hematological malignancies who relapsed after their first allogeneic SCT: long-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Takuro; Inagaki, Jiro; Nagatoshi, Yoshihisa; Fukano, Reiji; Nakashima, Kentaro; Ito, Nobuhiro; Sawa, Daisuke; Kawano, Yoshifumi; Okamura, Jun

    2012-11-01

    The impact of a second all-SCT on the long-term outcomes of children who relapse after allo-SCT has been unclear. We retrospectively analyzed the long-term outcomes of different salvage treatments for such children. Sixty-six children with hematological malignancies (40 ALL, 22 AML, three MDS, and one CML) who relapsed after a first allo-SCT received either a second allo-SCT (n = 16) or CTx and/or DLI (n = 50). The median follow-up for all children was 9.1 yr. The five-yr OS after relapse was significantly better in patients who underwent a second allo-SCT (42.9%) than in patients treated with CTx and/or DLI (11.8%) (p SCT, two died more than five yr after the second allo-SCT. A second allo-SCT can therefore lead to a prolonged OS in patients who relapse after allo-SCT. However, a second allo-SCT should be selected carefully. This is because the mortality rate is still high, even when there is an extensive duration of time following the second allo-SCT. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Second hematopoietic SCT for leukemia relapsing after myeloablative T cell-depleted transplants does not prolong survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIver, Z A; Yin, F; Hughes, T; Battiwalla, M; Ito, S; Koklanaris, E; Haggerty, J; Hensel, N F; Barrett, A John

    2013-09-01

    Patients with leukemia relapsing after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT have a dismal prognosis. A second SCT offers a further opportunity for cure, but has a high rate of treatment failure. To determine the utility of this option, we analyzed 59 consecutive patients relapsing after a myeloablative HLA-matched sibling T cell-depleted (TCD) SCT. Twenty-five patients (13 relapsing within 6 months and 12 relapsing between 6 and 170 months after the first SCT) received a T-replete second SCT. Thirty-eight patients relapsing early had a shorter survival than the 21 patients relapsing later (median 96 vs 298 days, P=0.0002). In patients relapsing early, the second SCT did not improve OS compared with patients receiving non-SCT treatments (median survival 109 vs 80 days, P=0.41). In patients relapsing late, despite an early trend in favor of second SCT, survival was comparable for patients receiving a second SCT compared with non retransplanted patients (median survival 363.5 vs 162 days, P=0.49). Disappointingly, our results do not demonstrate an important survival benefit for a second T-replete allogeneic SCT to treat relapse following a TCD SCT.

  15. Alignment of the MSGC barrel support structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kari, Tammi; Miikka, Kotamaki; Tommi, Vanhala; Antti, Onnela

    1999-01-01

    The MSGC barrel is a sub-part of the tracking system of the CMS experiment at the LHC. The mechanical support structure of the MSGC barrel consists of ladder-like support beams carrying the detector modules and of four disks supporting the ladders. The required alignment precision of the modules, a few tens of micrometers, is designed to be obtained by precise part manufacture and by careful measurement of the alignment during the assembly of the structure. In the paper the use of digital photogrammetry for the measurement of the alignment of the disks and for the structural verification is presented. Digital photogrammetry was chosen from a number of potential methods after a careful evaluation. The use of photogrammetry for the structural verification of a prototype is presented. The displacements were measured both of unloaded and loaded disk by using photogrammetry and linear displacement transducers for verification. The displacements obtained from the two measurement methods corresponded well, not only to each other, but also to the results given by finite element analysis. The structural verification will be done and the alignment procedure will be tested with a full-sized prototype of a half of the MSGC barrel. Preparations for the photogrammetry measurements are presented and the design of the required supplementary equipment is shown. (authors)

  16. Alignment of the MSGC barrel support structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kari, Tammi; Miikka, Kotamaki; Tommi, Vanhala [HIP, Helsinki Institute of Physics, CERN/EP, Geneva (Switzerland); Antti, Onnela [CERN, Conseil Europeen pour la recherche nucleaire, Laboratoire europeen pour la physique des particules, Geneve (Switzerland)

    1999-07-01

    The MSGC barrel is a sub-part of the tracking system of the CMS experiment at the LHC. The mechanical support structure of the MSGC barrel consists of ladder-like support beams carrying the detector modules and of four disks supporting the ladders. The required alignment precision of the modules, a few tens of micrometers, is designed to be obtained by precise part manufacture and by careful measurement of the alignment during the assembly of the structure. In the paper the use of digital photogrammetry for the measurement of the alignment of the disks and for the structural verification is presented. Digital photogrammetry was chosen from a number of potential methods after a careful evaluation. The use of photogrammetry for the structural verification of a prototype is presented. The displacements were measured both of unloaded and loaded disk by using photogrammetry and linear displacement transducers for verification. The displacements obtained from the two measurement methods corresponded well, not only to each other, but also to the results given by finite element analysis. The structural verification will be done and the alignment procedure will be tested with a full-sized prototype of a half of the MSGC barrel. Preparations for the photogrammetry measurements are presented and the design of the required supplementary equipment is shown. (authors)

  17. Continuing ARAS visible spectroscopic monitoring of the slow classical nova Sct 2017 = ASASSN-17hx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarro, Joan; Berardi, Paolo; Sollecchia, Umberto; Lester, Tim; Bohlsen, Terry; Luckas, Paul; Campos, Fran; Franco, Lorenzo; Garde, Olivier; Buil, Christian; Edlin, Jim; Teyssier, François

    2017-09-01

    We report the results of our continuing spectroscopic monitoring of the slow classical nova Sct 2017 = ASASSN-17hx (Atel# 10523, #10524, #10527, #10558, #10736) as part of the ongoing program by members of the ARAS group.

  18. ADHD and SCT Symptomatology in Relation to College Students' Use of Self-Regulated Learning Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Christopher R; Addison, William E; Hartung, Cynthia M

    2017-02-01

    The present study examined the relation between self-regulated learning (SRL) strategies and ADHD and sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) symptomatology. Participants were 303 college students, aged 18 to 25 ( M = 20.04, SD = 1.45), from a Midwestern university who completed the Barkley Adult ADHD Rating Scale-IV (BAARS-IV), and a shortened, generalized version of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Among college students, inattention symptomatology was consistently predictive of deficits in use of value, expectancy, and self-regulation strategies, while SCT symptomatology was only predictive of deficits in the use of self-regulation strategies. This study is the first to examine the relation between SCT symptomatology and SRL strategy use in college students. The findings revealed that SRL strategy use differs between college students exhibiting ADHD or SCT symptomatology. Remediation focusing on these deficits would likely increase academic achievement. Clinical implications, limitations, and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  19. Matched-pair analysis to compare the outcomes of a second salvage auto-SCT to systemic chemotherapy alone in patients with multiple myeloma who relapsed after front-line auto-SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yhim, H-Y; Kim, K; Kim, J S; Kang, H J; Kim, J-A; Min, C-K; Bae, S H; Park, E; Yang, D-H; Suh, C; Kim, M K; Mun, Y-C; Eom, H S; Shin, H J; Yoon, H-J; Kwon, J H; Lee, J H; Kim, Y S; Yoon, S-S; Kwak, J-Y

    2013-03-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the outcomes of second salvage auto-SCT and to identify the impacts of a second auto-SCT compared with systemic chemotherapy alone on disease outcome. Data from 48 patients who underwent second auto-SCT were matched to 144 patients (1:3) who received systemic chemotherapy alone from the Korean Myeloma Registry. Groups were matched for nine potential prognostic factors and compared for treatment outcomes. The median age of matching-pairs at relapse was 55.5 years. A total of 156 patients (81%) received vincristine, doxorubicin and dexamethasone induction therapy before the first auto-SCT. Thirty-five patients (73%) in the second auto-SCT group received novel agent-based therapies before the second auto-SCT, and similar proportion in both groups received novel therapies after relapse of front-line auto-SCT. With a median follow-up of 55.3 months, patients who underwent a second auto-SCT had significantly better median OS (55.5 vs 25.4 months, P=0.035). In multivariate analysis for OS, SCT, International Staging System III and salvage chemotherapy alone were independent predictors for worse OS. The outcomes of second auto-SCT appear to be superior to those of systemic chemotherapy alone. A randomized trial comparing both treatment strategies is required.

  20. Physical and emotional well-being of survivors of childhood and young adult allo-SCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Josef Nathan; Gøtzsche, Frederik; Heilmann, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to examine, within a population-based study of a national cohort comprising Danish survivors of allo-SCT (n = 148), the long-term effects of allo-SCT in children and young adults. Physical and emotional well-being was assessed using the Short Form 36 (SF-36) and ...... of anxiety, depression, and physical and emotional well-being to those of the normal population....

  1. Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT: phenotypes and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, A; Godet, C; Chevret, S; Lorillon, G; Peffault de Latour, R; de Revel, T; Robin, M; Ribaud, P; Socié, G; Tazi, A

    2013-06-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) is recognized as a new-onset obstructive lung defect (OLD) in pulmonary function testing and is related to pulmonary chronic GVHD. Little is known about the different phenotypes of patients with BOS and their outcomes. We reviewed the data of all allogeneic HSCT recipients referred to our pulmonary department for a non-infectious bronchial disease between 1999 and 2010. We identified 103 patients (BOS (n=77), asthma (n=11) and chronic bronchitis (n=15)). In patients with BOS, we identified two functional phenotypes: a typical OLD, that is, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio <0.7 (n=53), and an atypical OLD with a concomitant decrease in the FEV1 <80% and FVC <80% predicted with a normal total lung capacity (n=24). The typical OLD was characterized by more severe FEV1 and fewer centrilobular nodules on the computed tomography scan. The FEV1 was not significantly affected during the follow-up, regardless of the phenotype. In addition to acute and extensive chronic GVHD, only the occurrence of BOS soon after transplantation and the intentional treatment of BOS with steroids were associated with a poor survival. The determination of patient subgroups should be explored to improve the management of this condition.

  2. Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic SCT as salvage treatment for relapsed multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lavallade, H; El-Cheikh, J; Faucher, C; Fürst, S; Stoppa, A-M; Coso, D; Bouabdallah, R; Chabannon, C; Gastaut, J-A; Blaise, D; Mohty, M

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective analysis was to assess the benefit of reduced-intensity conditioning allo SCT (RIC allo-SCT) in a cohort of 32 relapsed multiple myeloma (MM) patients. A total of 19 patients had an HLA-identical sibling donor ('donor' group), while 13 patients had no donor ('no-donor' group). There were no significant differences between these two groups as for prognosis risk factors. Eighteen patients from the 'donor' group could actually proceed to RIC allo-SCT. With a median follow-up of 36 (range, 21-60) months, six patients died from transplant-related toxicity (cumulative incidence, 33% (95% CI, 11-55%)). Only 4 patients from the 18 transplanted patients (22%; 95% CI, 7-48%) progressed after RIC allo-SCT, as compared to 12 (86%; 95% CI, 56-98%; P=0.0003) among the nontransplanted patients. In an 'intention-to-treat' analysis, the Kaplan-Meier estimate of PFS was significantly higher in the 'donor' group as compared to the 'no-donor' group (P=0.01; 46 versus 8% at 3 years). There was no difference in terms of overall survival. However, in multivariate analysis, actual performance of RIC allo-SCT was associated with better PFS (relative risk, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.15-0.82; P=0.01). These data suggest a potential benefit for RIC allo-SCT in the management of relapsed MM warranting further prospective investigations.

  3. 3D Printing the ATLAS' barrel toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, Tiago Barreiro

    2016-01-01

    The present report summarizes my work as part of the Summer Student Programme 2016 in the CERN IR-ECO-TSP department (International Relations – Education, Communication & Outreach – Teacher and Student Programmes). Particularly, I worked closely with the S’Cool LAB team on a science education project. This project included the 3D designing, 3D printing, and assembling of a model of the ATLAS’ barrel toroid. A detailed description of the project' development is presented and a short manual on how to use 3D printing software and hardware is attached.

  4. Failure analysis of a barrel exposed to high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, A.; Salam, I.; Rizvi, S.A.; Qasir, S.

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with the study of a tank gun barrel which had failed after firing only a few rounds. The failure was in the form of bulging at the muzzle end (ME). The material of the barrel was characterized using different techniques including chemical and mechanical testing, optical microscopy and electron microscopy. Study disclosed that the barrel was subjected to excessively high temperature that resulted in its softening and consequent bulging under high pressure of the round. (author)

  5. Advancing the Multi-Informant Assessment of Sluggish Cognitive Tempo: Child Self-Report in Relation to Parent and Teacher Ratings of SCT and Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Belén; Servera, Mateu; Burns, G Leonard; Becker, Stephen P

    2018-04-27

    Despite increasing interest in sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) in children and advancements in its measurement, little research has examined child self-reported SCT. Child self-report of SCT is important for the multi-informant assessment of SCT. The current study used a large, school-based sample of children and a multi-informant design to examine child self-reported SCT using the Child Concentration Inventory - Version 2 (CCI-2) which was recently revised based on meta-analytic findings and parallels the item content of validated parent and teacher rating scales. The study involved 2142 unique children (ages 8-13 years, 50.51% males). Children (n = 1980) completed measures of SCT, loneliness, and preference for solitude. Mothers (n = 1648), fathers (n = 1358), and teachers (n = 1773) completed measures of SCT, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder-IN (ADHD-IN), academic impairment, social impairment, and conflicted shyness. Children's self-reported SCT demonstrated good reliability with the 15 SCT symptoms showing moderate to strong loadings on the SCT factor. The child self-report SCT factor also showed moderate convergent validity with mother, father, and teacher ratings of children's SCT. In addition, higher child-reported SCT predicted greater mother, father, and teacher ratings of children's academic impairment even after controlling for mother, father, and teacher ratings of children's SCT and ADHD-IN. Higher child-rated SCT also predicted greater mother ratings of children's social impairment after controlling for mother ratings of children's SCT and ADHD-IN. The present study provides initial empirical support for the reliability and validity of child-reported SCT as part of the multi-informant assessment of SCT. A key direction for future research includes evaluating the unique contributions of different informants and their utility within specific contexts to guide evidence-based recommendations for assessing SCT.

  6. Progress of the EM Barrel Presampler Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Hostachy, J.Y.

    The liquid argon barrel presampler is a separate detector which will be placed in front of the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter, in the same cryostat. It is made of 32×2 sectors, each of them being 3.1 m long, about 28 cm large and a few cm thick. Three countries are involved in its construction: France (ISN-Grenoble), Sweden (KTH-Stockholm) and Morocco (Universities: Hassan II Ain Chock-Casablanca and Mohamed V-Rabat, and CNESTEN-Rabat). The design of the presampler started ten years ago and the series production began at the end of the year 2000. Today two-thirds of the sectors are produced and validated. In November 2002, half the detector (i.e. 32 sectors), was inserted on the internal face of the first EM calorimeter wheel (see pictures). Despite the fact that only 0.4 mm was available between sectors, it was possible to insert them all without meeting major difficulties. This operation was led by a team of four people, the sectors being systematically tested after insertion in the wheel. The inserti...

  7. ATLAS TRT Barrel in Test Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    Luehring, F

    In July, the TRT group made a highly successful test of 6 Barrel TRT modules in the ATLAS H8 testbeam. Over 3000 TRT straw tubes (4 mm diameter gas drift tubes) were instrumented and found to operate well. The prototype represents 1/16 of the ATLAS TRT barrel and was assembled from TRT modules produced as spares. This was the largest scale test of the TRT to this date and the measured detector performance was as good as or better than what was expected in all cases. The 2004 TRT testbeam setup before final cabling was attached. The readout chain and central DAQ system used in the TRT testbeam is a final prototype for the ATLAS experiment. The TRT electronics used to read out the data were: The Amplifier/Shaper/Discriminator with Baseline Restoration (ASDBLR) chip is the front-end analog chip that shapes and discriminates the electronic pulses generated by the TRT straws. The Digital Time Measurement Read Out Chip (DTMROC) measures the time of the pulse relative to the beam crossing time. The TRT-ROD ...

  8. The CMS Barrel Muon Trigger Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Triossi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The increase of luminosity expected by LHC during Phase 1 will impose several constrains for rate reduction while maintaining high efficiency in the CMS Level 1 trigger system. The TwinMux system is the early layer of the muon barrel region that concentrates the information from different subdetectors DT, RPC and HO. It arranges and fan-out the slow optical trigger links from the detector chambers into faster links (10 Gbps) that are sent to the track finders. Results, from collision runs, that confirm the satisfactory operation of the trigger system up to the output of the barrel track finder, will be shown. SUMMARY: In view of the increase of luminosity during phase 1 upgrade of LHC, the muon trigger chain of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment underwent considerable improvements. The muon detector was designed for preserving the complementarity and redundancy of three separate muon detection systems, Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC), Drift Tubes (DT) and Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC), until ...

  9. Results of a search for γ Dor and δ SCT stars with the Kepler spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, P. A.; Miles, L. F. [XCP-6, MS F-699 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Guzik, J. A. [XTD-NTA, MS T-086 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Uytterhoeven, K. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain and Departamento de Astrofisica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Jackiewicz, J. [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Kinemuchi, K., E-mail: pbradley@lanl.gov [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The light curves of 2768 stars with effective temperatures and surface gravities placing them near the gamma Doradus (γ Dor)/delta Scuti (δ Sct) instability region were observed as part of the Kepler Guest Observer program from Cycles 1 through 5. The light curves were analyzed in a uniform manner to search for γ Dor, δ Sct, and hybrid star pulsations. The γ Dor, δ Sct, and hybrid star pulsations extend asteroseismology to stars slightly more massive (1.4–2.5 M{sub ⊙}) than our Sun. We find 207 γ Dor, 84 δ Sct, and 32 hybrid candidate stars. Many of these stars are cooler than the red edge of the γ Dor instability strip as determined from ground-based observations made before Kepler. A few of our γ Dor candidate stars lie on the hot side of the ground-based γ Dor instability strip. The hybrid candidate stars cover the entire region between 6200 K and the blue edge of the ground-based δ Sct instability strip. None of our candidate stars are hotter than the hot edge of the ground-based δ Sct instability strip. Our discoveries, coupled with the work of others, show that Kepler has discovered over 2000 γ Dor, δ Sct, and hybrid star candidates in the 116 square degree Kepler field of view. We found relatively few variable stars fainter than magnitude 15, which may be because they are far enough away to lie between spiral arms in our Galaxy, where there would be fewer stars.

  10. Results of a search for γ Dor and δ SCT stars with the Kepler spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, P. A.; Miles, L. F.; Guzik, J. A.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Jackiewicz, J.; Kinemuchi, K.

    2015-01-01

    The light curves of 2768 stars with effective temperatures and surface gravities placing them near the gamma Doradus (γ Dor)/delta Scuti (δ Sct) instability region were observed as part of the Kepler Guest Observer program from Cycles 1 through 5. The light curves were analyzed in a uniform manner to search for γ Dor, δ Sct, and hybrid star pulsations. The γ Dor, δ Sct, and hybrid star pulsations extend asteroseismology to stars slightly more massive (1.4–2.5 M ⊙ ) than our Sun. We find 207 γ Dor, 84 δ Sct, and 32 hybrid candidate stars. Many of these stars are cooler than the red edge of the γ Dor instability strip as determined from ground-based observations made before Kepler. A few of our γ Dor candidate stars lie on the hot side of the ground-based γ Dor instability strip. The hybrid candidate stars cover the entire region between 6200 K and the blue edge of the ground-based δ Sct instability strip. None of our candidate stars are hotter than the hot edge of the ground-based δ Sct instability strip. Our discoveries, coupled with the work of others, show that Kepler has discovered over 2000 γ Dor, δ Sct, and hybrid star candidates in the 116 square degree Kepler field of view. We found relatively few variable stars fainter than magnitude 15, which may be because they are far enough away to lie between spiral arms in our Galaxy, where there would be fewer stars.

  11. Haploidentical hematopoietic SCT increases graft-versus-tumor effect against renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budak-Alpdogan, T; Sauter, C T; Bailey, C P; Biswas, C S; Panis, M M; Civriz, S; Flomenberg, N; Alpdogan, O

    2013-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) has been shown to be an effective treatment option for advanced renal cell cancer (RCC). However, tumor resistance/relapse remains as the main post transplant issue. Therefore, enhancing graft-versus-tumor (GVT) activity without increasing GVHD is critical for improving the outcome of HSCT. We explored the GVT effect of haploidentical-SCT (haplo-SCT) against RCC in murine models. Lethally irradiated CB6F1 (H2K(b/d)) recipients were transplanted with T-cell-depleted BM cells from B6CBAF1 (H2K(b/k)) mice. Haplo-SCT combined with a low-dose haploidentical (HI) T-cell infusion (1 × 10(5)) successfully provided GVT activity without incurring GVHD. This effect elicited murine RCC growth control and consequently displayed a comparative survival advantage of haplo-SCT recipients when compared with MHC-matched (B6D2F1CB6F1) and parent-F1 (B6CB6F1) transplant recipients. Recipients of haplo-SCT had an increase in donor-derived splenic T-cell numbers, T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ-secreting donor-derived T-cells, a critical aspect for anti-tumor activity. The splenocytes from B6CBAF1 mice had a higher cytotoxicity against RENCA cells than the splenocytes from B6 and B6D2F1 donors after tumor challenge. These findings suggest that haplo-SCT might be an innovative immunotherapeutic platform for solid tumors, particularly for renal cell carcinoma.

  12. Prognostic value of comorbidity for auto-SCT eligibility and outcome in relapsed or refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattel, W J; Kluin-Nelemans, H C; de Bock, G H; van Imhoff, G W

    2011-06-01

    Salvage reinduction therapy followed by high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and auto-SCT is the treatment of choice for fit patients with refractory or relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). We assessed the prognostic value of comorbidity at the time of relapse to predict receipt of auto-SCT and outcome. We analyzed 156 consecutive NHL patients, referred to our center between 1999 and 2007 for salvage reinduction therapy, followed by HDCT and auto-SCT. Comorbidity according to the hematopoietic SCT comorbidity index was scored at relapse and directly before HDCT and auto-SCT. Primary end points were actual receipt of auto-SCT and survival. At relapse, comorbidity scores of 0, 1-2 and ≥3 were found among 64 (41%), 62 (40%) and 30 (19%) patients, respectively. Ultimately, 95 patients received auto-SCT. Higher comorbidity scores at relapse were associated with significantly less chance of receiving auto-SCT and with inferior OS, independently from secondary age-adjusted International Prognostic Index (sAAIPI) scores. For transplanted patients, OS rates at 5 years were 62, 30 and 17% for relapse comorbidity scores of 0, 1-2 and ≥3, respectively. In patients with relapsed NHL, comorbidity at relapse is associated with receipt of auto-SCT and subsequent survival independently from the sAAIPI.

  13. Arrival metering fuel consumption analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Arrival metering is a method of time-based traffic management that is used by the Federal Aviation Administration to plan and manage streams of arrival traffic during periods of : high demand at busy airports. The Traffic Management Advisor is an aut...

  14. Donor-derived HLA antibody production in patients undergoing SCT from HLA antibody-positive donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, K; Yoshihara, S; Maruya, E; Ikegame, K; Kaida, K; Hayashi, K; Kato, R; Inoue, T; Fujioka, T; Tamaki, H; Okada, M; Onuma, T; Fujii, N; Kusunoki, Y; Soma, T; Saji, H; Ogawa, H

    2012-10-01

    Pre-existing donor-specific HLA antibodies in patients undergoing HLA-mismatched SCT have increasingly been recognized as a risk factor for primary graft failure. However, the clinical implications of the presence of HLA antibodies in donors remain unknown. We prospectively examined 123 related donors for the presence of HLA antibodies by using a Luminex-based single antigen assay. Of these, 1/57 (1.8%) male, 6/27 (22%) parous female and 0/39 (0%) nonparous female donors were HLA antibody-positive. Then, we determined the presence of HLA antibodies in seven patients who received SCT from antibody-positive donors. Of these, four became HLA antibody-positive after SCT. The specificities of the antibodies that emerged in the patients closely resembled those of the antibodies found in the donors, indicating their production by donor-derived plasma cells. Moreover, the kinetics of the HLA antibody levels were similar in all four patients: levels started increasing within 1 week after SCT and peaked at days 10-21, followed by a gradual decrease. These results suggest that donor-derived HLA antibody production frequently occurs in patients undergoing SCT from antibody-positive donors. Further studies are warranted for clarifying the clinical significance of donor-derived HLA antibodies, including the role of these antibodies in post transplant platelet transfusion refractoriness.

  15. 27 CFR 25.141 - Barrels and kegs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Marks, Brands, and Labels § 25.141 Barrels and kegs. (a) General... shown on the bung or on the tap cover, or on a label securely affixed to each barrel or keg, the place... production: (i) May be shown as the only location on the bung, or on the tap cover, or on a separate label...

  16. Scraping the bottom of the barrel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, L.F. [PETROBRAS (Brazil)

    2001-03-01

    This article focuses on technologies for upgrading residual streams to improve refiners margins, and reports on the refining technology programme (PROTER) set up by the Brazilian PETROBRAS company. Details are given of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) pilot units at PETROBRAS's CENPES Research and Development Centre in Rio de Janeiro State, the development of new proprietary closed cyclone technology, the Ultramist feedstock injection device, the feed nozzle, and the high accessibility catalyst. FCC units at PETROBRAS, FCC ongoing projects, and the use of delayed coking to convert low value residues to high value residues are described along with other bottom of barrel projects such as residue hydrocracking, hydropyrolysis, and the production of a stable fuel emulsion from an asphalt residue stream.

  17. Whole body X-ray CT scanner SCT-3000T series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Teruhiko; Takemura, Kunihiko; Suzuki, Satoru; Sato, Yukio; Kawamoto, Yasushi; Goto, Mitsuhiro; Mishina, Yukio

    1989-01-01

    The whole body CT scanner, SCT-3000T series which improve the patient through-put and the diagnostic capability, has been developed. In the SCT-3000T series CT scanners, the great reduction of the reconstruction time and the scan cycle time has been achieved by developing the special purpose hardwares for image reconstruction such as the fast front end processor, the intelligent buffer memory. In case of the SCT-3000TX routine conditions of operation, including 3.0 sec scan, table increment, image reconstruction and image filing, the scan cycle time is about 9 seconds which is the shortest value among the competitive models. Furthermore, the higher diagnostic capability has been provided with the system, by adopting the 1024 x 1024 display matrices, and by developing the diagnostic softwares such as 3-D display program, arbitrary curved plane MPR program, r-CBF measurement program and etc. (author)

  18. Incidence and risk factors for hypogammaglobulinemia in pediatric patients following allo-SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangoul, H; Min, E; Wang, W; Chandrasekhar, R; Calder, C; Evans, M; Manes, B; Bruce, K; Brown, V; Ho, R; Domm, J

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated the incidence and risk factors for hypogammaglobulinemia after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) in pediatric patients. Ig levels were measured pre-transplant, every 2 weeks until day 100 and then monthly post SCT in 185 patients undergoing myeloablative HSCT. Median age was 9 years; 142 (77%) had malignant disease and 114 (62%) received stem cells from an unrelated source. Hypogammaglobulinemia (IgG SCT. The cumulative incidence of hypogammaglobulinemia at 1 year was higher among patients who developed acute GVHD (97% vs 54%, PSCT (P<0.001) and development of acute GVHD (P<0.001) were all significantly associated with higher risk of hypogammaglobulinemia post HSCT. We conclude that hypogammaglobulinemia is common, following allogeneic HSCT in pediatric patients, especially in those with malignant diseases, those who receive an unrelated transplant or patients who develop GVHD.

  19. The excitation of solar-like oscillations in a δ Sct star by efficient envelope convection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoci, V.; Handler, G.; Kallinger, T.

    2011-01-01

    Delta Scuti (δSct) stars are opacity-driven pulsators with masses of 1.5-2.5Msolar, their pulsations resulting from the varying ionization of helium. In less massive stars such as the Sun, convection transports mass and energy through the outer 30per cent of the star and excites a rich spectrum...... of resonant acoustic modes. Based on the solar example, with no firm theoretical basis, models predict that the convective envelope in δSct stars extends only about 1per cent of the radius, but with sufficient energy to excite solar-like oscillations. This was not observed before the Kepler mission, so...... the presence of a convective envelope in the models has been questioned. Here we report the detection of solar-like oscillations in the δSct star HD187547, implying that surface convection operates efficiently in stars about twice as massive as the Sun, as the ad hoc models predicted....

  20. Amplitude modulation in δ Sct stars: statistics from an ensemble of Kepler targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Dominic M.; Kurtz, Donald W.; Breger, Michel; Murphy, Simon J.; Holdsworth, Daniel L.

    2017-10-01

    The results of a search for amplitude modulation of pulsation modes in 983 δ Sct stars, which have effective temperatures between 6400 ⩽ Teff ⩽ 10 000 K in the Kepler Input Catalogue and were continuously observed by the Kepler Space Telescope for 4 yr, are presented. A total of 603 δ Sct stars (61.3 per cent) are found to exhibit at least one pulsation mode that varies significantly in amplitude over 4 yr. Furthermore, it is found that amplitude modulation is not restricted to a specific region within the classical instability strip in the HR diagram, therefore its cause is not necessarily dependent on stellar parameters such as Teff or log g. On the other hand, many δ Sct stars show constant pulsation amplitudes demonstrating that the cause of pulsational non-linearity in these stars is not well understood.

  1. The results of the irradiations of microstrip detectors for the ATLAS tracker (SCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dervan, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    The SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) of ATLAS will operate in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will reach luminosities of 10 34 cm 2 s -1 . Silicon single-sided microstrip detectors will be used for particle tracking. Due to the proximity to the beam, the silicon detectors need to withstand damage from ionising radiation (10 Mrad total dose) and from non-ionising radiation such as neutrons (2x10 14 1 MeV equivalent neutrons/cm 2 total fluence). The final characteristics of the silicon SCT detectors which are needed to operate under LHC conditions and the conclusions reached after various years of test irradiation studies will be reported. The integration and performance of these detectors in complete SCT modules is also discussed

  2. Response sensitivity of barrel neuron subpopulations to simulated thalamic input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Michael J; Rittenhouse, Cynthia D; Pinto, David J

    2010-06-01

    Our goal is to examine the relationship between neuron- and network-level processing in the context of a well-studied cortical function, the processing of thalamic input by whisker-barrel circuits in rodent neocortex. Here we focus on neuron-level processing and investigate the responses of excitatory and inhibitory barrel neurons to simulated thalamic inputs applied using the dynamic clamp method in brain slices. Simulated inputs are modeled after real thalamic inputs recorded in vivo in response to brief whisker deflections. Our results suggest that inhibitory neurons require more input to reach firing threshold, but then fire earlier, with less variability, and respond to a broader range of inputs than do excitatory neurons. Differences in the responses of barrel neuron subtypes depend on their intrinsic membrane properties. Neurons with a low input resistance require more input to reach threshold but then fire earlier than neurons with a higher input resistance, regardless of the neuron's classification. Our results also suggest that the response properties of excitatory versus inhibitory barrel neurons are consistent with the response sensitivities of the ensemble barrel network. The short response latency of inhibitory neurons may serve to suppress ensemble barrel responses to asynchronous thalamic input. Correspondingly, whereas neurons acting as part of the barrel circuit in vivo are highly selective for temporally correlated thalamic input, excitatory barrel neurons acting alone in vitro are less so. These data suggest that network-level processing of thalamic input in barrel cortex depends on neuron-level processing of the same input by excitatory and inhibitory barrel neurons.

  3. Management of CML in the Pediatric Age Group: Imatinib Mesylate or SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Alfy, Mohsen S; Al-Haddad, Alaa M; Hamed, Ahmed A

    2010-12-01

    Management of CML has changed markedly since the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However stem cell transplantation (SCT) remains a valid therapeutic modality especially in developing countries due to its relatively lower cost. We aim to compare between imatinib mesylate and SCT as regard outcome in CML in the pediatric age group. Forty-eight patients with newly diagnosed CML in the chronic phase, aged 3 to 18 years were enrolled in this prospective study. Patients without a matched donor (Group I; N=30) were assigned to receive imatinib mesylate at a dose of 340mg÷m2÷day, while patients with a fully matched related donor (Group II; N=18), were offered SCT. Response (hematologic, cytogenetic and molecular), side effects and survival were analyzed. Complete hematologic response was obtained in 97% of the patients in group I and 94% in group II. Major cytogenetic response (CyR) was obtained in 80% of patients in group I and 100% in group II. Complete CyR was 57% in group I and 64% in group II. Major molecular response (MMR) was 36% in group I and 50% in group II with no significant difference between both groups. Six years overall survival (OS) was 87% in the 1st group and 61% in the 2nd group (pSCT group (55% had GVHD and 78% had infection). Imatinib mesylate has a superior OS and EFS than SCT in children. It is generally safe and well tolerated. Imatinib mesylate should be the 1st line treatment of pediatric patients with CML in the chronic phase. CML- Imatinib- SCT- Pediatrics.

  4. Differentiating SCT and inattentive symptoms in ADHD using fMRI measures of cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbender, Catherine; Krafft, Cynthia E; Schweitzer, Julie B

    2015-01-01

    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is associated with different impairment profiles in the symptom domains of hyperactivity/impulsivity and/or inattention. An additional symptom domain of sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) has also been proposed. Although there is a degree of correlation between the SCT symptom domain and inattention, it has been proposed as a distinct disorder independent of ADHD. The objective of this study was to examine the neural substrates of cue-related preparatory processes associated with SCT symptoms versus inattentive symptoms in a group of adolescents with ADHD. We also compared cue-related effects in the entire ADHD group compared with a group of typically developing (TD) peers. A modified cued flanker paradigm and fMRI examined brain activity associated with attention preparation and motor response preparation. Between group contrasts between the ADHD and TD group revealed significant hypoactivity in the ADHD group during general attention preparation in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and in the right superior parietal lobe (SPL) during response preparation. In the ADHD group, greater numbers of SCT symptoms were associated with hypoactivity in the left SPL to cues in general whereas greater numbers of inattentive symptoms were associated with greater activity in the SMA to cues that provided no information and less activity in the thalamus during response preparation. Hypoactivity in the SPL with increasing SCT symptoms may be associated with impaired reorienting or shifting of attention. Altered activity in the SMA and thalamus with increasing inattention may be associated with a general problem with response preparation, which may also reflect inefficient processing of the response preparation cue. Our results support a degree of differentiation between SCT and inattentive symptom profiles within adolescents with ADHD.

  5. Prognostic value of comorbidity for auto-SCT eligibility and outcome in relapsed or refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plattel, W. J.; Kluin-Nelemans, H. C.; de Bock, G. H.; van Imhoff, G. W.

    Salvage reinduction therapy followed by high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and auto-SCT is the treatment of choice for fit patients with refractory or relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). We assessed the prognostic value of comorbidity at the time of relapse to predict receipt of auto-SCT

  6. Prognostic factors and outcome in relapsed multiple myeloma after nonmyeloablative allo-SCT: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnema, M C; van Dorp, S; van de Donk, N W C J; Schouten, F; Kersten, M J; Coenen, J L L M; Schouten, H; Zweegman, S; Schaafsma, R; Lokhorst, H M

    2011-02-01

    For relapsed multiple myeloma (MM) patients, allo-SCT is a possible treatment option, but recent data obtained using a nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning regimen are scarce. We retrospectively collected data from 38 relapsed MM patients who received a NMA allo-SCT from October 2001 to January 2008. In total, 18 patients (48%) were transplanted using a matched unrelated donor. The median follow-up is 2.3 years. In 16 patients (42%) the response improved and eight patients (21%) were rapidly progressive within 6 months after allo-SCT. In total, 15 patients (39%) were in CR after allo-SCT. The median PFS was 1.4 years (range, 0.1-4.9), and having a CR after allo-SCT or having chronic GVHD resulted in longer PFS. Median OS was 3.1 years (range, 0.2-7.2) and again having a CR after allo-SCT or chronic GVHD was associated with a better OS. Six patients (16%) have died from treatment-related diseases. These results indicate that NMA allo-SCT is a treatment option in relapsed MM patients and that results may be improved by strategies that enhance the CR rate after allo-SCT.

  7. Evaluation of salmon calcitonin (sCT) enteric-coated capsule for enhanced absorption and GI tolerability in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Zhang, Ge; Lu, Qin; Sun, Qian; Wang, Mulan; Li, Na; Gao, Zidong; Sun, Ya; Li, Tingting; Han, Deen; Yu, Xue; Wang, Lei; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Di; Wu, Yaning; Lu, Yang; Chen, Xijing

    2010-03-01

    Considering the chronic and repeated nature of salmon calcitonin (sCT) therapy, the oral route is a preferred route of administration. But, the oral bioavailability of sCT is very low due to enzymatic degradation and poor permeation across intestinal epithelial cells. It was the aim of this study to investigate the pharmacodynamic (PD), pharmacokinetic (PK), and mucosal injury characteristic of sCT oral delivery system. In this study, PD experiments were performed to find a suitable releasing region of sCT, an effect absorption enhancer, and an optimal mass ratio of sCT/enhancer. In addition, the PK experiments were designed to validate the absorption enhancement of this oral delivery system. Histopathological evaluations on the intestinal mucosa were carried out to assess any potential toxicity of the absorption enhancer. Through the PD research, we determined that oral sCT enteric-coated capsules containing sCT and citric acid (CA) with a ratio of 1:20 may be an adaptable delivery. PK study further proved that the oral absorption of sCT was enhanced from this delivery system. Finally, no damage on intestinal mucosa was observed when rats received the delivery system containing CA for up to 7 days. These results suggested that enteric-coated capsules with a certain amount of CA might give enhanced oral delivery of peptide drugs like sCT.

  8. Distress, problems, and supportive care needs of patients treated with auto- or allo-SCT. Bone Marrow Transplant.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annemarie Braamse; prof Berno van Meijel; A.T. Beekman; O. Visser; J. Dekker

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hematological malignancies and treatment with hematopoietic SCT are known to affect patients' quality of life. The problem profile and care needs of this patient group need clarification, however. This study aimed to assess distress, problems and care needs after allo- or auto-SCT, and to

  9. Auto-SCT improves survival in systemic light chain amyloidosis: a retrospective analysis with 14-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, S; Kongtim, P; Champlin, R; Dinh, Y; Elgharably, Y; Wang, M; Bashir, Q; Shah, J J; Shah, N; Popat, U; Giralt, S A; Orlowski, R Z; Qazilbash, M H

    2014-08-01

    Optimal treatment approach continues to remain a challenge for systemic light chain amyloidosis (AL). So far, Auto-SCT is the only modality associated with long-term survival. However, failure to show survival benefit in randomized study raises questions regarding its efficacy. We present a comparative outcome analysis of Auto-SCT to conventional therapies (CTR) in AL patients treated over a 14-year period at our institution. Out of the 145 AL amyloidosis patients, Auto-SCT was performed in 80 patients with 1-year non-relapse mortality rate of 12.5%. Novel agents were used as part of induction therapy in 56% of transplant recipients vs 46% of CTR patients. Hematological and organ responses were seen in 74.6% and 39% in the Auto-SCT arm vs 53% and 12% in the CTR arm, respectively. The projected 5-year survival for Auto-SCT vs CTR was 63% vs 38%, respectively. Landmark analysis of patients alive at 1-year after diagnosis showed improved 5-year OS of 72% with Auto-SCT vs 65% in the CTR arm. In the multivariate analysis, age SCT were associated with improved survival. In conclusion, Auto-SCT is associated with long-term survival for patients with AL amyloidosis.

  10. Outcome of relapse after allogeneic HSCT in children with ALL enrolled in the ALL-SCT 2003/2007 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlen, Michaela; Willasch, Andre M; Dalle, Jean-Hugues

    2018-01-01

    Relapse remains the major cause of treatment failure in children with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Prognosis is considered dismal but data on risk factors and outcome are lacking from prospective studies. We...... analysed 242 children with recurrence of ALL after first allo-SCT enrolled in the Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster (BFM) ALL-SCT-BFM 2003 and ALL-SCT-BFM international 2007 studies. Median time from allo-SCT to relapse was 7·7 months; median follow-up from relapse after allo-SCT until last follow-up was 3·4 years....... The 3-year event-free survival (EFS) was 15% and overall survival (OS) was 20%. The main cause of death was disease progression or relapse (86·5%). The majority of children (48%) received salvage therapy without second allo-SCT, 26% of the children underwent a second allo-SCT and 25% received palliative...

  11. Globally intertwined evolutionary history of giant barrel sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swierts, Thomas; Peijnenburg, Katja T. C. A.; de Leeuw, Christiaan A.; Breeuwer, Johannes A. J.; Cleary, Daniel F. R.; de Voogd, Nicole J.

    2017-09-01

    Three species of giant barrel sponge are currently recognized in two distinct geographic regions, the tropical Atlantic and the Indo-Pacific. In this study, we used molecular techniques to study populations of giant barrel sponges across the globe and assessed whether the genetic structure of these populations agreed with current taxonomic consensus or, in contrast, whether there was evidence of cryptic species. Using molecular data, we assessed whether giant barrel sponges in each oceanic realm represented separate monophyletic lineages. Giant barrel sponges from 17 coral reef systems across the globe were sequenced for mitochondrial (partial CO1 and ATP6 genes) and nuclear (ATPsβ intron) DNA markers. In total, we obtained 395 combined sequences of the mitochondrial CO1 and ATP6 markers, which resulted in 17 different haplotypes. We compared a phylogenetic tree constructed from 285 alleles of the nuclear intron ATPsβ to the 17 mitochondrial haplotypes. Congruent patterns between mitochondrial and nuclear gene trees of giant barrel sponges provided evidence for the existence of multiple reproductively isolated species, particularly where they occurred in sympatry. The species complexes in the tropical Atlantic and the Indo-Pacific, however, do not form separate monophyletic lineages. This rules out the scenario that one species of giant barrel sponge developed into separate species complexes following geographic separation and instead suggests that multiple species of giant barrel sponges already existed prior to the physical separation of the Indo-Pacific and tropical Atlantic.

  12. Monitoring core barrel motion by neutron noise diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Por, G.

    1985-08-01

    The core barrel motion is detected by ionization chambers located around the reactor vessel. The method is based on the measurement of the neutron flux fluctuations. Calculations to determine the direction and the size of the motion are discussed. The identification of core barrel motion and its connection with the error of one of the main circulating pumps in the Rheinsberg nuclear power plant are described. Core barrel motion of 10 Hz with an amplitude less than 50 μm could be diagnozed at the Paks-1 reactor using the Dutch high accuracy evaluation system. (V.N.)

  13. Qualification Procedures of the CMS Pixel Barrel Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Starodumov, A; Horisberger, R.; Kastli, H.Chr.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, B.; Rohe, T.; Trueb, P.

    2006-01-01

    The CMS pixel barrel system will consist of three layers built of about 800 modules. One module contains 66560 readout channels and the full pixel barrel system about 48 million channels. It is mandatory to test each channel for functionality, noise level, trimming mechanism, and bump bonding quality. Different methods to determine the bump bonding yield with electrical measurements have been developed. Measurements of several operational parameters are also included in the qualification procedure. Among them are pixel noise, gains and pedestals. Test and qualification procedures of the pixel barrel modules are described and some results are presented.

  14. Beam tests of the ZEUS barrel calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, A; Bienz, T; Caldwell, A; Chen, L; Derrick, M; Gialas, I; Hamri, A; Imlay, R; Kartik, S; Kim, H J; Kinnel, T; Kreutzmann, H; Li, C G; Lim, J N; Loveless, R; Lu, B; Mallik, U; McLean, K W; McNeil, R; Metcalf, W; Musgrave, B; Oh, B Y; Park, S; Parsons, J A; Reeder, D; Repond, J; Ritz, S; Roco, M T.P.; Sandler, P H; Sciulli, F; Smith, W H; Talaga, R L; Tzanakos, G; Wai, L; Wang, M Z; Whitmore, J; Wu, J; Yang, S [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States) Nevis Labs., Irvington-on-Hudson, NY (United States) Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States) Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States) Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States) Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States) Virginia Polytechnic Inst., and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States) Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1993-11-15

    A fully compensating uranium-scintillator calorimeter was constructed for the ZEUS detector at HERA. Several of the barrel calorimeter modules were subjected to beam tests at Fermilab before shipping them to DESY for installation. The calibrations of the modules used beams of electrons and hadrons, measuring the uniformity of the response, and checking the resolution. The runs also provided opportunity to test a large fraction of the actual ZEUS calorimeter readout system in an integrated beam environment more than one year before HERA turn on. The experiment utilized two computer controlled mechanical structures, one of which was capable of holding up to four modules in order to study shower containment, and a magnetic spectrometer with a high resolution beam tracking system. During two running periods, beams of 6 to 110 GeV containing e, [mu], [pi], and anti p were used. The results show energy resolutions of 35%/[radical]E for hadrons and 19%/[radical]E for electrons, uniformities at the 1% level, energy nonlinearity less than 1%, and equal response for electrons and hadrons. (orig.)

  15. Common barrel and forward CA tracking algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mykhailo, Pugach [Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt (Germany); KINR, Kyiv (Ukraine); Gorbunov, Sergey; Kisel, Ivan [Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    There are complex detector setups which consist of barrel (cylindrical) and forward parts, and such systems require a special approach in the registered charged particles track finding procedure. Currently the tracking procedure might be performed in both parts of such detector independently from each other, but the final goal on this direction is a creation of a combined tracking, which will work in both parts of the detector simultaneously. The basic algorithm is based on Kalman Filter (KF) and Cellular Automata (CA). And the tracking procedure in such a complex system is rather extraordinary as far as it requires 2 different models to describe the state vector of segments of the reconstructed track in the mathematical apparatus of the KF-algorithm. To overcome this specifics a mathematical apparatus of transition matrices must be developed and implemented, so that one can transfer from one track model to another. Afterwards the work of the CA is performed, which reduces to segments sorting, their union into track-candidates and selection of the best candidates by the chi-square criteria after fitting of the track-candidate by the KF. In this report the algorithm, status and perspectives of such combined tracking are described.

  16. Finite Element calculations of heat transfer for Forward SCT ModulesPart I - the Outer Module

    CERN Document Server

    Blocki, J; Perrin, E

    2000-01-01

    A status report on the thermal performance of the baseline SCT forward modules is presented. Possible design changes of the outer module which lead to significant improvements of the thermal characteristics of the module are indicated, in the context of a 2-point cooling scheme.

  17. Early-onset acute kidney injury is a poor prognostic sign for allogeneic SCT recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingai, N; Morito, T; Najima, Y; Kobayashi, T; Doki, N; Kakihana, K; Ohashi, K; Ando, M

    2015-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) following stem-cell transplantation (SCT) contributes to a poor prognosis, yet its impact may vary depending on the timing of AKI onset. A prospective cohort study was performed to understand the significance of the onset timing in 103 allogeneic SCT (allo-SCT) recipients. AKI prior to stem-cell engraftment was defined as early AKI and subsequently occurring AKI as late AKI. Propensity score (PS) for early AKI was calculated using a logistic regression model to reduce confounding effects related to differences in clinical background between the early and late AKI groups. The cumulative incidences of early and late AKI were 22.3% and 54.9%, respectively. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) was 39.1% and 7.0%, and overall survival (OS) was 56.5% and 90.9% in early and late AKI at 100 days after AKI, respectively (PSCT was 41.5% and 19.1% in early and late AKI, respectively (P=0.048). Logistic regression analysis adjusted for the PS showed that early AKI was significantly associated with OS (odds ratio (95% confidence interval); 4.63 (1.15-21.4), P=0.031) but with neither NRM (1.25 (0.28-5.33), P=0.766) nor CKD (1.85 (0.41-8.60), P=0.422). In conclusion, early AKI may portend a poor survival for allo-SCT recipients.

  18. Clinical factors affecting engraftment and transfusion needs in SCT: a single-center retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesveld, J; Pawlowski, J; Chen, R; Hyrien, O; Debolt, J; Becker, M; Phillips, G; Chen, Y

    2013-05-01

    Successful utilization of SCT modalities often requires utilization of both red cell and platelet transfusions. In this retrospective evaluation of clinical factors affecting transplant engraftment and transfusion utilization at a single transplant center in 505 patients from 2005 through 2009, we found that graft type, donor type and the conditioning regimen intensity significantly affected both the neutrophil engraftment time (PSCT patients required an average of 6.2 red cell units, and 7.9 platelet transfusions in the first 100 days with a wide s.d. Among auto-SCT patients, 5% required neither RBC nor platelet transfusions. Some reduced-intensity transplants were also associated with no transfusion need, and in allogeneic transplants, conditioning regimen intensity was positively correlated with platelet transfusion events as assessed by multivariate analysis. Other patient characteristics such as gender, graft type, donor type, underlying disease and use of TBI were all independently associated with transfusion needs in SCT patients. Further studies are required to understand the means to minimize transfusions and potential related complications in SCT patients.

  19. Peculiarities and Variations in the Optical Spectrum of the RV Tauri-type Star R Sct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kipper Tõnu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed some new high resolution optical spectra of the semiregular RV Tauri-type star R Sct. Fundamental parameters were found to be Teff = 4500 K, log g = 0.0 and ξt = 4.0 km s−1. The results of chemical analysis show that R Sct is a metal-poor star with [Fe/H]≈ −0.5. The carbon content with respect to iron is significantly larger than in the Sun, [C/Fe]=0.84, but there is an evident deficiency of heavy elements. We found no tight correlation of the chemical abundances on the condensation temperatures of elements. This means that in R Sct the depletion by condensation into dust does not work, with possible exception of Ca and Sc. The luminosity derived from the Hipparcos parallax corresponds to a tip of the red-giant branch or slightly above it. Thus it is possible that R Sct evolved off the early-AGB when it has not yet experienced the third dredge-up in thermal pulses, or it is still located on AGB. The peculiarities of spectral features (emissions, line-splitting and the complicated time-variable radial velocities were also studied.

  20. ON THE PULSATIONAL-ORBITAL-PERIOD RELATION OF ECLIPSING BINARIES WITH δ-SCT COMPONENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X. B.; Luo, C. Q. [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Fu, J. N. [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2013-11-01

    We have deduced a theoretical relation between the pulsation and orbital-periods of pulsating stars in close binaries based on their Roche lobe filling. It appears to be of a simple linear form, with the slope as a function of the pulsation constant, the mass ratio, and the filling factor for an individual system. Testing the data of 69 known eclipsing binaries containing δ-Sct-type components yields an empirical slope of 0.020 ± 0.006 for the P{sub pul}-P{sub orb} relation. We have further derived the upper limit of the P{sub pul}/P{sub orb} ratio for the δ-Sct stars in eclipsing binaries with a value of 0.09 ± 0.02. This value could serve as a criterion to distinguish whether or not a pulsator in an eclipsing binary pulsates in the p-mode. Applying the deduced P{sub pul}-P{sub orb} relation, we have computed the dominant pulsation constants for 37 δ-Sct stars in eclipsing systems with definite photometric solutions. These ranged between 0.008 and 0.033 days with a mean value of about 0.014 days, indicating that δ-Sct stars in eclipsing binaries mostly pulsate in the fourth or fifth overtones.

  1. Comparison between two possible CMS Barrel Muon Readout Architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguayo, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Molinero, A.; Pablos, J.L.; Willmott, C.; Alberdi, J.; Marin, J.; Navarrete, J.; Romero, L.

    1997-01-01

    A comparison between two possible readout arquitectures for the CMS muon barrel readout electronics is presented, including various aspects like costs, reliability, installation, staging and maintenance. A review of the present baseline architecture is given in the appendix. (Author)

  2. Tri-Service Green Gun Barrel (PP 1074)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rusch, Lawrence F

    2003-01-01

    ...) PP 1074 Tri-Service Green Gun Barrel. The program's goal was to develop an environmentally friendly process for depositing wear and erosion resistant materials onto gun bores replacing the current hazardous aqueous electro-deposition...

  3. Experimental investigation on shore hardness of barrel-finished ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rupinder Singh

    2017-08-02

    Aug 2, 2017 ... Barrel finishing (BF) process is widely used to improve the surface finish and dimensional features of metallic and ... plastic-based waste can be easily recycled. However .... The pattern prepared with solid density has a dense.

  4. SCT: a suite of programs for comparing atomistic models with small-angle scattering data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David W; Perkins, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering techniques characterize proteins in solution and complement high-resolution structural studies. They are of particular utility when large proteins cannot be crystallized or when the structure is altered by solution conditions. Atomistic models of the averaged structure can be generated through constrained modelling, a technique in which known domain or subunit structures are combined with linker models to produce candidate global conformations. By randomizing the configuration adopted by the different elements of the model, thousands of candidate structures are produced. Next, theoretical scattering curves are generated for each model for trial-and-error fits to the experimental data. From these, a small family of best-fit models is identified. In order to facilitate both the computation of theoretical scattering curves from atomistic models and their comparison with experiment, the SCT suite of tools was developed. SCT also includes programs that provide sequence-based estimates of protein volume (either incorporating hydration or not) and add a hydration layer to models for X-ray scattering modelling. The original SCT software, written in Fortran, resulted in the first atomistic scattering structures to be deposited in the Protein Data Bank, and 77 structures for antibodies, complement proteins and anionic oligosaccharides were determined between 1998 and 2014. For the first time, this software is publicly available, alongside an easier-to-use reimplementation of the same algorithms in Python. Both versions of SCT have been released as open-source software under the Apache 2 license and are available for download from https://github.com/dww100/sct.

  5. Multimodal treatment with ALL-like chemotherapy, Auto-SCT and radiotherapy for lymphoblastic lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersvendsen, Hanne; Kolstad, Arne; Blystad, Anne Kirsti; Aurlien, Ellen; Fosså, Alexander; Kvaløy, Stein O; Holte, Harald; Lauritzsen, Grete F

    2014-05-01

    Recommended treatment for lymphoblastic lymphomas, a highly aggressive, relatively rare lymphoma entity predominantly seen in teenagers and young adults, includes acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)-like induction chemotherapy. Whether these patients should be consolidated with maintenance chemotherapy or autologous stem cell transplantation (Auto-SCT) and the use of radiotherapy are matters of debate. We reviewed treatment and outcome for 25 consecutive patients above the age of 15 years with lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-lineage; T-LBL, n = 19; B-lineage; B-LBL, n = 6) seen at a single center during a 12-year period (1999-2011). Patients were given an ALL-like chemotherapy induction regimen, and responding patients were consolidated with Auto-SCT and local radiotherapy when applicable. Median age at diagnosis was 33 years (range 15-65). Seventeen of the T-LBL patients had a mediastinal mass, three patients had central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Chemotherapy with intensified CNS prophylaxis induced an overall response rate of 92% (CR 84%, PR 8%). In total 23/25 (92%) patients underwent Auto-SCT in first remission while 13 of 14 eligible patients with mediastinal involvement received local radiotherapy. Twenty percent of the patients had hepatotoxicity grade 3-4 and 32% thromboembolic events (TE). Two patients (8%) died of treatment-related toxicity. One patient had progressive disease and died of lymphoma. Three patients have relapsed, but two of these (both B-LBL) are currently alive in second CR after Allo-SCT. With a median follow-up of 98 months (range 1-163) the 5- and 8-year PFS and OS are 76% and 84%, respectively. Combined intensive ALL-like induction and early consolidation chemotherapy followed by Auto-SCT and local radiation therapy resulted in high sustained cure rates.

  6. SCT: Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Lévy, Simon; Dupont, Sara M; Fonov, Vladimir S; Stikov, Nikola; Louis Collins, D; Callot, Virginie; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-01-15

    For the past 25 years, the field of neuroimaging has witnessed the development of several software packages for processing multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to study the brain. These software packages are now routinely used by researchers and clinicians, and have contributed to important breakthroughs for the understanding of brain anatomy and function. However, no software package exists to process mpMRI data of the spinal cord. Despite the numerous clinical needs for such advanced mpMRI protocols (multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, cervical spondylotic myelopathy, etc.), researchers have been developing specific tools that, while necessary, do not provide an integrative framework that is compatible with most usages and that is capable of reaching the community at large. This hinders cross-validation and the possibility to perform multi-center studies. In this study we introduce the Spinal Cord Toolbox (SCT), a comprehensive software dedicated to the processing of spinal cord MRI data. SCT builds on previously-validated methods and includes state-of-the-art MRI templates and atlases of the spinal cord, algorithms to segment and register new data to the templates, and motion correction methods for diffusion and functional time series. SCT is tailored towards standardization and automation of the processing pipeline, versatility, modularity, and it follows guidelines of software development and distribution. Preliminary applications of SCT cover a variety of studies, from cross-sectional area measures in large databases of patients, to the precise quantification of mpMRI metrics in specific spinal pathways. We anticipate that SCT will bring together the spinal cord neuroimaging community by establishing standard templates and analysis procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Integration and installation of the CMS pixel barrel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kastli, Hans-Christian

    2008-01-01

    A 66 million pixel detector has been installed in 2008 into the CMS experiment at CERN. The development and construction time took more than 10 years. In this paper the assembly of the barrel detector is described. A simple but effective method to accomplish a survey of the module positions during assembly is discussed. Furthermore the insertion and commissioning of the CMS pixel barrel detector which took place in July 2008 is illustrated.

  8. Sodium Dichromate Barrel Landfill expedited response action proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) prepare an expedited response action (ERA) for the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Landfill. The Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Site was used in 1945 for disposal of crushed barrels. The site location is the sole waste site within the 100-IU-4 Operable Unit. The Waste Information Data System (WIDS 1992) assumes that the crushed barrels contained 1% residual sodium dichromate at burial time and that only buried crushed barrels are at the site. Burial depth is shallow since visual inspection finds numerous barrel debris on the surface. A non-time-critical ERA proposal includes preparation of an engineering evaluation and cost analysis (EE/CA) section. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration from the landfill to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. Since the landfill is the only waste site within the operable unit, the ERA will present a final remediation of the 100-IU-4 operable unit

  9. The significant impact of acute kidney injury on CKD in patients who survived over 10 years after myeloablative allogeneic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoi, T; Ando, M; Munakata, W; Kobayashi, T; Kakihana, K; Ohashi, K; Akiyama, H; Sakamaki, H

    2013-01-01

    There are no well-defined studies of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among long-term survivors after hematopoietic SCT. A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted to characterize CKD in 77 subjects that had undergone myeloablative allogeneic SCT, all of whom had their serum creatinine (Cr) levels followed-up during the 10-year period after SCT. Their mean (range) survival time was 14.4 (10.5-20.2) years. CKD was defined as a persistent decrease in the Cr-based estimated glomerular filtration rate to below 60 mL/min/1.73 m². Acute kidney injury (AKI) was defined as an increase in Cr within the first 100 days after SCT, and its severity was classified into three stages according to the AKIN criteria. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses evaluated the association between AKI and the incidence of CKD. The cumulative incidence of CKD increased over time and reached 34% at 10 years. After adjusting for known risks for post-SCT CKD, each AKIN stage was strongly associated with the incidence of CKD. The incidence of CKD probably increases over time among subjects who are alive at >10 years after SCT. This study places a new emphasis on AKI as an important risk factor for CKD in post-SCT subjects.

  10. The neurocognitive nature of children with ADHD comorbid sluggish cognitive tempo: Might SCT be a disorder of vigilance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baytunca, Muharrem Burak; Inci, Sevim Berrin; Ipci, Melis; Kardas, Burcu; Bolat, Gul Unsel; Ercan, Eyup Sabri

    2018-03-21

    Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) refers to a clinical construct including several symptoms such as sluggishness, absentmindedness, low energy. In the present study, we compared neurocognitive laboratory outcomes of ADHD children with or without SCT. The CNS Vital Signs Battery was utilized to measure neurocognitive measure of the participants. The SCT+ADHD group comprised of 42 subjects, ADHD group was 41 subjects and control group was 24 subjects. The cognitive flexibility score was found to be more severely impaired in ADHD children with SCT in comparison to the ADHD-only. Additionally, greater deficits in the Shifting Attention Test (p = 0.014) and the Continuous Performance Test (reaction time score, p SCT+ADHD group relative to ADHD group. Processing speed, visual/auditory memory, psychomotor speed and reaction time were not found to more impaired in those comorbid with SCT. Impairments in the cognitive flexibility and more specifically shifting attention and continuous performance may be indicative of vigilance and orientation problems rather than executive functions for the SCT construct. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Outcome of allogeneic SCT in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyekunle, Anthony; Zander, Axel R; Binder, Mascha; Ayuk, Francis; Zabelina, Tatjana; Christopeit, Maximilian; Stübig, Thomas; Alchalby, Haefaa; Schafhausen, Philippe; Lellek, Heinrich; Wolschke, Christine; Müller, Ingo; Bacher, Ulrike; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2013-04-01

    The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) led to a dramatic change in the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) with a rapid decline in the number of patients receiving SCT in first chronic phase (CP1). We evaluated 68 consecutive patients in all phases of CML (male/female = 39:29, 27 in CP1), who received SCT from related/unrelated donors (related/unrelated = 23:45) under myeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning (MAC/RIC = 45:23). Forty-eight patients (71 %) received TKIs pre-SCT, 20 patients post-SCT (29 %). Overall survival (OS) of CP1 patients achieved a plateau of 85 % at 10 months. Relapse-free survival (RFS) of CP1 patients was 85 % at 1 and 2 years, and 81 % at 5 years. Multivariate analysis showed adverse OS and RFS for patients transplanted >CP1 (hazard ratio (HR) = 6.61 and 4.62) and those who had grade III-IV aGvHD (HR = 2.45 and 1.82). Patients with advanced CML had estimated OS of 65 and 47 %; and RFS of 41 and 32 % at 1 and 2 years respectively. Therefore, for patients with advanced CML phases, allogeneic SCT provides an acceptable chance of cure. Transplant research should focus on improving conditioning regimens and post-SCT management for this subgroup of CML patients.

  12. Tandem autologous-allo-SCT is feasible in patients with high-risk relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocchiolo, R; Castagna, L; Fürst, S; El-Cheikh, J; Faucher, C; Oudin, C; Granata, A; Bouabdallah, R; Coso, D; Chabannon, C; Balzarotti, M; Santoro, A; Blaise, D

    2013-02-01

    Allo-SCT is used to exploit GVL effect in high-risk relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Here, we retrospectively analyzed 34 high-risk NHL patients who underwent auto-SCT followed closely by reduced-intensity allo-SCT ('tandem auto-allo') from January 2002 to November 2010. The search for an allogeneic donor was started at the beginning of salvage regimen. Median patients' age was 47 (27-68) years; histotypes were: diffuse large B-cell n=5, follicular n=14, transformed follicular n=4, mantle-cell n=5, plasmocytoid lymphoma n=1, anaplastic large T-cell n=2, peripheral T-cell n=3. Donors were HLA-identical siblings (n=29) or 10/10-matched unrelated individuals (n=5). Median interval between auto-SCT and allo-SCT was 77 days (36-197). At a median follow-up of 46 (8-108) months since allo-SCT, 5-year OS is 77% (61-93) and PFS is 68% (51-85). Disease relapse or progression occurred in six patients, 100-day TRM was 0%, 2-year TRM incidence was 6%. In conclusion, tandem transplantation is feasible in high-risk NHL patients having a HLA-identical donor. This approach could represent a suitable therapeutic option for those patients with high-risk NHL potentially benefitting from further therapy after auto-SCT. Donor searches should be started promptly whenever such an approach is chosen.

  13. Rituximab administration within 6 months of T cell-depleted allogeneic SCT is associated with prolonged life-threatening cytopenias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIver, Zachariah; Stephens, Nicole; Grim, Andrew; Barrett, A John

    2010-11-01

    The monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody Rituximab (RTX) is increasingly used in allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) to treat lymphoproliferative disorders and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). RTX administration can be complicated by delayed and prolonged neutropenia, but the mechanism is unclear. We report the occurrence of profound cytopenias following RTX given in the conditioning regimen or early after T cell-deplete SCT to treat B cell lymphoproliferative disorders or chronic GVHD (cGVHD). Between 2006 and 2009, 102 patients (median age: 43 years, range: 13-68 years), received a myeloablative matched-sibling T cell-deplete SCT for lymphoid or myeloid hematologic disorders. Neutropenia occurring within 4 weeks of treatment developed in 16 of 17 patients given RTX within the first 190 days after SCT. Fourteen patients developed severe neutropenia (count SCT compared to patients with cGVHD not treated with early RTX (P SCT experienced only moderate neutropenia 3 to 5 months after treatment lasting 10 to 20 days while maintaining absolute neutrophil count (ANC) >1.0 × 10⁹/L. Although RTX rapidly controlled cGVHD, we conclude that its administration early after T cell-deplete SCT is associated with prolonged profound and life-threatening cytopenias, and should be avoided. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. A phase II study of V-BEAM as conditioning regimen before second auto-SCT for multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T-F; Fiala, M A; Cashen, A F; Uy, G L; Abboud, C N; Fletcher, T; Wu, N; Westervelt, P; DiPersio, J F; Stockerl-Goldstein, K E; Vij, R

    2014-11-01

    High-dose melphalan has been the standard conditioning regimen for auto-SCT in multiple myeloma (MM) for decades. A more effective conditioning regimen may induce deeper responses and longer remission duration. It is especially needed in the setting of second auto-SCT, which rarely achieves comparable results with the first auto-SCT using the same conditioning regimen. Here we conducted a phase II study to investigate the efficacy and safety of a conditioning regimen V-BEAM (bortezomib-BEAM) before second auto-SCT for multiple myeloma. Ten patients were enrolled from September 2012 to May 2013. The CR rate at day +100 after auto-SCT was 75%; all except for one patient remained in remission after a median follow-up of 6 months. Three patients developed Clostridium difficile infection. Two patients died within the first 30 days of auto-SCT from neutropenic colitis and overwhelming sepsis, respectively. Due to the high rate of morbidity and mortality, the study was terminated after 10 patients. In summary, although the conditioning regimen V-BEAM before second auto-SCT for MM provided promising responses, it was associated with unexpected treatment-related toxicity and should not be investigated further without modifications.

  15. Differences in mothers' and fathers' health-related quality of life after pediatric SCT: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, M; Atenafu, E; Doyle, J; Berlin-Romalis, D; Hancock, K

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine longitudinally health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and related factors in mothers and fathers of children who undergo SCT, before, and 1 and 2 years after SCT. A total of 84 parents (49 mothers/35 fathers) of patients diagnosed mainly with leukemia completed a HRQOL measure before SCT, 46 at 1 year (26 mothers/20 fathers) and 50 parents (31 mothers/19 fathers) at 2 years post SCT. Physical and psychosocial HRQOL summary scores are reported. Parents' age and gender, child's diagnosis, radiation history, age, behavior and physical health were examined. Linear mixed models for repeated measures with a covariate structure were used for analysis. Physical HRQOL did not differ between mothers and fathers or over time. Maternal and paternal psychosocial HRQOL scores improved by 2 years post SCT. Child's behavior problems and poor health, and maternal age (younger) predicted poor maternal psychosocial HRQOL 2 years post SCT. Child's behavior problems, diagnosis and treatment severity predicted poor paternal psychosocial HRQOL. These findings identify similar (child's poor behavior) and differential risk factors (parental young age, disease and treatment severity, and child's poor health status) for poor HRQOL for mothers and fathers. These findings can guide comprehensive family-care interventions before, during and after pediatric SCT.

  16. Long-term outcome of patients with multiple [corrected] myeloma-related advanced renal failure following auto-SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavey, S V; Gertz, M A; Dispenzieri, A; Kumar, S; Buadi, F; Lacy, M; Hayman, S R; Kapoor, P; Dingli, D; McCurdy, A; Hogan, W J; Gastineau, D A; Leung, N

    2013-11-01

    Renal failure commonly complicates multiple myeloma (MM) and is associated with reduced survival. It is not clear whether auto-SCT results in improved renal function or attainment of independence from dialysis in patients with advanced renal impairment due to MM. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all patients who underwent auto-SCT for MM complicated by advanced renal failure at our institution over a 10-year period (2000-2010). We aimed to assess the association between auto-SCT and renal outcome in patients with serum creatinine (SCr) over 3 mg/dL, attributable to MM, including those who were dialysis dependent. Thirty patients (2.8% of all auto-SCT patients) met inclusion criteria. Fourteen of 15 patients who were dialysis dependent before auto-SCT remained dialysis dependent in the long term despite hematological response (HR). Of the remaining 15 patients with SCr >3 mg/dL, an improvement in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from 15 to 19.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2) was noted post auto-SCT (P=0.035); however, neither HR post auto-SCT or pre-existing renal function were independently associated with renal outcome. Auto-SCT was not associated with independence from dialysis in patients with renal failure due to MM at our institution. Although auto-SCT was associated with an improvement in GFR in patients with SCr >3 mg/dL, this improvement was not related to HR.

  17. Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC) members, United Kingdom, visiting the ATLAS semiconductor tracker (SCT) module tests.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Mr Peter Warry, PPARC Chairman, Victrex Plc, United Kingdom visiting the ATLAS SCT module tests with Dr Joleen Pater, SCT (Manchester). Photo 02: PPARC Council Members, United Kingdom, visiting the ATLAS SCT module tests. L.t to r.: Mrs Judith Scott, Chief Executive, British Computer Society, Prof. George Efstathiou, Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Mr Peter Warry, PPARC Chairman, Victrex Plc, Prof. Martin Ward, Director X-Ray Astronomy, of Leicester, Prof. James Stirling, Director, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Durham and Prof. Brian Foster, University of Bristol.

  18. Equilibrium Arrival Times to Queues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Jesper; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    We consider a non-cooperative queueing environment where a finite number of customers independently choose when to arrive at a queueing system that opens at a given point in time and serves customers on a last-come first-serve preemptive-resume (LCFS-PR) basis. Each customer has a service time...... requirement which is identically and independently distributed according to some general probability distribution, and they want to complete service as early as possible while minimizing the time spent in the queue. In this setting, we establish the existence of an arrival time strategy that constitutes...... a symmetric (mixed) Nash equilibrium, and show that there is at most one symmetric equilibrium. We provide a numerical method to compute this equilibrium and demonstrate by a numerical example that the social effciency can be lower than the effciency induced by a similar queueing system that serves customers...

  19. Bronchiolitis obliterans after allo-SCT: clinical criteria and treatment options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlving, H H; Buchvald, F; Heilmann, C J

    2012-01-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) following allogeneic haematopoietic SCT (HSCT) is a serious complication affecting 1.7-26% of the patients, with a reported mortality rate of 21-100%. It is considered a manifestation of chronic graft-versus-host disease, but our knowledge of aetiology and pathogenes...... treatment options for BO and presents the treatment results with HDPM in a paediatric national HSCT-cohort.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 29 August 2011; doi:10.1038/bmt.2011.161....

  20. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing prior to myeloablative allo-SCT: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, C R; Scott, J M; Lane, A; Schwitzer, E; West, M J; Thomas, S; Herndon, J E; Michalski, M G; Horwitz, M E; Hennig, T; Jones, L W

    2014-10-01

    The feasibility of symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) prior to allo-SCT was assessed in addition to the prognostic value of CPET-derived measures. CPET was performed prospectively on 21 patients with hematologic malignancies, with assessments of peak (for example, peak oxygen consumption, VO2peak) and submaximal (for example, ventilatory threshold (VT)) measures of cardiopulmonary function. No serious adverse events were observed during CPET procedures, with 95% of patients achieving criteria for a peak test. Mean VO2peak was 24.7±6.4 mL kg(-1 )min(-1) (range: 10.9-35.5), equivalent to 29%±17% below that of age-matched healthy controls. All patients proceeded with the conditioning regimen followed by allo-SCT. Median follow-up was 25 months. During this period, 11 (52.4%) patients died (n=6, relapsed disease; n=5, non-relapse mortality (NRM)); 9 patients (43%) developed pulmonary toxicity. In univariate analyses, both peak and submaximal markers of cardiopulmonary function were predictors of OS, pulmonary toxicity and NRM. For OS, the HR for VO2peak and VT were 0.89 (95% CI, 0.8-0.99, P=0.04) and 0.84 (95% CI, 0.71-0.98, P=0.03), respectively. In conclusion, CPET is safe and feasible prior to allo-SCT. Patients have marked impairments in cardiopulmonary function prior to allo-SCT. CPET-derived metrics may complement conventional measures to improve risk stratification.

  1. Aerobic exercise capacity at long-term follow-up after paediatric allogeneic haematopoietic SCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, S; Uhlving, H H; Buchvald, F

    2014-01-01

    Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), a measure of aerobic exercise capacity, predicts mortality and morbidity in healthy and diseased individuals. Our aim was to determine VO2peak years after paediatric allogeneic haematopoietic SCT (HSCT) and to identify associations with baseline patient and donor...... type or GvHD were found. Although causes for reduced VO2peak may be multiple, our findings stress the need to focus on physical activity post HSCT to prevent lifestyle diseases and improve quality of life....

  2. Spray cryotherapy (SCT): institutional evolution of techniques and clinical practice from early experience in the treatment of malignant airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Robert; Turner, J Francis; Parrish, Scott

    2015-12-01

    Spray cryotherapy (SCT) was initially developed for gastroenterology (GI) endoscopic use in the esophagus. In some institutions where a device has been utilized by GI, transition to use in the airways by pulmonologists and thoracic surgeons occurred. Significant differences exist, however, in the techniques for safely using SCT in the airways. We describe the early experience at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center from 2011 to 2013 using SCT in patients with malignant airway disease and the evolution of our current techniques and clinical practice patterns for SCT use in patients. In November 2013 enrollment began in a multi-institutional prospective SCT registry in which we are still enrolling and will be reported on separately. Twenty-seven patients that underwent 80 procedures (2.96 procedures/patient). The average age was 63 years with a range of 20 to 87 years old. The average Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status was 1.26. All malignancies were advanced stage disease. All procedures were performed in the central airways. Other modalities were used in combination with SCT in 31 (39%) of procedures. Additionally 45 of the 80 (56%) procedures were performed in proximity to a silicone, hybrid, or metal stent. Three complications occurred out of the 80 procedures. All three were transient hypoxia that limited continued SCT treatments. These patients were all discharged from the bronchoscopy recovery room to their pre-surgical state. SCT can be safely used for treatment of malignant airway tumor (MAT) in the airways. Understanding passive venting of the nitrogen gas produced as the liquid nitrogen changes to gas is important for safe use of the device. Complications can be minimized by adopting strict protocols to maximize passive venting and to allow for adequate oxygenation in between sprays.

  3. Patient socioeconomic status as a prognostic factor for allo-SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silla, L; Fischer, G B; Paz, A; Daudt, L E; Mitto, I; Katz, B; da Graça Grossini, M; Bittencourt, H N; Jochims, A; Fogliatto, L; Bittar, C M; Friedrisch, J R; Bittencourt, R I

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of socioeconomic status (SeS) on the outcome of allo-SCT at a Brazilian SCT center. In total, 201 patients receiving HLA-identical related allo-SCTs were studied. The median age was 30 years. Overall, 163 patients had malignancies (CML 68, ALL/AML 63, myelodysplastic syndrome 12 and others 20). SeS was defined according to the Brazilian Association of Market Research Agencies classification, where people are clustered in groups A-E (richest to poorest). In total, 146 patients (72%) were classified as richest (A+B+C) and 55 (28%) as poorest (D+E). The D+E SeS group was associated with a higher incidence of chronic GVHD and acute GVHD (hazard ratio (HR)=2.61; P=0.001 and HR=2.62; P=0.001, respectively), better platelet and neutrophil engraftment (HR=1.94; P=factor in patients undergoing allo-SCT in Brazil, influencing engraftment, TRM and overall survival.

  4. Spectral evolution of Nova V400 Per (1974) and Nova V373 Sct (1975)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosino, L.

    1978-01-01

    Photographic and spectroscopic observations of the two galactic novae, V400 Per and V373 Sct, which appeared in 1974 and 1975, have been carried out at Asiago. The light curves of the two novae were characterized by the presence of brightness oscillations during the early decline. The spectral evolution was quite normal: the spectra showed at first, over a relatively strong continuum, wide emission bands of moderate excitation, accompanied by blueshifted absorptions, with radial velocities of - 1760 kms -1 (Nova Per) and - 1260 kms -1 (Nova Sct). Later, after the novae entered the nebular stage, the continuum weakened, the absorption disappeared and the novae displayed the usual emission spectrum, with permitted and forbidden lines of high excitation ([O III], N III, He I, He II). Forbidden lines of Fe VI and Fe VII - and in Nova Sct, also Fe X and A X - were present for a time, but they soon disappeared, so that at the end the spectrum was dominated by the [O III] nebular lines, even stronger than Hα. (Auth.)

  5. A multigene array for measurable residual disease detection in AML patients undergoing SCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, M; McGowan, K S; Lu, K; Jain, N; Candia, J; Hensel, N F; Tang, J; Calvo, K R; Battiwalla, M; Barrett, A J; Hourigan, C S

    2015-01-01

    AML is a diagnosis encompassing a diverse group of myeloid malignancies. Heterogeneous genetic etiology, together with the potential for oligoclonality within the individual patient, have made the identification of a single high-sensitivity marker of disease burden challenging. We developed a multiple gene measurable residual disease (MG-MRD) RQ–PCR array for the high-sensitivity detection of AML, retrospectively tested on 74 patients who underwent allo-SCT at the NHLBI in the period 1994–2012. MG-MRD testing on peripheral blood samples prior to transplantation demonstrated excellent concordance with traditional BM-based evaluation and improved risk stratification for post-transplant relapse and OS outcomes. Pre-SCT assessment by MG-MRD predicted all clinical relapses occurring in the first 100 days after allo-SCT compared with 57% sensitivity using WT1 RQ–PCR alone. Nine patients who were negative for WT1 prior to transplantation were correctly reclassified into a high-risk MG-MRD-positive group, associated with 100% post-transplant mortality. This study provides proof of principle that a multiple gene approach may be superior to the use of WT1 expression alone for AML residual disease detection. PMID:25665046

  6. Solid and Cystic Tumor (SCT of the Pancreas in an Adult Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ohiwa

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid and cystic tumor (SCT of the pancreas predominantly Occurs in women, and the occurrence in men is extremely rare. We experienced a male case of SCT. A 38-year-old man was admitted with the complaint of upper abdominal pain. CT scan showed the presence of a mass in the head of the pancreas. The mass was composed of high density areas and low density areas. Ultrasonograms revealed the mass being composed of high echoic areas and low echoic areas. The mass .was hypovascular on angiography. SCT was suspected and pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. The cut surface of the tumor showed mainly cystic degenerative areas containing dark red hemorrhagic materials. Microscopically, there were solid areas in the periphery and pseudopapillary areas in the center. No metastasis was found in the removed lymph nodes. The tumor cells were not stained by Grimelius' silver stain. The tumor cells were positive for alpha-l-antitrypsin (AAT and neuron-specific enolase (NSE. Pancreatic hormones such as insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin were all negative. Electron micrograph showed that tumor cells were rich in mitochondria. Zymogen granules and neurosecretory granules were not detected. Estrogen receptor (ER and progesterone receptor (PR were both negative.

  7. Sporadic late-onset nemaline myopathy with MGUS: long-term follow-up after melphalan and SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voermans, Nicol C; Benveniste, Olivier; Minnema, Monique C; Lokhorst, Henk; Lammens, Martin; Meersseman, Wouter; Delforge, Michel; Kuntzer, Thierry; Novy, Jan; Pabst, Thomas; Bouhour, Françoise; Romero, Norma; Leblond, Veronique; Bergh, Peter van den; Vekemans, Marie-Christiane; van Engelen, Baziel G; Eymard, Bruno

    2014-12-02

    Sporadic late-onset nemaline myopathy (SLONM) is a rare, late-onset myopathy that progresses subacutely. If associated with a monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS), the outcome is unfavorable: the majority of these patients die within 1 to 5 years of respiratory failure. This study aims to qualitatively assess the long-term treatment effect of high-dose melphalan (HDM) followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) in a series of 8 patients with SLONM-MGUS. We performed a retrospective case series study (n = 8) on the long-term (1-8 years) treatment effect of HDM followed by autologous SCT (HDM-SCT) on survival, muscle strength, and functional capacities. Seven patients showed a lasting moderate-good clinical response, 2 of them after the second HDM-SCT. All of them had a complete, a very good partial, or a partial hematologic response. One patient showed no clinical or hematologic response and died. This case series shows the positive effect of HDM-SCT in this rare disorder. Factors that may portend an unfavorable outcome are a long disease course before the hematologic treatment and a poor hematologic response. Age at onset, level and type of M protein (κ vs λ), and severity of muscle weakness were not associated with a specific outcome. This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with SLONM-MGUS, HDM-SCT increases the probability of survival and functional improvement. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Long-term renal toxicity in children following fractionated total-body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstein, Johanna; Meyer, Andreas; Fruehauf, Joerg; Karstens, Johann H.; Bremer, Michael; Sykora, Karl-Walter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: to retrospectively assess the incidence and time course of renal dysfunction in children (≤ 16 years) following total-body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Patients and methods: between 1986 and 2003, 92 children (median age, 11 years; range, 3-16 years) underwent TBI before allogeneic SCT. 43 of them had a minimum follow-up of 12 months (median, 51 months; range, 12-186 months) and were included into this analysis. Conditioning regimen included chemotherapy and fractionated TBI with 12 Gy (n = 26) or 11.1 Gy (n = 17). In one patient, renal dose was limited to 10 Gy by customized renal shielding due to known nephropathy prior to SCt. Renal dysfunction was defined as an increase of serum creatinine > 1.25 times the upper limit of age-dependent normal. Results: twelve children (28%) experienced an episode of renal dysfunction after a median of 2 months (range, 1-10 months) following SCT. In all but one patient renal dysfunction was transient and resolved after a median of 8 months (range, 3-16 months). One single patient developed persistent renal dysfunction with onset at 10 months after SCT. None of these patients required dialysis. The actuarial 3-year freedom from persistent renal toxicity for children surviving > 12 months after SCt was 97.3%. Conclusion: the incidence of persistent renal dysfunction after fractionated TBI with total doses ≤ 12 Gy was very low in this analysis. (orig.)

  9. First two barrel ECAL supermodules inserted in CMS HCAL

    CERN Multimedia

    K.Bell

    2006-01-01

    The first two barrel "supermodules" for the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) have been inserted into the barrel hadron calorimeter (HCAL) in the experimental hall (called SX5) in Cessy in preparation for the forthcoming magnet test and cosmic challenge (MTCC). Each of the two supermodules contains 1700 lead tungstate crystals in glass-fibre alveolar support structures, with associated avalanche photodiodes (APDs, for scintillation light detection), electronics and cooling system. The barrel ECAL will consist of 36 supermodules, many of which have already been produced (see CERN Bulletin 17-18, 2006). Team from CMS ECAL, CMS Integration and CEA-DAPNIA were involved in the insertion, with the production/integration of the supermodules themselves involving many technicians, engineers and physicists from many institutes. From left to right: Olivier Teller, Maf Alidra and Lucien Veillet.

  10. Correcting the Chromatic Aberration in Barrel Distortion of Endoscopic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Harry Ng

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern endoscopes offer physicians a wide-angle field of view (FOV for minimally invasive therapies. However, the high level of barrel distortion may prevent accurate perception of image. Fortunately, this kind of distortion may be corrected by digital image processing. In this paper we investigate the chromatic aberrations in the barrel distortion of endoscopic images. In the past, chromatic aberration in endoscopes is corrected by achromatic lenses or active lens control. In contrast, we take a computational approach by modifying the concept of image warping and the existing barrel distortion correction algorithm to tackle the chromatic aberration problem. In addition, an error function for the determination of the level of centroid coincidence is proposed. Simulation and experimental results confirm the effectiveness of our method.

  11. Mechanical Commissioning of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Foussat, A; Dudarev, A; Bajas, H; Védrine, P; Berriaud, C; Sun, Z; Sorbi, M

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Its features include the 4 T Barrel Toroid magnet, the largest superconducting magnet (25 m long, 20 m diameter) that provides the magnetic field for the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The coils integrated at CERN, were tested individually at maximum current of 22 kA in 2005. Following the mechanical assembly of the Barrel Toroid in the ATLAS underground cavern, the test of the full Barrel Toroid was performed in October 2006. Further tests are foreseen at the end 2007 when the system will include the two End Cap Toroids (ECT). The paper gives an overview of the good mechanical test results achieved in comparison with model predictions and the experience gained in the mechanical behavior of the ATLAS Toroidal coils is discussed.

  12. Effect analysis of core barrel openings under CEFR normal condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yabo; Yang Hongyi

    2008-01-01

    Openings on the bottom of core barrel are important part of the decay heat removal system of China Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR), which are designed to discharge the decay heat from reactor under accident condition. This paper analyses the effect of the openings design on the normal operation condition using the famouse CFD code CFX. The result indicates that the decay heat can be discharged safely and at the same time the effect of core barrel openings on the normal operation condition is acceptable. (authors)

  13. LHC-rate beam test of CMS pixel barrel modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdmann, W.; Hoermann, Ch.; Kotlinski, D.; Horisberger, R.; Kaestli, H. Chr.; Gabathuler, K.; Bertl, W.; Meier, B.; Langenegger, U.; Trueeb, P.; Rohe, T.

    2007-01-01

    Modules for the CMS pixel barrel detector have been operated in a high rate pion beam at PSI in order to verify under LHC-like conditions the final module design for the production. The test beam provided charged particle rates up to 10 8 cm -2 s -1 over the full module area. Bunch structure and randomized high trigger rates simulated realistic operation. A four layer telescope made of single pixel readout chip assemblies provided tracking needed for the determination of the modules hit reconstruction efficiency. The performance of the modules has been shown to be adequate for the CMS pixel barrel

  14. Expert AE signal arrival detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chlada, Milan; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, 3/4 (2011), s. 191-205 ISSN 1741-8410. [NDT in PROGRESS /4./. Praha, 05.11.2007-07.11.2007] R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/274; GA ČR GA101/07/1518 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission * signal arrival detection Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://www.inderscience.com/search/index.php?mainAction=search& action =record&rec_id=43215&prevQuery=&ps=10&m=or

  15. Outcome of patients with HTLV-1-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma after SCT: a retrospective study by the EBMT LWP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarbachi, A; Cwynarski, K; Boumendil, A; Finel, H; Fields, P; Raj, K; Nagler, A; Mohty, M; Sureda, A; Dreger, P; Hermine, O

    2014-10-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) carries a dismal prognosis. Experience with allo-SCT for ATL appears encouraging but is limited to Japanese series. This retrospective analysis of the EBMT registry revealed 21 HTLV-I seropositive ATL including 7 acute and 12 lymphoma subtypes. Four patients received auto-SCT and rapidly died from ATL. Out of 17 allo-SCT (4 myeloablative, 13 reduced intensity), 6 are still alive (4 were in CR1 at SCT). Eleven patients died within 2 years, eight from relapse/progression and three from transplant toxicity. Six of seven informative patients who lived >12 months had chronic GVHD. Overall these results indicate that allo-SCT but not auto-SCT may salvage a subset of ATL patients, supporting the existence of graft vs ATL effect also in non-Japanese patients.

  16. End of the EM Barrel Presampler Construction and Insertion

    CERN Multimedia

    Hostachy, J.Y.

    The liquid argon barrel presampler is a thin detector placed in front of the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter, made up of two half barrels also, but with 32 sectors per half barrel instead of 16. Each of these 64 sectors is 3.1 m long, 28 cm large and 2.9 cm thick. Three countries took part in its construction: France (LPSC-Grenoble), Sweden (KTH-Stockholm) and Morocco (Hassan II Ain Chock-Casablanca and Mohamed V-Rabat universities, and CNESTEN-Rabat). The design of the presampler started 11 years ago and the series production began at the end of 2000. Cabling, mechanical and electronic tests of the anodes were achieved in Morocco. Forty-one sectors were assembled and validated at the LPSC-Grenoble and 25 at the KTH-Stockholm. In November 2002, the first half was inserted on the inner face of the first EM calorimeter wheel. The insertion of the other 32 sectors in the second EM calorimeter wheel was achieved in July 2003 (see pictures). The production of two additional sectors will allow us to study the p...

  17. barrel temperature emperature emperature effects on the ffects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Keywords: barrel temperature,plastic products, injection moulding machine , tensile strength, flexual strength. 1. INTRODUCTION. INTRODUCTION. INTRODUCTION. The utilization of process control and process monitoring are rarely fully implemented for the production of injection moulded products. This may be due to a ...

  18. LOCALIZATION OF NMDA AND AMPA RECEPTORS IN RAT BARREL FIELD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JAARSMA, D; SEBENS, JB; KORF, J

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to asses the distribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-S-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in the barrel field of rat primary somatosensory (SI) cortex using light-microscopic in vitro autoradiography. NMDA receptors were labeled

  19. Results of 3D photogrammetry on the CMS barrel yoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudard, R.; Humbertclaude, C.; Nummiaro, K.

    1999-01-01

    The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) detector of the new LHC will be built till 2005 at CERN in Geneva. The Barrel Yoke survey has been decided to be done mostly by photogrammetry. After this first measurement, it has been proved that a practical simulation and a study of adapted tools and procedures were helpful for measurement on such a large object. Using only conventional surveying methods would have been impossible with such constraints. The most important points were the high required accuracy compared to the size of the object, the connection of the two planes, the time intervention, the restricted factory environment and the impossibility for having any outside network. The photogrammetric method was considered to be the best way to survey the Barrel Yoke ring. Since the required precision has been reached at all levels with the first full Barrel measurements, the procedure is validated for the four remaining Barrels in the factory and afterwards again at CERN. This project was challenging due to the size of the object, the required accuracy and the lack of practical references in the field of digital industrial photogrammetry. This method is a new step for using the three dimensional photogrammetric measurements on large objects. (authors)

  20. ATLAS barrel hadron tile calorimeter: spacers plates mass production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artikov, A.M.; Budagov, Yu.A.; Khubua, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this article we expose the main problems of the mass production of the so-called 'spacer plates' for the ATLAS Barrel Hadron Tile Calorimeter. We describe all practical solutions of these problems. Particularly we present the measurement procedures and calculation schemes we used for the spacers dimensions determination. The results of the calculations are presented

  1. Experiences developing socially acceptable interactions for a robotic trash barrel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Stephen; Mok, Brian Ka Jun; Sirkin, David

    2015-01-01

    strategies that seemed to evoke clear engagement and responses, both positive and negative. Observations and interviews show that a) people most welcome the robot's presence when they need its services and it actively advertises its intent through movement; b) people create mental models of the trash barrel...

  2. New results in meson spectroscopy from the crystal barrel experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, C.A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Recent observations by the Crystal Barrel experiment of two scalar resonances, f{sub o}(1365) and a{sub o}(1450) have allowed the authors to clarify the members of the scalar nonet. In addition, a third scalar, f{sub o}(1500), appears to be supernumerary, and is a candidate for the scalar glueball expected near 1500 MeV.

  3. Monitoring of the ageing of the DELPHI Barrel RICH MWPCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apeldoorn, G.; Buys, A.; Dracos, M.; Toet, D.Z.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a method to monitor ageing effects in the multiwire proportional chambers (MWPCs) of the barrel ring imaging Cherenkov (BRICH) detector of DELPHI. It is based on a measurement of plateau-curve characteristics and the shift of these as a function of the total collected charge. Results indicate that, as yet, no ageing effects are present. (orig.)

  4. Study on the correlation between SCT features and pathology, MVD, expressions of VEGF in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xuejun; Gao Jianbo; Yang Xuehua; Zhou Zhigang; Guo Hua; Yue Songwei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the correlation between spiral CT (SCT) features and pathology, MVD, and expressions of VEGF in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: Thirty-four patients with RCC diagnosed by pathology underwent SCT examinations. MVD and expressions of VEGF were examined immunohistochemically using SABC techniques. Results: (1) The detection and characterization as well as accuracy of staging in 34 RCC on two-phase enhanced SCT scans were 100%, 100%, and 94%, respectively. (2) Tumors with low density ring on SCT scans mostly had pseudocapsules at pathological examination. The nuclear grade was higher in groups of tumor without low density ring, with central necrosis, and the diameter larger than 3.0 cm than in those of tumor with low density ring, without central necrosis, and the diameter less than 3.0 cm (P<0.01, P<0.01, P<0.01, respectively). (3) In 34 cases of RCC, the mean MVD was 89.5 ± 56.0. The positive expression of VEGF was 70.6% (24/34). (4) The MVD and positive expressions of VEGF in groups of tumor without a low density ring, with central necrosis on SCT scans were higher than in those tumor with a low density ring, without central necrosis (P<0.05 respectively in each of the groups). On early enhanced scans, MVD was closely correlated with tumor enhancement (P<0.05). MVD was higher in tumors with intravenous tumor emboli than in tumors without emboli (P<0.01). Conclusion: (1) Two-phase enhanced SCT scan was a reliable technique in the detection, characterization and staging of RCC. (2) Some SCT features were closely correlated with MVD and expressions of VEGF in RCC, which could be a noninvasive method in predicting aggressiveness and metastasis. (authors)

  5. The role of HLA antibodies in allogeneic SCT: is the 'type-and-screen' strategy necessary not only for blood type but also for HLA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, S; Taniguchi, K; Ogawa, H; Saji, H

    2012-12-01

    The role of HLA antibodies in SCT has drawn increasing attention because of the significantly increased number of patients who receive HLA-mismatched SCT, including cord blood transplantation, haploidentical SCT and unrelated SCT. Technical advancements in the methods of HLA Ab testing have realized rapid, accurate and objective identification, as well as quantification of specific HLA antibodies. Recent clinical studies have suggested that the presence of donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSA) in patients is associated with graft failure in HLA-mismatched SCT when the above-listed stem cell sources are used and results in different impacts. Of note, most of the 'HLA-matched' unrelated SCT actually involve HLA mismatches in HLA-DP and the presence of antibodies against this locus has been reported to be associated with graft failure. Thus, HLA Ab should be examined as a work-up for all patients who undergo SCT from 'alternative donors.' The simplest route for preventing HLA Ab-mediated graft failure in Ab-positive patients is to avoid donors who possess the target Ag of HLA antibodies. If SCT from such donors must be performed, treatment for DSA before SCT may improve the chances of successful donor engraftment.

  6. Long-term event-free and overall survival after risk-adapted melphalan and SCT for systemic light chain amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, H; Smith, M; Landry, C; Chou, J F; Devlin, S M; Hassoun, H; Bello, C; Giralt, S; Comenzo, R L

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation (SCT), an effective therapy for amyloid light chain (AL) amyloidosis patients, is associated with low treatment-related mortality (TRM) with appropriate patient selection and risk-adapted dosing of melphalan (RA-SCT). Consolidation after SCT increases hematologic complete response (CR) rates and may improve overall survival (OS) for patients with SCT with or without consolidation. Melphalan was administered at 100 (14%), 140 (52%) and 200 (34%) mg/m 2 . The TRM rate at 100 days was 5%. RA-SCT resulted in CR in 24% (3 months) and 48% (12 months) of patients. The CR rate was particularly high (62%) in patients offered bortezomib consolidation. With a median follow-up among survivors of 7.7 years, median event-free survival (EFS) with RA-SCT was 4.04 years (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.41-5.01 years); median OS was 10.4 years (95% CI: 7.3-not achieved). Patients with CR at 12 months after SCT had significantly longer EFS (P=0.01) and OS (P=0.04). In a multivariate analysis, melphalan dose had no impact on EFS (P=0.26) or OS (P=0.11). For selected patients, RA-SCT was safe and was associated with extended long-term survival. With the availability of novel agents for consolidation, RA-SCT remains a very effective and important backbone treatment for AL amyloidosis.

  7. Comparison of the effects of salmon calcitonin (sCT) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in a number of in vivo and in vitro tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, S.P.; Brase, D.; Cooper, C.; Dewey, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    sCT and CGRP have been shown previously to have multiple activities in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent work has shown that CGRP (15 μg) intraventricularly (IVT) produces a naloxone reversible 37% inhibition in the p-phenylquinone test (PPQ) accompanied by severe diarrhea. The ED50 of sCT in the PPQ test is 362 ng and this effect is not reversed totally by naloxone. The onset of CGRP is more rapid than that of sCT. sCT and CGRP (10 -6 M) both produce naloxone reversible inhibition of the electrically stimulated guinea pig ileum (GPI) (25% and 50% respectively). Both sCT and CGRP (10 -6 M) produce contracture (15% and 40% respectively) of the non-stimulated GPI that is not blocked by atropine. Both sCT and CGRP block the naloxone-induced contracture of the morphine (MS04) dependent ilea (29% and 68% respectively). Both sCT and CGRP produce biphasic shifts in the MS04 acetylcholine dose-effect curves in the stimulated and nonstimulated GPI, respectively. Neither sCT nor CGRP (10 -9 to 10 -4 M) displaces 3 H-naloxone binding to mouse brain membranes. Both sCT and CGRP may produce their effects by modulation of CA +2 fluxes in the CNS and GPI

  8. Fluoropyrimidine-HAI (hepatic arterial infusion) versus systemic chemotherapy (SCT) for unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Pasquali, Sandro; Nitti, Donato

    2009-07-08

    Although locoregional treatments such as hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) claim the advantage of delivering higher doses of anticancer agents directly into the metastatic organ as compared to systemic chemotherapy (SCT), the benefit in terms of overall survival (OS) is unclear. We quantitatively summarized the results of randomised controlled trials (RCT) comparing HAI to SCT for the treatment of unresectable liver metastatic disease from colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this work is to quantitatively summarize the results of RCT comparing HAI to SCT for the treatment of unresectable hepatic metastases from CRC. A systematic review of reports published until September 2008 on the findings of RCT that compared HAI to SCT for the treatment of unresectable CRC liver metastases was performed by searching the MEDLINE, Embase, Cancerlit, Cochrane and GoogleScholar electronic databases as well as other databanks collecting information on clinical trials. Inclusion criteria were patients with unresectable CRC liver metastases enrolled in RCT comparing HAI to SCT. The outcome measures were tumor response rate and overall survival. Two authors independently carried out study selection and assessment of methodological quality. A third author performed a concordance analysis in order to unravel potential systematic biases. Ten RCT were identified that met the eligibility criteria. HAI regimens were based on floxuridine (FUDR), 5-fluorouracil or either one of these two fluoropyrimidines in eight and one RCT, respectively. SCT consisted of FUDR or 5-fluorouracil in three and seven RCT, respectively. By pooling the summary data, tumor response rate resulted 42.9% and 18.4% for HAI and SCT, respectively (RR = 2.26; 95% CI, 1.80 to 2.84; P < 0.0001). Mean weighted median OS times were 15.9 and 12.4 months for HAI and SCT, respectively: the meta-risk of death was not statistically different between the two treatment groups (HR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.07; P = 0.24). Currently

  9. In search of the optimal platform for Post-Allogeneic SCT immunotherapy in relapsed multiple myeloma: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostvogels, R; Uniken Venema, S M; de Witte, M; Raymakers, R; Kuball, J; Kröger, N; Minnema, M C

    2017-09-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has the potential to induce sustained remissions in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Currently, allo-SCT is primarily performed in high-risk MM patients, most often in the setting of early relapse after first-line therapy with autologous SCT. However, the implementation of allo-SCT for MM is jeopardized by high treatment-related mortality (TRM) rates as well as high relapse rates. In this systematic review, we aimed to identify a safe allo-SCT strategy that has optimal 1-year results regarding mortality, relapse and severe GvHD, creating opportunities for post-transplantation strategies to maintain remissions in the high-risk group of relapsed MM patients. Eleven studies were included. Median PFS ranged from 5.2 to 36.8 months and OS was 13.0 to 63.0 months. The relapse related mortality at 1 year varied between 0 and 50% and TRM between 8 and 40%. Lowest GvHD incidences were reported for conditioning regimens with T-cell depletion using ATG or graft CD34+ selection. Similar strategies could lay the foundation for a post-transplant immune platform, this should be further evaluated in prospective clinical trials.

  10. Chest health surveillance utility in the early detection of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in children after allo-SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassas, A; Craig-Barnes, H; Dell, S; Doyle, J; Schechter, T; Sung, L; Egeler, M; Palaniyar, N

    2013-06-01

    To prospectively assess whether periodic chest health surveillance is beneficial for the early detection of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) in children after allo-SCT. Children up to 18 years of age receiving allo-SCT from September 2009 to September 2011 were included. Surveillance consisted of the following: a 7-item respiratory system questionnaire of cough, wheeze and shortness of breath; focused physical examination; and pulmonary function test (PFT) conducted before SCT and at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months after SCT. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled. Five children developed BOS at a median time of 192 days (range 94-282). Positive response comparisons between the BOS group vs the non-BOS group were NS for history questionnaire (P=0.2), heart rate (P=0.3), respiratory rate (P=0.3) and oxygen saturation monitoring (P=0.8). Differences between the two groups for chest auscultation and PFT were statistically significant (P=0.03 and P=0.01, respectively). However, chest auscultation in the BOS group was only positive after BOS diagnosis. PFT reduction was evident in the asymptomatic phase (BOS group 33%; non-BOS group 4.5%, P=0.01). Changes in PFT, but not history/physical examination, allow the early detection of BOS in children after SCT. Our study is limited by the small sample size.

  11. Indications for allo- and auto-SCT for haematological diseases, solid tumours and immune disorders: current practice in Europe, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda, A; Bader, P; Cesaro, S; Dreger, P; Duarte, R F; Dufour, C; Falkenburg, J H F; Farge-Bancel, D; Gennery, A; Kröger, N; Lanza, F; Marsh, J C; Nagler, A; Peters, C; Velardi, A; Mohty, M; Madrigal, A

    2015-08-01

    This is the sixth special report that the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation regularly publishes on the current practice and indications for haematopoietic SCT for haematological diseases, solid tumours and immune disorders in Europe. Major changes have occurred in the field of haematopoietic SCT over the last years. Cord blood units as well as haploidentical donors have been increasingly used as stem cell sources for allo-SCT, thus, augmenting the possibility of finding a suitable donor for a patient. Continuous refinement of conditioning strategies has also expanded not only the number of potential indications but also has permitted consideration of older patients or those with co-morbidity for a transplant. There is accumulating evidence of the role of haematopoietic SCT in non-haematological disorders such as autoimmune diseases. On the other hand, the advent of new drugs and very effective targeted therapy has challenged the role of SCT in some instances or at least, modified its position in the treatment armamentarium of a given patient. An updated report with revised tables and operating definitions is presented.

  12. A prospective registration study to determine feasibility of hematopoietic SCT in adults with acute leukemia: planning, expectations and reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labopin, M; Gorin, N-C; Polge, E; Socié, G; Gurman, G; Gluckman, E; Jindra, P; Poiré, X; Schäfer-Eckart, K; Ruutu, T; Milone, G; Arcese, W; Mohty, M; Rocha, V

    2014-03-01

    For adults with acute leukemia, it is important to know whether the therapeutic schemes initially planned were actually implemented. The European Group for Blood and Marrow transplantation Acute Leukemia Working Party prospectively followed 695 consecutive patients who were registered at the time of HLA typing. Of 304 patients with an available matched sibling donor (MSD), SCT was planned in 264, chemotherapy in 33 and autografting in 7. For the rest, an unrelated donor (UD) search was initiated in 198. Among these, 117 were transplanted, 114 received chemotherapy and 77 underwent autografting. Probabilities of receiving a planned treatment were 60 and 65% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Patients scheduled to receive MSD SCT had an 82% probability, whereas those scheduled to undergo UD SCT had a 57% probability, of receiving their transplant at 1 year. The only factor associated with a lower probability of MSD SCT in first remission was delayed HLA typing (HR=0.82; P=0.03). One year after enrollment, 40% of patients did not follow their initial treatment plan. Because OS was 50% only at 3 years and only 57% of the patients without a MSD underwent SCT, this suggests room for improvement in outcomes for adults with acute leukemia.

  13. Risk and prevention of graft failure in patients with preexisting donor-specific HLA antibodies undergoing unmanipulated haploidentical SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, S; Maruya, E; Taniguchi, K; Kaida, K; Kato, R; Inoue, T; Fujioka, T; Tamaki, H; Ikegame, K; Okada, M; Soma, T; Hayashi, K; Fujii, N; Onuma, T; Kusunoki, Y; Saji, H; Ogawa, H

    2012-04-01

    A role of donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSA) in graft failure after SCT has been suggested, but the relevance of DSA in unmanipulated haploidentical SCT (haplo-SCT) remains unknown. We prospectively examined HLA antibodies using the Luminex-based single Ag assay for 79 adult patients undergoing unmanipulated haplo-SCT. Among them, 16 (20.2%) were HLA Ab-positive, including five patients with antibodies not corresponding to donor HLA Ags and 11 DSA-positive patients. Of the 11 DSA-positive patients, five received treatments to decrease DSA levels, including two, who received plasma exchange and rituximab, two who received platelet transfusions from healthy-related donors having DSA-corresponding HLA Ags and one who received bortezomib. Platelet transfusion was the most simple and effective treatment option for class I DSA. The cumulative incidence of neutrophil recovery was significantly lower in pretransplant (post-treatment) DSA-positive patients than in DSA-negative patients (61.9 vs 94.4%, P=0.026). Notably, three of five patients with high levels of DSA had graft failure. Donors should be selected on the basis of an evaluation of HLA antibodies. If haplo-SCT from donors with HLA Ags that correspond to high levels of DSA must be performed, then recipients should be treated for DSA to improve the chances of successful donor engraftment.

  14. Treatment strategies in patients with AML or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome relapsed after Allo-SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, T; Silling, G; Groth, C; Rosenow, F; Krug, U; Görlich, D; Evers, G; Albring, J; Besoke, R; Mesters, R M; Müller-Tidow, C; Kessler, T; Büchner, T; Berdel, W E; Stelljes, M

    2015-04-01

    Non-relapse mortality after Allo-SCT has significantly decreased over the last years. Nevertheless, relapse remains a major cause for post SCT mortality in patients with AML and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). In this retrospective single-center analysis, we have analyzed the treatment outcomes of 108 patients with AML or MDS, who relapsed after Allo-SCT. Seventy of these patients (65%) were treated with salvage therapies containing chemotherapy alone, allogeneic cell-based treatment or the combination of both. Thirty-eight patients (35%) received palliative treatment. Median OS after diagnosis of relapse was 130 days. Compared with patients who received chemotherapy alone, response to salvage therapy was significantly improved in patients treated with a combination of chemo- and allogeneic cell-based therapy (CR rate 57% vs 13%, P=0.002). Among risk factors concerning pretreatment characteristics, disease status before first Allo-SCT, and details of transplantation, only the time interval from Allo-SCT to relapse was an independent predictor of response to salvage therapy and OS. These data confirmed that time to relapse after transplantation is an important prognostic factor. Up to now, only patients eligible for treatment regimens containing allogeneic cell-based interventions achieved relevant response rates.

  15. Tandem high-dose chemotherapy and auto-SCT for malignant brain tumors in children under 3 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, K W; Lim, D H; Lee, S H; Yoo, K H; Koo, H H; Kim, J H; Suh, Y-L; Joung, Y S; Shin, H J

    2013-07-01

    In an effort to improve survival and reduce late adverse effects of radiation therapy (RT), 25 children SCT following six cycles of induction chemotherapy. RT was either not given or deferred until 3 years of age if the patient was in CR after tandem HDCT/auto-SCT. Tumors relapsed or progressed in nine patients (five during induction treatment), and two of these patients survived after receiving salvage treatment, including RT. Two patients died due to toxicities during tandem HDCT/auto-SCT. A total of 16 patients survived to a median follow-up period of 52 months (range 18-96) from the time of diagnosis. Four of these patients did not receive RT, two received local RT (L-RT), three received craniospinal RT (CSRT), and seven received both L-RT and CSRT. The 5-year OS and EFS rates were 67.8±9.4% and 55.5±10.0%, respectively. Neuroendocrine and neurocognitive functions evaluated 3 years after tandem HDCT/auto-SCT were acceptable. Our results indicate that tandem HDCT/auto-SCT may improve survival in young children with malignant brain tumors with an acceptable level of risk of long-term toxicity.

  16. Total dose effects on ATLAS-SCT front-end electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Ullán, M; Dubbs, T; Grillo, A A; Spencer, E; Seiden, A; Spieler, H; Gilchriese, M G D; Lozano, M

    2002-01-01

    Low dose rate effects (LDRE) in bipolar technologies complicate the hardness assurance testing for high energy physics applications. The damage produced in the ICs in the real experiment can be underestimated if fast irradiations are carried out, while experiments done at the real dose rate are usually unpractical due to the still high total doses involved. In this work the sensitivity to LDRE of two bipolar technologies proposed for the ATLAS-SCT experiment at CERN is evaluated, finding one of them free of those effects. (12 refs).

  17. Investigation of Υ Dor - δ Sct hybrid stars based on high precission space photometry and complementary ground based spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareter, M.

    2013-01-01

    Stellar pulsation carries information on the physical condition within the star. While pressure modes (p modes) probe the outer layers of a star, gravity modes (g modes) penetrate deep into the radiative zone and thus carry valuable information on the physical conditions there. gamma Dor stars are stars that pulsate in such modes, apart from white dwarfs and slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars. Therefore, these stars are important test benches for stellar evolution and pulsation theory. delta Sct - gamma Dor hybrids are stars that pulsate like gamma Dor stars with g modes but also with p modes as the delta Sct stars do. This makes them even more suited for asteroseismology. The CoRoT long runs offer a great opportunity to analyse a large sample of stars observed homogeneously, uninterrupted and long time base of about 150 days, which is practically unachievable with ground based observation. Since space missions avoid the scintillation caused by the Earth's atmosphere, they allow to detect stellar oscillations on a sub-millimagnitude level even for stars as faint as 15th magnitude. The photometric data is supplemented by AAOmega classification spectroscopy, allowing to determine effective tem- peratures and surface gravity. With these data a statistical approach was adopted to describe the pulsation behaviour gamma Dor and delta Sct - gamma Dor hybrid stars. A temperature - period relation was found for gamma Dor and delta Sct stars, but none for delta Sct - gamma Dor hybrid stars, when considering their strongest g mode or p mode, respectively. The instability domain of hybrid stars is equal to that of delta Sct stars and is not con- fined to the overlapping region of the delta Sct and gamma Dor IS in the Hertzsprung- Russell diagram. Hybrid stars behave differently in the g mode regime than gamma Dor stars, which poses a serious question on how to define properly a delta Sct - gamma Dor hybrid. The convective flux blocking mechanism is supposed to work for stars

  18. Immunoparesis and polyclonal immunoglobulin recovery after auto-SCT for patients with multiple myeloma treated at a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Zepeda, Victor H; Duggan, Peter; Neri, Paola; Chaudhry, Ahsan; Tay, Jason; Bahlis, Nizar

    2017-11-21

    Immunoparesis and polyclonal immunoglobulin recovery have been recently described as common indicators of immune dysfunction in patients with multiple myeloma. In the present study, we aimed to assess the impact of immunoparesis and polyclonal immunoglobulin recovery at day-100 post autologous stem cell transplant (auto-SCT) on clinical outcomes. A total of 302 patients were included for the analysis of immunoparesis, and 197 were evaluable for polyclonal immunoglobulin recovery evaluation. Immunoparesis was observed in 93.5% of cases, with 47% of cases having polyclonal immunoglobulin recovery at 12 months post auto-SCT. Median overall and progression-free survival were longer in the group of patients with complete or partial normalization of polyclonal immunoglobulins. Patients receiving consolidation had a lower level of polyclonal reconstitution. In conclusion, polyclonal immunoglobulin recovery by 12 months post-auto-SCT is associated with superior overall and progression free survival in patients with MM. Efforts to better enhance polyclonal recovery deserve further investigation.

  19. Characterizing the observational properties of δ Sct stars in the era of space photometry from the Kepler mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Dominic M.; Kurtz, Donald W.

    2018-05-01

    The δ Sct stars are a diverse group of intermediate-mass pulsating stars located on and near the main sequence within the classical instability strip in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Many of these stars are hybrid stars pulsating simultaneously with pressure and gravity modes that probe the physics at different depths within a star's interior. Using two large ensembles of δ Sct stars observed by the Kepler Space Telescope, the instrumental biases inherent to Kepler mission data and the statistical properties of these stars are investigated. An important focus of this work is an analysis of the relationships between the pulsational and stellar parameters, and their distribution within the classical instability strip. It is found that a non-negligible fraction of main-sequence δ Sct stars exist outside theoretical predictions of the classical instability boundaries, which indicates the necessity of a mass-dependent mixing length parameter to simultaneously explain low and high radial order pressure modes in δ Sct stars within the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Furthermore, a search for regularities in the amplitude spectra of these stars is also presented, specifically the frequency difference between pressure modes of consecutive radial order. In this work, it is demonstrated that an ensemble-based approach using space photometry from the Kepler mission is not only plausible for δ Sct stars, but that it is a valuable method for identifying the most promising stars for mode identification and asteroseismic modelling. The full scientific potential of studying δ Sct stars is as yet unrealized. The ensembles discussed in this paper represent a high-quality data set for future studies of rotation and angular momentum transport inside A and F stars using asteroseismology.

  20. ATLAS barrel toroid integration and test area in building 180

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two 'double-pancake' windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. The barrel toroid is being assembled in building 180 on the Meyrin site. In the first phase of assembly, the coils are packed into their aluminium-alloy casing. These photos show the double-pancake coils from ANSALDO and the coil casings from ALSTOM. In the foreground is the tooling from COSMI used to turn over the coil casings during this first phase. In the right background is the yellow lifting gantry manufactured at JINR-Dubna, Russia which will transport the coil casings to a heating table for prestressing. Two test benches with magnetic mirror are also visible.

  1. The bar PANDA Barrel-TOF Detector at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, S.; Suzuki, K.; Steinschaden, D.; Chirita, M.; Ahmed, G.; Dutta, K.; Kalita, K.; Lehmann, A.; Böhm, M.; Schwarz, K.; Orth, H.; Brinkmann, K.-Th.

    2017-08-01

    The barrel-Time-of-Flight subdetector is one of the outer layers of the multi-layer design of the \\panda target spectrometer. It is designed with a minimal material budget in mind mainly consisting of 90×30×5 mm3 thin plastic scintillator tiles read out on each end by a serial connection of 4 SiPMs. 120 such tiles are placed on 16 2460 × 180 mm2 PCB boards forming a barrel covering an azimuthal angle from 22.5o to 150o. The detector is designed to achieve a time resolution below σ< 100 ps which allows to distinguish events in the constant stream of hits, as well as particle identification below the Cherenkov threshold via the time-of-flight; simultaneously providing the interaction times of events. The current prototype achieved a time resolution of ~54 ps, well below the design goal.

  2. Membrane potential correlates of sensory perception in mouse barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachidhanandam, Shankar; Sreenivasan, Varun; Kyriakatos, Alexandros; Kremer, Yves; Petersen, Carl C H

    2013-11-01

    Neocortical activity can evoke sensory percepts, but the cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We trained mice to detect single brief whisker stimuli and report perceived stimuli by licking to obtain a reward. Pharmacological inactivation and optogenetic stimulation demonstrated a causal role for the primary somatosensory barrel cortex. Whole-cell recordings from barrel cortex neurons revealed membrane potential correlates of sensory perception. Sensory responses depended strongly on prestimulus cortical state, but both slow-wave and desynchronized cortical states were compatible with task performance. Whisker deflection evoked an early (sensory response that was encoded through cell-specific reversal potentials. A secondary late (50-400 ms) depolarization was enhanced on hit trials compared to misses. Optogenetic inactivation revealed a causal role for late excitation. Our data reveal dynamic processing in the sensory cortex during task performance, with an early sensory response reliably encoding the stimulus and later secondary activity contributing to driving the subjective percept.

  3. Simulgeo and its application for the muon barrel position monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunel, L.

    1999-01-01

    The design process of the Muon Barrel Position Monitor of the CMS (compact muon solenoid) experiment for LHC is at the origin of the need of a software like Simulgeo. The software Silmugeo started to be developed in 1995 in order to allow the study of many systems. The idea of Simulgeo is to automatically make the modelling of a system and automatically construct the design matrix. This paper makes in part 2 an overview of the possibilities of Simulgeo, in part 3 it presents the standard objects. In part 4, it explains the mathematical basis and in part 5 the computing aspect. In part 6, it shows an application to the Muon Barrel Position Monitor Project and, in part 7, it mentions other projects where it has been used

  4. Design of the LHC US ATLAS Barrel Cryostat

    CERN Document Server

    Rehak, M L; Farah, Y; Grandinetti, R; Müller, T; Norton, S; Sondericker, J

    2002-01-01

    One of the experiments of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the ATLAS Liquid Argon detector. The Liquid Argon Barrel Cryostat is part of the United States contribution to the LHC project and its design is presented here. The device is made up of four concentric cylinders: the smallest and largest of which form a vacuum vessel enclosing a cold vessel cryostat filled with liquid argon. The Cryostat serves as the housing for an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter, supports and provides space in vacuum for a solenoid magnet while the toroidal opening furnishes room for a tracker detector. Design requirements are determined by its use in a collider experiment: the construction has to be compact, the material between the interaction region and the calorimeter has to be minimal and made of aluminum to reduce the amount of absorbing material. The design complies with code regulations while being optimized for its use in a physics environment. (2 refs).

  5. Signal feedthroughs for the ATLAS barrel and endcap calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axen, D.; Hackenburg, R.; Hoffmann, A.; Kane, S.; Lissauer, D.; Makowiecki, D.; Muller, T.; Pate, D.; Radeka, V.; Rahm, D.; Rehak, M.; Rescia, S.; Sexton, K.; Sondericker, J.; Birney, P.; Dowling, A.W.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Hodges, T.; Holness, F.; Honkanen, N.

    2005-01-01

    The function, design, construction, testing, and installation of the signal feedthroughs for the barrel and endcap ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters are described. The feedthroughs provide a high density and radiation hard method to extract over 200 000 signals from the cryogenic environment of the calorimeters using an application of a design based on flexible kapton circuit board transmission lines. A model to describe the frequency dependent behavior of the transmission lines is also presented

  6. Reversible man-in-the-barrel syndrome in myasthenia gravis

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Poornima A; Wadia, Pettarusp Murzban

    2016-01-01

    Man-in-the-barrel syndrome (MBS) is an uncommon presentation due to bilateral, predominantly proximal muscle weakness that has not been described to be associated with myasthenia gravis. We describe a case of myasthenia gravis presenting as MBS. Additionally, he had significant wasting of the deltoids bilaterally with fibrillations on electromyography (EMG) at rest and brief duration (3-6 ms) bi/triphasic motor unit potentials (MUPs) on submaximal effort apart from a decremental response on r...

  7. Device for cementing radioactive of toxic waste into barrels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempelmann, W.; Waldenmeier, G.; Mathis, P.; Mathis, B.; Mathis, F.

    1987-01-01

    The plant consists of conventional means, such as through mixers and dosing and transport spirals, which are accommodated in a glovebox. The inactive additives cement and sand and the active materials evaporation concentrates and sludges are mixed by them, and are then filled into a waste barrel which is empty or already filled with solid waste. Liquid radioactive wastes are used to concrete over the solid waste. (DG) [de

  8. Design and construction of the ZEUS barrel calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repond, J.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanical design and construction techniques of the barrel calorimeter for the ZEUS detector are presented. The calorimeter uses alternate layers of depleted uranium and scintillator with one radiation length sampling. The unit cell has e/h = 1 which yields an optimal energy resolution for hadronic jets. We discuss the placing of the structural components and cracks between modules. Details of the construction and assembly effort needed to realize the total calorimeter are reported. 4 figs., 1 tab

  9. Mechanical structure of the TOPAZ barrel drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, T.; Maruyama, K.; Okuno, H.

    1987-07-01

    A Barrel Drift Chamber (BDC) is constructed for the TOPAZ experiment at TRISTAN, KEK. The BDC has a cylindrical shape with dimensions of 325.2 cm in inner diameter, 347.2 cm in outer diameter and 500 cm long. It consists of 1232 drift tubes made of conductive plastic cathodes, which are staggered in four layers. In this report, a design of the mechanical structure and construction procedures are described in detail. (author)

  10. Non-compensation of the ATLAS barrel combined calorimeter prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kul'chitskij, Yu.A.; Kuz'min, M.V.

    1998-01-01

    The e / π ratio for the ATLAS Barrel Combined Calorimeter Prototype, composed from electromagnetic LArg calorimeter and hadronic Tile calorimeter was investigated. Response of Combined Calorimeter on pions and electrons in the energy region of 20-300 GeV was studied. Found e / h = 1.37 ± 0.01 ± 0.02 is in good agreement with the results from previous Combined Calorimeter tests but has more precisions

  11. Optical properties of the PANDA barrel DIRC radiator bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalicy, Grzegorz; Krebs, Marvin; Peters, Klaus [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Schwarz, Carsten; Schwiening, Jochen [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The PANDA experiment at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) at GSI, Darmstadt, will study fundamental questions of hadron physics and QCD. A fast focusing DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) counter will provide hadronic particle identification (PID) in the barrel region of the PANDA detector. To meet the PID requirements, the Barrel DIRC has to provide precise measurements of the Cherenkov angle, which is conserved for Cherenkov photons propagating through the radiator by total internal reflection. The radiators, rectangular bars made from fused silica, have to fulfill very strict optical and mechanical requirements. This includes the squareness and parallelism of the sides of the bars, sharp corners, and a very smooth surface polish, ensuring that the Cherenkov photons reach the optical sensors without angular distortions. Currently the Barrel DIRC is at the final design stage and several different bar shapes and fabrication methods are being considered for the final detector. An optical setup, consisting of a computer-controlled positioning and a multi-wavelength laser system, is used to evaluate the radiator bars to obtain critical values like transmittance and reflectivity. The current results and techniques are presented on this poster.

  12. Efficacy of cisplatin-based immunochemotherapy plus alloSCT in high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia : final results of a prospective multicenter phase 2 HOVON study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelder, M.; van Oers, M. H.; Alemayehu, W. G.; Abrahamse-Testroote, M. C. J.; Cornelissen, J. J.; Chamuleau, M. E.; Zachee, P.; Hoogendoorn, M.; Nijland, M.; Petersen, E. J.; Beeker, A.; Timmers, G-J; Verdonck, L.; Westerman, M.; de Weerdt, O.; Kater, A. P.

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) remains the only curative option for CLL patients. Whereas active disease at the time of alloSCT predicts poor outcome, no standard remission-induction regimen exists. We prospectively assessed outcome after cisplatin-containing immune-chemotherapy

  13. Energy metrics for driving competitiveness of countries: Energy weakness magnitude, GDP per barrel and barrels per capita

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coccia, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Energy metrics is the development of a whole new theoretical framework for the conception and measurement of energy and economic system performances, energy efficiency and productivity improvements with important political economy implications consistent with the best use of all natural and economic resources. The purpose of this research is to present some vital energy indicators based on magnitude and scale of energy weakness, GDP per barrel of oil that is an indicator of energy productivity and barrels (of oil) per capita that is an indicator of energy efficiency. Energy metrics can support the monitoring of energy and economic system performances in order to design effective energy strategy and political economy interventions focused on the 'competitive advantage' increase of countries in modern economies.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation is a frequent event after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) and quantitatively predicts EBV-lymphoproliferative disease following T-cell--depleted SCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esser, J W; van der Holt, B; Meijer, E; Niesters, H G; Trenschel, R; Thijsen, S F; van Loon, A M; Frassoni, F; Bacigalupo, A; Schaefer, U W; Osterhaus, A D; Gratama, J W; Löwenberg, B; Verdonck, L F; Cornelissen, J J

    2001-01-01

    Reactivation of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) may evoke a protective cellular immune response or may be complicated by the development of EBV-lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). So far, very little is known about the incidence, recurrence, and

  15. The barrel muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector has acquired its first cosmic event in a magnetic field produced by the barrel toroid magnet.

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A 3-D event display of a cosmic muon event, showing the path of a muon travelling through three layers of the barrel muon spectrometer. Three of the eight coils of the barrel toroid magnet can be seen in the top half of the drawing.

  16. 8 CFR 232.3 - Arriving aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arriving aliens. 232.3 Section 232.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS DETENTION OF ALIENS FOR PHYSICAL AND MENTAL EXAMINATION § 232.3 Arriving aliens. When a district director has reasonable grounds...

  17. Modelling Chinese Inbound Tourism Arrivals into Christchurch

    OpenAIRE

    Fieger, Peter; Rice, John

    2016-01-01

    New data and modelling approaches are improving the usefulness of internet search data for forecasting inbound tourist arrivals. This short paper provides evidence of the usefulness of Baidu search data in predicting Chinese inbound tourist arrivals into a specific region in New Zealand. It also compares three modelling approaches, finding a Vector Autoregressive approach the most useful.

  18. STS-114: Discovery Crew Arrival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    George Diller of NASA Public Affairs narrates the STS-114 Crew arrival at Kennedy Space Center aboard a Gulf Stream aircraft. They were greeted by Center Director Jim Kennedy. Commander Eileen Collins introduced each of her crew members and gave a brief description of their roles in the mission. Mission Specialist 3, Andrew Thomas will be the lead crew member on the inspection on flight day 2; he is the intravehicular (IV) crew member that will help and guide Mission Specialists Souichi Noguchi and Stephen Robinson during their spacewalks. Pilot James Kelly will be operating the shuttle systems in flying the Shuttle; he will be flying the space station robotic arm during the second extravehicular activity and he will be assisting Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence during the other two extravehicular activities; he will be assisting on the rendezvous on flight day three, and landing of the shuttle. Commander Collins also mentioned Pilot Kelly's recent promotion to Colonel by the United States Air Force. Mission Specialist 1, Souichi Noguchi from JAXA (The Japanese Space Agency) will be flying on the flight deck for ascent; he will be doing three spacewalks on day 5, 7, and 9; He will be the photo/TV lead for the different types of cameras on board to document the flight and to send back the information to the ground for both technical and public affairs reasons. Mission Specialist 5, Charles Camada will be doing the inspection on flight day 2 with Mission Specialist Thomas and Pilot Kelly; he will be transferring the logistics off the shuttle and onto the space station and from the space station back to the shuttle; He will help set up eleven lap tops on board. Mission Specialist 4, Wendy Lawrence will lead the transfer of logistics to the space station; she is the space station arm operator during extravehicular activities 1 and 3; she will be carrying the 6,000 pounds of external storage platform from the shuttle payload bay over to the space station; she is also

  19. High prevalence of Dapsone-induced oxidant hemolysis in North American SCT recipients without glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olteanu, H; Harrington, A M; George, B; Hari, P N; Bredeson, C; Kroft, S H

    2012-03-01

    Dapsone (4-4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone) is commonly used for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) prophylaxis in immunocompromised patients. Oxidant hemolysis is a known complication of dapsone, but its frequency in adult patients who have undergone a SCT for hematological malignancies is not well established. We studied the presence of oxidant hemolysis, by combining examination of RBC morphology and laboratory data, in 30 patients who underwent a SCT and received dapsone for PCP prophylaxis, and compared this group with 26 patients who underwent a SCT and received trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) for PCP prophylaxis. All patients had normal glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) enzymatic activity. In SCT patients, dapsone compared with TMP-SMX for PCP prophylaxis was associated with a high incidence of oxidant hemolysis (87 vs 0%, PSCT patients is 20-fold higher than the reported rate in the population of HIV-infected patients, and thus much higher than the prevalence of G6PDH variants in the general population. In our patients, it manifested clinically as a lower Hb that was not significant enough to result in increased packed RBC transfusions.

  20. Safety and efficacy of high-dose melphalan and auto-SCT in patients with AL amyloidosis and cardiac involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girnius, S; Seldin, D C; Meier-Ewert, H K; Sloan, J M; Quillen, K; Ruberg, F L; Berk, J L; Doros, G; Sanchorawala, V

    2014-03-01

    In Ig light chain (AL) amyloidosis, cardiac involvement is associated with worse prognosis and increased treatment-related complications. In this retrospective cohort study, we assessed survival, hematologic and cardiac responses to high-dose melphalan and auto-SCT (HDM/SCT) in patients with AL amyloidosis and cardiac involvement, stratified by cardiac biomarkers brain natriuretic peptide and Troponin I, analogous to the Mayo cardiac staging. Forty-seven patients underwent HDM/SCT based upon functional measures; six patients had modified cardiac stage I disease, seventeen had modified cardiac stage II disease and twenty-four had modified cardiac stage III disease. Treatment-related mortality was 4% for all patients and 8% for patients with stage III disease. Three-year survival was 88% and EFS was 47%; these did not differ by stage. By intention-to-treat analysis, 27% of patients achieved a hematologic complete response and 32% a very good partial response, of whom 70 and 45%, respectively, have not required additional therapy at 36 months. Cardiac response was achieved in 53% of patients. We conclude that with appropriate patient selection and a risk-adapted treatment approach, HDM/SCT is safe and effective in patients with AL amyloidosis and cardiac involvement.

  1. Iterative local Chi2 alignment approach for the ATLAS SCT detector

    CERN Document Server

    Härtel, Roland

    An approach for the alignment of SCT modules in the ATLAS Inner Detector with particle tracks was developed and implemented in the ATLAS software framework Athena. The approach uses distance of closest approach residuals and a linear least squares minimization to derive the most probable set of alignment parameters for each module. The procedure is iterative, i.e. with the first set of alignment constants a track refit is done and the alignment algorithm is repeated. Correlations between modules are only implicitly taken into account due to the improvement of track parameters through the iterations. A derivation of the underlying concepts is presented. The achievable accuracy and limits of the alignment approach were studied with Monte Carlo simulated tracks in the Athena framework. The results and limitations obtained with the present versions of Athena and the proposed alignment software are presented.

  2. The pharmacokinetics and safety of twice daily i.v. BU during conditioning in pediatric allo-SCT recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, J B; Milone, M C; Waxman, I M; Shaw, L M; Harrison, L; Duffy, D; van de Ven, C; Militano, O; Geyer, M B; Morris, E; Bhatia, M; Satwani, P; George, D; Garvin, J H; Bradley, M B; Schwartz, J; Baxter-Lowe, L A; Cairo, M S

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous BU divided four times daily (q6 h) has been shown to be safe and effective in pediatric allo-SCT recipients. Though less frequent dosing is desirable, pharmacokinetic (PK) data on twice daily (q12 h) i.v. BU administration in pediatric allo-SCT recipients is limited. We prospectively examined the PK results in a cohort of pediatric allo-SCT recipients receiving i.v. BU q12 h as part of conditioning before allo-SCT. BU levels were obtained after the first dose of conditioning. PK parameter analysis (n=49) yielded the following 95% confidence intervals (CI₉₅): weight-normalized volume of distribution: 0.65-0.73 L/kg; t(1/2): 122-147 min; weight-normalized clearance (CL(n)): 3.4-4.3 mL/min/kg; and area under the curve: 1835-2180 mmol × min/L. From these results, a steady state concentration was calculated with CI₉₅ between 628-746 ng/mL. Comparison between recipients ≤4 vs >4 years old revealed significant differences in t(1/2) (mean: 115 vs 146 min, P=0.008) and CL(n) (mean: 4.4 vs 3.5 mL/min/kg, P=0.038). Intravenous BU q12 h had a comparable PK to i.v. BU q6 h PK seen in the literature, and in pediatric allo-SCT recipients, is a feasible, attractive alternative to i.v. q6h dosing.

  3. Potential prolongation of PFS in mantle cell lymphoma after R-HyperCVAD: auto-SCT consolidation or rituximab maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, T; McQuade, J; Porter, D; Frey, N; Loren, A W; Goldstein, S C; Svoboda, J; Stadtmauer, E; Schuster, S J; Nasta, S D

    2012-08-01

    We retrospectively analyzed 44 patients undergoing first-line treatment for mantle cell lymphoma with R-HyperCVAD, with or without rituximab (R) maintenance or auto-SCT. The primary study end point was PFS; secondary end point was overall survival.Median follow up for all patients was 3.3 years. Median age was 54 years, and 95% (n=42) were stage III or IV at diagnosis. In all, 17 patients underwent consolidative auto-SCT and 12 patients received R maintenance. The overall response rate was 95%, with 91% achieving complete response (CR). Median PFS for all patients was 3.5 years. Median PFS was 2.3 years for patients treated with R-HyperCVAD alone vs 3.9 years (P=0.02) with R-HyperCVAD+ R maintenance and 4.5 years (P=0.01) with R-HyperCVAD+ auto-SCT. For patients who did not achieve CR at interim staging, PFS for R-HyperCVAD alone was 1.4 years vs not reached for R-HyperCVAD+ consolidation (either R maintenance or auto-SCT) (P=0.02). PFS for patients with CR at interim staging was 3.3 years vs not reached (P=0.04) after consolidation. Our data suggest potential improvement in PFS when R-HyperCVAD is consolidated with either R maintenance or auto-SCT. This benefit appears particularly significant in those patients who do not achieve CR at interim restaging.

  4. X-36 arrival at Dryden

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    NASA and McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) personnel steady the X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft following arrival at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on July 2, 1996. The aircraft is being hoisted out of it's shipping crate. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds

  5. Reversible man-in-the-barrel syndrome in myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poornima A Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Man-in-the-barrel syndrome (MBS is an uncommon presentation due to bilateral, predominantly proximal muscle weakness that has not been described to be associated with myasthenia gravis. We describe a case of myasthenia gravis presenting as MBS. Additionally, he had significant wasting of the deltoids bilaterally with fibrillations on electromyography (EMG at rest and brief duration (3-6 ms bi/triphasic motor unit potentials (MUPs on submaximal effort apart from a decremental response on repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS at 2 Hz. While electrophysiology is an important tool in the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis, pathological EMG patterns do not exclude the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis.

  6. Reversible man-in-the-barrel syndrome in myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Poornima A; Wadia, Pettarusp Murzban

    2016-01-01

    Man-in-the-barrel syndrome (MBS) is an uncommon presentation due to bilateral, predominantly proximal muscle weakness that has not been described to be associated with myasthenia gravis. We describe a case of myasthenia gravis presenting as MBS. Additionally, he had significant wasting of the deltoids bilaterally with fibrillations on electromyography (EMG) at rest and brief duration (3-6 ms) bi/triphasic motor unit potentials (MUPs) on submaximal effort apart from a decremental response on repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) at 2 Hz. While electrophysiology is an important tool in the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis, pathological EMG patterns do not exclude the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. PMID:27011638

  7. Computing angle of arrival of radio signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, John J.; Steele, David K.

    2017-11-07

    Various technologies pertaining to computing angle of arrival of radio signals are described. A system that is configured for computing the angle of arrival of a radio signal includes a cylindrical sheath wrapped around a cylindrical object, where the cylindrical sheath acts as a ground plane. The system further includes a plurality of antennas that are positioned about an exterior surface of the cylindrical sheath, and receivers respectively coupled to the antennas. The receivers output measurements pertaining to the radio signal. A processing circuit receives the measurements and computes the angle of arrival of the radio signal based upon the measurements.

  8. Fenomen erozije cevi naoružanja / Gun barrel erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Ilić

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available U radu su prikazana dosadašnja istraživanja erozije cevi. Trošenje cevi je neizbežan proces do kojeg dolazi pri svakom opaljenju. Erozija cevi može se definisati kao progresivna povreda ili oštećenje površine cevi i proširenje kalibra usled opaljenja, koja utiče na: gubitak ili pad početne brzine projektila, tačnost i efektivnost oruđa. Kao glavni uzročnici koji utiču na intenzitet erozije cevi opisani su termički, hemijski i mehanički faktori. Njihov uticaj prikazan je u interakciji cev-projektil-barutno punjenje. / An overview of research into gun barrel erosion is presented in this paper. The gun bore wear is an unavoidable process during normal firing. The wear can be defined as progressive damage of the bore surface and enlargement of the bore, ultimately resulting in loss in the muzzle velocity, range and accuracy. Thermal, chemical and mechanical factors are described as major factors of gun barrel erosion. The influence of these factors is presented in the interaction of gun tube - projectile - propellant.

  9. Recent results from the DELPHI barrel ring imaging Cherenkov counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anassontzis, E.G.; Ioannou, P.; Kalkanis, G.; Katsanevas, S.; Kontaxis, I.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Nounos, S.; Preve, P.; Resvanis, L.K.; Brunet, J.M.; Dolbeau, J.; Guglielmo, L.; Ledroit, F.; Poutot, D.; Tristram, G.

    1991-01-01

    The DELPHI detector, installed at LEP, is equipped with RICH (Ring Imaging Cherenkov) counters. The Barrel part incorporates a liquid (C 6 F 14 ) and a gaseous (C 5 F 12 ) radiator providing particle identification up to 20GeV/c. The Cherenkov protons of both radiators are detected by TPC-like photon detectors. The drift gas (75% CH 4 + 25% C 2 H 6 ) is doped with TMAE, but which the UV Cherenkov photons are converted into single free photo-electrons. These are drifted towards MWPC's at the end of the drift tubes and the space coordinates of the conversion point are determined. One half of the Barrel RICH is now equipped with drift tubes and has provided results from the liquid radiator since spring 1990. The gas radiator has been tested with C 2 F 6 as a preliminary filling since August 1990. The data obtained demonstrate the good particle identification potential. For the liquid radiator the number of detected photons per ring in hadron jets is N=8, whereas for muon pairs (single tracks) N=10 has been obtained. For the gas radiator 2.1 photons per track were observed, which demonstrates the good functioning of the focussing mirrors, as the C 2 F 6 this is close to the expected value

  10. First physics pulses in the Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter with cosmics

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Serin

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic barrel calorimeter has been installed in its final position in October 2005. Since then, the calorimeter is being equipped with front-end electronics. Starting in April 2006, electronics calibration runs are taken a few times per week to debug the electronics and to study the performance in the pit (stability, noise). Today, 10 out of the 32 Front End crates are being read out, amounting to about 35000 channels. cool down, few little typos --> After a 6-week cool down, the barrel cryostat was filled with Liquid Argon in May. The presence of a few shorts (~1MΩ) at the edges of the modules was indicating the possibility of conducting dust having entered into the calorimeter with the flowing liquid. In order to try to improve this situation, the calorimeter was emptied and filled again, but this time by condensating the argon instead of flowing it in liquid phase. The new High Voltage tests are not showing any significant improvement but the situation is statisfactory for ATLAS runn...

  11. Strategic Arrivals Recommendation Tool, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During the conduct of a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) in 2012 and 2013, the Mosaic ATM team first developed the Strategic Arrivals Recommendation Tool concept, or...

  12. TOURIST ARRIVALS AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN SARAWAK

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Evan; Oh, Swee-Ling; Hu, Sing-Sing

    2008-01-01

    This study empirically investigates the comovements and the causality relationship between tourist arrivals and economic growth in Sarawak during the period of 1972 to 2004. The empirical evidence clearly shows that the long run causality running from tourist arrivals to economic growth in the estimation period. As one of the income generator for Sarawak, the findings are consistent with economic theory and proffer important policy conclusions.

  13. Installation of CMS EB (ECAL Barrel) Supermodules 5 and 13 inside HB+ (HCAL Barrel) on 26/27 April 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    Ken Bell, RAL

    2006-01-01

    The first two barrel "supermodules" of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) have been inserted into the barrel hadron calorimeter (HCAL) in the CMS experimental hall (called SX5) in Cessy in preparation for the forthcoming magnet test and cosmic challenge (MTCC). Each of the two supermodules contains 1700 lead tungstate crystals in glass-fibre alveolar support structures, with associated avalanche photodiodes (APDs, for scintillation light detection), electronics and cooling system. See also the document CMS-PHO-OREACH-2006-019. The first two pictures show the two supermodules in their final position. Fig. 3: the "enfourneur" in position on the HB Cradle. Fig. 4: supermodule n. 5 and extension rails being lifted to the enforneur. Figs. 5-6: supermodule approaching the enforneur. Fig. 7: rotating the Enfourneur to the correct phi direction Figs. 8-9: aligning the extension rails with the rails inside HB and view from inside HB, once the rails are aligned. Figs. 10-12: insertion of supermodule n. 5. Fig. ...

  14. Mapping functional connectivity in barrel-related columns reveals layer- and cell type-specific microcircuits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, D.; Kotter, R.; Staiger, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    Synaptic circuits bind together functional modules of the neocortex. We aim to clarify in a rodent model how intra- and transcolumnar microcircuits in the barrel cortex are laid out to segregate and also integrate sensory information. The primary somatosensory (barrel) cortex of rodents is the ideal

  15. Fabrication and Tests of M240 Machine Gun Barrels Lined with Stellite 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    ARL-TR-7662 ● APR 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Fabrication and Tests of M240 Machine Gun Barrels Lined with Stellite 25...Fabrication and Tests of M240 Machine Gun Barrels Lined with Stellite 25 by William S de Rosset and Sean Fudger Weapons and Materials Research...

  16. Patchwork-Type Spontaneous Activity in Neonatal Barrel Cortex Layer 4 Transmitted via Thalamocortical Projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenobu Mizuno

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Establishment of precise neuronal connectivity in the neocortex relies on activity-dependent circuit reorganization during postnatal development; however, the nature of cortical activity during this period remains largely unknown. Using two-photon calcium imaging of the barrel cortex in vivo during the first postnatal week, we reveal that layer 4 (L4 neurons within the same barrel fire synchronously in the absence of peripheral stimulation, creating a “patchwork” pattern of spontaneous activity corresponding to the barrel map. By generating transgenic mice expressing GCaMP6s in thalamocortical axons, we show that thalamocortical axons also demonstrate the spontaneous patchwork activity pattern. Patchwork activity is diminished by peripheral anesthesia but is mostly independent of self-generated whisker movements. The patchwork activity pattern largely disappeared during postnatal week 2, as even L4 neurons within the same barrel tended to fire asynchronously. This spontaneous L4 activity pattern has features suitable for thalamocortical (TC circuit refinement in the neonatal barrel cortex. : By two-photon calcium imaging of layer 4 neurons and thalamocortical axon terminals in neonatal mouse barrel cortex, Mizuno et al. find a patchwork-like spontaneous activity pattern corresponding to the barrel map, which may be important for thalamocortical circuit maturation. Keywords: activity-dependent development, spontaneous activity, synchronized activity, barrel cortex, thalamocortical axons, neonates, in vivo calcium imaging, awake, single-cell labeling, whisker monitoring

  17. Shell model in-water frequencies of the core barrel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, K.; De Santo, D.F.

    1980-01-01

    Natural frequencies of a 1/24th-scale core barrel/vessel model in air and in water are measured by determining frequency responses to applied forces. The measured data are analyzed by the use of the one-dimensional fluid-structure computer code, MULTIFLEX, developed to calculate the hydraulic force. The fluid-structure interaction in the downcomer annulus is computed with a one-dimensional network model formed to be equivalent to two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction. The structural model incorporated in MULTIFLEX is substantially simpler than that necessary for structural analyses. Proposed for computation of structural dynamics is the projector method than can deal with the beam mode by modal analysis and the other shell modes by a direct integration method. Computed in-air and in-water frequencies agree fairly well with the experimental data, verifying the above MULTIFLEX technique

  18. The CMS Level-1 Trigger Barrel Track Finder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ero, J.; Wulz, C.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Guiducci, L.; Sotiropoulos, S.; Sphicas, P.; Triossi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The design and performance of the upgraded CMS Level-1 Trigger Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF) is presented. Monte Carlo simulation data as well as cosmic ray data from a CMS muon detector slice test have been used to study in detail the performance of the new track finder. The design architecture is based on twelve MP7 cards each of which uses a Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA and can receive and transmit data at 10 Gbps from 72 input and 72 output fibers. According to the CMS Trigger Upgrade TDR the BMTF receives trigger primitive data which are computed using both RPC and DT data and transmits data from a number of muon candidates to the upgraded Global Muon Trigger. Results from detailed studies of comparisons between the BMTF algorithm results and the results of a C++ emulator are also presented. The new BMTF will be commissioned for data taking in 2016

  19. Manufacturing aspects of the ATLAS barrel toroid double pancakes

    CERN Document Server

    Drago, G; Gagliardi, P; Laurenti, A; Marabotto, R; Penco, R

    2002-01-01

    In 1999 INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) ordered to ANSALDO the manufacturing of 16 double pancakes for the ATLAS BARREL TOROID. In July 2001 four Double Pancakes have already been completed and shipped to the integration site. In this paper the main aspects of the manufacturing of the largest superconducting coils ever built (5*25 m) are described. The main phases of the manufacturing procedure are reviewed starting from the conductor preparation to the VPI impregnation, including references to the materials used as well as to the relevant customer's requirements. In particular the special winding form and the winding technique are treated. For each phase the most critical aspects and the relevant solutions are pointed out. Particular details about the technical solutions adopted for the impregnation and curing of the Double Pancake, which could not be performed inside an autoclave due to the huge dimension of the coil itself, are reported. Finally the methods used for the dimensional and electri...

  20. Early relapse after single auto-SCT for multiple myeloma is a major predictor of survival in the era of novel agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Zepeda, V H; Reece, D E; Trudel, S; Chen, C; Tiedemann, R; Kukreti, V

    2015-02-01

    The role of auto-SCT in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) in the era of novel agents continues to evolve. It is now clear that the depth of response and clinical outcomes have significantly improved as a result of the combination of these strategies. However, not all patients with MM who undergo auto-SCT are able to sustain a meaningful response and 20% of patients relapse shortly after auto-SCT. In this study, we aimed to assess the impact of early relapse (ER) after auto-SCT on OS for MM patients undergoing single auto-SCT who had received novel agent-based induction regimens. All consecutive patients with MM undergoing single auto-SCT from January 2002 to September 2012 who had novel induction therapy were evaluated. A total of 184 patients were identified. The median OS and PFS for the group of transplanted patients were 93 and 25.4 months, respectively. Median time to relapse was 17.2 months with 40% having relapsed at the time of analysis. ER (SCT) was seen in 27 (36%) out of 75 patients who had relapsed, and median OS was significantly shorter than in those with non-ER. Multivariate analysis showed ER as the major independent prognostic factor for OS. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that not only attainment of a good response, but sustainability of it, appears to be a major prognostic variable in MM in the era of novel therapy. Patients with ER post auto-SCT should biologically be characterized in prospective studies to better understand the mechanisms of resistance associated with this particular entity.

  1. Effect of Friction on Barreling during cold Upset Forging of Aluminium 6082 Alloy Solid cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, Amrita; Kiran, C. P.; Suresh, K.

    2018-03-01

    Friction is one of the significant factors in forging operations since it affects metal flow in the die, forming load, strain distribution, tool and die life, surface quality of the product etc. In upset forging, the frictional forces at the die-workpiece interface oppose the outward flow of the material due to which the specimen develops a barrel shape. As a result, the deformation becomes non-uniform or inhomogeneous which is undesirable. Barreling can be reduced by applying effective lubricant on the surface of the platens. The objective of the present work is to study experimentally the effect of various frictional conditions (dry, grease, mineral oil) on barreling during upset forging of aluminum 6082 solid cylinders of different aspect ratio (length/diameter: 0.5, 0.75, 1). The friction coefficients are determined using the ring compression test. Curvature of barrel is determined based on the assumption that the curvature of the barrel follows the geometry of circular arc.

  2. Study and analysis for the flow-induced vibration of the core barrel of a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Weida; Shi Guolin; Jiang Nanyan

    1989-01-01

    The resemblance criteria are derived and a test model is designed by applying the flow-soild coupling theory. After having completed the model analysis of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) core barrel in an 1:10 model, the dynamic characteristics are obtained. In an 1:5 reactor model with a hydraulic closed loop, the hydraulic vibration tests of the core barrel are performed, and the relations between the flow rate and the flow-induced pulse pressure on core barrel, acceleration and strain signals have been measured. The corresponding responses and a group of computational equations for hydraulic vibration are derived from these two experiments. The computational hydraulic vibration responses for core barrel in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant are in good agreement with the test results, and it shows that the core barrel is safe within its lifetime of 30 years

  3. A radial map of multi-whisker correlation selectivity in the rat barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estebanez, Luc; Bertherat, Julien; Shulz, Daniel E; Bourdieu, Laurent; Léger, Jean-François

    2016-11-21

    In the barrel cortex, several features of single-whisker stimuli are organized in functional maps. The barrel cortex also encodes spatio-temporal correlation patterns of multi-whisker inputs, but so far the cortical mapping of neurons tuned to such input statistics is unknown. Here we report that layer 2/3 of the rat barrel cortex contains an additional functional map based on neuronal tuning to correlated versus uncorrelated multi-whisker stimuli: neuron responses to uncorrelated multi-whisker stimulation are strongest above barrel centres, whereas neuron responses to correlated and anti-correlated multi-whisker stimulation peak above the barrel-septal borders, forming rings of multi-whisker synchrony-preferring cells.

  4. Physical and emotional well-being of survivors of childhood and young adult allo-SCT - A Danish national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Josef Nathan; Gøtzsche, Frederik; Heilmann, Carsten; Sengeløv, Henrik; Adamsen, Lis; Christensen, Karl Bang; Larsen, Hanne Baekgaard

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to examine, within a population-based study of a national cohort comprising Danish survivors of allo-SCT (n = 148), the long-term effects of allo-SCT in children and young adults. Physical and emotional well-being was assessed using the Short Form 36 (SF-36) and the HADS. Allo-SCT-related data were obtained from the participants' medical records. The study includes 148 patients, with an 89% response rate (n = 132). For comparison purposes, norm data from Danish (1994, n = 6000), Swedish (2006, n = 285), and British (2001, n = 1792) population samples were used. Factors negatively influencing the SF-36 subscales included female gender; TBI; stem cells derived from PB; older age at time of questioning; and living alone. Factors significantly (p SCT patients were similar to norm data. In conclusion, this national cohort study shows that patients treated with SCT in early life (SCT, showed similar levels of anxiety, depression, and physical and emotional well-being to those of the normal population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Expansion of donor-reactive host T cells in primary graft failure after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT following reduced-intensity conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, M; Hashimoto, D; Nagafuji, K; Eto, T; Ohno, Y; Aoyama, K; Iwasaki, H; Miyamoto, T; Hill, G R; Akashi, K; Teshima, T

    2014-01-01

    Graft rejection remains a major obstacle in allogeneic hematopoietic SCT following reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC-SCT), particularly after cord blood transplantation (CBT). In a murine MHC-mismatched model of RIC-SCT, primary graft rejection was associated with activation and expansion of donor-reactive host T cells in peripheral blood and BM early after SCT. Donor-derived dendritic cells are at least partly involved in host T-cell activation. We then evaluated if such an expansion of host T cells could be associated with graft rejection after RIC-CBT. Expansion of residual host lymphocytes was observed in 4/7 patients with graft rejection at 3 weeks after CBT, but in none of the 17 patients who achieved engraftment. These results suggest the crucial role of residual host T cells after RIC-SCT in graft rejection and expansion of host T cells could be a marker of graft rejection. Development of more efficient T cell-suppressive conditioning regimens may be necessary in the context of RIC-SCT.

  6. Long-term follow-up of patients undergoing auto-SCT for advanced germ cell tumour: a multicentre cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seftel, M D; Paulson, K; Doocey, R; Song, K; Czaykowski, P; Coppin, C; Forrest, D; Hogge, D; Kollmansberger, C; Smith, C A; Shepherd, J D; Toze, C L; Murray, N; Sutherland, H; Nantel, S; Nevill, T J; Barnett, M J

    2011-06-01

    Failure of cisplatin-based chemotherapy in advanced germ cell tumour (GCT) is associated with a poor outcome. High-dose chemotherapy and auto-SCT is one therapeutic option, although the long-term outcome after this procedure is unclear. We conducted a multicentre cohort study of consecutive patients undergoing a single auto-SCT for GCT between January 1986 and December 2004. Of 71 subjects, median follow-up is 10.1 years. OS at 5 years is 44.7% (95% confidence interval (CI) 32.9-56.5%) and EFS is 43.5% (95% CI 31.4-55.1%). There were seven (10%) treatment-related deaths within 100 days of auto-SCT. Three (4.2%) patients developed secondary malignancies. Of 33 relapses, 31 occurred within 2 years of auto-SCT. Two very late relapses were noted 13 and 11 years after auto-SCT. In multivariate analysis, favourable outcome was associated with IGCCC (International Germ Cell Consensus Classification) good prognosis disease at diagnosis, primary gonadal disease and response to salvage chemotherapy. We conclude that auto-SCT results in successful outcome for a relatively large subgroup of patients with high-risk GCT. Late relapses may occur, a finding not previously reported.

  7. Comparative genomics and transcriptome analysis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 11443 and the mutant strain SCT-10-10-60 with enhanced L-lactic acid production capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liang; Lu, Zhilong; Li, Jianxiu; Sun, Feifei; Huang, Ribo

    2018-02-01

    Mechanisms for high L-lactic acid production remain unclear in many bacteria. Lactobacillus rhamnosus SCT-10-10-60 was previously obtained from L. rhamnosus ATCC 11443 via mutagenesis and showed improved L-lactic acid production. In this study, the genomes of strains SCT-10-10-60 and ATCC 11443 were sequenced. Both genomes are a circular chromosome, 2.99 Mb in length with a GC content of approximately 46.8%. Eight split genes were identified in strain SCT-10-10-60, including two LytR family transcriptional regulators, two Rex redox-sensing transcriptional repressors, and four ABC transporters. In total, 60 significantly up-regulated genes (log 2 fold-change ≥ 2) and 39 significantly down-regulated genes (log 2 fold-change ≤ - 2) were identified by a transcriptome comparison between strains SCT-10-10-60 and ATCC 11443. KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed that "pyruvate metabolism" was significantly different (P < 0.05) between the two strains. The split genes and the differentially expressed genes involved in the "pyruvate metabolism" pathway are probably responsible for the increased L-lactic acid production by SCT-10-10-60. The genome and transcriptome sequencing information and comparison of SCT-10-10-60 with ATCC 11443 provide insights into the anabolism of L-lactic acid and a reference for improving L-lactic acid production using genetic engineering.

  8. Quantum arrival times and operator normalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegerfeldt, Gerhard C.; Seidel, Dirk; Gonzalo Muga, J.

    2003-01-01

    A recent approach to arrival times used the fluorescence of an atom entering a laser illuminated region, and the resulting arrival-time distribution was close to the axiomatic distribution of Kijowski, but not exactly equal, neither in limiting cases nor after compensation of reflection losses by normalization on the level of expectation values. In this paper we employ a normalization on the level of operators, recently proposed in a slightly different context. We show that in this case the axiomatic arrival-time distribution of Kijowski is recovered as a limiting case. In addition, it is shown that Allcock's complex potential model is also a limit of the physically motivated fluorescence approach and connected to Kijowski's distribution through operator normalization

  9. Assembly of 5.5-Meter Diameter Developmental Barrel Segments for the Ares I Upper Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Full scale assembly welding of Ares I Upper Stage 5.5-Meter diameter cryogenic tank barrel segments has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). One full-scale developmental article produced under the Ares 1 Upper Stage project is the Manufacturing Demonstration Article (MDA) Barrel. This presentation will focus on the welded assembly of this barrel section, and associated lessons learned. Among the MDA articles planned on the Ares 1 Program, the Barrel was the first to be completed, primarily because the process of manufacture from piece parts (barrel panels) utilized the most mature friction stir process planned for use on the Ares US program: Conventional fixed pin Friction Stir Welding (FSW). This process is in use on other space launch systems, including the Shuttle s External Tank, the Delta IV common booster core, the Delta II, and the Atlas V rockets. The goals for the MDA Barrel development were several fold: 1) to prove out Marshall Space Flight Center s new Vertical Weld Tool for use in manufacture of cylindrical barrel sections, 2) to serve as a first run for weld qualification to a new weld specification, and 3) to provide a full size cylindrical section for downstream use in precision cleaning and Spray-on Foam Insulation development. The progression leading into the welding of the full size barrel included sub scale panel welding, subscale cylinder welding, a full length confidence weld, and finally, the 3 seamed MDA barrel processing. Lessons learned on this MDA program have been carried forward into the production tooling for the Ares 1 US Program, and in the use of the MSFC VWT in processing other large scale hardware, including two 8.4 meter diameter Shuttle External Tank barrel sections that are currently being used in structural analysis to validate shell buckling models.

  10. Managing customer arrivals with time windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Gang; Jiang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Due to increasing container traffic and mega-ships, many seaports face challenges of huge amounts of truck arrivals and congestion problem at terminal gates, which affect port efficiency and generate serious air pollution. To solve this congestion problem, we propose a solution of managing truck...... arrivals with time windows based on the truck-vessel service relationship, specifically trucks delivering containers for the same vessel share one common time window. Time windows can be optimized with different strategies. In this paper, we first propose a framework for installing this solution...

  11. Angle of arrival estimation using spectral interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Z.W.; Harrington, C.; Thiel, C.W.; Babbitt, W.R.; Krishna Mohan, R.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a correlative signal processing concept based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and spatial-spectral (S2) materials that enables direct mapping of RF spectral phase as well as power spectral recording. This configuration can be used for precise frequency resolved time delay estimation between signals received by a phased antenna array system that in turn could be utilized to estimate the angle of arrival. We present an analytical theoretical model and a proof-of-principle demonstration of the concept of time difference of arrival estimation with a cryogenically cooled Tm:YAG crystal that operates on microwave signals modulated onto a stabilized optical carrier at 793 nm.

  12. Angle of arrival estimation using spectral interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Z.W.; Harrington, C.; Thiel, C.W.; Babbitt, W.R. [Spectrum Lab, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Krishna Mohan, R., E-mail: krishna@spectrum.montana.ed [Spectrum Lab, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    We have developed a correlative signal processing concept based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and spatial-spectral (S2) materials that enables direct mapping of RF spectral phase as well as power spectral recording. This configuration can be used for precise frequency resolved time delay estimation between signals received by a phased antenna array system that in turn could be utilized to estimate the angle of arrival. We present an analytical theoretical model and a proof-of-principle demonstration of the concept of time difference of arrival estimation with a cryogenically cooled Tm:YAG crystal that operates on microwave signals modulated onto a stabilized optical carrier at 793 nm.

  13. [Getting qi and arrival of qi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nong-Yu

    2014-08-01

    In order to clarify the inter-relationship between getting qi and arrival of qi, the relevant theory in the Inner Canon of Yellow Emperor is re-considered, and then the relationship of the two concepts by combining with some opinions from scholars is compared and analyzed. Getting qi is the signal of acupuncture at an acupoint; also it is a sign of arrival of qi at an acupoint; what's more, it is the premise for reinforcing or reducing manipulation. The sensation of arrival of qi comes from both doctors and patients, characterized with explicit symptoms including "tight and swift", "sunken, sticky and tight", "light, loose and slow", "warm at the acupoint" or "cold at the acupoint" as well as implicit symptom including "qi moving along the meridians"; also there is the condition of qi regulation that is characterized with "paced and harmony" stomach qi. The arrival of qi could be divided into "qi moving to the needles" and "qi traveling to the diseases". The "qi moving to the needles" has similar meaning to getting qi. The "qi traveling to the diseases" is reflected as "qi arrival with efficacy" and characterized as an immediate effect or a delayed effect. There are differences between the concepts of getting qi and arrival of qi. Getting qi focuses on the importance of the doctor during acupuncture processes (differentiate the nature of qi, guard qi, manipulate qi), which also suggests the clinical significance of implicit getting qi. "Arrival of qi" emphasizes "qi arrival with efficacy", and indicates that during treatment the differences of the exterior or interior and deficit or surplus should be distinguished. For external and shallow diseases involving myofascia-related diseases, miu needling and shallow needling can achieve an immediate treatment effect; for deep, internal and deficient diseases, reinforcing or reducing manipulation should be used to achieve stomach qi, which has delayed effects but can be used as an indicator. It is believed that pulse

  14. Efficacy and safety of micafungin for prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections in patients undergoing haplo-identical hematopoietic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Cheikh, J; Venton, G; Crocchiolo, R; Fürst, S; Faucher, C; Granata, A; Oudin, C; Coso, D; Bouabdallah, R; Vey, N; Duran, S; Fougereau, E; Berger, P; Chabannon, C; Blaise, D

    2013-11-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) such as candidiasis and mold infections have caused significant morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients in recent years. Micafungin, a new echinocandin, inhibits fungal cell wall β-glucan synthesis, with potent activity against most species of Candida and Aspergillus. The aim of this observational study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of micafungin in prophylaxis of IFIs in 26 high-risk adult patients with various hematological diseases receiving haplo-identical Allo-SCT. Only two patients had a history of possible aspergillosis before transplant treated by voriconazole. The patients received a median of four lines (2-7) of treatment before Allo-SCT. Thirteen patients (50%) received at least one prior Auto-SCT; and eight patients (31%) received a previous Allo-SCT. Patients received a median of 29 infusions (range, 15-85) of micafungin (50 mg/day i.v. as a 1-h infusion). The treatment was initiated at the beginning of the transplant conditioning regimen until the hospital discharge. None of our patients discontinued the treatment for drug-related adverse events. Micafungin was not associated with any hepatotoxicity. Only one patient (4%) discontinued the treatment because of early disease progression. In all patients no Candida and/or Aspergillus species was documented after 3 and 6 months from transplant. None of our patients presented a positive galactomannan antigenemia >0.5. Nine patients (35%) presented a CMV reactivation. Four patients presented an acute GVHD grade II and two patients presented a chronic GVHD. The median follow-up was 11 months (3-23). At the last follow-up, there were 20 patients (77%) who were alive; four patients (12%) died because of disease progression and two patients because of graft failure. Micafungin has a good safety and tolerability profile, with an efficacy in preventing IFI in this high-risk population. Our data provide support for an efficacy study in a

  15. Control and synchronisation in switched arrival systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rem, B.; Armbruster, H.D.

    2003-01-01

    A chaotic model of a production flow called the switched arrival system is extended to include switching times and maintenance. The probability distribution of the chaotic return times is calculated. Scheduling maintenance, loss of production due to switching, and control of the chaotic dynamics is

  16. The TIM Barrel Architecture Facilitated the Early Evolution of Protein-Mediated Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Aaron David; Beatty, Joshua T; Landweber, Laura F

    2016-01-01

    The triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel protein fold is a structurally repetitive architecture that is present in approximately 10% of all enzymes. It is generally assumed that this ubiquity in modern proteomes reflects an essential historical role in early protein-mediated metabolism. Here, we provide quantitative and comparative analyses to support several hypotheses about the early importance of the TIM barrel architecture. An information theoretical analysis of protein structures supports the hypothesis that the TIM barrel architecture could arise more easily by duplication and recombination compared to other mixed α/β structures. We show that TIM barrel enzymes corresponding to the most taxonomically broad superfamilies also have the broadest range of functions, often aided by metal and nucleotide-derived cofactors that are thought to reflect an earlier stage of metabolic evolution. By comparison to other putatively ancient protein architectures, we find that the functional diversity of TIM barrel proteins cannot be explained simply by their antiquity. Instead, the breadth of TIM barrel functions can be explained, in part, by the incorporation of a broad range of cofactors, a trend that does not appear to be shared by proteins in general. These results support the hypothesis that the simple and functionally general TIM barrel architecture may have arisen early in the evolution of protein biosynthesis and provided an ideal scaffold to facilitate the metabolic transition from ribozymes, peptides, and geochemical catalysts to modern protein enzymes.

  17. Poor concordance of spiral CT (SCT) and high probability ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) studies in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, M.R.; Angelides, S.; Chen, N.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Despite its limitations, V/Q scintigraphy remains the favoured non-invasive technique for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE). PE is present in 85-90% and 30-40% of high and intermediate probability V/Q studies respectively. The value of spiral CT (SCT), a newer imaging modality, has yet to be determined. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of positive SCT for PE in high and intermediate probability V/Q studies performed within 24hr apart. 15 patients (6M, 9F, mean age - 70.2) with a high probability study were included. Six (40%) SCT were reported as positive (four with emboli present in the main pulmonary arteries), seven as negative, one equivocal and one was technically sub-optimal. Pulmonary angiography was not performed in any patient. In all seven negative studies, the SCT was performed before the V/Q study. Of these, two studies were revised to positive once the result of the V/Q study was known, while, three others had resolving mismatch V/Q defects on follow-up studies (performed 5-14 days later); two of these three also had a positive duplex scan of the lower limbs. One other was most likely due to chronic thromboembolic disease. Only three patients had a V/Q scan prior to the SCT; all were positive for PE on both imaging modalities. Of 26 patients (11M, 15F, mean age - 68.5) with an intermediate probability V/Q study, SCT was positive in only two (8%). Thus the low detection rate of PE by SCT in this albeit small series, raises doubts as to its role in the diagnosis of PE. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  18. Syria: a waited petroleum production of 600 000 barrels per day for the end of 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the reserves of petroleum deposits and gives statistical data on the production of the main oil fields in Syria. Petroleum production has grown from 160000 barrels per day in 1984 to 515000 barrels per day in 1992 and a production at a level of 600000 barrels per day is waited in 1993. Several petroleum companies, operating in Syria, have contributed to this rise, especially Al-Furat Petroleum Company (AFPC), joint venture between Syrian Petroleum Company (SPC) and Pecten/Shell/Deminex, followed by Deiz Ezzor Petroleum Company (DEZPC), association between the french company Elf Aquitaine and SPC. 2 tabs

  19. Vinten exposure measurements of the Salem Unit 1 lower core barrel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glennon, P.T.

    1988-01-01

    On November 6, 1987, the lower core barrel of Salem Unit I was removed from the reactor vessel and placed in the refueling pool as part of the unit's ten year inspection program. This paper deals with the supporting actions of the dosimetry group of PSE ampersand G. Prior to the move of the lower core barrel, Westinghouse predicted dose rates at one foot in water as a function of axial distance along the core barrel. This prediction was used in planning the health physics requirements associated with the move. It was agreed that a measurement of the axial dose rates would either lend confidence to the predictions or identify weaknesses in them

  20. Second Barrel Toroid Coil Installed in ATLAS Cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Tappern, G.

    The second barrel toroid coil was lowered into the ATLAS Cavern on Friday, 26 November. The operation takes approximately five hours of precision crane and winch operations. Before lowering, several checks are made to ensure that no loose items have been left on the coil which would fall during the lowering down the shaft. This is a very difficult, but very important check, with the first coil in position, and partly below the shaft. After changing the winch tooling on Wednesday December 1st, the coil was lifted, rotated and placed into the feet. The girders which support the coil and the Z direction stops had all been pre-set before putting the coil in the feet. The angle is controlled by an inclinometer. When the final adjustments of position have been made, which will locate the coils at the plus/minus two mm level, the connection beams (voussoirs and struts) will be put in place; this requires a complex shimming procedure. This will lock together the two coils into the feet and forms the foundation for th...

  1. Double Barreled Wet Colostomy: Initial Experience and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Cruz, Luis; Espin-Basany, Eloy; Vallribera-Valls, Francesc; Sanchez-Garcia, Jose; Jimenez-Gomez, Luis Miguel; Marti-Gallostra, Marc; Garza-Maldonado, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pelvic exenteration and multivisceral resection in colorectal have been described as a curative and palliative intervention. Urinary tract reconstruction in a pelvic exenteration is achieved in most cases with an ileal conduit of Bricker, although different urinary reservoirs have been described. Methods. A retrospective and observational study of six patients who underwent a pelvic exenteration and urinary tract reconstruction with a double barreled wet colostomy (DBWC) was done, describing the preoperative diagnosis, the indication for the pelvic exenteration, the complications associated with the procedure, and the followup in a period of 5 years. A literature review of the case series reported of the technique was performed. Results. Six patients had a urinary tract reconstruction with the DBWC technique, 5 male patients and one female patient. Age range was from 20 to 77 years, with a medium age 53.6 years. The most frequent complication presented was a pelvic abscess in 3 patients (42.85%); all complications could be resolved with a conservative treatment. Conclusion. In the group of our patients with pelvic exenteration and urinary tract reconstruction with a DBWC, it is a safe procedure and well tolerated by the patients, and most of the complications can be resolved with conservative treatment. PMID:25574498

  2. Energy Resolution of the Barrel of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Adzic, Petar; Almeida, Carlos; Almeida, Nuno; Anagnostou, Georgios; Anfreville, Marc; Anicin, Ivan; Antunovic, Zeljko; Auffray, Etiennette; Baccaro, Stefania; Baffioni, Stephanie; Baillon, Paul; Barney, David; Barone, Luciano; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Bell, Ken W; Benetta, Robert; Bercher, Michel; Berthon, Ursula; Betev, Botjo; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Bialas, Wojciech; Biino, Cristina; Bimbot, Stephane; Blaha, Jan; Bloch, Philippe; Blyth, Simon; Bordalo, Paula; Bornheim, Adolf; Bourotte, Jean; Britton, David; Brown, Robert M; Brunelière, Renaud; Busson, Philippe; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cavallari, Francesca; Cerutti, Muriel; Chamont, David; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Charlot, Claude; Chatterji, Sudeep; Chen, E Augustine; Chipaux, Rémi; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Cockerill, David J A; Collard, Caroline; Combaret, Christophe; Cossutti, Fabio; Da Silva, J C; Dafinei, Ioan; Daskalakis, Georgios; Davatz, Giovanna; Decotigny, David; De Min, Alberto; Deiters, Konrad; Dejardin, Marc; Del Re, Daniele; Della Negra, Rodolphe; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Depasse, Pierre; Descamp, J; Dewhirst, Guy; Dhawan, Satish; Diemoz, Marcella; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Djambazov, Lubomir; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Drndarevic, Snezana; Dupanloup, Michel; Dzelalija, Mile; Ehlers, Jan; El-Mamouni, H; Peisert, Anna; Evangelou, Ioannis; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Fay, Jean; Ferri, Federico; Flower, Paul S; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gaillac, Anne-Marie; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gascon-Shotkin, S; Geerebaert, Yannick; Gentit, François-Xavier; Ghezzi, Alessio; Gilly, Jean; Giolo-Nicollerat, Anne-Sylvie; Givernaud, Alain; Gninenko, Sergei; Go, Apollo; Godinovic, Nikola; Golubev, Nikolai; Golutvin, Igor; Gómez-Reino, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Grahl, James; Gras, Philippe; Greenhalgh, Justin; Guillaud, Jean-Paul; Haguenauer, Maurice; Hamel De Montechenault, G; Hansen, Magnus; Heath, Helen F; Hill, Jack; Hobson, Peter R; Holmes, Daniel; Holzner, André; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Ille, Bernard; Ingram, Quentin; Jain, Adarsh; Jarry, Patrick; Jauffret, C; Jha, Manoj; Karar, M A; Kataria, Sushil Kumar; Katchanov, V A; Kennedy, Bruce W; Kloukinas, Kostas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Korjik, M; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Krpic, Dragomir; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Lebeau, Michel; Lecomte, Pierre; Lecoq, Paul; Lemaire, Marie-Claude; Lethuillier, Morgan; Lin, Willis; Lintern, A L; Lister, Alison; Litvin, V; Locci, Elizabeth; Lodge, Anthony B; Longo, Egidio; Loukas, Demetrios; Luckey, D; Lustermann, Werner; Lynch, Clare; MacKay, Catherine Kirsty; Malberti, Martina; Maletic, Dimitrije; Mandjavidze, Irakli; Manthos, Nikolaos; Markou, Athanasios; Mathez, Hervé; Mathieu, Antoine; Matveev, Viktor; Maurelli, Georges; Menichetti, Ezio; Meridiani, Paolo; Milenovic, Predrag; Milleret, Gérard; Miné, Philippe; Mur, Michel; Musienko, Yuri; Nardulli, Alessandro; Nash, Jordan; Neal, Homer; Nédélec, Patrick; Negri, Pietro; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Newman, Harvey B; Nikitenko, Alexander; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Organtini, Giovanni; Paganini, Pascal; Paganoni, Marco; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paramatti, Riccardo; Pastrone, Nadia; Pauss, Felicitas; Puljak, Ivica; Pullia, Antonino; Puzovic, Jovan; Ragazzi, Stefano; Ramos, Sergio; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rander, John; Ranjan, Kirti; Ravat, Olivier; Raymond, M; Razis, Panos A; Redaelli, Nicola; Renker, Dieter; Reucroft, Steve; Reymond, Jean-Marc; Reynaud, Michel; Reynaud, Serge; Romanteau, Thierry; Rondeaux, Françoise; Rosowsky, André; Rovelli, Chiara; Rumerio, Paolo; Rusack, Roger; Rusakov, Sergey V; Ryan, Matthew John; Rykaczewski, Hans; Sakhelashvili, Tariel; Salerno, Roberto; Santos, Marcelino; Seez, Christopher; Semeniouk, Igor; Sharif, Omar; Sharp, Peter; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Shevchenko, Sergey; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Sidiropoulos, Georgios; Sillou, Daniel; Singovsky, Alexander; Sirois, Y; Sirunyan, Albert M; Smith, Brian; Smith, Vincent J; Sproston, Martin; Suter, Henry; Swain, John; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Takahashi, Maiko; Tapper, Robert J; Tcheremoukhine, Alexandre; Teixeira, Isabel; Teixeira, Joao Paulo; Teller, Olivier; Timlin, Claire; Triantis, F A; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Ueno, Koji; Uzunian, Andrey; Varela, Joao; Vaz-Cardoso, N; Verrecchia, Patrice; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Vigano, S; Viertel, Gert; Virdee, Tejinder; Vlassov, E; Wang, Minzu; Weinstein, Alan; Williams, Jennifer C; Yaselli, Ignacio; Zabi, Alexandre; Zamiatin, Nikolai; Zelepoukine, Serguei; Zeller, Michael E; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Jia-Wen; Zhang, Yawei; Zhu, Kejun; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2007-01-01

    The energy resolution of the barrel part of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter has been studied using electrons of 20 to 250 GeV in a test beam. The incident electron's energy was reconstructed by summing the energy measured in arrays of 3x3 or 5x5 channels. There was no significant amount of correlated noise observed within these arrays. For electrons incident at the centre of the studied 3x3 arrays of crystals, the mean stochastic term was measured to be 2.8% and the mean constant term to be 0.3%. The amount of the incident electron's energy which is contained within the array depends on its position of incidence. The variation of the containment with position is corrected for using the distribution of the measured energy within the array. For uniform illumination of a crystal with 120 GeV electrons a resolution of 0.5% was achieved. The energy resolution meets the design goal for the detector.

  3. Cryogenic Characteristics of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Superconducting Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Pengo, R; Delruelle, N; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Passardi, Giorgio; Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS, one of the experiments of the LHC accelerator under commissioning at CERN, is equipped with a large superconducting magnet the Barrel Toroid (BT) that has been tested at nominal current (20500 A). The BT is composed of eight race-track superconducting coils (each one weights about 45 tons) forming the biggest air core toroidal magnet ever built. By means of a large throughput centrifugal pump, a forced flow (about 10 liter/second at 4.5 K) provides the indirect cooling of the coils in parallel. The paper describes the results of the measurements carried out on the complete cryogenic system assembled in the ATLAS cavern situated 100 m below the ground level. The measurements include, among other ones, the static heat loads, i.e., with no or constant current in the magnet, and the dynamic ones, since additional heat losses are produced, during the current ramp-up or slow dump, by eddy currents induced on the coil casing.

  4. Some developments in core-barrel vibration diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, I.; Karlsson, J.; Garis, N.S.

    1998-01-01

    Diagnostics of core-barrel motion, and notably that of beam mode vibrations, has been usually performed by two distinct concepts. One strategy is to perform a qualitative analysis in the time domain, using descriptors such as vibration trajectory, probability distributions etc. This approach is rather realistic in the sense that it allows for general anisotropic pendular vibrations. The other strategy is to use frequency analysis with the goal of quantifying certain vibration properties. However, this second approach could so far handle only isotropic and unidirectional vibrations. In this paper we propose a unification of these two approaches by introducing a model by which general anisotropic vibrations can be quantified in the frequency domain. However, when separating the noise components prior to the frequency analysis, we suggest the use of symmetry properties of the noise in the time domain, based on reactor physics assumptions, as opposed to the earlier methods that use statistical independence of the components. Due to the unified approach, a combination of time and frequency domain analysis methods can be used for presentation and maximum information extraction

  5. Barrel Toroid fully charged to nominal field, and it works!

    CERN Multimedia

    Herman ten Kate

    After a few weeks of testing up to intermediate currents, finally, on Thursday evening November 9, the current in the Barrel Toroid was pushed up to its nominal value of 20500 A and even 500 A beyond this value to prove that we have some margin. It went surprisingly well. Of course, the 8 coils forming the toroid were already tested individually at the surface but still, some surprise may have come from those parts added to the toroid in the cavern for the first time like the 8 cryoring sections linking the coils as well as the valve box at the bottom in sector 13 regulating the helium flow or the current lead cryostat on the top in sector 5. No training quenches, nothing to worry about, and the test was concluded with a fast dump triggered at 00:40 in the very early morning of November 10. (left) The toroid current during the evening and night of November 9. (right) The test crew oscillated between fear and hope while looking at the control panels as the current approached 21kA. Big relief was in the...

  6. Cerebral glucose utilization after vasopressin barrel rotation or bicuculline seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurpel, J.; Dundore, R.; Bryan, R.; Keil, L.; Severs, W.B.

    1986-01-01

    Intraventricular (ivt) arginine vasopressin (AVP) causes a violent motor behavior termed barrel rotation (BR). AVP-BR is affected by visual/vestibular sensory input and may be related to other CNS motor disorders (seizures). Local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) was compared in SD rats during AVP-BR and bicuculline (BIC) seizures. Three groups were used: saline-ivt; AVP-ivt 0.5 μg; BIC-5.5 mg/kg,sc. 14 C-glucose (40 μCI iv) was injected 15 sec. after ivt-saline or AVP or onset of BIC seizures. Rats were decapitated 10 min. after 14 C-glucose. Brains were removed and dissected into 19 regions which were digested and glucose uptake quantified by liquid scintillation counting. LCGU was significantly increased in all CNS areas during BIC seizures vs controls (21-92%; p < 0.05 ANOVA). LCGU exhibits variable (upward arrow, downward arrow) changes in discrete areas during AVP-BR (p < .05). Glucose uptake increased in: cortex-olfactory (21%), sensory (9%), motor (8%) cerebellum-rt (13%) and 1t (17%) hemispheres, vermis (6%); pyramidal tract (6%); mesencephalon (5%); and pons (8%). Two areas decreased LCGU during AVP-BR: auditory cortex (-8%) and hippocampus (-11%). AVP-BR exhibits distinct changes in LCGU vs BIC seizures

  7. Knowledge-based scheduling of arrival aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzeczowski, K.; Davis, T.; Erzberger, H.; Lev-Ram, I.; Bergh, C.

    1995-01-01

    A knowledge-based method for scheduling arrival aircraft in the terminal area has been implemented and tested in real-time simulation. The scheduling system automatically sequences, assigns landing times, and assigns runways to arrival aircraft by utilizing continuous updates of aircraft radar data and controller inputs. The scheduling algorithms is driven by a knowledge base which was obtained in over two thousand hours of controller-in-the-loop real-time simulation. The knowledge base contains a series of hierarchical 'rules' and decision logic that examines both performance criteria, such as delay reduction, as well as workload reduction criteria, such as conflict avoidance. The objective of the algorithms is to devise an efficient plan to land the aircraft in a manner acceptable to the air traffic controllers. This paper will describe the scheduling algorithms, give examples of their use, and present data regarding their potential benefits to the air traffic system.

  8. FORECASTING TOURIST ARRIVALS TO LANGKAWI ISLAND MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamarul Ariffin MANSOR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is the act of travelling for a person or group of people from their own locality to a specific destination in a short term or long term period either for leisure or business purposes. Tourism is an important sector in the Malaysian economy where tourism development will lead to the positive economic development of the country and in general improve the quality of life for all citizens. Therefore, forecasting tourist arrivals with high accuracy becomes important since it may ensure the development and the readiness of all tourism related industries such as hotels, transportation, food and services industries and their best shape. This study focuses on tourist arrivals in Langkawi Island as one of the major tourist attractions situated in the northerly region of Peninsular Malaysia. Importantly, this paper attempts to measure and compare the performance of forecasting with Exponential Smoothing, ARIMA and ARFIMA models using the R software package.

  9. Th17 plasticity and transition toward a pathogenic cytokine signature are regulated by cyclosporine after allogeneic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartlan, Kate H; Varelias, Antiopi; Koyama, Motoko; Robb, Renee J; Markey, Kate A; Chang, Karshing; Wilkinson, Andrew N; Smith, David; Ullah, Md Ashik; Kuns, Rachel D; Raffelt, Neil C; Olver, Stuart D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Cheong, Melody; Teng, Michele W L; Smyth, Mark J; Tey, Siok-Keen; MacDonald, Kelli P A; Hill, Geoffrey R

    2017-02-14

    T-helper 17 (Th17) cells have been widely implicated as drivers of autoimmune disease. In particular, Th17 cytokine plasticity and acquisition of an interleukin-17A + (IL-17A + )interferon γ(IFNγ) + cytokine profile is associated with increased pathogenic capacity. Donor Th17 polarization is known to exacerbate graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT); however, donor Th17 cytokine coexpression and plasticity have not been fully characterized. Using IL-17 "fate-mapping" mice, we identified IL-6-dependent Th17 cells early after allo-SCT, characterized by elevated expression of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-17A, IL-22, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and tumor necrosis factor. This population did not maintain lineage fidelity, with a marked loss of IL-17A and IL-22 expression late posttransplant. Th17 cells were further segregated based on IFNγ coexpression, and IL-17A + IFNγ + Th17 displayed an enhanced proinflammatory phenotype. Th17 cytokine plasticity and IFNγ production were critically dependent upon donor-derived IL-12p40, and cyclosporine (CsA) treatment regulated this differentiation pathway. This observation was highly concordant with clinical samples from allo-SCT recipients receiving CsA-based immune suppression where although the IFNγ-negative-Th17 subset predominated, IFNγ + -Th17 cells were also present. In sum, Th17 polarization and ensuing differentiation are mediated by sequential inflammatory signals, which are modulated by immunosuppressive therapy, leading to distinct phenotypes within this lineage.

  10. FORECASTING TOURIST ARRIVALS TO LANGKAWI ISLAND MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Kamarul Ariffin MANSOR; Wan Irham ISHAK

    2015-01-01

    Tourism is the act of travelling for a person or group of people from their own locality to a specific destination in a short term or long term period either for leisure or business purposes. Tourism is an important sector in the Malaysian economy where tourism development will lead to the positive economic development of the country and in general improve the quality of life for all citizens. Therefore, forecasting tourist arrivals with high accuracy becomes important since it may ensure t...

  11. A Front-End Readout Architecture for the CMS Barrel Muon Detector: A Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguayo, P.; Alberdi, J.; Barcala, J.M.; Marin, J.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Pablos, J.L. de; Romero, L.; Willmot, C.

    1995-01-01

    A feasibility study of a possible architecture for the CMS barrel muon detector readout electronics is presented. some aspects of system reliability are discussed. Values for the required FIFO's to store data during the first level trigger latency are given

  12. Beta 2-adrenergic receptors are colocalized and coregulated with whisker barrels in rat somatosensory cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, P.; Kaufmann, D.; Hand, P.J.; Wolfe, B.B.

    1990-01-01

    Autoradiography has been used to visualize independently the subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat somatosensory cortex. Beta 2-adrenergic receptors, but not beta 1-adrenergic receptors colocalize with whisker barrels in this tissue. Thus, each whisker sends a specific multisynaptic pathway to the somatosensory cortex that can be histochemically visualized and only one subtype of beta-adrenergic receptor is specifically associated with this cortical representation. Additionally, neonatal lesion of any or all of the whisker follicles results in loss of the corresponding barrel(s) as shown by histochemical markers. This loss is paralleled by a similar loss in the organization of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the somatosensory cortex. Other results indicate that these beta 2-adrenergic receptors are not involved in moment-to-moment signal transmission in this pathway and, additionally, are not involved in a gross way in the development of whisker-barrel array

  13. Astrocytes control GABAergic inhibition of neurons in the mouse barrel cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, B; Matyash, V; Kettenmann, H

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes in the barrel cortex respond with a transient Ca2+ increase to neuronal stimulation and this response is restricted to the stimulated barrel field. In the present study we suppressed the astrocyte response by dialysing these cells with the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA. Electrical stimulation triggered a depolarization in stellate or pyramidal ‘regular spiking’ neurons from cortex layer 4 and 2/3 and this response was augmented in amplitude and duration after astrocytes were dialysed with BAPTA. Combined blockade of GABAA and GABAB receptors mimicked the effect of BAPTA dialysis, while glutamate receptor blockers had no effect. Moreover, the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic currents was increased after BAPTA dialysis. Outside the range of BAPTA dialysis astrocytes responded with a Ca2+ increase, but in contrast to control, the response was no longer restricted to one barrel field. Our findings indicate that astrocytes control neuronal inhibition in the barrel cortex. PMID:21224221

  14. Study and analysis on the flow induced vibration of the core barrel of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Weida; Shi Guolin; Jiang Nanyan; Peng YongYong; Zhang Huijun; Wang Yufen; Xie Yongcheng; Guo Chunhua; Shen Qinping

    1989-01-01

    The deduction of the resemblance criterion and the design of the test model by applying flow-solid coupling theory are described. The model analysis of a core barrel both in the air and stationary water were performed in a 1:10 model, thus obtaining the dynamic characteristic. In a 1:5 reactor model with a hydraulic closed loop, the inner structure and support were modeled for performing hydraulic closed loop, the inner structure and support were modeled for performing hydraulic vibration test of the core barrel. The flow induced pulse pressure of the core barrel and corresponding response were obtained by using miniature pressure capsule, strain gauge and accelerometer. Power spectrum, correlation functions, transfer function and amplitudes under different flow velocities were calculated. The hydraulic vibration test shows that the core barrel will be in safety during its 30-year life time

  15. Astrocytes control GABAergic inhibition of neurons in the mouse barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, B; Matyash, V; Kettenmann, H

    2011-03-01

    Astrocytes in the barrel cortex respond with a transient Ca2+ increase to neuronal stimulation and this response is restricted to the stimulated barrel field. In the present study we suppressed the astrocyte response by dialysing these cells with the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA. Electrical stimulation triggered a depolarization in stellate or pyramidal ‘regular spiking' neurons from cortex layer 4 and 2/3 and this response was augmented in amplitude and duration after astrocytes were dialysed with BAPTA. Combined blockade of GABAA and GABAB receptors mimicked the effect of BAPTA dialysis, while glutamate receptor blockers had no effect. Moreover, the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic currents was increased after BAPTA dialysis. Outside the range of BAPTA dialysis astrocytes responded with a Ca2+ increase, but in contrast to control, the response was no longer restricted to one barrel field. Our findings indicate that astrocytes control neuronal inhibition in the barrel cortex.

  16. The first American magnet has arrived!

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 21 January the first US-built LHC magnet arrived at CERN, after a journey of 6000 km by land and sea, an event hailed on both sides of the Atlantic. This 10-m long, 4.7-tonne dipole magnet was manufactured over a period of nine months by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Single-aperture magnets of this type will be installed on either side of the ALICE and LHCb experiments and will deviate the beams in order to provoke their interaction and subsequent separation. Brookhaven will be supplying 19 other dipoles for the insertion regions, including four of the same type as the one which has just arrived. «These magnets are based on a technology developed by Brookhaven Laboratory for its own RHIC accelerator,» explains Ranko Ostojic. LHC Project Leader Lyn Evans adds «our Brookhaven colleagues have done a fantastic job in completing the USA's first superconducting magnet for the LHC to specification and on schedule. Other deliveries will shortly be arriving from Brookhaven but also from Fermilab and the ...

  17. Modified high-dose melphalan and autologous SCT for AL amyloidosis or high-risk myeloma: analysis of SWOG trial S0115.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchorawala, V; Hoering, A; Seldin, D C; Finn, K T; Fennessey, S A; Sexton, R; Mattar, B; Safah, H F; Holmberg, L A; Dean, R M; Orlowski, R Z; Barlogie, B

    2013-11-01

    We designed a trial using two sequential cycles of modified high-dose melphalan at 100 mg/m(2) and autologous SCT (mHDM/SCT) in AL amyloidosis (light-chain amyloidosis, AL), AL with myeloma (ALM) and host-based high-risk myeloma (hM) patients through SWOG-0115. The primary objective was to evaluate OS. From 2004 to 2010, 93 eligible patients were enrolled at 17 centers in the United States (59 with AL, 9 with ALM and 25 with hM). The median OS for patients with AL and ALM was 68 months and 47 months, respectively, and has not been reached for patients with hM. The median PFS for patients with AL and ALM was 38 months and 16 months, respectively, and has not been reached for patients with hM. The treatment-related mortality (TRM) was 12% (11/93) and was observed only in patients with AL after SCT. Grade 3 and higher non-hematologic adverse events were experienced by 81%, 67% and 57% of patients with AL, ALM and hM, respectively, during the first and second HDM/SCT. This experience demonstrates that with careful selection of patients and use of mHDM for SCT in patients with AL, ALM and hM, even in the setting of a multicenter study, OS can be improved with acceptable TRM and morbidity.

  18. SCT for severe autoimmune diseases: consensus guidelines of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation for immune monitoring and biobanking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, T; Bondanza, A; Muraro, P A; Greco, R; Saccardi, R; Daikeler, T; Kazmi, M; Hawkey, C; Simoes, B P; Leblanc, K; Fibbe, W E; Moore, J; Snarski, E; Martin, T; Hiepe, F; Velardi, A; Toubert, A; Snowden, J A; Farge, D

    2015-02-01

    Over the past 15 years, SCT has emerged as a promising treatment option for patients with severe autoimmune diseases (ADs). Mechanistic studies recently provided the proof-of-concept that restoration of immunological tolerance can be achieved by haematopoietic SCT in chronic autoimmunity through eradication of the pathologic, immunologic memory and profound reconfiguration of the immune system, that is, immune 'resetting'. Nevertheless, a number of areas remain unresolved and warrant further investigation to refine our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of action and to optimize clinical SCT protocols. Due to the low number of patients transplanted in each centre, it is essential to adequately collect and analyse biological samples in a larger cohort of patients under standardized conditions. The European society for blood and marrow transplantation Autoimmune Diseases and Immunobiology Working Parties have, therefore, undertaken a joint initiative to develop and implement guidelines for 'good laboratory practice' in relation to procurement, processing, storage and analysis of biological specimens for immune reconstitution studies in AD patients before, during and after SCT. The aim of this document is to provide practical recommendations for biobanking of samples and laboratory immune monitoring in patients with ADs undergoing SCT, both for routine supportive care purposes and investigational studies.

  19. Evidence for a GVL effect following reduced-intensity allo-SCT in ALL: a British Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medd, P G; Peniket, A J; Littlewood, T J; Pearce, R; Perry, J; Kirkland, K E; Shaw, B E; Potter, M N; Craddock, C F; Milligan, D W; Fielding, A K; Marks, D I; Cook, G

    2013-07-01

    Myeloablative allo-SCT decreases relapse incidence (RI) in ALL. Reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) may extend allo-SCT to older and less fit patients. Sixty-nine ALL patients reported to the BSBMT underwent fludarabine-based RIC allo-SCT, 38 from unrelated donors (UD). Forty-four patients received alemtuzumab. ALL was in CR in 64 patients (93%). This was a second or third SCT in 23 patients. Two-year OS and PFS were 36% and 32%, respectively. In multivariate analysis male recipients demonstrated better OS and PFS (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.42, P = 0.008 and HR = 0.45, P = 0.012, respectively). Two-year TRM was 29%: higher with younger age (HR = 0.97/year, P = 0.041), female recipient (HR = 2.55, P = 0.049) and increasing grade of acute GVHD (HR = 1.87, P = 0.001). Two-year RI was 38% and was lower in patients with acute and chronic GVHD (HR = 0.62 per increasing grade, P = 0.035 and HR = 0.52, P = 0.025, respectively). Long-term ALL-free survival is achievable following fludarabine-based RIC allo-SCT. The association between GVHD and decreased RI suggests the presence of a GVL effect.

  20. Next-generation sequencing indicates false-positive MRD results and better predicts prognosis after SCT in patients with childhood ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrova, M; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Formankova, R; Sedlacek, P; Brüggemann, M; Zuna, J; Stary, J; Trka, J; Fronkova, E

    2017-07-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring via quantitative PCR (qPCR) detection of Ag receptor gene rearrangements has been the most sensitive method for predicting prognosis and making post-transplant treatment decisions for patients with ALL. Despite the broad clinical usefulness and standardization of this method, we and others have repeatedly reported the possibility of false-positive MRD results caused by massive B-lymphocyte regeneration after stem cell transplantation (SCT). Next-generation sequencing (NGS) enables precise and sensitive detection of multiple Ag receptor rearrangements, thus providing a more specific readout compared to qPCR. We investigated two cohorts of children with ALL who underwent SCT (30 patients and 228 samples). The first cohort consisted of 17 patients who remained in long-term CR after SCT despite having low MRD positivity (SCT monitoring using qPCR. Only one of 27 qPCR-positive samples was confirmed to be positive by NGS. Conversely, 10 of 15 samples with low qPCR-detected MRD positivity from 13 patients who subsequently relapsed were also confirmed to be positive by NGS (P=0.002). These data show that NGS has a better specificity in post-SCT ALL management and indicate that treatment interventions aimed at reverting impending relapse should not be based on qPCR only.

  1. Modeling two-phase flow in barrels of weapons with combined charges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebojša P. Hristov

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The processes occurring during the firing within barrels of weapons with combined charges are described aiming at the improvement of fire power of existing weapons and the design of new ones. The firing process simulation enables the optimization of gunpowders. The analysis of the obtained results helps in choosing the best combination of input-output parameters for the highest muzzle velocity possible while keeping powder gas maximum pressures inside the barrel at the lowest possible level.

  2. The composite barrel of retail prices and its relationship to crude oil prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balabanoff, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper challenges assumptions about the relationship between refinery gate prices, retail prices paid by consumers and crude oil prices. The analysis presented here considers their relationship within the context of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries' (OPEC's) composite barrel statistics, which includes taxes and other government policy effects on prices. Speed of adjustment and retail price response to taxes are analysed with respect to crude import prices. OPEC's composite barrel is explained and evaluated. Test results are summarized. (UK)

  3. Criticality safety of storage barrels for enriched uranium fresh fuel at the RB research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M. P.

    1997-01-01

    Study on criticality safety of fresh low and high enriched uranium (LEU and HEU) fuel elements in the storage/transport barrels at the RB research reactor is carried out by using the well-known MCNP computer code. It is shown that studied arrays of tightly closed fuel barrels, each entirely loaded with 100 fresh (HEU or LEU) fuel slugs, are far away from criticality, even in cases of an unexpected flooding by light water.(author)

  4. Monitoring of core barrel vibrations in WWER type reactor using out-of-reactor ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dach, K.

    1982-01-01

    Vibration of the core barrel is least desirable for safe operation of the PWR reactor. These mechanical vibrations are in correlation with the fluctuations of neutron flux density whose time and frequency analysis serves failure diagnosis. The mathematical model is described of the transfer of mechanical vibrations of the core barrel to neutron noise. Other steps are indicated indispensable for the application of the method of neutron noise analysis for in-service diagnostics of nuclear power plants. (Z.M.)

  5. Energy calibration of the barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisenkov, A.V.; Aulchenko, V.M.; Bashtovoy, N.S.; Bondar, A.E.; Grebenuk, A.A.; Epifanov, D.A.; Epshteyn, L.B.; Erofeev, A.L.; Kovalenko, O.A.; Kozyrev, A.N.; Kuzmin, A.S.; Mikhailov, K.Yu.; Logashenko, I.B.; Razuvaev, G.P.; Ruban, A.A.; Shebalin, V.E.; Shwartz, B.A.; Talyshev, A.A.; Titov, V.M.; Yudin, Yu.V.

    2017-01-01

    The VEPP-2000 e + e − collider has been operated in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics since 2010. Experiments are carried out with two detectors CMD-3 and SND. The calorimetry at the CMD-3 detector is based on three subsystems, two coaxial barrel calorimeters—Liquid Xenon calorimeter and crystal CsI calorimeter, and end cap calorimeter with BGO crystals. This paper describes the procedures of the energy calibration of the combined barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector.

  6. First half-barrel of the CMS hadron calorimeter successfully asembled

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The first half barrel of the CMS hadron calorimeter has been assembled in the CMS construction hall in Cessy (neighbouring France), called SX5, in October 2001. The picture sequence shows the insertion of the last (the keystone) wedge. It is lifted up to the top of the structure and carefully inserted into the half barrel. Photos 6 and 7 show the HB- in SX5.

  7. Fluid and structural dynamics calculations to determine core barrel loads during blowdown (EV 3,000)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, R.; Schlechtendahl, E.G.

    1977-01-01

    To begin with, the main physical phenomena in connection with blowdown loads on the care barrel and the computer models used are briefly described. These models have also been used in the design of the HTR test care barrel. The fluid dynamics part of the calculations was carried out using the WHAMMOD and DAPSY codes; for the structural dynamics part, the STRUDL/Dynal code was employed. (orig./RW) [de

  8. Functional diversity of supragranular GABAergic neurons in the barrel cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc J Gentet

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the neocortex forms a distributed system comprised of several functional areas, its vertical columnar organization is largely conserved across areas and species, suggesting the existence of a canonical neocortical microcircuit. In order to elucidate the principles governing the organization of such a cortical diagram, a detailed understanding of the dynamics binding different types of cortical neurons into a coherent algorithm is essential. Within this complex circuitry, GABAergic interneurons, while forming approximately only 15-20% of all cortical neurons, appear critical in maintaining a dynamic balance between excitation and inhibition. Despite their importance, cortical GABAergic neurons have not been extensively studied in vivo and their precise role in shaping the local microcircuit sensory response still remains to be determined. Their paucity, combined with their molecular, anatomical and physiological diversity, has made it difficult to even establish a consensual nomenclature.However, recent technological advances in microscopy and mouse genetics have fostered a renewed interest in neocortical interneurons by putting them within visible reach of experimenters. The anatomically well-defined whisker-to-barrel pathway of the rodent is particularly amenable to studies attempting to link cortical circuit dynamics to behavior. To each whisker corresponds a discrete cortical unit equivalent to a single column, specialized in the encoding and processing of the sensory information it receives. In this review, we will focus on the functional role that each subtype of supragranular GABAergic neuron embedded within such a single neocortical unit may play in shaping the dynamics of the local circuit during somatosensory integration.

  9. Evolutions of volatile sulfur compounds of Cabernet Sauvignon wines during aging in different oak barrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dong-Qing; Zheng, Xiao-Tian; Xu, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Yun-He; Duan, Chang-Qing; Liu, Yan-Lin

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in Cabernet Sauvignon wines from seven regions of China during maturation in oak barrels was investigated. The barrels were made of different wood grains (fine and medium) and toasting levels (light and medium). Twelve VSCs were quantified by GC/FPD, with dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and methionol exceeding their sensory thresholds. Most VSCs tended to decline during the aging, while DMS was found to increase. After one year aging, the levels of DMS, 2-methyltetrahy-drothiophen-3-one and sulfur-containing esters were lower in the wines aged in oak barrels than in stainless steel tanks. The wood grain and toasting level of oak barrels significantly influenced the concentration of S-methyl thioacetate and 2-methyltetrahy-drothiophen-3-one. This study reported the evolution of VSCs in wines during oak barrel aging for the first time and evaluated the influence of barrel types, which would provide wine-makers with references in making proposals about wine aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation hardness and lifetime studies of LEDs and VCSELs for the optical readout of the ATLAS SCT

    CERN Document Server

    Beringer, J; Mommsen, R K; Nickerson, R B; Weidberg, A R; Monnier, E; Hou, H Q; Lear, K L

    1999-01-01

    We study the radiation hardness and the lifetime of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) and Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser diodes (VCSELs) in the context of the development of the optical readout for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) at LHC. About 170 LEDs from two different manufacturers and about 130 VCSELs were irradiated with neutron and proton fluences equivalent to (and in some cases more than twice as high as) the combined neutral and charged particle fluence of about 5x10 sup 1 sup 4 n (1 MeV eq. in GaAs)/cm sup 2 expected in the ATLAS inner detector. We report on the radiation damage and the conditions required for its partial annealing under forward bias, we calculate radiation damage constants, and we present post-irradiation failure rates for LEDs and VCSELs. The lifetime after irradiation was investigated by operating the diodes at an elevated temperature of 50 degree sign C for several months, resulting in operating times corresponding to up to 70 years of operation in the ATLAS SCT. From o...

  11. High-resolution 2-deoxyglucose mapping of functional cortical columns in mouse barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCasland, J S; Woolsey, T A

    1988-12-22

    Cortical columns associated with barrels in layer IV of the somatosensory cortex were characterized by high-resolution 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) autoradiography in freely behaving mice. The method demonstrates a more exact match between columnar labeling and cytoarchitectonic barrel boundaries than previously reported. The pattern of cortical activation seen with stimulation of a single whisker (third whisker in the middle row of large hairs--C3) was compared with the patterns from two control conditions--normal animals with all whiskers present ("positive control")--and with all large whiskers clipped ("negative control"). Two types of measurements were made from 2DG autoradiograms of tangential cortical sections: 1) labeled cells were identified by eye and tabulated with a computer, and 2) grain densities were obtained automatically with a computer-controlled microscope and image processor. We studied the fine-grained patterns of 2DG labeling in a nine-barrel grid with the C3 barrel in the center. From the analysis we draw five major conclusions. 1. Approximately 30-40% of the total number of neurons in the C3 barrel column are activated when only the C3 whisker is stimulated. This is about twice the number of neurons labeled in the C3 column when all whiskers are stimulated and about ten times the number of neurons labeled when all large whiskers are clipped. 2. There is evidence for a vertical functional organization within a barrel-related whisker column which has smaller dimensions in the tangential direction than a barrel. There are densely labeled patches within a barrel which are unique to an individual cortex. The same patchy pattern is found in the appropriate regions of sections above and below the barrels through the full thickness of the cortex. This functional arrangement could be considered to be a "minicolumn" or more likely a group of "minicolumns" (Mountcastle: In G.M. Edelman and U.B. Mountcastle (eds): The Material Brain: Cortical Organization

  12. Laser characterisation of a 3D single-type column p-type prototype module read out with ATLAS SCT electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrich, T.; Kuehn, S.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Eckert, S.; Jakobs, K.; Maassen, M.; Parzefall, U.; Piemonte, C.; Pozza, A.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper measurements of a 3D single-type column (3D-stc) microstrip silicon device are shown. The 3D-stc sensor has n-type columns in p-type substrate. It has been connected to an ATLAS SCT ABCD3T chip and is readout with ATLAS SCT electronics at 40 MHz. Spatial measurements were done with a laser setup to investigate the expected low field region in 3D devices. An influence of the p-stops on the collected charge has been observed

  13. Laser characterisation of a 3D single-type column p-type prototype module read out with ATLAS SCT electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrich, T. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder Str. 3, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Kuehn, S. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder Str. 3, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: susanne.kuehn@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.-F. [ITC-irst Trento, Microsystems Division, via Sommarive, 18 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Eckert, S.; Jakobs, K.; Maassen, M.; Parzefall, U. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder Str. 3, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Piemonte, C.; Pozza, A.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N. [ITC-irst Trento, Microsystems Division, via Sommarive, 18 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2007-12-11

    In this paper measurements of a 3D single-type column (3D-stc) microstrip silicon device are shown. The 3D-stc sensor has n-type columns in p-type substrate. It has been connected to an ATLAS SCT ABCD3T chip and is readout with ATLAS SCT electronics at 40 MHz. Spatial measurements were done with a laser setup to investigate the expected low field region in 3D devices. An influence of the p-stops on the collected charge has been observed.

  14. Modelling tourists arrival using time varying parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciptawati, P.; Sukarsa, K. G.; Kencana, Eka N.

    2017-06-01

    The importance of tourism and its related sectors to support economic development and poverty reduction in many countries increase researchers’ attentions to study and model tourists’ arrival. This work is aimed to demonstrate time varying parameter (TVP) technique to model the arrival of Korean’s tourists to Bali. The number of Korean tourists whom visiting Bali for period January 2010 to December 2015 were used to model the number of Korean’s tourists to Bali (KOR) as dependent variable. The predictors are the exchange rate of Won to IDR (WON), the inflation rate in Korea (INFKR), and the inflation rate in Indonesia (INFID). Observing tourists visit to Bali tend to fluctuate by their nationality, then the model was built by applying TVP and its parameters were approximated using Kalman Filter algorithm. The results showed all of predictor variables (WON, INFKR, INFID) significantly affect KOR. For in-sample and out-of-sample forecast with ARIMA’s forecasted values for the predictors, TVP model gave mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) as much as 11.24 percent and 12.86 percent, respectively.

  15. A key component of the Globe arrives

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The first component of the Palais de l'Equilibre arrived at CERN last week. Renamed the Globe of Innovation, this elegant wooden sphere will be inaugurated in October 2004. The convoy transporting the first component of the Palais de l'Equilibre, the keystone of the famous wooden globe, arrived at CERN on the night of 28th August in the middle of a violent storm and dramatic flashes of lightning. Erected in Neuchâtel last year for the EXPO.02 exhibition, the Palais de l'Equilibre was a gift to the Laboratory from the Swiss Confederation (see Bulletin 25/2003). The gift of the structure and 4 million Swiss francs, together with help from the Swiss army for the reassembly work, received the final approval of the Swiss Federal Council on 20th August 2003. Renamed the Globe of Innovation, the 27-metre-high sphere measuring 40 metres in diameter will house the Laboratory's new exhibition centre in 2005. The keystone, known as the "central vertex", is a crown measuring 6.5 m in diameter and 4.5 m high, located a...

  16. LHCb Calorimeter modules arrive at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Two of the three components of the LHCb Calorimeter system have started to arrive from Russia. Members of the LHCb Calorimeter group with the ECAL and HCAL modules that have just arrived at CERN. The first two of the 56 Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL) modules and 1200 of the 3300 modules of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) have reached CERN from Russia. The third part of the system, the Preshower detector, is still being prepared in Russia. The calorimeter system identifies and triggers on high-energy particles, namely electrons, hadrons and photons by measuring their positions and energies. The HCAL is going to be a pure trigger device. The ECAL will also be used in the triggering, but in addition it will reconstruct neutral pions and photons from B meson decays. One of the major aims of the LHCb experiment is to study CP violation through B meson decays including Bs mesons with high statistics in different decay modes. CP violation (violation of charge and parity) is necessary to explain why the Universe...

  17. Assembly of a Full-Scale External Tank Barrel Section Using Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Chip; Adams, Glynn

    1999-01-01

    A full-scale pathfinder barrel section of the External Tank for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space Transport System (Space Shuttle) has been assembled at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) via a collaborative effort between NASA/MSFC and Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems. The barrel section is 27.5 feet in diameter and 15 feet in height. The barrel was assembled using Super-Light-Weight (SLWT), orthogrid, Al-Li 2195 panel sections and a single longeron panel. A vertical weld tool at MSFC was modified to accommodate FSW and used to assemble the barrel. These modifications included the addition of a FSW weld head and new controller hardware and software, the addition of a backing anvil and the replacement of the clamping system with individually actuated clamps. Weld process 4evelopment was initially conducted to optimize the process for the welds required for completing the assembly. The variable thickness welds in the longeron section were conducted via both two-sided welds and with the use of a retractable pin tool. The barrel assembly was completed in October 1998. Details of the vertical weld tool modifications and the assembly process are presented.

  18. Triggering and measuring bent cosmic muon tracks with the Muon Spectrometer barrel for the first time

    CERN Multimedia

    Fabio Cerutti

    During the ATLAS barrel toroid stability test, bent cosmic muon tracks were seen for the first time in the ATLAS cavern by means of the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The barrel toroid has been powered at its nominal current (20.5 thousand Amperes) and kept in steady state for more than one day during the weekend of 18-19 November (see a report on this test in the Magnet section). During this test one large sector and part of a small sector of the barrel muon spectrometer were readout and used to detect the cosmic muons tracks bent by the toroidal magnetic field. Thirteen muon stations in the feet sectors (sectors 13 and 14) have been used in this test. The muon stations are formed of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) that were providing the muon trigger, and Monitored Drift Tubes that were used to measure with high accuracy the muon curvature hence their momentum. The Level-1 Barrel trigger chain was based on the Barrel Middle Large chambers equipped with final production modules on both the on-detector and the o...

  19. ON THE ARRIVAL TRAFFIC FLOW ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita A. Assorov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is about air traffic flow organization, ICAO regulations describe the organizing of traffic flow as one of the purposes of air traffic control, but they don’t state exactly at what point the flow has to be organized and metered. The flight phase, where air traffic controller interferes with his instructions in order to begin organizing of all aircraft landing at a certain airport depends on the actual traffic volume per hour, airspace capacity and design.The example of air traffic situation in Moscow Domodedovo airport is described in the article, with runway 32 right in use, no significant weather, real usage of STARs, considering all the ICAO and Russian Federation regulations regarding speed control with the restrictions mentioned in AIP of Moscow Domodedovo. The purpose of the experiment is to prove the need of metering the air traffic flow on the entry points in Moscow TMA, because in case of unorganized air traffic flow approach controllers will have additional unnecessary workload.The conducted calculations show, that only 3 aircraft entering TMA on the same distance from initial approach point can be handled using only speed control and existing standard arrival procedures, in all other cases vectoring or holding areas should be used.In order to avoid such situations and increase the number of the aircraft that can be handled by the approach controller with less instructions, all the traffic arriving on the TMA entry point has to be metered by area control centre, because the air traffic control unit has much more space and time for long term speed control modifications, e.g. ±0,02 Mach. In conclusion a simple rule comes to mind – the bigger inbound traffic is, the earlier one has to organize it, in order to do it speed control, radar vectors, miles-in-trail can be used. Also new equipment and technology can help air traffic controller with this task, e.g. AMAN (arrival manager, in addition to this, the experience of

  20. Astringency, bitterness and color changes in dry red wines before and during oak barrel aging: An updated phenolic perspective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si-Yu; Duan, Chang-Qing

    2018-01-30

    To understand effects of using oak barrels on the astringency, bitterness and color of dry red wines, phenolic reactions in wines before and after barrel aging are reviewed in this paper, which has been divided into three sections. The first section includes an introduction to chemical reactivities of grape-derived phenolic compounds, a summary of the phenolic reactions that occur in dry red wines before barrel aging, and a discussion of the effects of these reactions on wine astringency, bitterness and color. The second section introduces barrel types that determine the oak barrel constituents in wines (primarily oak aldehydes and ellagitannins) and presents reactions between the oak constituents and grape-derived phenolic compounds that may modulate wine astringency, bitterness and color. The final section illustrates the chemical differences between basic oxidation and over-oxidation in wines, discusses oxygen consumption kinetics in wines during barrel aging by comparing different oxygen consumption kinetics observed previously by others, and speculates on the possible preliminary phenolic reactions that occur in dry red wines during oak barrel aging that soften tannins and stabilize pigments via basic oxidation. Additionally, sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) addition during barrel aging and suitability of adopting oak barrels for aging wines are briefly discussed.

  1. MUON DETECTOR: BARREL DRIFT TUBES (DT) AND ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    Marco Dallavalle

    After months of cosmics data taking the drift tube (DT) detector is in good shape, ready for LHC beams. Several hundreds of millions of cosmics events have been recorded; out of those, more than 90% were triggered by the DT system. Data integrity analyses have shown a very reliable read-out system, also during high rate tests. With a 98% of the detector operational, only awaiting the arrival of some low voltage modules and for the completion of the DT Track Finder system, data taking is starting to become routine job. These continuous running exercises have been very useful to study performance and reliability of the detector in a medium term period, allowing understanding and fixing failures that have occurred with low frequency. Drift tubes have become a very stable system, becoming a service of muon triggering for the tracker after its final installation. During the last months, major efforts have taken place in synchronization tasks, within the DT system (250 chambers) and also with the rest of the CMS su...

  2. Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski arrives at KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski notes the time on his watch upon his late arrival aboard a T-38 jet at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Parazynski's first plane experienced problems at the stop at Tyndall AFB and he had to wait for another jet and pilot to finish the flight to KSC. He joined other crewmembers Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, Mission Specialist Pedro Duque, with the European Space Agency (ESA), and Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), for final pre-launch preparations. STS-95 is expected to launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and land at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7.

  3. The Stardust spacecraft arrives at KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    After arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility in the early morning hours, the crated Stardust spacecraft waits to be unloaded from the aircraft. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re- entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by in January 2006.

  4. Finite Element calculations of heat transfer for the Forward SCT ModulesPart II - the Inner Module ATL-COM-INDET-2000-015

    CERN Document Server

    Blocki, J

    2000-01-01

    A status report on the thermal performance of the baseline SCT inner forward modules is presented. In order to understand improvements of the thermal behaviour, design changes that have been proposed elsewhere for the outer module, and which lead to significant improvements of the thermal characteristics of the modules, have been applied to the inner module.

  5. Simple preparation of thiol-ene particles in glycerol and surface functionalization by thiol-ene chemistry (TEC) and surface chain transfer free radical polymerization (SCT-FRP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Christian; Chiaula, Valeria; Yu, Liyun

    2018-01-01

    functionalization of excess thiol groups via photochemical thiol-ene chemistry (TEC) resulting in a functional monolayer. In addition, surface chain transfer free radical polymerization (SCT-FRP) was used for the first time to introduce a thicker polymer layer on the particle surface. The application potential...

  6. Screening and monitoring of MPL W515L mutation with real-time PCR in patients with myelofibrosis undergoing allogeneic-SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alchalby, H; Badbaran, A; Bock, O; Fehse, B; Bacher, U; Zander, A R; Kröger, N

    2010-09-01

    Monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) after allogeneic (allo)-SCT for myelofibrosis (MF) allows recognizing the depth of remission and thus guides application of appropriate therapeutic interventions. MPL W515L/K mutations, which are detected in 5-10% of JAK2V617F-negative patients, may be useful for this purpose. Using a highly sensitive quantitative PCR method, we tested 90 patients with MF who underwent allo-SCT for the presence of MPL W515L/K mutations. Two patients with primary MF were found to harbor MPLW515L while no patient was positive for MPLW515K mutation. Both patients were JAK2V617F negative and cleared the mutation rapidly after allo-SCT and remained negative for a median follow-up of 19 months. The results of molecular monitoring correlated well with other remission parameters such as normalization of peripheral blood counts and morphology and complete donor chimerism. We conclude that MPLW515L can be cleared after allo-SCT and hence may be used as an MRD marker in a proportion of JAK2V617F-negative MF patients.

  7. Stable long-term pulmonary function after fludarabine, antithymocyte globulin and i.v. BU for reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirou, S; Malard, F; Chambellan, A; Chevallier, P; Germaud, P; Guillaume, T; Delaunay, J; Moreau, P; Delasalle, B; Lemarchand, P; Mohty, M

    2014-05-01

    Lung function decline is a well-recognized complication following allogeneic SCT (allo-SCT). Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and in vivo T-cell depletion by administration of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) may have a protective role in the occurrence of late pulmonary complications. This retrospective study reported the evolution of lung function parameters within the first 2 years after allo-SCT in a population receiving the same RIC regimen that included fludarabine and i.v. BU in combination with low-dose ATG. The median follow-up was 35.2 months. With a median age of 59 years at the time of transplant, at 2 years, the cumulative incidences of non-relapse mortality was as low as 9.7%. The cumulative incidence of relapse was 33%. At 2 years, the cumulative incidences of extensive chronic GVHD (cGVHD) and of pulmonary cGVHD were 23.1% and 1.9%, respectively. The cumulative incidences of airflow obstruction and restrictive pattern were 3.8% and 9.6%, respectively. Moreover, forced expiratory volume (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1/FVC ratio remained stable from baseline up to 2 years post transplantation (P=0.26, P=0.27 and P=0.07, respectively). These results correspond favorably with the results obtained with other RIC regimens not incorporating ATG, and suggest that ATG may have a protective pulmonary role after allo-SCT.

  8. The impact of center experience on results of reduced intensity:allogeneic hematopoietic SCT for AML. An analysis from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giebel, S; Labopin, M; Mohty, M

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic SCT with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC-HSCT) is increasingly adopted for the treatment of older adults with AML. Our goal was to verify for the first time, if center experience influences outcome of RIC-HSCT. Results of 1413 transplantations from HLA-matched related...

  9. Improving the transition of highly complex patients into the community: impact of a pharmacist in an allogeneic stem cell transplant (SCT) outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieng, Ruth; Coutsouvelis, John; Poole, Susan; Dooley, Michael J; Booth, Diana; Wei, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    Patients having undergone allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) require complex medication regimens. To ensure the safe and effective management of this patient group, specialised care in a centre with a dedicated and experienced healthcare team is essential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a specialty clinical pharmacist working in an ambulatory SCT clinic. A prospective cohort study was conducted on patients post SCT and discharged to the ambulatory setting. Patients were reviewed by a clinical pharmacist weekly for six visits. At these visits a medication review was undertaken. Interventions from these reviews were recorded. Interventions were then assigned a risk rating by a multidisciplinary panel. Adherence was also assessed by a Morisky questionnaire and review of dose administration aids. Comparison of data over the six-visit period was undertaken. In total 23 patients were enrolled in the study. All six visits were completed in 17 patients and 161 interventions were recorded at an average of 1.4 interventions per patient visit. The panel rated 40 % of interventions as high risk, 46 % as medium risk and 14 % as low risk. At all visit points high- and medium-risk interventions constituted >80 % of the total. Morisky scores improved by an average of 1.53 (p SCT outpatient clinic resulted in regular and effective intervention contributing to improved medication management and adherence.

  10. Evaluating the construct validity of adult ADHD and SCT among college students: a multitrait-multimethod analysis of convergent and discriminant validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Daniel R; Bryan, Angela D; Pennington, Bruce F; Willcutt, Erik G

    2015-03-01

    To advance our understanding of adult ADHD and sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT), the present study investigates their construct validity by exploring the nature of trait- and method-related variance in self- and parent-ratings of ADHD and SCT. Using a multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) design, response variance in college undergraduates' (n = 3,925) and a subset of their parents' (n = 2,242) ratings was decomposed into method, trait, and error-specific variance. Global evidence for convergent and discriminant validity was supported, but parameter-level comparisons suggest that method effects, situational specificity, and ADHD's core feature--inattention--are prominent. This investigation offers two important conclusions: (a) SCT appears to be a related but separate factor from ADHD; and (b) self- and parent-ratings of emerging adult ADHD exhibit low to moderate correlations and support the situational specificity hypothesis, suggesting that multiple raters should be consulted when assessing adult ADHD. Implications of these findings and recommendations for the continued study of SCT are discussed. © 2014 SAGE Publications.

  11. The polymorphism IL-1 beta T-31C is associated with a longer overall survival in patients with multiple myeloma undergoing auto-SCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsted, A.J.; Klausen, T.W.; Ruminski, W.

    2009-01-01

    high-dose melphalan treatment followed by Auto-SCT and examined the influence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the inflammatory response. We found that the polymorphism IL-1 beta T-31C significantly influenced overall survival (OS; P = 0.02) and that carriers...

  12. A scintillating fibre detector for the Crystal Barrel experiment at ELSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suft, G.; Anton, G.; Bogendoerfer, R.; Ehmanns, A.; Foesel, A.; Hoessl, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kueppersbusch, C.; Walther, D.

    2005-01-01

    A scintillating fibre detector with high spatial granularity was built for the Crystal Barrel experiment at ELSA (CB-ELSA) in Bonn. It consists of 513 scintillating fibres with 2mm in diameter, arranged in three layers with cylindrical geometry inside the Crystal Barrel detector surrounding the target cell. Two layers are wound in opposite directions, the third is parallel to the incident beam direction, resulting in an unambiguous hit reconstruction and a position resolution better than 1.6mm for charged particles. The read-out is done with 16-channel multi-anode photomultipliers. The detector was designed to cover the full angular acceptance of the Crystal Barrel detector with an angular range of 12 deg. ≤θ = 168 deg. and 0 deg. ≤φ≤360 deg. in the lab frame

  13. Analysis of core and core barrel heat-up under conditions simulating severe reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chellaiah, S.; Viskanta, R.; Ranganathan, P.; Anand, N.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a model for estimating the temperature distributions in the reactor core, core barrel, thermal shield and reactor pressure vessel of a PWR during an undercooling transient. A number of numerical calculations simulating the core uncovering of the TMI-2 reactor and the subsequent heat-up of the core have been performed. The results of the calculations show that the exothermic heat release due to Zircaloy oxidation contributes to the sharp heat-up of the core. However, the core barrel temperature rise which is driven by the temperature increase of the edge of the core (e.g., the core baffle) is very modest. The maximum temperature of the core barrel never exceeded 610 K (at a system pressure of 68 bar) after a 75 minute simulation following the start of core uncovering

  14. CHANGES IN VOLATILE COMPOSITION AND SENSORY PROPERTIES OF VUGAVA WINES AGED IN CROATIA OAK BARRELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanka HERJAVEC

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Vugava musts were fermented in medium-toasted Croatian barrique barrels (225 L made from Quercus petrea and Q. robur oak wood. The oak species used in this research infl uenced the specifi c change of the aroma structure of Vugava wines. During the age period the increase in the concentration of cis and trans oaklactons, guaiacol, eugenol, furfural and 5-methylfurfural was noted. Wines fermented and aged in Q. petrea barrels have higher concentrations of most volatile phenols compared to wines from Q. robur oak wood. From the organoleptic point of view this study suggested that fermentation and on the lees ageing production method in Croatian oak barrels positively infl uenced the quality of Vugava wines where best results were achieved by use of Q. petrea oak wood.

  15. Early stages in the biogenesis of eukaryotic β-barrel proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jores, Tobias; Rapaport, Doron

    2017-09-01

    The endosymbiotic organelles mitochondria and chloroplasts harbour, similarly to their prokaryotic progenitors, β-barrel proteins in their outer membrane. These proteins are encoded on nuclear DNA, translated on cytosolic ribosomes and imported into their target organelles by a dedicated machinery. Recent studies have provided insights into the import into the organelles and the membrane insertion of these proteins. Although the cytosolic stages of their biogenesis are less well defined, it is speculated that upon their synthesis, chaperones prevent β-barrel proteins from aggregation and keep them in an import-competent conformation. In this Review, we summarize the current knowledge about the biogenesis of β-barrel proteins, focusing on the early stages from the translation on cytosolic ribosomes to the recognition on the surface of the organelle. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. Performance of the ATLAS Level-1 muon barrel trigger during the Run 2 data taking

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00404546; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger is one of the main elements of the event selection of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. It exploits the Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) detectors to generate the trigger signal. The RPCs are placed in the barrel region of the ATLAS experiment: they are arranged in three concentric double layers and operate in a strong magnetic toroidal field. RPC detectors cover the pseudo-rapidity range |η| < 1.05 for a total surface of more than 4000 m 2 and about 3600 gas volumes. The Level-1 Muon Trigger in the barrel region allows to select muon candidates according to their transverse momentum and associates them with the correct bunch-crossing. The trigger system is able to take a decision within a latency of about 2 μs. The measurement of the RPC detector efficiencies and the trigger performance during the ATLAS Run-II data taking are here presented.

  17. Distributed Wireless Monitoring System for Ullage and Temperature in Wine Barrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenqi; Skouroumounis, George K.; Monro, Tanya M.; Taylor, Dennis K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a multipurpose and low cost sensor for the simultaneous monitoring of temperature and ullage of wine in barrels in two of the most important stages of winemaking, that being fermentation and maturation. The distributed sensor subsystem is imbedded within the bung of the barrel and runs on battery for a period of at least 12 months and costs around $27 AUD for all parts. In addition, software was designed which allows for the remote transmission and easy visual interpretation of the data for the winemaker. Early warning signals can be sent when the temperature or ullage deviates from a winemakers expectations so remedial action can be taken, such as when topping is required or the movement of the barrels to a cooler cellar location. Such knowledge of a wine’s properties or storage conditions allows for a more precise control of the final wine quality. PMID:26266410

  18. Efficacy and connectivity of intracolumnar pairs of layer 2/3 pyramidal cells in the barrel cortex of juvenile rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmeyer, Dirk; Lübke, Joachim; Sakmann, Bert

    2006-01-01

    Synaptically coupled layer 2/3 (L2/3) pyramidal neurones located above the same layer 4 barrel (‘barrel-related’) were investigated using dual whole-cell voltage recordings in acute slices of rat somatosensory cortex. Recordings were followed by reconstructions of biocytin-filled neurones. The onset latency of unitary EPSPs was 1.1 ± 0.4 ms, the 20–80% rise time was 0.7 ± 0.2 ms, the average amplitude was 1.0 ± 0.7 mV and the decay time constant was 15.7 ± 4.5 ms. The coefficient of variation (c.v.) of unitary EPSP amplitudes decreased with increasing EPSP peak and was 0.33 ± 0.18. Bursts of APs in the presynaptic pyramidal cell resulted in EPSPs that, over a wide range of frequencies (5–100 Hz), displayed amplitude depression. Anatomically the barrel-related pyramidal cells in the lower half of layer 2/3 have a long apical dendrite with a small terminal tuft, while pyramidal cells in the upper half of layer 2/3 have shorter and often more ‘irregularly’ shaped apical dendrites that branch profusely in layer 1. The number of putative excitatory synaptic contacts established by the axonal collaterals of a L2/3 pyramidal cell with a postsynaptic pyramidal cell in the same column varied between 2 and 4, with an average of 2.8 ± 0.7 (n = 8 pairs). Synaptic contacts were established predominantly on the basal dendrites at a mean geometric distance of 91 ± 47 μm from the pyramidal cell soma. L2/3-to-L2/3 connections formed a blob-like innervation domain containing 2.8 mm of the presynaptic axon collaterals with a bouton density of 0.3 boutons per μm axon. Within the supragranular layers of its home column a single L2/3 pyramidal cell established about 900 boutons suggesting that 270 pyramidal cells in layer 2/3 are innervated by an individual pyramidal cell. In turn, a single pyramidal cell received synaptic inputs from 270 other L2/3 pyramidal cells. The innervation domain of L2/3-to-L2/3 connections superimposes almost exactly with that of L4-to-L2

  19. NKp46 expression on NK cells as a prognostic and predictive biomarker for response to allo-SCT in patients with AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chretien, Anne-Sophie; Devillier, Raynier; Fauriat, Cyril; Orlanducci, Florence; Harbi, Samia; Le Roy, Aude; Rey, Jérôme; Bouvier Borg, Gaelle; Gautherot, Emmanuel; Hamel, Jean-François; Ifrah, Norbert; Lacombe, Catherine; Cornillet-Lefebvre, Pascale; Delaunay, Jacques; Toubert, Antoine; Arnoulet, Christine; Vey, Norbert; Blaise, Didier; Olive, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    NKp46 is a major determinant of natural killer (NK) cell function and it is implicated in tumor immune surveillance in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of NKp46 expression in an independent cohort of patients with AML, and to investigate the impact of NKp46 on clinical outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). NKp46 expression was assessed at diagnosis on NK cells by flow cytometry (N = 180 patients). Clinical outcome was evaluated with regard to NKp46 expression. Patients with NKp46 high phenotype at diagnosis had better progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) than patients with NKp46 low phenotype (74.3% vs. 46.6%, p = 0.014; 82.6% vs. 57.1%, p = 0.010, respectively). In multivariate analysis, high NKp46 was an independent factor for improved OS (HR = 0.409, p = 0.010) and PFS (HR = 0.335, p = 0.011). Subgroup analysis revealed that allo-SCT had a favorable impact on PFS in patients with NKp46 high phenotype ( p = 0.025). By contrast, allo-SCT did not impact PFS in patients with low NKp46 expression ( p = 0.303). In conclusion, we validate the prognostic value of NKp46 expression at diagnosis in AML. However, the prognostic value of NKp46 expression is limited to patients treated with allo-SCT, thus suggesting that NKp46 status may be predictive for allo-SCT responsiveness.

  20. An auto-SCT-based total therapy resulted in encouraging outcomes in adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: report from a single center of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J; Zou, D-H; Li, Z-J; Fu, M-W; Xu, Y; Zhao, Y-Z; Qi, J-Y; Feng, S-Z; Liu, B-C; Lin, D; Mi, Y-C; Han, M-Z; Wang, J-X; Qiu, L-G

    2012-08-01

    Application of auto-SCT in the post-remission therapy for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with ALL is controversial. We analyzed the outcomes of 79 AYAs (15-24 years) with ALL who received our designed total therapy protocol with auto-SCT in first CR from 1990 to 2009. The estimated OS and EFS at 5 years for the cohort were 62.8±5.9 and 61.5±5.7%. The cumulative non-relapse mortality and relapse rate at 5 years for the cohort were 7.2±3.1 and 33.6±5.8%. Time to CR >4 weeks was the only independent unfavorable factor associated with OS, EFS and relapse in multivariate analysis. Patients in standard risk (SR) group and high risk (HR) group had better OS (78.3±7.4, 63.8±10.2 vs 38.1±11.6%) and EFS (78.0±7.4, 63.4±9.4 vs 32.4±11.3%), and lower relapse rate (15.9±6.5, 31.5±9.5 vs 65.7±11.8%) compared with patients in very high risk (VHR) group. Our data confirmed that auto-SCT-based total therapy might be an optional treatment strategy for AYAs with ALL in SR. Patients in HR also could get benefit from such schedule. But for those in VHR, allogenetic SCT is still the prior recommendation for the frequent recurrence after auto-SCT.

  1. Development of the SSTL-300-S1 Composite Imager Barrel Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamar, Chris; Wood, Trevor; Alsami, Sami; Hallett, Ben

    2014-06-01

    The SSTL-300-S1 is the latest in the family of highly capable SSTL-300 platforms, providing high resolution imagery with all the existing mission performance of the heritage platform. In developing the product, SSTL has had to undertake the development of a composite imager barrel assembly, which forms the payload instrument's primary structure. Working to a nominal schedule of 24 months from requirements definition to structural qualification, the barrel's development philosophy has had to carefully balance the interdependent optical, structural and programmatic requirements. This paper provides a brief summary description of that development.

  2. ATLAS Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger robustness study at X5 test facility

    CERN Document Server

    Di Mattia, A; Nisati, A; Pastore, F C; Vari, R; Veneziano, Stefano; Aielli, G; Camarri, P; Cardarelli, R; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Simone, A; Liberti, B; Santonico, R

    2004-01-01

    The present paper describes the Level-1 Barrel Muon Trigger performance as expected with the current configuration of the RPC detectors, as designed for the Barrel Muon Spectrometer of ATLAS. Results of a beam test performed at the X5-GIF facility at CERN are presented in order to show the trigger efficiency with different conditions of RPC detection efficiency and several background rates. Small RPC chambers with part of the final trigger electronics are used, while the trigger coincidence logic is applied off-line using a detailed simulation model. copy 2003 Published by Esevier B.V. 3 Refs.

  3. A study of aging effects of barrel Time-Of-Flight system in the BESIII experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan-Huan; Sun, Sheng-Sen; Fang, Shuang-Shi; Wu, Zhi; Dai, Hong-Liang; Heng, Yue-Kun; Zhou, Ming; Deng, Zi-Yan; Liu, Huai-Min

    2018-02-01

    The Time-Of-Flight system consisting of plastic scintillation counters plays an important role for particle identification in the BESIII experiment at the BEPCII double ring e+e- collider. Degradation of the detection efficiency of the barrel TOF system has been observed since the start of physical data taking and this effect has triggered intensive and systematic studies about aging effects of the detector. The aging rates of the attenuation lengths and relative gains are obtained based on the data acquired in past several years. This study is essential for ensuring an extended operation of the barrel TOF system in optimal conditions.

  4. Prevalence of menstrual cycles and outcome of 50 pregnancies after high-dose chemotherapy and auto-SCT in non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma patients younger than 40 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, S; Youssef, I; Soudy, H; Elhassan, T A M; Rauf, S M; Maghfoor, I

    2015-12-01

    Data are limited regarding the prevalence of menstrual cycles and pregnancies after high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and auto-stem cell transplantation (SCT). Female patients who underwent HDC auto-SCT for non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma (1997-2012) were reviewed. The selection criteria were as follows: (1) alive without disease 12 and 24 months after auto-SCT for menstrual cycles and pregnancy, respectively, (2) age SCT, and (3) no primary infertility. One-hundred and seventy-six females underwent single auto-SCT. Eighty-nine were eligible for menstrual cycles and pregnancy analysis. Median age at auto-SCT was 25 years (14-40 years), at pregnancy 27 years (20-37 years), median follow-up 65 months (range 24-190). Regular menstrual-cycles resumed in 56/89 patients (63%). Increasing age (P=0.02) and number of prior chemotherapy cycles (P=0.02) are associated with higher risk of amenorrhea. Forty patients tried to get pregnant, 26 (65%) became pregnant 50 times: 43 (86%) live birth, 7 (14%) miscarriage and 2/50 had birth defects. Twenty-four patients practiced breastfeeding (median duration 4 months (1-24 months)). Enough breast milk production was reported 62.5% vs 100% in those patients who did or did not receive above the diaphragm radiation therapy, respectively, (P=0.066). Our data highlights significantly higher than perceived incidence of menstrual cycle resumption, successful pregnancies and breastfeeding after HDC auto-SCT.

  5. 27 CFR 25.160 - Tax adjustment for brewers who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer. 25.160 Section 25.160 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Tax on Beer Determination of Tax § 25.160 Tax adjustment for brewers who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer. Each...

  6. Start of Final Assembly of the CMS Barrel Yoke on schedule at P5 the 1st august, 2000. I

    CERN Multimedia

    Hubert Gerwig, CERN/ EP-CMI

    2000-01-01

    The Barrel Yoke and the vacuumtank weigh 6500 tonnes. The barrel Yoke consists of 5 rings eacu one weighing 1200 tonnes. The vacuum tank is a stainless steel structure weighing 270 tonnes (length = 13 m , outer diamter 7.6 m) The final assembly of these items will take approximately 1 year from now on.

  7. Involvement and necessity of the Cpx regulon in the event of aberrant β-barrel outer membrane protein assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, Henri; Leiser, Owen P.; Bennion, Drew; Misra, Rajeev

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Cpx and σE regulons help maintain outer membrane integrity; the Cpx pathway monitors the biogenesis of cell surface structures, such as pili, while the σE pathway monitors the biogenesis of β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs). In this study we revealed the importance of the Cpx regulon in the event of β-barrel OMP mis-assembly, by utilizing mutants expressing either a defective β-barrel OMP assembly machinery (Bam) or assembly defective β-barrel OMPs. Analysis of specific mRNAs showed that ΔcpxR bam double mutants failed to induce degP expression beyond the wild type level, despite activation of the σE pathway. The synthetic conditional lethal phenotype of ΔcpxR in mutant Bam or β-barrel OMP backgrounds was reversed by wild type DegP expressed from a heterologous plasmid promoter. Consistent with the involvement of the Cpx regulon in the event of aberrant β-barrel OMP assembly, the expression of cpxP, the archetypal member of the cpx regulon, was upregulated in defective Bam backgrounds or in cells expressing a single assembly-defective β-barrel OMP species. Together, these results showed that both the Cpx and σE regulons are required to reduce envelope stress caused by aberrant β-barrel OMP assembly, with the Cpx regulon principally contributing by controlling degP expression. PMID:20487295

  8. The arrival time distribution of muons in extensive air showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Walt, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment was done to investigate the lateral dependence of the muon arrival time distribution in extensive air showers at small core distances. In the present experiment the muon arrival time distribution was investigated by measuring the relative arrival times between single muons in five fast Cerenkov detectors beneath 500g/cm 2 of concrete and at an atmospheric depth of 880g/cm 2 . It is shown that, although it is not possible to determine the arrival time distribution as such, it is possible to interpret the relative arrival times between muons in terms of the differences between the order statistics of a sample drawn from the arrival time distribution. The relationship between the arrival time distribution of muons relative to the first detected muon and the muon arrival time distribution is also derived. It was found that the dispersion of the muon arrival time distribution does not increase significantly with increasing core distance between 10m and 60m from the core. A comparison with theoretical distributions obtained from model calculations for proton initiated showers indicate that 1. the mean delay of muons with respect to the first detected muon is significantly larger than that expected from the model and 2. the observed dispersion is also significantly larger than the predicted dispersion for core distances between 10m and 60m

  9. Tourist Arrivals to Sabah by Using Fuzzy Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarmudi Zamali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the existing tourist trend arrival in Sabah based on fuzzy approach. It focuses on the latest 12 years (2002 – 2013 visitors arrival based on their nationality for forecasting purposes. Based on Sabah Tourism Board’s data, the tourist arrival continue to grow annually but with an inconsistent number of arrival. This can be seen from the trend of tourist arrival from 2011 to 2012. There is an increase in the number of arrival but only at 1.1 % compared to the other years which are in the rank of 10 – 18% increase in number of arrival per year. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to predict the number of tourist arrival to Sabah. The study employs the modification of Fuzzy Delphi Method (FDM and utilizes the flexibility of triangular fuzzy numbers (TFNs as well as fuzzy averaging to deal with the yearly inconsistency numbers of visitor’s arrival. Then, the trio levels of alpha (α-cut was used via linguistic variables to assess the confidence of decision made and to overcome the uncertainty of the input data sets. The analysis was carried out using fully data sets obtained from the official website of Sabah tourism board. Results show that our proposed forecasting approach offers a new dimension technique as compared to the traditional statistical method. It also derived more confident decision and precision forecast for Sabah tourism authority planning purposes.

  10. Performance of the SLD Barrel CRID during the 1992 physics data run

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Hasegawa, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Suekane, F.; Toge, N.; Yuta, H.; Baird, K.; Jacques, P.; Kalelkar, M.; Plano, R.; Stamer, P.; Word, G.; Bean, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Duboscq, J.; Huber, J.; Lu, A.; Mathys, L.; McHugh, S.; Yellin, S.; Ben-David, R.; Manly, S.; Snyder, J.; Turk, J.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Colye, P.; Coyne, D.; Liu, X.; Williams, D.A.; Coller, J.; Shank, J.T.; Whitaker, J.S.; d'Oliveira, A.; Johnson, R.A.; Martinez, J.; Meadows, B.; Nussbaum, M.; Santha, A.K.S.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Stockdale, I.; Wilson, R.J.

    1992-11-01

    The SLD Barrel Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector was fully operational in the 1992 physics data run. The electron drift velocity and magnetic field deflection of electron trajectories have been measured. Cherenkov rings have been observed from both the liquid and gas radiators. The number and the resolution of the angle of Cherenkov photons have been measured to be approximately equal to design specifications

  11. Construction and test of the final CMS Barrel Drift Tube Muon Chamber prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alberdi, J.; Arneodo, M.; Banicz, K.; Benettoni, M.; Benvenuti, A.; Bethke, S.; Cerrada, M. E-mail: cerrada@ciemat.es; Cirio, R.; Colino, N.; Conti, E.; Dallavalle, M.; Daniel, M.; Dattola, D.; Daudo, F.; De Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Fanfani, A.; Fanin, C.; Fouz, M.C.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giacomelli, P.; Giordano, V.; Gonella, F.; Grandi, C.; Guaita, P.; Guerzoni, M.; Lacaprara, S.; Lippi, I.; Marcellini, S.; Marin, J.; Martinelli, R.; Maselli, S.; Meneguzzo, A.; Migliore, E.; Mocholi, J.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Montanari, C.; Odorici, F.; Oller, J.C.; Paoletti, S.; Passaseo, M.; Pegoraro, M.; Peroni, C.; Puerta, J.; Reithler, H.; Romero, A.; Romero, L.; Ronchese, P.; Rossi, A.M.; Rovelli, T.; Sacchi, R.; Salicio, J.M.; Staiano, A.; Steinbeck, T.; Torassa, E.; Travaglini, R.; Ventura, L.; Ventura, S.; Vitelli, A.; Voetee, F.; Wegner, M.; Willmott, C.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G

    2002-03-21

    A prototype of the CMS Barrel Muon Detector incorporating all the features of the final chambers was built using the mass production assembly procedures and tools. The performance of this prototype was studied in a muon test beam at CERN and the results obtained are presented in this paper.

  12. Phenolic Composition and Related Properties of Aged Wine Spirits: Influence of Barrel Characteristics. A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Canas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The freshly distilled wine spirit has a high concentration of ethanol and many volatile compounds, but is devoid of phenolic compounds other than volatile phenols. Therefore, an ageing period in the wooden barrel is required to attain sensory fullness and high quality. During this process, several phenomena take place, namely the release of low molecular weight phenolic compounds and tannins from the wood into the wine spirit. Research conducted over the last decades shows that they play a decisive role on the physicochemical characteristics and relevant sensory properties of the beverage. Their contribution to the antioxidant activity has also been emphasized. Besides, some studies show the modulating effect of the ageing technology, involving different factors such as the barrel features (including the wood botanical species, those imparted by the cooperage technology, and the barrel size, the cellar conditions, and the operations performed, on the phenolic composition and related properties of the aged wine spirit. This review aims to summarize the main findings on this topic, taking into account two featured barrel characteristics—the botanical species of the wood and the toasting level.

  13. Inference of core barrel motion from neutron noise spectral density. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, J.C.; Shahrokhi, F.; Kryter, R.C.

    1977-03-15

    A method was developed for inference of core barrel motion from the following statistical descriptors: cross-power spectral density, autopower spectral density, and amplitude probability density. To quantify the core barrel motion in a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR), a scale factor was calculated in both one- and two-dimensional geometries using forward, variational, and perturbation methods of discrete ordinates neutron transport. A procedure for selection of the proper frequency band limits for the statistical descriptors was developed. It was found that although perturbation theory is adequate for the calculation of the scale factor, two-dimensional geometric effects are important enough to rule out the use of a one-dimensional approximation for all but the crudest calculations. It was also found that contributions of gamma rays can be ignored and that the results are relatively insensitive to the cross-section set employed. The proper frequency band for the statistical descriptors is conveniently determined from the coherence and phase information from two ex-core power range neutron monitors positioned diametrically across the reactor vessel. Core barrel motion can then be quantified from the integral of the band-limited cross-power spectral density of two diametrically opposed ex-core monitors or, if the coherence between the pair is greater than or equal to 0.7, from a properly band-limited amplitude probability density function. Wide-band amplitude probability density functions were demonstrated to yield erroneous estimates for the magnitude of core barrel motion.

  14. Learning-Dependent Plasticity of the Barrel Cortex Is Impaired by Restricting GABA-Ergic Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posluszny, Anna; Liguz-Lecznar, Monika; Turzynska, Danuta; Zakrzewska, Renata; Bielecki, Maksymilian; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Experience-induced plastic changes in the cerebral cortex are accompanied by alterations in excitatory and inhibitory transmission. Increased excitatory drive, necessary for plasticity, precedes the occurrence of plastic change, while decreased inhibitory signaling often facilitates plasticity. However, an increase of inhibitory interactions was noted in some instances of experience-dependent changes. We previously reported an increase in the number of inhibitory markers in the barrel cortex of mice after fear conditioning engaging vibrissae, observed concurrently with enlargement of the cortical representational area of the row of vibrissae receiving conditioned stimulus (CS). We also observed that an increase of GABA level accompanied the conditioning. Here, to find whether unaltered GABAergic signaling is necessary for learning-dependent rewiring in the murine barrel cortex, we locally decreased GABA production in the barrel cortex or reduced transmission through GABAA receptors (GABAARs) at the time of the conditioning. Injections of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA), an inhibitor of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), into the barrel cortex prevented learning-induced enlargement of the conditioned vibrissae representation. A similar effect was observed after injection of gabazine, an antagonist of GABAARs. At the behavioral level, consistent conditioned response (cessation of head movements in response to CS) was impaired. These results show that appropriate functioning of the GABAergic system is required for both manifestation of functional cortical representation plasticity and for the development of a conditioned response.

  15. Tob38, a novel essential component in the biogenesis of β-barrel proteins of mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waizenegger, Thomas; Habib, Shukry J; Lech, Maciej; Mokranjac, Dejana; Paschen, Stefan A; Hell, Kai; Neupert, Walter; Rapaport, Doron

    2004-01-01

    Insertion of β-barrel proteins into the outer membrane of mitochondria is mediated by the TOB complex. Known constituents of this complex are Tob55 and Mas37. We identified a novel component, Tob38. It is essential for viability of yeast and the function of the TOB complex. Tob38 is exposed on the surface of the mitochondrial outer membrane. It interacts with Mas37 and Tob55 and is associated with Tob55 even in the absence of Mas37. The Tob38–Tob55 core complex binds precursors of β-barrel proteins and facilitates their insertion into the outer membrane. Depletion of Tob38 results in strongly reduced levels of Tob55 and Mas37 and the residual proteins no longer form a complex. Tob38-depleted mitochondria are deficient in the import of β-barrel precursor proteins, but not of other outer membrane proteins or proteins of other mitochondrial subcompartments. We conclude that Tob38 has a crucial function in the biogenesis of β-barrel proteins of mitochondria. PMID:15205677

  16. Experimental study of the single electron response of the DELPHI Barrel RICH MWPC's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dracos, M.

    1989-01-01

    We present herewith the results of an experimental study of the multiwire proportionnal chambers (MWPC's) used in the Barrel RICH particle identifier of the LEP-DELPHI experiment. Emphasis is given to the problem of detection efficiency and to the measurements of the charge induced by a single photoelectron

  17. Late emergence of the vibrissa direction selectivity map in the rat barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Yves; Léger, Jean-François; Goodman, Dan; Brette, Romain; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2011-07-20

    In the neocortex, neuronal selectivities for multiple sensorimotor modalities are often distributed in topographical maps thought to emerge during a restricted period in early postnatal development. Rodent barrel cortex contains a somatotopic map for vibrissa identity, but the existence of maps representing other tactile features has not been clearly demonstrated. We addressed the issue of the existence in the rat cortex of an intrabarrel map for vibrissa movement direction using in vivo two-photon imaging. We discovered that the emergence of a direction map in rat barrel cortex occurs long after all known critical periods in the somatosensory system. This map is remarkably specific, taking a pinwheel-like form centered near the barrel center and aligned to the barrel cortex somatotopy. We suggest that this map may arise from intracortical mechanisms and demonstrate by simulation that the combination of spike-timing-dependent plasticity at synapses between layer 4 and layer 2/3 and realistic pad stimulation is sufficient to produce such a map. Its late emergence long after other classical maps suggests that experience-dependent map formation and refinement continue throughout adult life.

  18. Dependence of Oak-Related Volatile Compounds on the Physicochemical Characteristics of Barrel-Aged Wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Rodríguez-Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the effect of some of the physicochemical characteristics of wines such as volatile acidity, titratable acidity, pH, free SO2 and alcohol content on the accumulation of oak-related volatile compounds in barrel-aged wines, in order to give more light on the contradictory results found by other authors in this respect. For this, three different single variety wines were aged for twelve months in barrels with the same characteristics (same cooperage, wood origin, toasting level and volume, repeating the experiment in two consecutive years. Our results show that the percentage of wine alcohol and its titratable acidity positively correlated with the final concentration of vanillin and guaiacyl compounds in the oak-matured wines and negatively with the cis- and trans-β-methyl-γ-octalactone concentration. Therefore, when studying the effect of oak barrel variables (oak origin and seasoning, size of the barrel, number of uses, etc. on the concentration of oak-related volatile compounds in wine, the effect of the physicochemical variables of the wine, especially titratable acidity and alcohol content, should also be taken into account since the final wine aroma composition will also depend on these characteristics.

  19. 33 CFR 135.103 - Levy and payment of barrel fee on OCS oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OFFSHORE OIL POLLUTION COMPENSATION FUND Levy of Fees § 135.103 Levy and payment of barrel fee on OCS oil. (a) A fee of $.03 per... paragraph (a) of this section applies whenever the unobligated Fund balance is less than $200,000,000. (d...

  20. Test of the wire ageing induced by radiation for the CMS barrel muon chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Conti, Enrico

    2000-01-01

    We have carried out laboratory test to measure the ageing of a wire tube due to pollutant outgassed by various materials. The tested materials are those used in the muon barrel drift tubes. An X-ray gun irradiated the test tube to accelerate the ageing process. No ageing effect has been measured for a period equivalent to 10 years of operation at LHC.

  1. Health-related quality of life in pediatric patients after allogeneic SCT: development of the PedsQL Stem Cell Transplant module and results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawitschka, A; Güclü, E D; Varni, J W; Putz, M; Wolff, D; Pavletic, S; Greinix, H; Peters, C; Felder-Puig, R

    2014-08-01

    With increased survival after pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic SCT health-related quality of life (HRQL) has emerged as an essential health outcome. The impact of transplant and chronic GVHD (cGVHD)-associated morbidity remains a major obstacle. In 2005, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consensus Conference on Criteria for Clinical Trials in cGVHD recommended HRQL tools as an independent measure of the impact of disease burden. The NIH recommendations did not provide a cGVHD-specific tool for HRQOL measures in children. This report focuses on the development of an SCT-specific instrument to assess HRQL in children and adolescents. For the assessment of generic HRQL we chose the PedsQL (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory) Generic Cores Scales, which have been used in a large number of healthy, acutely ill and chronically ill children and adolescents. To capture SCT- and, specifically, cGVHD-related problems, we developed the PedsQL Stem Cell Transplant module by reviewing the literature, taking over some items/scales of other PedsQL modules, interviewing patients, parents and members of the health-care team, and applying the PedsQL measurement methods. The final PedsQL Stem Cell Transplant module consists of the HRQL domains: pain and hurt, fatigue/sleeping problems/weakness, nausea, worry/anxiety about disease/treatment, nutritional problems, neurocognitive problems, communication about disease/treatment, loneliness, physical functioning and additional somatic complaints (pruritus, skin inflammation, oral problems, eyes or breathing) including patients' and parents' assessment. It was tested in 35 pediatric patients, who were referred to our SCT Outpatient Clinic about 100 days post SCT. Both the generic PedsQL and the SCT-specific scales showed high internal consistency, with Cronbach alpha levels of ⩾0.70 in almost all scales. Most problems were detected within the HRQL domains of physical functioning and pain. The summary scores of the generic Peds

  2. Performance analysis for the CALIFA Barrel calorimeter of the R{sup 3}B experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Pol, H., E-mail: hector.alvarez@usc.es [Dpt. de Física de Partículas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ashwood, N. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Aumann, T. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bertini, D. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Cabanelas, P. [Dpt. de Física de Partículas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Casarejos, E. [Universidade de Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain); Cederkall, J. [Department of Physics, Lund University, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Cortina-Gil, D.; Díaz Fernández, P.; Duran, I. [Dpt. de Física de Partículas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Fiori, E. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Galaviz, D. [Centro de Fsica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Labiche, M. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Nacher, E. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Pietras, B. [Dpt. de Física de Partículas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); and others

    2014-12-11

    The CALIFA calorimeter is an advanced detector for gamma rays and light charged particles, accordingly optimized for the demanding requirements of the physics programme proposed for the R{sup 3}B facility at FAIR. The multipurpose character of CALIFA is required to fulfil challenging demands in energy resolution (5–6% at 1 MeV for gamma rays) and efficiency. Charged particles, e.g. protons of energies up to 320 MeV in the Barrel section, should also be identified with an energy resolution better to 1%. CALIFA is divided into two well-separated sections: a “Forward EndCap” and a cylindrical “Barrel” covering an angular range from 43.2° to 140.3°. The Barrel section, based on long CsI(Tl) pyramidal frustum crystals coupled to large area avalanche photodiodes (LAAPDs), attains the requested high efficiency for calorimetric purposes. The construction of the CALIFA Demonstrator, comprising 20% of the total detector, has already been initiated, and commissioning experiments are expected for 2014. The assessment of the capabilities and expected performance of the detector elements is a crucial step in their design, along with the prototypes evaluation. For this purpose, the Barrel geometry has been carefully implemented in the simulation package R3BRoot, including easily variable thicknesses of crystal wrapping and carbon fibre supports. A complete characterization of the calorimeter response (including efficiency, resolution, evaluation of energy and reconstruction losses) under different working conditions, with several physics cases selected to probe the detector performance over a wide range of applications, has been undertaken. Prototypes of different sections of the CALIFA Barrel have been modeled and their responses have been evaluated and compared with the experimental results. The present paper summarizes the outcome of the simulation campaign for the entire Barrel section and for the corresponding prototypes tested at different European installations.

  3. Study on natural convection in core barrel. Experimental and numerical results for band type spacer pads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kenji; Kawamata, Nobuhiro; Kamide, Hideki

    2003-03-01

    In a fast reactor an Inter-Wrapper Flow (IWF) is one of significant phenomena for decay heat removal under natural circulation condition, when a direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) is adopted for decay heat removal system. Cold coolant provided by dipped heat exchangers (DHX) of DRACS can penetrate into the core barrel (region between the subassemblies) and it makes natural convection int he core barrel. Such IWF will depend on a spacer pad geometry of subassemblies. Water experiment, TRIF (Test Rig for Inter-wrapper Flow), was carried out for IWF in a reactor core. The test section modeled a 1/12th sector of the core and upper plenum of reactor vessel. Experimental parameters were the spacer pad geometry and flow path geometries connecting the upper plenum and core barrel. Numerical simulation using AQUA code was also performed to confirm applicability of a simulation method. An experimental series using a button type spacer pad had been carried out. Here a band type spacer pad was examined. Temperatures at subassembly wall were measured with parameter of the flow path geometries; one was a connection pipe between the upper plenum and core barrel and the other was flow hole in core former plates between the outermost subassemblies and the core barrel. It was found that these flow paths were effective to remove heat in the core in case of the band type spacer pad. A general purpose three dimensional analysis code, AQUA, was applied to the experimental analysis. Each subassembly and inter wrapper gap region were modeled by slab mesh geometry. Pressure loss coefficient at the pacer pad was set based on the geometry. The numerical simulation results were in good agreement with measured temperature profiles in the core. (author)

  4. Semiconductor Strip Tracker Endcaps come to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Bell

    The first few months of 2006 saw the delivery to CERN of the final components of the ATLAS Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT), namely the completed SCT end-caps. Regular ATLAS eNews readers will recall that the SCT barrel arrived in sections in 2005 and was assembled later that year (see the April 2005 and December 2005 issues, respectively.) And as reported in this issue of the eNews, the barrel SCT has recently been integrated with the barrel Transition Radiation Tracker. The end-caps were constructed in Liverpool (side C) and NIKHEF (side A), using components manufactured at many different sites across the world. End-cap C left Liverpool on Monday 20 February and arrived at CERN after a two-day journey by road and through the Channel Tunnel. Accelerations in all three dimensions were monitored during the trip, as was temperature and humidity inside the container; all values remained within pre-specified safe ranges. The end-cap was visually inspected upon arrival, with no obvious damage being seen. Subsequent ...

  5. 7 CFR 319.8-4 - Notice of arrival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... for the Plant Protection and Quarantine Programs, a notice of such arrival, on a form provided for... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of arrival. 319.8-4 Section 319.8-4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...

  6. 7 CFR 319.75-6 - Arrival notification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Plant Protection and Quarantine of the arrival by such means as a manifest, Customs entry document... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arrival notification. 319.75-6 Section 319.75-6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  7. Arrival first queueing networks with applications in kanban production systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boucherie, R.J.; Chao, X.; Miyazawa, M.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new class of queueing networks called {\\it arrival first networks}. We characterise its transition rates and derive the relationship between arrival rules, linear partial balance equations, and product form stationary distributions. This model is motivated by production

  8. Arrival first queueing networks with applications in kanban production systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boucherie, Richardus J.; Chao, X.; Miyazawa, M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new class of queueing networks called arrival first networks. We characterise its transition rates and derive the relationship between arrival rules, linear partial balance equations, and product form stationary distributions. This model is motivated by production

  9. Forecasting Tourist Arrivals and Supply and Demand Gap Analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper aims to forecast the long term behavior of tourist arrivals and analyze the gap between supply and demand for the hotel/accommodation sector of the city of Addis Ababa. It also intends to provide vital information in regards to the sparse knowledge in the subject of forecasting tourist arrivals in Ethiopia.

  10. 14 CFR 93.29 - International Arrival Authorizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false International Arrival Authorizations. 93.29... at Chicago O'Hare International Airport § 93.29 International Arrival Authorizations. (a) Except as... marketing arrangement unless the flight was predominately marketed, by contract, under the control of...

  11. 9 CFR 93.804 - Declaration upon arrival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Elephants, Hippopotami, Rhinoceroses, and Tapirs § 93.804 Declaration upon arrival. Upon arrival of an elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir at a..., rhinoceros, or tapir was shipped; (h) The number, species, and purpose of importation of the elephant...

  12. Causes and Consequences of Late Arrival in Labour | Aziken ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The outcome of labour depends to a large extent on the quality of intrapartum care given. Prompt arrival in hospital is essential for optimal care of parturient women. The causes and consequences of late arrival in labour have not been analysed in our setting. Objective: To determine the causes and ...

  13. Optimal control of arrival and service rates in tandem queues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustafa, M.S.

    1995-08-01

    We consider n M/M/1 queues in series. At queue one the arrival and service rates are chosen in pair from a finite set whenever there are arrivals or service completions at any queue. Customers arriving to queue L (L=1,2,...,n-1) must go on to queue L+1 after finishing service at server L. Customers arriving to queue n leave the system after finishing service at the last server. At queues 2 to n arrival and service rates are fixed. The objective is to minimize the expected discounted cost of the system over finite and infinite horizons. We show that the optimal policy is of threshold type. In order to establish the result, we formulate the optimal control problem as a Linear Programming. (author). 9 refs

  14. Consumer demand for green stormwater management technology in an urban setting: The case of Chicago rain barrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Amy W.; Freitas, Luiz P. C.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrological disruption and water pollution from urbanization can be reduced if households in urban areas adopt decentralized storm water controls. We study a citywide municipal subsidized rain-barrel program in the third biggest city in the United States, Chicago, to explore what factors influence whether households purchase this sort of green storm water management technology in an urban setting. Specifically, we regress census-tract level data on the number of rain barrels adopted in different parts of the city on socioeconomic variables, data on local flood frequency, and features of the housing stock. We find that rain-barrel purchases are not correlated with local levels of flooding, even though city residents were told by program managers that rain barrels could alleviate local flooding. Instead, rain barrels are heavily concentrated in places with high-income attitudinally green populations. We do find more rain barrels were adopted in places close to rain-barrel distribution points and near sites of hydrological information campaigns; thus, policy makers might increase green-technology adoption in areas where they can do the most good by reducing transaction costs and providing education programs to those areas. Finally, our results indicate that owner occupancy is positively correlated with green-technology adoption. Low-rise rental housing may have inefficiently low levels of adoption, such that city managers might want to develop programs to encourage storm water management investments by landlords who do not live in their own properties.

  15. Effect of oak wood barrel capacity and utilization time on phenolic and sensorial profile evolution of an Encruzado white wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Paulo; Muxagata, Sara; Correia, Ana C; Nunes, Fernando M; Cosme, Fernanda; Jordão, António M

    2017-11-01

    Several studies have reported the influence of diverse winemaking technologies in white wine characteristics. However, the impact of the use of different oak wood barrel capacities and utilization time on the evolution of white wine phenolic content and sensorial characteristics are not usually considered. Thus the aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of oak wood barrel capacity and utilization time on the evolution of phenolic compounds, browning potential index and sensorial profile of an Encruzado white wine. For the 180 aging days considered, the use of new oak wood barrels induced a greater increase in global phenolic composition, including several individual compounds, such as gallic and ellagic acid, independently of the barrel capacity. Tendency for a lesser increase of the browning potential index values was detected for white wines aged in new oak wood barrels. The sensorial profile evolution, showed significant differences only for the aroma descriptors, namely for 'wood aroma' and 'aroma intensity', white wine aged in 225 L new oak wood barrels being the highest scored. The results show that, in general, the use of different capacities and utilization time of oak wood barrels used for white wine aging could play an important role in white wine quality. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Single center experience with total body irradiation and melphalan (TBI-MEL) myeloablative conditioning regimen for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients with refractory hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Bhavana; Rapoport, Aaron P; Fang, Hong-Bin; Ilyas, Can; Marangoz, Deniz; Akbulut, Vinil; Ruehle, Kathleen; Badros, Ashraf; Yanovich, Saul; Akpek, Görgün

    2014-04-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the tolerability and efficacy of fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) (1,200 cGy) and melphalan (MEL) (100-110 mg/m(2)) myeloablative conditioning in 48 patients with nonremission AML (n = 14), ALL (n = 10), NHL (n = 18), and other refractory hematologic malignancies (n = 6) who received allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) between 2002 and 2011. Median age was 48 years (22 to 68); 14 out of 26 leukemia patients (54 %) had circulating blasts at transplant, 20 (50 %) evaluable patients had poor-risk cytogenetics, 12 (25 %) had prior SCT, and 10 (21 %) received stem cells from a mismatch donor. All patients received tacrolimus with or without methotrexate for GVHD prophylaxis. At the time of analysis, 13 patients (27 %) were alive and disease free. Engraftment was complete in all patients. The median time to ANC recovery (>500) was 12 days (range, 6-28). The most common grade III and IV toxicities were mucositis and infections. Eighteen patients (43 %) developed grade II-IV acute GVHD, and eight (26 %) had extensive chronic GVHD. Of 44 evaluable patients for response, 28 (64 %) achieved a complete remission (CR), and seven (15 %) had a partial remission after the transplant. With a median follow-up of 30 months (4 to 124 months) for surviving patients, the cumulative incidence of relapse was 45 % at 1 year, and the probability of overall survival (OS) at 5 years was 22.5 %. Multivariate analysis showed that platelet count (500 IU/L) at SCT were associated with relapse. Age less than 53 years and CR after SCT were associated with better OS. Our data suggest that TBI-MEL can result in CR in two thirds, durable remission in one third, and 5-year survival in about one quarter of patients with nonremission hematologic malignancies. Further studies with TBI-MEL in standard risk transplant patients are warranted.

  17. Auto-SCT induces a phenotypic shift from CMP to GMP progenitors, reduces clonogenic potential and enhances in vitro and in vivo cycling activity defined by (18)F-FLT PET scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolthuis, C; Agool, A; Olthof, S; Slart, R H J A; Huls, G; Smid, W M; Schuringa, J J; Vellenga, E

    2011-01-01

    Autologous SCT (auto-SCT) introduces a reduced tolerance to chemotherapy even in patients with adequate engraftment, suggesting long-term effects of the transplantation procedure on the BM capacity. To study the hematopoietic cell compartment after auto-SCT, CD34(+) BM cells (n = 16) from patients at 6-9 months after auto-SCT were studied with regard to the progenitor subsets, colony frequency and cell cycle status. The BM compartments were studied in vivo using PET tracer 3-fluoro-3-deoxy-L-thymidine (¹⁸F-FLT PET). BM CD34(+) cells after auto-SCT were compared with normal CD34(+) cells and showed a phenotypic shift from common myeloid progenitor (CMP mean percentage 3.7 vs 19.4%, P=0.001) to granulocyte-macrophage progenitor (GMP mean percentage 51.8 vs 27.6%, P=0.01). In addition, a reduced clonogenic potential and higher cycling activity especially of the GMP fraction (41% ± 4 in G2/S phase vs 19% ± 2, P = 0.03) were observed in BM after auto-SCT compared with normal. The enhanced cycling activity was confirmed in vivo by showing a significantly higher uptake of the ¹⁸F-FLT PET tracer by the BM compartment. This study shows that auto-SCT results in defects of the hematopoietic compartment at least 6 months after auto-SCT, characterized by changes in the composition of progenitor subsets and enhanced in vitro and in vivo cycling activity.

  18. Quantitative/Statistical Approach to Bullet-to-Firearm Identification with Consecutively Manufactured Barrels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Striupaitis; R.E. Gaensslen

    2005-01-30

    Efforts to use objective image comparison and bullet scanning technologies to distinguish bullets from consecutively manufactured handgun barrels from two manufacturers gave mixed results. The ability of a technology to reliably distinguish between matching and non-matching bullets, where the non-matching bullets were as close in pattern to the matching ones as is probably possible, would provide evidence that the distinctions could be made ''objectively'', and independently of human eyes. That evidence is identical or very close to what seems to be needed to satisfy Daubert standards. It is fair to say that the FTI IBIS image comparison technology correctly distinguished between all the Springfield barrel bullets, and between most but not all of the HiPoint barrel bullets. In the HiPoint cases that were not distinguished 100% of the time, they would he distinguished correctly at least 83% of the time. These results, although obviously limited to the materials used in the comparisons, provide strong evidence that barrel-to-bullet matching is objectively reliable. The results with SciClops were less compelling. The results do not mean that bullet-to-barrel matching is not objectively reliable--rather, they mean that this version of the particular technology could not quite distinguish between these extremely similar yet different bullets as well as the image comparison technology did. In a number of cases, the numerical results made the correct distinctions, although they were close to one another. It is hard to say from this data that this technology differs in its ability to make distinctions between the manufacturers, because the results are very similar with both. The human examiner results were as expected. We did not expect any misidentifications, and there were not any. It would have been preferable to have a higher return rate, and thus more comparisons in the overall sample. As noted, the ''consecutively manufactured barrel

  19. Cobalamin-Independent Methionine Synthase (MetE): A Face-to-Face Double Barrel that Evolved by Gene Duplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejcha, Robert; Ludwig, Martha L. (Michigan)

    2010-03-08

    Cobalamin-independent methionine synthase (MetE) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to L-homocysteine (Hcy) without using an intermediate methyl carrier. Although MetE displays no detectable sequence homology with cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH), both enzymes require zinc for activation and binding of Hcy. Crystallographic analyses of MetE from T. maritima reveal an unusual dual-barrel structure in which the active site lies between the tops of the two ({beta}{alpha}){sub 8} barrels. The fold of the N-terminal barrel confirms that it has evolved from the C-terminal polypeptide by gene duplication; comparisons of the barrels provide an intriguing example of homologous domain evolution in which binding sites are obliterated. The C-terminal barrel incorporates the zinc ion that binds and activates Hcy. The zinc-binding site in MetE is distinguished from the (Cys){sub 3}Zn site in the related enzymes, MetH and betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase, by its position in the barrel and by the metal ligands, which are histidine, cysteine, glutamate, and cysteine in the resting form of MetE. Hcy associates at the face of the metal opposite glutamate, which moves away from the zinc in the binary E {center_dot} Hcy complex. The folate substrate is not intimately associated with the N-terminal barrel; instead, elements from both barrels contribute binding determinants in a binary complex in which the folate substrate is incorrectly oriented for methyl transfer. Atypical locations of the Hcy and folate sites in the C-terminal barrel presumably permit direct interaction of the substrates in a ternary complex. Structures of the binary substrate complexes imply that rearrangement of folate, perhaps accompanied by domain rearrangement, must occur before formation of a ternary complex that is competent for methyl transfer.

  20. Cobalamin-Independent Methionine Synthase (MetE): A Face-to-Face Double Barrel that Evolved by Gene Duplication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pejcha, Robert; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2005-01-01

    Cobalamin-independent methionine synthase (MetE) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to L-homocysteine (Hcy) without using an intermediate methyl carrier. Although MetE displays no detectable sequence homology with cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH), both enzymes require zinc for activation and binding of Hcy. Crystallographic analyses of MetE from T. maritima reveal an unusual dual-barrel structure in which the active site lies between the tops of the two (βα) 8 barrels. The fold of the N-terminal barrel confirms that it has evolved from the C-terminal polypeptide by gene duplication; comparisons of the barrels provide an intriguing example of homologous domain evolution in which binding sites are obliterated. The C-terminal barrel incorporates the zinc ion that binds and activates Hcy. The zinc-binding site in MetE is distinguished from the (Cys) 3 Zn site in the related enzymes, MetH and betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase, by its position in the barrel and by the metal ligands, which are histidine, cysteine, glutamate, and cysteine in the resting form of MetE. Hcy associates at the face of the metal opposite glutamate, which moves away from the zinc in the binary E · Hcy complex. The folate substrate is not intimately associated with the N-terminal barrel; instead, elements from both barrels contribute binding determinants in a binary complex in which the folate substrate is incorrectly oriented for methyl transfer. Atypical locations of the Hcy and folate sites in the C-terminal barrel presumably permit direct interaction of the substrates in a ternary complex. Structures of the binary substrate complexes imply that rearrangement of folate, perhaps accompanied by domain rearrangement, must occur before formation of a ternary complex that is competent for methyl transfer.

  1. Cobalamin-independent methionine synthase (MetE: a face-to-face double barrel that evolved by gene duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Pejchal

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Cobalamin-independent methionine synthase (MetE catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to L-homocysteine (Hcy without using an intermediate methyl carrier. Although MetE displays no detectable sequence homology with cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH, both enzymes require zinc for activation and binding of Hcy. Crystallographic analyses of MetE from T. maritima reveal an unusual dual-barrel structure in which the active site lies between the tops of the two (betaalpha(8 barrels. The fold of the N-terminal barrel confirms that it has evolved from the C-terminal polypeptide by gene duplication; comparisons of the barrels provide an intriguing example of homologous domain evolution in which binding sites are obliterated. The C-terminal barrel incorporates the zinc ion that binds and activates Hcy. The zinc-binding site in MetE is distinguished from the (Cys(3Zn site in the related enzymes, MetH and betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase, by its position in the barrel and by the metal ligands, which are histidine, cysteine, glutamate, and cysteine in the resting form of MetE. Hcy associates at the face of the metal opposite glutamate, which moves away from the zinc in the binary E.Hcy complex. The folate substrate is not intimately associated with the N-terminal barrel; instead, elements from both barrels contribute binding determinants in a binary complex in which the folate substrate is incorrectly oriented for methyl transfer. Atypical locations of the Hcy and folate sites in the C-terminal barrel presumably permit direct interaction of the substrates in a ternary complex. Structures of the binary substrate complexes imply that rearrangement of folate, perhaps accompanied by domain rearrangement, must occur before formation of a ternary complex that is competent for methyl transfer.

  2. BAT2 and BAT3 polymorphisms as novel genetic risk factors for rejection after HLA-related SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Ignazio Stefano; Angius, Andrea; Andreani, Marco; Testi, Manuela; Lucarelli, Guido; Floris, Matteo; Marktel, Sarah; Ciceri, Fabio; La Nasa, Giorgio; Fleischhauer, Katharina; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Bulfone, Alessandro; Gregori, Silvia; Bacchetta, Rosa

    2014-11-01

    The genetic background of donor and recipient is an important factor determining the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (allo-HSCT). We applied whole-genome analysis to investigate genetic variants-other than HLA class I and II-associated with negative outcome after HLA-identical sibling allo-HSCT in a cohort of 110 β-Thalassemic patients. We identified two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in BAT2 (A/G) and BAT3 (T/C) genes, SNP rs11538264 and SNP rs10484558, both located in the HLA class III region, in strong linkage disequilibrium between each other (R(2)=0.92). When considered as single SNP, none of them reached a significant association with graft rejection (nominal P<0.00001 for BAT2 SNP rs11538264, and P<0.0001 for BAT3 SNP rs10484558), whereas the BAT2/BAT3 A/C haplotype was present at significantly higher frequency in patients who rejected as compared to those with functional graft (30.0% vs 2.6%, nominal P=1.15 × 10(-8); and adjusted P=0.0071). The BAT2/BAT3 polymorphisms and specifically the A/C haplotype may represent a novel immunogenetic factor associated with graft rejection in patients undergoing allo-HSCT.

  3. ADAM results from the May 95 SCT beam test, and an update on the Higgs to four lepton analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fares, F.J.; Taylor, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    The Atlas Detector Analog Memory (ADAM) chip has been designed for use at the Large Hadron Collider as a digital front end readout for the μ-strip detectors used in the ATLAS semiconductor Tracker (SCT). A particle level study has been done and shows that is possible to see a signal above background. the main cut against the background being impact parameter and calorimeter isolation cuts. The current analysis involves repeating the particle level study, however using a full simulation of the ATLAS detector using the GEANT package. In particular the impact of the Inner tracker design on this decay channel is being investigated. A full simulation of Higgs and tt-bar events was performed using the geometry described in the ATLAS technical proposal. A full reconstruction was performed using electro-magnetic calorimeter ( EM) clusters as track seeds. A crude EM calibration, using simulated electrons at four different energies, was also performed to correct for the energy. Preliminary results indicate that the impact parameter cut against the tt-bar background doesn't work when doing a full detector simulation

  4. Reaction of intermetallic compounds of the ScT composition (T=Ag, Cu, Zn, Ni) with hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilkin, S.P.; Volkova, L.S.; Tarasov, B.P.

    1995-01-01

    Reaction of intermetallic compounds of ScT composition (T=Ag, Cu, Zn, Ni), crystallized in CsCl structural type, with hydrogen at 0.2-10 MPa pressure and 293-673 K temperature is studied by chemical, x-ray phase and complex thermogravimetry analysis methods. It is shown that under such conditions hydrogen absorption by ScAg and ScCu is accompanied by the decay of their source matrices into scandium dihydride and metal silver and copper respectively. For ScZn a fine-dispersion mixture of scandium dihydride with zinc and hydride phase of a new zinc-containing intermetallic compound appears to be the finite reaction product. In case of ScNi a hydride phase of ScNiH 2.6 composition is produced, which is crystallized in a rhombic syngony with the lattice periods: a=0.5281±0.0007, b=0.7393±0.0009 and c=0.3327±0.0004 nm. 9 refs.; 2 tabs

  5. Analysis of Premature Wear-Out of Aircraft Gun Barrel by Applying a Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łęczycki Krzysztof

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Firing from gun armament generates a wide range of physico-chemical phenomena contributing to the degradation of barrel material, e.g. pressure, high temperature, chemically aggressive character of post-detonation gases and friction of a driving band. In this work the technique of thin foils was used in Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM to study the influence of physicochemical phenomena on the material microstructure of aircraft gun barrel. A mechanism and reason of premature wear-out of the barrel under consideration was also outlined by utilising light microscopy and hardness measurements.

  6. SiPM photosensors and fast timing readout for the Barrel Time-of-Flight detector in bar PANDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, K.

    2018-03-01

    The Barrel Time-of-Flight detector system will be installed in the upcoming bar PANDA experiment at FAIR in Germany. The detector has a barrel shape of phi=0.5 m and 1.8 m long, covering about 5 m2, which corresponds to the laboratory polar angle coverage of 22oPANDA Barrel Time-of-Flight detector are presented. The test shows that the current design fulfils satisfactorily the required timing performance (σt~ 56 ps) and the timing performance depends little on the hit position on the surface.

  7. Allo-SCT for  Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms in blast phase: a study from the Societe Française de Greffe de Moelle et de Therapie Cellulaire (SFGM-TC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahu, X; Chevallier, P; Clavert, A; Suarez, F; Michallet, M; Vincent, L; Vigouroux, S; Blaise, D; Mariette, C; Bilger, K; Robin, M; Yakoub-Agha, I; Peffault de Latour, R; Mohty, M

    2014-06-01

    Progression of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative (MPN) or myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an adverse event in the course of the disease. Although allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (allo-SCT) is considered as the only curative therapy, few data exist on the outcome of patients with Philadelphia-negative MPN or MDS/MPN in blast phase who received an allo-SCT. Sixty patients were included in this retrospective study. AML was secondary to an MPN in 43 cases, whereas AML evolved from an MDS/MPN in 17 cases. Patients received allo-SCT in CR or advanced disease in 26 cases and 34 cases, respectively. With a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 25-44), OS and leukemia-free survival (LFS) were, respectively, 18% and 9% at 3 years. CR at transplant was associated with an improved LFS in univariate and multivariate analysis. The 3-year LFS was 18% for patients undergoing allo-SCT in CR versus 3% in advanced disease (P=0.008). Absence of thrombosis and an intermediate or favorable AML karyotype were associated with an improved outcome for patients who received allo-SCT in CR. New strategies are needed to improve the outcome of patients with MPN-MDS/MPN in blast phase.

  8. Current Status of the Pixel Phase I Upgrade in CMS: Barrel Module Production

    CERN Document Server

    Bartek, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    The silicon pixel detector is the innermost component of the CMS tracking system, providing high precision space point measurements of charged particle trajectories. Before 2018 the instantaneous luminosity of the LHC is expected to reach about 2~x~$10^{34}~\\rm{cm}^{-2}\\rm{s}^{-1}$, which will significantly increase the number of interactions per bunch crossing. To maintain a high tracking efficiency, CMS has planned to replace the current pixel system during phase I by a new lightweight detector, equipped with an additional 4th layer in the barrel, and one additional forward/backward disk. The present status of barrel modules production will be presented, including preliminary results from tests on the first production pixel modules of the new pixel tracker.

  9. Double-barrelled wet colostomy formation after pelvic exenteration for locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemendaal, A L A; Kraus, R; Buchs, N C; Hamdy, F C; Hompes, R; Cogswell, L; Guy, R J

    2016-11-01

    In advanced pelvic cancer it may be necessary to perform a total pelvic exenteration. In such cases urinary tract reconstruction is usually achieved with the creation of an ileal conduit with a urinary stoma on the right side of the patient's abdomen and an end colostomy separately on the left. The potential morbidity from a second stoma may be avoided by the use of a double-barrelled wet colostomy (DBWC), as a single stoma. Another advantage is the possibility of using a vertical rectus abdominis muscle flap for perineal reconstruction. All patients undergoing formation of a DBWC were included. A DBWC was formed in 10 patients. One patient underwent formation of a double-barrelled wet ileostomy. In this technical note we present our early experience in 11 cases and a video of DBWC formation in a male patient. Colorectal Disease © 2016 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. Design, Construction and Installation of the ATLAS Hadronic Barrel Scintillator-Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Alexa, C; Alves, R; Amaral, P; Ananiev, A; Anderson, K; Andresen, X; Antonaki, A; Batusov, V; Bednar, P; Bergeaas, E; Biscarat, C; Blanch, O; Blanchot, G; Bohm, C; Boldea, V; Bosi, F; Bosman, M; Bromberg, C; Budagov, Yu A; Calvet, D; Cardeira, C; Carli, T; Carvalho, J; Cascella, M; Castillo, M V; Costello, J; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Cerqueira, A S; Clément, C; Cobal, M; Cogswell, F; Constantinescu, S; Costanzo, D; Da Silva, P; Davidek, M; David, T; Dawson, J; De, K; Del Prete, T; Di Girolamo, B; Dita, S; Dolejsi, J; Dolezal, Z; Dotti, A; Downing, R; Drake, G; Efthymiopoulos, I; Errede, D; Errede, S; Farbin, A; Fassouliotis, D; Feng, E; Fenyuk, A; Ferdi, C; Ferreira, B C; Ferrer, A; Flaminio, V; Flix, J; Francavilla, P; Fullana, E; Garde, V; Gellerstedt, K; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giangiobbe, V; Gildemeister, O; Gilewsky, V; Giokaris, N; Gollub, N; Gomes, A; González, V; Gouveia, J; Grenier, P; Gris, P; Guarino, V; Guicheney, C; Sen-Gupta, A; Hakobyan, H; Haney, M; Hellman, S; Henriques, A; Higón, E; Hill, N; Holmgren, S; Hruska, I; Hurwitz, M; Huston, J; Jen-La Plante, I; Jon-And, K; Junk, T; Karyukhin, A; Khubua, J; Klereborn, J; Kopikov, S; Korolkov, I; Krivkova, P; Kulchitsky, Y; Kurochkin, Yu; Kuzhir, P; Lapin, V; Le Compte, T; Lefèvre, R; Leitner, R; Li, J; Liablin, M; Lokajícek, M; Lomakin, Y; Lourtie, P; Lovas, L; Lupi, A; Maidantchik, C; Maio, A; Maliukov, S; Manousakis, A; Marques, C; Marroquim, F; Martin, F; Mazzoni, E; Merritt, F S; Myagkov, A; Miller, R; Minashvili, I; Miralles, L; Montarou, G; Némécek, S; Nessi, M; Nikitine, I; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Onofre, A; Oreglia, M; Palan, B; Pallin, D; Pantea, D; Pereira, A; Pilcher, J E; Pina, J; Pinhão, J; Pod, E; Podlyski, F; Portell, X; Poveda, J; Pribyl, L; Price, L E; Proudfoot, J; Ramalho, M; Ramstedt, M; Raposeiro, L; Reis, J; Richards, R; Roda, C; Romanov, V; Rosnet, P; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Rumiantsau, V; Russakovich, N; Sada Costa, J; Salto, O; Salvachúa, B; Sanchis, E; Sanders, H; Santoni, C; Santos, J; Saraiva, J G; Sarri, F; Says, L P; Schlager, G; Schlereth, J L; Seixas, J M; Selldén, B; Shalanda, N; Shevtsov, P; Shochet, M; Simaitis, V; Simonyan, M; Sisakian, A; Sjölin, J; Solans, C; Solodkov, A; Solovianov, J; Silva, O; Sosebee, M; Spanó, F; Speckmeyer, P; Stanek, R; Starchenko, E; Starovoitov, P; Suk, M; Sykora, I; Tang, F; Tas, P; Teuscher, R; Tokar, S; Topilin, N; Torres, J; Underwood, D; Usai, G; Valero, A; Valkár, S; Valls, J A; Vartapetian, A; Vazeille, F; Vellidis, C; Ventura, F; Vichou, I; Vivarelli, I; Volpi, M; White, A; Zaitsev, A; Zenin, A; Zenis, T; Zenonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zilka, B

    2007-01-01

    The scintillator tile hadronic calorimeter is a sampling calorimeter using steel as the absorber structure and scintillator as the active medium. The scintillator is located in "pockets" in the steel structure and the wavelength-shifting fibers are contained in channels running radially within the absorber to photomultiplier tubes which are located in the outer support girders of the calorimeter structure. In addition, to its role as a detector for high energy particles, the tile calorimeter provides the direct support of the liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter in the barrel region, and the liquid argon electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters in the endcap region. Through these, it indirectly supports the inner tracking system and beam pipe. The steel absorber, and in particular the support girders, provide the flux return for the solenoidal field from the central solenoid. Finally, the end surfaces of the barrel calorimeter are used to mount services, power supplies and readout crates for the inner tr...

  11. A Barrel IFR Instrumented With Limited Streamer Tubes for BABAR Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreotti, M.; Ferrara U.; INFN, Ferrara

    2006-01-01

    The new barrel Instrumented Flux Return (IFR) of BABAR detector will be reported here. Limited Streamer Tubes (LSTs) have been chosen to replace the existing RPCs as active elements of the barrel IFR. The layout of the new detector will be discussed: in particular, a cell bigger than the standard one has been used to improve efficiency and reliability. The extruded profile is coated with a resistive layer of graphite having a typical surface resistivity between 0.2 and 0.4 MOhm/square. The tubes are assembled in modules and installed in 12 active layers of each sextant of the IFR detector. R and D studies to choose the final design and Quality Control procedure adopted during the tube production will be briefly discussed. Finally the performances of installed LSTs into 2/3 of IFR after 8 months of operations will be reported

  12. Intercalibration of the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment at start-up

    CERN Document Server

    Adzic, Petar; Almeida, Nuno; Anagnostou, Georgios; Andelin, Daniel; Anfreville, Marc; Anicin, Ivan; Antunovic, Zeljko; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Auffray, Etiennette; Argiro, Stefano; Askew, Andrew; Atramentov, Oleksiy; Baccaro, Stefania; Baffioni, Stephanie; Balazs, Michael; Barney, David; Barone, Luciano; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Baty, Clement; Bandurin, Dmitry; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bell, Ken W; Benetta, Robert; Bercher, Michel; Bernet, Colin; Berthon, Ursula; Besançon, Marc; Betev, Botjo; Beuselinck, Raymond; Biino, Cristina; Blaha, Jan; Bloch, Philippe; Blyth, Simon; Bornheim, Adolf; Bourotte, Jean; Brett, Angela Mary; Brown, Robert M; Britton, David; Bühler, M; Busson, Philippe; Camanzi, Barbara; Camporesi, Tiziano; Carrera, E; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cavallari, Francesca; Cerutti, Muriel; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Charlot, Claude; Chen, E Augustine; Chen, Wan-Ting; Chen, Zheng-Yu; Chipaux, Rémi; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Cockerill, David J A; Combaret, Christophe; Conetti, Sergio; Cossutti, Fabio; Cox, Bradley; Cussans, David; Dafinei, Ioan; Da Silva Di Calafiori, Diogo Raphael; Daskalakis, Georgios; Davatz, Giovanna; David, A; Deiters, Konrad; Dejardin, Marc; Djordjevic, Milos; Della Negra, Rodolphe; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Del Re, Daniele; De Min, Alberto; Denegri, Daniel; Depasse, Pierre; Descamps, Julien; Diemoz, Marcella; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Djambazov, Lubomir; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Drndarevic, Snezana; Duboscq, Jean Etienne; Dutta, Dipanwita; Dzelalija, Mile; Peisert, A; El-Mamouni, H; Evangelou, Ioannis; Evans, David; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Fay, Jean; Ferri, Federico; Flower, Paul S; Franci, Daniele; Franzoni, Giovanni; Freudenreich, Klaus; Funk, Wolfgang; Ganjour, Serguei; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gascon, Susan; Gataullin, Marat; Geerebaert, Yannick; Gentit, François-Xavier; Gershtein, Yuri; Ghezzi, Alessio; Ghodgaonkar, Manohar; Gilly, Jean; Givernaud, Alain; Gninenko, Sergei; Go, Apollo; Gobbo, Benigno; Godinovic, Nikola; Golubev, Nikolai; Gong, Datao; Govoni, Pietro; Grant, Nicholas; Gras, Philippe; Greenhalgh, R J S; Guevara Riveros, Luz; Guillaud, Jean-Paul; Haguenauer, Maurice; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Hansen, Magnus; Heath, Helen F; Heltsley, Brian; Hill, Jack; Hintz, Wieland; Hirosky, Robert; Hobson, Peter R; Honma, Alan; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Husejko, Michal; Ille, Bernard; Imlay, Richard; Ingram, Quentin; Jarry, Patrick; Jessop, Colin; Jovanovic, Dragoslav; Kaadze, Ketino; Kachanov, Vassili; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kataria, Sushil Kumar; Kennedy, Bruce W; Kloukinas, Kostas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Kolberg, Ted; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Krpic, Dragomir; Kubota, Yuichi; Kumar, P; Kuo, Chen-Cheng; Kyberd, Paul; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Lebeau, Michel; Lecomte, Pierre; Lecoq, Paul; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Leshev, Georgi; Lethuillier, Morgan; Lin, Sheng-Wen; Lin, Willis; Lintern, A L; Litvine, Vladimir; Locci, Elizabeth; Lodge, Anthony B; Longo, Egidio; Loukas, Demetrios; Luckey, Paul David; Lustermann, Werner; Lynch, Clare; Ma, Yousi; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Malberti, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Maletic, Dimitrije; Mandjavidze, Irakli; Manthos, Nikolaos; Maravin, Yurii; Marchica, Carmelo; Marinelli, Nancy; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Marone, Matteo; Mathez, Hervé; Matveev, Viktor; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Maurelli, Georges; Meridiani, Paolo; Milenovic, Predrag; Milleret, Gérard; Miné, Philippe; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Moortgat, Filip; Mur, Michel; Musella, Pasquale; Musienko, Yuri; Nardulli, Alessandro; Nash, Jordan; Nédélec, Patrick; Negri, Pietro; Newman, Harvey B; Nikitenko, Alexander; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Organtini, Giovanni; Orimoto, Toyoko; Paganoni, Marco; Paganini, Pascal; Palma, Alessandro; Panev, Bozhidar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Papadakis, Antonakis; Papadakis, Ioannis; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paramatti, Riccardo; Parracho, P; Pastrone, Nadia; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Pauss, Felicitas; Petrakou, Eleni; Phillips, D G; Piroué, Pierre; Ptochos, Fotios; Puljak, Ivica; Pullia, Antonino; Punz, Thomas; Puzovic, Jovan; Ragazzi, Stefano; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rander, John; Razis, Panos A; Redaelli, Nicola; Renker, Dieter; Reucroft, Steve; Reymond, Jean-Marc; Ribeiro, Pedro Quinaz; Röser, Ulf; Rogan, Christopher; Romanteau, Thierry; Rondeaux, Françoise; Ronquest, Michael; Rosowsky, André; Rovelli, Chiara; Rumerio, Paolo; Rusack, Roger; Rusakov, Sergey V; Ryan, Matthew John; Sala, Leonardo; Salerno, Roberto; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schinzel, Dietrich; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Siamitros, Christos; Sillou, Daniel; Singovsky, Alexander; Sirois, Yves; Sirunyan, Albert M; Silva, J; Silva, Pedro; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Shukla, Prashant; Smith, Brian; Smith, Vincent J; Sproston, Martin; Stöckli, Fabian; Suter, Henry; Swain, John; Tabarellide Fatis, T; Takahashi, Maiko; Tcheremoukhine, Alexandre; Teller, Olivier; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Thiebaux, Christophe; Timciuc, Vladlen; Timlin, Claire; Titov, Maksym; Tobias, A; Topkar, Anita; Triantis, Frixos A; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Ueno, Koji; Uzunian, Andrey; Varela, Joao; Verrecchia, Patrice; Veverka, Jan; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Virdee, Tejinder; Vlassov, E; Von Gunten, Hans Peter; Wang, Minzu; Wardrope, David; Weber, Markus; Weng, Joanna; Williams, Jennifer C; Yang, Yong; Yaselli, Ignacio; Yohay, Rachel; Zabi, Alexandre; Zamiatin, Nikolai; Zelepoukine, Serguei; Zhang, Jia-Wen; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Kejun; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Calibration of the relative response of the individual channels of the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS detector was accomplished before installation with cosmic ray muons and test beams. One fourth of the calorimeter was exposed to a beam of high energy electrons and the relative calibration of the channels, the intercalibration, was found to be reproducible to a precision of about 0.3\\%. Additionally, data were collected with cosmic rays for the entire ECAL barrel during the commissioning phase. By comparing the intercalibration constants obtained with the electron beam data with those from the cosmic ray data, it is demonstrated that the latter provide an intercalibration precision of 1.5\\% over most of the ECAL. The best intercalibration precision is expected to come from the analysis of events collected {\\it in situ} during the LHC operation. Using data collected with both electrons and pion beams, several aspects of the intercalibration procedures based on electrons or neutral pions were in...

  13. Synaptic molecular imaging in spared and deprived columns of mouse barrel cortex with array tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Nicholas C; Collman, Forrest; Vogelstein, Joshua T; Burns, Randal; Smith, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    A major question in neuroscience is how diverse subsets of synaptic connections in neural circuits are affected by experience dependent plasticity to form the basis for behavioral learning and memory. Differences in protein expression patterns at individual synapses could constitute a key to understanding both synaptic diversity and the effects of plasticity at different synapse populations. Our approach to this question leverages the immunohistochemical multiplexing capability of array tomography (ATomo) and the columnar organization of mouse barrel cortex to create a dataset comprising high resolution volumetric images of spared and deprived cortical whisker barrels stained for over a dozen synaptic molecules each. These dataset has been made available through the Open Connectome Project for interactive online viewing, and may also be downloaded for offline analysis using web, Matlab, and other interfaces.

  14. TEM study of radiation induced defects in baffle-former-barrel assembly from decommissioned NPP Greifswald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srba, O.; Michalicka, J.; Keilova, E.; Kocik, K.

    2013-06-01

    A complex transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of reactor vessel internal (RVI) materials from the baffle-former-barrel assembly from NPP Greifswald (VVER 440), Unit 1 decommissioned after 15 service cycles has been undertaken. All parts of the baffle-former-barrel assembly are made from Ti-stabilized austenitic stainless steel 08Ch18N10T. The materials were exposed to different dose of neutron radiation (2.4 - 11.4 dpa) at temperatures 267 - 398 deg. C depending on position in the core. Three types of radiation induced defects were identified and quantified, namely: dislocations, cavities (voids) and fine-scaled precipitated particles of Ni-Si rich phases. Black-dot type defects were observed too. Operation conditions are around ≅ 300 deg. C that is why we have observed defect typical for both low and high regions of irradiation temperatures. (authors)

  15. The CMS Barrel Calorimeter Response to Particle Beams from 2 to 350 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Yazgan, Elfe

    2009-01-01

    The response of the combined CMS barrel calorimeters to hadrons, electrons and muons over a range from 2 to 350 GeV/$c$ has been measured. The analysis of the differences in calorimeter response to charged pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons and a discussion of the underlying phenomena are presented. Techniques to correct the signals from the considerably different electromagnetic (EB) and hadronic (HB) barrel calorimeters in reconstructing the energies of hadrons are also presented. Above 5 GeV/$c$, these corrections improve the energy resolution of the combined system where the stochastic term equals $84.7$\\% and the constant term is $7.4$\\%. The corrected mean response remains constant within 1.3\\% {\\it rms}.

  16. Concept of Operations for Interval Management Arrivals and Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicok, Daniel S.; Barmore, Bryan E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of operations for interval management operations to be deployed in the US National Airspace System (NAS) by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) after 2020. The use of interval management operations is described that begin in en route airspace and continue to a termination point inside the arrival terminal area, in a terminal environment that includes other arrival management tools such as arrival metering, Ground-based Interval Management - Spacing (GIM-S), and Terminal Sequencing and Spacing (TSAS). The roles of Air Traffic Controllers and Flight Crews and the ground automation tools that are used by Air Traffic Controllers to enable the primary operation and variations are described.

  17. Overview of contaminant arrival distributions as general evaluation requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The environmental consequences of subsurface contamination problems can be completely and effectively evaluated by fulfilling the following five requirements: Determine each present or future outflow boundary of contaminated groundwater; provide the location/arrival-time distributions; provide the location/outflow-quantity distributions; provide these distributions for each individual chemical or biological constituent of environmental importance; and use the arrival distributions to determine the quantity and concentration of each contaminant that will interface with the environment as time passes. The arrival distributions on which these requirements are based provide a reference point for communication among scientists and public decision makers by enabling complicated scientific analyses to be presented as simple summary relationships

  18. Narrowband direction of arrival estimation for antenna arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Foutz, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to narrowband array signal processing, classical and subspace-based direction of arrival (DOA) estimation with an extensive discussion on adaptive direction of arrival algorithms. The book begins with a presentation of the basic theory, equations, and data models of narrowband arrays. It then discusses basic beamforming methods and describes how they relate to DOA estimation. Several of the most common classical and subspace-based direction of arrival methods are discussed. The book concludes with an introduction to subspace tracking and shows how subspace tr

  19. NMR investigations of structural and dynamics features of natively unstructured drug peptide - salmon calcitonin: implication to rational design of potent sCT analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Atul; Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Backbone dynamics and conformational properties of drug peptide salmon calcitonin have been studied in aqueous solution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Although salmon calcitonin (sCT) is largely unfolded in solution (as has been reported in several circular dichroism studies), the secondary H(α) chemical shifts and three bond H(N) -H(α) coupling constants indicated that most of the residues of the peptide are populating the α-helical region of the Ramachandran (ϕ, ψ) map. Further, the peptide in solution has been found to exhibit multiple conformational states exchanging slowly on the NMR timescale (10(2) -10(3)  s(-1) ), inferred by the multiple chemical shift assignments in the region Leu4-Leu12 and around Pro23 (for residues Gln20-Tyr22 and Arg24). Possibly, these slowly exchanging multiple conformational states might inhibit symmetric self-association of the peptide and, in part, may account for its reduced aggregation propensity compared with human calcitonin (which lacks this property). The (15) N NMR-relaxation data revealed (i) the presence of slow (microsecond-to-millisecond) timescale dynamics in the N-terminal region (Cys1-Ser5) and core residues His17 and Asn26 and (ii) the presence of high frequency (nanosecond-to-picosecond) motions in the C-terminal arm. Put together, the various results suggested that (i) the flexible C-terminal of sCT (from Thr25-Thr31) is involved in identification of specific target receptors, (ii) whereas the N-terminal of sCT (from Cys1-Gln20) in solution - exhibiting significant amount of conformational plasticity and strong bias towards biologically active α-helical structure - facilitates favorable conformational adaptations while interacting with the intermembrane domains of these target receptors. Thus, we believe that the structural and dynamics features of sCT presented here will be useful guiding attributes for the rational design of biologically active sCT analogs. Copyright © 2012 European Peptide

  20. CD4(+)and CD8(+)T-cell reactions against leukemia-associated- or minor-histocompatibility-antigens in AML-patients after allogeneic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Brigitte; Milosevic, Slavoljub; Doessinger, Georg; Reuther, Susanne; Liepert, Anja; Braeu, Marion; Schick, Julia; Vogt, Valentin; Schuster, Friedhelm; Kroell, Tanja; Busch, Dirk H; Borkhardt, Arndt; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Tischer, Johanna; Buhmann, Raymund; Schmetzer, Helga

    2014-04-01

    T-cells play an important role in the remission-maintenance in AML-patients (pts) after SCT, however the role of LAA- (WT1, PR1, PRAME) or minor-histocompatibility (mHag, HA1) antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+)T-cells is not defined. A LAA/HA1-peptide/protein stimulation, cloning and monitoring strategy for specific CD8(+)/CD4(+)T-cells in AML-pts after SCT is given. Our results show that (1) LAA-peptide-specific CD8+T-cells are detectable in every AML-pt after SCT. CD8(+)T-cells, recognizing two different antigens detectable in 5 of 7 cases correlate with long-lasting remissions. Clonal TCR-Vβ-restriction exemplarily proven by spectratyping in PRAME-specific CD8(+)T-cells; high PRAME-peptide-reactivity was CD4(+)-associated, as shown by IFN-γ-release. (2) Two types of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) were tested for presentation of LAA/HA1-proteins to CD4(+)T-cells: miniEBV-transduced lymphoblastoid cells (B-cell-source) and CD4-depleted MNC (source for B-cell/monocyte/DC). We provide a refined cloning-system for proliferating, CD40L(+)CD4(+)T-cells after LAA/HA1-stimulation. CD4(+)T-cells produced cytokines (GM-CSF, IFN-γ) upon exposure to LAA/HA1-stimulation until after at least 7 restimulations and demonstrated cytotoxic activity against naive blasts, but not fibroblasts. Antileukemic activity of unstimulated, stimulated or cloned CD4(+)T-cells correlated with defined T-cell-subtypes and the clinical course of the disease. In conclusion we provide immunological tools to enrich and monitor LAA/HA1-CD4(+)- and CD8(+)T-cells in AML-pts after SCT and generate data with relevant prognostic value. We were able to demonstrate the presence of LAA-peptide-specific CD8(+)T-cell clones in AML-pts after SCT. In addition, we were also able to enrich specific antileukemic reactive CD4(+)T-cells without GvH-reactivity upon repeated LAA/HA1-protein stimulation and limiting dilution cloning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Diagnosis of vibrations of barrel and fuel elements in the PWRs of Relishing Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, I.; Martin, M.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of the inside of the PWR, in particular the core barrel and its support can be performed by analysis of the signals from the neutron detectors extra-nuclear. Several methods have been developed that have been used in various plants worldwide. The objective is to monitor the integrity of the core structure and the early detection and quantification of signs of fatigue, wear, etc. in the different structures.

  2. Performance Study of the CMS Barrel Resistive Plate Chambers with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M., Jr.; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; 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Bloch, P; Bolognesi, S; Bona, M; Bos, J; Bourgeois, N; Bourrel, T; Breuker, H; Bunkowski, K; Campi, D; Camporesi, T; Cano, E; Cattai, A; Chatelain, J P; Chauvey, M; Christiansen, T; Coarasa Perez, J A; Conde Garcia, A; Covarelli, R; Curé, B; De Roeck, A; Delachenal, V; Deyrail, D; Di Vincenzo, S; Dos Santos, S; Dupont, T; Edera, L M; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eppard, M; Favre, M; Frank, N; Funk, W; Gaddi, A; Gastal, M; Gateau, M; Gerwig, H; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girod, J P; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R; Goudard, R; Gowdy, S; Guida, R; Guiducci, L; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Hartl, C; Harvey, J; Hegner, B; Hoffmann, H F; Holzner, A; Honma, A; Huhtinen, M; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Le Godec, G; Lecoq, P; Leonidopoulos, C; Loos, R; Lourenço, C; Lyonnet, A; Macpherson, A; Magini, N; Maillefaud, J D; Maire, G; Mäki, T; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Meridiani, P; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Meynet Cordonnier, A; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Mulon, J; Noy, M; Oh, A; Olesen, G; Onnela, A; 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    2010-01-01

    In October and November 2008, the CMS collaboration conducted a programme of cosmic ray data taking, which has recorded about 270 million events. The Resistive Plate Chamber system, which is part of the CMS muon detection system, was successfully operated in the full barrel. More than 98% of the channels were operational during the exercise with typical detection efficiency of 90%. In this paper, the performance of the detector during these dedicated runs is reported.

  3. Plasticity-Related Gene 1 Affects Mouse Barrel Cortex Function via Strengthening of Glutamatergic Thalamocortical Transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Baumgart, Jan; Roskoden, Thomas; Schneider, Patrick; Sommer, Angela; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) is a brain-specific protein that modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we investigated the functional role of PRG-1 in adolescent and adult mouse barrel cortex both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with wild-type (WT) animals, PRG-1-deficient (KO) mice showed specific behavioral deficits in tests assessing sensorimotor integration and whisker-based sensory discrimination as shown in the beam balance/walking test and sandpaper tactile discriminatio...

  4. Influence of fuel vibration on PWR neutron noise associated with core barrel motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; March-Leuba, J.

    1984-01-01

    Ex-core neutron detector noise has been utilized to monitor core support barrel (CSB) vibrations. In order to observe long-term changes, noise signals at Sequoyah-1 were monitored continuously during the whole first fuel cycle and part of the second cycle. Results suggest that neutron noise measurements performed infrequently may not provide adequate surveillance of the CSB because it may be difficult to separate noise amplitude changes due solely to CSB motion from changes caused by fuel motion and burnup

  5. Homemade battery-operated multi-barreled muzzle-loading gun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiah, R; Thirunavukkarasu, G

    2003-11-01

    In a recent shootout by a terrorist group against a law enforcement agency, some unusual firearms were seized. On examination, these firearms were found to be homemade, battery-operated, multi-barreled muzzle-loading guns, analogous to a repeater. Reference to battery-operated firearms is rather scanty in the literature. Hence, the unique design features, electrical circuit, and the operation system of these unusual guns are described.

  6. Distortion of the temporary cavity and its influence on staining in firearm barrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schyma, Christian; Müller, Rolf; Brenčičová, Eva; Brünig, Julia

    2018-06-01

    After contact shots to the head, biological traces can be found inside the barrel of the firearm. Experimental protocols to generate this sort of staining, using 12 cm gelatin cubes containing thin foil bags filled with acrylic paint, human blood, and radiocontrast agent, have been developed. Previous research on shots fired at a distance has shown the underlay sustaining these gelatin cubes has an influence on experimental results. This study was conducted to investigate the role of the sustaining base of the gelatin blocks during contact shots, and its influence on the staining result inside firearm barrels. Eighteen contact shots were performed using 22 LR, 32 ACP (7.65 Browning) and 9 mm Luger semi-automatic pistols. With each pistol, shots were fired onto six gelatin cubes; three placed upon a rigid platform and three upon an elastic underlay. The shots were recorded by a high-speed video camera as they penetrated the gelatin cube. Any staining present inside the firearm barrels after the shots were fired was documented by endoscopy. Cross sections of the gelatin blocks were then compared to the high-speed video. It was found that the nature of the staining inside the barrel was not influenced by the underlay sustaining the target model. In the experiment using a 9 mm Luger, the rigid counterfort provoked a visible distortion of the temporary cavity, but, cross sectional analysis of the gelatin cubes did not reveal a relevant influence of the sustaining underlay on the crack length in the gelatin. This could be explained by a secondary expansion of the temporary cavity left by the projectile as a consequence of subsequent inflow of muzzle gases.

  7. Brain-wide map of efferent projections from rat barrel cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela M. Zakiewicz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The somatotopically organized whisker barrel field of the rat primary somatosensory (S1 cortex is a commonly used model system for anatomical and physiological investigations of sensory processing. The neural connections of the barrel cortex have been extensively mapped. But most investigations have focused on connections to limited regions of the brain, and overviews in the literature of the connections across the brain thus build on a range of material from different laboratories, presented in numerous publications. Furthermore, given the limitations of the conventional journal article format, analyses and interpretations are hampered by lack of access to the underlying experimental data. New opportunities for analyses have emerged with the recent release of an online resource of experimental data consisting of collections of high-resolution images from 6 experiments in which anterograde tracers were injected in S1 whisker or forelimb representations. Building on this material, we have conducted a detailed analysis of the brain wide distribution of the efferent projections of the rat barrel cortex. We compare our findings with the available literature and reports accumulated in the Brain Architecture Management System (BAMS2 database. We report well-known and less known intracortical and subcortical projections of the barrel cortex, as well as distinct differences between S1 whisker and forelimb related projections. Our results correspond well with recently published overviews, but provide additional information about relative differences among S1 projection targets. Our approach demonstrates how collections of shared experimental image data are suitable for brain-wide analysis and interpretation of connectivity mapping data.

  8. Fluid-structure coupled dynamic response of PWR core barrel during LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, M.W.; Zhang, Y.G.; Shi, F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is engaged in the Fluid-Structure Interaction LOCA analysis of the core barrel of PWR. The analysis is performed by a multipurpose computer code SANES. The FSI inside the pressure vessel is treated by a FEM code including some structural and acoustic elements. The transient in the primary loop is solved by a two-phase flow code. Both codes are coupled one another. Some interesting conclusions are drawn. (author)

  9. Right and left support feet of the Central Barrel Yoke of the CMS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Franz Leher, DWE

    2000-01-01

    Fully loaded the Central Barrel will weigh 3000 tonnes. Those feet have tosupport this weight. Therefore they are made of 120 mm thick steel plates.To guarantee a maximum coverage for the muon detctor they will house a muon detector just benaeth the top plate. Weight of 1 foot is 35 tonnes.Its height is 3.5 m and it is 2.5 m large

  10. Reversibility and two state behaviour in the thermal unfolding of oligomeric TIM barrel proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Romero, Sergio; Costas, Miguel; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela; Alejandro Fernández-Velasco, D

    2015-08-28

    Temperature is one of the main variables that modulate protein function and stability. Thermodynamic studies of oligomeric proteins, the dominant protein natural form, have been often hampered because irreversible aggregation and/or slow reactions are common. There are no reports on the reversible equilibrium thermal unfolding of proteins composed of (β/α)8 barrel subunits, albeit this "TIM barrel" topology is one of the most abundant and versatile in nature. We studied the eponymous TIM barrel, triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), belonging to five species of different bacterial taxa. All of them were found to be catalytically efficient dimers. The three-dimensional structure of four enzymes was solved at high/medium resolution. Irreversibility and kinetic control were observed in the thermal unfolding of two TIMs, while for the other three the thermal unfolding was found to follow a two-state equilibrium reversible process. Shifts in the global stability curves of these three proteins are related to the organismal temperature range of optimal growth and modulated by variations in maximum stability temperature and in the enthalpy change at that temperature. Reversibility appears to correlate with the low isoelectric point, the absence of a residual structure in the unfolded state, small cavity volume in the native state, low conformational stability and a low melting temperature. Furthermore, the strong coupling between dimer dissociation and monomer unfolding may reduce aggregation and favour reversibility. It is therefore very thought-provoking to find that a common topological ensemble, such as the TIM barrel, can unfold/refold in the Anfinsen way, i.e. without the help of the cellular machinery.

  11. Safety analysis of ventilation and inspection operations on barrels in which spent fuel elements are stored

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovic, R.; Todorovic, D.; Plecas, I.

    2000-01-01

    Safety analysis of possible accident during performing ventilation and inspection operations on barrels in which spent fuel elements are stored has been proposed. Investigation is confined to a case when primary contamination is localized to the disposal room and controlled release of gaseous effluents to the atmosphere. 85 Kr is the most important radionuclide considered risk estimation due to release of gaseous fission products (author) [sr

  12. Mechanical design and material budget of the CMS barrel pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amsler, C; Boesiger, K; Chiochia, V; Maier, R; Meyer, Hp; Robmann, P; Scherr, S; Schmidt, A; Steiner, S [Universitaet Zuerich, Physik-Institut, Winterthurerstr. 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Koenig, S; Kotlinski, D; Meier, B; Streuli, S [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Rizzi, A [ETH Zuerich, Institute for Particle Physics, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: Alexander.Schmidt@cern.ch

    2009-05-15

    The Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN includes a silicon pixel detector as its innermost component. Its main task is the precise reconstruction of charged particles close to the primary interaction vertex. This paper gives an overview of the mechanical requirements and design choices for the barrel pixel detector. The distribution of material in the detector as well as its description in the Monte Carlo simulation are discussed in detail.

  13. Mechanical Design and Material Budget of the CMS Barrel Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Maier, R; Meyer, H; Meier, B; Meyer, Hp; Rizzi, A; Robmann, P; Scherr, S; Schmidt, A; Steiner, S; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Meier, B; Streuli, S; Rizzi, A

    2009-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN includes a silicon pixel detector as its innermost component. Its main task is the precise reconstruction of charged particles close to the primary interaction vertex. This paper gives an overview of the mechanical requirements and design choices for the barrel pixel detector. The distribution of material in the detector as well as its description in the Monte Carlo simulation are discussed in detail.

  14. Test of the wire ageing induced by radiation for the CMS barrel muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Conti, E

    2001-01-01

    We have carried out laboratory tests to measure the ageing of a wire tube due to pollutants outgassed by various materials. The tested materials are those used in the barrel muon drift tubes of the CMS experiment at LHC. An X-ray gun irradiated the test tube to accelerate the ageing process. No ageing effect has been measured for a period equivalent to 10 years of operation at LHC. (15 refs).

  15. Performances of the ATLAS Level-1 Muon barrel trigger during the Run-II data taking

    CERN Document Server

    Sessa, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger is one of the main elements of the event selection of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. It exploits the Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) detectors to generate the trigger signal. The RPCs are placed in the barrel region of the ATLAS experiment: they are arranged in three concentric double layers and operate in a strong magnetic toroidal field. RPC detectors cover the pseudo-rapidity range $|\\eta|<1.05$ for a total surface of more than $4000\\ m^2$ and about 3600 gas volumes. The Level-1 Muon Trigger in the barrel region allows to select muon candidates with respect to their transverse momentum and associates them with the correct bunch-crossing number. The trigger system is able to take a decision within a latency of about 2 $\\mu s$. The detailed measurement of the RPC detector efficiencies and of the trigger performance during the ATLAS Run-II data taking is here presented.

  16. Forming H-shaped and barrel-shaped nebulae with interacting jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Muhammad; Bear, Ealeal; Soker, Noam

    2018-04-01

    We conduct three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of two opposite jets with large opening angles launched from a binary stellar system into a previously ejected shell and show that the interaction can form barrel-like and H-like shapes in the descendant nebula. Such features are observed in planetary nebulae (PNe) and supernova remnants. Under our assumption, the dense shell is formed by a short instability phase of the giant star as it interacts with a stellar companion, and the jets are then launched by the companion as it accretes mass through an accretion disc from the giant star. We find that the H-shaped and barrel-shaped morphological features that the jets form evolve with time, and that there are complicated flow patterns, such as vortices, instabilities, and caps moving ahead along the symmetry axis. We compare our numerical results with images of 12 PNe, and show that jet-shell interaction that we simulate can account for the barrel-like or H-like morphologies that are observed in these PNe.

  17. Upgrade of the CMS muon trigger system in the barrel region

    CERN Document Server

    Rabady, Dinyar; Carlin, Roberto; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Dallavalle, Marco; Erö, Janos; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Fulcher, Jonathan; Guiducci, Luigi; Loukas, Nikitas; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Reis, Thomas; Sakulin, Hannes; Sphicas, Paris; Triossi, Andrea; Venturi, Andrea; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    To maintain the excellent performance of the LHC during its Run-1 also in Run-2, the Level-1 Trigger of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment underwent a significant upgrade. One part of this upgrade was the re-organisation of the muon trigger path from a subsystem-centric view in which hits in the drift tubes, the cathode strip chambers, and the resistive plate chambers were treated separately in dedicated track-finding systems, to one in which complementary detector systems for a given region (barrel, overlap, and endcap) are merged already at the track-finding level. This also required the development of a new system to sort as well as cancel-out the muon tracks found by each system. An overview will be given of the new track-finder system for the barrel region, the Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF) as well as the cancel-out and sorting layer, the upgraded Global Muon Trigger (µGMT). While the BMTF improves on the proven and well-tested algorithms used in the Drift Tube Track Finder during Run-1, the µGMT i...

  18. Plasticity-Related Gene 1 Affects Mouse Barrel Cortex Function via Strengthening of Glutamatergic Thalamocortical Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Baumgart, Jan; Roskoden, Thomas; Schneider, Patrick; Sommer, Angela; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-07-01

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) is a brain-specific protein that modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we investigated the functional role of PRG-1 in adolescent and adult mouse barrel cortex both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with wild-type (WT) animals, PRG-1-deficient (KO) mice showed specific behavioral deficits in tests assessing sensorimotor integration and whisker-based sensory discrimination as shown in the beam balance/walking test and sandpaper tactile discrimination test, respectively. At P25-31, spontaneous network activity in the barrel cortex in vivo was higher in KO mice compared with WT littermates, but not at P16-19. At P16-19, sensory evoked cortical responses in vivo elicited by single whisker stimulation were comparable in KO and WT mice. In contrast, at P25-31 evoked responses were smaller in amplitude and longer in duration in WT animals, whereas KO mice revealed no such developmental changes. In thalamocortical slices from KO mice, spontaneous activity was increased already at P16-19, and glutamatergic thalamocortical inputs to Layer 4 spiny stellate neurons were potentiated. We conclude that genetic ablation of PRG-1 modulates already at P16-19 spontaneous and evoked excitability of the barrel cortex, including enhancement of thalamocortical glutamatergic inputs to Layer 4, which distorts sensory processing in adulthood. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Upgrade of the CMS muon trigger system in the barrel region

    CERN Document Server

    Battilana, Carlo; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Ero, Janos; Flouris, Giannis; Fountas, Konstantinos; Fulcher, Jonathan Richard; Guiducci, Luigi; Loukas, Nikitas; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Rabady, Dinyar Sebastian; Reis, Thomas; Sakulin, Hannes; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Triossi, Andrea; Venturi, Andrea; Wulz, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    To maintain the excellent performance of the LHC during its Run-1 also in Run-2, the Level-1 Trigger of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment underwent a significant upgrade. One part of this upgrade was the re-organisation of the muon trigger path from a subsystem-centric view in which hits in the drift tubes, the cathode strip chambers, and the resistive plate chambers were treated separately in dedicated track-finding systems, to one in which complementary detector systems for a given region (barrel, overlap, and endcap) are merged already at the track-finding level. This also required the development of a new system to sort as well as cancel-out the muon tracks found by each system. An overview will be given of the new track-finder system for the barrel region, the Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF) as well as the cancel-out and sorting layer, the upgraded Global Muon Trigger ($\\mu$GMT). While the BMTF improves on the proven and well-tested algorithms used in the Drift Tube Track Finder during Run-1, the $\\m...

  20. Upgrade of the CMS muon trigger system in the barrel region

    CERN Document Server

    Rabady, Dinyar; Carlin, Roberto; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Dallavalle, Marco; Erö, Janos; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Fulcher, Jonathan; Guiducci, Luigi; Loukas, Nikitas; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Reis, Thomas; Sakulin, Hannes; Sphicas, Paris; Triossi, Andrea; Venturi, Andrea; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    To maintain the excellent performance of the LHC during its Run-1 also in Run-2, the Level-1 Trigger of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment underwent a significant upgrade. One part of this upgrade was the re-organisation of the muon trigger path from a subsystem-centric view in which hits in the drift tubes, the cathode strip chambers, and the resistive plate chambers were treated separately in dedicated track-finding systems, to one in which complementary detector systems for a given region (barrel, overlap, and endcap) are merged already at the track-finding level. This also required the development of a new system to sort as well as cancel-out the muon tracks found by each system. An overview will be given of the new track-finder system for the barrel region, the Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF) as well as the cancel-out and sorting layer, the upgraded Global Muon Trigger (µGMT). While the BMTF improves on the proven and well-tested algorithms used in the Drift Tube Track Finder during Run-1, the µGMT i...

  1. Design studies for the Phase II upgrade of the CMS Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Orimoto, Toyoko Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will provide unprecedented instantaneous and integrated luminosity. The lead tungstate crystals forming the barrel part of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) will still perform well, even after the expected integrated luminosity of 3000fb-1 at the end of HL-LHC. The avalanche photodiodes (APDs) used to detect the scintillation light will also continue to be operational, although there will be some increase in noise due to radiation-induced dark currents. This will be mitigated by reducing the barrel operating temperature during HL-LHC running.The front-end electronics of the ECAL barrel will be replaced, in order to remove existing constraints on trigger rate and latency and to provide additional capability to fully exploit the higher luminosity delivered by the HL-LHC. New developments in high-speed optical links will allow single-crystal readout at 40 MHz to upgraded off-detector processors, allowing maximum flexibility and enhanced tri...

  2. Upgrade of the CMS muon trigger system in the barrel region

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080489; Flouris, Gianis; Fulcher, Jonathan; Loukas, Nikitas; Paradas, Evangelos; Reis,Thomas; Sakulin, Hannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    To maintain the excellent performance shown during the LHCs Run-1 the Level-1 Trigger of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment underwent a significant upgrade. One part of this upgrade is the re-organization of the muon trigger path from a subsystem-centric view in which hits in the drift tubes (DT), the cathode strip chambers (CSC), and the resistive plate chambers (RPC) were treated separately in dedicated track-finding systems to one in which complementary detector systems for a given region (barrel, overlap, and endcap) are merged at the track-finding level. This fundamental restructuring of the muon trigger system required the development of a system to receive track candidates from the track-finding layer, remove potential duplicate tracks, and forward the best candidates to the global decision layer.An overview will be given of the new track-finder system for the barrel region, the Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF) as well as the cancel-out and sorting layer, the upgraded Global Muon Trigger ($\\mu$GMT). B...

  3. CREB Regulates Experience-Dependent Spine Formation and Enlargement in Mouse Barrel Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabella Pignataro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experience modifies synaptic connectivity through processes that involve dendritic spine rearrangements in neuronal circuits. Although cAMP response element binding protein (CREB has a key function in spines changes, its role in activity-dependent rearrangements in brain regions of rodents interacting with the surrounding environment has received little attention so far. Here we studied the effects of vibrissae trimming, a widely used model of sensory deprivation-induced cortical plasticity, on processes associated with dendritic spine rearrangements in the barrel cortex of a transgenic mouse model of CREB downregulation (mCREB mice. We found that sensory deprivation through prolonged whisker trimming leads to an increased number of thin spines in the layer V of related barrel cortex (Contra in wild type but not mCREB mice. In the barrel field controlling spared whiskers (Ipsi, the same trimming protocol results in a CREB-dependent enlargement of dendritic spines. Last, we demonstrated that CREB regulates structural rearrangements of synapses that associate with dynamic changes of dendritic spines. Our findings suggest that CREB plays a key role in dendritic spine dynamics and synaptic circuits rearrangements that account for new brain connectivity in response to changes in the environment.

  4. Identification of Clearance and Contact Stiffness in a Simplified Barrel-Cradle Structure of Artillery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In gun barrel-cradle structure, the presence of clearance usually changes the dynamic response of muzzle and results in shooting dispersion (under continuous firing condition. The parameter estimation of such clearance nonlinear system is the prerequisite for establishing quantitative relation between the clearance and muzzle disturbance. In this paper, the restoring force surface (RFS method and the nonlinear identification through feedback of outputs (NIFO method are first combined for parameter identification in a simplified barrel-cradle structure. With the RFS method, clearance value can be obtained by analyzing the restoring force plot. Then the contact stiffness can be identified by using NIFO method. This identification process is verified in a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF system with clearance. To adapt to the rigid-flexible coupled beam system with clearances which is simplified from the barrel-cradle structure, a modification for the combined method mentioned above is proposed. The core idea of the modification is reducing the continuous system to multiple-degree-of-freedom (MDOF system to reserve the nonlinear characteristics through modal transformation matrix. The advantage of this transformation is that the linear parts of the MDOF systems are decoupled, which greatly reduces the difficulty of identification. The simulation results have shown the effectiveness of current method.

  5. Resource Review Board Celebrates the Magnet and Liquid Argon Barrel Tests in Hall 180

    CERN Multimedia

    Jenni, P.

    2004-01-01

    Address by the Director-General, R. Aymar, in front of the barrel cryostat. On 25th October 2004 many RRB delegates and guests, ATLAS National Contact Physicists, and colleagues from far and from CERN working on the Liquid Argon calorimeter and the magnet system were gathering in Hall 180 to celebrate the major milestones reached during the past months in this hall: the successful cold tests of the first barrel toroid coil, of the solenoid, and of the barrel Liquid Argon calorimeter. About 250 people spent a relaxing evening after the speeches by the Director-General R. Aymar and by the spokesperson who gave the following address: 'It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you all here in Hall 180 in the name of the ATLAS Collaboration! With a few words I would like to recall why we are actually here today to share, what I hope, is a relaxed and joyful moment. To concentrate it all in one sentence I could say: To thank cordially all the main actors for the enormous work accomplished here over many years,...

  6. Orofacial Neuropathic Pain Leads to a Hyporesponsive Barrel Cortex with Enhanced Structural Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Karine; Rivière, Sébastien; Lenkei, Zsolt; Férézou, Isabelle; Pezet, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a long-lasting debilitating condition that is particularly difficult to treat due to the lack of identified underlying mechanisms. Although several key contributing processes have been described at the level of the spinal cord, very few studies have investigated the supraspinal mechanisms underlying chronic pain. Using a combination of approaches (cortical intrinsic imaging, immunohistochemical and behavioural analysis), our study aimed to decipher the nature of functional and structural changes in a mouse model of orofacial neuropathic pain, focusing on cortical areas involved in various pain components. Our results show that chronic neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with decreased haemodynamic responsiveness to whisker stimulation in the barrel field cortex. This reduced functional activation is likely due to the increased basal neuronal activity (measured indirectly using cFos and phospho-ERK immunoreactivity) observed in several cortical areas, including the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. In the same animals, immunohistochemical analysis of markers for active pre- or postsynaptic elements (Piccolo and phospho-Cofilin, respectively) revealed an increased immunofluorescence in deep cortical layers of the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. These results suggest that long-lasting orofacial neuropathic pain is associated with exacerbated neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity at the cortical level.

  7. Dead zone analysis of ECAL barrel modules under static and dynamic load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre-Emile, T.; Anduze, M.

    2018-03-01

    In the context of ILD project, impact studies of environmental loads on the Electromagnetic CALorimeter (ECAL) have been initiated. The ECAL part considered is the barrel and it consists of several independent modules which are mounted on the Hadronic CALorimeter barrel (HCAL) itself mounted on the cryostat coil and the yoke. The estimate of the gap required between each ECAL modules is fundamental to define the assembly step and avoid mechanical contacts over the barrel lifetime. In the meantime, it has to be done in consideration to the dead spaces reduction and detector hermiticity optimization. Several Finite Element Analysis (FEA) with static and dynamic loads have been performed in order to define correctly the minimum values for those gaps. Due to the implantation site of the whole project in Japan, seismic analysis were carried out in addition to the static ones. This article shows results of these analysis done with the Finite Element Method (FEM) in ANSYS. First results show the impact of HCAL design on the ECAL modules motion in static load. The second study dedicated to seismic approach on a larger model (including yoke and cryostat) gives additional results on earthquake consequences.

  8. Functions of phenylalanine residues within the beta-barrel stem of the anthrax toxin pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A key step of anthrax toxin action involves the formation of a protein-translocating pore within the endosomal membrane by the Protective Antigen (PA moiety. Formation of this transmembrane pore by PA involves interaction of the seven 2beta2-2beta3 loops of the heptameric precursor to generate a 14-strand transmembrane beta barrel.We examined the effects on pore formation, protein translocation, and cytotoxicity, of mutating two phenylalanines, F313 and F314, that lie at the tip the beta barrel, and a third one, F324, that lies part way up the barrel.Our results show that the function of these phenylalanine residues is to mediate membrane insertion and formation of stable transmembrane channels. Unlike F427, a key luminal residue in the cap of the pore, F313, F314, and F324 do not directly affect protein translocation through the pore. Our findings add to our knowledge of structure-function relationships of a key virulence factor of the anthrax bacillus.

  9. A review on the gun barrel vibrations and control for a main battle tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Dursun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Achieving high hitting accuracy for a main battle tank is challenging while the tank is on the move. This can be reached by proper design of a weapon control and gun system. In order to design an effective gun system while the tank is moving, better understanding of the dynamic behavior of the gun system is required. In this study, the dynamic behaviour of a gun system is discussed in this respect. Both experimental and numerical applications for the determination of the dynamic behaviour of a tank gun system are investigated. Methods such as the use of muzzle reference system (MRS and vibration absorbers, and active vibration control technology for the control and the reduction of the muzzle tip deflections are also reviewed. For the existing gun systems without making substantial modifications, MRS could be useful in controlling the deflections of gun barrels with estimation/prediction algorithms. The vibration levels could be cut into half by the use of optimised vibration absorbers for an existing gun. A new gun system with a longer barrel can be as accurate as the one with a short barrel with the appropriate structural modifications.

  10. R6 FIFRA e-Notice of Arrival

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This database processes approximately 3,000 Notice of Arrival (NOA) reporting forms from importers and exporters of pesticide products. This is an electronic version...

  11. True Time API Link (real time arrival info)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This link will take you to the site where you can create an account to access Port Authority's real time arrival information. To request access to Port Authority's...

  12. Obtaining contaminant arrival distributions for steady flow in heterogeneous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The versatility of the new contaminant arrival distributions for determining environmental consequences of subsurface pollution problems is demonstrated through application to a field example involving land drainage in heterogeneous porous materials. Though the four phases of the hydrologic evaluations are complicated because of the material heterogeneity encountered in the field problem, the arrival distributions still effectively summarize the minimal amount of data required to determine the environmental implications. These arrival distributions yield a single graph or tabular set of data giving the consequences of the subsurface pollution problems. Accordingly, public control authorities would be well advised to request that the results of subsurface pollution investigations be provided in the form of arrival distributions and the resulting simpler summary curve or tabulation. Such an objective is most easily accomplished through compliance with the requirements for assuring a complete subsurface evaluation

  13. Astronauts Armstrong and Scott arrive at Hickam Field, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (center), command pilot, and David R. Scott, pilot, arrive at Hickam Field, Hawaii on their way from Naha, Okinawa, to Cape Kennedy, Florida. Astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr. is at extreme left.

  14. Water-Soluble Pd8L4 Self-assembled Molecular Barrel as an Aqueous Carrier for Hydrophobic Curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Imtiyaz Ahmad; Jain, Ruchi; Siddiqui, Mujahuddin M; Saini, Deepak K; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi

    2017-05-01

    A tetrafacial water-soluble molecular barrel (1) was synthesized by coordination driven self-assembly of a symmetrical tetrapyridyl donor (L) with a cis-blocked 90° acceptor [cis-(en)Pd(NO 3 ) 2 ] (en = ethane-1,2-diamine). The open barrel structure of (1) was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The presence of a hydrophobic cavity with large windows makes it an ideal candidate for encapsulation and carrying hydrophobic drug like curcumin in an aqueous medium. The barrel (1) encapsulates curcumin inside its molecular cavity and protects highly photosensitive curcumin from photodegradation. The photostability of encapsulated curcumin is due to the absorption of a high proportion of the incident photons by the aromatic walls of 1 with a high absorption cross-sectional area, which helps the walls to shield the guest even against sunlight/UV radiations. As compared to free curcumin in water, we noticed a significant increase in solubility as well as cellular uptake of curcumin upon encapsulation inside the water-soluble molecular barrel (1) in aqueous medium. Fluorescence imaging confirmed that curcumin was delivered into HeLa cancer cells by the aqueous barrel (1) with the retention of its potential anticancer activity. While free curcumin is inactive toward cancer cells in aqueous medium at room temperature due to negligible solubility, the determined IC 50 value of ∼14 μM for curcumin in aqueous medium in the presence of the barrel (1) reflects the efficiency of the barrel as a potential curcumin carrier in aqueous medium without any other additives. Thus, two major challenges of increasing the bioavailability and stability of curcumin in aqueous medium even in the presence of UV light have been addressed by using a new supramolecular water-soluble barrel (1) as a drug carrier.

  15. Parameters, test criteria and fault assessment in random sampling of waste barrels from non-qualified processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    In the context of random sampling tests, parameters are checked on the waste barrels and criteria are given on which these tests are based. Also, it is shown how faulty data on the properties of the waste or faulty waste barrels should be treated. To decide the extent of testing, the properties of the waste relevant to final storage are determined based on the conditioning process used. (DG) [de

  16. An outbreak of norovirus-associated acute gastroenteritis associated with contaminated barrelled water in many schools in Zhejiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Minyang; Song, Jianqiang; He, Fan; Qiu, Yinwei; Wu, Haocheng; Lu, Qinbao; Feng, Yan; Lin, Junfen; Chen, Enfu; Chai, Chengliang

    2017-01-01

    Objectives More than 900 students and teachers at many schools in Jiaxing city developed acute gastroenteritis in February 2014. An immediate epidemiological investigation was conducted to identify the pathogen, infection sources and route of transmission. Methods The probable cases and confirmed cases were defined as students or teachers with diarrhoea or vomiting present since the term began in February 2014. An active search was conducted for undiagnosed cases among students and teachers. Details such as demographic characteristics, gastrointestinal symptoms, and drinking water preference and frequency were collected via a uniform epidemiological questionnaire. A case-control study was implemented, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Rectal swabs from several patients, food handlers and barrelled water factory workers, as well as water and food samples, were collected to test for potential bacteria and viruses. Results A total of 924 cases fit the definition of the probable case, including 8 cases of laboratory-confirmed norovirus infection at 13 schools in Jiaxing city between February 12 and February 21, 2014. The case-control study demonstrated that barrelled water was a risk factor (OR: 20.15, 95% CI: 2.59–156.76) and that bottled water and boiled barrelled water were protective factors (OR: 0.31, 95% CI: 0.13–0.70, and OR: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.16–0.77). A total of 11 rectal samples and 8 barrelled water samples were detected as norovirus-positive, and the genotypes of viral strains were the same (GII). The norovirus that contaminated the barrelled water largely came from the asymptomatic workers. Conclusions This acute gastroenteritis outbreak was caused by barrelled water contaminated by norovirus. The outbreak was controlled after stopping the supply of barrelled water. The barrelled water supply in China represents a potential source of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks due to the lack of surveillance and supervision

  17. Estimating bus passenger waiting times from incomplete bus arrivals data

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, F.N.

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of estimating bus passenger waiting times at bus stops using incomplete bus arrivals data. This is of importance to bus operators and regulators as passenger waiting time is a key performance measure. Average waiting times are usually estimated from bus headways, that is, time gaps between buses. It is both time-consuming and expensive to measure bus arrival times manually so methods using automatic vehicle location systems are attractive; however, these syste...

  18. Onchocerciasis in the Americas: from arrival to (near) elimination

    OpenAIRE

    Sauerbrey Mauricio; Hopkins Adrian; Gustavsen Ken

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Onchocerciasis (river blindness) is a blinding parasitic disease that threatens the health of approximately 120 million people worldwide. While 99% of the population at-risk for infection from onchocerciasis live in Africa, some 500,000 people in the Americas are also threatened by infection. A relatively recent arrival to the western hemisphere, onchocerciasis was brought to the New World through the slave trade and spread through migration. The centuries since its arrival have seen...

  19. 19 CFR 123.61 - Baggage arriving in baggage car.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Baggage arriving in baggage car. 123.61 Section... car. An inward foreign manifest on Customs Form 7533 shall be used for all baggage arriving in baggage cars. [T.D. 70-121, 35 FR 8215, May 26, 1970, as amended by T.D. 82-145, 47 FR 35478, Aug. 16, 1982] ...

  20. BREATHER (PENTA 16) short-cycle therapy (SCT) (5 days on/2 days off) in young people with chronic human immunodeficiency virus infection: an open, randomised, parallel-group Phase II/III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Karina; Inshaw, Jamie; Ford, Deborah; Bernays, Sarah; Scott, Karen; Kenny, Julia; Klein, Nigel; Turkova, Anna; Harper, Lynda; Nastouli, Eleni; Paparini, Sara; Choudhury, Rahela; Rhodes, Tim; Babiker, Abdel; Gibb, Diana

    2016-06-01

    For human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adolescents facing lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART), short-cycle therapy (SCT) with long-acting agents offers the potential for drug-free weekends, less toxicity, better adherence and cost savings. To determine whether or not efavirenz (EFV)-based ART in short cycles of 5 days on and 2 days off is as efficacious (in maintaining virological suppression) as continuous EFV-based ART (continuous therapy; CT). Secondary objectives included the occurrence of new clinical HIV events or death, changes in immunological status, emergence of HIV drug resistance, drug toxicity and changes in therapy. Open, randomised, non-inferiority trial. Europe, Thailand, Uganda, Argentina and the USA. Young people (aged 8-24 years) on EFV plus two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and with a HIV-1 ribonucleic acid level [viral load (VL)] of  12 months. Young people were randomised to continue daily ART (CT) or change to SCT (5 days on, 2 days off ART). Follow-up was for a minimum of 48 weeks (0, 4 and 12 weeks and then 12-weekly visits). The primary outcome was the difference between arms in the proportion with VL > 50 copies/ml (confirmed) by 48 weeks, estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method (12% non-inferiority margin) adjusted for region and age. In total, 199 young people (11 countries) were randomised (n = 99 SCT group, n = 100 CT group) and followed for a median of 86 weeks. Overall, 53% were male; the median age was 14 years (21% ≥ 18 years); 13% were from the UK, 56% were black, 19% were Asian and 21% were Caucasian; and the median CD4% and CD4 count were 34% and 735 cells/mm(3), respectively. By week 48, only one participant (CT) was lost to follow-up. The SCT arm had a 27% decreased drug exposure as measured by the adherence questionnaire and a MEMSCap(™) Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMSCap Inc., Durham, NC, USA) substudy (median cap openings per week: SCT group, n = 5; CT group, n

  1. Order of arrival affects competition in two reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geange, Shane W; Stier, Adrian C

    2009-10-01

    Many communities experience repeated periods of colonization due to seasonally regenerating habitats or pulsed arrival of young-of-year. When an individual's persistence in a community depends upon the strength of competitive interactions, changes in the timing of arrival relative to the arrival of a competitor can modify competitive strength and, ultimately, establishment in the community. We investigated whether the strength of intracohort competitive interactions between recent settlers of the reef fishes Thalassoma hardwicke and T. quinquevittatum are dependent on the sequence and temporal separation of their arrival into communities. To achieve this, we manipulated the sequence and timing of arrival of each species onto experimental patch reefs by simulating settlement pulses and monitoring survival and aggressive interactions. Both species survived best in the absence of competitors, but when competitors were present, they did best when they arrived at the same time. Survival declined as each species entered the community progressively later than its competitor and as aggression by its competitor increased. Intraspecific effects of resident T. hardwicke were similar to interspecific effects. This study shows that the strength of competition depends not only on the identity of competitors, but also on the sequence and timing of their interactions, suggesting that when examining interaction strengths, it is important to identify temporal variability in the direction and magnitude of their effects. Furthermore, our findings provide empirical evidence for the importance of competitive lotteries in the maintenance of species diversity in demographically open marine systems.

  2. Locating Microseism Sources Using Spurious Arrivals in Intercontinental Noise Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retailleau, Lise; Boué, Pierre; Stehly, Laurent; Campillo, Michel

    2017-10-01

    The accuracy of Green's functions retrieved from seismic noise correlations in the microseism frequency band is limited by the uneven distribution of microseism sources at the surface of the Earth. As a result, correlation functions are often biased as compared to the expected Green's functions, and they can include spurious arrivals. These spurious arrivals are seismic arrivals that are visible on the correlation and do not belong to the theoretical impulse response. In this article, we propose to use Rayleigh wave spurious arrivals detected on correlation functions computed between European and United States seismic stations to locate microseism sources in the Atlantic Ocean. We perform a slant stack on a time distance gather of correlations obtained from an array of stations that comprises a regional deployment and a distant station. The arrival times and the apparent slowness of the spurious arrivals lead to the location of their source, which is obtained through a grid search procedure. We discuss improvements in the location through this methodology as compared to classical back projection of microseism energy. This method is interesting because it only requires an array and a distant station on each side of an ocean, conditions that can be met relatively easily.

  3. The area postrema (AP) and the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) are important sites for salmon calcitonin (sCT) to decrease evoked phasic dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Lynda; McCutcheon, James E; Boyle, Christina N; Roitman, Mitchell F; Lutz, Thomas A

    2017-07-01

    The pancreatic hormone amylin and its agonist salmon calcitonin (sCT) act via the area postrema (AP) and the lateral parabrachial nucleus (PBN) to reduce food intake. Investigations of amylin and sCT signaling in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) suggest that the eating inhibitory effect of amylin is, in part, mediated through the mesolimbic 'reward' pathway. Indeed, administration of the sCT directly to the VTA decreased phasic dopamine release (DA) in the NAc. However, it is not known if peripheral amylin modulates the mesolimbic system directly or whether this occurs via the AP and PBN. To determine whether and how peripheral amylin or sCT affect mesolimbic reward circuitry we utilized fast scan cyclic voltammetry under anesthesia to measure phasic DA release in the NAc evoked by electrical stimulation of the VTA in intact, AP lesioned and bilaterally PBN lesioned rats. Amylin (50μg/kg i.p.) did not change phasic DA responses compared to saline control rats. However, sCT (50μg/kg i.p.) decreased evoked DA release to VTA-stimulation over 1h compared to saline treated control rats. Further investigations determined that AP and bilateral PBN lesions abolished the ability of sCT to suppress evoked phasic DA responses to VTA-stimulation. These findings implicate the AP and the PBN as important sites for peripheral sCT to decrease evoked DA release in the NAc and suggest that these nuclei may influence hedonic and motivational processes to modulate food intake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of G-CSF to hasten neutrophil recovery after auto-SCT for AML is not associated with increased relapse incidence: a report from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerw, T; Labopin, M; Gorin, N-C; Giebel, S; Blaise, D; Dumas, P-Y; Foa, R; Attal, M; Schaap, N; Michallet, M; Bonmati, C; Veelken, H; Mohty, M

    2014-07-01

    Application of G-CSF in AML is controversial as leukemic blasts may express receptors interacting with the cytokine, which may stimulate leukemia growth. We retrospectively analyzed the impact of G-CSF use to accelerate neutrophil recovery after auto-SCT on outcome. Adults with AML in first CR autografted between 1994 and 2010 were included. Nine hundred and seventy two patients were treated with G-CSF after auto-SCT whereas 1121 were not. BM and PB were used as a source of stem cells in 454 (22%) and 1639 (78%) cases, respectively. The incidence of relapse at 5 years in the BM-auto-SCT group was 38% for patients receiving post-transplant G-CSF and 43% for those not treated with G-CSF, P=0.46. In the PB-auto-SCT cohort, respective probabilities were 48% and 49%, P=0.49. No impact of the use of G-CSF could be demonstrated with respect to the probability of leukemia-free survival: in the BM-auto-SCT group, 51% for G-CSF(+) and 48% for G-CSF(-), P=0.73; in PB-auto-SCT group, 42% for G-CSF(+) and 43% for G-CSF(-), P=0.83. Although G-CSF administration significantly shortened the neutropenic phase, no beneficial effect was observed with regard to non-relapse mortality. In patients with AML, the use of G-CSF after auto-SCT is not associated with increased risk of relapse irrespective of the source of stem cells used.

  5. Strengthening economy through tourism sector by tourist arrival prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriatna, A.; Subartini, B.; Hertini, E.; Sukono; Rumaisha; Istiqamah, N.

    2018-03-01

    Tourism sector has a tendency to be proposed as a support for national economy to many countries with various of natural resources, such as Indonesia. The number of tourist is very related with the success rate of a tourist attraction, since it is also related with planning and strategy. Hence, it is important to predict the climate of tourism in Indonesia, especially the number of domestic or international tourist in the future. This study uses Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (SARIMA) time series method to predict the number of tourist arrival to tourism strategic areas in Nusa Tenggara Barat. The prediction was done using the international and domestic tourist arrival to Nusa Tenggara Barat data from January 2008 to June 2016. The established SARIMA method was (0,1,1)(0,0,2)12 with MAPE error of 15.76. The prediction for the next six time periods showed that the highest number of tourist arrival is during September 2016 with 330,516 tourist arrivals. Prediction of tourist arrival hopefully might be used as reference for local and national government to make policies to strengthen national economy for a long period of time

  6. Alternative donor transplantation--"mixing and matching": the role of combined cord blood and haplo-identical donor transplantation (haplo-cord SCT) as a treatment strategy for patients lacking standard donors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongtao; van Besien, Koen

    2015-03-01

    In the past decade, haplo-cord stem cell transplantation (SCT) using myeloablative or reduced intensive conditioning regimens has been shown to result in reliable and fast engraftment of neutrophils and platelets comparable to HLA-matched donors and much faster than after cord stem cell transplant. Haplo-cord SCT also has a low incidence of early non-relapse mortality, low incidences of acute and chronic graft-vs-host disease (GVHD), and excellent graft-vs-leukemia (GVL) effects. Favorable long-term outcomes for high-risk patients with hematologic malignancies have been reported, including older patients. Haplo-cord SCT will likely overcome the limitations of cell dose during cord stem cell selection and might significantly expand the use of cord stem cell transplant in the adult population. The comparable survival outcomes of matched related donor (MRD), matched unrelated donor (MUD), and haplo-cord stem cell transplant strongly argue that haplo-cord SCT should be considered as effective alternative stem cell transplant for high-risk patients lacking standard donors. Further improvement in supportive care and incorporation of a better understanding of the human fetal immune development into the haplo-cord SCT are required to further improve this strategy.

  7. Different impact of intermediate and unfavourable cytogenetics at the time of diagnosis on outcome of de novo AML after allo-SCT: a long-term retrospective analysis from a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahi, H; Remberger, M; Machaczka, M; Ungerstedt, J; Mattson, J; Ringden, O; Le-Blanc, Katarina; Ljungman, P; Hägglund, H

    2012-12-01

    Karyotype of myeloblasts at the time of AML diagnosis has been shown to be prognostic significant for pre-remission outcome and outcome after allo-SCT, but the latter requires further studies. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the impact of intermediate and unfavourable cytogenetics at the time of primary diagnosis on outcome after allo-SCT in de novo AML. The study included 169 patients who underwent allo-SCT at Karolinska University Hospital between 1980 and 2010. Intermediate and unfavourable cytogenetics were found in 129 (76%) and 40 patients (24%), respectively. Myeloablative and reduced-intensity conditioning were given to 120 (71%) and 49 (29%) patients, respectively. Allo-SCT was performed in CR1 in 122 patients (72%). TRM was 16% in both cytogenetics groups. Relapse occurred in 29% patients with intermediate and in 45% patients with unfavourable cytogenetics (P=0.01). The probabilities of 5-year OS for patients with intermediate and unfavourable cytogenetics were 60 and 43%, respectively (P=0.02). Multivariate analysis revealed intermediate cytogenetics, chronic GVHD, and recipient CMV-negative serostatus as variables associated with favourable OS. Our study showed that outcome after allo-SCT in de novo AML differs depending on cytogenetic risk-group; however its position in post-remission therapy of eligible AML patients is not threatened.

  8. The 52nd International Conference on Medicinal Chemistry (RICT 2016) of the French Medicinal Chemistry Society (SCT) Held in Caen (Normandy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapi, Janos; Van Hijfte, Luc; Dallemagne, Patrick

    2017-06-21

    Outstanding Medchem in France: Guest editors Janos Sapi, Luc Van Hjfte, and Patrick Dallemagne look back at the 52 nd International Conference on Medicinal Chemistry (RICT 2016) held in Caen, France. They discuss the history of the French Medicinal Chemistry Society (Société de Chimie Thérapeutique, SCT) and provide highlights of last year's events, including some key presentations now collected in this Special Issue. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The design and performance of a twenty barrel hydrogen pellet injector for Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbahn, J.A.

    1994-05-01

    A twenty barrel hydrogen pellet injector has been designed, built and tested both in the laboratory and on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak at MIT. The injector functions by firing pellets of frozen hydrogen or deuterium deep into the plasma discharge for the purpose of fueling the plasma, modifying the density profile and increasing the global energy confinement time. The design goals of the injector are: (1) Operational flexibility, (2) High reliability, (3) Remote operation with minimal maintenance. These requirements have lead to a single stage, pipe gun design with twenty barrels. Pellets are formed by in- situ condensation of the fuel gas, thus avoiding moving parts at cryogenic temperatures. The injector is the first to dispense with the need for cryogenic fluids and instead uses a closed cycle refrigerator to cool the thermal system components. The twenty barrels of the injector produce pellets of four different size groups and allow for a high degree of flexibility in fueling experiments. Operation of the injector is under PLC control allowing for remote operation, interlocked safety features and automated pellet manufacturing. The injector has been extrusively tested and shown to produce pellets reliably with velocities up to 1400 m/sec. During the period from September to November of 1993, the injector was successfully used to fire pellets into over fifty plasma discharges. Experimental results include data on the pellet penetration into the plasma using an advanced pellet tracking diagnostic with improved time and spatial response. Data from the tracker indicates pellet penetrations were between 30 and 86 percent of the plasma minor radius

  10. Developmental Changes in Sensory-Evoked Optical Intrinsic Signals in the Rat Barrel Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Sintsov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical Intrinsic Signal imaging (OISi is a powerful technique for optical brain studies. OIS mainly reflects the hemodynamic response (HR and metabolism, but it may also involve changes in tissue light scattering (LS caused by transient cellular swelling in the active tissue. Here, we explored the developmental features of sensory-evoked OIS in the rat barrel cortex during the first 3 months after birth. Multispectral OISi revealed that two temporally distinct components contribute to the neonatal OIS: an early phase of LS followed by a late phase of HR. The contribution of LS to the early response was also evidenced by an increase in light transmission through the active barrel. The early OIS phase correlated in time and amplitude with the sensory-evoked electrophysiological response. Application of the Modified Beer-Lambert Law (MBLL to the OIS data revealed that HR during the early phase involved only a slight decrease in blood oxygenation without any change in blood volume. In contrast, HR during the late phase manifested an adult-like increase in blood volume and oxygenation. During development, the peak time of the delayed HR progressively shortened with age, nearly reaching the stimulus onset and overlapping with the early LS phase by the fourth postnatal week. Thus, LS contributes to the sensory-evoked OIS in the barrel cortex of rats at all ages, and it dominates the early OIS phase in neonatal rats due to delayed HR. Our results are also consistent with the delayed blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal in human preterm infants.

  11. Evaporating short-circuits in the ATLAS liquid argon barrel presampler 006

    CERN Document Server

    Belhorma, B; Lund-Jensen, B; Rydström, S; Yamouni, M

    2005-01-01

    A technique to eliminate or limit the implications of short-circuits in the ATLAS barrel presampler is described. A high voltage capacitor with a large capacity is charged at different high voltages and discharged through the short-circuit which allows either to disintegrate the dust being the origin of the short-circuit, or to burn away a thin etched copper strip which acts as a fuse on the corresponding presampler anode. This effect is possible even in the presence of a resistive HV cable (10 to 30 ohms) in series which dampens the pulse.

  12. Correlations decrease with propagation of spiking activity in the mouse barrel cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayathri Nattar Ranganathan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Propagation of suprathreshold spiking activity through neuronal populations is important for the function of the central nervous system. Neural correlations have an impact on cortical function particularly on the signaling of information and propagation of spiking activity. Therefore we measured the change in correlations as suprathreshold spiking activity propagated between recurrent neuronal networks of the mammalian cerebral cortex. Using optical methods we recorded spiking activity from large samples of neurons from two neural populations simultaneously. The results indicate that correlations decreased as spiking activity propagated from layer 4 to layer 2/3 in the rodent barrel cortex.

  13. Design, performance, and calibration of CMS hadron-barrel calorimeter wedges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullin, S.; Abramov, V.; Goncharov, P.; Khmelnikov, A.; Korablev, A.; Korneev, Y.; Krinitsyn, A.; Kryshkin, V.; Lukanin, V.; Pikalov, V.; Ryazanov, A.; Talov, V.; Turchanovich, L.; Volkov, A.; Acharya, B.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, S.; Chendvankar, S.; Dugad, S.; Kalmani, S.; Katta, S.; Mazumdar, K.; Mondal, N.; Nagaraj, P.; Patil, M.; Reddy, L.; Satyanarayana, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Verma, P.; Adams, M.; Burchesky, K.; Qian, W.; Akchurin, N.; Carrell, K.; Guemues, K.; Thomas, R.; Akgun, U.; Ayan, S.; Duru, F.; Merlo, J.P.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Miller, M.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Schmidt, I.; Anderson, E.W.; Hauptman, J.; Antchev, G.; Hazen, E.; Lawlor, C.; Machado, E.; Posch, C.; Rohlf, J.; Wu, S.X.; Aydin, S.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Polatoz, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdes-Koca, N.; Baarmand, M.; Ralich, R.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Baden, D.; Bard, R.; Eno, S.; Grassi, T.; Jarvis, C.; Kellogg, R.; Kunori, S.; Skuja, A.; Barnes, V.; Laasanen, A.; Pompos, A.; Bawa, H.; Beri, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kaur, M.; Kohli, J.; Kumar, A.; Singh, J.; Baiatian, G.; Sirunyan, A.; Bencze, G.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zalan, P.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Chung, Y.; De Barbaro, P.; Haelen, T.; Camporesi, T.; Visser, T. de; Cankocak, K.; Cremaldi, L.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D.A.; Cushman, P.; Sherwood, B.; Damgov, J.; Dimitrov, L.; Genchev, V.; Piperov, S.; Vankov, I.; Demianov, A.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kodolova, O.; Petrushanko, S.; Sarycheva, L.; Vardanyan, I.; Elias, J.; Elvira, D.; Freeman, J.; Green, D.; Los, S.; O'Dell, V.; Ronzhin, A.; Sergeyev, S.; Suzuki, I.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Emeliantchik, I.; Massolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Stefanovich, R.; Fisher, W.; Tully, C.; Gavrilov, V.; Kaftanov, V.; Kisselevich, I.; Kolossov, V.; Krokhotin, A.; Kuleshov, S.; Stolin, V.; Ulyanov, A.; Gershtein, Y.; Golutvin, I.; Kalagin, V.; Kosarev, I.; Mescheryakov, G.; Smirnov, V.; Volodko, A.; Zarubin, A.; Grinev, B.; Lubinsky, V.; Senchishin, V.; Guelmez, E.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K.; Heering, A.; Imboden, M.; Isiksal, E.; Karmgard, D.; Ruchti, R.; Kaya, M.; Lazic, D.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Litvintsev, D.; Litov, L.; Mans, J.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Ozok, F.; Serin-Zeyrek, M.; Sever, R.; Zeyrek, M.; Paktinat, S.; Podrasky, V.; Sanzeni, C.; Winn, D.; Vlassov, E.

    2008-01-01

    Extensive measurements have been made with pions, electrons and muons on four production wedges of the compact muon solenoid (CMS) hadron barrel (HB) calorimeter in the H2 beam line at CERN with particle momenta varying from 20 to 300 GeV/c. The time structure of the events was measured with the full chain of preproduction front-end electronics running at 34 MHz. Moving-wire radioactive source data were also collected for all scintillator layers in the HB. The energy dependent time slewing effect was measured and tuned for optimal performance. (orig.)

  14. Precise Mapping of the Magnetic Field in the CMS Barrel Yoke using Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; 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Milenovic, P; Moortgat, F; Nardulli, A; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Punz, T; Rizzi, A; Ronga, F J; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Sawley, M C; Sordini, V; Stieger, B; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Trüb, P; Weber, M; Wehrli, L; Weng, J; Zelepoukine, S; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; De Visscher, S; Regenfus, C; Robmann, P; Rommerskirchen, T; Schmidt, A; Tsirigkas, D; Wilke, L; Chang, Y H; Chen, E A; Chen, W T; Go, A; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y; Lei, Y J; Lin, S W; Lu, R S; Schümann, J; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Ueno, K; Velikzhanin, Y; Wang, C C; Wang, M; Adiguzel, A; Ayhan, A; Azman Gokce, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Karaman, T; Kayis Topaksu, A; Kurt, P; Önengüt, G; Önengüt Gökbulut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatöz, A; Sogut, K; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Uzun, D; Vergili, L N; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Öcalan, K; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Zeyrek, M; Deliomeroglu, M; Demir, D; Gülmez, E; Halu, A; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Sonmez, N; Levchuk, L; Lukyanenko, S; Soroka, D; Zub, S; Bostock, F; Brooke, J J; Cheng, T L; Cussans, D; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grant, N; Hansen, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hill, C; Huckvale, B; Jackson, J; Mackay, C K; Metson, S; Newbold, D M; Nirunpong, K; Smith, V J; Velthuis, J; Walton, R; Bell, K W; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Camanzi, B; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Geddes, N I; Harder, K; Harper, S; Kennedy, B W; Murray, P; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Tomalin, I R; Williams, J H; Womersley, W J; Worm, S D; Bainbridge, R; Ball, G; Ballin, J; Beuselinck, R; Buchmuller, O; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Foudas, C; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Hall, G; Hays, J; Iles, G; Karapostoli, G; MacEvoy, B C; Magnan, A M; Marrouche, J; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Papageorgiou, A; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rompotis, N; Rose, A; Ryan, M J; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sidiropoulos, G; Stettler, M; Stoye, M; Takahashi, M; Tapper, A; Timlin, C; Tourneur, S; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardrope, D; Whyntie, T; Wingham, M; Cole, J E; Goitom, I; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leslie, D; Munro, C; Reid, I D; Siamitros, C; Taylor, R; Teodorescu, L; Yaselli, I; Bose, T; Carleton, M; Hazen, E; Heering, A H; Heister, A; John, J St; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Osborne, D; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Wu, S; Andrea, J; Avetisyan, A; Bhattacharya, S; Chou, J P; Cutts, D; Esen, S; Kukartsev, G; Landsberg, G; Narain, M; Nguyen, D; Speer, T; Tsang, K V; Breedon, R; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Case, M; Cebra, D; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Cox, P T; Dolen, J; Erbacher, R; Friis, E; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Maruyama, S; Miceli, T; Nikolic, M; Pellett, D; Robles, J; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stilley, J; Tripathi, M; Vasquez Sierra, R; Veelken, C; Andreev, V; Arisaka, K; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Mumford, J; Plager, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Tucker, J; Valuev, V; Wallny, R; Yang, X; Babb, J; Bose, M; Chandra, A; Clare, R; Ellison, J A; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Kao, S C; Liu, F; Liu, H; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Shen, B C; Stringer, R; Sturdy, J; Sytnik, V; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Dusinberre, E; Evans, D; Golf, F; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Lipeles, E; Mangano, B; Muelmenstaedt, J; Norman, M; Padhi, S; Petrucci, A; Pi, H; Pieri, M; Ranieri, R; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Garberson, J; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Koay, S A; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lamb, J; Lowette, S; Pavlunin, V; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; Vlimant, J R; Witherell, M; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chiorboli, M; Gataullin, M; Kcira, D; Litvine, V; Ma, Y; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The CMS detector is designed around a large 4 T superconducting solenoid, enclosed in a 12000-tonne steel return yoke. A detailed map of the magnetic field is required for the accurate simulation and reconstruction of physics events in the CMS detector, not only in the inner tracking region inside the solenoid but also in the large and complex structure of the steel yoke, which is instrumented with muon chambers. Using a large sample of cosmic muon events collected by CMS in 2008, the field in the steel of the barrel yoke has been determined with a precision of 3 to 8% depending on the location.

  15. Upgrade of the CMS muon trigger system in the barrel region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabady, Dinyar; Ero, Janos; Flouris, Giannis; Fulcher, Jonathan; Loukas, Nikitas; Paradas, Evangelos; Reis, Thomas; Sakulin, Hannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    To maintain the excellent performance shown during the LHC's Run-1 the Level-1 Trigger of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment underwent a significant upgrade. One part of this upgrade is the re-organization of the muon trigger path from a subsystem-centric view in which hits in the drift tubes (DT), the cathode strip chambers (CSC), and the resistive plate chambers (RPC) were treated separately in dedicated track-finding systems to one in which complementary detector systems for a given region (barrel, overlap, and endcap) are merged at the track-finding level. This fundamental restructuring of the muon trigger system required the development of a system to receive track candidates from the track-finding layer, remove potential duplicate tracks, and forward the best candidates to the global decision layer. An overview will be given of the new track-finder system for the barrel region, the Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF), as well as the cancel-out and sorting layer: the upgraded Global Muon Trigger (μGMT). Both the BMTF and μGMT have been implemented in a Xilinx Virtex-7 card utilizing the microTCA architecture. While the BMTF improves on the proven and well-tested algorithms used in the Drift Tube Track Finder during Run-1, the μGMT is an almost complete re-development due to the re-organization of the underlying systems from track-finders for a specific detector to regional track finders covering a given area of the whole detector. Additionally the μGMT calculates a muon's isolation using energy information received from the calorimeter trigger. This information is added to the muon objects forwarded to the global decision layer, the so-called Global Trigger. - Highlights: • Presented upgraded Global Muon Trigger and Barrel Muon Track Finder systems. • Upgraded system moves from sub-detector centric view to geometric-view. • To improve trigger performance. • Common hardware improves maintainability and increases development speed. • Use of

  16. Precise mapping of the magnetic field in the CMS barrel yoke using cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Aremenia); et al.,

    2010-03-01

    The CMS detector is designed around a large 4 T superconducting solenoid, enclosed in a 12000-tonne steel return yoke. A detailed map of the magnetic field is required for the accurate simulation and reconstruction of physics events in the CMS detector, not only in the inner tracking region inside the solenoid but also in the large and complex structure of the steel yoke, which is instrumented with muon chambers. Using a large sample of cosmic muon events collected by CMS in 2008, the field in the steel of the barrel yoke has been determined with a precision of 3 to 8% depending on the location.

  17. The drift velocity monitoring system of the CMS barrel muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Altenhoefer, Georg Friedrich; Heidemann, Carsten Andreas; Reithler, Hans; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel Francois

    2017-01-01

    The drift velocity is a key parameter of drift chambers. Its value depends on several parameters: electric field, pressure, temperature, gas mixture, and contamination, for example, by ambient air. A dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) with 1-L volume has been built at the III. Phys. Institute A, RWTH Aachen, in order to monitor the drift velocity of all CMS barrel muon Drift Tube chambers. A system of six VDCs was installed at CMS and has been running since January 2011. We present the VDC monitoring system, its principle of operation, and measurements performed.

  18. The drift velocity monitoring system of the CMS barrel muon chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenhöfer, Georg; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Reithler, Hans; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel

    2018-04-01

    The drift velocity is a key parameter of drift chambers. Its value depends on several parameters: electric field, pressure, temperature, gas mixture, and contamination, for example, by ambient air. A dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) with 1-L volume has been built at the III. Phys. Institute A, RWTH Aachen, in order to monitor the drift velocity of all CMS barrel muon Drift Tube chambers. A system of six VDCs was installed at CMS and has been running since January 2011. We present the VDC monitoring system, its principle of operation, and measurements performed.

  19. Progress in the construction of the B0 model of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Acerbi, E; Ambrosio, G; Baccaglioni, G; Broggi, F; Rossi, L; Sorbi, M; Volpini, G

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS Barrel Toroid air-core magnet (BT) will be composed by 8 superconducting coils, each one 25 m long and 5 m wide. In order to validate the technologies and manufacturing processes, a smaller model (9 m long) of one BT coil, named B0, is now under construction. This paper presents a general overview of the B0 project status, with special regard to the components for which the LASA Lab. is responsible: (a) the aluminium-clad NbTi conductor; (b) the double coils winding and impregnation; (c) the components of the cryostat (vacuum chamber, thermal shield and suspension rod). (6 refs).

  20. Projects to get you off the grid rain barrels, chicken coops, and solar panels

    CERN Document Server

    Instructablescom

    2014-01-01

    Instructables is back with this compact book focused on a series of projects designed to get you thinking creatively about thinking green. Twenty Instructables illustrate just how simple it can be to make your own backyard chicken coop, or turn a wine barrel into a rainwater collector.Illustrated with dozens of full-color photographs per project accompanying easy-to-follow instructions, this Instructables collection utilizes the best that the online community has to offer, turning a far-reaching group of people into a mammoth database churning out ideas to make life better, easier, and in this

  1. The inclusion of RPC only segments in the Barrel Muon Track Finder

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    On November 3, 2017 during the LHC fill 6360 and from the run number 306121 RPC-only segments were enable to trigger. In this document we show the impact of the RPC-only segments in the Barrel Muon Track Finder efficiency performance. The efficiency measurement was done with Tag and Probe cut and count following the Muon POG working point recommendations (tight ID and Particle Flow isolation requirements more details can be found in https://cds.cern.ch/record/2054113). The used dataset was ZMuMu corresponding to each period.

  2. High precision, low disturbance calibration of the High Voltage system of the CMS Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Fasanella, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter utilizes scintillating lead tungstate crystals, with avalanche photodiodes (APD) as photo-detectors in the barrel part. 1224 HV channels bias groups of 50 APD pairs, each at a voltage of about 380 V. The APD gain dependence on the voltage is 3pct/V. A stability of better than 60 mV is needed to have negligible impact on the calorimeter energy resolution. Until 2015 manual calibrations were performed yearly. A new calibration system was deployed recently, which satisfies the requirement of low disturbance and high precision. The system is discussed in detail and first operational experience is presented.

  3. High precision, low disturbance calibration of the High Voltage system of the CMS Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Marzocchi, Badder

    2017-01-01

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter is made of scintillating lead tungstate crystals, using avalanche photodiodes (APD) as photo-detectors in the barrel part. The high voltage system, consisting of 1224 channels, biases groups of 50 APD pairs, each at a voltage of about 380 V. The APD gain dependence on the voltage is 3pct/V. A stability of better than 60 mV is needed to have negligible impact on the calorimeter energy resolution. Until 2015 manual calibrations were performed yearly. A new calibration system was deployed recently, which satisfies the requirement of low disturbance and high precision. The system is discussed in detail and first operational experience is presented.

  4. High precision, low disturbance calibration of the High Voltage system of the CMS Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Fasanella, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter utilizes scintillating lead tungstate crystals, with avalanche photodiodes (APD) as photo-detectors in the barrel part. 1224 HV channels bias groups of 50 APD pairs, each at a voltage of about 380 V. The APD gain dependence on the voltage is 3pct/V. A stability of better than 60 mV is needed to have negligible impact on the calorimeter energy resolution. Until 2015 manual calibrations were performed yearly. A new calibration system was deployed recently, which satisfies the requirement of low disturbance and high precision. The system is discussed in detail and first operational experience is presented.

  5. Upgrade of the CMS muon trigger system in the barrel region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabady, Dinyar, E-mail: dinyar.rabady@cern.ch [Institute of High Energy Physics Vienna (HEPHY), Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Wien (Austria); Ero, Janos [Institute of High Energy Physics Vienna (HEPHY), Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Wien (Austria); Flouris, Giannis [University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Fulcher, Jonathan [CERN, 1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Loukas, Nikitas; Paradas, Evangelos [University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Reis, Thomas; Sakulin, Hannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth [CERN, 1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland)

    2017-02-11

    To maintain the excellent performance shown during the LHC's Run-1 the Level-1 Trigger of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment underwent a significant upgrade. One part of this upgrade is the re-organization of the muon trigger path from a subsystem-centric view in which hits in the drift tubes (DT), the cathode strip chambers (CSC), and the resistive plate chambers (RPC) were treated separately in dedicated track-finding systems to one in which complementary detector systems for a given region (barrel, overlap, and endcap) are merged at the track-finding level. This fundamental restructuring of the muon trigger system required the development of a system to receive track candidates from the track-finding layer, remove potential duplicate tracks, and forward the best candidates to the global decision layer. An overview will be given of the new track-finder system for the barrel region, the Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF), as well as the cancel-out and sorting layer: the upgraded Global Muon Trigger (μGMT). Both the BMTF and μGMT have been implemented in a Xilinx Virtex-7 card utilizing the microTCA architecture. While the BMTF improves on the proven and well-tested algorithms used in the Drift Tube Track Finder during Run-1, the μGMT is an almost complete re-development due to the re-organization of the underlying systems from track-finders for a specific detector to regional track finders covering a given area of the whole detector. Additionally the μGMT calculates a muon's isolation using energy information received from the calorimeter trigger. This information is added to the muon objects forwarded to the global decision layer, the so-called Global Trigger. - Highlights: • Presented upgraded Global Muon Trigger and Barrel Muon Track Finder systems. • Upgraded system moves from sub-detector centric view to geometric-view. • To improve trigger performance. • Common hardware improves maintainability and increases development speed. • Use of

  6. The Crystal Barrel: Meson Spectroscopy at LEAR with a 4$\\pi$ Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS197 \\\\ \\\\The Crystal Barrel is a 4$\\pi$ spectrometer designed to provide complete and precise information on practically every final state produced in $\\bar{p} p $ and $\\bar{p}d $ annihilations at low energy and to collect high statistics data samples. Selective triggers can be applied when necessary. \\\\ \\\\The physics goal is to identify all light mesons in the mass range from 0.14 to 2.3~GeV/c$^{2}$, to determine their quantum numbers and decay properties and to study the annihilation dynamics. The main interest is to find the glueball and hybrid degrees of freedom predicted in the framework of Quantum Chromodynamics. \\\\ \\\\\

  7. Overview of the 63000 PWO Barrel Crystals for CMS_ECAL Production

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, E

    2008-01-01

    In March 2007, the PWO crystal production for the barrel part of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter has been completed. Since September 1998, 63000 crystals (61000 in Russia, 2000 in China) have been produced, received and tested in two regional centers (CERN and INFN Rome). This paper presents an overview of the procedures used from the R&D phase up to the final large scale reception and quality control. The crystals characteristics and the lessons learned from the production of this unprecedented amount of crystals in a HEP experiment are also presented.

  8. Design, performance, and calibration of CMS hadron-barrel calorimeter wedges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullin, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)]|[Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Abramov, V.; Goncharov, P.; Khmelnikov, A.; Korablev, A.; Korneev, Y.; Krinitsyn, A.; Kryshkin, V.; Lukanin, V.; Pikalov, V.; Ryazanov, A.; Talov, V.; Turchanovich, L.; Volkov, A. [IHEP, Protvino (Russian Federation); Acharya, B.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, S.; Chendvankar, S.; Dugad, S.; Kalmani, S.; Katta, S.; Mazumdar, K.; Mondal, N.; Nagaraj, P.; Patil, M.; Reddy, L.; Satyanarayana, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Verma, P. [Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Adams, M.; Burchesky, K.; Qian, W. [Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Akchurin, N.; Carrell, K.; Guemues, K.; Thomas, R. [Texas Tech Univ., Dept. of Physics, Lubbock, TX (United States); Akgun, U.; Ayan, S.; Duru, F.; Merlo, J.P.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Miller, M.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Schmidt, I. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Anderson, E.W.; Hauptman, J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Antchev, G.; Hazen, E.; Lawlor, C.; Machado, E.; Posch, C.; Rohlf, J.; Wu, S.X. [Boston Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Aydin, S.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Polatoz, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdes-Koca, N. [Cukurova Univ., Adana (Turkey); Baarmand, M.; Ralich, R.; Vodopiyanov, I. [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Baden, D.; Bard, R.; Eno, S.; Grassi, T.; Jarvis, C.; Kellogg, R.; Kunori, S.; Skuja, A. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Barnes, V.; Laasanen, A.; Pompos, A. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Bawa, H.; Beri, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kaur, M.; Kohli, J.; Kumar, A.; Singh, J. [Panjab Univ., Chandigarh (India); Baiatian, G.; Sirunyan, A. [Yerevan Physics Inst., Yerevan (Armenia); Bencze, G.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zalan, P. [KFKI-RMKI, Research Inst. for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest (Hungary)] [and others

    2008-05-15

    Extensive measurements have been made with pions, electrons and muons on four production wedges of the compact muon solenoid (CMS) hadron barrel (HB) calorimeter in the H2 beam line at CERN with particle momenta varying from 20 to 300 GeV/c. The time structure of the events was measured with the full chain of preproduction front-end electronics running at 34 MHz. Moving-wire radioactive source data were also collected for all scintillator layers in the HB. The energy dependent time slewing effect was measured and tuned for optimal performance. (orig.)

  9. Obtaining and utilizing contaminant arrival distributions in transient flow systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The versatility of the new contaminant arrival distributions for determining environmental consequences of subsurface pollution problems is demonstrated through application to a transient flow system. Though some of the four phases of the hydrologic evaluations are more complicated because of the time-dependence of the flow and input contaminant concentrations, the arrival distributions still effectively summarize the data required to determine the environmental implications. These arrival distributions yield two graphs or tabular sets of data giving the consequences of the subsurface pollution problems in a simple and direct form. Accordingly, the public control authorities would be able to use these results to choose alternatives or initiate corrective actions, depending on the indicated environmental consequences

  10. Healthcare system information at language schools for newly arrived immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tynell, Lena Lyngholt; Wimmelmann, Camilla Lawaetz; Jervelund, Signe Smith

    2017-01-01

    a language school in Copenhagen in 2012 received either a course or written information on the Danish healthcare system and subsequently evaluated this quantitatively. Results: The evaluation revealed a positive appraisal of the course/information provided. Conclusion: In times of austerity, incorporating......Objective: In most European countries, immigrants do not systematically learn about the host countries’ healthcare system when arriving. This study investigated how newly arrived immigrants perceived the information they received about the Danish healthcare system. Method: Immigrants attending...... healthcare information into an already existing language programme may be pertinent for providing immigrants with knowledge on the healthcare system....

  11. Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Barrel Trigger for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Marino; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The present ATLAS muon trigger in the barrel region (|eta|<1.05) is based on three layers of RPC chambers. It was designed to run for 10 years at the LHC luminosity of 10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1} and operated successfully and with high selectivity during the first run of the LHC. In order to ensure a stable performance of the RPCs until 2035 at the higher rates and at luminosities of 5-7x10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1} provided by HL-LHC, the chambers will have to be operated with reduced gas gain to respect the original design limits on currents and integrated charge. The ATLAS muon collaboration proposes an upgrade of the system by installing an inner layer of new generation RPCs during the LHC shutdown expected for the year 2023. This new layer will increase the system redundancy and therefore allow operation with high efficiency and high selectivity during the HL-LHC phase. The insertion of this new layer will also increase the geometrical acceptance in the barrel region from 75% to 95%. Moreover, the additional measu...

  12. Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Barrel Trigger for HL-LHC.

    CERN Document Server

    Biondi, Silvia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The present ATLAS muon trigger in the barrel region (|η | < 1.05) is based on three layers of RPC chambers. It was designed to run for 10 years at the LHC luminosity of 1034cm−2s−1 and operated successfully and with high selectivity during the first run of the LHC. In order to ensure a stable performance of the RPCs until 2035 at the higher rates and at luminosities of 5−7x1034cm−2s−1 provided by HL-LHC, the chambers will have to be operated with reduced gas gain to respect the original design limits on currents and integrated charge. The ATLAS muon collaboration proposes an upgrade of the system by installing an inner layer of new generation RPCs during the LHC shutdown expected for the year 2023. This new layer will increase the system redundancy and therefore allow operation with high efficiency and high selectivity during the HL-LHC phase. The insertion of this new layer will also increase the geometrical acceptance in the barrel region from 75% to 95%. Moreover, the additional measurements ...

  13. Insertion of the first half-barrel of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter into its cryostat

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The first cylinder of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel and the presampler have been inserted in the cryostat.The ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter is intended to detect electrons, positrons and photons by measuring the energy they deposit on being absorbed. The cylinder of the calorimeter is in two halves, that will be sunk in a liquid-argon bath cooled to 90 kelvin (-180°C). Each half-barrel is 3.2 metres long, 53 cm thick and formed by assembling 16 modules. Each module is made up of alternate lead absorbers and electrodes pressed into 64 layers folded accordion-fashion. The presampler, set up inside the cylinder, is an integral part of the calorimeter system: It measures the energy lost by a particle before it reaches the calorimeter. To ensure an ultra-clean environment, a tent (visible here) was erected round the calorimeter and entry point to the cryostat. The detector and presampler, fitted together, could then be slid gradually into the cryostat like a drawer. To do so, the insertion team...

  14. Insertion of the first half-barrel of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter into its cryostat

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The first cylinder of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel and the presampler have been inserted in the cryostat. The ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter is intended to detect electrons, positrons and photons by measuring the energy they deposit on being absorbed. The cylinder of the calorimeter is in two halves, that will be sunk in a liquid-argon bath cooled to 90 kelvin (-180°C). Each half-barrel is 3.2 metres long, 53 cm thick and formed by assembling 16 modules. Each module is made up of alternate lead absorbers and electrodes pressed into 64 layers folded accordion-fashion. The presampler, set up inside the cylinder, is an integral part of the calorimeter system: It measures the energy lost by a particle before it reaches the calorimeter. To ensure an ultra-clean environment, a tent was erected round the calorimeter and entry point to the cryostat. The detector and presampler, fitted together, could then be slid gradually into the cryostat like a drawer. To do so, the insertion team had to fine-t...

  15. Installation of the Liquid Argon Calorimater Barrel in the ATLAS Experimental Cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Vandoni, G.

    On the 27th of October, the Liquid Argon Barrel cryostat was transported from Building 180 to point 1. The next day, the Barrel was lowered into the cavern, and was placed on jacks close to its final position inside the completed lower half of the Tile calorimeter. After a day of precise adjustment, it was resting within a few millimetres of its nominal final position, waiting for the upper half of the Tile calorimeter to be installed. Tight requests had been issued by the Liquid Argon collaboration for the whole transport. It was foreseen that the cryostat should not see any acceleration larger than 0.15g along its axis, 0.08g transversally and 0.3g in the vertical direction. In addition, no acceleration higher than 0.03g (or even 0.003g for permanent oscillation) would be allowed at 20Hz, to avoid the risk of damaging the absorbers at this spontaneous vibration frequency. The difficulty would arise when coping these demands with the tortuous route, its slopes and curbs, vibration transmission from the engi...

  16. The CMS Barrel Calorimeter Response to Particle Beams from 2 to 350 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Abdullin, Salavat; Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Adam, Nadia; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adzic, Petar; Akchurin, Nural; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Alemany-Fernandez, Reyes; Almeida, Nuno; Anagnostou, Georgios; Andelin, Daniel; Anderson, E Walter; Anfreville, Marc; Anicin, Ivan; Antchev, Georgy; Antunovic, Zeljko; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Auffray, Etiennette; Argiro, Stefano; Askew, Andrew; Atramentov, Oleksiy; Ayan, S; Arcidy, M; Aydin, Sezgin; Aziz, Tariq; Baarmand, Marc M; Babich, Kanstantsin; Baccaro, Stefania; Baden, Drew; Baffioni, Stephanie; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Balazs, Michael; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bard, Robert; Barge, Derek; Barnes, Virgil E; Barney, David; Barone, Luciano; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Baty, Clement; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Baiatian, G; Bandurin, Dmitry; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bell, Ken W; Bencze, Gyorgy; Benetta, Robert; Bercher, Michel; Beri, Suman Bala; Bernet, Colin; Berntzon, Lisa; Berthon, Ursula; Besançon, Marc; Betev, Botjo; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Bhatti, Anwar; Biino, Cristina; Blaha, Jan; Bloch, Philippe; Blyth, Simon; Bodek, Arie; Bornheim, Adolf; Bose, Suvadeep; Bose, Tulika; Bourotte, Jean; Brett, Angela Mary; Brown, Robert M; Britton, David; Budd, Howard; Bühler, M; Burchesky, Kyle; Busson, Philippe; Camanzi, Barbara; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cankocak, Kerem; Carrell, Kenneth Wayne; Carrera, E; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cavallari, Francesca; Cerci, Salim; Cerutti, cM; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Charlot, Claude; Chen, E Augustine; Chen, Wan-Ting; Chen, Zheng-Yu; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Chipaux, Rémi; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Chung, Yeon Sei; Clarida, Warren; Cockerill, David J A; Combaret, Christophe; Conetti, Sergio; Cossutti, Fabio; Cox, Bradley; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Cushman, Priscilla; Cussans, David; Dafinei, Ioan; Damgov, Jordan; Da Silva Di Calafiori, Diogo Raphael; Daskalakis, Georgios; Davatz, Giovanna; David, A; De Barbaro, Pawel; Debbins, Paul; Deiters, Konrad; Dejardin, Marc; Djordjevic, Milos; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Della Negra, Rodolphe; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Del Re, Daniele; Demianov, A; De Min, Alberto; Denegri, Daniel; Depasse, Pierre; de Visser, Theo; Descamps, Julien; Deshpande, Pandurang Vishnu; Díaz, Jonathan; Diemoz, Marcella; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Djambazov, Lubomir; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Drndarevic, Snezana; Duboscq, Jean Etienne; Dugad, Shashikant; Dumanoglu, Isa; Duru, Firdevs; Dutta, Dipanwita; Dzelalija, Mile; Efthymiopoulos, I; Elias, John E; Peisert, A; El-Mamouni, H; Elvira, D; Emeliantchik, Igor; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ershov, Alexander; Erturk, Sefa; Esen, Selda; Eskut, Eda; Evangelou, Ioannis; Evans, David; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Fay, Jean; Fenyvesi, Andras; Ferri, Federico; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flower, Paul S; Franci, Daniele; Franzoni, Giovanni; Freeman, Jim; Freudenreich, Klaus; Funk, Wolfgang; Ganjour, Serguei; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gascon, Susan; Gataullin, Marat; Gaultney, Vanessa; Gamsizkan, Halil; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Geerebaert, Yannick; Genchev, Vladimir; Gentit, François-Xavier; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershtein, Yuri; Ghezzi, Alessio; Ghodgaonkar, Manohar; Gilly, Jean; Givernaud, Alain; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Gninenko, Sergei; Go, Apollo; Gobbo, Benigno; Godinovic, Nikola; Golubev, Nikolai; Golutvin, Igor; Goncharov, Petr; Gong, Datao; Govoni, Pietro; Grant, Nicholas; Gras, Philippe; Grassi, Tullio; Green, Dan; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gribushin, Andrey; Grinev, B; Guevara Riveros, Luz; Guillaud, Jean-Paul; Gurtu, Atul; Murat Guler, A; Gülmez, Erhan; Gümüs, K; Haelen, T; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Haguenauer, Maurice; Halyo, Valerie; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Hansen, Sten; Hashemi, Majid; Hauptman, John M; Hazen, Eric; Heath, Helen F; Heering, Arjan Hendrix; Heister, Arno; Heltsley, Brian; Hill, Jack; Hintz, Wieland; Hirosky, Robert; Hobson, Peter R; Honma, Alan; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Hunt, Adam; Husejko, Michal; Ille, Bernard; Ilyina, N; Imlay, Richard; Ingram, D; Ingram, Quentin; Isiksal, Engin; Jarry, Patrick; Jarvis, Chad; Jeong, Chiyoung; Jessop, Colin; Johnson, Kurtis F; Jones, John; Jovanovic, Dragoslav; Kaadze, Ketino; Kachanov, Vassili; Kaftanova, V; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kalagin, Vladimir; Kalinin, Alexey; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kataria, Sushil Kumar; Kaur, Manjit; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Kayis-Topaksu, A; Kellogg, Richard G; Kennedy, Bruce W; Khmelnikov, Alexander; Kim, Heejong; Kisselevich, I; Kloukinas, Kostas; Kodolova, Olga; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Kolberg, Ted; Kolossov, V; Korablev, Andrey; Korneev, Yury; Kosarev, Ivan; Kramer, Laird; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Krinitsyn, Alexander; Krokhotin, Andrey; Krpic, Dragomir; Kryshkin, V; Kubota, Yuichi; Kubrik, A; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kumar, Arun; Kumar, P; Kunori, Shuichi; Kuo, Chen-Cheng; Kurt, Pelin; Kyberd, Paul; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Laasanen, Alvin T; Ladygin, Vladimir; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Laszlo, Andras; Lawlor, C; Lazic, Dragoslav; Lebeau, Michel; Lecomte, Pierre; Lecoq, Paul; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lee, Sang Joon; Leshev, Georgi; Lethuillier, Morgan; Levchuk, Leonid; Lin, Sheng-Wen; Lin, Willis; Linn, Stephan; Lintern, A L; Litvine, Vladimir; Litvintsev, Dmitri; Litov, Leander; Lobolo, L; Locci, Elizabeth; Lodge, Anthony B; Longo, Egidio; Loukas, Demetrios; Los, Serguei; Lubinsky, V; Luckey, Paul David; Lukanin, Vladimir; Lustermann, Werner; Lynch, Clare; Ma, Yousi; Machado, Emanuel; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Malberti, Martina; Malclès, Julie; Maletic, Dimitrije; Mandjavidze, Irakli; Mans, Jeremy; Manthos, Nikolaos; Maravin, Yurii; Marchica, Carmelo; Marinelli, Nancy; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Marlow, Daniel; Markowitz, Pete; Marone, Matteo; Martínez, German; Mathez, Hervé; Matveev, Viktor; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Maurelli, Georges; Mazumdar, Kajari; Meridiani, Paolo; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mescheryakov, G; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Mikhailin, V; Milenovic, Predrag; Miller, Michael; Milleret, Gérard; Miné, Philippe; Möller, A; Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Moissenz, P; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Moortgat, Filip; Mossolov, Vladimir; Mur, Michel; Musella, Pasquale; Musienko, Yuri; Nagaraj, P; Nardulli, Alessandro; Nash, Jordan; Nédélec, Patrick; Negri, Pietro; Newman, Harvey B; Nikitenko, Alexander; Norbeck, Edwin; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Onengüt, G; Organtini, Giovanni; Orimoto, Toyoko; Ozkan, Cigdem; Ozkurt, Halil; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Ozok, Ferhat; Paganoni, Marco; Paganini, Pascal; Paktinat, S; Pal, Andras; Palma, Alessandro; Panev, Bozhidar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Papadakis, Antonakis; Papadakis, Ioannis; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paramatti, Riccardo; Parracho, P; Pastrone, Nadia; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Pauss, Felicitas; Penzo, Aldo; Petrakou, Eleni; Petrushanko, Sergey; Petrosian, A; Phillips II, David; Pikalov, Vladimir; Piperov, Stefan; Piroué, Pierre; Podrasky, V; Polatoz, A; Pompos, Arnold; Popescu, Sorina; Posch, C; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Ptochos, Fotios; Puljak, Ivica; Pullia, Antonino; Punz, Thomas; Puzovic, Jovan; Qian, Weiming; Ragazzi, Stefano; Rahatlou, Shahram; Ralich, Robert; Rande, J; Razis, Panos A; Redaelli, Nicola; Reddy, L; Reidy, Jim; Renker, Dieter; Reucroft, Steve; Reymond, Jean-Marc; Ribeiro, Pedro Quinaz; Röser, Ulf; Rogalev, Evgueni; Rogan, Christopher; Roh, Youn; Rohlf, James; Romanteau, Thierry; Rondeaux, Françoise; Ronquest, Michael; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Rosowsky, André; Rovelli, Chiara; Ruchti, Randy; Rumerio, Paolo; Rusack, Roger; Rusakov, Sergey V; Ryan, Matthew John; Ryazanov, Anton; Safronov, Grigory; Sala, Leonardo; Salerno, Roberto; Sanders, David A; Santanastasio, Francesco; Sanzeni, Christopher; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Satyanarayana, B; Schinzel, Dietrich; Schmidt, Ianos; Seez, Christopher; Sekmen, Sezen; Semenov, Sergey; Senchishin, V; Sergeyev, S; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Sharp, Peter; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Siamitros, Christos; Sillou, Daniel; Singh, Jas Bir; Singovsky, Alexander; Sirois, Yves; Sirunyan, Albert M; Silva, J; Silva, Pedro; Skuja, Andris; Sharma, Seema; Sherwood, Brian; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Shukla, Prashant; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Smith, Brian; Smith, Vincent J; Sogut, Kenan; Sonmez, Nasuf; Sorokin, Pavel; Spezziga, Mario; Sproston, Martin; Stefanovich, R; Stockli, F; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Sudhakar, Katta; Sulak, Lawrence; Suter, Henry; Suzuki, Ichiro; Swain, John; Tabarellide Fatis, T; Talov, Vladimir; Takahashi, Maiko; Tcheremoukhine, Alexandre; Teller, Olivier; Teplov, Konstantin; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Thiebaux, Christophe; Thomas, Ray; Timciuc, Vladlen; Timlin, Claire; Titov, Maksym; Tobias, A; Tonwar, Suresh C; Topakli, Huseyin; Topkar, Anita; Triantis, Frixos A; Troshin, Sergey; Tully, Christopher; Turchanovich, L; Tyurin, Nikolay; Ueno, Koji; Ulyanov, A; Uzunian, Andrey; Vanini, A; Vankov, Ivan; Vardanyan, Irina; Varela, F; Varela, Joao; Vasil ev, A; Velasco, Mayda; Vergili, Mehmet; Verma, Piyush; Verrecchia, Patrice; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Veverka, Jan; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Vidal, Richard; Virdee, Tejinder; Vishnevskiy, Alexander; Vlassov, E; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Volobouev, Igor; Volkov, Alexey; Volodko, Anton; Von Gunten, Hans Peter; Wang, Lei; Wang, Minzu; Wardrope, David; Weber, Markus; Weng, Joanna; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Wetstein, Matthew; Winn, Dave; Wigmans, Richard; Williams, Jennifer C; Whitmore, Juliana; Won, Steven; Wu, Shouxiang; Yang, Yong; Yaselli, Ignacio; Yazgan, Efe; Yetkin, Taylan; Yohay, Rachel; Zabi, Alexandre; Zálán, Peter; Zamiatin, Nikolai; Zarubin, Anatoli; Zelepoukine, Serguei; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Zhang, Jia-Wen; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Kejun; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    The response of the CMS barrel calorimeter (electromagnetic plus hadronic) to hadrons, electrons and muons over a wide momentum range from 2 to 350 GeV/c has been measured. To our knowledge, this is the widest range of momenta in which any calorimeter system has been studied. These tests, carried out at the H2 beam-line at CERN, provide a wealth of information, especially at low energies. The analysis of the differences in calorimeter response to charged pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons and a detailed discussion of the underlying phenomena are presented. We also show techniques that apply corrections to the signals from the considerably different electromagnetic (EB) and hadronic (HB) barrel calorimeters in reconstructing the energies of hadrons. Above 5 GeV/c, these corrections improve the energy resolution of the combined system where the stochastic term equals 84.7$\\pm$1.6$\\%$ and the constant term is 7.4$\\pm$0.8$\\%$. The corrected mean response remains constant within 1.3$\\%$ rms.

  17. Qualification of barrel pixel detector modules for the Phase 1 Upgrade of the CMS vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kudella, Simon

    2016-01-01

    To withstand the higher particle rates of LHC Runs 2 and 3, with expected luminosities of up to $2\\times 10^{34}\\,\\mathrm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$, the current CMS pixel detector at the LHC will be replaced as part of the CMS Phase I Upgrade during the extended winter shutdown in 2016/17. The new pixel detector features a new geometry with one additional detector layer in the barrel region~(BPIX) and one pair of additional disks in the forward region~(FPIX), new digital readout chips as well as a new CO$_{2}$-based cooling system for both the barrel and forward region. The BPIX detector module production is summarized, with special focus on the different stages of quality assurance. The quality tests as well as the calibrations which all produced modules undergo in a temperature and humidity controlled environment are described. Exemplarily, the KIT/Aachen production line and its subprocesses are presented together with its quality and yields.

  18. Start of operation of the barrel measuring facility II-01. Implementation into operational processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buesing, B.; Escher, M.

    2013-01-01

    For the operation of the barrel measuring facility (FAME) II-01 a variety requirements to the measuring techniques were defined and tested in the frame of start-up. The used mechanical engineering and measuring technique complies with the state-of-the-art. Using the barrel measuring facility quality assured determinations of the dose rate and the nuclide-specific activity inventory were performed. For the evaluation of the gamma spectrometric measurements of FAME II-01 appropriately qualified personnel is available. The implementation of the facility in combination with the connection to the data base system PIK-AS and AVK it guaranteed that important data are available in real-time for the measuring process and the subsequent work steps. Besides this it is guaranteed that using the import/export functions relevant data are reviewed, supplemented and exchanged between the systems without transfer errors. The determined data of the dose rate and gamma spectrometric measurements allow an activity determination of the waste package with quality assurance and close to reality. Conservative assumptions in the frame of activity calculations for the later final disposal can be reduced. The automated operation of FAME allows also the reduction of radiation exposure of the personnel.

  19. A case of adenocarcinoma occurred at site of radiated double-barrel sigmoid colostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Hideaki; Kondo, Yukifumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi [Sapporo-Kosei General Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    A 60-year-old female developed an adenocarcinoma at the site of double-barrel sigmoid colostomy. She underwent a total hysterectomy and the subsequent radiation therapy due to carcinoma uteri when she was 34 years old. She had rectal stenosis one year later and underwent sigmoid colostomy. She had been healthy thereafter, however, when she was 58 years old, she noticed an elevated lesion at the site of colostomy. Biopsy revealed well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, so surgery was recommended but she refused it. Two years later, the entire stoma became a carcinoma, which directly invaded the abdominal wall on MRI images. A bow-shaped skin incision was made and en bloc resection of the tumor, colostomy and the surrounding tissues was performed. Finally, descending colostomy in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen was reconstructed. Primary adenocarcinoma occurring at a double-barrel colostomy is very rare, and such a case may never have been reported, although there were some reports of carcinoma occurring at an end colostomy. Since the site of the present carcinoma was radiated, the radiation may contribute to this carcinogenesis, suspecting its late effect. Our surgical procedure enabled simultaneously operation of combined resection and intraabdominal manipulation, and the reconstruction site of the stoma was easily selected. (author)

  20. A case of adenocarcinoma occurred at site of radiated double-barrel sigmoid colostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Hideaki; Kondo, Yukifumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi

    1996-01-01

    A 60-year-old female developed an adenocarcinoma at the site of double-barrel sigmoid colostomy. She underwent a total hysterectomy and the subsequent radiation therapy due to carcinoma uteri when she was 34 years old. She had rectal stenosis one year later and underwent sigmoid colostomy. She had been healthy thereafter, however, when she was 58 years old, she noticed an elevated lesion at the site of colostomy. Biopsy revealed well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, so surgery was recommended but she refused it. Two years later, the entire stoma became a carcinoma, which directly invaded the abdominal wall on MRI images. A bow-shaped skin incision was made and en bloc resection of the tumor, colostomy and the surrounding tissues was performed. Finally, descending colostomy in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen was reconstructed. Primary adenocarcinoma occurring at a double-barrel colostomy is very rare, and such a case may never have been reported, although there were some reports of carcinoma occurring at an end colostomy. Since the site of the present carcinoma was radiated, the radiation may contribute to this carcinogenesis, suspecting its late effect. Our surgical procedure enabled simultaneously operation of combined resection and intraabdominal manipulation, and the reconstruction site of the stoma was easily selected. (author)