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Sample records for screw sense a comment

  1. Direct access to polyisocyanide screw sense using vibrational circular dichroism

    Schwartz, E.; Domingos, S.R.; Vdovin, A.; Koepf, M.; Buma, W.J.; Cornelissen, J.J.L.M.; Rowan, A.E.; Nolte, R.J.M.; Woutersen, S.

    2010-01-01

    We show that the screw sense of polyisocyanide helices can be determined in a simple manner from the vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) of their CN-stretching mode. The relation between VCD and molecular structure is obtained using the coupled-oscillator approximation. It is shown that since the

  2. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  3. [Fracture of implant abutment screws and removal of a remaining screw piece

    Broeke, S.M. van den; Baat, C. de

    2008-01-01

    Fracture of the implant abutment screws is a complication which can render an implant useless. The prevalence of abutment screw fracture does not exceed 2.5% after 10 years. Causes are loosening of implant abutment screw, too few, too short or too narrow implants, implants not inserted perpendicular

  4. A geometrical introduction to screw theory

    Minguzzi, E

    2013-01-01

    This work introduces screw theory, a venerable but little known theory aimed at describing rigid body dynamics. This formulation of mechanics unifies in the concept of screw the translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the body. It captures a remarkable mathematical analogy between mechanical momenta and linear velocities, and between forces and angular velocities. For instance, it clarifies that angular velocities should be treated as applied vectors and that, under the composition of motions, they sum with the same rules of applied forces. This work provides a short and rigorous introduction to screw theory intended for an undergraduate and general readership. (paper)

  5. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Stop with an Integral Guide

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Perek, John (Inventor); Geck, Kellan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a housing assembly, a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is rotationally mounted in the housing assembly, is adapted to receive an input torque, and is configured, upon receipt thereof, to rotate and supply a drive force. The ball screw is mounted within the housing assembly and extends through the ball nut. The ball screw has a first end and a second end, and is coupled to receive the drive force from the ball nut. The ball screw is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively translate between a stow position and a deploy position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw to translate therewith and is configured to at selectively engage the housing assembly while the ball screw is translating, and engage the ball nut when the ball screw is in the deploy position.

  6. A Novel Pedicle Screw with Mobile Connection: A Pilot Study

    Yasuaki Tokuhashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To prevent adjacent disc problems after spinal fusion, a pedicle screw with a mobile junction between the head and threaded shaft was newly developed. The threaded shaft of the screw has 10 degrees mobility in all directions, but its structure is to prevent abnormal translation and tilting. This screw was evaluated as follows: (1 endurance test: 106 times rotational stress was applied; (2 biological reactions: novel screws with a mobile head and conventional screws with a fixed head were inserted into the bilateral pedicles of the L3, L4, and L5 in two mini pigs with combination. Eight months after surgery, vertebral units with the screw rod constructs were collected. After CT scan, the soft and bony tissues around the screws were examined grossly and histologically. As a result, none of the screws broke during the endurance test stressing. The mean amount of abrasion wear was 0.0338 g. In the resected mini pig section, though zygapophyseal joints between fixed-head screws showed bony union, the amount of callus in the zygapophyseal joints connected with mobile-head screws was small, and joint space was confirmed by CT. No metalloses were noted around any of the screws. Novel screws were suggested to be highly durable and histologically safe.

  7. Transpedicular screw fixation in the thoracic and lumbar spine with a novel cannulated polyaxial screw system

    Lutz Weise

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lutz Weise, Olaf Suess, Thomas Picht, Theodoros KombosNeurochirurgische Klinik, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, GermanyObjective: Transpedicular screws are commonly and successfully used for posterior fixation in spinal instability, but their insertion remains challenging. Even using navigation techniques, there is a misplacement rate of up to 11%. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of a novel pedicle screw system.Methods: Thoracic and lumbar fusions were performed on 67 consecutive patients for tumor, trauma, degenerative disease or infection. A total of 326 pedicular screws were placed using a novel wire-guided, cannulated, polyaxial screw system (XIA Precision®, Stryker. The accuracy of placement was assessed post operatively by CT scan, and the patients were followed-up clinically for a mean of 16 months.Results: The total medio-caudal pedicle wall perforation rate was 9.2% (30/326. In 19 of these 30 cases a cortical breakthrough of less than 2 mm occurred. The misplacement rate (defined as a perforation of 2 mm or more was 3.37% (11/326. Three of these 11 screws needed surgical revision due to neurological symptoms or CSF leakage. There have been no screw breakages or dislocations over the follow up-period.Conclusion: We conclude that the use of this cannulated screw system for the placement of pedicle screws in the thoracic and lumbar spine is accurate and safe. The advantages of this technique include easy handling without a time-consuming set up. Considering the incidence of long-term screw breakage, further investigation with a longer follow-up period is necessary.Keywords: spinal instrumentation, pedicle screws, misplacement, pedicle wall perforation

  8. A phenomenological study on twin screw extruders

    Janssen, L.P.B.M.

    1976-01-01

    Although more and more twin screw extruders are being used in the polymer industry, the theoretical background is relatively undeveloped. The literature abounds in contradictions and often informs the reader that all extrusion problems can be solved if a certain new design is considered. The

  9. "PRICE LEVELS AND ECONOMIC GROWTH : MAKING SENSE OF REVISIONS TO DATA ON REAL INCOMES": A COMMENT

    Inklaar, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In his recent paper, Ravallion (2013) proposes a new method to predict changes in purchasing power parities (PPPs), arguing that a model that includes economic growth and exchange rate movements is superior to the standard approach of using inflation differences. In this comment, I argue that his

  10. Predicting the switchable screw sense in fluorene-based polymers.

    Pietropaolo, Adriana; Wang, Yue; Nakano, Tamaki

    2015-02-23

    A chirality-switching free-energy landscape was reconstructed on a 43-mer of poly(9,9-dioctylfluoren-2,7-diyl) (PDOF). The simulations were conducted on amorphous silica surface as well as in the vacuum phase for a single chain or for a group of sixteen chains. The achiral-to-chiral transition occurs only on amorphous silica (activation free-energy 35 kcal mol(-1) ), where the enantiomeric (homochiral) basins are detected. This was supported by the experiments where effective chirality induction to PDOF using circularly polarized light (CPL) was attained only for a film deposited on a quartz glass and not for a solution or a suspension. These results indicate that interactions of PDOF with amorphous silica play a crucial role in chirality switching. Importance of chain assembling was also indicated. Theoretical ECD spectra of the enantiomeric basins containing a 51 helix reproduce the experimental spectra. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. In vitro evaluation of force-expansion characteristics in a newly designed orthodontic expansion screw compared to conventional screws

    Oshagh Morteza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Expansion screws like Hyrax, Haas and other types, produce heavy interrupted forces which are unfavorable for dental movement and could be harmful to the tooth and periodontium. The other disadvantage of these screws is the need for patient cooperation for their regular activation. The purpose of this study was to design a screw and compare its force- expansion curve with other types. Materials and Methods : A new screw was designed and fabricated in the same dimension, with conventional types, with the ability of 8 mm expansion (Free wire length: 12 mm, initial compression: 4.5 mm, spring wire diameter: 0.4 mm, spring diameter: 3 mm, number of the coils: n0 ine, material: s0 tainless steel. In this in vitro study, the new screw was placed in an acrylic orthodontic appliance, and after mounting on a stone cast, the force-expansion curve was evaluated by a compression test machine and compared to other screws. Results : Force-expansion curve of designed screw had a flatter inclination compared to other screws. Generally it produced a light continuous force (two to 3.5 pounds for every 4 mm of expansion. Conclusion : In comparison with heavy and interrupted forces of other screws, the newly designed screw created light and continuous forces.

  12. Magnesium Alloys as a Biomaterial for Degradable Craniofacial Screws

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Verdelis, Konstantinos; Maiti, Spandan; Pal, Siladitya; Chung, William L.; Chou, Da-Tren; Kumta, Prashant N.; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, magnesium (Mg) alloys have received significant attention as a potential biomaterial for degradable implants, and this study was directed at evaluating the suitability of Mg for craniofacial bone screws. The objective was to implant screws fabricated from commercially available Mg-alloys (pure Mg and AZ31) in-vivo in a rabbit mandible. First, Mg-alloy screws were compared to stainless steel screws in an in-vitro pull-out test and determined to have a similar holding strength (~40N). A finite element model of the screw was created using the pull-out test data, and the model can be used for future Mg-alloy screw design. Then, Mg-alloy screws were implanted for 4, 8, and 12 weeks, with two controls of an osteotomy site (hole) with no implant and a stainless steel screw implanted for 12 weeks. MicroCT (computed tomography) was used to assess bone remodeling and Mg-alloy degradation, both visually and qualitatively through volume fraction measurements for all time points. Histologic analysis was also completed for the Mg-alloys at 12 weeks. The results showed that craniofacial bone remodeling occurred around both Mg-alloy screw types. Pure Mg had a different degradation profile than AZ31, however bone growth occurred around both screw types. The degradation rate of both Mg-alloy screw types in the bone marrow space and the muscle were faster than in the cortical bone space at 12 weeks. Furthermore, it was shown that by alloying Mg, the degradation profile could be changed. These results indicate the promise of using Mg-alloys for craniofacial applications. PMID:24384125

  13. A four lumen screwing device for multiparametric brain monitoring.

    Feuerstein, T H; Langemann, H; Gratzl, O; Mendelowitsch, A

    2000-01-01

    We describe multiparametric monitoring in severe head trauma using a new screwing device. Our aim was to create a screw which would make the implantation of the probes and thus multiparametric monitoring easier. The new screw allows us to implant 3 probes (microdialysis, Paratrend and an intracranial pressure device) through one burr hole. The screw has four channels, the fourth being for ventricular drainage. We monitored 13 patients with severe head trauma (GCS = 3-8) for up to 7 days. Brain tissue pO2, pCO2, pH, and temperature were measured on-line with the Paratrend 7 machine. The microdialytic parameters glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glutamate were determined semi on-line with a CMA 600 enzymatic analyser. There were no complications in any of the patients that could be ascribed to the screw.

  14. A power recirculating test rig for ball screw endurance tests

    Giberti Hermes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual design of an innovative test rig for endurance tests of ball screws is presented in this paper. The test rig layout is based on the power recirculating principle and it also allows to overtake the main critical issues of the ball screw endurance tests. Among these there are the high power required to make the test, the lengthy duration of the same and the high loads between the screw and the frame that holds it. The article describes the test rig designed scheme, the kinematic expedients to be adopted in order to obtain the required performance and functionality and the sizing procedure to choose the actuation system.

  15. Undertapping of Lumbar Pedicle Screws Can Result in Tapping With a Pitch That Differs From That of the Screw, Which Decreases Screw Pullout Force.

    Bohl, Daniel D; Basques, Bryce A; Golinvaux, Nicholas S; Toy, Jason O; Matheis, Erika A; Bucklen, Brandon S; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2015-06-15

    Survey of spine surgeons and biomechanical comparison of screw pullout forces. To investigate what may be a suboptimal practice regularly occurring in spine surgery. In order for a tap to function in its intended manner, the pitch of the tap should be the same as the pitch of the screw. Undertapping has been shown to increase the pullout force of pedicle screws compared with line-to-line tapping. However, given the way current commercial lumbar pedicle screw systems are designed, undertapping may result in a tap being used that has a different pitch from that of the screw (incongruent pitch). A survey asked participants questions to estimate the proportion of cases each participant performed in the prior year using various hole preparation techniques. Participant responses were interpreted in the context of manufacturing specifications of specific instrumentation systems. Screw pullout forces were compared between undertapping with incongruent pitch and undertapping with congruent pitch using 0.16 g/cm polyurethane foam block and 6.5-mm screws. Of the 3679 cases in which participants reported tapping, participants reported line-to-line tapping in 209 cases (5%), undertapping with incongruent pitch in 1156 cases (32%), and undertapping with congruent pitch in 2314 cases (63%). The mean pullout force for undertapping with incongruent pitch was 56 N (8%) less than the mean pullout force for undertapping with congruent pitch. This is equivalent to 13 lb. This study estimates that for about 1 out of every 3 surgical cases with tapping of lumbar pedicle screws in the United States, hole preparation is being performed by undertapping with incongruent pitch. This study also shows that undertapping with incongruent pitch results in a decrease in pullout force by 8% compared with undertapping with congruent pitch. Steps should be taken to correct this suboptimal practice. 3.

  16. Pullout strength of misplaced pedicle screws in the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae - A cadaveric study

    Shyam K Saraf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this cadaveric study was to analyze the effects of iatrogenic pedicle perforations from screw misplacement on the mean pullout strength of lower thoracic and lumbar pedicle screws. We also investigated the effect of bone mineral density (BMD, diameter of pedicle screws, and the region of spine on the pullout strength of pedicle screws. Materials and Methods: Sixty fresh human cadaveric vertebrae (D10-L2 were harvested. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA scan of vertebrae was done for BMD. Titanium pedicle screws of different diameters (5.2 and 6.2 mm were inserted in the thoracic and lumbar segments after dividing the specimens into three groups: a standard pedicle screw (no cortical perforation; b screw with medial cortical perforation; and c screw with lateral cortical perforation. Finally, pullout load of pedicle screws was recorded using INSTRON Universal Testing Machine. Results: Compared with standard placement, medially misplaced screws had 9.4% greater mean pullout strength and laterally misplaced screws had 47.3% lesser mean pullout strength. The pullout strength of the 6.2 mm pedicle screws was 33% greater than that of the 5.2 mm pedicle screws. The pullout load of pedicle screws in lumbar vertebra was 13.9% greater than that in the thoracic vertebra ( P = 0.105, but it was not statistically significant. There was no significant difference between pullout loads of vertebra with different BMD ( P = 0.901. Conclusion: The mean pullout strength was less with lateral misplaced pedicle screws while medial misplaced pedicle screw had more pullout strength. The pullout load of 6.2 mm screws was greater than that of 5.2 mm pedicle screws. No significant correlation was found between bone mineral densities and the pullout strength of vertebra. Similarly, the pullout load of screw placed in thoracic and lumbar vertebrae was not significantly different.

  17. Theoretical investigation of flash vaporisation in a screw expander

    Vasuthevan, Hanushan; Brümmer, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    In the present study flash vaporisation of liquid injection in a twin screw expander for a Trilateral Flash Cycle (TFC) is examined theoretically. The TFC process comprises a pressure increase in the working fluid, followed by heating the liquid close to boiling point. The hot liquid is injected into the working chamber of a screw expander. During this process the pressure of the liquid drops below the saturation pressure, while the temperature of the liquid remains virtually constant. Hence the liquid is superheated and in a metastable state. The liquid jet seeks to achieve a stable state in thermodynamic equilibrium and is therefore partially vaporised. This effect is referred to as flash vaporisation. Accordingly, a two-phase mixture, consisting of vapour and liquid, exists in the working chamber. Thermodynamic simulations were carried out using water as the working fluid for representative screw expander geometry. The simulations presented are performed from two different aspects during the filling process of a screw expander. The first case is the vaporisation of the injected liquid in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium, whereby the two-phase mixture is treated entirely as a compressible and homogeneous gas. The second case considers flashing efficiency. It describes the quantity of flashed vapour and consists of a liquid and vapour domain. Both models are compared and analysed with respect to the operational behaviour of a screw expander.

  18. Pull out Strength of Dual Outer Diameter Pedicle Screws Compared to Uncemented and Cemented Standard Pedicle Screws: A Biomechanical in vitro Study.

    Lorenz, Andrea; Leichtle, Carmen I; Frantz, Sandra; Bumann, Marte; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Shiozawa, Thomas; Leichtle, Ulf G

    2017-05-01

    To analyze the potential of the dual outer diameter screw and systematically evaluate the pull-out force of the dual outer diameter screw compared to the uncemented and cemented standard pedicle screws with special regard to the pedicle diameter and the vertebra level. Sixty vertebrae of five human spines (T 6 -L 5 ) were sorted into three study groups for pairwise comparison of the uncemented dual outer diameter screw, the uncemented standard screw, and the cemented standard screw, and randomized with respect to bone mineral density (BMD) and vertebra level. The vertebrae were instrumented, insertion torque was determined, and pull-out testing was performed using a material testing machine. Failure load was evaluated in pairwise comparison within each study group. The screw-to-pedicle diameter ratio was determined and the uncemented dual outer diameter and standard screws were compared for different ratios as well as vertebra levels. Significantly increased pull-out forces were measured for the cemented standard screw compared to the uncemented standard screw (+689 N, P dual outer diameter screw (+403 N, P dual outer diameter screw to the uncemented standard screw in the total study group, a distinct but not significant increase was measured (+149 N, P = 0.114). Further analysis of these two screws, however, revealed a significant increase of pull-out force for the dual outer diameter screw in the lumbar region (+247 N, P = 0.040), as well as for a screw-to-pedicle diameter ratio between 0.6 and 1 (+ 488 N, P = 0.028). For clinical application, cement augmentation remains the gold standard for increasing screw stability. According to our results, the use of a dual outer diameter screw is an interesting option to increase screw stability in the lumbar region without cement augmentation. For the thoracic region, however, the screw-to-pedicle diameter should be checked and attention should be paid to screw cut out, if the dual outer diameter screw is considered.

  19. Numerical simulation of a twin screw expander for performance prediction

    Papes, Iva; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan

    2015-08-01

    With the increasing use of twin screw expanders in waste heat recovery applications, the performance prediction of these machines plays an important role. This paper presents a mathematical model for calculating the performance of a twin screw expander. From the mass and energy conservation laws, differential equations are derived which are then solved together with the appropriate Equation of State in the instantaneous control volumes. Different flow processes that occur inside the screw expander such as filling (accompanied by a substantial pressure loss) and leakage flows through the clearances are accounted for in the model. The mathematical model employs all geometrical parameters such as chamber volume, suction and leakage areas. With R245fa as working fluid, the Aungier Redlich-Kwong Equation of State has been used in order to include real gas effects. To calculate the mass flow rates through the leakage paths formed inside the screw expander, flow coefficients are considered as constant and they are derived from 3D Computational Fluid Dynamic calculations at given working conditions and applied to all other working conditions. The outcome of the mathematical model is the P-V indicator diagram which is compared to CFD results of the same twin screw expander. Since CFD calculations require significant computational time, developed mathematical model can be used for the faster performance prediction.

  20. Bioabsorbable metal screws in traumatology: A promising innovation

    Roland Biber

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available MAGNEZIX® CS (Syntellix AG, Hanover, Germany is a bioabsorbable compression screw made of a magnesium alloy (MgYREZr. Currently there are only two clinical studies reporting on a limited number of elective patients who received this screw in a hallux valgus operation. We applied MAGNEZIX® CS for fixation of distal fibular fracture in a trauma patient who had sustained a bimalleolar fracture type AO 44-B2.3. Clinical course was uneventful, fracture healing occurred within three months. Follow-up X-rays showed a radiolucent area around the implant for some months, yet this radiolucent area had disappeared in the 17-months follow-up X-ray. Keywords: Magnesium, Bioabsorbable, Compression screw, Osteosynthesis, Ankle fracture

  1. The Improvement of Bone-Tendon Fixation by Porous Titanium Interference Screw: A Rabbit Animal Model.

    Tsai, Pei-I; Chen, Chih-Yu; Huang, Shu-Wei; Yang, Kuo-Yi; Lin, Tzu-Hung; Chen, San-Yuan; Sun, Jui-Sheng

    2018-05-04

    The interference screw is a widely used fixation device in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgeries. Despite the generally satisfactory results, problems of using interference screws were reported. By using additive manufacturing (AM) technology, we developed an innovative titanium alloy (Ti 6 Al 4 V) interference screw with rough surface and inter-connected porous structure designs to improve the bone-tendon fixation. An innovative Ti 6 Al 4 V interference screws were manufactured by AM technology. In vitro mechanical tests were performed to validate its mechanical properties. Twenty-seven New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into control and AM screw groups for biomechanical analyses and histological analysis at 4, 8 and 12 weeks postoperatively; while micro-CT analysis was performed at 12 weeks postoperatively. The biomechanical tests showed that the ultimate failure load in the AM interference screw group was significantly higher than that in the control group at all tested periods. These results were also compatible with the findings of micro-CT and histological analyses. In micro-CT analysis, the bone-screw gap was larger in the control group; while for the additive manufactured screw, the screw and bone growth was in close contact. In histological study, the bone-screw gaps were wider in the control group and were almost invisible in the AM screw group. The innovative AM interference screws with surface roughness and inter-connected porous architectures demonstrated better bone-tendon-implant integration, and resulted in stronger biomechanical characteristics when compared to traditional screws. These advantages can be transferred to future interference screw designs to improve their clinical performance. The AM interference screw could improve graft fixation and eventually result in better biomechanical performance of the bone-tendon-screw construct. The innovative AM interference screws can be transferred to future

  2. Fixation strength of biocomposite wedge interference screw in ACL reconstruction: effect of screw length and tunnel/screw ratio. A controlled laboratory study

    Herrera Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary stability of the graft is essential in anterior cruciate ligament surgery. An optimal method of fixation should be easy to insert and provide great resistance against pull-out forces. A controlled laboratory study was designed to test the primary stability of ACL tendinous grafts in the tibial tunnel. The correlation between resistance to traction forces and the cross-section and length of the screw was studied. Methods The tibial phase of ACL reconstruction was performed in forty porcine tibias using digital flexor tendons of the same animal. An 8 mm tunnel was drilled in each specimen and two looped tendons placed as graft. Specimens were divided in five groups according to the diameter and length of the screw used for fixation. Wedge interference screws were used. Longitudinal traction was applied to the graft with a Servohydraulic Fatigue System. Load and displacement were controlled and analyzed. Results The mean loads to failure for each group were 295,44 N (Group 1; 9 × 23 screw, 564,05 N (Group 2; 9 × 28, 614,95 N (Group 3; 9 × 35, 651,14 N (Group 4; 10 × 28 and 664,99 (Group 5; 10 × 35. No slippage of the graft was observed in groups 3, 4 and 5. There were significant differences in the load to failure among groups (ANOVA/P Conclusions Longer and wider interference screws provide better fixation in tibial ACL graft fixation. Short screws (23 mm do not achieve optimal fixation and should be implanted only with special requirements.

  3. A modified transcondylar screw to accommodate anatomical skull base variations.

    Ghaly, R F; Lissounov, A

    2017-01-01

    Occipitocervical instability may be attributed to congenital, bony/ligamentous abnormalities, trauma, neoplasm, degenerative bone disease, and failed atlantoaxial fixation. Indications for occipitocervical fixation include the prevention of disabling pain, cranial nerve dysfunction, paralysis, or even sudden death. The screw trajectory for the modified transcondylar screw (mTCS) is optimally planned utilizing a three-dimensional skull reconstructed image. The modified mTCS technique is helpful where there is a loss of bone, such as after prior suboccipital craniotomy and/or an inadequate occipital condyle. The new proposed technique is similar to the classical transcondylar screw placement but follows a deeper course along the bony lip of foramen magnum toward clivus from a dorsolateral approach. The modified mTCS technique allows for direct visualization and, therefore, helps to avoid damage to the hypoglossal nerve and lateral aspect of brain stem.

  4. Idealized Compression Ratio for a Screw Briquetting Press

    Peter Biath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with issues in determining the ideal compression ratio for a screw briquetting press. First, the principles of operation and a basic description of the main parts of a screw briquetting press are introduced. The next section describes the pressing space by means of 3D software. The pressing space was created using a Boolean subtract function. The final section of the paper measures the partial volumes of the pressing chamber in CATIA V5 by function of measuring. The measured values are substituted into the formula for the compression ratio, and the resulting evaluations are presented in the diagram in the conclusion of this paper.

  5. Screw compressor analysis from a vibration point-of-view

    Hübel, D.; Žitek, P.

    2017-09-01

    Vibrations are a very typical feature of all compressors and are given great attention in the industry. The reason for this interest is primarily the negative influence that it can have on both the operating staff and the entire machine's service life. The purpose of this work is to describe the methodology of screw compressor analysis from a vibration point-of-view. This analysis is an essential part of the design of vibro-diagnostics of screw compressors with regard to their service life.

  6. Biomechanical evaluation of a second generation headless compression screw for ankle arthrodesis in a cadaver model.

    Somberg, Andrew Max; Whiteside, William K; Nilssen, Erik; Murawski, Daniel; Liu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Many types of screws, plates, and strut grafts have been utilized for ankle arthrodesis. Biomechanical testing has shown that these constructs can have variable stiffness. More recently, headless compression screws have emerged as an evolving method of achieving compression in various applications but there is limited literature regarding ankle arthrodesis. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical stability provided by a second generation fully threaded headless compression screw compared to a standard headed, partially threaded cancellous screw in a cadaveric ankle arthrodesis model. Twenty fresh frozen human cadaver specimens were subjected to simulated ankle arthrodesis with either three standard cancellous-bone screws (InFix 7.3mm) or with three headless compression screws (Acumed Acutrak 2 7.5mm). The specimens were subjected to cyclic loading and unloading at a rate of 1Hz, compression of 525 Newtons (N) and distraction of 20N for a total of 500 cycles using an electromechanical load frame (Instron). The amount of maximum distraction was recorded as well as the amount of motion that occurred through 1, 10, 50, 100, and 500 cycles. No significant difference (p=0.412) was seen in the amount of distraction that occurred across the fusion site for either screw. The average maximum distraction after 500 cycles was 201.9μm for the Acutrak 2 screw and 235.4μm for the InFix screw. No difference was seen throughout each cycle over time for the Acutrak 2 screw (p-value=0.988) or the InFix screw (p-value=0.991). Both the traditional InFix type screw and the second generation Acumed Acutrak headless compression screws provide adequate fixation during ankle arthrodesis under submaximal loads. There is no demonstrable difference between traditional cannulated partially threaded screws and headless compression screws studied in this model. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Kinematics and Dynamic Evaluation of the Screw Conveyor of a ...

    An analysis of the vortex motion in a horizontal screw conveyor of a Cassava Centrifuge Dewatering Machine is presented. It is shown that the vortex motion is characterised by the tangential component of the absolute grain velocity being constant with the radial position of a point on the blade. On this basis, an expression ...

  8. Sacroiliac screw fixation: A mini review of surgical technique

    Hernando Raphael Alvis-Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sacral percutaneous fixation has many advantages but can be associated with a significant exposure to X-ray radiation. Currently, sacroiliac screw fixation represents the only minimally invasive technique to stabilize the posterior pelvic ring. It is a technique that should be used by experienced surgeons. We present a practical review of important aspects of this technique.

  9. Kinematics of a Hybrid Manipulator by Means of Screw Theory

    Gallardo-Alvarado, J

    2005-01-01

    In this work the kinematics of a hybrid manipulator, namely a fully parallel-serial manipulator, with a particular topology is approached by means of the theory of screws. Given the length of the six independent limbs, the forward position analysis of the mechanism under study, indeed the computation of the resulting pose, position and orientation, of the end-platform with respect to the fixed platform, is carried out in closed-form solution. Therefore conveniently this initial analysis avoids the use of a numerical technique such as the Newton-Raphson method. Writing in screw form the reduced acceleration state of the translational platform, with respect to the fixed platform, a simple expression for the computation of the acceleration of the translational platform is derived by taking advantage of the properties of reciprocal screws, via the Klein form, a bilinear symmetric form of the Lie algebra e(3). Following a similar procedure, a simple expression for the computation of the angular acceleration of the end-platform, with respect to the translational platform, is easily derived. Naturally, as an intermediate step, this contribution also provides the forward and inverse velocity analyses of the chosen parallel-serial manipulator. Finally, in order to prove the versatility of the expressions obtained via screw theory for solving the kinematics, up to the acceleration analysis, of the proposed spatial mechanism, a numerical example is solved with the help of commercial computer codes

  10. I Move, therefore I am - A Comment on "The Importance of Sensing One's Movements in the World for the Sense of Personal Identity" by Haselager, Broens, & Quilici Gonzalez

    Sandro Nannini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The position taken by Haselager, Broens and Quilici Gonzalez in The Importance of Sensing One’s Movements in the World for the Sense of Personal Identity consists in three fundamental theses which can be summarized as follows: (1 The fundamental core of human self-consciousness is not language or thought but the body sense; (2 The traditional dichotomy between external and internal senses is false; (3 There is no prominence of the brain over the rest of the body with regard to the sense of identity that every human being has. This paper aims at showing that – while thesis (1 is perfectly convincing - theses (2 and (3 must be revisited in part since they are too committed to the kind of anti-representationalism proposed by Brooks. In fact, several experimental findings (see above all the vestibulo-ocular reflex show – in contrast to (2 – that the brain distinguishes even at a purely perceptual level between self and external world. Moreover, while other experiments do confirm the “importance”of the body for cognition and the steady interaction between the brain and the body including for the execution of cognitive tasks, they also show – in contrast to (3 – that the influence of bodily movement on the associative areas of the cortex is not directly due to the motor schemata that direct bodily movements but to “higher” brain representations of actions each of which can be executed by different motor schemata.

  11. Posterior cervical spine arthrodesis with laminar screws. A report of two cases

    Nakanishi, Kazuo; Tanaka, Masato; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2007-01-01

    We performed fixation using laminar screws in 2 patients in whom lateral mass screws, pedicle screws or transarticular screws could not be inserted. One was a 56-year-old woman who had anterior atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS). When a guide wire was inserted using an imaging guide, the hole bled massively. We thought the re-insertion of a guide wire or screw would thus increase the risk of vascular injury, so we used laminar screws. The other case was an 18-year-old man who had a hangman fracture. Preoperative magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion of the left vertebral artery. A laminar screw was inserted into the patent side (i.e., the right side of C2). Cervical pedicle screws are the most biomechanically stable screws. However, their use carries a high risk of neurovascular complications during screw insertion, because the cervical pedicle is small and is adjacent laterally to the vertebral artery, medially to the spinal cord, and vertically to the nerve roots. Lateral mass screws are also reported to involve a risk of neurovascular injuries. The laminar screw method was thus thought to be useful, since arterial injuries could thus be avoided and it could also be used as a salvage modality for the previous misinsertion. (author)

  12. Stress and stability of plate-screw fixation and screw fixation in the treatment of Schatzker type IV medial tibial plateau fracture: a comparative finite element study.

    Huang, Xiaowei; Zhi, Zhongzheng; Yu, Baoqing; Chen, Fancheng

    2015-11-25

    The purpose of this study is to compare the stress and stability of plate-screw fixation and screw fixation in the treatment of Schatzker type IV medial tibial plateau fracture. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the medial tibial plateau fracture (Schatzker type IV fracture) was created. An axial force of 2500 N with a distribution of 60% to the medial compartment was applied to simulate the axial compressive load on an adult knee during single-limb stance. The equivalent von Mises stress, displacement of the model relative to the distal tibia, and displacement of the implants were used as the output measures. The mean stress value of the plate-screw fixation system was 18.78 MPa, which was significantly (P stress value of the triangular fragment in the plate-screw fixation system model was 42.04 MPa, which was higher than that in the screw fixation model (24.18 MPa). But the mean stress of the triangular fractured fragment in the screw fixation model was significantly higher in terms of equivalent von Mises stress (EVMS), x-axis, and z-axis (P < 0.001). This study demonstrated that the load transmission mechanism between plate-screw fixation system and screw fixation system was different and the stability provided by the plate-screw fixation system was superior to the screw fixation system.

  13. The effect of different screw-rod design on the anti-rotational torque: a biomechanical comparison of three conventional screw-rod constructs.

    Huang, Zifang; Wang, Chongwen; Fan, Hengwei; Sui, Wenyuan; Li, Xueshi; Wang, Qifei; Yang, Junlin

    2017-07-28

    Screw-rod constructs have been widely used to correct spinal deformities, but the effects of different screw-rod systems on anti-rotational torque have not been determined. This study aimed to analyze the biomechanical effect of different rod-screw constructs on anti-rotational torque. Three conventional spinal screw-rod systems (Legacy, RF-F-10 and USSII) were used to test the anti-rotational torque in the material test machine. ANOVA was performed to evaluate the anti-rotational capacity of different pedicle screws-rod constructs. The anti-rotational torque of Legacy group, RF-F-10 group and USSII group were 12.3 ± 1.9 Nm, 6.8 ± 0.4 Nm, and 3.9 ± 0.8 Nm, with a P value lower than 0.05. This results indicated that the Legacy screws-rod construct could provide a highest anti-rotation capacity, which is 68% and 210% greater than RF-F-10 screw-rod construct and USSII screw-rod respectively. The anti-rotational torque may be mainly affected by screw cap and groove design. Our result showed the anti-rotational torque are: Legacy system > RF-F-10 system > USSII system, suggesting that appropriate rod-screw constructs selection in surgery may be vital for anti-rotational torque improvement and preventing derotation correction loss.

  14. The improvement of screw compressor performance using a newly developed rotor profile

    Kishi, Takayuki; Nishio, Toshio; Matsui, Akira; Ino, Nobumi

    1994-01-01

    An oil-compression phenomenon occurs at two portions of a conventional oil injected screw compressor that degrades the isothermal efficiency of the screw compressor. Hence a new screw rotor profile and lubricant have been developed in order to avoid the above oil-compression phenomena. Mycom and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory have measured the performance of a new Mycom compound type screw compressor 2016C using the new profile rotors and the new lubricant. In the experiments, a 33% enhancement rate in the isothermal efficiency of the new screw compressor installed in Fermilab was achieved

  15. A technique for the management of screw access opening in cement-retained implant restorations

    Hamid Kermanshah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Abutment screw loosening has been considered as a common complication of implant-supported dental prostheses. This problem is more important in cement-retained implant restorations due to their invisible position of the screw access opening. Case Report: This report describes a modified retrievability method for cement-retained implant restorations in the event of abutment screw loosening. The screw access opening was marked with ceramic stain and its porcelain surface was treated using hydrofluoric acid (HF, silane, and adhesive to bond to composite resin. Discussion: The present modified technique facilitates screw access opening and improves the bond between the porcelain and composite resin.

  16. Covering the screw-access holes of implant restorations in the esthetic zone: a clinical report.

    Abolfazl Saboury

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Screw-retained implant restorations have an advantage of predictable retention as well as retrievability, and obviate the risk of excessive sub-gingival cement commonly associated with cement retained implant restorations. Screw-retained restorations generally have screw access holes, which can compromise esthetics and weaken the porcelain around the holes. The purpose of this study is to describe the use of a separate overcasting crown design to cover the screw access hole of implant screw-retained prosthesis for improved esthetics.

  17. A rationale method for evaluating unscrewing torque values of prosthetic screws in dental implants

    Felipe Miguel Saliba

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Previous studies that evaluated the torque needed for removing dental implant screws have not considered the manner of transfer of the occlusal loads in clinical settings. Instead, the torque used for removal was applied directly to the screw, and most of them omitted the possibility that the hexagon could limit the action of the occlusal load in the loosening of the screws. The present study proposes a method for evaluating the screw removal torque in an anti-rotational device independent way, creating an unscrewing load transfer to the entire assembly, not only to the screw. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty hexagonal abutments without the hexagon in their bases were fixed with a screw to 20 dental implants. They were divided into two groups: Group 1 used titanium screws and Group 2 used titanium screws covered with a solid lubricant. A torque of 32 Ncm was applied to the screw and then a custom-made wrench was used for rotating the abutment counterclockwise, to loosen the screw. A digital torque meter recorded the torque required to loosen the abutment. RESULTS: There was a significant difference between the means of Group 1 (38.62±6.43 Ncm and Group 2 (48.47±5.04 Ncm, with p=0.001. CONCLUSION: This methodology was effective in comparing unscrewing torque values of the implant-abutment junction even with a limited sample size. It confirmed a previously shown significant difference between two types of screws.

  18. Mechanical comparison between lengthened and short sacroiliac screws in sacral fracture fixation: a finite element analysis.

    Zhao, Y; Zhang, S; Sun, T; Wang, D; Lian, W; Tan, J; Zou, D; Zhao, Y

    2013-09-01

    To compare the stability of lengthened sacroiliac screw and standard sacroiliac screw for the treatment of unilateral vertical sacral fractures; to provide reference for clinical applications. A finite element model of Tile type C pelvic ring injury (unilateral Denis type II fracture of the sacrum) was produced. The unilateral sacral fractures were fixed with lengthened sacroiliac screw and sacroiliac screw in six different types of models respectively. The translation and angle displacement of the superior surface of the sacrum (in standing position on both feet) were measured and compared. The stability of one lengthened sacroiliac screw fixation in S1 or S2 segment is superior to that of one sacroiliac screw fixation in the same sacral segment. The stability of one lengthened sacroiliac screw fixation in S1 and S2 segments respectively is superior to that of one sacroiliac screw fixation in S1 and S2 segments respectively. The stability of one lengthened sacroiliac screw fixation in S1 and S2 segments respectively is superior to that of one lengthened sacroiliac screw fixation in S1 or S2 segment. The stability of one sacroiliac screw fixation in S1 and S2 segments respectively is markedly superior to that of one sacroiliac screw fixation in S1 or S2 segment. The vertical and rotational stability of lengthened sacroiliac screw fixation and sacroiliac screw fixation in S2 is superior to that of S1. In a finite element model of type C pelvic ring disruption, S1 and S2 lengthened sacroiliac screws should be utilized for the fixation as regularly as possible and the most stable fixation is the combination of the lengthened sacroiliac screws of S1 and S2 segments. Even if lengthened sacroiliac screws cannot be systematically used due to specific conditions, one sacroiliac screw fixation in S1 and S2 segments respectively is recommended. No matter which kind of sacroiliac screw is used, if only one screw can be implanted, the fixation in S2 segment is more recommended

  19. A Biomechanical Analysis of 2 Constructs for Metacarpal Spiral Fracture Fixation in a Cadaver Model: 2 Large Screws Versus 3 Small Screws.

    Eu-Jin Cheah, Andre; Behn, Anthony W; Comer, Garet; Yao, Jeffrey

    2017-12-01

    Surgeons confronted with a long spiral metacarpal fracture may choose to fix it solely with lagged screws. A biomechanical analysis of a metacarpal spiral fracture model was performed to determine whether 3 1.5-mm screws or 2 2.0-mm screws provided more stability during bending and torsional loading. Second and third metacarpals were harvested from 12 matched pairs of fresh-frozen cadaveric hands and spiral fractures were created. One specimen from each matched pair was fixed with 2 2.0-mm lagged screws whereas the other was fixed with 3 1.5-mm lagged screws. Nine pairs underwent combined cyclic cantilever bending and axial compressive loading followed by loading to failure. Nine additional pairs were subjected to cyclic external rotation while under a constant axial compressive load and were subsequently externally rotated to failure under a constant axial compressive load. Paired t tests were used to compare cyclic creep, stiffness, displacement, rotation, and peak load levels. Average failure torque for all specimens was 7.2 ± 1.7 Nm. In cyclic torsional testing, the group with 2 screws exhibited significantly less rotational creep than the one with 3 screws. A single specimen in the group with 2 screws failed before cyclic bending tests were completed. No other significant differences were found between test groups during torsional or bending tests. Both constructs were biomechanically similar except that the construct with 2 screws displayed significantly less loosening during torsional cyclic loading, although the difference was small and may not be clinically meaningful. Because we found no obvious biomechanical advantage to using 3 1.5-mm lagged screws to fix long spiral metacarpal fractures, the time efficiency and decreased implant costs of using 2-2.0 mm lagged screws may be preferred. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A CFD study of Screw Compressor Motor Cooling Analysis

    Branch, S.

    2017-08-01

    Screw compressors use electric motors to drive the male screw rotor. They are cooled by the suction refrigerant vapor that flows around the motor. The thermal conditions of the motor can dramatically influence the performance and reliability of the compressor. The more optimized this flow path is, the better the motor performance. For that reason it is important to understand the flow characteristics around the motor and the motor temperatures. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to provide a detailed analysis of the refrigerant’s flow behavior and motor temperatures to identify the undesirable hot spots in the motor. CFD analysis can be used further to optimize the flow path and determine the reduction of hot spots and cooling effect. This study compares the CFD solutions of a motor cooling model to a motor installed with thermocouples measured in the lab. The compressor considered for this study is an R134a screw compressor. The CFD simulation of the motor consists of a detailed breakdown of the stator and rotor components. Orthotropic thermal conductivity material properties are used to represent the simplified motor geometry. In addition, the analysis includes the motor casings of the compressor to draw heat away from the motor by conduction. The study will look at different operating conditions and motor speeds. Finally, the CFD study will investigate the predicted motor temperature change by varying the vapor mass flow rates and motor speed. Recommendations for CFD modeling of such intricate heat transfer phenomenon have thus been proposed.

  1. Do screws and screw holes affect osteolysis in cementless cups using highly crosslinked polyethylene? A 7 to 10-year follow-up case-control study.

    Taniguchi, N; Jinno, T; Takada, R; Koga, D; Ando, T; Okawa, A; Haro, H

    2018-05-01

    The use of screws and the presence of screw holes may cause acetabular osteolysis and implant loosening in cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) using conventional polyethylene. In contrast, this issue is not fully understood using highly crosslinked polyethylene (HXLPE), particularly in large comparative study. Therefore, we performed a case-control study to assess the influence of screw usage and screw holes on: (1) implant fixation and osteolysis and (2) polyethylene steady-state wear rate, using cases with HXLPE liners followed up for 7-10 years postoperatively. The screw usage and screw holes adversely affect the implant fixation and incidence of wear-related osteolysis in THA with HXLPE. We reviewed 209 primary cementless THAs performed with 26-mm cobalt-chromium heads on HXLPE liners. To compare the effects of the use of screws and the presence of screw holes, the following groups were established: (1) with-screw (n=140); (2) without-screw (n=69); (3) no-hole (n=27) and (4) group in which a cup with screw holes, but no screw was used (n=42). Two adjunct groups (no-hole cups excluded) were established to compare the differences in the two types of HXLPE: (5) remelted group (n=100) and (6) annealed group (n=82). Implant stability and osteolysis were evaluated by plain radiography and computed tomography. The wear rate from 1 year to the final evaluation was measured using plain X-rays and PolyWare Digital software. All cups and stems achieved bony fixation. On CT-scan, no acetabular osteolysis was found, but there were 3 cases with a small area of femoral osteolysis. The mean steady-state wear rate of each group was (1) 0.031±0.022, (2) 0.033±0.035, (3) 0.031±0.024, (4) 0.029±0.018, (5) 0.030±0.018 and (6) 0.034±0.023mm/year, respectively. A comparison of the effects of screw usage or screw holes found no significant between-group differences in the implant stability, prevalence of osteolysis [no acetabular osteolysis and 3/209 at femoral side (1

  2. Process and device for the ultrasonic testing of slotted screws screwed into a head of a nuclear reactor fuel element for cracks

    Scharpenberg, R.

    1986-01-01

    To achieve correct echo signals, a test head is set separately on each area limited by a slot of the top of the slotted screw and the screw head is ultrasonically sounded in the direction of the suspected cracks. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Pedicle Screw Insertion Accuracy Using O-Arm, Robotic Guidance, or Freehand Technique: A Comparative Study.

    Laudato, Pietro Aniello; Pierzchala, Katarzyna; Schizas, Constantin

    2018-03-15

    A retrospective radiological study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of pedicle screw insertion using O-Arm navigation, robotic assistance, or a freehand fluoroscopic technique. Pedicle screw insertion using either "O-Arm" navigation or robotic devices is gaining popularity. Although several studies are available evaluating each of those techniques separately, no direct comparison has been attempted. Eighty-four patients undergoing implantation of 569 lumbar and thoracic screws were divided into three groups. Eleven patients (64 screws) had screws inserted using robotic assistance, 25 patients (191 screws) using the O-arm, while 48 patients (314 screws) had screws inserted using lateral fluoroscopy in a freehand technique. A single experienced spine surgeon assisted by a spinal fellow performed all procedures. Screw placement accuracy was assessed by two independent observers on postoperative computed tomography (CTs) according to the A to D Rampersaud criteria. No statistically significant difference was noted between the three groups. About 70.4% of screws in the freehand group, 69.6% in the O arm group, and 78.8% in the robotic group were placed completely within the pedicle margins (grade A) (P > 0.05). About 6.4% of screws were considered misplaced (grades C&D) in the freehand group, 4.2% in the O-arm group, and 4.7% in the robotic group (P > 0.05). The spinal fellow inserted screws with the same accuracy as the senior surgeon (P > 0.05). The advent of new technologies does not appear to alter accuracy of screw placement in our setting. Under supervision, spinal fellows might perform equally well to experienced surgeons using new tools. The lack of difference in accuracy does not imply that the above-mentioned techniques have no added advantages. Other issues, such as surgeon/patient radiation, fiddle factor, teaching suitability, etc., outside the scope of our present study, need further assessment. 3.

  4. A reactor study on a belt-shaped screw pinch

    Bustraan, M.; Franken, W.M.P.; Klippel, H.Th.; Veringa, H.J.; Verschuur, K.A.

    1979-10-01

    A previous study on a screw-pinch reactor with circular cross section (ECN-16 (1977) or Rijnhuizen report 77-101) has been extended to a belt configuration which allows to raise β to 0.5. The present study starts from the main assumptions and principal constraints of the previous work, but some technical aspects are treated more realistically. More attention has been paid to the modular construction, the non-uniform distribution of the wall loading, the thermo-hydraulics, the design of and the losses in the coil systems, and the energy storage and electric transmission systems. A potential use of the first wall of the blanket as part of the implosion coil system is suggested. Finally, a conceptual design of a reactor, with a cost estimate is given. Numerical results are given of parameter variations around the values for the reference reactor. The belt screw-pinch reactor with resistive coils turns out to be uneconomical because of its low net efficiency and its high capital costs. The application of superconducting coils to reduce the ohmic losses turns out to be a non-viable alternative. A more promising way to improve the energy balance seems to be the alternative scheme of fuel injection during the burn

  5. In Vivo Evaluation of Immediately Loaded Stainless Steel and Titanium Orthodontic Screws in a Growing Bone

    Gritsch, Kerstin; Laroche, Norbert; Bonnet, Jeanne-Marie; Exbrayat, Patrick; Morgon, Laurent; Rabilloud, Muriel; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The present work intends to evaluate the use of immediate loaded orthodontic screws in a growing model, and to study the specific bone response. Thirty-two screws (half of stainless steel and half of titanium) were inserted in the alveolar bone of 8 growing pigs. The devices were immediately loaded with a 100 g orthodontic force. Two loading periods were assessed: 4 and 12 weeks. Both systems of screws were clinically assessed. Histological observations and histomorphometric analysis evaluate...

  6. A novel magnetic lead screw active suspension system for vehicles

    Berg, Nick Ilsø; Holm, Rasmus Koldborg; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    2014-01-01

    This paper encompasses a detailed study of the redesign of a novel Magnetic Lead Screw (MLS) active suspension system for possible regeneration of the energy dispatched in the suspension system and active control of vehicle body movement. The MLS converts a low speed high force linear motion...... of a translator into a high speed low torque rotational motion of a rotor through helically shaped magnets. The paper describes the drawback of the first MLS prototype v1.0 developed for active suspension system, which lead to a new design of the MLS prototype named v1.5. Furthermore the paper introduces detailed...

  7. Biomechanical comparison of 3.0 mm headless compression screw and 3.5 mm cortical bone screw in a canine humeral condylar fracture model.

    Gonsalves, Mishka N; Jankovits, Daniel A; Huber, Michael L; Strom, Adam M; Garcia, Tanya C; Stover, Susan M

    2016-09-20

    To compare the biomechanical properties of simulated humeral condylar fractures reduced with one of two screw fixation methods: 3.0 mm headless compression screw (HCS) or 3.5 mm cortical bone screw (CBS) placed in lag fashion. Bilateral humeri were collected from nine canine cadavers. Standardized osteotomies were stabilized with 3.0 mm HCS in one limb and 3.5 mm CBS in the contralateral limb. Condylar fragments were loaded to walk, trot, and failure loads while measuring construct properties and condylar fragment motion. The 3.5 mm CBS-stabilized constructs were 36% stiffer than 3.0 mm HCS-stabilized constructs, but differences were not apparent in quality of fracture reduction nor in yield loads, which exceeded expected physiological loads during rehabilitation. Small residual fragment displacements were not different between CBS and HCS screws. Small fragment rotation was not significantly different between screws, but was weakly correlated with moment arm length (R² = 0.25). A CBS screw placed in lag fashion provides stiffer fixation than an HCS screw, although both screws provide similar anatomical reduction and yield strength to condylar fracture fixation in adult canine humeri.

  8. Range of motion, sacral screw and rod strain in long posterior spinal constructs: a biomechanical comparison between S2 alar iliac screws with traditional fixation strategies.

    Sutterlin, Chester E; Field, Antony; Ferrara, Lisa A; Freeman, Andrew L; Phan, Kevin

    2016-12-01

    S1 screw failure and L5/S1 non-union are issues with long fusions to S1. Improved construct stiffness and S1 screw offloading can help avoid this. S2AI screws have shown to provide similar stiffness to iliac screws when added to L3-S1 constructs. We sought to examine and compare the biomechanical effects on an L2-S1 pedicle screw construct of adding S2AI screws, AxiaLIF, L5-S1 interbody support via transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), and to examine the effect of the addition of cross connectors to each of these constructs. Two S1 screws and one rod with strain gauges (at L5/S1) were used in L2-S1 screw-rod constructs in 7 L1-pelvis specimens (two with low BMD). ROM, S1 screw and rod strain were assessed using a pure-moment flexibility testing protocol. Specimens were tested intact, and then in five instrumentation states consisting of: (I) Pedicle screws (PS) L2-S1; (II) PS + S2AI screws; (III) PS + TLIF L5/S1; (IV) PS + AxiaLIF L5/S1; (V) PS + S2AI + AxiaLIF L5/S1. The five instrumentation conditions were also tested with crosslinks at L2/3 and S1/2. Tests were conducted in flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial torsion with no compressive preload. S2A1 produces reduced S1 screw strain for flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial torsion, as well as reduced rod strain in lateral bending and axial torsion in comparison to AxiaLIF and interbody instrumentation, at the expense of increased rod flexion-extension strain. Cross-connectors may have a role in further reduction of S1 screw and rod strain. From a biomechanical standpoint, the use of the S2AI technique is at least equivalent to traditional iliac screws, but offers lower prominence and ease of assembly compared to conventional sacroiliac stabilization.

  9. Pyrolysis of Rubber in a Screw Reactor

    Lozhechnik, A. V.; Savchin, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    On the basis of an analysis of thermal methods described in the literature and from the results of experimental investigations of steam conversion, the authors have developed and created a facility for thermal processing of rubber waste. Rubber crumb was used as the raw material; the temperature in the reactor was 500°C; nitrogen, steam, and a mixture of light hydrocarbons (noncondensable part of pyrolysis products) represented the working medium. The pyrolysis yielded 36-38% of a solid fraction, 54-56% of a liquid hydrocarbon fraction, and 6-9% of noncondensable gases. Changes in the composition of the gas mixture have been determined at different stages of processing. Gas chromatography of pyrolysis gases has shown that the basic gases produced by pyrolysis are H2 and hydrocarbons C2H4, C3H6, C3H8, C4H8, C2H6, C3H6O2, and C4H10, and a small amount of H2S, CO, and CO2. Noncondensable gases will be used as a fuel to heat the reactor and to implement the process.

  10. Ipsilateral proximal femur and shaft fractures treated with hip screws and a reamed retrograde intramedullary nail.

    Ostrum, Robert F; Tornetta, Paul; Watson, J Tracy; Christiano, Anthony; Vafek, Emily

    2014-09-01

    Although not common, proximal femoral fractures associated with ipsilateral shaft fractures present a difficult management problem. A variety of surgical options have been employed with varying results. We investigated the use of hip screws and a reamed retrograde intramedullary (IM) nail for the treatment of this combined fracture pattern in terms of postoperative alignment (malunion), nonunion, and complications. Between May 2002 and October 2011, a total of 95 proximal femoral fractures with associated shaft fractures were treated at three participating Level 1 trauma centers; all were treated with hip screw fixation (cannulated screws or sliding hip screws) and retrograde reamed IM nails. The medical records of these patients were reviewed retrospectively for alignment, malunion, nonunion, and complications. Followup was available on 92 of 95 (97%) of the patients treated with hip screws and a retrograde nail. Forty were treated with a sliding hip screw, and 52 were treated with cannulated screws. There were five proximal malunions in this series (5%). The union rate was 98% (90 of 92) for the femoral neck fractures and 91.3% (84 of 92) for the femoral shaft fractures after the initial surgery. There were two nonunions of comminuted femoral neck fractures after cannulated screw fixation. There was no difference in femoral neck union or alignment when comparing cannulated screws to a sliding hip screw. Four open comminuted femoral shaft fractures went on to nonunion and required secondary surgery to obtain union, and one patient developed symptomatic avascular necrosis. The treatment of ipsilateral proximal femoral neck and shaft fractures with hip screw fixation and a reamed retrograde nail demonstrated a high likelihood of union for the femoral neck fractures and a low risk of malunion. Comminution and initial displacement of the proximal femoral fracture may still lead to a small incidence of malunion or nonunion, and open comminuted femoral shaft fractures

  11. Fate of the syndesmotic screw--Search for a prudent solution.

    Kaftandziev, Igor; Spasov, Marko; Trpeski, Simon; Zafirova-Ivanovska, Beti; Bakota, Bore

    2015-11-01

    Ankle fractures are common injuries. Since the recognition of the importance of syndesmotic injury in ankle fractures, much of the scientific work has been focused on concomitant syndesmotic injury. Despite the invention of novel devices for restoration and maintenance of the congruent syndesmosis following syndesmotic injury, the metallic syndesmotic screw is still considered to be the "gold standard". The aim of this study was to compare the clinical results in patients who retained the syndesmosis screw with those in whom the screw was removed following open reduction and internal fixation of the malleolar fracture associated with syndesmosis disruption. This was a retrospective study of 82 patients. Minimum follow-up was 12 months. Clinical evaluation included American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for patient general satisfaction. The condition of the screw (removed, intact or broken), presence of radiolucency around the syndesmotic screw and the tibiofibular clear space were recorded using final follow-up radiographs. Three cortices were engaged in 66 patients (80%) and quadricortical fixation was performed in the remaining 16 patients (20%). The number of engaged cortices did not correlate with the clinical outcome and screw fracture. A single syndesmotic screw was used in 71 patients (86%. The mean AOFAS score in the group with intact screw (I) was 83; the scores in the group with broken screw (B) and removed screw (R) were 92.5 and 85.5, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between the three groups: this was due to the difference between groups I and B; the difference between groups I and R and groups B and R were not statistically significant. There were no statistically significant differences in VAS results. There were no statistically significant differences in clinical outcome between the group with the screw retained and the group in which the screw was removed; however, the

  12. Treating Simple Tibia Fractures with Poly-DL-Lactic Acid Screw as a ...

    Purpose: To investigate the curative effect of poly-DL-lactic acid (PDLLA) absorbable screw as a locked intramedullary nail for simple tibia fractures. Methods: In this study, 35 patients treated with the PDLLA screw were observed, and another 35 patients treated with a traditional locking intramedullary nail were treated as ...

  13. The accuracy and safety of fluoroscopically guided percutaneous pedicle screws in the lumbosacral junction and the lumbar spine: a review of 880 screws.

    Chiu, C K; Kwan, M K; Chan, C Y W; Schaefer, C; Hansen-Algenstaedt, N

    2015-08-01

    We undertook a retrospective study investigating the accuracy and safety of percutaneous pedicle screws placed under fluoroscopic guidance in the lumbosacral junction and lumbar spine. The CT scans of patients were chosen from two centres: European patients from University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany, and Asian patients from the University of Malaya, Malaysia. Screw perforations were classified into grades 0, 1, 2 and 3. A total of 880 percutaneous pedicle screws from 203 patients were analysed: 614 screws from 144 European patients and 266 screws from 59 Asian patients. The mean age of the patients was 58.8 years (16 to 91) and there were 103 men and 100 women. The total rate of perforation was 9.9% (87 screws) with 7.4% grade 1, 2.0% grade 2 and 0.5% grade 3 perforations. The rate of perforation in Europeans was 10.4% and in Asians was 8.6%, with no significant difference between the two (p = 0.42). The rate of perforation was the highest in S1 (19.4%) followed by L5 (14.9%). The accuracy and safety of percutaneous pedicle screw placement are comparable to those cited in the literature for the open method of pedicle screw placement. Greater caution must be taken during the insertion of L5 and S1 percutaneous pedicle screws owing to their more angulated pedicles, the anatomical variations in their vertebral bodies and the morphology of the spinal canal at this location. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  14. Screw-System-Based Mobility Analysis of a Family of Fully Translational Parallel Manipulators

    Ernesto Rodriguez-Leal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the mobility of a family of fully translational parallel manipulators based on screw system analysis by identifying the common constraint and redundant constraints, providing a case study of this approach. The paper presents the branch motion-screws for the 3-RP̲C-Y parallel manipulator, the 3-RCC-Y (or 3-RP̲RC-Y parallel manipulator, and a newly proposed 3-RP̲C-T parallel manipulator. Then the paper determines the sets of platform constraint-screws for each of these three manipulators. The constraints exerted on the platforms of the 3-RP̲C architectures and the 3-RCC-Y manipulators are analyzed using the screw system approach and have been identified as couples. A similarity has been identified with the axes of couples: they are perpendicular to the R joint axes, but in the former the axes are coplanar with the base and in the latter the axes are perpendicular to the limb. The remaining couples act about the axis that is normal to the base. The motion-screw system and constraint-screw system analysis leads to the insightful understanding of the mobility of the platform that is then obtained by determining the reciprocal screws to the platform constraint screw sets, resulting in three independent instantaneous translational degrees-of-freedom. To validate the mobility analysis of the three parallel manipulators, the paper includes motion simulations which use a commercially available kinematics software.

  15. Percutaneous Intramedullary Screw Fixation of Distal Fibula Fractures: A Case Series and Systematic Review

    Loukachov, Vladimir V.; Birnie, Merel F. N.; Dingemans, Siem A.; de Jong, Vincent M.; Schepers, Tim

    2017-01-01

    The current reference standard for unstable ankle fractures is open reduction and internal fixation using a plate and lag screws. This approach requires extensive dissection and wound complications are not uncommon. The use of intramedullary screw fixation might overcome these issues. The aim of our

  16. Accuracy of navigated pedicle screw insertion by a junior spine surgeon without spinal surgery experience

    Yamazaki, Hironori; Kotani, Toshiaki; Motegi, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Tetsuharu; Koshi, Takana; Nagahara, Ken; Minami, Syohei

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate pedicle screw placement accuracy during navigated surgery by a junior spine surgeon who had no spinal surgery experience. A junior spine surgeon with no spinal surgery experience implanted a total of 137 pedicle screws by using a navigation system. Postoperative computerized tomography was performed to evaluate screw placement, and the pedicle perforation rate was 2.2%. There were no neurologic or vascular complications related to the pedicle screws. The results demonstrated that pedicle screws can be placed safely and effectively by a junior spine surgeon who has no spinal surgery experience when instructed by a senior spine surgeon. The results of this study suggest that navigation can be used as a surgical training tool for junior spine surgeons. (author)

  17. Flow and pressure characteristics within a screw compressor

    Guerrato, D.; Nouri, J. M.; Stosic, N.; Arcoumanis, C.

    2007-10-01

    The angle-resolved mean and turbulence characteristics of the axial air flow inside a screw compressor with both male and female rotors have been measured, using a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) with high spatial and temporal resolution at different radial and axial locations for speeds of 800-1600 rpm, discharge pressures of 1-1.6 bar and discharge temperatures of 33-90°C. The velocity measurements were performed through a special transparent window fixed near the discharge port. The results confirmed the ability of the LDV technique to characterise the flow inside the compressor working chamber; an angular resolution of 1.5° was able to fully describe the velocity field within the machine. The flow variation between the different working chambers was established as well as the spatial variation of the axial mean velocity and turbulence velocity fluctuation within the working chamber. The effect of discharge port opening on the axial mean and RMS velocities was found to be significant near the leading edge of the rotors causing an increase in the mean and RMS velocities of the order of 4.2Vp in mean (where Vp is the axial pitched velocity) for male rotor and 5.4Vp for, female rotor and this effect is less pronounced on the flow near the root of the rotor. Moreover, to obtain a better understanding of the flow motion, a high sampling rate pressure transducer was used to provide the internal angular static pressure variation. These measurements are used to validate the in-house CFD model of the fluid flow within twin screw compressors which, in turn, allows reliable optimisation of various compressor designs.

  18. Flow and pressure characteristics within a screw compressor

    Guerrato, D; Nouri, J M; Stosic, N; Arcoumanis, C [Centre for Energy and the Environment, School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, Northampton Square, London, EC1V OHB (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    The angle-resolved mean and turbulence characteristics of the axial air flow inside a screw compressor with both male and female rotors have been measured, using a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) with high spatial and temporal resolution at different radial and axial locations for speeds of 800-1600 rpm, discharge pressures of 1-1.6 bar and discharge temperatures of 33-90{sup 0}C. The velocity measurements were performed through a special transparent window fixed near the discharge port. The results confirmed the ability of the LDV technique to characterise the flow inside the compressor working chamber; an angular resolution of 1.5{sup 0} was able to fully describe the velocity field within the machine. The flow variation between the different working chambers was established as well as the spatial variation of the axial mean velocity and turbulence velocity fluctuation within the working chamber. The effect of discharge port opening on the axial mean and RMS velocities was found to be significant near the leading edge of the rotors causing an increase in the mean and RMS velocities of the order of 4.2V{sub p} in mean (where V{sub p} is the axial pitched velocity) for male rotor and 5.4V{sub p} for, female rotor and this effect is less pronounced on the flow near the root of the rotor. Moreover, to obtain a better understanding of the flow motion, a high sampling rate pressure transducer was used to provide the internal angular static pressure variation. These measurements are used to validate the in-house CFD model of the fluid flow within twin screw compressors which, in turn, allows reliable optimisation of various compressor designs.

  19. Flow and pressure characteristics within a screw compressor

    Guerrato, D; Nouri, J M; Stosic, N; Arcoumanis, C

    2007-01-01

    The angle-resolved mean and turbulence characteristics of the axial air flow inside a screw compressor with both male and female rotors have been measured, using a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) with high spatial and temporal resolution at different radial and axial locations for speeds of 800-1600 rpm, discharge pressures of 1-1.6 bar and discharge temperatures of 33-90 0 C. The velocity measurements were performed through a special transparent window fixed near the discharge port. The results confirmed the ability of the LDV technique to characterise the flow inside the compressor working chamber; an angular resolution of 1.5 0 was able to fully describe the velocity field within the machine. The flow variation between the different working chambers was established as well as the spatial variation of the axial mean velocity and turbulence velocity fluctuation within the working chamber. The effect of discharge port opening on the axial mean and RMS velocities was found to be significant near the leading edge of the rotors causing an increase in the mean and RMS velocities of the order of 4.2V p in mean (where V p is the axial pitched velocity) for male rotor and 5.4V p for, female rotor and this effect is less pronounced on the flow near the root of the rotor. Moreover, to obtain a better understanding of the flow motion, a high sampling rate pressure transducer was used to provide the internal angular static pressure variation. These measurements are used to validate the in-house CFD model of the fluid flow within twin screw compressors which, in turn, allows reliable optimisation of various compressor designs

  20. Routine versus on demand removal of the syndesmotic screw; a protocol for an international randomised controlled trial (RODEO-trial)

    Dingemans, S. A.; Birnie, M. F. N.; Sanders, F. R. K.; van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; Backes, M.; van Beeck, E.; Bloemers, F. W.; van Dijkman, B.; Flikweert, E.; Haverkamp, D.; Holtslag, H. R.; Hoogendoorn, J. M.; Joosse, P.; Parkkinen, M.; Roukema, G.; Sosef, N.; Twigt, B. A.; van Veen, R. N.; van der Veen, A. H.; Vermeulen, J.; Winkelhagen, J.; van der Zwaard, B. C.; van Dieren, S.; Goslings, J. C.; Schepers, T.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Syndesmotic injuries are common and their incidence is rising. In case of surgical fixation of the syndesmosis a metal syndesmotic screw is used most often. It is however unclear whether this screw needs to be removed routinely after the syndesmosis has healed. Traditionally the screw is

  1. Cement Augmentation in Sacroiliac Screw Fixation Offers Modest Biomechanical Advantages in a Cadaver Model.

    Osterhoff, Georg; Dodd, Andrew E; Unno, Florence; Wong, Angus; Amiri, Shahram; Lefaivre, Kelly A; Guy, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    Sacroiliac screw fixation in elderly patients with pelvic fractures is prone to failure owing to impaired bone quality. Cement augmentation has been proposed as a possible solution, because in other anatomic areas this has been shown to reduce screw loosening. However, to our knowledge, this has not been evaluated for sacroiliac screws. We investigated the potential biomechanical benefit of cement augmentation of sacroiliac screw fixation in a cadaver model of osteoporotic bone, specifically with respect to screw loosening, construct survival, and fracture-site motion. Standardized complete sacral ala fractures with intact posterior ligaments in combination with ipsilateral upper and lower pubic rami fractures were created in osteoporotic cadaver pelves and stabilized by three fixation techniques: sacroiliac (n = 5) with sacroiliac screws in S1 and S2, cemented (n = 5) with addition of cement augmentation, and transsacral (n = 5) with a single transsacral screw in S1. A cyclic loading protocol was applied with torque (1.5 Nm) and increasing axial force (250-750 N). Screw loosening, construct survival, and sacral fracture-site motion were measured by optoelectric motion tracking. A sample-size calculation revealed five samples per group to be required to achieve a power of 0.80 to detect 50% reduction in screw loosening. Screw motion in relation to the sacrum during loading with 250 N/1.5 Nm was not different among the three groups (sacroiliac: 1.2 mm, range, 0.6-1.9; cemented: 0.7 mm, range, 0.5-1.3; transsacral: 1.1 mm, range, 0.6-2.3) (p = 0.940). Screw subsidence was less in the cemented group (3.0 mm, range, 1.2-3.7) compared with the sacroiliac (5.7 mm, range, 4.7-10.4) or transsacral group (5.6 mm, range, 3.8-10.5) (p = 0.031). There was no difference with the numbers available in the median number of cycles needed until failure; this was 2921 cycles (range, 2586-5450) in the cemented group, 2570 cycles (range, 2500-5107) for the sacroiliac specimens, and

  2. scaphoid dimensions and appropriate screw sizes in a kenyan

    There were no side to side differences in the total length or the distal pole. Conclusion: Scaphoid screws .... gender differences in prehension may contribute to .... differences between males and females. Sports. Med Arthroscopy Review. 2002 ...

  3. Lag screw stabilization of a cervical vertebral fracture by use of computed tomography in a horse

    Barnes, H.G.; Tucker, R.L.; Grant, B.D.; Roberts, G.D.; Prades, M.

    1995-01-01

    A traumatic fracture of C2 was diagnosed radiographically in a 1-year-old German Warm-blood stallion. Fracture configuration was difficult to see on survey radiographs. Computed tomography yielded a more accurate assessment of the fracture and facilitated fracture repair with cortical lag screws. Precise screw placement, to avoid spinal cord damage, was obtained by use of computed tomography. Follow-up radiography revealed normal bone healing, and the horse was in dressage schooling 24 months after surgery

  4. Experimental results of single screw mechanical tests: a follow-up to SAND2005-6036.

    Lee, Sandwook; Lee, Kenneth L.; Korellis, John S.; McFadden, Sam X.

    2006-08-01

    The work reported here was conducted to address issues raised regarding mechanical testing of attachment screws described in SAND2005-6036, as well as to increase the understanding of screw behavior through additional testing. Efforts were made to evaluate fixture modifications and address issues of interest, including: fabrication of 45{sup o} test fixtures, measurement of the frictional load from the angled fixture guide, employment of electromechanical displacement transducers, development of a single-shear test, and study the affect of thread start orientation on single-shear behavior. A286 and 302HQ, No.10-32 socket-head cap screws were tested having orientations with respect to the primary loading axis of 0{sup 0}, 45{sup o}, 60{sup o}, 75{sup o} and 90{sup o} at stroke speeds 0,001 and 10 in/sec. The frictional load resulting from the angled screw fixture guide was insignificant. Load-displacement curves of A286 screws did not show a minimum value in displacement to failure (DTF) for 60{sup o} shear tests. Tests of 302HQ screws did not produce a consistent trend in DTF with load angle. The effect of displacement rate on DTF became larger as shear angle increased for both A286 and 302HQ screws.

  5. Investigation of a Ball Screw Feed Drive System Based on Dynamic Modeling for Motion Control

    Yi-Cheng Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the frequency response relationship between the ball screw nut preload, ball screw torsional stiffness variations and table mass effect for a single-axis feed drive system. Identification for the frequency response of an industrial ball screw drive system is very important for the precision motion when the vibration modes of the system are critical for controller design. In this study, there is translation and rotation modes of a ball screw feed drive system when positioning table is actuated by a servo motor. A lumped dynamic model to study the ball nut preload variation and torsional stiffness of the ball screw drive system is derived first. The mathematical modeling and numerical simulation provide the information of peak frequency response as the different levels of ball nut preload, ball screw torsional stiffness and table mass. The trend of increasing preload will indicate the abrupt peak change in frequency response spectrum analysis in some mode shapes. This study provides an approach to investigate the dynamic frequency response of a ball screw drive system, which provides significant information for better control performance when precise motion control is concerned.

  6. Factors influencing success of cement versus screw-retained implant restorations: a clinical review

    Ahmad Manawar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: As more and more dental practitioners are focusing on implant-supported fixed restorations, some clinicians favor the use of cement retained restorations while others consider screw retained prosthesis to be the best choice. Discussion: In screw-retained restorations, the fastening screw provides a solid joint between the restoration and the implant abutment, while in cement-retained prostheses the restorative screw is eliminated to enhance esthetics, occlusal stability, and passive fit of the restorations. The factors that influence the type of fixation of the prostheses to the implants like passivity of the framework, ease of fabrication, occlusion, esthetics, accessibility, retention and retrievability are discussed in this article with scientific studies demonstrating superior outcomes of one technique over another. Screwretained implant restorations have an advantage of predictable retention, retrievability and lack of potentially retained subgingival cement. However, a few disadvantages exist such as precise placement of the implant for optimal and esthetic location of the screw access hole and obtaining passive fit. On the other hand, cement retained restorations eliminate unesthetic screw access holes, have passive fit of castings, reduced complexity of clinical and lab procedures, enhanced esthetics, reduced cost factors and non disrupted morphology of the occlusal table. Conclusion: This article compares the advantages, potential disadvantages and limitations of screw and cement retained restorations and their specific implications in the most common clinical situation.

  7. Parameters Affecting the Extraction Process of Jatropha Curcas Oil Using a Single Screw Extruder

    Siregar, Ali Nurrakhmad; Ghani, Jaharah A; Che Haron, Che Hassan; Rizal, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly used technique to separate oil and cake from J. curcas seeds is mechanical extraction. It uses simple tools such as a piston and a screw extruder to produce high pressure, driven by hand or by engine. A single screw extruder has one screw rotating inside the barrel and materials simultaneously flow from the feed to the die zone. The highest oil yield can be obtained by a well-designed oil press as well as finding the optimum conditions for all parameters involved during the ...

  8. Control of influence of a thread on a bending of screws

    Proskuriakov, N E; Lopa, I V; Trapeznikov, E V

    2017-01-01

    The influence of the threads and the bending of screw on their moments of inertia of the cross section considered. This problem is actual since existing methods exclude from calculations the influence of supporting the thread, using as the basic geometrical parameter such as the internal diameter of the thread (diameter of cavities). Fundamental difference of a bend of the screw from a bend of a smooth rod consists that moment of inertia of the screw is a variable. It is shown that the change in cross-section moment of inertia along the length of the screw are essential and have periodic character. Analytical interrelation of the bending of the screw and the decreasing of moment of inertia of its cross section is established and equation describing this phenomenon is suggested. The greatest decrease of the moment of inertia occurs in the middle of the screw length, and the lowest - at its ends. Function and approximate coefficients for the main types of thread are proposed, which take into account this change. (paper)

  9. Parametric analysis and design of a screw extruder for slightly non-Newtonian (pseudoplastic materials

    J.I. Orisaleye

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Extruders have found application in the food, polymer and pharmaceutical industries. Rheological characteristics of materials are important in the specification of design parameters of screw extruders. Biopolymers, which consist of proteins, nucleic acids and polysaccharides, are shear-thinning (pseudoplastic within normal operating ranges. However, analytical models to predict and design screw extruders for non-Newtonian pseudoplastic materials are rare. In this study, an analytical model suitable to design a screw extruder for slightly non-Newtonian materials was developed. The model was used to predict the performance of the screw extruder while processing materials with power law indices slightly deviating from unity (the Newtonian case. Using non-dimensional analysis, the effects of design and operational parameters were investigated. Expressions to determine the optimum channel depth and helix angle were also derived. The model is capable of predicting the performance of the screw extruder within the range of power law indices considered (1/2⩽n⩽1. The power law index influences the choice of optimum channel depth and helix angle of the screw extruder. Keywords: Screw extruder, Slightly non-Newtonian, Shear-thinning, Pseudoplastic, Biopolymer, Power law

  10. Development of a high speed extrusion concept using a floating screw sleeve for solid-melt-separation

    Karrenberg, Gregor; Wortberg, Johannes

    2015-05-01

    The High-Speed-S-Truder with floating screw sleeve is an alternative extrusion concept with solid-melt-separation. A fairly conventional 35 mm screw with a length of 21 D, which is accelerated by a 75 kW gearless, water cooled synchronous drive, conveys the resin into a 60 mm screw sleeve with a length of 10 D. Inside the sleeve the material is plasticizied and discharged into the outer screw channel of the sleeve through radial bores. Only the solid bed remains inside. The development of a melt pool - and thus a decrease of the plasticizing capacity - is avoided. The sleeve is rotated by drag forces only (approximately 10 - 15 % of the screw speed). Due to the low speed of the screw sleeve molten material is conveyed to a 4 D Dynamic Mixing Ring in a gentle manner. The DMRs floating ring and the screw sleeve are directly coupled. The granules in the screw channel are stopped by a barrier on the screw in front of the mixing device. So nearly no unmelted material can pass the system. For temperature management in the plastification and mixing zone a 3-zone heating/air-cooling system is used. Various kinds of experiments with the High-Speed S-Truder were conducted. Reachable throughputs with different types of material (LDPE, LLDPE, PP, PS) have been tested. Also three screw geometries, which are mainly varying in the channel depth, were compared. Experimental results and theoretical background will be described in this paper.

  11. Ab-Initio Simulation of a/2 Screw Dislocations Gamma-TiAl

    Woodward, C; Rao, S. I

    2004-01-01

    ...The equilibrium core structure of an isolated a/2screw dislocations is calculated using a first-principles pseudopotential-planewave method within the Local Density Approximation of Density Functional Theory...

  12. Modelling and Experimental Investigation of Unsteady Behaviour of a Screw Compressor Plant

    Chukanova, Ekatarina; Stosic, Nikola; Kovacevic, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Majority of air compressor plants installed worldwide operate permanently under unsteady conditions, however, there is still a lack of published papers which describe the plant dynamics and offer quantification parameters of the phenomenon. An experimental and analytical study of a screw compressor operation under unsteady conditions has been carried out. For this purpose a one dimensional model of the processes within a screw compressor based on the differential equations of conservation of ...

  13. Scaphoid Fracture Fixation with an Acutrak? Screw

    Loving, Vilert A.; Richardson, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of fixation of a scaphoid fracture using an Acutrak? screw. This screw is cannulated and headless, which allows it to be implanted below the surface of the bone. It uses the same concept of variable thread pitch as the Herbert screw, but unlike the Herbert screw, is fully threaded, with continuously varying pitch along its length. This variable pitch creates constant compression across a fracture as the screw is advanced, and gives the screw its unique appearance. This featur...

  14. Paramagnetism and plasma beta in a screw-pinch

    Lehnert, B.; Scheffel, J.

    1991-02-01

    Anisotropic resistivity causes paramagnetic effects (B z ' (r) less then 0) in a screw pinch, being basically different to the self-relaxation described by Taylor. We compute, analytically and numerically, the resulting effect on equilibrium in a 1-D straight cylindrical plasma. In particular we compute paramagnetic effects on the plasma radius and on plasma beta. Ohm's law also contains diamagnetic terms; in this paper we consider radial particle diffusion and the Nernst effect. In a Tokamak or rector plasma these effects are shown to be negligible, whereas they may contribute in present ULQ, Extrap and RFP experiments. A basic result is an expression for the coupling between the poloidal and axial magnetic field components with the above effects included. A result of specific importance to the Extrap programme is that plasma current limitation can arise from lack of equilibrium when the plasma radius tends to exceed its upper limit, being defined by a magnetic or material limiter. The paramagnetic effect described in this work lowers the plasma beta further, making D-D reactor depending on safety factors q(a) bigger than 1 seems less attainable. (au)

  15. Biomechanical properties of a novel biodegradable magnesium-based interference screw

    Marco Ezechieli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium-based interference screws may be an alternative in anterior/posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The well-known osteoconductive effects of biodegradable magnesium alloys may be useful. It was the purpose of this study to evaluate the biomechanical properties of a magnesium based interference screw and compare it to a standard implant. A MgYREZr-alloy interference screw and a standard implant (Milagro®; De Puy Mitek, Raynham, MA, USA were used for graft fixation. Specimens were placed into a tensile loading fixation of a servohydraulic testing machine. Biomechanical analysis included pretensioning of the constructs at 20 N for 1 min following cyclic pretensioning of 20 cycles between 20 and 60 N. Biomechanical elongation was evaluated with cyclic loading of 1000 cycles between 50 and 200 N at 0.5 Hz. Maximum load to failure was 511.3±66.5 N for the Milagro® screw and 529.0±63.3 N for magnesium-based screw (ns, P=0.57. Elongations after preload, during cyclical loading and during failure load were not different between the groups (ns, P>0.05. Stiffness was 121.1±13.8 N/mm for the magnesiumbased screw and 144.1±18.4 for the Milagro® screw (ns, P=0.32. MgYREZr alloy interference screws show comparable results in biomechanical testing to standard implants and may be an alternative for anterior cruciate reconstruction in the future.

  16. Stress analysis in a pedicle screw fixation system with flexible rods in the lumbar spine.

    Kim, Kyungsoo; Park, Won Man; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Lee, SuKyoung

    2010-01-01

    Breakage of screws has been one of the most common complications in spinal fixation systems. However, no studies have examined the breakage risk of pedicle screw fixation systems that use flexible rods, even though flexible rods are currently being used for dynamic stabilization. In this study, the risk of breakage of screws for the rods with various flexibilities in pedicle screw fixation systems is investigated by calculating the von Mises stress as a breakage risk factor using finite element analysis. Three-dimensional finite element models of the lumbar spine with posterior one-level spinal fixations at L4-L5 using four types of rod (a straight rod, a 4 mm spring rod, a 3 mm spring rod, and a 2 mm spring rod) were developed. The von Mises stresses in both the pedicle screws and the rods were analysed under flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsion moments of 10 Nm with a follower load of 400 N. The maximum von Mises stress, which was concentrated on the neck region of the pedicle screw, decreased as the flexibility of the rod increased. However, the ratio of the maximum stress in the rod to the yield stress increased substantially when a highly flexible rod was used. Thus, the level of rod flexibility should be considered carefully when using flexible rods for dynamic stabilization because the intersegmental motion facilitated by the flexible rod results in rod breakage.

  17. Effectiveness of the Thoracic Pedicle Screw Placement Using the Virtual Surgical Training System: A Cadaver Study.

    Hou, Yang; Lin, Yanping; Shi, Jiangang; Chen, Huajiang; Yuan, Wen

    2018-03-14

    The virtual simulation surgery has initially exhibited its promising potentials in neurosurgery training. To evaluate effectiveness of the Virtual Surgical Training System (VSTS) on novice residents placing thoracic pedicle screws in a cadaver study. A total of 10 inexperienced residents participated in this study and were randomly assigned to 2 groups. The group using VSTS to learn thoracic pedicle screw fixation was the simulation training (ST) group and the group receiving an introductory teaching session was the control group. Ten fresh adult spine specimens including 6 males and 4 females with a mean age of 58.5 yr (range: 33-72) were collected and randomly allocated to the 2 groups. After exposing anatomic structures of thoracic spine, the bilateral pedicle screw placement of T6-T12 was performed on each cadaver specimen. The postoperative computed tomography scan was performed on each spine specimen, and experienced observers independently reviewed the placement of the pedicle screws to assess the incidence of pedicle breach. The screw penetration rates of the ST group (7.14%) was significantly lower in comparison to the control group (30%, P < .05). Statistically significant difference in acceptable rates of screws also occurred between the ST (100%) and control (92.86%) group (P < .05). In addition, the average screw penetration distance in control group (2.37 mm ± 0.23 mm) was significantly greater than ST group (1.23 mm ± 0.56 mm, P < .05). The virtual reality surgical training of thoracic pedicle screw instrumentation effectively improves surgical performance of novice residents compared to those with traditional teaching method, and can help new beginners to master the surgical technique within shortest period of time.

  18. Parameters Affecting the Extraction Process of Jatropha curcas Oil Using a Single Screw Extruder

    Ali Nurrakhmad Siregar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The most commonly used technique to separate oil and cake from J. curcas seeds is mechanical extraction. It uses simple tools such as a piston and a screw extruder to produce high pressure, driven by hand or by engine. A single screw extruder has one screw rotating inside the barrel and materials simultaneously flow from the feed to the die zone. The highest oil yield can be obtained by a well-designed oil press as well as finding the optimum conditions for all parameters involved during the extraction process. The influence of the parameters in a single screw extruder was studied using finite element analysis and computational fluid dynamics simulation with ANSYS POLYFLOW. The research focused on predicting the velocity, pressure and shear rate in the metering section that influenced the screw rotational speed and mass flow rate. The obtained results revealed that increasing the screw rotational speed will increase the pressure, velocity and shear rate. Meanwhile, increasing the mass flow rate results in decreasing the pressure while the velocity and shear rate remain constant.

  19. First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Arthrodesis: A Retrospective Comparison of Crossed-screws, Locking and Non-Locking Plate Fixation with Lag Screw

    Leif Claassen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:Locking plate fixation is increasingly used for first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTP-I arthrodesis. Still there is few comparable clinical data regarding this procedure. Methods:We retrospectively evaluated 60 patients who received an arthrodesis of the MTP-I between January 2008 and June 2010. With 20 patients each we performed a locking plate fixation with lag screw, arthrodesis with crossed-screwsor with a nonlocking plate with lag screw. Results: There were four non-unions in crossed-screws patients and one nonunion in non-locked plate group. All the patients in locking plate group achieved union. 90% of the patients were completely or mildly satisfied in locking plate group, whereas this rate was 80% for patients in both crossed screws and non-locking plate groups. Conclusions: Use of dorsal plating for arthrodesis of MTP1 joint either locking or non-locking were associated with high union rate and acceptable and comparable functional outcome. Although nonunion rate was high using two crossed screws but functional outcome was not significantly different compare to dorsal plating. Level of evidence:Ш, retrospective comparative study

  20. Performance Characteristics of a 4 × 6 Oil-Free Twin-Screw Compressor

    Sun-Seok Byeon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The screw compressor in the early stage of development is generally known as the oil-injection type. However, escalating environmental problems and advances in electronic components have spurred continuous R & D to minimize the oil content in compressed air. The oil-free twin-screw compressor is continuously compressed by inner volumetric change between rotors and casing. For this reason, in order to predict the overall performance of the screw compressor at the early stage of the design process, industry still relies on the empirical method. However, it is difficult using the existing empirical method to gain more information of the inner fluid flow of the twin-screw compressor. Flow simulation techniques using CFD are required. This study presents applications of a recently proposed overset grid method to the solution of the flow around a moving boundary. In order to analyze the performance of a 4 × 6 oil-free screw compressor, the 3-D, unsteady and compressible flow fields were numerically calculated with a shear stress transport (SST turbulence model, and implemented by the commercial software, Star-CCM+. The pressure distributions were calculated and graphically depicted. Results also showed that the volumetric and adiabatic efficiencies of the screw compressor measured by the experiments were 78% and 71%, respectively.

  1. Bone anchors or interference screws? A biomechanical evaluation for autograft ankle stabilization.

    Jeys, Lee; Korrosis, Sotiris; Stewart, Todd; Harris, Nicholas J

    2004-01-01

    Autograft stabilization uses free semitendinosus tendon grafts to anatomically reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament. Study aims were to evaluate the biomechanical properties of Mitek GII anchors compared with the Arthrex Bio-Tenodesis Screw for free tendon reconstruction of the anterior talofibular ligament. There are no differences in load to failure and percentage specimen elongation at failure between the 2 methods. Controlled laboratory study using porcine models. Sixty porcine tendon constructs were failure tested. Re-creating the pull of the anterior talofibular ligament, loads were applied at 70 degrees to the bones. Thirty-six tendons were fixed to porcine tali and tested using a single pull to failure; 10 were secured with anchors and No. 2 Ethibond, 10 with anchors and FiberWire, 10 with screws and Fiberwire, and 6 with partially gripped screws. Cyclic preloading was conducted on 6 tendons fixed by anchors and on 6 tendons fixed by screws before failure testing. Two groups of 6 components fixed to the fibula were also tested. The talus single-pull anchor group produced a mean load of 114 N and elongation of 37% at failure. The talus single-pull screw group produced a mean load of 227 N and elongation of 22% at failure (P anchors. The improved biomechanics of interference screws suggests that these may be more suited to in vivo reconstruction of the anterior talofibular ligament than are bone anchors.

  2. Research on energy conversion mechanism of a screw centrifugal pump under the water

    Quan, H; Li, R N; Han, W; Cheng, X R; Shen, Z J; Su, Q M

    2013-01-01

    In order to research screw centrifugal pump impeller power capability and energy conversion mechanism, we used Navier-Stokes equation and standard k-ε equation turbulence model on the basis of the Euler equations to carry out screw centrifugal pump internal flow numerical simulation. This was explored by simulating specific design conditions; the medium is water, variation of speed and pressure of flow filed under the action of the impeller, and the screw centrifugal impeller shroud line and wheel line segment take monitoring sites. The monitoring points are between dynamic head and static head change to analyze the energy conversion capability along the impeller corners of screw centrifugal pump. The results show that the energy of fluid of the screw centrifugal pump is provided by spiral segment, the spiral segment in front of the impeller has played a multi-level role, it has significant reference value to research the energy conversion mechanism of screw centrifugal pump under solid-liquid two phase

  3. Descending aortic injury by a thoracic pedicle screw during posterior reconstructive surgery: a case report.

    Watanabe, Kei; Yamazaki, Akiyoshi; Hirano, Toru; Izumi, Tomohiro; Sano, Atsuki; Morita, Osamu; Kikuchi, Ren; Ito, Takui

    2010-09-15

    Case report. To describe an iatrogenic aortic injury by pedicle screw instrumentation during posterior reconstructive surgery of spinal deformity. Iatrogenic major vascular injuries during anterior instrumentation procedures have been reported by several authors, but there have been few reports regarding iatrogenic major vascular injuries during posterior instrumentation procedures. A 57-year-old woman with thoracolumbar kyphosis due to osteoporotic T12 vertebral fracture underwent posterior correction and fusion (T10-L2), using segmental pedicle screw construct concomitant with T12 pedicle subtraction osteotomy. Postoperative routine plain radiographs and computed tomography myelography demonstrated a misplaced left T10 pedicle screw, which was in contact with the posteromedial aspect of the thoracic aorta, and suspected penetration of the aortic wall. The patient underwent removal of the pedicle screw, and repair of the penetrated aortic wall through a simultaneous anterior-posterior approach. The patient tolerated the procedure well without neurologic sequelae, and was discharged several days after removal of a left tube thoracostomy. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid fusion at the osteotomy site and no loosening of hardware. Preoperative neurologic symptoms improved completely at 18-months follow-up. Use of pedicle screw instrumentation has the potential to cause major vascular injury during posterior spinal surgery, and measures to prevent this complication must be taken. Timely diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent both early and delayed complications and death.

  4. To Determine the Percentage of Copper in a Brass Screw Using a Computer Interface with a Colorimeter.

    Horgan, Joan; Hedge, Robyn

    1997-01-01

    Year 11 students investigated the real-world problem of whether screws are really brass. It allowed them to use the colorimeter and computer interface in a way that was easily understood and models normal practice in testing laboratories. Screws were dissolved in nitric acid and their absorbance of red light was compared with a standard curve.…

  5. On the effects of a screw dislocation and a linear potential on the harmonic oscillator

    Bueno, M.J.; Furtado, C., E-mail: furtado@fisica.ufpb.br; Bakke, K., E-mail: kbakke@fisica.ufpb.br

    2016-09-01

    Quantum effects on the harmonic oscillator due to the presence of a linear scalar potential and a screw dislocation are investigated. By searching for bound states solutions, it is shown that an Aharonov-Bohm-type effect for bound states and a restriction of the values of the angular frequency of the harmonic oscillator can be obtained, where the allowed values are determined by the topology of the screw dislocation and the quantum numbers associated with the radial modes and the angular momentum. As particular cases, the angular frequency and the energy levels associated with the ground state and the first excited state of the system are obtained.

  6. Risks to the Superior Gluteal Neurovascular Bundle During Iliosacral and Transsacral Screw Fixation: A Computed Tomogram Arteriography Study.

    Maslow, Jed; Collinge, Cory A

    2017-12-01

    Iliosacral (IS) and transsacral (TS) screws are popular techniques to repair complicated injuries to the pelvis. The anatomy of the superior gluteal neurovasculature (SG NV bundle) is well described as running along the posterior ilium, providing innervation and perfusion to important abductor muscles. The method of pelvis fixation least likely to injure the SG NV bundle is unknown. Twenty uninjured patients with a contrasted computed tomogram of the pelvis and lower extremities (CTA) were evaluated. Starting points for an S1 IS screw and S1 and S2 TS screws were estimated on the "ghost" lateral CTA image for those pelvi with safe corridors (>9 mm diameter). The distance from the projected screw to the SG artery was measured. A distance of <3.65 mm (half of a 7.3-mm screw's diameter) was considered likely for NV bundle injury. Of 40 pelvi CTAs (single sides), 10 pelvi (25%) were determined to be inappropriate for an S1 TS screw. The average distances from the screw starting point and the artery were 25.3 mm (±9.2) for S1 IS, 12.4 mm (±9.0) for S1 TS, and 23.5 mm (±10.7) for S2 TS screws, respectively. Ten S1 TS screws (25%) and no S1 IS or S2 TS screws were projected to have caused injury to the SG NV bundle (P < 0.001). Inserting S1 IS and S2 TS screws put the SG NV anatomy at significantly less risk than S1 TS screws. This information may aid in choosing the "best" fixation option for patients with pelvic ring trauma requiring surgery.

  7. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System

    Sim, Bo Kyun; Kim, Bongju; Kim, Min Jeong; Jeong, Guk Hyun; Ju, Kyung Won; Shin, Yoo Jin; Kim, Man Yong; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access ...

  8. Axial loading screw fixation for chevron type osteotomies of the distal first metatarsal: a retrospective outcomes analysis.

    Murphy, Ryan M; Fallat, Lawrence M; Kish, John P

    2014-01-01

    The distal chevron osteotomy is a widely accepted technique for the treatment of hallux abductovalgus deformity. Although the osteotomy is considered to be stable, displacements of the capital fragment has been described. We propose a new method for fixation of the osteotomy involving the axial loading screw (ALS) used in addition to single screw fixation. We believe this method will provide a more mechanically stable construct. We reviewed the charts of 46 patients in whom 52 feet underwent a distal chevron osteotomy that was fixated with either 1 screw or 2 screws that included the ALS. We hypothesized that the ALS group would have fewer displacements and would heal more quickly than the single screw fixation group. We found that the group with ALS fixation had healed at a mean of 6.5 weeks and that the group with single screw fixation had healed at 9.53 weeks (p = .001). Also, 8 cases occurred of displacement of the capital fragment in the single screw, control group compared with 2 cases of displacement in the ALS group. However, this finding was not statistically significant. The addition of the ALS to single screw fixation allowed the patients to heal approximately 3 weeks earlier than single screw fixation alone. The ALS is a fixation option for the surgeon to consider when osseous correction of hallux abducto valgus is performed. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Does a trochanteric lag screw improve fixation of vertically oriented femoral neck fractures? A biomechanical analysis in cadaveric bone.

    Hawks, Michael A; Kim, Hyunchul; Strauss, Joseph E; Oliphant, Bryant W; Golden, Robert D; Hsieh, Adam H; Nascone, Jason W; O'Toole, Robert V

    2013-10-01

    We assessed the biomechanical performances of a trochanteric lag screw construct and a traditional inverted triangle construct in the treatment of simulated Pauwels type 3 femoral neck fractures. An inverted triangle construct (three 7.3-mm cannulated screws placed in inverted triangle orientation) and a trochanteric lag screw construct (two 7.3-mm cannulated screws placed across the superior portion of the femoral neck and one 4.5-mm lag screw placed perpendicular to the fracture in superolateral to inferomedial orientation) were tested in nine matched pairs of non-osteoporotic human cadaveric femora. We used a previously described vertically oriented femoral neck fracture model and testing protocol that incrementally loaded the constructs along the mechanical axis of the femur to 1400 N. Specimens that survived incremental loading underwent cyclic loading. Apparent construct stiffness, force at 3mm of displacement, and survival of incremental loading were recorded. The trochanteric lag screw group had a 70% increase in stiffness (261 N/mm [29 standard deviation] versus 153 N/mm [16 standard deviation]; P=0.026) and a 43% increase in force required for displacement (620 N versus 435 N; P=0.018) compared with the inverted triangle group. One trochanteric lag screw and no inverted triangle specimen survived incremental loading. A trochanteric lag screw construct applied to vertically oriented femoral neck fractures provides marked improvement in mechanical performance compared with the inverted triangle construct. © 2013.

  10. Experiments on a Toroidal Screw Pinch with Various Field Programming

    Zwicker, H.; Wilhelm, R.; Krause, H. [Max-Planck-Institut Fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Garching, Munich, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1971-10-15

    In the toroidal screw pinch ISAR-IV (large diameter 60 cm, aspect ratio 5, maximum storage, energy 140 kj) attempts were made to get an improved stability of the plasma by different kinds of field programming. The best results were obtained with positive trapped B{sub z}-fields and simultaneous switching of main B{sub z}-field and I{sub z}-current. In this case the dense plasma column (n{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 2-3 x 10{sup 16} , kT Almost-Equal-To 50-100 eV, {beta} Almost-Equal-To 15-20%) is surrounded by a force-free plasma ({beta} = 1%) with weak shear and it behaves stably for, at least, 25 {mu}s. The resulting containment time nr of near 10{sup 12} s cm{sup -3} remains a factor of 2-3 below the upper limit given by the classical diffusion. The following loss of the equilibrium position near the coil axis ({Delta} Almost-Equal-To 1-2 cm) is connected to a strong damping of the axial plasma current which starts near the end of the containment. It may be assumed that the increase of the effective plasma resistance mainly results from a contact of the force-free regions with the tube wall. Attempts were made to improve the containment by suitable programming of a plasma z-current. The results are presented. Experiments with one quartz limiter inside the torus improved the equilibrium but introduced instabilities at the new surface of the dilute plasma. To obtain more information about the outer region, the dilute plasma was produced without a dense core and separated from the tube walls by weak adiabatic compression. Under these Tokamak-like conditions the q-value was varied. In the region of q Almost-Equal-To 1 there appeared instabilities which seem to haver higher m-modes and rather short wavelengths. In a different kind of field programming the field distribution of the ''diffuse pinch'' was realized within an accuracy of 5-10% (kT Almost-Equal-To 100 eV, {beta} Almost-Equal-To 30%). In contrast to the predictions of MHD-theory, stability was observed only for

  11. Pedicle screw-rod fixation: a feasible treatment for dogs with severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis.

    Tellegen, Anna R; Willems, Nicole; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Meij, Björn P

    2015-12-07

    Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis is a common problem in large breed dogs. For severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis, conservative treatment is often not effective and surgical intervention remains as the last treatment option. The objective of this retrospective study was to assess the middle to long term outcome of treatment of severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis with pedicle screw-rod fixation with or without evidence of radiological discospondylitis. Twelve client-owned dogs with severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis underwent pedicle screw-rod fixation of the lumbosacral junction. During long term follow-up, dogs were monitored by clinical evaluation, diagnostic imaging, force plate analysis, and by using questionnaires to owners. Clinical evaluation, force plate data, and responses to questionnaires completed by the owners showed resolution (n = 8) or improvement (n = 4) of clinical signs after pedicle screw-rod fixation in 12 dogs. There were no implant failures, however, no interbody vertebral bone fusion of the lumbosacral junction was observed in the follow-up period. Four dogs developed mild recurrent low back pain that could easily be controlled by pain medication and an altered exercise regime. Pedicle screw-rod fixation offers a surgical treatment option for large breed dogs with severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis with or without evidence of radiological discospondylitis in which no other treatment is available. Pedicle screw-rod fixation alone does not result in interbody vertebral bone fusion between L7 and S1.

  12. Design and test of a novel magnetic lead screw for active suspension system in a vehicle

    Berg, Nick Ilsø; Holm, Rasmus Koldborg; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    2014-01-01

    . Furthermore the Magnetic Lead Screw is introduced and its benefits when used with an active suspension system are discussed. Based on a model of a quarter car, the design specifications for the MLS active suspension system are found, which leads to a design study. The design study investigates the relation...

  13. Local electron density measurements in a screw pinch by means of a Michelson interferometer

    Hoekzema, J.A.; Busch, P.J.; Mastop, W.J.

    1976-06-01

    The time-dependent density profile of a toroidal screw-pinch plasma is determined from successive measurements of the line density along different sections of a line through the plasma. The pathlength is varied by the introduction of a hollow quartz tube into the plasma

  14. Tool for cutting locking cups from guide tube mounting screws in a nuclear reactor

    Nee, J.D.; Hahn, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for freeing a socket-head screw from a locking cup therefor in a reactor cavity, wherein the locking cup includes a fixed cylindrical side wall encircling the side surface of the screw head and an annular end wall overlying the outer end surface of the screw head. The apparatus consists of: frame means, cylindrical cutter means having a longitudinal axis and having a frustoconical cutting surface with an inner diameter less than the inner diameter of the locking cup side wall and with an outer diameter greater than the outer diameter of the locking cup side wall, and drive means carried by the frame means and coupled to the cutter means for effecting rotation thereof about the axis, the rotating cutter means are operable for severing the locking cup end wall from the locking cup side wall at the junction therebetween when the cutter means is moved against the locking cup substantially coaxially therewith

  15. Precision insertion of percutaneous sacroiliac screws using a novel augmented reality-based navigation system: a pilot study.

    Wang, Huixiang; Wang, Fang; Leong, Anthony Peng Yew; Xu, Lu; Chen, Xiaojun; Wang, Qiugen

    2016-09-01

    Augmented reality (AR) enables superimposition of virtual images onto the real world. The aim of this study is to present a novel AR-based navigation system for sacroiliac screw insertion and to evaluate its feasibility and accuracy in cadaveric experiments. Six cadavers with intact pelvises were employed in our study. They were CT scanned and the pelvis and vessels were segmented into 3D models. The ideal trajectory of the sacroiliac screw was planned and represented visually as a cylinder. For the intervention, the head mounted display created a real-time AR environment by superimposing the virtual 3D models onto the surgeon's field of view. The screws were drilled into the pelvis as guided by the trajectory represented by the cylinder. Following the intervention, a repeat CT scan was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the system, by assessing the screw positions and the deviations between the planned trajectories and inserted screws. Post-operative CT images showed that all 12 screws were correctly placed with no perforation. The mean deviation between the planned trajectories and the inserted screws was 2.7 ± 1.2 mm at the bony entry point, 3.7 ± 1.1 mm at the screw tip, and the mean angular deviation between the two trajectories was 2.9° ± 1.1°. The mean deviation at the nerve root tunnels region on the sagittal plane was 3.6 ± 1.0 mm. This study suggests an intuitive approach for guiding screw placement by way of AR-based navigation. This approach was feasible and accurate. It may serve as a valuable tool for assisting percutaneous sacroiliac screw insertion in live surgery.

  16. A screw-based dynamic balancing approach, applied to a 5-bar mechanism

    de Jong, Jan Johannes; van Dijk, Johannes; Herder, Justus Laurens; Lenarcic, Jadran; Merlet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic balancing aims to reduce or eliminate the shaking base reaction forces and moments of mechanisms, in order to minimize vibration and wear. The derivation of the dynamic balance conditions requires significant algebraic effort, even for simple mechanisms. In this study, a screw-based

  17. Intra-abdominal Migration of a Lag Screw in Gamma Nailing: Report of a Case

    Heineman, D.J.; van Buijtenen, J.M.; Heuff, G.; Derksen, E.J.; Pöll, R.G.

    2010-01-01

    An 83-year-old female patient was referred to the emergency room with progressive pain on mobilization. Three weeks before presentation, she had been treated with a gamma nail for an unstable right intertrochanteric fracture. Pelvic X-ray showed an intra-abdominally migrated lag screw. No evidence

  18. Percutaneous Intramedullary Screw Fixation of Distal Fibula Fractures: A Case Series and Systematic Review.

    Loukachov, Vladimir V; Birnie, Merel F N; Dingemans, Siem A; de Jong, Vincent M; Schepers, Tim

    The current reference standard for unstable ankle fractures is open reduction and internal fixation using a plate and lag screws. This approach requires extensive dissection and wound complications are not uncommon. The use of intramedullary screw fixation might overcome these issues. The aim of our study was to provide an overview of the published data regarding intramedullary screw fixation of fibula fractures combined with a small consecutive case series. We performed a search of published studies to identify the studies in which fibula fractures were treated with percutaneous intramedullary screw fixation. Additionally, all consecutive patients treated for an unstable ankle fracture in a level 1 trauma center using an intramedullary screw were retrospectively included. The literature search identified 6 studies with a total of 180 patients. Wound infection was seen in 1 patient (0.6%), anatomic reduction was achieved in 168 patients (93.3%), and a loss of reduction was seen in 2 patients (1.1%). Implant removal was deemed necessary in 3 patients (1.7%) and nonunion was seen is 2 patients (1.1%). A total of 11 patients, in whom no wound complications occurred, were included in our study. The follow-up duration was a minimum of 12 months. A secondary dislocation was seen in 1 patient, and delayed union was observed after 7.5 months in 1 other patient. In conclusion, intramedullary screw fixation is a safe and adequate method to use for fibula fractures, with a low risk of wound complications. Additional research regarding functional outcome is warranted. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Devolatilization Analysis in a Twin Screw Extruder by using the Flow Analysis Network (FAN) Method

    Tomiyama, Hideki; Takamoto, Seiji; Shintani, Hiroaki; Inoue, Shigeki

    We derived the theoretical formulas for three mechanisms of devolatilization in a twin screw extruder. These are flash, surface refreshment and forced expansion. The method for flash devolatilization is based on the equation of equilibrium concentration which shows that volatiles break off from polymer when they are relieved from high pressure condition. For surface refreshment devolatilization, we applied Latinen's model to allow estimation of polymer behavior in the unfilled screw conveying condition. Forced expansion devolatilization is based on the expansion theory in which foams are generated under reduced pressure and volatiles are diffused on the exposed surface layer after mixing with the injected devolatilization agent. Based on these models, we developed the simulation software of twin-screw extrusion by the FAN method and it allows us to quantitatively estimate volatile concentration and polymer temperature with a high accuracy in the actual multi-vent extrusion process for LDPE + n-hexane.

  20. A novel modeling approach to the mixing process in twin-screw extruders

    Kennedy, Amedu Osaighe; Penlington, Roger; Busawon, Krishna; Morgan, Andy

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a theoretical model for the mixing process in a self-wiping co-rotating twin screw extruder by combination of statistical techniques and mechanistic modelling has been proposed. The approach was to examine the mixing process in the local zones via residence time distribution and the flow dynamics, from which predictive models of the mean residence time and mean time delay were determined. Increase in feed rate at constant screw speed was found to narrow the shape of the residence time distribution curve, reduction in the mean residence time and time delay and increase in the degree of fill. Increase in screw speed at constant feed rate was found to narrow the shape of the residence time distribution curve, decrease in the degree of fill in the extruder and thus an increase in the time delay. Experimental investigation was also done to validate the modeling approach.

  1. Geothermal ORC Systems Using Large Screw Expanders

    Biederman, Tim R.; Brasz, Joost J.

    2014-01-01

    Geothermal ORC Systems using Large Screw Expanders Tim Biederman Cyrq Energy Abstract This paper describes a low-temperature Organic Rankine Cycle Power Recovery system with a screw expander a derivative of developed of Kaishan's line of screw compressors, as its power unit. The screw expander design is a modified version of its existing refrigeration compressor used on water-cooled chillers. Starting the ORC development program with existing refrigeration screw compre...

  2. Foundations for computer simulation of a low pressure oil flooded single screw air compressor

    Bein, T. W.

    1981-12-01

    The necessary logic to construct a computer model to predict the performance of an oil flooded, single screw air compressor is developed. The geometric variables and relationships used to describe the general single screw mechanism are developed. The governing equations to describe the processes are developed from their primary relationships. The assumptions used in the development are also defined and justified. The computer model predicts the internal pressure, temperature, and flowrates through the leakage paths throughout the compression cycle of the single screw compressor. The model uses empirical external values as the basis for the internal predictions. The computer values are compared to the empirical values, and conclusions are drawn based on the results. Recommendations are made for future efforts to improve the computer model and to verify some of the conclusions that are drawn.

  3. Design and analysis of a field modulated magnetic screw for artificial heart

    Ling, Zhijian; Ji, Jinghua; Wang, Fangqun; Bian, Fangfang

    2017-05-01

    This paper proposes a new electromechanical energy conversion system, called Field Modulated Magnetic Screw (FMMS) as a high force density linear actuator for artificial heart. This device is based on the concept of magnetic screw and linear magnetic gear. The proposed FMMS consists of three parts with the outer and inner carrying the radially magnetized helically permanent-magnet (PM), and the intermediate having a set of helically ferromagnetic pole pieces, which modulate the magnetic fields produced by the PMs. The configuration of the newly designed FMMS is presented and its electromagnetic performances are analyzed by using the finite-element analysis, verifying the advantages of the proposed structure.

  4. Application of an expandable pedicle screw in the severe osteoporotic spine: a preliminary study.

    Wu, Zi-xiang; Cui, Geng; Lei, Wei; Fan, Yong; Wan, Shi-yong; Ma, Zhen-sheng; Sang, Hong-xun

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the clinical abstract and radiographic outcome of multi-axial expandable pedicle screws (MEPS) in patients with osteoporosis. One hundred and twenty-five consecutive patients received MEPS from the UPASS spinal fixation system to obtain thoracolumbar or lumbosacral stabilization. All patients underwent bone mineral density (BMD) scans. The indications for use of the MEPS were spinal diseases with severe osteoporosis (degenerative diseases 46 cases, compression fractures 28 cases, lumbar tuberculosis 27 cases and revision spine surgery 24 cases). The pre-operative and three months post-operative functional evaluations were graded with JOA and VAS scoring system. One week, six months and 12 months after surgery, plain film and three-dimensional CT scans were obtained to evaluate the spinal fusion and fixation effectiveness of MEPS. The mean follow-up period was 18 months (ranged from 6 to 33 months). All patients suffered from severely osteoporosis with a decrease of 25.3% in BMD. The pre-operative JOA and VAS scores were 11.3±3.0 and 6.7±1.8 mm, respectively. Three months after operation, the JOA and VAS scores were 25.2±2.0 and 2.3±1.7 mm. The recovery rate was 78.1±11.5% and the clinical results were satisfying. There were no instances of screw loosening or pullout of the MEPS and the screw-bone interface was excellent. The radiographic results showed that bone healing, both around the screws and inter-vertebral, was achieved. In osteoporosis spine surgery, excellent bone-screw interface and fixation strength can be achieved by using MEPS. MEPS are a novel approach to increase the pedicle screw fixation in osteoporotic and revision spine surgeries.

  5. A comparitive clinical study between self tapping and drill free screws as a source of rigid orthodontic anchorage.

    Gupta, Nishant; Kotrashetti, S M; Naik, Vijay

    2012-03-01

    Self-tapping miniscrews are commonly being used as a temporary anchorage device for orthodontic purpose. A prerequisite for the insertion of these screws is the preparation of a pilot hole, which is time consuming and may result in damage to nerves, tooth root, drill bit breakage and thermal necrosis of bone. On the other hand the design of drill-free screws enables them to be inserted without drilling. The aim of this prospective study was to compare the stability and clinical response of the soft tissue around the self tapping and drill free screws when used for orthodontic anchorage for en mass retraction of maxillary anterior teeth. The study sample consisted of 20 patients requiring retraction of maxillary anterior teeth. The screws were placed in the alveolar bone between maxillary 2nd premolar and 1st molar bilaterally at the junction of attached gingiva and moveable mucosa. Pilot hole was drilled on the side which was selected for insertion of the self tapping screw under copious irrigation, after which it was inserted. Drill free screw was inserted on the contralateral side without predrilling. All screws were immediately loaded with 150-200 gm of retraction force. Patients were recalled for regular follow up for a period of 6 months. If the screws became mobile or showed any signs of inflammation during the course of the study, they were considered to be a failure. After a period of 6 months an overall success rate of 77.5% was noted. Four self tapping and five drill-free screws failed during the study. There was no statistically significant difference between the two types of screws with respect to success/failure. Mobility was found to be the major cause for the failure. Both self-tapping and the drill-free screws are effective anchorage units. But the latter have an edge over the conventional self-tapping screws because of decrease in operative time, little bone debris, less thermal damage, lower morbidity, and minimal patient discomfort as

  6. Safety of lumbar spine radiofrequency procedures in the presence of posterior pedicle screws: technical report of a cadaver study.

    Gazelka, Halena M; Welch, Tasha L; Nassr, Ahmad; Lamer, Tim J

    2015-05-01

    To determine whether the thermal energy associated with lumbar spine radiofrequency neurotomy (RFN) performed near titanium and stainless steel pedicle screws is conducted to the pedicle screws or adjacent tissues, or both, thus introducing potential for thermal damage to those tissues. Cadaver study. Cadaver laboratory equipped with fluoroscopy, surgical spine implements, and radiofrequency generator. No live human subject; a fresh frozen (and thawed) cadaver torso was used for the study. Titanium and stainless steel pedicle screws were placed in the lumbar spine of a fresh frozen cadaver torso with real-time fluoroscopic guidance. Conventional RFN cannula placement was performed at the level of pedicle screws and a control (nonsurgically altered) lumbar level. Neurotomy was performed with conventional radiofrequency lesioning parameters. Temperatures were recorded at multiple sites through thermistor probes. Direct contact of the radiofrequency cannula with the pedicle screws during conventional RFN produced a substantial increase in temperature in the surrounding soft tissues. A small increase in temperature occurred at the same sites at the control level. Titanium and stainless steel pedicle screws are capable of sustaining large increases in temperature when the radiofrequency probe comes in contact with the screw. These results are suggestive that pedicle screws could serve as a possible source of tissue heating and thermal injury during RFN. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Routine versus on demand removal of the syndesmotic screw; A protocol for an international randomised controlled trial (RODEO-trial)

    S.A. Dingemans (Siem); Birnie, M.F.N. (M. F.N.); Sanders, F.R.K. (F. R.K.); M.P.J. van den Bekerom (Michel); Backes, M. (M.); E.F. van Beeck (Ed); F.W. Bloemers (Frank); B.A. van Dijkman (Bart); E.R. Flikweert (Elvira); D.J. Haverkamp; H.R. Holtslag (Herman); Hoogendoorn, J.M. (J. M.); P. Joosse (Pieter); Parkkinen, M. (M.); G.R. Roukema (Gert); N.L. Sosef (Nico L.); B. Twigt (Bas); R.N. van Veen (Ruben); Van Der Veen, A.H. (A. H.); Vermeulen, J. (J.); Winkelhagen, J. (J.); Van Der Zwaard, B.C. (B. C.); S. Van Dieren (Susan); J.C. Goslings (Carel); T. Schepers (Tim)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Syndesmotic injuries are common and their incidence is rising. In case of surgical fixation of the syndesmosis a metal syndesmotic screw is used most often. It is however unclear whether this screw needs to be removed routinely after the syndesmosis has healed. Traditionally

  8. In vivo degradation of a new concept of magnesium-based rivet-screws in the minipig mandibular bone

    Schaller, Benoit; Saulacic, Nikola; Beck, Stefan; Imwinkelried, Thomas; Goh, Bee Tin; Nakahara, Ken; Hofstetter, Willy; Iizuka, Tateyuki

    2016-01-01

    Self-tapping of magnesium screws in hard bone may be a challenge due to the limited torsional strength of magnesium alloys in comparison with titanium. To avoid screw failure upon implantation, the new concept of a rivet-screw was applied to a WE43 magnesium alloy. Hollow cylinders with threads on the outside were expanded inside drill holes of minipig mandibles. During the expansion with a hexagonal mandrel, the threads engaged the surrounding bone and the inside of the screw transformed into a hexagonal screw drive to allow further screwing in or out of the implant. The in vivo degradation of the magnesium implants and the performance of the used coating were studied in a human standard-sized animal model. Four magnesium alloy rivet-screws were implanted in each mandible of 12 minipigs. Six animals received the plasmaelectrolytically coated magnesium alloy implants; another six received the uncoated magnesium alloy rivet-screws. Two further animals received one titanium rivet-screw each as control. In vivo radiologic examination was performed at one, four, and eight weeks. Euthanasia was performed for one group of seven animals (three animals with coated, three with uncoated magnesium alloy implants and one with titanium implant) at 12 weeks and for the remaining seven animals at 24 weeks. After euthanasia, micro-computed tomography and histological examination with histomorphometry were performed. Significantly less void formation as well as higher bone volume density (BV/TV) and bone-implant contact area (BIC) were measured around the coated implants compared to the uncoated ones. The surface coating was effective in delaying degradation despite plastic deformation. The results showed potential for further development of magnesium hollow coated screws for bone fixation. - Highlights: • A new concept of rivet screws as an alternative to classical screws is presented • The rivet screw concept was tested in vivo in a mini-pig pilot study • Un-coated and

  9. In vivo degradation of a new concept of magnesium-based rivet-screws in the minipig mandibular bone

    Schaller, Benoit [Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); National Dental Centre Singapore, 168938 (Singapore); Saulacic, Nikola [Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Beck, Stefan, E-mail: SBECK2@its.jnj.com [Synthes Biomaterials, Eimattstr. 3, CH-4436 Oberdorf (Switzerland); Imwinkelried, Thomas [RMS Foundation, Bischmattstr. 12, CH-2544 Bettlach (Switzerland); Goh, Bee Tin [National Dental Centre Singapore, 168938 (Singapore); Nakahara, Ken [Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Hofstetter, Willy [Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Iizuka, Tateyuki [Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland)

    2016-12-01

    Self-tapping of magnesium screws in hard bone may be a challenge due to the limited torsional strength of magnesium alloys in comparison with titanium. To avoid screw failure upon implantation, the new concept of a rivet-screw was applied to a WE43 magnesium alloy. Hollow cylinders with threads on the outside were expanded inside drill holes of minipig mandibles. During the expansion with a hexagonal mandrel, the threads engaged the surrounding bone and the inside of the screw transformed into a hexagonal screw drive to allow further screwing in or out of the implant. The in vivo degradation of the magnesium implants and the performance of the used coating were studied in a human standard-sized animal model. Four magnesium alloy rivet-screws were implanted in each mandible of 12 minipigs. Six animals received the plasmaelectrolytically coated magnesium alloy implants; another six received the uncoated magnesium alloy rivet-screws. Two further animals received one titanium rivet-screw each as control. In vivo radiologic examination was performed at one, four, and eight weeks. Euthanasia was performed for one group of seven animals (three animals with coated, three with uncoated magnesium alloy implants and one with titanium implant) at 12 weeks and for the remaining seven animals at 24 weeks. After euthanasia, micro-computed tomography and histological examination with histomorphometry were performed. Significantly less void formation as well as higher bone volume density (BV/TV) and bone-implant contact area (BIC) were measured around the coated implants compared to the uncoated ones. The surface coating was effective in delaying degradation despite plastic deformation. The results showed potential for further development of magnesium hollow coated screws for bone fixation. - Highlights: • A new concept of rivet screws as an alternative to classical screws is presented • The rivet screw concept was tested in vivo in a mini-pig pilot study • Un-coated and

  10. Navigation of Pedicle Screws in the Thoracic Spine with a New Electromagnetic Navigation System: A Human Cadaver Study

    Patrick Hahn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Posterior stabilization of the spine is a standard procedure in spinal surgery. In addition to the standard techniques, several new techniques have been developed. The objective of this cadaveric study was to examine the accuracy of a new electromagnetic navigation system for instrumentation of pedicle screws in the spine. Material and Method. Forty-eight pedicle screws were inserted in the thoracic spine of human cadavers using EMF navigation and instruments developed especially for electromagnetic navigation. The screw position was assessed postoperatively by a CT scan. Results. The screws were classified into 3 groups: grade 1 = ideal position; grade 2 = cortical penetration <2 mm; grade 3 = cortical penetration ≥2 mm. The initial evaluation of the system showed satisfied positioning for the thoracic spine; 37 of 48 screws (77.1%, 95% confidence interval [62.7%, 88%] were classified as group 1 or 2. Discussion. The screw placement was satisfactory. The initial results show that there is room for improvement with some changes needed. The ease of use and short setup times should be pointed out. Instrumentation is achieved without restricting the operator’s mobility during navigation. Conclusion. The results indicate a good placement technique for pedicle screws. Big advantages are the easy handling of the system.

  11. In vitro validation of a novel mechanical model for testing the anchorage capacity of pedicle screws using physiological load application.

    Liebsch, Christian; Zimmermann, Julia; Graf, Nicolas; Schilling, Christoph; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Kienle, Annette

    2018-01-01

    Biomechanical in vitro tests analysing screw loosening often include high standard deviations caused by high variabilities in bone mineral density and pedicle geometry, whereas standardized mechanical models made of PU foam often do not integrate anatomical or physiological boundary conditions. The purpose of this study was to develop a most realistic mechanical model for the standardized and reproducible testing of pedicle screws regarding the resistance against screw loosening and the holding force as well as to validate this model by in vitro experiments. The novel mechanical testing model represents all anatomical structures of a human vertebra and is consisting of PU foam to simulate cancellous bone, as well as a novel pedicle model made of short carbon fibre filled epoxy. Six monoaxial cannulated pedicle screws (Ø6.5 × 45mm) were tested using the mechanical testing model as well as human vertebra specimens by applying complex physiological cyclic loading (shear, tension, and bending; 5Hz testing frequency; sinusoidal pulsating forces) in a dynamic materials testing machine with stepwise increasing load after each 50.000 cycles (100.0N shear force + 20.0N per step, 51.0N tension force + 10.2N per step, 4.2Nm bending moment + 0.8Nm per step) until screw loosening was detected. The pedicle screw head was fixed on a firmly clamped rod while the load was applied in the vertebral body. For the in vitro experiments, six human lumbar vertebrae (L1-3, BMD 75.4 ± 4.0mg/cc HA, pedicle width 9.8 ± 0.6mm) were tested after implanting pedicle screws under X-ray control. Relative motions of pedicle screw, specimen fixture, and rod fixture were detected using an optical motion tracking system. Translational motions of the mechanical testing model experiments in the point of load introduction (0.9-2.2mm at 240N shear force) were reproducible within the variation range of the in vitro experiments (0.6-3.5mm at 240N shear force). Screw loosening occurred continuously in

  12. The feasibility of inserting a C1 pedicle screw in patients with ponticulus posticus: a retrospective analysis of eleven patients.

    Zhang, Xin-Liang; Huang, Da-Geng; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhu, Jin-Wen; Li, Yi-Bing; He, Bao-Rong; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2017-04-01

    Ponticulus posticus is a common anatomic variation that can be mistaken for a broad posterior arch during C1 pedicle screw placement. When the atlas lateral mass screws are placed via the posterior arch, injury to the vertebral artery may result. To our knowledge, there are few clinical studies that have analyzed the feasibility of C1 pedicle screw fixation in patients with ponticulus posticus, in clinical practice. To evaluate the feasibility of inserting a C1 pedicle screw in patients with ponticulus posticus. Between January 2008 and January 2012, 11 consecutive patients with atlantoaxial instability, and with a ponticulus posticus at C1, underwent posterior fusion surgery in our institution. According to preoperative computed tomography (CT) reconstruction, a complete ponticulus posticus was found unilaterally in nine patients and bilaterally in two. Postoperative CT reconstructive imaging was performed to assess whether C1 pedicle screw placement was successful. Patients were followed up at regular intervals and evaluated for symptoms of ponticulus posticus syndrome. Thirteen C1 pedicles (atlas vertebral artery groove), each with a complete ponticulus posticus, were successfully inserted with thirteen 3.5- or 4.0-mm diameter pedicle screws, without resection of the bony anomaly. No intraoperative complications (venous plexus, vertebral artery, or spinal cord injury) occurred. The mean follow-up period was 21 (range 14-30) months. Postoperative CT reconstructive images showed that all 13 pedicle screws were inserted in the C1 pedicles without destruction of the atlas pedicle cortical bone. In the follow-up period, none of the patients demonstrated clinical symptoms of ponticulus posticus syndrome or developed bone fusion. Three-dimensional CT imaging should be considered prior to C1 pedicle screw fixation in patients with ponticulus posticus, to avoid mistaking the ponticulus posticus for a widened dorsal arch of the atlas. If there is no ponticulus posticus

  13. Modelica-based modeling and simulation of a twin screw compressor for heat pump applications

    Chamoun, Marwan; Rulliere, Romuald; Haberschill, Philippe; Peureux, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    A new twin screw compressor has been developed by SRM (Svenska Rotor Maskiner) for use in a new high temperature heat pump using water as refrigerant. This article presents a mathematical model of the thermodynamic process of compression in twin screw compressors. Using a special discretization method, a transient twin screw compressor model has been developed using Modelica in order to study the dry compression cycle of this machine at high temperature levels. The pressure and enthalpy evolution in the control volumes of the model are calculated as a function of the rotational angle of the male rotor using energy and continuity equations. In addition, associated processes encountered in real machines such as variable fluid leakages, water injection and heat losses are modeled and implemented in the main compressor model. A comparison is performed using the model developed, demonstrating the behavior of the compressor and the evolution of its different parameters in different configurations with and without water injection. This comparison shows the need for water injection to avoid compressor failure and improve its efficiency. -- Highlights: • Difficulties related to the compressor limit the development of a high temperature heat pump using water as refrigerant. • A new water vapor double screw compressor has been developed to overcome compression problems. • A dynamic model of this compressor has been developed and simulated using Modelica. • The behavior of the compressor has been identified all along the compression cycle and efficiencies have been calculated

  14. Magnetic design consideration of a Magnetic Lead Screw with Halbach Array

    Holm, Rasmus Koldborg; Berg, Nick Ilsø; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    This paper presents the novel design of a Magnetic Lead Screw (MLS) with magnetic thread of Halbach Arrays. The MLS where designed and build, tests indicated a stall force which where 12 % lower than calculated in 3D FE. This is explained by demagnetization of the magnet during stall, the behavio...

  15. Dynamics of screw dislocations : a generalised minimising-movements scheme approach

    Bonaschi, G.A.; Meurs, van P.J.P.; Morandotti, M.

    2015-01-01

    The gradient flow structure of the model introduced in [CG99] for the dynamics of screw dislocations is investigated by means of a generalised minimising-movements scheme approach. The assumption of a finite number of available glide directions, together with the "maximal dissipation criterion" that

  16. Treating Simple Tibia Fractures with Poly-DL-Lactic Acid Screw as a ...

    ) absorbable screw as a ... fractures. Keywords: Simple tibia fracture, Fracture healing time Poly-DL-lactic acid, Poly-DL-Lactic Acid, ..... bilateral cortex of the bone due to the weak anti- ... Hu YL, Yuan WQ, Wang LF, Liu HF, Jin D. A prospective.

  17. Modelling extrudate expansion in a twin-screw food extrusion cooking process through dimensional analysis methodology

    Cheng, Hongyuan; Friis, Alan

    2010-01-01

    A new phenomenological model is proposed to correlate extrudate expansion and extruder operation parameters in a twin-screw food extrusion cooking process. Buckingham's pi dimensional analysis method is applied to establish the model. Three dimensionless groups, i.e. pump efficiency, water content...

  18. Replacing by numbers - computer aided installation of ball screws in a CANDU

    Granz, R.; Georgas, J.

    1992-01-01

    Performing repair procedures on a commissioned nuclear reactor is a critical maintenance task and certainly not one suitable for on-the-job experimentation. That was our dilemma when the engineering staff developed what was thought would be a better way to replace the ball screws in the fuelling machine support bridges of a CANDU nuclear plant. The 40ft long ball screws must be installed vertically into square cavities that are less than 40ft from the ''ceiling'' of the room where they are located. Standard operating procedures for replacing the ball screw involve opening up the feeder cabinet located above to provide clearance. But this practice risks damage to delicate piping located inside the cabinet. The new concept involved walking the ball screw in by tilting it at a series of angles. Unfortunately, there was no simple way that we could determine with pencil and paper whether or not this approach would work or exactly how to do it in practice. Using the solid modelling capabilities of the Aries Concept Station mechanical computer-aided engineering system, we proved the new procedure and developed a series of illustrations offering step-by-step visual instructions to guide the maintenance crew performing the task. (Author)

  19. Extrusion trials with a TSK045 twin screw extruder (Poster presentation)

    Sabel, H.W.R.; Schonewille, E.

    1998-01-01

    In 1994 a 45mm twin screw extruder was introduced at the Prins Maurits Laboratory of TNO for the processing of energetic materials. Initial safety experiments were carried out by using inert compositions with small amounts of different energetic components and micro encapsulated chemical sensors to

  20. Radical Polymerization of Styrene and Styrene–Butylmethacrylate in a Counterrotating Twin Screw Extruder

    Goot, A.J. van der; Janssen, L.P.B.M.

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the copolymerization of styrene–butylmethacrylate (St-BMA) and the homopolymerization of styrene (St) in a counterrotating twin screw extruder. The effect of prepolymerization on both the product properties and process was studied. It turned out that the process of reactive

  1. Twin screw extruders as polymerization reactors for a free radical homo polymerization

    Ganzeveld, K.J.; Janssen, L.P.B.M.

    The bulk polymerization of n-butylmethacrylate was investigated in a counter-rotating twin screw extruder. It appeared that the gel effect, occurring with bulk polymerizations, affected the polymerization progress very strongly. Due to this effect the conversion of the reaction is independent of the

  2. Radical polymerization of styrene and styrene-butylmethacrylate in a counterrotating twin screw extruder

    vanderGoot, AJ; Janssen, LPB

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the copolymerization of styrene-butylmethacrylate (St-BMA) and the homopolymerization of styrene (St) in a counterrotating twin screw extruder. The effect of prepolymerization on both the product properties and process was studied. It turned out that the process of reactive

  3. A new type of axial-flux magnetic lead screw with inherent spring characteristic

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Xia, Yongming; Pan, Haipeng

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Lead Screw (MLS) can transfer slow linear motion into fast rotary motion offering much higher force density than that of traditional linear permanent magnet machines. It has been developed for ocean wave energy harvester and active damper for electrical vehicles. In this paper, a new type...

  4. [Odontoid bending stiffness after anterior fixation with a single lag screw: biomechanical study].

    Buchvald, P; Čapek, L; Barsa, P

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The aim of the experiment was to compare the bending stiffness of an intact odontoid process with bending stiffness after its simulated type II fracture was fixed with a single lag screw. The experiment was done with a desire to answer the question of whether a single osteosynthetic screw is sufficient for good fixation of a type II odontoid fracture. MATERIAL AND METHODS The C2 vertebrae of six cadavers were used. With simultaneous measurement of odontoid bending stiffness, the occurrence of a fracture (type IIA, Grauer's modification of the Anderson- D'Alonzo classification) was simulated using action exerted by a tearing machine in the direction perpendicular to the odontoid axis. Each odontoid fracture was subsequently treated by direct osteosynthesis with a single lag screw inserted in the axial direction by a standard surgical procedure in order to provide conditions similar to those achieved by routine surgical management. The treated odontoid process was subsequently subjected to the same tearing machine loading as applied to it at the start of the experiment. The bending stiffness measured was then compared with that found before the fracture occurred. The results were statistically evaluated by the t-test for paired samples at the level of significance α = 0.05. RESULTS The average value of bending stiffness for odontoid processes of intact vertebrae at the moment of fracture occurrence was 318.3 N/mm. After single axial lag screw fixation of the fracture, the average bending stiffness for the odontoid processes treated was 331.3 N/mm. DISCUSSION Higher values of bending stiffness after screw fixation were found in all specimens and, in comparison with the values recorded before simulated fractures, the increase was statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS The results of our measurements suggest that the single lag screw fixation of a type IIA odontoid fracture will provide better stability for the fracture fragment-C2 body complex on

  5. Dual small fragment plating improves screw-to-screw load sharing for mid-diaphyseal humeral fracture fixation: a finite element study.

    Kosmopoulos, Victor; Luedke, Colten; Nana, Arvind D

    2015-01-01

    A smaller humerus in some patients makes the use of a large fragment fixation plate difficult. Dual small fragment plate constructs have been suggested as an alternative. This study compares the biomechanical performance of three single and one dual plate construct for mid-diaphyseal humeral fracture fixation. Five humeral shaft finite element models (1 intact and 4 fixation) were loaded in torsion, compression, posterior-anterior (PA) bending, and lateral-medial (LM) bending. A comminuted fracture was simulated by a 1-cm gap. Fracture fixation was modelled by: (A) 4.5-mm 9-hole large fragment plate (wide), (B) 4.5-mm 9-hole large fragment plate (narrow), (C) 3.5-mm 9-hole small fragment plate, and (D) one 3.5-mm 9-hole small fragment plate and one 3.5-mm 7-hole small fragment plate. Model A showed the best outcomes in torsion and PA bending, whereas Model D outperformed the others in compression and LM bending. Stress concentrations were located near and around the unused screw holes for each of the single plate models and at the neck of the screws just below the plates for all the models studied. Other than in PA bending, Model D showed the best overall screw-to-screw load sharing characteristics. The results support using a dual small fragment locking plate construct as an alternative in cases where crutch weight-bearing (compression) tolerance may be important and where anatomy limits the size of the humerus bone segment available for large fragment plate fixation.

  6. Development of a DIPG Orthotopic Model in Mice Using an Implantable Guide-Screw System.

    Miguel Marigil

    Full Text Available In this work we set to develop and to validate a new in vivo frameless orthotopic Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG model based in the implantation of a guide-screw system.It consisted of a guide-screw also called bolt, a Hamilton syringe with a 26-gauge needle and an insulin-like 15-gauge needle. The guide screw is 2.6 mm in length and harbors a 0.5 mm central hole which accepts the needle of the Hamilton syringe avoiding a theoretical displacement during insertion. The guide-screw is fixed on the mouse skull according to the coordinates: 1mm right to and 0.8 mm posterior to lambda. To reach the pons the Hamilton syringe is adjusted to a 6.5 mm depth using a cuff that serves as a stopper. This system allows delivering not only cells but also any kind of intratumoral chemotherapy, antibodies or gene/viral therapies.The guide-screw was successfully implanted in 10 immunodeficient mice and the animals were inoculated with DIPG human cell lines during the same anesthetic period. All the mice developed severe neurologic symptoms and had a median overall survival of 95 days ranging the time of death from 81 to 116 days. Histopathological analysis confirmed tumor into the pons in all animals confirming the validity of this model.Here we presented a reproducible and frameless DIPG model that allows for rapid evaluation of tumorigenicity and efficacy of chemotherapeutic or gene therapy products delivered intratumorally to the pons.

  7. A Methodology of Designing the Teeth Conjugation in a Planetary Roller Screw

    Lisowski Filip

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the methodology for designing the teeth conjunction of planetary gears in the planetary roller screw mechanism. A function of the planetary gears is to synchronize an operation of rollers in order to avoid axial displacements. A condition of the correct operation is no axial movement of rollers in relation to the nut. The planetary gears are integral parts of rollers and therefore an operation of the gear transmissions has a direct impact on cooperation of the screw, rollers and the nut. The proper design of gear engagements is essential for reducing slippage on surfaces of the cooperating threaded elements. For this purpose, in a designing method, both the limitations of operation and kinematic conditions of rollers’ operation have to be taken into account.

  8. Removal torque of nail interlocking screws is related to screw proximity to the fracture and screw breakage.

    White, Alexander A; Kubacki, Meghan R; Samona, Jason; Telehowski, Paul; Atkinson, Patrick J

    2016-06-01

    Studies have shown that titanium implants can be challenging to explant due to the material's excellent biocompatibility and resulting osseointegration. Clinically, titanium alloy nail interlocking screws may require removal to dynamize a construct or revise the nail due to nonunion, infection, pain, or periprosthetic fracture. This study was designed to determine what variables influence the removal torque for titanium alloy interlocking screws. An intramedullary nail with four interlocking screws was used to stabilize a 1-cm segmental femoral defect in a canine model for 16 weeks. The animals were observed to be active following a several-day recovery after surgery. In six animals, the femora and implanted nail/screws were first tested to failure in torsion to simulate periprosthetic fracture of an implant after which the screws were then removed. In four additional animals, the screws were removed without mechanical testing. Both intraoperative insertional and extraction torques were recorded for all screws. Mechanical testing to failure broke 10/24 screws. On average, the intact screws required 70% of the insertional torque during removal while broken screws only required 16% of the insertional torque (p torque than the outboard distal screw (p torque was ∼80°. The peak axial load did not significantly correlate with the torque required to remove the screws. On average, the removal torque was lower than at the time of insertion, and less torque was required to remove broken screws and screws remote to the fracture. However, broken screws will require additional time to retrieve the remaining screw fragment. This study suggests that broken screws and screws in prematurely active patients will require less torque to remove. © IMechE 2016.

  9. Acromioclavicular Joint Fixation Using an Acroplate Combined With a Coracoclavicular Screw

    Tavakoli Darestani, Reza; Ghaffari, Arash; Hosseinpour, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    Background Appropriate treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation is controversial. Acroplate fixation is one of the most common treatment methods of acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocation. Based on the risk of re-dislocation after Acroplate fixation, we assumed that combined fixation with an Acroplate and a coracoclavicular screw helps improve the outcome. Objectives The main purpose of the current study was to compare the outcome of ACJ dislocation treated with an Acroplate alone and in combination with coracoclavicular screw. Patients and Methods This study was carried out on 40 patients with ACJ dislocation types III to VI who were divided randomly into two equal groups: Acroplate group (P) and Acroplate in combination with coracoclavicular screw group (P + S). The screws were extracted 3-6 months postoperatively. The patients were followed for 1 year and Imatani’s score was calculated. Finally, the data were compared between the groups. Results The mean Imatani’s score was significantly higher in P + S group (83.4 ± 14.1) than P group (81.2 ± 10.3) (P < 0.001). The mean duration of surgery was the same in the two groups (59.8 ± 9.4 minutes in group P V.s 64.3 ± 10.9 minutes in group P + S; P = 0.169). There were no cases of re-dislocation, degenerative changes and ossification and all patients returned to their previous jobs or sporting activities. Conclusions Using a coracoclavicular screw combined with an Acroplate can improve the patients’ function after ACJ disruption without any significant increase in surgical duration. Authors recommend this technique in the fixation of ACJ dislocation. PMID:24396788

  10. The risk of translaminar screw fixation to the transverse foramen of the lower cervical spine: a computed tomography study.

    Kong, Ganggang; Ji, Wei; Huang, Zucheng; Liu, Junhao; Chen, Jianting; Zhu, Qingan

    2017-04-21

    Translaminar screw fixation (TSF) of the axis is considered as an efficient, safe and simple surgical procedure, however the study of the potential risk of TSF to the transverse foramen in lower cervical spine is lacked. Head-neck CT images of 60 patients were included in this study. Maximum screw length, laminar thickness, the screw angle and the laminar height were measured. The feasibility of 3.5-mm diameter screw fixation and the potential risk of transverse foramen injury was analyzed. The TSF was safe at C3 and C4, but risky to the transverse foraman at a rate of 8.7% at C5 (0% on the left side and 20% on the right side), 33.3% at C6 (24.4% on the left side and 42.9% on the right side). C7 had the highest 77.8% rate (65.5% on the left side and 89.8% on the right side). The safe screw length was 27.7 mm at C3, 27.4 mm at C4, 28.0 mm at C5, 25.6 mm at C6 and 25.5 mm at C7, respectively. The present study showed that translaminar screw could place the transverse foramen of C5-C7 at risk. Preoperative CT scanning was necessary for safe screw placement.

  11. Minimal access direct spondylolysis repair using a pedicle screw-rod system: a case series

    Mohi Eldin Mohamed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Symptomatic spondylolysis is always challenging to treat because the pars defect causing the instability needs to be stabilized while segmental fusion needs to be avoided. Direct repair of the pars defect is ideal in cases of spondylolysis in which posterior decompression is not necessary. We report clinical results using segmental pedicle-screw-rod fixation with bone grafting in patients with symptomatic spondylolysis, a modification of a technique first reported by Tokuhashi and Matsuzaki in 1996. We also describe the surgical technique, assess the fusion and analyze the outcomes of patients. Case presentation At Cairo University Hospital, eight out of twelve Egyptian patients’ acute pars fractures healed after conservative management. Of those, two young male patients underwent an operative procedure for chronic low back pain secondary to pars defect. Case one was a 25-year-old Egyptian man who presented with a one-year history of axial low back pain, not radiating to the lower limbs, after falling from height. Case two was a 29-year-old Egyptian man who presented with a one-year history of axial low back pain and a one-year history of mild claudication and infrequent radiation to the leg, never below the knee. Utilizing a standardized mini-access fluoroscopically-guided surgical protocol, fixation was established with two titanium pedicle screws place into both pedicles, at the same level as the pars defect, without violating the facet joint. The cleaned pars defect was grafted; a curved titanium rod was then passed under the base of the spinous process of the affected vertebra, bridging the loose fragment, and attached to the pedicle screw heads, to uplift the spinal process, followed by compression of the defect. The patients were discharged three days after the procedure, with successful fusion at one-year follow-up. No rod breakage or implant-related complications were reported. Conclusions Where there is no

  12. Simple New Screw Insertion Technique without Extraction for Broken Pedicle Screws.

    Kil, Jin-Sang; Park, Jong-Tae

    2018-05-01

    Spinal transpedicular screw fixation is widely performed. Broken pedicle screw rates range from 3%-7.1%. Several techniques have been described for extraction of broken pedicle screws. However, most of these techniques require special instruments. We describe a simple, modified technique for management of broken pedicle screws without extraction. No special instruments or drilling in an adjacent pedicle are required. We used a high-speed air drill with a round burr. With C-arm fluoroscopy guidance, the distal fragment of a broken pedicle screw was palpated using free-hand technique through the screw entry hole. A high-speed air drill with a round burr (not a diamond burr) was inserted through the hole. Drilling began slowly and continued until enough space was obtained for new screw insertion. Using this space, we performed new pedicle screw fixation medially alongside the distal fragment of the broken pedicle screw. We performed the insertion with a previously used entry hole and pathway in the pedicle. The same size pedicle screw was used. Three patients were treated with this modified technique. New screw insertion was successful in all cases after partial drilling of the distal broken pedicle screw fragment. There were no complications, such as screw loosening, dural tears, or root injury. We describe a simple, modified technique for management of broken pedicle screws without extraction. This technique is recommended in patients who require insertion of a new screw. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Maxillary anterior en masse retraction using different antero-posterior position of mini screw: a 3D finite element study

    Zohreh Hedayati

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays, mini screws are used in orthodontic tooth movement to obtain maximum or absolute anchorage. They have gained popularity among orthodontists for en masse retraction of anterior teeth after first premolar extraction in maximum anchorage cases. The purpose of this study was to determine the type of anterior tooth movement during the time when force was applied from different mini screw placements to the anterior power arm with various heights. Methods A finite element method was used for modeling maxillary teeth and bone structure. Brackets, wire, and hooks were also designed for modeling. Two appropriate positions for mini screw in the mesial and distal of the second premolar were designed as fixed nodes. Forces were applied from the mini screw to four different levels of anterior hook height: 0, 3, 6, and 9 mm. Initial tooth movement in eight different conditions was analyzed and calculated with ANSYS software. Results Rotation of anterior dentition was decreased with a longer anterior power arm and the mesial placement of the mini screw. Bodily movements occurred with the 9-mm height of the power arm in both mini screw positions. Intrusion or extrusion of the anterior teeth segment depended on the level of the mini screw and the edge of the power arm on the Z axis. Conclusions According to the findings of this study, the best control in the sagittal plane during anterior en masse retraction was achieved by mesial placement of the mini screw and the 9-mm height of the anterior power arm. Where control in the vertical plane was concerned, distal placement of the mini screw with the 6-mm power arm height had minimum adverse effect on anterior dentition.

  14. Conservative treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture: Comparing intermaxillary fixation with screws or arch bar. A randomised clinical trial.

    van den Bergh, B; Blankestijn, J; van der Ploeg, T; Tuinzing, D B; Forouzanfar, T

    2015-06-01

    A mandibular condyle fracture can be treated conservatively by intermaxillary fixation (IMF) or by open reposition and internal fixation (ORIF). Many IMF-modalities can be chosen, including IMF-screws (IMFS). This prospective multi-centre randomised clinical trial compared the use of IMFS with the use of arch bars in the treatment of mandibular condyle fractures. The study population consisted of 50 patients (mean age: 31.8 years). Twenty-four (48%) patients were allocated in the IMFS group. Twenty-six (52%) patients were assigned to the arch bars group. In total 188 IMF-screws were used (5-12 screws per patient, mean 7.83 screws per patient). All pain scores were lower in the IMFS group. Three patients developed a malocclusion (IFMS-group: one patient, arch bars-group: two patients). Mean surgical time was significantly shorter in the IMFS group (59 vs. 126 min; pfractured on insertion (0.53%), one (0.53%) screw was inserted into a root. Six (3.2%) screws loosened spontaneously in four patients. Mucosal disturbances were seen in 22 patients, equally divided over both groups. Considering the advantages and the disadvantages of IMFS, and observing the results of this study, the authors conclude that IMFS provide a superior method for IMF. IMFS are safer for the patients and surgeons. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Probabilistic analysis of preload in the abutment screw of a dental implant complex.

    Guda, Teja; Ross, Thomas A; Lang, Lisa A; Millwater, Harry R

    2008-09-01

    Screw loosening is a problem for a percentage of implants. A probabilistic analysis to determine the cumulative probability distribution of the preload, the probability of obtaining an optimal preload, and the probabilistic sensitivities identifying important variables is lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the inherent variability of material properties, surface interactions, and applied torque in an implant system to determine the probability of obtaining desired preload values and to identify the significant variables that affect the preload. Using software programs, an abutment screw was subjected to a tightening torque and the preload was determined from finite element (FE) analysis. The FE model was integrated with probabilistic analysis software. Two probabilistic analysis methods (advanced mean value and Monte Carlo sampling) were applied to determine the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of preload. The coefficient of friction, elastic moduli, Poisson's ratios, and applied torque were modeled as random variables and defined by probability distributions. Separate probability distributions were determined for the coefficient of friction in well-lubricated and dry environments. The probabilistic analyses were performed and the cumulative distribution of preload was determined for each environment. A distinct difference was seen between the preload probability distributions generated in a dry environment (normal distribution, mean (SD): 347 (61.9) N) compared to a well-lubricated environment (normal distribution, mean (SD): 616 (92.2) N). The probability of obtaining a preload value within the target range was approximately 54% for the well-lubricated environment and only 0.02% for the dry environment. The preload is predominately affected by the applied torque and coefficient of friction between the screw threads and implant bore at lower and middle values of the preload CDF, and by the applied torque and the elastic modulus of the abutment

  16. Comment on 'The remote sensing of ocean primary productivity - Use of a new data compilation to test satellite algorithms' by William Balch et al

    Platt, Trevor; Sathyendranath, Shubha

    1993-01-01

    Various conclusions by Balch et al. (1992) about the current state of modeling primary production in the sea (lack of improvement in primary production models, since 1957, utility of analytical models, and merits or weaknesses of complex models) are commented on. It is argued that since they are based on a false premise, these conclusions are not robust, and that the approach used by Balch et al. (the model of Platt and Sathyendranath, 1988) was inadequate for the question they set out to address. The present criticism is based mainly on the issue of whether implementation was correct with respect to parameter selection. It is concluded that the findings of Balch et al. with respect to the model of Platt and Sathyendranath is unreliable. Balch replies that satellite-derived estimates of primary production should be compared directly to that measured in situ in as many regions as possible. This will provide a first-order estimate of the magnitude of the error involved in estimating primary production from space.

  17. Comparison of revision strategies for failed C2-posterior cervical pedicle screws: a biomechanical study.

    Mayer, Michael; Zenner, Juliane; Bogner, Robert; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Figl, Markus; von Keudell, Arvind; Stephan, Daniel; Penzkofer, Rainer; Augat, Peter; Korn, Gundobert; Resch, Herbert; Koller, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    With increasing usage within challenging biomechanical constructs, failures of C2 posterior cervical pedicle screws (C2-pCPSs) will occur. The purpose of the study was therefore to investigate the biomechanical characteristics of two revision techniques after the failure of C2-pCPSs. Twelve human C2 vertebrae were tested in vitro in a biomechanical study to compare two strategies for revision screws after failure of C2-pCPSs. C2 pedicles were instrumented using unicortical 3.5-mm CPS bilaterally (Synapse/Synthes, Switzerland). Insertion accuracy was verified by fluoroscopy. C2 vertebrae were potted and fixed in an electromechanical testing machine with the screw axis coaxial to the pullout direction. Pullout testing was conducted with load and displacement data taken continuously. The peak load to failure was measured in newtons (N) and is reported as the pullout resistance (POR). After pullout, two revision strategies were tested in each vertebra. In Group-1, revision was performed with 4.0-mm C2-pCPSs. In Group-2, revision was performed with C2-pedicle bone-plastic combined with the use of a 4-mm C2-pCPSs. For the statistical analysis, the POR between screws was compared using absolute values (N) and the POR of the revision techniques normalized to that of the primary procedures (%). The POR of primary 3.5-mm CPSs was 1,140.5 ± 539.6 N for Group-1 and 1,007.7 ± 362.5 N for Group-2; the difference was not significant. In the revision setting, the POR in Group-1 was 705.8 ± 449.1 N, representing a reduction of 38.1 ± 32.9 % compared with that of primary screw fixation. For Group-2, the POR was 875.3 ± 367.9 N, representing a reduction of 13.1 ± 23.4 %. A statistical analysis showed a significantly higher POR for Group-2 compared with Group-1 (p = 0.02). Although the statistics showed a significantly reduced POR for both revision strategies compared with primary fixation (p plastic, the POR can be significantly increased compared with the use of only an

  18. Positioning device for screwing or unscrewing screw nut

    Sevelinge, G.

    1987-01-01

    This automatic positioning device for screwing or unscrewing a screw nut on a closure stud has a drawed socket and means for axially centre and angularly by wedge the socket on the closure stud and generate a continuous spiral between the socket and the closure stud [fr

  19. Application of a continuous twin screw-driven process for dilute acid pretreatment of rape straw.

    Choi, Chang Ho; Oh, Kyeong Keun

    2012-04-01

    Rape straw, a processing residue generated from the bio-oil industry, was used as a model biomass for application of continuous twin screw-driven dilute acid pretreatment. The screw rotation speed and feeding rate were adjusted to 19.7rpm and 0.5g/min, respectively to maintain a residence time of 7.2min in the reaction zone, respectively. The sulfuric acid concentration was 3.5wt% and the reaction temperature was 165°C. The enzymatic digestibility of the glucan in the pretreated solids was 70.9%. The continuous process routinely gave around 28.8% higher yield for glucan digestibility than did the batch processing method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Reduction of Ochratoxin A in Oat Flakes by Twin-Screw Extrusion Processing.

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Dahal, Samjhana; Perez, Enrique Garcia; Kowalski, Ryan Joseph; Ganjyal, Girish M; Ryu, Dojin

    2017-10-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most important mycotoxins owing to its widespread occurrence and toxicity, including nephrotoxicity and potential carcinogenicity to humans. OTA has been detected in a wide range of agricultural commodities, including cereal grains and their processed products. In particular, oat-based products show a higher incidence and level of contamination. Extrusion cooking is widely used in the manufacturing of breakfast cereals and snacks and may reduce mycotoxins to varying degrees. Hence, the effects of extrusion cooking on the stability of OTA in spiked (100 μg/kg) oat flake was investigated by using a laboratory-scale twin-screw extruder with a central composite design. Factors examined were moisture content (20, 25, and 30% dry weight basis), temperature (140, 160, and 180°C), screw speed (150, 200, and 250 rpm), and die size (1.5, 2, and 3 mm). Both nonextruded and extruded samples were analyzed for reductions of OTA by high-performance liquid chromatography, coupled with fluorescence detection. The percentage of reductions in OTA in the contaminated oat flakes upon extrusion processing were in the range of 0 to 28%. OTA was partially stable during extrusion, with only screw speed and die size having significant effect on reduction (P < 0.005). The highest reduction of 28% was achieved at 180°C, 20% moisture, 250 rpm screw speed, and a 3-mm die with 193 kJ/kg specific mechanical energy. According to the central composite design analyses, up to 28% of OTA can be reduced by a combination of 162°C, 30% moisture, and 221 rpm, with a 3-mm die.

  1. Percutaneous sacroiliac screw versus anterior plating for sacroiliac joint disruption: A retrospective cohort study.

    Zhang, Ruipeng; Yin, Yingchao; Li, Shilun; Hou, Zhiyong; Jin, Lin; Zhang, Yingze

    2018-02-01

    Sacroiliac joint disruption (SJD) is a common cause of pelvic ring instability. Clinically, percutaneous unilateral S1 sacroiliac screw and anterior plating are always applied to manage SJD. The objective of this study is to elaborate their respective therapeutic traits. Patients with SJD fixed with unilateral S1 sacroiliac screw or anterior plating from June 2011 to June 2015 were recruited into this study and were divided into two groups: group A (unilateral sacroiliac screw) and group B (anterior plating). Surgical time, blood loss, frequency of intraoperative fluoroscopy and complications were reviewed. Postoperative radiograph and CT were conducted to assess the reduction quality. Fracture healing was evaluated by radiograph performed at each follow-up. Majeed score was recorded at the final follow-up to assess the functional outcome. Thirty-eight patients were included in group A and thirty-two patients in group B in this study. There was no significant difference in the demographic data of the two groups. A significant difference existed in the results for average operation time (P = .022) and blood loss (P = .000) between group A and group B. The mean frequency of intraoperative fluoroscopy was 15.82 in group A and 3.94 in group B (P = .000). All the fractures healed in this study. The rates of satisfactory reduction quality and functional outcome showed no significant difference between the two groups (P > .05). The complication rate was 15.79% (6/38) in group A and 9.38% (3/32) in group B (P = .660). Compared with anterior plating, percutaneous unilateral S1 sacroiliac screw usage is less invasive; however, more intraoperative X-ray exposure and permanent neurologic damage may accompany this procedure. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Contribution to the study of screw dislocations; Contribution a l'etude des dislocations helicoidales

    Grilhe, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay aux Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-03-01

    The aim of this work is to study the germination, growth and properties of screw dislocations. In the introduction (first chapter), we describe briefly the main experimental results obtained by various authors (observations of screws by Amelinckx and Bontinck in ionic crystals, by Dash in silicon crystals and by Thomas and Whelan in aluminium based alloys). We then make a few considerations concerning characteristic geometry of screws and the various methods used for calculating the energy of a dislocation. In the second chapter we study the problems involving only slip of the screw around its cylinder. We calculate the equilibrium step as a function of the forces acting on the extremities. We determine the critical stress required to disrupt the screw and study the interactions between the screw and other dislocations of the lattice. In the third chapter we consider the problem of the stability when the dislocation can climb by absorption or emission of vacancies. We study separately the stability of the size which only involves volume diffusion and the stability of the shape which depends only on the rearrangement of the vacancies along the dislocation. In chapter four we put forward a germination model for the screws: since the vacancies are not absorbed by the screw dislocations, they form clusters which take up a spiral form. The formation of these spirals is studied from the geometrical point of view in face-centered cubic systems. In chapter five we make use of the results obtained in chapters two and three for studying the growth of the spirals. (author) [French] Le but de ce travail est d'etudier la germination, la croissance et les proprietes des dislocations helico ales. Dans l'introduction (premier chapitre), nous exposons brievement les principaux resultats experimentaux obtenus par differents auteurs (observations d'helice par Amelinckx et Bontinck dans les cristaux ioniques, par Dash dans des cristaux de silicium et par Thomas et Whelan dans des

  3. Twin Screw Extruders as Continuous Mixers for Thermal Processing: a Technical and Historical Perspective.

    Martin, Charlie

    2016-02-01

    Developed approximately 100 years ago for natural rubber/plastics applications, processes via twin screw extrusion (TSE) now generate some of the most cutting-edge drug delivery systems available. After 25 or so years of usage in pharmaceutical environments, it has become evident why TSE processing offers significant advantages as compared to other manufacturing techniques. The well-characterized nature of the TSE process lends itself to ease of scale-up and process optimization while also affording the benefits of continuous manufacturing. Interestingly, the evolution of twin screw extrusion for pharmaceutical products has followed a similar path as previously trodden by plastics processing pioneers. Almost every plastic has been processed at some stage in the manufacturing train on a twin screw extruder, which is utilized to mix materials together to impart desired properties into a final part. The evolution of processing via TSEs since the early/mid 1900s is recounted for plastics and also for pharmaceuticals from the late 1980s until today. The similarities are apparent. The basic theory and development of continuous mixing via corotating and counterrotating TSEs for plastics and drug is also described. The similarities between plastics and pharmaceutical applications are striking. The superior mixing characteristics inherent with a TSE have allowed this device to dominate other continuous mixers and spurred intensive development efforts and experimentation that spawned highly engineered formulations for the commodity and high-tech plastic products we use every day. Today, twin screw extrusion is a battle hardened, well-proven, manufacturing process that has been validated in 24-h/day industrial settings. The same thing is happening today with new extrusion technologies being applied to advanced drug delivery systems to facilitate commodity, targeted, and alternative delivery systems. It seems that the "extrusion evolution" will continue for wide

  4. Flow Field Simulation and Noise Control of a Twin-Screw Engine-Driven Supercharger

    Tao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advantages of good low-speed torque capability and excellent instant response performance, twin-screw superchargers have great potential in the automobile market, but the noise of these superchargers is the main factor that discourages their use. Therefore, it is important to study their noise mechanism and methods of reducing it. This study included a transient numerical simulation of a twin-screw supercharger flow field with computational fluid dynamics software and an analysis of the pressure field of the running rotor. The results showed that overcompression was significant in the compression end stage of the supercharger, resulting in a surge in airflow to a supersonic speed and the production of shock waves that resulted in loud noise. On the basis of these findings, optimization of the supercharger is proposed, including expansion of the supercharger exhaust orifice and creation of a slot along the direction of the rotor spiral normal line at the exhaust port, so as to reduce the compression end pressure, improve the exhaust flow channel, and weaken the source of the noise. Experimental results showed that the noise level value of the improved twin-screw supercharger was significantly lower at the same speed than the original model, with an average decrease of about 5 dB (A.

  5. Low-order models of a single-screw expander for organic Rankine cycle applications

    Ziviani, D.; Desideri, A.; Lemort, V.; De Paepe, M.; van den Broek, M.

    2015-08-01

    Screw-type volumetric expanders have been demonstrated to be a suitable technology for organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems because of higher overall effectiveness and good part-load behaviour over other positive displacement machines. An 11 kWe single-screw expander (SSE) adapted from an air compressor has been tested in an ORC test-rig operating with R245fa as working fluid. A total of 60 steady-steady points have been obtained at four different rotational speeds of the expander in the range between 2000 rpm and 3300 rpm. The maximum electrical power output and overall isentropic effectiveness measured were 7.3 kW and 51.9%, respectively. In this paper, a comparison between two low-order models is proposed in terms of accuracy of the predictions, the robustness of the model and the computational time. The first model is the Pacejka equation-based model and the second is a semi-empirical model derived from a well-known scroll expander model and modified to include the geometric aspects of a single screw expander. The models have been calibrated with the available steady-state measurement points by identifying the proper parameters.

  6. Deformation Analysis of the Main Components in a Single Screw Compressor

    Liu, Feilong; Liao, Xueli; Feng, Quanke; Van Den Broek, Martijn; De Paepe, Michel

    2015-08-01

    The single screw compressor is used in many fields such as air compression, chemical industry and refrigeration. During operation, different gas pressures and temperatures applied on the components can cause different degrees of deformation, which leads to a difference between the thermally induced clearance and the designed clearance. However, limited research about clearance design is reported. In this paper, a temperature measurement instrument and a convective heat transfer model were described and used to establish the temperature of a single screw air compressor's casing, screw rotor and star wheel. 3-D models of these three main components were built. The gas force deformation, thermal- structure deformation and thermal-force coupling deformation were carried out by using a finite element simulation method. Results show that the clearance between the bottom of the groove and the top of star wheel is reduced by 0.066 mm, the clearance between the side of groove and the star wheel is reduced by 0.015 mm, and the clearance between the cylinder and the rotor is reduced by 0.01 mm. It is suggested that these deformations should be taken into account during the design of these clearances.

  7. Pedicle screw loosening is correlated to chronic subclinical deep implant infection: a retrospective database analysis.

    Leitner, Lukas; Malaj, Isabella; Sadoghi, Patrick; Amerstorfer, Florian; Glehr, Mathias; Vander, Klaus; Leithner, Andreas; Radl, Roman

    2018-04-13

    Spinal fusion is used for treatment of spinal deformities, degeneration, infection, malignancy, and trauma. Reduction of motion enables osseous fusion and permanent stabilization of segments, compromised by loosening of the pedicle screws (PS). Deep implant infection, biomechanical, and chemical mechanisms are suspected reasons for loosening of PS. Study objective was to investigate the frequency and impact of deep implant infection on PS loosening. Intraoperative infection screening from wound and explanted material sonication was performed during revision surgeries following dorsal stabilization. Case history events and factors, which might promote implant infections, were included in this retrospective survey. 110 cases of spinal metal explantation were included. In 29.1% of revision cases, infection screening identified a germ, most commonly Staphylococcus (53.1%) and Propionibacterium (40.6%) genus. Patients screened positive had a significant higher number of previous spinal operations and radiologic loosening of screws. Patients revised for adjacent segment failure had a significantly lower rate of positive infection screening than patients revised for directly implant associated reasons. Removal of implants that revealed positive screening effected significant pain relief. Chronic implant infection seems to play a role in PS loosening and ongoing pain, causing revision surgery after spinal fusion. Screw loosening and multiple prior spinal operations should be suspicious for implant infection after spinal fusion when it comes to revision surgery. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  8. Improved Inverse Kinematics Algorithm Using Screw Theory for a Six-DOF Robot Manipulator

    Qingcheng Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on screw theory, a novel improved inverse-kinematics approach for a type of six-DOF serial robot, “Qianjiang I”, is proposed in this paper. The common kinematics model of the robot is based on the Denavit-Hartenberg (D-H notation method while its inverse kinematics has inefficient calculation and complicated solution, which cannot meet the demands of online real-time application. To solve this problem, this paper presents a new method to improve the efficiency of the inverse kinematics solution by introducing the screw theory. Unlike other methods, the proposed method only establishes two coordinates, namely the inertial coordinate and the tool coordinate; the screw motion of each link is carried out based on the inertial coordinate, ensuring definite geometric meaning. Furthermore, we adopt a new inverse kinematics algorithm, developing an improved sub-problem method along with Paden-Kahan sub-problems. This method has high efficiency and can be applied in real-time industrial operation. It is convenient to select the desired solutions directly from among multiple solutions by examining clear geometric meaning. Finally, the effectiveness and reliability performance of the new algorithm are analysed and verified in comparative experiments carried out on the six-DOF serial robot “Qianjiang I”.

  9. Finite element analysis of the equivalent stress distribution in Schanz screws during the use of a femoral fracture distractor

    Vincenzo Giordano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT To evaluate the mechanical stress and elastic deformation exercised in the thread/shaft transition of Schanz screws in assemblies with different screw anchorage distances in the entrance to the bone cortex, through the distribution and location of tension in the samples. An analysis of 3D finite elements was performed to evaluate the distribution of the equivalent stress (triple stress state in a Schanz screw fixed bicortically and orthogonally to a tubular bone, using two mounting patterns: (1 thread/shaft transition located 20 mm from the anchorage of the Schanz screws in the entrance to the bone cortex and (2 thread/shaft transition located 3 mm from the anchorage of the Schanz screws in entrance to the bone cortex. The simulations were performed maintaining the same direction of loading and the same distance from the force vector in relation to the center of the hypothetical bone. The load applied, its direction, and the distance to the center of the bone were constant during the simulations in order to maintain the moment of flexion equally constant. The present calculations demonstrated linear behavior during the experiment. It was found that the model with a distance of 20 mm between the Schanz screws anchorage in the entrance to the bone cortex and the thread/shaft transition reduces the risk of breakage or fatigue of the material during the application of constant static loads; in this model, the maximum forces observed were higher (350 MPa. The distance between the Schanz screws anchorage at the entrance to the bone cortex and the smooth thread/shaft transition of the screws used in a femoral distractor during acute distraction of a fracture must be farther from the entrance to the bone cortex, allowing greater degree of elastic deformation of the material, lower mechanical stress in the thread/shaft transition, and minimized breakage or fatigue. The suggested distance is 20 mm.

  10. Use of a life-size three-dimensional-printed spine model for pedicle screw instrumentation training.

    Park, Hyun Jin; Wang, Chenyu; Choi, Kyung Ho; Kim, Hyong Nyun

    2018-04-16

    Training beginners of the pedicle screw instrumentation technique in the operating room is limited because of issues related to patient safety and surgical efficiency. Three-dimensional (3D) printing enables training or simulation surgery on a real-size replica of deformed spine, which is difficult to perform in the usual cadaver or surrogate plastic models. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the educational effect of using a real-size 3D-printed spine model for training beginners of the free-hand pedicle screw instrumentation technique. We asked whether the use of a 3D spine model can improve (1) screw instrumentation accuracy and (2) length of procedure. Twenty life-size 3D-printed lumbar spine models were made from 10 volunteers (two models for each volunteer). Two novice surgeons who had no experience of free-hand pedicle screw instrumentation technique were instructed by an experienced surgeon, and each surgeon inserted 10 pedicle screws for each lumbar spine model. Computed tomography scans of the spine models were obtained to evaluate screw instrumentation accuracy. The length of time in completing the procedure was recorded. The results of the latter 10 spine models were compared with those of the former 10 models to evaluate learning effect. A total of 37/200 screws (18.5%) perforated the pedicle cortex with a mean of 1.7 mm (range, 1.2-3.3 mm). However, the latter half of the models had significantly less violation than the former half (10/100 vs. 27/100, p 3D-printed spine model can be an excellent tool for training beginners of the free-hand pedicle screw instrumentation.

  11. Advantages of Direct Insertion of a Straight Probe Without a Guide Tube During Anterior Odontoid Screw Fixation of Odontoid Fractures.

    Park, Jin Hoon; Kang, Dong-Ho; Lee, Moon Kyu; Yoo, Byoungwoo; Jung, Sang Ku; Hwang, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Jeoung Hee; Oh, Sunkyu; Lee, Eun Jung; Jeon, Sang Ryong; Roh, Sung Woo; Rhim, Seung Chul

    2016-05-01

    A retrospective cohort study. The aim of this study was to compare the anterior odontoid screw fixation (AOSF) with a guide tube or with a straight probe. AOSF associates with several complications, including malpositioning, fixation loss, and screw breakage. Screw pull-out from the C2 body is the most common complication. All consecutive patients with type II or rostral shallow type III odontoid fractures who underwent AOSFs during the study period were enrolled retrospectively. The guide-tube AOSF method followed the standard published method except C3 body and C2-3 disc annulus rimming was omitted to prevent disc injury; instead, the guide tube was anchored at the anterior inferior C2 vertebra corner. After 2 screw pull-outs, the guide-tube cohort was analyzed to identify the cause of instrument failure. Thereafter, the straight-probe method was developed. A guide tube was not used. A small pilot hole was made on the most anterior side of the inferior endplate, followed by insertion of a 2.5 mm straight probe through the C2 body. Non-union and instrument failure rates and screw-direction angles of the guide-tube and straight-probe groups were recorded. The guide-tube group (n = 13) had 2 screw pull-outs and 1 non-union. The straight-probe group (n = 8) had no complications and significantly larger screw-direction angles than the guide-tube group (60.5 ± 4.63 vs. 54.8 ± 3.82 degrees; P = 0.047). Straight-probe AOSF yielded larger direction angles without injuring bone and disc. Complications were absent. The procedure was easier than guide-tube AOSF and assured sufficient engagement, even in horizontal fracture orientation cases. 3.

  12. 3D printing-assisted preoperative plan of pedicle screw placement for middle-upper thoracic trauma: a cohort study.

    Xu, Wei; Zhang, Xuming; Ke, Tie; Cai, Hongru; Gao, Xiang

    2017-08-11

    This study aimed to evaluate the application of 3D printing in assisting preoperative plan of pedicle screw placement for treating middle-upper thoracic trauma. A preoperative plan was implemented in seven patients suffering from middle-upper thoracic (T3-T7) trauma between March 2013 and February 2016. In the 3D printing models, entry points of 56 pedicle screws (Magerl method) and 4 important parameters of the pedicle screws were measured, including optimal diameter (ϕ, mm), length (L, mm), inclined angle (α), head-tilting angle (+β), and tail-tilting angle (-β). In the surgery, bare-hands fixation of pedicle screws was performed using 3D printing models and the measured parameters as guidance. A total of seven patients were enrolled, including five men and two women, with the age of 21-62 years (mean age of 37.7 years). The position of the pedicle screw was evaluated postoperatively using a computerized tomography scan. Totally, 56 pedicle screws were placed, including 33 pieces of level 0, 18 pieces of level 1, 4 pieces of level 2 (pierced lateral wall), and 1 piece of level 3 (pierced lateral wall, no adverse consequences), with a fine rate of 91.0%. 3D printing technique is an intuitive and effective assistive technology to pedicle screw fixation for treating middle-upper thoracic vertebrae, which improve the accuracy of bare-hands screw placement and reduce empirical errors. The trial was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Fujian Provincial Hospital. It was registered on March 1st, 2013, and the registration number was K2013-03-001.

  13. Frictional performance of ball screw

    Nakashima, Katuhiro; Takafuji, Kazuki

    1985-01-01

    As feed screws, ball screws have become to be adopted in place of trapezoidal threads. The structure of ball screws is complex, but those are the indispensable component of NC machine tools and machining centers, and are frequently used for industrial robots. As the problems in the operation of ball screws, there are damage, life and the performance related to friction. As to the damage and life, though there is the problem of the load distribution on balls, the results of the research on rolling bearings are applied. The friction of ball screws consists of the friction of balls and a spiral groove, the friction of a ball and a ball, the friction in a ball-circulating mechanism and the viscous friction of lubricating oil. It was decided to synthetically examine the frictional performance of ball screws, such as driving torque, the variation of driving torque, efficiency, the formation of oil film and so on, under the working condition of wide range, using the screws with different accuracy and the nuts of various circuit number. The experimental setup and the processing of the experimental data, the driving performance of ball screws and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  14. Graft tendon slippage with metallic and bioabsorbable interference screws under cyclic load: a biomechanical study in a porcine model

    Ari Digiácomo Ocampo Moré

    Full Text Available Introduction The rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is the most common type of knee injury. Reconstructive surgery is the ‘gold standard’ treatment. During the immediate post-operative period, the fixation of the graft is entirely dependent on the ability of the grafted implant to be secured inside the bone tunnel under the cyclical loads associated with daily tasks. Poor fixation can lead to graft slippage, thus impairing the healing and integration of the graft. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical performance of tendon graft fixation devices with metallic and bioabsorbable interference screws. Methods Twenty ACL reconstructions were carried out in porcine tibias using deep flexor tendons to fix 9 × 20 mm metallic (n=10 and PLLA 70/30 bioabsorbable screws (n=10. To verify the ability of a construct to resist immediate postoperative (PO rehabilitation protocols for immediate load bearing, a cyclic loading test was applied with 50-250 N of tensile force at 1 Hz for 1000 cycles, and the displacement was measured at 10, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 load cycles to quantify the slippage of the graft during the test. After the cyclic loading test, a single-cycle load-to-failure test was applied. Results The slippage of the graft using metallic screws did not differ (P = 0.616 from that observed when using bioabsorbable screws. Conclusion The results obtained in this experiment indicate that metallic screws may promote a similar amount of graft slippage during low cyclic loading as bioabsorbable screws. Additionally, there was no difference in the biomechanical performance of these two types of screws during high failure loads.

  15. A novel piezoelectric actuator with a screw-coupled stator and rotor for driving an aperture

    Li, Xiaoniu; Zhou, Shengqiang

    2016-01-01

    Variable apertures have become very important in optical applications. This paper presents a new type of piezoelectric actuator with a screw-coupled stator and rotor that is developed to operate an aperture. The actuator and the aperture are integrated to control the luminous flux. To open or close, the aperture only needs to rotate through a limited angle. Therefore, the actuator is designed so that the rotor and the stator are simply connected by a screw to couple the axial preload and the circumferential movement. The torque and velocity of the actuator are produced by its circumferential motion. The preload of the actuator is applied by deforming the rotor along the axial direction. This method of preloading makes it difficult to keep the preload constant during the actuator’s work. To overcome this problem, a novel flexible rotor with a low stiffness is designed. An equivalent stiffness model of the rotor is presented for the design of a flexible rotor. Its design parameters are determined by a numerical model and confirmed using the finite element method. A prototype is fabricated to drive the aperture. The experimental results demonstrate a resolution of 20 μrad and a rotational range of 300°. The opening and closing durations of the aperture are 96 ms and 97.2 ms, respectively, for a rotation range of 90°. The rotation angle of the actuator is linearly related to time, which shows that its performance is controlled well. The novel screw-coupled piezoelectric actuator for driving an aperture features high resolution, high speed, simple structure and compact size. (paper)

  16. Landau quantization, Aharonov–Bohm effect and two-dimensional pseudoharmonic quantum dot around a screw dislocation

    Filgueiras, Cleverson; Rojas, Moises; Aciole, Gilson; Silva, Edilberto O.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We derive the Schrödinger equation for an electron around a screw dislocation in the presence of an external magnetic field. • We consider the electron confined on an interface. • Modifications due to the screw dislocation on the light interband absorption coefficient and absorption threshold frequency. - Abstract: We investigate the influence of a screw dislocation on the energy levels and the wavefunctions of an electron confined in a two-dimensional pseudoharmonic quantum dot under the influence of an external magnetic field inside a dot and Aharonov–Bohm field inside a pseudodot. The exact solutions for energy eigenvalues and wavefunctions are computed as functions of applied uniform magnetic field strength, Aharonov–Bohm flux, magnetic quantum number and the parameter characterizing the screw dislocation, the Burgers vector. We investigate the modifications due to the screw dislocation on the light interband absorption coefficient and absorption threshold frequency. Two scenarios are possible, depending on if singular effects either manifest or not. We found that as the Burgers vector increases, the curves of frequency are pushed up towards of the growth of it. One interesting aspect which we have observed is that the Aharonov–Bohm flux can be tuned in order to cancel the screw effect of the model.

  17. Landau quantization, Aharonov–Bohm effect and two-dimensional pseudoharmonic quantum dot around a screw dislocation

    Filgueiras, Cleverson, E-mail: cleverson.filgueiras@dfi.ufla.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Lavras, Caixa Postal 3037, 37200-000, Lavras, MG (Brazil); Rojas, Moises, E-mail: moises.leyva@dfi.ufla.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Lavras, Caixa Postal 3037, 37200-000, Lavras, MG (Brazil); Aciole, Gilson [Unidade Acadêmica de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, POB 10071, 58109-970, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil); Silva, Edilberto O., E-mail: edilberto.silva@ufma.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, 65085-580, São Luís, MA (Brazil)

    2016-11-25

    Highlights: • We derive the Schrödinger equation for an electron around a screw dislocation in the presence of an external magnetic field. • We consider the electron confined on an interface. • Modifications due to the screw dislocation on the light interband absorption coefficient and absorption threshold frequency. - Abstract: We investigate the influence of a screw dislocation on the energy levels and the wavefunctions of an electron confined in a two-dimensional pseudoharmonic quantum dot under the influence of an external magnetic field inside a dot and Aharonov–Bohm field inside a pseudodot. The exact solutions for energy eigenvalues and wavefunctions are computed as functions of applied uniform magnetic field strength, Aharonov–Bohm flux, magnetic quantum number and the parameter characterizing the screw dislocation, the Burgers vector. We investigate the modifications due to the screw dislocation on the light interband absorption coefficient and absorption threshold frequency. Two scenarios are possible, depending on if singular effects either manifest or not. We found that as the Burgers vector increases, the curves of frequency are pushed up towards of the growth of it. One interesting aspect which we have observed is that the Aharonov–Bohm flux can be tuned in order to cancel the screw effect of the model.

  18. The best location for proximal locking screw for femur interlocking nailing: A biomechanical study

    Ahmet A Karaarslan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: According to our findings, there is twice as much difference in locking screw bending resistance between these two application levels. To avoid proximal locking screw deformation, locking screws should be placed in the level of the lesser trochanter in nailing of 1/3 middle and distal femur fractures.

  19. Medial pelvic migration of the lag screw in a short gamma nail after hip fracture fixation: a case report and review of the literature

    Li Xinning

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hip fractures are a common injury among the elderly. Internal fixation with an intramedullary (IM system has gained popularity for the treatment of intertrochanteric femur fractures. Multiple complications associated with IM fracture fixation have been described, however, we report a rare complication of medial pelvic migration of the lag screw of a short IM nail in a stable construct ten weeks post surgery. The patient was subsequently treated with Lag Screw removal and revision surgery with a shorter Lag Screw and an accessory cannulated screw acting as a de-rotational device. The patient did well with the revision surgery and was able to return to full activities.

  20. Computed tomography- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults: a new technique

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Huwart, Laurent; Browaeys, Patrick; Nouri, Yasir; Ibba, Caroline [Hopital Archet 2, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology, Nice (France); Hauger, Olivier [Hopital Pellegrin, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Bordeaux, Department of Radiology, Bordeaux (France); Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Antoine Lacassagne Cancer Research Institute, Department of Radiology, Nice (France); Boileau, Pascal [Hopital Archet 2, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nice (France)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of computed tomography (CT)- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation for the treatment of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults. Ten consecutive adult patients (four men and six women; mean age: 57.1 [range, 44-78 years]) were prospectively treated by percutaneous screw fixation for low-grade (six grade 1 and four grade 2) isthmic spondylolisthesis of L5. For each patient, two 4.0-mm Asnis III cannulated screws were placed to fix the pars interarticularis defects. All procedures were performed under local anaesthesia by using CT and fluoroscopy guidance. Post-operative outcome was assessed using the visual analogue scale and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. The procedure time ranged from 45 to 60 min. The mean screw length was 27 mm (range, 24-32 mm). The VAS and ODI measurements {+-} SD decreased from 7.8 {+-} 0.9 preoperatively to 1.5 {+-} 1.1 at the last 2-year follow-up, and from 62.3 {+-} 17.2 to 15.1 {+-} 6.0, respectively (P < 0.001 in both cases). Neither slip progression nor screw failure was noted. This feasibility study showed that CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation could be a rapid, safe and effective method of treating low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis. (orig.)

  1. Computed tomography- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults: a new technique

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Huwart, Laurent; Browaeys, Patrick; Nouri, Yasir; Ibba, Caroline; Hauger, Olivier; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Boileau, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of computed tomography (CT)- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation for the treatment of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults. Ten consecutive adult patients (four men and six women; mean age: 57.1 [range, 44-78 years]) were prospectively treated by percutaneous screw fixation for low-grade (six grade 1 and four grade 2) isthmic spondylolisthesis of L5. For each patient, two 4.0-mm Asnis III cannulated screws were placed to fix the pars interarticularis defects. All procedures were performed under local anaesthesia by using CT and fluoroscopy guidance. Post-operative outcome was assessed using the visual analogue scale and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. The procedure time ranged from 45 to 60 min. The mean screw length was 27 mm (range, 24-32 mm). The VAS and ODI measurements ± SD decreased from 7.8 ± 0.9 preoperatively to 1.5 ± 1.1 at the last 2-year follow-up, and from 62.3 ± 17.2 to 15.1 ± 6.0, respectively (P < 0.001 in both cases). Neither slip progression nor screw failure was noted. This feasibility study showed that CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation could be a rapid, safe and effective method of treating low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis. (orig.)

  2. CT-guided screw fixation of vertical sacral fractures in local anaesthesia using a standard CT; CT-kontrollierte Schraubenosteosynthese von vertikalen Frakturen des hinteren Beckenringes in Lokalanaesthesie

    Reuther, G.; Dehne, I. [Thueringen-Klinik, Saalfeld (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Roehner, U.; Will, T.; Petereit, U. [Thueringen-Klinik, Saalfeld (Germany). Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate time efficiency, radiation dose, precision and complications of percutaneous iliosacral screw placement under CT-guidance in local anaesthesia. Retrospective analysis of 143 interventions in 135 patients during a period of 42 months. Implant failures could be evaluated in 85/182 screws and bony healing or refracturing in 46/182 screws. A total of 182 iliosacral screw placements in 179 vertical sacral fractures (105 unilateral, 37 bilateral) took place in 135 patients. 166/179 of the sacral fractures were detected in Denis zone 1, 10 in Denis zone 2 and 3 in Denis zone 3. No screw misplacements including the simultaneous bilateral procedures were noted. The average time for a unilateral screw placement was 23 minutes (range: 14-52 minutes) and 35 minutes (range: 21-60 minutes) for simultaneous bilateral screwing. The dose length product was 365 mGy x cm (range: 162-1014 mGy x cm) for the unilateral and 470 mGy x cm (range: 270-1271 mGy x cm) for the bilateral procedure. 1 gluteal bleeding occurred as the only acute minor complication (0.7%). Fracture healing was verified with follow-up CTs in 42/46 sacral fractures after screw placement. Backing out occurred in 12/85 screws between 6 and 69 days after intervention. In 8 patients contralateral stress fractures were detected after unilateral screw placement between day 10 and 127 (average: 48 days). CT-guided iliosacral screw placement in sacral fractures is a safe tool providing a very high precision. The radiation dose is in the order of a diagnostic CT of the pelvis for both unilateral and bilateral screws. Contralateral stress fractures in unilateral screw placements have to be considered during the first weeks after intervention.

  3. The effects of loading on the preload and dimensions of the abutment screw for a 3-unit cantilever-fixed prosthesis design.

    Setia, Gaurav; Yousef, Hoda; Ehrenberg, David; Luke, Allyn; Weiner, Saul

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to use an in vitro model system to compare the effects on the screw torque and screw dimensions within 2 commercially available implant systems from occlusal loading on a cantilevered-fixed partial denture. Cantilevered implant-supported 3-unit prostheses with 2 premolar abutments and 1 premolar pontic (7.3 mm in length) were made on resin casts containing 2 implant analogs for 2 implant systems: BioLok Silhouette Tapered Implant System (Birmingham, AL) and Zimmer Tapered Screw-Vent Implant System (Carlsbad, CA) with 10 samples in each group. Each sample was loaded with either of 2 protocols: (1) a load of 50 N on the cantilevered pontic unit and (2) a loading of 150 N on all 3 units. The outcome measures were (1) changes in residual torque of the abutment screws and (2) changes in screw dimension. The BioLok Silhouette Tapered Implant group demonstrated slight but statistically significant torque loss 18.8% to 28.5% in both abutment screws for both protocols, P ≤ 0.05, without any changes in screw dimension. In the Zimmer Tapered Screw-Vent Implant group, there was a significant elongation of the abutment screws and a markedly significant 44.4%, (P ≤ 0.01) loss in torque in the mesial screw and a 28.5%, (P ≤ 0.05) loss in torque in the distal screw when the cantilever alone was loaded. Differences in screw design influence the maintenance of preload and distortion of the shank. The influence of the interface design, namely an internal hex of 1 mm versus an external hex did not influence the preload. Cantilevered prostheses can cause loss of torque and dimensional changes in abutment screws.

  4. Stress field of a near-surface basal screw dislocation in elastically anisotropic hexagonal crystals

    Valeri S. Harutyunyan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we derive and analyze the analytical expressions for stress components of the dislocation elastic field induced by a near-surface basal screw dislocation in a semi-infinite elastically anisotropic material with hexagonal crystal lattice. The variation of above stress components depending on “free surface–dislocation” distance (i.e., free surface effect is studied by means of plotting the stress distribution maps for elastically anisotropic crystals of GaN and TiB2 that exhibit different degrees of elastic anisotropy. The dependence both of the image force on a screw dislocation and the force of interaction between two neighboring basal screw dislocations on the “free surface–dislocation” distance is analyzed as well. The influence of elastic anisotropy on the latter force is numerically analyzed for GaN and TiB2 and also for crystals of such highly elastically-anisotropic materials as Ti, Zn, Cd, and graphite. The comparatively stronger effect of the elastic anisotropy on dislocation-induced stress distribution quantified for TiB2 is attributed to the higher degree of elastic anisotropy of this compound in comparison to that of the GaN. For GaN and TiB2, the dislocation stress distribution maps are highly influenced by the free surface effect at “free surface–dislocation” distances roughly smaller than ≈15 and ≈50 nm, respectively. It is found that, for above indicated materials, the relative decrease of the force of interaction between near-surface screw dislocations due to free surface effect is in the order Ti > GaN > TiB2 > Zn > Cd > Graphite that results from increase of the specific shear anisotropy parameter in the reverse order Ti < GaN < TiB2 < Zn < Cd < Graphite. The results obtained in this study are also applicable to the case when a screw dislocation is situated in the “thin film–substrate” system at a (0001 basal interface between the film and substrate provided that the elastic constants

  5. A New Orthodontic Appliance with a Mini Screw for Upper Molar Distalization.

    Ozkalayci, Nurhat; Yetmez, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present a new upper molar distalization appliance called Cise distalizer designed as intraoral device supported with orthodontic mini screw for upper permanent molar distalization. The new appliance consists of eight main components. In order to understand the optimum force level, the appliance under static loading is tested by using strain gage measurement techniques. Results show that one of the open coils produces approximately 300 gr distalization force. Cise distalizer can provide totally 600 gr distalization force. This range of force level is enough for distalization of upper first and second molar teeth.

  6. A New Orthodontic Appliance with a Mini Screw for Upper Molar Distalization

    Nurhat Ozkalayci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present a new upper molar distalization appliance called Cise distalizer designed as intraoral device supported with orthodontic mini screw for upper permanent molar distalization. The new appliance consists of eight main components. In order to understand the optimum force level, the appliance under static loading is tested by using strain gage measurement techniques. Results show that one of the open coils produces approximately 300 gr distalization force. Cise distalizer can provide totally 600 gr distalization force. This range of force level is enough for distalization of upper first and second molar teeth.

  7. Functional outcomes following syndesmotic fixation: A comparison of screws retained in situ versus routine removal - Is it really necessary?

    Tucker, Adam; Street, Julia; Kealey, David; McDonald, Sinead; Stevenson, Mike

    2013-12-01

    Syndesmotic disruption can occur in up to 20% of ankle fractures and is more common in Weber Type C injuries. Syndesmotic repair aims to restore ankle stability. Routine removal of syndesmosis screws is advocated to avoid implant breakage and adverse functional outcome such as pain and stiffness, but conflicting evidence exists to support this. The aim of the current study is to determine whether functional outcome differs in patients who had syndesmosis screws routinely removed, compared to those who did not, and whether a cost benefit exists if removal of screws is not routinely necessary. A retrospective review of consecutive syndesmosis repairs was performed from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2010 in a single regional trauma centre. We identified 91 patients who had undergone open reduction internal fixation of an ankle fracture with placement of a syndesmosis screw at index procedure. As many as 69 patients were eligible for the study as defined by the inclusion criteria and they completed a validated functional outcome questionnaire. The functional outcomes of patients with 'retained screws' and 'removed screws' were analysed and compared using the Olerud Molander Ankle Score (OMAS). A total of 63 patients responded with a mean follow-up period of 31 months (range 10-43 months). Of those patients, 43 underwent routine screw removal whilst 20 had screws left in situ. The groups were comparable considering age, gender and follow-up time. The 'retained' group scored higher mean OMAS scores, 81.5±19.3 compared to 75±12.9 in the 'removed' group (p=0.107). The retained group achieved higher functional scores in each of the OMAS domains as well as experiencing less pain. When adjusted for gender, the findings were found to be statistically significant (p=0.046). Our study has shown that retained-screw fixation does not significantly impair functional capacity, with additional cost-effectiveness. We therefore advocate that syndesmosis screws be left in situ and

  8. Ordinary Cannulated Compression Screws or Headless Cannulated Compression Screws? A Synthetic Bone Biomechanical Research in the Internal Fixation of Vertical Femoral Neck Fracture

    Baokun Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study is to verify whether the headless cannulated compression screw (HCCS has higher biomechanical stability than the ordinary cannulated compression screw (OCCS in the treatment of vertical femoral neck fractures. Materials and Methods. 30 synthetic femur models were equally divided into 2 groups, with 50°, 60°, and 70° Pauwels angle of femoral neck fracture, under 3D printed guiding plates and C-arm fluoroscopic guidance. The femur molds were fixed with three parallel OCCSs as OCCS group and three parallel HCCSs as HCCS group. All specimens were tested for compressive strength and maximum load to failure with a loading rate of 2 mm/min. Results. The result showed that there was no significant difference with the compressive strength in the Pauwels angle of 50° and 60°. However, we observed that the maximum load to failure with the Pauwels angle of 50°, 60°, and 70° and the compressive strength with 70° of HCCS group showed better performance than the OCCS group. Conclusion. HCCS performs with better biomechanical stability than OCCS in the treatment of vertical femoral neck fracture, especially with the Pauwels angle of 70°.

  9. Intraoperative three-dimensional fluoroscopy after transpedicular positioning of Kirschner-wire versus conventional intraoperative biplanar fluoroscopic control: A retrospective study of 345 patients and 1880 pedicle screws

    Ghassan Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design: Retrospective study. Objective: The aim was to find out whether intraoperative three-dimensional imaging after transpedicular positioning of Kirschner wire (K-wire in lumbar and thoracic posterior instrumentation procedures is of benefit to the patients and if this technique is accurately enough to make a postoperative screw position control through computer tomography (CT dispensable. Patients and Methods: Lumbar and thoracic posterior instrumentation procedures conducted at our department between 2002 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into two groups: group A, including patients who underwent intraoperative three-dimensional scan after transpedicular positioning of the K-wire and group B, including patients who underwent only intraoperative biplanar fluoroscopy. An early postoperative CT of the instrumented section was done in all cases to assess the screw position. The rate of immediate intraoperative correction of the K-wires in cases of mal-positioning, as well as the rate of postoperative screw revisions, was measured. Results: In general, 345 patients (1880 screws were reviewed and divided into two groups; group A with 225 patients (1218 screws and group B with 120 patients (662 screws. One patient (0.44% (one screw [0.082%] of group A underwent postoperative screw correction while screw revisions were necessary in 14 patients (11.7% (28 screws [4.2%] of group B. Twenty-three patients (10.2% (28 K-wires [2.3%] of group A underwent intraoperative correction due to primary intraoperative detected K-wire mal-position. None of the corrected K-wires resulted in a corresponding neurological deficit. Conclusion: Three-dimensional imaging after transpedicular K-wire positioning leads to solid intraoperative identification of misplaced K-wires prior to screw placement and reduces screw revision rates compared with conventional fluoroscopic control. When no clinical deterioration emerges, a

  10. Percutaneous Sacroiliac Screw Placement: A Prospective Randomized Comparison of Robot-assisted Navigation Procedures with a Conventional Technique

    Wang, Jun-Qiang; Wang, Yu; Feng, Yun; Han, Wei; Su, Yong-Gang; Liu, Wen-Yong; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Wu, Xin-Bao; Wang, Man-Yi; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sacroiliac (SI) screw fixation is a demanding technique, with a high rate of screw malposition due to the complex pelvic anatomy. TiRobot™ is an orthopedic surgery robot which can be used for SI screw fixation. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of robot-assisted placement of SI screws compared with a freehand technique. Methods: Thirty patients requiring posterior pelvic ring stabilization were randomized to receive freehand or robot-assisted SI screw fixation, between January 2016 and June 2016 at Beijing Jishuitan Hospital. Forty-five screws were placed at levels S1 and S2. In both methods, the primary end point screw position was assessed and classified using postoperative computed tomography. Fisher's exact probability test was used to analyze the screws’ positions. Secondary end points, such as duration of trajectory planning, surgical time after reduction of the pelvis, insertion time for guide wire, number of guide wire attempts, and radiation exposure without pelvic reduction, were also assessed. Results: Twenty-three screws were placed in the robot-assisted group and 22 screws in the freehand group; no postoperative complications or revisions were reported. The excellent and good rate of screw placement was 100% in the robot-assisted group and 95% in the freehand group. The P value (0.009) showed the same superiority in screw distribution. The fluoroscopy time after pelvic reduction in the robot-assisted group was significantly shorter than that in the freehand group (median [Q1, Q3]: 6.0 [6.0, 9.0] s vs. median [Q1, Q3]: 36.0 [21.5, 48.0] s; χ2 = 13.590, respectively, P < 0.001); no difference in operation time after reduction of the pelvis was noted (χ2 = 1.990, P = 0.158). Time for guide wire insertion was significantly shorter for the robot-assisted group than that for the freehand group (median [Q1, Q3]: 2.0 [2.0, 2.7] min vs. median [Q1, Q3]: 19.0 [15.5, 45.0] min; χ2 = 20.952, respectively, P < 0.001). The number of guide

  11. Metallurgical analysis of a failed maraging steel shear screw used in the band separation system of a satellite launch vehicle

    S.V.S. Narayana Murty

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Maraging steels have excellent combination of strength and toughness and are extensively used for a variety of aerospace applications. In one such critical application, this steel was used to fabricate shear screws of a stage separation system in a satellite launch vehicle. During assembly preparations, one of the shear screws which connected the separation band and band end block has failed at the first thread. Microstructural analysis revealed that the crack originated from the root of the thread and propagated in an intergranular mode. The failure is attributed to combined effect of stress and corrosion leading to stress corrosion cracking.

  12. Parameter study of a screw-pinch reactor with circular cross-section

    Bustraan, M.; Franken, W.M.P.; Klippel, H.Th.; Muysken, M.; Verschuur, K.A.

    1977-04-01

    In the framework of system studies on pulsed high-β fusion reactors, a parameter study of a reactor based on a screw pinch with a circular cross-section has been performed. The plasma is heated to ignition in two stages. First, the cold plasma is heated by fast implosion in order to guarantee pitch conservation of the inward moving magnetic field lines. The relevant implosion theory has been generalized to a β<1 plasma. In the second stage, an adiabatic compression heats the plasma to the ignition temperature at which point α-particle heating takes over. For stability reasons, β is kept below 0.25. The choice of a particular set of basic parameter values is justified by global design considerations of the reactor. These considerations, e.g. on blanket design and electrotechnical requirements, are presented in some detail. A computer program searches for optimal reactors, i.e. for which at a given thermal output the net efficiency is a maximum. The parameters of a Reference Screw-Pinch Reactor and some other numerical examples are given. The main conclusions are: the net efficiency, although increasing with output energy, is low because of ohmic losses in the compression coil system; the application of sustained fields generated by superconducting coils to reduce these ohmic losses is problematical; a belt-shaped screw pinch in which higher values of β may be reached, improves the net efficiency and alleviates the technical requirements; heating by implosion and adiabatic compression of a plasma with values of β as low as considered here, is inefficient. Therefore, other means of heating the plasma to ignition may be attractive

  13. Dynamic modelling of a 3-CPU parallel robot via screw theory

    L. Carbonari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the dynamic modelling of I.Ca.Ro., a novel Cartesian parallel robot recently designed and prototyped by the robotics research group of the Polytechnic University of Marche. By means of screw theory and virtual work principle, a computationally efficient model has been built, with the final aim of realising advanced model based controllers. Then a dynamic analysis has been performed in order to point out possible model simplifications that could lead to a more efficient run time implementation.

  14. Improved Inverse Kinematics Algorithm Using Screw Theory for a Six-DOF Robot Manipulator

    Chen, Qingcheng; Zhu, Shiqiang; Zhang, Xuequn

    2015-01-01

    Based on screw theory, a novel improved inverse-kinematics approach for a type of six-DOF serial robot, “Qianjiang I”, is proposed in this paper. The common kinematics model of the robot is based on the Denavit-Hartenberg (D-H) notation method while its inverse kinematics has inefficient calculation and complicated solution, which cannot meet the demands of online real-time application. To solve this problem, this paper presents a new method to improve the efficiency of the inverse kinematics...

  15. Linear theory of drift-tearing and interchange modes in a screw pinch

    Copenhaver, C.

    1978-04-01

    A drift dispersion relation, as applied to a resistive incompressible plasma in a screw pinch, is derived. This dispersion relation incorporates both drift-tearing and drift-interchange modes and is valid throughout the collisional regime by including kinetic theory factors. The dispersion relation reduces to the drift-tearing dispersion relation in the zero pressure gradient limit, and to the classical resistive dispersion relation in the zero drift limit. The electron temperature gradient instability is still present. Now, however, the introduction of the interchange-drift instability increases the growth rate further above the tearing-drift case. (orig.) [de

  16. Continuous decompression of unicameral bone cyst with cannulated screws: a comparative study.

    Brecelj, Janez; Suhodolcan, Lovro

    2007-09-01

    We determined the role of mechanical decompression in the resolution of unicameral bone cyst. A total of 69 children with unicameral bone cysts were treated either by (i) open curettage and bone grafting, (ii) steroid injection or (iii) cannulated screw insertion. During a mean follow-up of 69 months (range, 12-58), the cysts were evaluated by radiological criteria. The healing rates in the three groups were 25, 12 and 29% after the first treatment, and a further 50, 19 and 65% after the second. The study has demonstrated the advantages of the decompression technique for unicameral bone cysts over other treatment modalities studied.

  17. In vivo evaluation of immediately loaded stainless steel and titanium orthodontic screws in a growing bone.

    Kerstin Gritsch

    Full Text Available The present work intends to evaluate the use of immediate loaded orthodontic screws in a growing model, and to study the specific bone response. Thirty-two screws (half of stainless steel and half of titanium were inserted in the alveolar bone of 8 growing pigs. The devices were immediately loaded with a 100 g orthodontic force. Two loading periods were assessed: 4 and 12 weeks. Both systems of screws were clinically assessed. Histological observations and histomorphometric analysis evaluated the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" and static and dynamic bone parameters in the vicinity of the devices (test zone and in a bone area located 1.5 cm posterior to the devices (control zone. Both systems exhibit similar responses for the survival rate; 87.5% and 81.3% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.64; 4-week period, and 62.5% and 50.0% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.09; 12-week period. No significant differences between the devices were found regarding the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" (p = 0.1 or the static and dynamic bone parameters. However, the 5% threshold of "bone-to-implant contact" was obtained after 4 weeks with the stainless steel devices, leading to increased survival rate values. Bone in the vicinity of the miniscrew implants showed evidence of a significant increase in bone trabecular thickness when compared to bone in the control zone (p = 0.05. In our study, it is likely that increased trabecular thickness is a way for low density bone to respond to the stress induced by loading.

  18. In vivo evaluation of immediately loaded stainless steel and titanium orthodontic screws in a growing bone.

    Gritsch, Kerstin; Laroche, Norbert; Bonnet, Jeanne-Marie; Exbrayat, Patrick; Morgon, Laurent; Rabilloud, Muriel; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The present work intends to evaluate the use of immediate loaded orthodontic screws in a growing model, and to study the specific bone response. Thirty-two screws (half of stainless steel and half of titanium) were inserted in the alveolar bone of 8 growing pigs. The devices were immediately loaded with a 100 g orthodontic force. Two loading periods were assessed: 4 and 12 weeks. Both systems of screws were clinically assessed. Histological observations and histomorphometric analysis evaluated the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" and static and dynamic bone parameters in the vicinity of the devices (test zone) and in a bone area located 1.5 cm posterior to the devices (control zone). Both systems exhibit similar responses for the survival rate; 87.5% and 81.3% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.64; 4-week period), and 62.5% and 50.0% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.09; 12-week period). No significant differences between the devices were found regarding the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" (p = 0.1) or the static and dynamic bone parameters. However, the 5% threshold of "bone-to-implant contact" was obtained after 4 weeks with the stainless steel devices, leading to increased survival rate values. Bone in the vicinity of the miniscrew implants showed evidence of a significant increase in bone trabecular thickness when compared to bone in the control zone (p = 0.05). In our study, it is likely that increased trabecular thickness is a way for low density bone to respond to the stress induced by loading.

  19. Endovascular Treatment of a Vertebral Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Posterior C1-C2 Transarticular Screw Fixation

    Mendez, Jose C.; Gonzalez-Llanos, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    We present a case of vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm after a posterior C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation procedure that was effectively treated with endovascular coil occlusion. Vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm complicating posterior C1-C2 transarticular fixation is extremely rare, with only one previous case having been reported previously. Endovascular occlusion is better achieved in the subacute phase of the pseudoaneurysm, when the wall of the pseudoaneurysm has matured and stabilized. Further follow-up angiographies are mandatory in order to confirm that there is no recurrence of the lesion

  20. A Sense of Place

    Rachel Black

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available People increasingly want to know where their food and wine comes from and who produces it. This is part of developing a taste of place, or what the French call terroir. The academic and industry debates surrounding the concept of terroir are explored, and the efforts of Massachusetts wine producers to define their sense of place are discussed.

  1. Anterior transarticular C1-C2 fixation with contralateral screw insertion: a report of two cases and technical note.

    Lvov, Ivan; Grin, Andrey; Kaykov, Aleksandr; Smirnov, Vladimir; Krylov, Vladimir

    2017-08-08

    Anterior transarticular fixation of the C1-C2 vertebrae is a well-known technique that involves screw insertion through the body of the C2 vertebra into the lateral masses of the atlas through an anterior transcervical approach. Meanwhile, contralateral screw insertion has been previously described only in anatomical studies. We describe two case reports of the clinical application of this new technique. In Case 1, the patient was diagnosed with an unstable C1 fracture. The clinical features of the case did not allow for any type of posterior atlantoaxial fusion, Halo immobilization, or routine anterior fixation using the Reindl and Koller techniques. The possible manner of screw insertion into the anterior third of the right lateral mass was via a contralateral trajectory, which was performed in this case. Case 2 involved a patient with neglected posteriorly dislocated dens fracture who could not lie in the prone position due to concomitant cardiac pathology. Reduction of atlantoaxial dislocation was insufficient, even after scar tissue resection at the fracture, while transdental fusion was not possible. Considering the success of the previous case, atlantoaxial fixation was performed through the small approach, using the Reindl technique and contralateral screw insertion. These two cases demonstrate the potential of anterior transarticular fixation of C1-C2 vertebrae in cases where posterior atlantoaxial fusion is not achievable. This type of fixation can be performed through a single approach if one screw is inserted using the Reindl technique and another is inserted via a contralateral trajectory.

  2. A biomechanical comparison of headless tapered variable pitch and AO cortical bone screws for fixation of a simulated slab fracture in equine third carpal bones.

    Bueno, Aloisio C D; Galuppo, Larry D; Taylor, Kenneth T; Jensen, David G; Stover, Susan M

    2003-01-01

    To compare the mechanical shear strengths and stiffnesses obtained from in vitro testing of a simulated complete third carpal bone (C3) frontal plane radial facet slab fracture (osteotomy) stabilized with either a 4/5 Acutrak (AT) compression screw or a 4.5-mm AO cortical bone (AO) screw inserted in lag fashion. Drilling, tapping, and screw insertion torques, forces, and times also were compared between AT and AO implants. In vitro biomechanical assessment of site preparation, screw insertion, and shear failure test variables of bone screw stabilized simulated C3 slab fracture in paired cadaveric equine carpi. Eight pairs of cadaveric equine C3 without orthopedic abnormalities. Standardized simulated C3 slab fractures were repaired with either AO or AT screws (AO/C3 and AT/C3 groups, respectively). Drilling, tapping, and screw insertion torques, forces, and times were measured with a materials testing machine for each screw type. Repaired specimens were tested in axially oriented shear until failure. Paired Students t-tests were used to assess differences between site preparation, screw insertion, and shear testing variables. Significance was set at P bone fragment measurements of the standardized simulated C3 slab fractures created for AO or AT screws. There were no significant differences for mean and maximum drilling torques; however, the tapered AT drill had greater maximum drilling force compared with the 3.2-mm and 4.5-mm AO drill bits. Mean insertion torque and force measured from the self-tapping AT screw were not significantly different compared with the 4.5-mm AO tap. There were no significant differences in maximum screw torque among constructs. Total procedure time was significantly longer for the AT group (5.8 +/- 1.6 minutes) compared with the AO group (2.9 +/- 1.1 minutes; P =.001). AT stabilized specimens had significantly greater mean +/- SD initial shear stiffness (3.64 +/- 1.08 kN/mm) than AO specimens (1.64 +/- 0.73 kN/mm; P =.005). All other

  3. First-principles calculation for the effect of hydrogen atoms on the mobility of a screw dislocation in BCC iron

    Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Kaburaki, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Masatake; Endo, Tatsuro; Higuchi, Kenji; Ogata, Shigenobu; Kimizuka, Hajime

    2012-01-01

    Effect of hydrogen atoms on the mobility of a screw dislocation in BCC iron has been evaluated using the first-principles calculation. The stable position of a hydrogen atom is found to be near the screw dislocation core and inside the core respectively when the dislocation is at the easy-core or hard-core configuration in BCC iron. The intrinsically unstable hard-core configuration of the screw dislocation is stabilized when a hydrogen atom is trapped inside the core. On the basis of this first-principles result, an elastic string model of a dislocation is developed to predict the kink motion in the presence of a hydrogen atom. It is found that a double-kink formation is facilitated when a hydrogen atom is located near a dislocation line, however, a kink motion is retarded when a hydrogen atom is behind the kink. (author)

  4. Performance Characteristics of a 4 × 6 Oil-Free Twin-Screw Compressor

    Sun-Seok Byeon; Jae-Young Lee; Youn-Jea Kim

    2017-01-01

    The screw compressor in the early stage of development is generally known as the oil-injection type. However, escalating environmental problems and advances in electronic components have spurred continuous R & D to minimize the oil content in compressed air. The oil-free twin-screw compressor is continuously compressed by inner volumetric change between rotors and casing. For this reason, in order to predict the overall performance of the screw compressor at the early stage of the design ...

  5. Design of a magnetic lead screw for wave energy conversion

    Holm, Rasmus Koldborg; Berg, Nick Ilsø; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    2012-01-01

    on the bearing supports used to compensate for the magnetic attraction forces and the resulting deflection of the rotor. Also, in order to avoid some of the production related disadvantages of using surface mounted magnets, an embedded magnet topology is proposed. To demonstrate the technology a scaled 17 kN MLS...

  6. Design of a magnetic lead screw for wave energy conversion

    Holm, Rasmus Koldborg; Berg, Nick Ilsoe; Walkusch, Morten

    2013-01-01

    used to compensate for the magnetic attraction forces and the resulting deflection of the rotor. In addition, in order to avoid some of the assembling-related disadvantages of using surface-mounted magnets, an embedded-magnet topology is proposed. To demonstrate the technology, a scaled 17-kN MLS...

  7. A loose screw at the European Patent Office!

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    The European Patent Office (EPO) is an International Organisation which employs 7000 people on different sites across Europe, and is responsible for the granting of patents in Europe. In an ever more globalized society, it is essential to have a European institution which can grant patents of a very high quality and legally unassailable. However, over the past three years this organization has been under the rule of a president who imposes productivity targets which hinders the quality of the work done by the intellectual property specialists. This Presidency, with manners of a gone-by era, has only managed to degrade the social climate over the last years, which European media has echoed. By imposing ultra-liberal methods worthy of the 19th century -- when union rights and personnel representation were unheard of or repressed if they tried to rise -- the President endangers the institution and affects the European economy. And to better reach his goal, and scorning all rules that are often shared by interna...

  8. Experimental Investigation of the Performance of a Hermetic Screw-Expander Organic Rankine Cycle

    Sung-Wei Hsu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the authors experimentally investigate the performance of the organic Rankine cycle (ORC and screw expander under the influence of supply pressure and pressure ratio over the expander. Three tests were performed with expander pressure ratios of 2.4–3.5, 3.0–4.6, and 3.3–6.1, which cover the over-expansion and under-expansion operating modes. The test results show a maximum expander isentropic efficiency of 72.4% and a relative cycle efficiency of 10.5% at an evaporation temperature of 101 °C and condensation temperature of 45 °C. At a given pressure ratio over the expander, a higher supply pressure to the expander causes a higher expander isentropic efficiency and higher cycle efficiency in the over-expansion mode. However, in the under-expansion mode, the higher supply pressure results in a lower expander isentropic efficiency and adversely affects the cycle efficiency. The results also show that under the condition of operation at a given pressure ratio, a higher supply pressure yields a larger power output owing to the increased mass flow rate at the higher supply pressure. The study results demonstrate that a screw-expander ORC can be operated with a wide range of heat sources and heat sinks with satisfactory cycle efficiency.

  9. A compact ball screw based electromagnetic energy harvester for railroad application

    Pan, Yu; Lin, Teng; Liu, Cheng; Yu, Jie; Zuo, Jianyong; Zuo, Lei

    2018-03-01

    To enable the smart technologies, such as the positive train controls, rail damage detection and track health monitoring on the railroad side, the electricity is required and in needed. In this paper, we proposed a novel ball-screw based electromagnetic energy harvester for railway track with mechanical-motion-rectifier (MMR) mechanism, to harvest the energy that usually dissipated and wasted during train induced track vibration. Ball screw based design reduces backlash during motion transmission, and MMR nonlinear characteristics with one way clutches makes the harvester convert the bi-direction track vibration into a generator's unidirectional rotation, which improves the transmission reliability and increases the energy harvesting efficiency. A systematic model combining train-rail-harvester was established to analyze the dynamic characteristic of the proposed railway energy, and lab and in-field tests were carried out to experimentally characterize the proposed energy harvester. In lab bench test showed the proposed harvester reached a 70% mechanical efficiency with a high sensitivity to the environment vibration. In filed test showed that a peak 7.8W phase power was achieved when a two marshaling type A metro train passed by with a 30 km/h.

  10. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System.

    Sim, Bo Kyun; Kim, Bongju; Kim, Min Jeong; Jeong, Guk Hyun; Ju, Kyung Won; Shin, Yoo Jin; Kim, Man Yong; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access hole for easy retrieval. This study aimed to introduce this modified design of the abutment screw, the concept of easy retrieval, and to compare the mechanical strengths of the conventional and hollow abutment screws by finite element analysis (FEA) and mechanical test. In the FEA results, both types of abutment screws showed similar stress distribution in the single artificial tooth system. A maximum load difference of about 2% occurred in the vertical load by a mechanical test. This study showed that the hollow abutment screw may be an alternative to the conventional abutment screws because this is designed for easy retrieval and that both abutment screws showed no significant difference in the mechanical tests and in the FEA.

  11. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System

    Bo Kyun Sim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access hole for easy retrieval. This study aimed to introduce this modified design of the abutment screw, the concept of easy retrieval, and to compare the mechanical strengths of the conventional and hollow abutment screws by finite element analysis (FEA and mechanical test. In the FEA results, both types of abutment screws showed similar stress distribution in the single artificial tooth system. A maximum load difference of about 2% occurred in the vertical load by a mechanical test. This study showed that the hollow abutment screw may be an alternative to the conventional abutment screws because this is designed for easy retrieval and that both abutment screws showed no significant difference in the mechanical tests and in the FEA.

  12. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System

    Kim, Bongju; Shin, Yoo Jin

    2017-01-01

    The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access hole for easy retrieval. This study aimed to introduce this modified design of the abutment screw, the concept of easy retrieval, and to compare the mechanical strengths of the conventional and hollow abutment screws by finite element analysis (FEA) and mechanical test. In the FEA results, both types of abutment screws showed similar stress distribution in the single artificial tooth system. A maximum load difference of about 2% occurred in the vertical load by a mechanical test. This study showed that the hollow abutment screw may be an alternative to the conventional abutment screws because this is designed for easy retrieval and that both abutment screws showed no significant difference in the mechanical tests and in the FEA. PMID:29065610

  13. Use of next generation sequencing to detect biofilm bacteria in a patient with pedicle screw loosening after spine surgery

    Xu, Yijuan; Thomsen, Trine Rolighed; Lorenzen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    2. Center for Microbial Communities, Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Denmark 3. Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Magdeburg, Germany 4. Eifelklinik St. Brigida, Simmerath, Germany Aim: ”Hidden deep...... implant-related infection is believed to be linked to pedicle screw loosening after spine surgery. Low-grade bacterial infection can be hard to diagnose and may be undetected by conventional culture based methods. Next generation sequencing (NGS) could help to uncover hidden bacterial infections...... as a possible cause for implant loosening. This case report describes the use of NGS in the diagnostic work-up of a patient with pedicle screw loosening after spine surgery.” Method: ”A 60 y/o male had to undergo revision spine surgery for pedicle screw loosening and adjacent segment disease 3 years after...

  14. Image Guidance to Aid Pedicle Screw Fixation of a Lumbar Fracture-Dislocation Injury in a Toddler.

    Houten, John K; Nahkla, Jonathan; Ghandi, Shashank

    2017-09-01

    Pedicle screw fixation of the lumbar spine in children age <2 years is particularly challenging, as successful cannulation of the small pedicle dimensions requires a high level of precision and there are no implants specifically designed for the infant spine. Image-guided navigation is commonly used in adult spinal surgery and may be particularly helpful for the placement of spinal screws in areas where the bony anatomy is small and/or anatomically complex, as in the upper cervical area. A 19-month-old female presented with a fracture-dislocation injury of L1-2. Intraoperative imaging using the O-arm multidimensional imaging system was networked to a workstation, and neuronavigation was used to place pedicle instrumentation with 3.5-mm-diameter polyaxial screws designed for posterior cervical fixation. At a 48-month follow-up, the patient was neurologically intact, demonstrated normal physical development, and was engaging in normal physical activity for her age. Radiographs obtained approximately 4 years postsurgery showed no evidence of loss for fixation. Image-guided placement of pedicle screws may be a useful aid in achieving accurate and safe fixation in the small dimensions of the infant spine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A study on a pedicle-screw-based reduction method for artificially reduced artifacts

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Hae-Kag; Cho, Jae-Hwan

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is a quantitative analysis of the degree of the reduction of the artifacts that are induced by pedicle screws through the application of the recently developed iterative metallic artifact reduction (I MAR) software. Screw-type implants that are composed of 4.5 g/cm3 titanium (Ti) with an approximate average computed tomography (CT) value of 6500 Hounsfield units (HUs) that are used for the treatment of spinal diseases were placed in paraffin, a tissueequivalent material, and then dried. After the insertion, the scanning conditions were fixed as 120 kVp and 250 mA using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) (Enlarge, Siemens, Germany). The slice thickness and the increment were set at the fields of view (FOVs) of 3 mm and 120 mm, respectively; the pitch is 0.8; the rotation time is 1 s; and the I MAR software was applied to the raw data of the acquired images to compare the CT-value changes of the posterior images. When the I MAR software was applied to animal vertebrae, it was possible to reduce the 65.7% image loss of the black-hole-effect image through the application of the I MAR software. When the I MAR image loss (%) was compared with the white-streak-effect image, the high-intensity image type with the white-streak effect could be reduced by 91.34% through the application of the I MAR software. In conclusion, a metal artifact that is due to a high-density material can be reduced more effectively when the I MAR algorithm is applied compared with that from the application of the conventional MAR algorithm. The I MAR can provide information on the various tissues that form around the artifact and the reduced metal structures, which can be helpful for radiologists and clinicians in their determination of an accurate diagnosis.

  16. Failure Diagnosis System for a Ball-Screw by Using Vibration Signals

    Won Gi Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, in order to reduce high maintenance costs and to increase operating ratio in manufacturing systems, condition-based maintenance (CBM has been developed. CBM is carried out with indicators, which show equipment’s faults and performance deterioration. In this study, indicator signal acquisition and condition monitoring are applied to a ball-screw-driven stage. Although ball-screw is a typical linearly reciprocating part and is widely used in industry, it has not gained attention to be diagnosed compared to rotating parts such as motor, pump, and bearing. First, the vibration-based monitoring method, which uses vibration signal to monitor the condition of a machine, is proposed. Second, Wavelet transform is used to analyze the defect signals in time-frequency domain. Finally, the failure diagnosis system is developed using the analysis, and then its performance is evaluated. Using the system, we estimated the severity of failure and detect the defect position. The low defect frequency (≈58.7 Hz is spread all over the time in the Wavelet-filtered signal with low frequency range. Its amplitude reflects the progress of defect. The defect position was found in the signal with high frequency range (768~1,536 Hz. It was detected from the interval between abrupt changes of signal.

  17. Interface effects on elastic behavior of a screw dislocation around double nanowires

    Li, Jia; Fang, Qihong; Liu, Youwen

    2014-01-01

    The elastic behavior of a screw dislocation around double nanowires (NWs) is addressed with taking into account the interface stress effect in controlling mechanical response of nanoscale structures. The stress boundary conditions at the interface of the NWs are modified by incorporating surface/interface stress. The analytic solution of complex functions of the right NW, the infinite matrix and the left NW are obtained by applying the complex variable method. The equilibrium positions and the image force acting on the dislocation of a screw dislocation near one of the NWs are discussed in detail and compared with those obtained within the classical theory of elasticity. It is shown that the NWs possess a significant local softening or hardening at the interface, which can change the nature of the equilibrium positions for the dislocation. The radius ratio between NWs has profound effects on the equilibrium position. Additionally, the soft NW with the positive interface stress inhibits the dislocation motion to enhance its own structural stability.

  18. A comparison C1-C2 transarticular screw placement after self-education and mentored education of orthopaedic residents.

    Kirkpatrick, John S

    2012-08-01

    Prospective randomized trial. This study will provide preliminary data on whether residents can be "self-taught" and to what extent a lecture, demonstration, and coaching can improve skills and knowledge. Practice-based learning is an essential competency in Accreditation Council for graduate Medical Education-accredited residencies. Little has been done to demonstrate whether residents can be self-taught or benefit from mentoring in understanding and performing difficult surgical tasks. A written test was given to orthopedic residents on C1-C2 transarticular screw placement. They were then provided reading on C1-C2 transarticular screw placement. Residents were then divided into a "self-directed learning" group and a "mentored learning" group. All residents then performed the technique on models, with the "mentored" group receiving a lecture and coaching from the mentor. The models were analyzed for technique errors and the previous test was administered again as a posttest. The test and screw placement were repeated 4 months later. Residents without mentoring had an average improvement of 4.5 points, those with mentoring had average improvement of 8.6 points (P=0.0068). The screw placement technique error rate for the nonmentored group (n=8) was 2.55, and for the mentored group (n=9) was 1.47 (P=0.004). Sixteen residents completed the delayed test, 7 from the nonmentored groups and 8 from the mentored group. Nine residents were able to repeat the screw placement technique 4 months after the initial test and screw placement, 3 nonentored, and 6 mentored. Although there were some trends toward the mentored group having better retention, neither knowledge nor skill was statistically different. This preliminary trial seems to indicate that residents provided a lecture and guided technical instruction will obtain knowledge and perform procedures better than those that do not. Conclusions based upon Post Graduate year, motivation, and interest in spine surgery could

  19. Conservative treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture: comparing intermaxillary fixation with screws or arch bar. A randomised clinical trial

    van den Bergh, B.; Blankestijn, J.; van der Ploeg, T.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A mandibular condyle fracture can be treated conservatively by intermaxillary fixation (IMF) or by open reposition and internal fixation (ORIF). Many IMF-modalities can be chosen, including IMF-screws (IMFS). This prospective multi-centre randomised clinical trial compared the use of

  20. Conservative treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture: Comparing intermaxillary fixation with screws or arch bar. A randomised clinical trial

    van den Bergh, B.; Blankestijn, J.; van der Ploeg, T.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A mandibular condyle fracture can be treated conservatively by intermaxillary fixation (IMF) or by open reposition and internal fixation (ORIF). Many IMF-modalities can be chosen, including IMF-screws (IMFS). This prospective multi-centre randomised clinical trial compared the use of

  1. An atomic string model for a screw dislocation in iron: Implications for the development of interatomic potentials

    Gilbert, M.R.; Dudarev, S.L.; Chiesa, S.; Derlet, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Thermally activated motion of screw dislocations is the rate-determining mechanism for plastic deformation and fracture of body centred cubic (bcc) metals and alloys. Recent experimental observations by S.G. Roberts' group at Oxford showed that ductile-brittle behaviour of bcc vanadium, tungsten, pure iron, and iron-chromium alloys is controlled by an Arrhenius process in which the energy for thermal activation is proportional to the formation energy for a double kink on a b= 1/2 screw dislocation, where b is the Burgers vector of the dislocation. Interpreting these experimental observations and extending the analysis to the case of irradiated materials requires developing a full quantitative treatment for perfect and kinked screw dislocations. Modelling screw dislocations also presents a challenge for the development of interatomic potentials. Recent density functional theory (DFT) calculations have revealed that the ground-state structure of the core of screw dislocations in all the bcc transition metals is non-degenerate and symmetric, whereas inter-atomic potentials used in molecular dynamics simulations for these metals often predict a degenerate, symmetry-broken core-structure. In this work we show how, by treating the structure of a screw dislocation within a multistring Frenkel-Kontorova model, we can develop a criterion that guarantees the correct symmetric core of the dislocation. Extending this treatment, we find a systematic recipe for constructing Finnis-Sinclair-type potentials that are able, as a matter of routine, produce non-degenerate core structures of 1/2 screw dislocations. Modelling thermally activated mobility of screw dislocations also requires that the transition pathway between stable core positions of a dislocation is accurately reproduced. DFT data indicates that the shape of the 'Peierls energy barrier' is a single-hump curve, including transitional configurations close to the so-called 'hard' structure. Interatomic potentials have, up

  2. Evaluation of a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography of scaphoid fixation screws.

    Filli, Lukas; Marcon, Magda; Scholz, Bernhard; Calcagni, Maurizio; Finkenstädt, Tim; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) of scaphoid fixation screws. FDCT has gained interest in imaging small anatomic structures of the appendicular skeleton. Angiographic C-arm systems with flat detectors allow fluoroscopy and FDCT imaging in a one-stop procedure emphasizing their role as an ideal intraoperative imaging tool. However, FDCT imaging can be significantly impaired by artefacts induced by fixation screws. Following ethical board approval, commercially available scaphoid fixation screws were inserted into six cadaveric specimens in order to fix artificially induced scaphoid fractures. FDCT images corrected with the algorithm were compared to uncorrected images both quantitatively and qualitatively by two independent radiologists in terms of artefacts, screw contour, fracture line visibility, bone visibility, and soft tissue definition. Normal distribution of variables was evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. In case of normal distribution, quantitative variables were compared using paired Student's t tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for quantitative variables without normal distribution and all qualitative variables. A p value of < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistically significant differences. Metal artefacts were significantly reduced by the correction algorithm (p < 0.001), and the fracture line was more clearly defined (p < 0.01). The inter-observer reliability was "almost perfect" (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.85, p < 0.001). The prototype correction algorithm in FDCT for metal artefacts induced by scaphoid fixation screws may facilitate intra- and postoperative follow-up imaging. Flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) is a helpful imaging tool for scaphoid fixation. The correction algorithm significantly reduces artefacts in FDCT induced by scaphoid fixation screws. This may facilitate intra

  3. Additional Tension Screws Improve Stability in Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nailing: Biomechanical Analysis of a Femur Spiral Fracture Model.

    Zachert, Gregor; Rapp, Marion; Eggert, Rebecca; Schulze-Hessing, Maaike; Gros, Nina; Stratmann, Christina; Wendlandt, Robert; Kaiser, Martin M

    2015-08-01

    For pediatric femoral shaft fractures, elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) is an accepted method of treatment. But problems regarding stability with shortening or axial deviation are well known in complex fracture types and heavier children. Biomechanical in vitro testing was performed to determine whether two modified osteosyntheses with an additional tension screw fixation or screw fixation alone without nails could significantly improve the stability in comparison to classical ESIN. A total of 24 synthetic adolescent-sized femoral bone models (Sawbones, 4th generation; Vashon, Washington, United States) with an identical spiral fracture (length 100 mm) were used. All grafts underwent retrograde fixation with two C-shaped steel nails (2C). Of the 24, 8 osteosyntheses were supported by one additional tension screw (2C1S) and another 8 by two screws (2S) in which the intramedullary nails were removed before testing. Each configuration underwent biomechanical testing in 4-point bending, external rotation (ER) and internal rotation (IR). Furthermore, the modifications were tested in axial physiological 9 degrees position for shifting and dynamic compression as well as dynamic load. Both screw configurations (2C1S and 2S) demonstrated a significantly higher stability in comparison to the 2C configuration in 4-point bending (anterior-posterior, 0.95 Nm/mm [2C] spiral fracture model, the stability of ESIN could be significantly improved by two modifications with additional tension screws. If transferred in clinical practice, these modifications might offer earlier weight bearing and less problems of shortening or axial deviation. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Reconstruction of the lateral tibia plateau fracture with a third triangular support screw: A biomechanical study

    Eduardo Moran

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Triangular support fixation enhanced interfragmentary stability at the ultimate stage of dynamic loading. However, the level of improvement seems to be limited and may not legitimate the intervention with an additional third screw.

  5. Performance study of a twin-screw expander used in a geothermal organic Rankine cycle power generator

    Tang, Hao; Wu, Huagen; Wang, Xiaolin; Xing, Ziwen

    2015-01-01

    The ORC (organic Rankine cycle) system is an effective technology to generate electricity from low temperature heat sources. The twin-screw expander is a key component that is commonly used in the small-to-medium capacity ORC system to convert thermal energy into work. In this paper, the performance of a twin-screw expander is theoretically and experimentally studied. A mathematical model is developed and subsequently validated using experimental data. The effect of several important factors including expander speed, suction pressure and inlet superheat on the expander performance is investigated. Results indicate that the expander speed and suction pressure have large influences on the expander performance, while the inlet superheat has relatively small effect. The isentropic efficiency of the expander decreases from 0.88 to 0.6 and the expander volumetric efficiency decreases from 0.88 to 0.7 as the expander rotational speed increases from 1250 to 6000 rpm. The results further show that the expander volumetric efficiency decreases from 0.91 to 0.85 as the expander suction pressure increases from 0.33 to 0.47 MPa. Furthermore, the energy conversion efficiency of the studied ORC system using the twin-screw expander is as high as 7.5% under the site conditions. - Highlights: • Performance of a twin-screw expander used in an ORC (organic Rankine cycle) system was studied. • A thermodynamic model was developed for this purpose and experimentally validated. • Effect of several key factors on the expander performance was investigated. • Suction pressure has a large influence on the expander performance. • Twin-screw expanders can be operated with a wide range of heat source temperatures.

  6. To retain or remove the syndesmotic screw: a review of literature

    T. Schepers (Tim)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Syndesmotic positioning screws are frequently placed in unstable ankle fractures. Many facets of adequate placement techniques have been the subject of various studies. Whether or not the syndesmosis screw should be removed prior to weight-bearing is still debated. In this

  7. To retain or remove the syndesmotic screw: a review of literature

    Schepers, T.

    2011-01-01

    Syndesmotic positioning screws are frequently placed in unstable ankle fractures. Many facets of adequate placement techniques have been the subject of various studies. Whether or not the syndesmosis screw should be removed prior to weight-bearing is still debated. In this study, the recent

  8. Robot assisted navigated drilling for percutaneous pedicle screw placement: A preliminary animal study

    Hongwei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The preliminary study supports the view that computer assisted pedicle screw fixation using spinal robot is feasible and the robot can decrease the intraoperative fluoroscopy time during the minimally invasive pedicle screw fixation surgery. As spine robotic surgery is still in its infancy, further research in this field is worthwhile especially the accuracy of spine robot system should be improved.

  9. Improving the trajectory of transpedicular transdiscal lumbar screw fixation with a computer-assisted 3D-printed custom drill guide

    Zhen-Xuan Shao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Transpedicular transdiscal screw fixation is an alternative technique used in lumbar spine fixation; however, it requires an accurate screw trajectory. The aim of this study is to design a novel 3D-printed custom drill guide and investigate its accuracy to guide the trajectory of transpedicular transdiscal (TPTD lumbar screw fixation. Dicom images of thirty lumbar functional segment units (FSU, two segments of L1–L4 were acquired from the PACS system in our hospital (patients who underwent a CT scan for other abdomen diseases and had normal spine anatomy and imported into reverse design software for three-dimensional reconstructions. Images were used to print the 3D lumbar models and were imported into CAD software to design an optimal TPTD screw trajectory and a matched custom drill guide. After both the 3D printed FSU models and 3D-printed custom drill guide were prepared, the TPTD screws will be guided with a 3D-printed custom drill guide and introduced into the 3D printed FSU models. No significant statistical difference in screw trajectory angles was observed between the digital model and the 3D-printed model (P > 0.05. Our present study found that, with the help of CAD software, it is feasible to design a TPTD screw custom drill guide that could guide the accurate TPTD screw trajectory on 3D-printed lumbar models.

  10. Biomechanical Comparison of 3 Inferiorly Directed Versus 3 Superiorly Directed Locking Screws on Stability in a 3-Part Proximal Humerus Fracture Model.

    Donohue, David M; Santoni, Brandon G; Stoops, T Kyle; Tanner, Gregory; Diaz, Miguel A; Mighell, Mark

    2018-06-01

    To quantify the stability of 3 points of inferiorly directed versus 3 points of superiorly directed locking screw fixation compared with the full contingent of 6 points of locked screw fixation in the treatment of a 3-part proximal humerus fracture. A standardized 3-part fracture was created in 10 matched pairs (experimental groups) and 10 nonmatched humeri (control group). Osteosynthesis was performed using 3 locking screws in the superior hemisphere of the humeral head (suspension), 3 locking screws in the inferior hemisphere (buttress), or the full complement of 6 locking screws (control). Specimens were tested in varus cantilever bending (7.5 Nm) to 10,000 cycles or failure. Construct survival (%) and the cycles to failure were compared. Seven of 10 controls survived the 10,000-cycle runout (70%: 8193 average cycles to failure). No experimental constructs survived the 10,000-cycle runout. Suspension and buttress screw groups failed an average of 331 and 516 cycles, respectively (P = 1.00). The average number of cycles to failure and the number of humeri surviving the 10,000-cycle runout were greater in the control group than in the experimental groups (P ≤ 0.006). Data support the use of a full contingent of 6 points of locking screw fixation over 3 superior or 3 inferior points of fixation in the treatment of a 3-part proximal humerus fracture with a locking construct. No biomechanical advantage to the 3 buttress or 3 suspension screws used in isolation was observed.

  11. Development of a process map: A step towards a regime map for steady-state high shear wet twin screw granulation

    Kumar, Ashish; Dhondt, Jens; Vercruysse, Jurgen

    2016-01-01

    involves the combination of screw speed, material throughput and torque required to rotate the screws was correlated with the applied liquid-to-solid ratio to present process maps. The study suggested that, despite an increase in the granule size by the increasing liquid-to-solid ratio, most of the liquid...... contributes to formation of oversized granules. Therefore, keeping the liquid-to-solid ratio in a lower range and increasing the energy input to the system can be effectively used to lower the mean granule size. Changes in the screw geometry should also be explored to improve solid liquid mixing and breakage...

  12. Pedicle screw anchorage of carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws under cyclic loading.

    Lindtner, Richard A; Schmid, Rene; Nydegger, Thomas; Konschake, Marko; Schmoelz, Werner

    2018-03-01

    Pedicle screw loosening is a common and significant complication after posterior spinal instrumentation, particularly in osteoporosis. Radiolucent carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CF/PEEK) pedicle screws have been developed recently to overcome drawbacks of conventional metallic screws, such as metal-induced imaging artifacts and interference with postoperative radiotherapy. Beyond radiolucency, CF/PEEK may also be advantageous over standard titanium in terms of pedicle screw loosening due to its unique material properties. However, screw anchorage and loosening of CF/PEEK pedicle screws have not been evaluated yet. The aim of this biomechanical study therefore was to evaluate whether the use of this alternative nonmetallic pedicle screw material affects screw loosening. The hypotheses tested were that (1) nonmetallic CF/PEEK pedicle screws resist an equal or higher number of load cycles until loosening than standard titanium screws and that (2) PMMA cement augmentation further increases the number of load cycles until loosening of CF/PEEK screws. In the first part of the study, left and right pedicles of ten cadaveric lumbar vertebrae (BMD 70.8 mg/cm 3  ± 14.5) were randomly instrumented with either CF/PEEK or standard titanium pedicle screws. In the second part, left and right pedicles of ten vertebrae (BMD 56.3 mg/cm 3  ± 15.8) were randomly instrumented with either PMMA-augmented or nonaugmented CF/PEEK pedicle screws. Each pedicle screw was subjected to cyclic cranio-caudal loading (initial load ranging from - 50 N to + 50 N) with stepwise increasing compressive loads (5 N every 100 cycles) until loosening or a maximum of 10,000 cycles. Angular screw motion ("screw toggling") within the vertebra was measured with a 3D motion analysis system every 100 cycles and by stress fluoroscopy every 500 cycles. The nonmetallic CF/PEEK pedicle screws resisted a similar number of load cycles until loosening as the contralateral standard

  13. Incidental Radiographic Discovery of a Screw in a Primary Molar: An Unusual Case Report in a 6 Year Old Child

    Farhin Katge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentists often find foreign bodies in the primary dentition of children who habitually place objects in their mouths. The objects are frequently embedded in exposures that result from carious or traumatic lesions or from endodontic procedures that have been left open for drainage. Such bodies are often detected on routine radiographs and, less frequently, during clinical examination. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy who had inadvertently embedded a screw in his mandibular right first primary molar and had forgotten about it until it became symptomatic. The screw was impacted in the exposed pulp chamber due to a large carious lesion in the affected molar. This case report considers the possible medical and dental consequences of placing foreign bodies in the mouth.

  14. Use of a continuous twin screw granulation and drying system during formulation development and process optimization.

    Vercruysse, J; Peeters, E; Fonteyne, M; Cappuyns, P; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-01-01

    Since small scale is key for successful introduction of continuous techniques in the pharmaceutical industry to allow its use during formulation development and process optimization, it is essential to determine whether the product quality is similar when small quantities of materials are processed compared to the continuous processing of larger quantities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether material processed in a single cell of the six-segmented fluid bed dryer of the ConsiGma™-25 system (a continuous twin screw granulation and drying system introduced by GEA Pharma Systems, Collette™, Wommelgem, Belgium) is predictive of granule and tablet quality during full-scale manufacturing when all drying cells are filled. Furthermore, the performance of the ConsiGma™-1 system (a mobile laboratory unit) was evaluated and compared to the ConsiGma™-25 system. A premix of two active ingredients, powdered cellulose, maize starch, pregelatinized starch and sodium starch glycolate was granulated with distilled water. After drying and milling (1000 μm, 800 rpm), granules were blended with magnesium stearate and compressed using a Modul™ P tablet press (tablet weight: 430 mg, main compression force: 12 kN). Single cell experiments using the ConsiGma™-25 system and ConsiGma™-1 system were performed in triplicate. Additionally, a 1h continuous run using the ConsiGma™-25 system was executed. Process outcomes (torque, barrel wall temperature, product temperature during drying) and granule (residual moisture content, particle size distribution, bulk and tapped density, hausner ratio, friability) as well as tablet (hardness, friability, disintegration time and dissolution) quality attributes were evaluated. By performing a 1h continuous run, it was detected that a stabilization period was needed for torque and barrel wall temperature due to initial layering of the screws and the screw chamber walls with material. Consequently, slightly deviating

  15. Effect of screw position on single cycle to failure in bending and torsion of a locking plate-rod construct in a synthetic feline femoral gap model.

    Niederhäuser, Simone K; Tepic, Slobodan; Weber, Urs T

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of screw position on strength and stiffness of a combination locking plate-rod construct in a synthetic feline femoral gap model. 30 synthetic long-bone models derived from beechwood and balsa wood. 3 constructs (2 locking plate-rod constructs and 1 locking plate construct; 10 specimens/construct) were tested in a diaphyseal bridge plating configuration by use of 4-point bending and torsion. Variables included screw position (near the fracture gap and far from the fracture gap) and application of an intramedullary pin. Constructs were tested to failure in each loading mode to determine strength and stiffness. Failure was defined as plastic deformation of the plate or breakage of the bone model or plate. Strength, yield angle, and stiffness were compared by use of a Wilcoxon test. Placement of screws near the fracture gap did not increase bending or torsional stiffness in the locking plate-rod constructs, assuming the plate was placed on the tension side of the bone. Addition of an intramedullary pin resulted in a significant increase in bending strength of the construct. Screw positioning did not have a significant effect on any torsion variables. Results of this study suggested that, in the investigated plate-rod construct, screw insertion adjacent to the fracture lacked mechanical advantages over screw insertion at the plate ends. For surgeons attempting to minimize soft tissue dissection, the decision to make additional incisions for screw placement should be considered with even more caution.

  16. Stability of Uncemented Cups - Long-Term Effect of Screws, Pegs and HA Coating: A 14-Year RSA Follow-Up of Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Otten, Volker T C; Crnalic, Sead; Röhrl, Stephan M; Nivbrant, Bo; Nilsson, Kjell G

    2016-01-01

    Screws, pegs and hydroxyapatite-coating are used to enhance the primary stability of uncemented cups. We present a 14-year follow-up of 48 hips randomized to four groups: press-fit only, press-fit plus screws, press-fit plus pegs and hydroxyapatite-coated cups. Radiostereometric migration measurements showed equally good stability regardless cup augmentation. The mean wear rate was high, 0.21 mm/year, with no differences between the groups. Seven hips had radiographical osteolysis but only in hips with augmented cups. Cups without screw-holes compared with cups with screw-holes resulted in better clinical outcome at the 14-year follow-up. Thus, augmentation of uncemented cups with screws, pegs, or hydroxyapatite did not appear to improve the long-term stability compared with press-fit only. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of the Mechanical Characteristics of a Universal Small Biplane Plating Technique Without Compression Screw and Single Anatomic Plate With Compression Screw.

    Dayton, Paul; Ferguson, Joe; Hatch, Daniel; Santrock, Robert; Scanlan, Sean; Smith, Bret

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the mechanical characteristics of biplane locked plating in small bone fixation, the present study compared the stability under cyclic cantilever loading of a 2-plate locked biplane (BPP) construct without interfragmentary compression with that of a single-plate locked construct with an additional interfragmentary screw (SPS) using surrogate bone models simulating Lapidus arthrodesis. In static ultimate plantar bending, the BPP construct failed at significantly greater load than did the SPS construct (556.2 ± 37.1 N versus 241.6 ± 6.3 N, p = .007). For cyclic failure testing in plantar bending at a 180-N starting load, the BPP construct failed at a significantly greater number of cycles (158,322 ± 50,609 versus 13,718 ± 10,471 cycles) and failure load (242.5 ± 25.0 N versus 180.0 ± 0.0 N) than the SPS construct (p = .002). For cyclic failure testing in plantar bending at a 120-N starting load, the results were not significantly different between the BPP and SPS constructs for the number of cycles (207,646 ± 45,253 versus 159,334 ± 69,430) or failure load (205.0 ± 22.4 N versus 185.0 ± 33.5 N; p = .300). For cyclic testing with 90° offset loading (i.e., medial to lateral bending) at a 120-N starting load, all 5 BPP constructs (tension side) and 2 of the 5 SPS constructs reached 250,000 cycles without failure. Overall, the present study found the BPP construct to have superior or equivalent stability in multiplanar orientations of force application in both static and fatigue testing. Thus, the concept of biplane locked plating, using 2 low profile plates and unicortical screw insertion, shows promise in small bone fixation, because it provides consistent stability in multiplanar orientations, making it universally adaptable to many clinical situations. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Screw Configuration on the Preload Force of Implant-Abutment Screws.

    Zipprich, Holger; Rathe, Florian; Pinz, Sören; Schlotmann, Luca; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Ratka, Christoph

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of tightening torque, screw head angle, and thread number on the preload force of abutment screws. The test specimens consisted of three self-manufactured components (ie, a thread sleeve serving as an implant analog, an abutment analog, and an abutment screw). The abutment screws were fabricated with metric M1.6 external threads. The thread number varied between one and seven threads. The screw head angles were produced in eight varying angles (30 to 180 degrees). A sensor unit simultaneously measured the preload force of the screw and the torsion moment inside the screw shank. The tightening of the screw with the torque wrench was performed in five steps (15 to 35 Ncm). The torque wrench was calibrated before each step. Only the tightening torque and screw head angle affected the resulting preload force of the implant-abutment connection. The thread number had no effect. There was an approximately linear correlation between tightening torque and preload force. The tightening torque and screw head angle were the only study parameters that affected the resulting preload force of the abutment screw. The results obtained from this experiment are valid only for a single torque condition. Further investigations are needed that analyze other parameters that affect preload force. Once these parameters are known, it will add value for a strong, but detachable connection between the implant and abutment. Short implants and flat-to-flat connections especially will benefit significantly from this knowledge.

  19. Reinforcement Learning Approach to Generate Goal-directed Locomotion of a Snake-Like Robot with Screw-Drive Units

    Chatterjee, Sromona; Nachstedt, Timo; Tamosiunaite, Minija

    2014-01-01

    Abstract—In this paper we apply a policy improvement algorithm called Policy Improvement using Path Integrals (PI2) to generate goal-directed locomotion of a complex snake-like robot with screw-drive units. PI2 is numerically simple and has an ability to deal with high dimensional systems. Here...

  20. A sense of agency

    Laerkner, Eva; Egerod, Ingrid; Olesen, Finn

    2017-01-01

    familiar in the unfamiliar situation" and "Awareness of surrounding activities". Patients had the ability to interact from the first days of critical illness and a sense of agency was expressed through initiating, directing and participating in communication and other activities. Patients appreciated...... competent and compassionate nurses who were attentive and involved them as individual persons. Initiatives to enhance familiar aspects such as relatives, personal items and care, continuity and closeness of nurses contributed to the patients' experience of feeling safe and secure in the unfamiliar setting...

  1. Thermodynamic-behaviour model for air-cooled screw chillers with a variable set-point condensing temperature

    Chan, K.T.; Yu, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a thermodynamic model to evaluate the coefficient of performance (COP) of an air-cooled screw chiller under various operating conditions. The model accounts for the real process phenomena, including the capacity control of screw compressors and variations in the heat-transfer coefficients of an evaporator and a condenser at part load. It also contains an algorithm to determine how the condenser fans are staged in response to a set-point condensing temperature. The model parameters are identified, based on the performance data of chiller specifications. The chiller model is validated using a wide range of operating data of an air-cooled screw chiller. The difference between the measured and modelled COPs is within ±10% for 86% of the data points. The chiller's COP can increase by up to 115% when the set-point condensing temperature is adjusted, based on any given outdoor temperature. Having identified the variation in the chiller's COP, a suitable strategy is proposed for air-cooled screw chillers to operate at maximum efficiency as much as possible when they have to satisfy a building's cooling-load

  2. Gauge field theoretic solution of a uniformly moving screw dislocation and admissibility of supersonic speeds

    Sharma, P.; Zhang, X.

    2006-01-01

    The failure of classical elasticity to address dislocation behavior spatially close to its core and (in Lorentz-type fashion) near the speed of sound is well known. In gauge field theory of defects, the latter are not postulated a priori in an ad hoc fashion rather defects such as dislocations arise naturally as a consequence of broken translational symmetry exhibiting solutions that are physically meaningful (e.g., removal of divergence of stress and the natural emergence of a core making redundant the artificial cut-off radius). In the present work we present the gauge field theoretic solution to the problem of a uniformly moving screw dislocation. Apart from the formal derivations, we show that stress divergence at the core of the dislocation is removed at all time and (consistent with atomistic simulations), supersonic states are found to be admissible

  3. Percutaneous pedicle screw for unstable spine fractures in polytraumatized patients: A report of two cases

    Boon Beng Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Unstable spine fractures commonly occur in the setting of a polytraumatized patient. The aim of management is to balance the need for early operative stabilization and prevent additional trauma due to the surgery. Recent published literature has demonstrated the benefits of early stabilization of an unstable spine fracture particularly in patients with higher injury severity score (ISS. We report two cases of polytrauma with unstable spine fractures stabilized with a minimally invasive percutaneous pedicle screw instrumentation system as a form of damage control surgery. The patients had good recovery from the polytrauma injuries. These two cases illustrate the role of minimally invasive stabilization, its limitations and technical pitfalls in the management of unstable spine fractures in the polytrauma setting as a form of damage control surgery.

  4. Accurate guide wire of lag screw placement in the intertrochanteric fractures: a technical note.

    Li, Jiang; Wang, Liao; Li, Xiaodong; Feng, Kai; Tang, Jian; Wang, Xiaoqing

    2017-09-01

    Cephalomedullary fixations are commonly used in the treatment of intertrochanteric fractures. In clinical practice, one of the difficulties is when we exit the guide wire in a wrong position of femoral neck and insert near the hole again, the guide wire often flow into the previous track. This study develops a surgical technique to direct the guide wire to slip away the previous track and slip into a right position. When guide wire is exited to the cortex of femoral, we let the wire in and out at the cortical layer for several times to enlarge the entry hole. After that, electric drill is inverted, rubbed and entered slowly at a right angle. When guide wire encountered new resistance, the electric drill is turned back instantly. This technique can help trauma and orthopedic surgeons to obtain precision placement of the lag screw after the first try is failed.

  5. Mechanical Elongation of the Small Intestine: Evaluation of Techniques for Optimal Screw Placement in a Rodent Model

    P. A. Hausbrandt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate techniques and establish an optimal method for mechanical elongation of small intestine (MESI using screws in a rodent model in order to develop a potential therapy for short bowel syndrome (SBS. Material and Methods. Adult female Sprague Dawley rats (n=24 with body weight from 250 to 300 g (Σ=283 were evaluated using 5 different groups in which the basic denominator for the technique involved the fixation of a blind loop of the intestine on the abdominal wall with the placement of a screw in the lumen secured to the abdominal wall. Results. In all groups with accessible screws, the rodents removed the implants despite the use of washers or suits to prevent removal. Subcutaneous placement of the screw combined with antibiotic treatment and dietary modifications was finally successful. In two animals autologous transplantation of the lengthened intestinal segment was successful. Discussion. While the rodent model may provide useful basic information on mechanical intestinal lengthening, further investigations should be performed in larger animals to make use of the translational nature of MESI in human SBS treatment.

  6. Mechanical properties of PA6/PP compatibilized nanocomposites using a twin screw extruder

    De Almeida, M. F.; Correia, Aldina; e Silva, Eliana Costa; Lopes, I. Cristina

    2017-11-01

    In this article, a new approach to study the compatibilization effect of organophilic clays in PA6/PP polymer blends through experimental results of mechanical tests is presented. This study focus on the description of the interphase in compatibilization by addition of the organoclays C15A and C30B into the polymer PA6/PP blend by melt compounding using a Twin Screw Extruder. The experimental results variations are studied, by addition of the organoclays in uncompatibilized polymer blend, using non-parametric analysis of variance (Kruskal-Wallis Test). For all the experimental results, significant differences are identified between the types of polymer blends. It was observed the compatibilization effect of both organophilic clays, being the differences most evident in the presence of PP modified.

  7. Bentonite clay purification for development of polymeric nan composites using a single screw extruder

    Carvalho, Ana C.M. de; Ito, Edson N.; Costa, Maria C.B.; Barbosa, Maria I.R.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a bentonite clay rich in montmorillonite was purified and chemical treat to be used in the development of poly (methyl methacrylate) /clay nanocomposites via melting processes. After the clay treatment and purification, a masterbatch with 25% clay and 75% PMMA was produced by solution technique, using acetone as solvent. For produce samples with 2.5% clay, the masterbatch along with pure polymer were added and mixed in single screw extruder with a diameter of 16 mm and W/D 26. X-rays diffractometry (XRD) and X-rays fluorescence (XRF). Tests were performed to evaluate and characterizing the bentonite clay used in the development of this work and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) tests were performed to evaluate changes in the thermal properties of the nanocomposites produced. (author)

  8. A lateral approach for screw repair in lag fashion of spiral third metacarpal and metatarsal medial condylar fractures in horses.

    Smith, Lewis C R; Greet, Timothy R C; Bathe, Andrew P

    2009-08-01

    To describe a lateral approach for screw fixation in lag fashion of simple spiral medial condylar fractures of the third metacarpus/metatarsus (MC3/MT3). Case series. Thoroughbred racehorses (n=9). Nondisplaced medial MC3/MT3 condylar fractures (3 thoracic, 6 pelvic limbs), with mean length 126 mm (range, 91-151 mm) were repaired by internal fixation, under general anesthesia, using multiple 4.5 mm cortical screws inserted in lag fashion from the lateral aspect of the limb, using radiographic or fluoroscopic guidance. Horses were recovered from anesthesia in half-limb casts; 7 unassisted and 2 using a rope-recovery system. Horses had 2 months box rest, 1 month in-hand walking, and follow-up radiographic examination at 3 months. Horses recovered uneventfully from anesthesia. Five horses raced; 1 returned to training, was persistently lame, and was retired to stud; 2 were retired directly to stud; and 1 horse was lost to follow-up. MC3/MT3 medial condylar fractures were successfully repaired by screws inserted n lag fashion form the lateral aspect. Use of a lateral approach to medial condylar MC3/MT3 fractures allows screw insertion perpendicular to the fracture plane without interference with palmar/plantar soft tissue structures or from the splint bones. Although repair was performed under general anesthesia, the technique should be adaptable to application in standing horses.

  9. Capstan screw rotator cuff repair: a novel two-row mini-open technique

    Goubran, Alex; Jaques, Aishling; Smith, Christopher; Bunker, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Background Prospective data collection occurred between 2000 and 2010 on 143 consecutive patients with symptomatic rotator cuff tears, aiming to examine the end-result of a new technique of mini-open double row repair: the Capstan screw technique. Methods All patients had a pre- and postoperative Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score and range of movement measurements. All were followed up for a minimum of 1 year with an exit questionnaire. Subscapularis repairs, small (5 cm) supraspinatus repairs were excluded. Ninety-nine patients fitted the inclusion and exclusion criteria of whom 87 had a complete data set. Results The mean (SD) pre-operative OSS was 21.85 (8.6) and the mean (SD) postoperative OSS was 44.58 (5.2) (p < 0.0001). The mean (SD) pre-operative ASES score was 51.5 (19.4) and the mean (SD) postoperative ASES score was 86.42 (17.06) (p < 0.0001). Flexion improved from a mean of 119° to 170° (p < 0.0001). The clinical re-tear rate was 3.4% and the imaged re-tear rate was 6.8%. In total, 91% of patients were satisfied with the procedure. There were no deep infections and two (2%) minor wound infections. There was no single instance of deltoid dysfunction. Conclusions The Capstan screw technique represents a simple, rapid, strong and reliable mini-open technique. PMID:27582933

  10. A New Electromagnetic Navigation System for Pedicle Screws Placement: A Human Cadaver Study at the Lumbar Spine.

    Patrick Hahn

    Full Text Available Technical developments for improving the safety and accuracy of pedicle screw placement play an increasingly important role in spine surgery. In addition to the standard techniques of free-hand placement and fluoroscopic navigation, the rate of complications is reduced by 3D fluoroscopy, cone-beam CT, intraoperative CT/MRI, and various other navigation techniques. Another important aspect that should be emphasized is the reduction of intraoperative radiation exposure for personnel and patient. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of a new navigation system for the spine based on an electromagnetic field.Twenty pedicle screws were placed in the lumbar spine of human cadavers using EMF navigation. Navigation was based on data from a preoperative thin-slice CT scan. The cadavers were positioned on a special field generator and the system was matched using a patient tracker on the spinous process. Navigation was conducted using especially developed instruments that can be tracked in the electromagnetic field. Another thin-slice CT scan was made postoperatively to assess the result. The evaluation included the position of the screws in the direction of trajectory and any injury to the surrounding cortical bone. The results were classified in 5 groups: grade 1: ideal screw position in the center of the pedicle with no cortical bone injury; grade 2: acceptable screw position, cortical bone injury with cortical penetration ≤ 2 mm; grade 3: cortical bone injury with cortical penetration 2,1-4 mm, grad 4: cortical bone injury with cortical penetration 4,1-6 mm, grade 5: cortical bone injury with cortical penetration >6 mm.The initial evaluation of the system showed good accuracy for the lumbar spine (65% grade 1, 20% grade 2, 15% grade 3, 0% grade 4, 0% grade 5. A comparison of the initial results with other navigation techniques in literature (CT navigation, 2D fluoroscopic navigation shows that the accuracy of this system is

  11. Pyrolysis of Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF) wastes in a screw reactor

    Ferreira, Suelem Daiane; Altafini, Carlos Roberto; Perondi, Daniele; Godinho, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Medium Density Fiberboard wastes were pirolized in an auger reactor. • Experiments were carried out at two reaction temperatures and three solid residence times. • Yields were influenced by pyrolysis temperature, as well as by solid residence time. • Higher temperature produced more bio-oil rather than char generation. • Chars superficial area were compatibles with those of commercial activated carbons. - Abstract: Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF) wastes were undergoes via a thermal treatment through of a pyrolysis process. Pyrolysis was carried out in a pilot scale reactor with screw conveyor at two reaction temperatures (450 and 600 °C) and, for each one, three solid residence times (9, 15 and 34 min) were evaluated. Products (char/bio-oil/fuel gas) of the pyrolysis process were characterized and quantified. Results revealed that the products yields were influenced by pyrolysis temperature, as well as by solid residence time. Char yield ranged between 17.3 and 39.7 (wt.%), the bio-oil yield ranged between 23.9 and 40.0 (wt.%), while the fuel gas yield ranged between 34.6 and 50.7 (wt.%). The samples surface area at 450 and 600 °C in 15-min residence time were surprisingly high, 415 and 593 m 2 g −1 , respectively, which are compatible with the superficial area of commercial activated carbons. Energetic efficiency of process was estimated from energetic content present in the reaction products and the energetic content of MDF wastes, and the following results were obtained: 41.4% (fuel gas), 35.5% (char) and 29.2% (bio-oil). The contribution of this work is the development of a detailed study of the MDF pyrolysis in a pilot reactor with screw conveyor that supports the biorefineries concept

  12. Effect of Repeated Screw Joint Closing and Opening Cycles and Cyclic Loading on Abutment Screw Removal Torque and Screw Thread Morphology: Scanning Electron Microscopy Evaluation.

    Arshad, Mahnaz; Mahgoli, Hosseinali; Payaminia, Leila

    To evaluate the effect of repeated screw joint closing and opening cycles and cyclic loading on abutment screw removal torque and screw thread morphology using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Three groups (n = 10 in each group) of implant-abutment-abutment screw assemblies were created. There were also 10 extra abutment screws as new screws in group 3. The abutment screws were tightened to 12 Ncm with an electronic torque meter; then they were removed and removal torque values were recorded. This sequence was repeated 5 times for group 1 and 15 times for groups 2 and 3. The same screws in groups 1 and 2 and the new screws in group 3 were then tightened to 12 Ncm; this was also followed by screw tightening to 30 Ncm and retightening to 30 Ncm 15 minutes later. Removal torque measurements were performed after screws were subjected to cyclic loading (0.5 × 10⁶ cycles; 1 Hz; 75 N). Moreover, the surface topography of one screw from each group before and after cyclic loading was evaluated with SEM and compared with an unused screw. All groups exhibited reduced removal torque values in comparison to insertion torque in each cycle. However, there was a steady trend of torque loss in each group. A comparison of the last cycle of the groups before loading showed significantly greater torque loss value in the 15th cycle of groups 2 and 3 compared with the fifth cycle of group 1 (P abutment is definitively placed.

  13. Instantaneous Kinematics Analysis via Screw-Theory of a Novel 3-CRC Parallel Mechanism

    Hussein de la Torre

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the mobility and kinematics analysis of a novel parallel mechanism that is composed by one base, one platform and three identical limbs with CRC joints. The paper obtains closed-form solutions to the direct and inverse kinematics problems, and determines the mobility of the mechanism and instantaneous kinematics by applying screw theory. The obtained results show that this parallel robot is part of the family 2R1T, since the platform shows 3 DOF, i.e.: one translation perpendicular to the base and two rotations about skew axes. In order to calculate the direct instantaneous kinematics, this paper introduces the vector mh, which is part of the joint velocity vector that multiplies the overall inverse Jacobian matrix. This paper compares the results between simulations and numerical examples using Mathematica and SolidWorks in order to prove the accuracy of the analytical results.

  14. Numerical simulation of in vivo intraosseous torsional failure of a hollow-screw oral implant

    Akca Kivanc

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Owing to the complexity and magnitude of functional forces transferred to the bone-implant interface, the mechanical strength of the interface is of great importance. The purpose of this study was to determine the intraosseous torsional shear strength of an osseointegrated oral implant using 3-D finite element (FE stress analysis implemented by in vivo failure torque data of an implant. Methods A Ø 3.5 mm × 12 mm ITI® hollow screw dental implant in a patient was subjected to torque failure test using a custom-made strain-gauged manual torque wrench connected to a data acquisition system. The 3-D FE model of the implant and peri-implant circumstances was constructed. The in vivo strain data was converted to torque units (N.cm to involve in loading definition of FE analysis. Upon processing of the FE analysis, the shear stress of peri-implant bone was evaluated to assume torsional shear stress strength of the bone-implant interface. Results The in vivo torque failure test yielded 5952 μstrains at custom-made manual torque wrench level and conversion of the strain data resulted in 750 N.cm. FE revealed that highest shear stress value in the trabecular bone, 121 MPa, was located at the first intimate contact with implant. Trabecular bone in contact with external surface of hollow implant body participated shear stress distribution, but not the bone resting inside of the hollow. Conclusion The torsional strength of hollow-screw implants is basically provided by the marginal bone and the hollow part has negligible effect on interfacial shear strength.

  15. A pilot trial comparing the tear-out behavior in screw-sockets and cemented polyethylene acetabular components - a cadaveric study.

    Möbius, R; Schleifenbaum, S; Grunert, R; Löffler, S; Werner, M; Prietzel, T; Hammer, N

    2016-10-01

    The removal of well-fixed acetabular components following THA (total hip arthroplasty) is a difficult operation and could be accompanied by the loss of acetabular bone stock. The optimal method for fixation is still under debate. The aim of this pilot study was to compare the tear-out resistance and failure behavior between osseo-integrated and non-integrated screw cups. Furthermore, we examined whether there are differences in the properties mentioned between screw sockets and cemented polyethylene cups. Tear-out resistance and related mechanical work required for the tear-out of osseo-integrated screw sockets are higher than in non-integrated screw sockets. Ten human coxal bones from six cadavers with osseo-integrated screw sockets (n=4), non-integrated (implanted post-mortem, n=3) screw sockets and cemented polyethylene cups (n=3) were used for tear-out testing. The parameters axial failure load and mechanical work for tear-out were introduced as measures for determining the stability of acetabular components following THA. The osseo-integrated screw sockets yielded slightly higher tear-out resistance (1.61±0.26kN) and related mechanical work compared to the non-integrated screw sockets (1.23±0.39kN, P=0.4). The cemented polyethylene cups yielded the lowest tear-out resistance with a failure load of 1.18±0.24kN. Compared to the screw cups implanted while alive, they also differ on a non-significant level (P=0.1). Osseous failure patterns differed especially for the screw sockets compared to the cemented polyethylene cups. Osseo-integration did not greatly influence the tear-out stability in cementless screw sockets following axial loading. Furthermore, the strength of the bone-implant-interface of cementless screw sockets appears to be similar to cemented polyethylene cups. However, given the high failure load, high mechanical load and because of the related bone failure patterns, removal should not be performed by means of tear-out but rather by osteotomes

  16. Misplaced Cervical Screws Requiring Reoperation.

    Peterson, Jeremy C; Arnold, Paul M; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Fehlings, Michael G; Hart, Robert A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Nassr, Ahmad; Rahman, Ra'Kerry K; Tannoury, Chadi A; Tannoury, Tony; Mroz, Thomas E; Currier, Bradford L; De Giacomo, Anthony F; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Jobse, Bruce C; Massicotte, Eric M; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicenter, retrospective case series. In the past several years, screw fixation of the cervical spine has become commonplace. For the most part, this is a safe, low-risk procedure. While rare, screw backout or misplaced screws can lead to morbidity and increased costs. We report our experiences with this uncommon complication. A multicenter, retrospective case series was undertaken at 23 institutions in the United States. Patients were included who underwent cervical spine surgery from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2011, and had misplacement of screws requiring reoperation. Institutional review board approval was obtained at all participating institutions, and detailed records were sent to a central data center. A total of 12 903 patients met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. There were 11 instances of screw backout requiring reoperation, for an incidence of 0.085%. There were 7 posterior procedures. Importantly, there were no changes in the health-related quality-of-life metrics due to this complication. There were no new neurologic deficits; a patient most often presented with pain, and misplacement was diagnosed on plain X-ray or computed tomography scan. The most common location for screw backout was C6 (36%). This study represents the largest series to tabulate the incidence of misplacement of screws following cervical spine surgery, which led to revision procedures. The data suggest this is a rare event, despite the widespread use of cervical fixation. Patients suffering this complication can require revision, but do not usually suffer neurologic sequelae. These patients have increased cost of care. Meticulous technique and thorough knowledge of the relevant anatomy are the best means of preventing this complication.

  17. Tricortical cervical inter-body screw fixation.

    Goel A

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A new tricortical method of screw implantation for anterior cervical interbody plate fixation is described. The screws are placed obliquely such that they engage the anterior cortex of the body and traverse through the cortices adjoining the disc space. By this method the screws not only hold the plate firmly with a tricortical purchase, but by virtue of their course stabilize the two adjoining vertebral bodies by themselves. Sixteen patients were treated by this method. In three of these cases only tricortical screws without the metal plate were used for fixation. The advantages of the technique are discussed.

  18. A study of the bone healing kinetics of plateau versus screw root design titanium dental implants.

    Leonard, Gary

    2009-03-01

    This study was designed to compare the bone healing process around plateau root from (PRF) and screw root from (SRF) titanium dental implants over the immediate 12 week healing period post implant placement.

  19. Evaluation of a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography of scaphoid fixation screws

    Filli, Lukas; Finkenstaedt, Tim; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman [University Hospital of Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Marcon, Magda [University Hospital of Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Udine, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, Udine (Italy); Scholz, Bernhard [Imaging and Therapy Division, Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany); Calcagni, Maurizio [University Hospital of Zurich, Division of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) of scaphoid fixation screws. FDCT has gained interest in imaging small anatomic structures of the appendicular skeleton. Angiographic C-arm systems with flat detectors allow fluoroscopy and FDCT imaging in a one-stop procedure emphasizing their role as an ideal intraoperative imaging tool. However, FDCT imaging can be significantly impaired by artefacts induced by fixation screws. Following ethical board approval, commercially available scaphoid fixation screws were inserted into six cadaveric specimens in order to fix artificially induced scaphoid fractures. FDCT images corrected with the algorithm were compared to uncorrected images both quantitatively and qualitatively by two independent radiologists in terms of artefacts, screw contour, fracture line visibility, bone visibility, and soft tissue definition. Normal distribution of variables was evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. In case of normal distribution, quantitative variables were compared using paired Student's t tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for quantitative variables without normal distribution and all qualitative variables. A p value of < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistically significant differences. Metal artefacts were significantly reduced by the correction algorithm (p < 0.001), and the fracture line was more clearly defined (p < 0.01). The inter-observer reliability was ''almost perfect'' (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.85, p < 0.001). The prototype correction algorithm in FDCT for metal artefacts induced by scaphoid fixation screws may facilitate intra- and postoperative follow-up imaging. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography of scaphoid fixation screws

    Filli, Lukas; Finkenstaedt, Tim; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman; Marcon, Magda; Scholz, Bernhard; Calcagni, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) of scaphoid fixation screws. FDCT has gained interest in imaging small anatomic structures of the appendicular skeleton. Angiographic C-arm systems with flat detectors allow fluoroscopy and FDCT imaging in a one-stop procedure emphasizing their role as an ideal intraoperative imaging tool. However, FDCT imaging can be significantly impaired by artefacts induced by fixation screws. Following ethical board approval, commercially available scaphoid fixation screws were inserted into six cadaveric specimens in order to fix artificially induced scaphoid fractures. FDCT images corrected with the algorithm were compared to uncorrected images both quantitatively and qualitatively by two independent radiologists in terms of artefacts, screw contour, fracture line visibility, bone visibility, and soft tissue definition. Normal distribution of variables was evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. In case of normal distribution, quantitative variables were compared using paired Student's t tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for quantitative variables without normal distribution and all qualitative variables. A p value of < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistically significant differences. Metal artefacts were significantly reduced by the correction algorithm (p < 0.001), and the fracture line was more clearly defined (p < 0.01). The inter-observer reliability was ''almost perfect'' (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.85, p < 0.001). The prototype correction algorithm in FDCT for metal artefacts induced by scaphoid fixation screws may facilitate intra- and postoperative follow-up imaging. (orig.)

  1. Broken Bioabsorbable Tibial Interference Screw after Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL Reconstruction using a Semitendinosus-gracilis Graft: A Case Report

    Huang ME Deborah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available When a patient presents with knee pain and locking after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction, a new meniscal injury or an osteochondral loose body are usually considered for differential diagnosis. We present the case of a 22-year-old female with just these complaints 6 months after ACL reconstruction surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the knee showed a broken screw tip which was later arthroscopically removed. At arthroscopy, an 11mm long broken bioabsorbable interference screw tip was found lying in the intercondylar notch; this resulted in a 0.5cm Outerbridge grade II chondral ulcer located at mid- patella. Both menisci and cruciate ligaments were intact and no other loose bodies were found in the knee joint.

  2. Cervical pedicle screw fixation at C6 and C7 A cadaveric study

    Ye Li

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The intersection of the horizontal line through the midpoint of the transverse process root and vertical line through the intersection of the posterolateral and posterior planes of the isthmus can be used as an entry point for C6 and C7 pedicle screw fixation. The screws should be inserted at 60 or 90° with the posterolateral isthmus in the horizontal plane and at 75° with the posterior isthmus in the sagittal plane. The LSC should not exceed 30 mm.

  3. Feasibility of Modified Anterior Odontoid Screw Fixation: Analysis of a New Trajectory Using 3-Dimensional Simulation Software.

    Zhang, Li-Lian; Chen, Qi; Wang, Hao-Li; Xu, Hua-Zi; Tian, Nai-Feng

    2018-05-03

    Anterior odontoid screw fixation (AOSF) has been suggested as the optimal treatment for type II and some shallow type III odontoid fractures. However, only the classical surgical trajectory is available; no newer entry points or trajectories have been reported. We evaluated the anatomic feasibility of a new trajectory for AOSF using 3-dimensional (3D) screw insertion simulation software (Mimics). Computed tomography (CT) scans of patients (65 males and 59 females) with normal cervical structures were obtained consecutively, and the axes were reconstructed in 3 dimensions by Mimics software. Then simulated operations were performed using 2 new entry points below the superior articular process using bilateral screws of different diameters (group 1: 4 mm and 4 mm; group 2: 4 mm and 3.5 mm; group 3: 3.5 mm and 3.5 mm). The success rates and the required screw lengths were recorded and analyzed. The success rates were 79.03% for group 1, 95.16% for group 2, and 98.39% for group 3. The success rates for groups 2 and 3 did not differ significantly, and both were significantly better than the rate for group 1. The success rate was much higher in males than in females in group 1, but the success rate was similar in males and females in the other 2 groups. Screw lengths did not differ significantly among the 3 groups, but an effect of sex was apparent. Our modified trajectory is anatomically feasible for fixation of anterior odontoid fractures, but further anatomic experiments and clinical research are needed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A squamous odontogenic tumor following an orthodontic micro-screw: A rare case report and review of the literature.

    Tu, Jingqiu; Yin, Ping; Yuan, Yunyi; Chen, Jie; Yuan, Yongxiang; Lei, Yonghua

    2018-02-01

    We reported a very rare case of squamous odontogenic tumor(SOT) in a 23-year-old female. The tumor arose after an implanting operation of an orthodontic micro-screw, and was definitely diagnosed by the histopathological examination. Based on the case report and a review of the literature, we discussed about the general features, differential diagnosis and pathogenesis of SOT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Excessively anterior placement of the fibular interfragmentary screw can result in a malreduced ankle syndesmosis – a technical report

    S Mukhoapadhyay

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available S Mukhoapadhyay1, A R Guha1, R Thomas1, A M Perera1, P Mullaney21Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Unit, 2Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UKAbstract: The detection of often missed, syndesmotic injury in ankle fractures is important to reduce unacceptable clinical outcomes including possible future ankle arthritis. A case is presented in which the malpositioning of an interfragmentary screw has caused malreduction of syndesmosis.Keywords: syndesmotic injury, ankle fracture, arthritis

  6. A Universal Pedicle Screw and V-Rod System for Lumbar Isthmic Spondylolysis: A Retrospective Analysis of 21 Cases

    Chen, Xiong-sheng; Zhou, Sheng-yuan; Jia, Lian-shun; Gu, Xiao-min; Fang, Lei; Zhu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the surgical outcome of a universal pedicle screw-V rod system and isthmic bone grafting for isthmic spondylolysis. Methods Twenty-four patients with isthmic spondylolysis at L5 and grade 0–I spondylolisthesis (Meyerding classification) received isthmic bone graft and stabilization using the universal pedicle screw-V rod system. Back pain was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) and time to bone healing, improvement in spondylolisthesis and intervertebral space height at L5/S1 and L4/L5 were assessed. Results Twenty-one patients were followed up for 24 months and included in the analysis. Back pain was markedly improved at 3 months postoperatively with a statistical difference in VAS scores compared with preoperative VAS scores (Pspondylolysis and reduces back pain, prevents anterior displacement of the diseased segment and maintains intervertebral space height, thus offering a promising alternative to current approaches for isthmic spondylolysis. PMID:23691090

  7. Pumping Characteristics of a Helical Screw Agitator with a Draught Tube

    Hwang, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Youn-Jea

    In the use of helical type agitator, the mixing process is usually restricted to the laminar flow regime. Common examples of laminar mixing are found where the fluid has a very high viscosity, i.e., pseudoplastic fluids. It can be indicated that a helical type agitator is sufficiently suited to the creeping flow mixing. The pumping characteristic of a Helical Screw Agitator with a draught tube (HSA) is required to evaluate its capacity for the optimal configuration of the mixing chamber. It could be executed by changing some parameters such as the number of helix, the angular velocity and the rotating direction and so on. In this study, the numerical simulation was carried out with the Eulerian multiphase mixture model and the moving mesh approximation. Some of the optimum design parameters have been developed with the aid of numerical data from the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. Using the commercial code, Fluent, the pumping characteristics in the HSA are investigated from the rheological properties, and the results are graphically depicted.

  8. Standard Waste Box Lid Screw Removal Option Testing

    Anast, Kurt Roy

    2016-01-01

    This report provides results from test work conducted to resolve the removal of screws securing the standard waste box (SWB) lids that hold the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) drums. The test work evaluated equipment and process alternatives for removing the 42 screws that hold the SWB lid in place. The screws were secured with a red Loctite thread locker that makes removal very difficult because the rivets that the screw threads into would slip before the screw could be freed from the rivet, making it impossible to remove the screw and therefore the SWB lid.

  9. Standard Waste Box Lid Screw Removal Option Testing

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-11

    This report provides results from test work conducted to resolve the removal of screws securing the standard waste box (SWB) lids that hold the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) drums. The test work evaluated equipment and process alternatives for removing the 42 screws that hold the SWB lid in place. The screws were secured with a red Loctite thread locker that makes removal very difficult because the rivets that the screw threads into would slip before the screw could be freed from the rivet, making it impossible to remove the screw and therefore the SWB lid.

  10. The Effect of Polymethyl Methacrylate Augmentation on the Primary Stability of Cannulated Bone Screws in an Anterolateral Plate in Osteoporotic Vertebrae: A Human Cadaver Study.

    Rüger, Matthias; Sellei, Richard M; Stoffel, Marcus; von Rüden, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Cohort study. Objective Expandable anterolateral plates facilitate the reduction of posttraumatic deformities of thoracolumbar spine injuries and are commonly used in cases of unstable injuries or compromised bone quality. In this in vitro study, the craniocaudal yield load of the osseous fixation of an anterior angular stable plate fixation system and the effect of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) screw augmentation on the primary stability of the screw-bone interface during kyphosis reduction was evaluated in 12 osteoporotic human thoracolumbar vertebrae. Methods The anterolateral stabilization device used for this study is comprised of two swiveling flanges and an expandable midsection. It facilitates the controlled reduction of kyphotic deformities in situ with a geared distractor. Single flanges were attached to 12 thoracolumbar vertebrae. Six specimens were augmented with PMMA by means of cannulated bone screws. The constructs were subjected to static, displacement-controlled craniocaudal loading to failure in a servohydraulic testing machine. Results The uncemented screws cut out at a mean 393 ± 66 N, whereas the cemented screws showed significantly higher yield load of 966 ± 166 N (p augmentation is an effective method to increase two- to threefold the primary stability of the screw-bone interface of an anterolateral spine stabilization system in osteoporotic bone. We recommend it in cases of severely compromised bone quality to reduce the risk of screw loosening during initial kyphosis correction and to increase long-term construct stability.

  11. Three-dimensional navigation is more accurate than two-dimensional navigation or conventional fluoroscopy for percutaneous sacroiliac screw fixation in the dysmorphic sacrum: a randomized multicenter study.

    Matityahu, Amir; Kahler, David; Krettek, Christian; Stöckle, Ulrich; Grutzner, Paul Alfred; Messmer, Peter; Ljungqvist, Jan; Gebhard, Florian

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of computer-assisted sacral screw fixation compared with conventional techniques in the dysmorphic versus normal sacrum. Review of a previous study database. Database of a multinational study with 9 participating trauma centers. The reviewed group included 130 patients, 72 from the navigated group and 58 from the conventional group. Of these, 109 were in the nondysmorphic group and 21 in the dysmorphic group. Placement of sacroiliac (SI) screws was performed using standard fluoroscopy for the conventional group and BrainLAB navigation software with either 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional (3D) navigation for the navigated group. Accuracy of SI screw placement by 2-dimensional and 3D navigation versus conventional fluoroscopy in dysmorphic and nondysmorphic patients, as evaluated by 6 observers using postoperative computerized tomography imaging at least 1 year after initial surgery. Intraobserver agreement was also evaluated. There were 11.9% (13/109) of patients with misplaced screws in the nondysmorphic group and 28.6% (6/21) of patients with misplaced screws in the dysmorphic group, none of which were in the 3D navigation group. Raw agreement between the 6 observers regarding misplaced screws was 32%. However, the percent overall agreement was 69.0% (kappa = 0.38, P dysmorphic proximal sacral segment. We recommend the use of 3D navigation, where available, for insertion of SI screws in patients with normal and dysmorphic proximal sacral segments. Therapeutic level I.

  12. Biopolymer augmentation of the lag screw in the treatment of femoral neck fractures - a biomechanical in-vitro study

    Paech A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cut-out of the sliding screw is one of the most common complications in the treatment of intertrochanteric fractures. The reasons for the cut-out are: a suboptimal position of the hip-screw in the femoral head, the type of fracture and poor bone quality. The aim of this study was to reproduce the cut-out event biomechanically and to evaluate the possible prevention of this event by the use of a biopolymer augmentation of the hip screw. Concerning the density and compression force of osteoporotic femoral bone polyurethane foam according to the terms of the Association for Standard Testing Material (ASTMF 1839-97 was used as test material. The polyurethane foam Lumoltan 200 with a compression force of 3.3 Mpa and a density of 0.192 g/cm3 was used to reproduce the osteoporotic bone of the femoral fragment (density 12 lbm/ft3. A cylinder of 50 mm of length and 50 mm of width was produced by a rotary splint raising procedure with planar contact. The axial load of the system was performed by a hydraulic force cylinder of a universal test machine type Zwick 1455, Ulm, Germany. The CCD-angle of the used TGN-System was preset at 130 degrees. The migration pattern of the hip screw in the polyurethane foam was measured and expressed as a curve of the distance in millimeter [mm] against the applied load in Newton [N] up to the cut-out point. During the tests the implants reached a critical changing point from stable to unstable with an increased load progression of steps of 50 Newton. This unstable point was characterized by an increased migration speed in millimeters and higher descending gradient in the migration curve. This peak of the migration curve served as an indicator for the change of the hip screw position in the simulated bone material. The applied load in the non-augmented implant showed that in this group for a density degree of 12 (0,192 g/cm3 the mean force at the failure point was 1431 Newton (± 52 Newton. In the augmented

  13. Outcome and safety analysis of 3D printed patient specific pedicle screw jigs for complex spinal deformities: A comparative study.

    Garg, Bhavuk; Gupta, Manish; Singh, Menaka; Kalyanasundaram, Dinesh

    2018-05-03

    Spinal deformities are very challenging to treat and have a great risk of neurological complications due to hardware placement during corrective surgery. Various techniques have been introduced to ensure safe and accurate placement of pedicle screws. Patient-specific screw guides with pre-drawn and pre-validated trajectory seems to be an attractive option. We have focused on developing 3D printing technique for complex spinal deformities in India. This study also aimed to compare the placement of pedicle screw with 3D printing and free hand technique. This is a retrospective comparative clinical study at an academic institutional setting. A total of 20 patients were enrolled during the study, 10 were operated with the help of 3D printing (group 1) and 10 were operated with freehand technique (group 2). Group 1 included 6 congenital, 3 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), one post tubercular kyphosis and Group 2 included 5 congenital, 4 AIS and one post tubercular kyphosis patient. Primary outcomes were measured in terms of screw violation and secondary outcome were measured in terms of Surgical time, Blood loss, Radiation exposure (no. of shoots required) and complications. MIMICS v18.0 Software was used for 3D reconstruction from CT scan images of all the patients. 3-Matic software was used to create drill guide. 3-D printer from Stratasys Mojo ABS P 430 model material cartilage (a thermoplastic material) was used for printing of vertebrae model and jigs. Two sample test of proportion was used to compare correctly and wrongly pedicle screw placement with 3D printing and freehand technique. T-test with equal variance was used for operating surgical time and blood loss. This work was carried out by collaboration of Orthopaedics Department, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi and Biomedical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi. This project received the grant of USD 60000 from Department of Biotechnology (DBT

  14. A radial holding device for the bundle and brace plates envelope in a vapor generator, by the means of enclosed screw stops

    Comic, G.

    1995-01-01

    With the aim to protect the envelopes and bundles against seisms or other constraints, without causing interference with the water flow or being too complicated to install, as with previous systems, a holding system is proposed which uses screw stops fixed to the envelope and to the brace; the screw, enclosed in one of the two parts, ensures, during the assembly, the displacement of the second part for good contact with the brace plate. 6 fig

  15. Is the lag screw sliding effective in the intramedullary nailing in A1 and A2 AO-OTA intertrochanteric fractures? A prospective study of Sliding and None-sliding lag screw in Gamma-III nail

    Zhu Yi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Object To compare the Sliding with Non-sliding lag screw of a gamma nail in the treatment of A1 and A2 AO-OTA intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and methods 80 patients were prospectively collected. In each group, AO/OTA 31-A were classified into group A. AO/OTA 31-A2.1 was classified as group B. We classified the A2.2 and A2.3 as group C. According to the set-screw locking formation of Gamma-III, the cases were randomly allocated to Sliding subgroup and Non-sliding subgroup in A, B and C groups. Follow-ups were performed 1, 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Results In the Sliding group, the bone healing rate 3, 6, 12 months postoperatively reached 85.00%, 97.50%, 100% in group A, B and C. Meanwhile, in Non-sliding group, postoperatively, bone healing rate were 90.00%, 95.00% and 97.50% in group A, B and C, respectively. Both differences were not significant. Lower limb discrepancy between Sliding and Non-sliding pattern was significantly different in group C which represent fracture types of AO/OTA 31-A2.2 and A2.3 (0.573 ± 0.019 mm in Non-sliding group, 0.955 mm ± 0.024 mm in Sliding group, P Conclusions As a result, we can conclude that the sliding distance is minimal in Gamma nails and it is related to the comminuted extent of the intertrochanteric area in A1 and A2 AO-OTA intertrochanteric fractures. For treating these kinds of fractures, the sliding of the lag screw of an Gamma nail does not improve any clinical results and in certain cases, such as highly comminuted A1 and A2 fractures, can therefore even benefit from a locked lag screw by tightening the set-screw.

  16. The accuracy of the lateral vertebral notch-referred pedicle screw insertion technique in subaxial cervical spine: a human cadaver study.

    Luo, Jiaquan; Wu, Chunyang; Huang, Zhongren; Pan, Zhimin; Li, Zhiyun; Zhong, Junlong; Chen, Yiwei; Han, Zhimin; Cao, Kai

    2017-04-01

    This is a cadaver specimen study to confirm new pedicle screw (PS) entry point and trajectory for subaxial cervical PS insertion. To assess the accuracy of the lateral vertebral notch-referred PS insertion technique in subaxial cervical spine in cadaver cervical spine. Reported morphometric landmarks used to guide the surgeon in PS insertion show significant variability. In the previous study, we proposed a new technique (as called "notch-referred" technique) primarily based on coronal multiplane reconstruction images (CMRI) and cortical integrity after PS insertion in cadavers. However, the PS position in cadaveric cervical segment was not confirmed radiologically. Therefore, the difference between the pedicle trajectory and the PS trajectory using the notch-referred technique needs to be illuminated. Twelve cadaveric cervical spines were conducted with PS insertion using the lateral vertebral notch-referred technique. The guideline for entry point and trajectory for each vertebra was established based on the morphometric data from our previous study. After 3.5-mm diameter screw insertion, each vertebra was dissected and inspected for pedicle trajectory by CT scan. The pedicle trajectory and PS trajectory were measured and compared in axial plane. The perforation rate was assessed radiologically and was graded from ideal to unacceptable: Grade 0 = screw in pedicle; Grade I = perforation of pedicle wall less than one-fourth of the screw diameter; Grade II = perforation more than one-fourth of the screw diameter but less than one-second; Grade III = perforation more than one-second outside of the screw diameter. In addition, pedicle width between the acceptable and unacceptable screws was compared. A total of 120 pedicle screws were inserted. The perforation rate of pedicle screws was 78.3% in grade 0 (excellent PS position), 10.0% in grade I (good PS position), 8.3% in grade II (fair PS position), and 3.3% in grade III (poor PS position). The

  17. Quorum sensing: a quantum perspective.

    Majumdar, Sarangam; Pal, Sukla

    2016-09-01

    Quorum sensing is the efficient mode of communication in the bacterial world. After a lot of advancements in the classical theory of quorum sensing few basic questions of quorum sensing still remain unanswered. The sufficient progresses in quantum biology demands to explain these questions from the quantum perspective as non trivial quantum effects already have manifested in various biological processes like photosynthesis, magneto-reception etc. Therefore, it's the time to review the bacterial communications from the quantum view point. In this article we carefully accumulate the latest results and arguments to strengthen quantum biology through the addition of quorum sensing mechanism in the light of quantum mechanics.

  18. Electromyogram synergy control of a dexterous artificial hand to unscrew and screw objects.

    Kent, Benjamin A; Karnati, Nareen; Engeberg, Erik D

    2014-03-21

    Due to their limited dexterity, it is currently not possible to use a commercially available prosthetic hand to unscrew or screw objects without using elbow and shoulder movements. For these tasks, prosthetic hands function like a wrench, which is unnatural and limits their use in tight working environments. Results from timed rotational tasks with human subjects demonstrate the clinical need for increased dexterity of prosthetic hands, and a clinically viable solution to this problem is presented for an anthropomorphic artificial hand. Initially, a human hand motion analysis was performed during a rotational task. From these data, human hand synergies were derived and mapped to an anthropomorphic artificial hand. The synergy for the artificial hand is controlled using conventional dual site electromyogram (EMG) signals. These EMG signals were mapped to the developed synergy to control four joints of the dexterous artificial hand simultaneously.Five limb absent and ten able-bodied test subjects participated in a comparison study to complete a timed rotational task as quickly as possible with their natural hands (except for one subject with a bilateral hand absence), eight commercially available prosthetic hands, and the proposed synergy controller. Each test subject used two to four different artificial hands. With the able-bodied subjects, the developed synergy controller reduced task completion time by 177% on average. The limb absent subjects completed the task faster on average than with their own prostheses by 46%. There was a statistically significant improvement in task completion time with the synergy controller for three of the four limb absent participants with integrated prostheses, and was not statistically different for the fourth. The proposed synergy controller reduced average task completion time compared to commercially available prostheses. Additionally, the synergy controller is able to function in a small workspace and requires less physical

  19. Comment

    Sørensen, Peter Birch

    1999-01-01

    Comment on: Besley and Seabright (1999) The effects and policy implications of state aid to industry: an economic analysis. Economic Policy 14 (28), 13-53......Comment on: Besley and Seabright (1999) The effects and policy implications of state aid to industry: an economic analysis. Economic Policy 14 (28), 13-53...

  20. Comment

    Sørensen, Peter Birch

    1999-01-01

    Comment on: Alessandra Casella (1999) Tradable deficit permits: efficient implementation of the Stability Pact in the European Monetary Union. Economic Policy 14 (29), 321-362......Comment on: Alessandra Casella (1999) Tradable deficit permits: efficient implementation of the Stability Pact in the European Monetary Union. Economic Policy 14 (29), 321-362...

  1. Evaluation of roundness error using a new method based on a small displacement screw

    Nouira, Hichem; Bourdet, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    In relation to industrial need and the progress of technology, LNE would like to improve the measurement of its primary pressure, spherical and flick standards. The spherical and flick standards are respectively used to calibrate the spindle motion error and the probe which equips commercial conventional cylindricity measuring machines. The primary pressure standards are obtained using pressure balances equipped with rotary pistons with an uncertainty of 5 nm for a piston diameter of 10 mm. Conventional machines are not able to reach such an uncertainty level. That is why the development of a new machine is necessary. To ensure such a level of uncertainty, both stability and performance of the machine are not sufficient, and the data processing should also be done with accuracy less than a nanometre. In this paper, a new method based on the small displacement screw (SDS) model is proposed. A first validation of this method is proposed on a theoretical dataset published by the European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) in report no 3327. Then, an experiment is prepared in order to validate the new method on real datasets. Specific environment conditions are taken into account and many precautions are considered. The new method is applied to analyse the least-squares circle, minimum zone circle, maximum inscribed circle and minimum circumscribed circle. The results are compared to those done by the reference Chebyshev best-fit method and reveal perfect agreement. The sensibilities of the SDS and Chebyshev methodologies are investigated, and it is revealed that results remain unchanged when the value of the diameter exceeds 700 times the form error. (paper)

  2. Mini-screw implant or transpalatal arch-mediated anchorage reinforcement during canine retraction: a randomized clinical trial.

    Sharma, Mohit; Sharma, Vineet; Khanna, Bharat

    2012-06-01

    To compare mesial movement of upper first molars during maxillary canine retraction using a pre-adjusted edgewise appliance provided by anchorage reinforcement and a transpalatal arch or mini-screw implant. Randomized clinical trial. Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Armed Forces Medical College, Pune, India. From a cohort of subjects requiring the extraction of both upper first premolars and pre-adjusted edgewise appliances to correct their malocclusion, a total of 30 were randomly allocated to receive two different forms of anchorage reinforcement: group A--receiving mini-screw implant and group B--receiving a transpalatal arch Group A subjects received titanium mini-screw implants placed at the start of treatment between the maxillary second premolar and maxillary first molar. Maxillary second premolars were secured to the mini-screw implants using of 0.010-inch stainless steel ligature wire. Group B subjects received a custom-made transpalatal arch which was soldered to maxillary first molar bands. Active canine retraction was initiated in both groups on placement of a 0.019×0.025-inch stainless steel archwire using nickel titanium closed coil springs. Mesial movement of the upper first molars as measured on pre- (T1) and post-treatment (T2) lateral skull radiographs. The results showed that in group A the mean mesial movement of the first molars between T1 and T2 was 0.0 mm (SD 0.02; P = 0.90), whereas in Group B there was a mean forward movement of the first maolars of 2.48 mm (SD 0.71; Pimplants placed prior to levelling and aligning were able to provide absolute anchorage during maxillary canine retraction, in contrast to a transpalatal arch.

  3. Percutaneous Facet Screw Fixation in the Treatment of Symptomatic Recurrent Lumbar Facet Joint Cyst: A New Technique

    Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Gallo, Giacomo, E-mail: giacomo.gallo83@gmail.com; Bertrand, Anne-Sophie, E-mail: asbertrand3@hotmail.com [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice (France); Bard, Robert L., E-mail: rbard@cancerscan.com [New York Medical College (United States); Kelekis, Alexis, E-mail: akelekis@med.uoa.gr [University General Hospital “ATTIKON” (Greece)

    2016-01-15

    We present a case of percutaneous treatment of symptomatic recurrent lumbar facet joint cyst resistant to all medical treatments including facet joint steroid injection. Percutaneous transfacet fixation was then performed at L4–L5 level with a cannulated screw using CT and fluoroscopy guidance. The procedure time was 30 min. Using the visual analog scale (VAS), pain decreased from 9.5, preoperatively, to 0 after the procedure. At 6-month follow-up, an asymptomatic cystic recurrence was observed, which further reduced at the 1-year follow-up. Pain remained stable (VAS at 0) during all follow-ups. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous cyst rupture associated with facet screw fixation could be an alternative to surgery in patients suffering from a symptomatic recurrent lumbar facet joint cyst.

  4. Model-based analysis of a twin-screw wet granulation system for continuous solid dosage manufacturing

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Mortier, Severine T. F. C.

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of twin-screw granulation in a continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line requires process knowledge development. This is often pursued by application of mechanistic models incorporating the underlying mechanisms. In this study, granulation mechanisms considered to be domi......Implementation of twin-screw granulation in a continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line requires process knowledge development. This is often pursued by application of mechanistic models incorporating the underlying mechanisms. In this study, granulation mechanisms considered...... to be dominant in the kneading element regions of the granulator i.e., aggregation and breakage, were included in a one-dimensional population balance model. The model was calibrated using the experimentally determined inflow granule size distribution, and the mean residence time was used as additional input...

  5. A complete absorption mechanism of stacking fault tetrahedron by screw dislocation in copper

    Fan, Haidong; Wang, Qingyuan

    2013-01-01

    It was frequently observed in experiments that stacking fault tetrahedron (SFT) can be completely absorbed by dislocation and generate defect-free channels in irradiated materials, but the mechanism is still open. In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) was used to explore the dislocation mechanism of reaction between SFT and screw dislocation in copper. Our computational results reveal that, at high temperature, the SFT is completely absorbed by screw dislocation with the help of Lomer–Cottrell (LC) lock transforming into Lomer dislocation. This complete absorption mechanism is very helpful to understand the defect-free channels in irradiated materials

  6. The effect of infection and lag screw fixation on the union of membranous bone grafts in a rabbit model.

    Fialkov, J A; Phillips, J H; Walmsley, S L

    1994-03-01

    Infection complicating craniofacial procedures contributes significantly to patient morbidity and health care costs. The role of fixation materials in this setting remains unclear. As foreign material, does fixation hardware increase patients' susceptibility to developing postoperative infection? Furthermore, once infection is established, should fixation hardware be removed? To answer these questions, we performed an onlay membranous bone grafting procedure to the mandible in 94 New Zealand White rabbits, applied lag-screw fixation in half the animals, and inoculated the wounds with different bacterial doses. We quantified the differential rates of infection and rates of graft union in the presence of infection. The infection rates for the rigidly fixated group were not significantly different from the rates for the nonfixated group for a range of bacterial inoculum doses. There was no significant difference in the rates of resolution of infection and sepsis between the two groups. Gross and histologic assessments revealed a significantly lower union rate for infected grafts when compared with uninfected grafts. Furthermore, grafts rigidly fixated with a lag screw showed a higher rate of union when compared with nonfixated grafts in the presence of infection. In the absence of infection, the union rates for fixated and nonfixated groups did not differ significantly. While fixation hardware has been cited as a risk factor for postoperative infection, we were unable to show that lag-screw fixation contributes to this risk. Although infection impaired the union of membranous bone grafts to the recipient mandible, fixation of the grafts with a lag screw significantly decreased this deleterious effect of infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Interference screw versus Endoscrew fixation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A biomechanical comparative study in sawbones and porcine knees

    Chu-Chih Hung

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Interference screw fixation is one of the most common methods for ligament reconstruction. Although the advantages and clinical outcomes of this procedure have been widely reported, post-surgical complications often arise. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new femoral fixation device, the Endoscrew, for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. We performed a mechanical test in accordance with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standards and an in vitro biomechanical study. An axial pullout test was conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of the new device and the interference screw when implanted in solid rigid polyurethane foam test blocks. The biomechanical test used porcine femora to evaluate the initial fixation strength between these two implants. The maximum pullout force of the interference screw group [722.05 ± 130.49 N (N] was significantly greater (p < 0.01 than the Endoscrew group (440.79 ± 26.54 N when implanted in polyurethane foam 320 kg/m3 density. With polyurethane foam 160 kg/m3 density, the maximum pullout forces were (242.61 ± 37.36 N (p < 0.001 and (99.33 ± 30.01 N for the interference screw group and Endoscrew group, respectively. In the in vitro mechanical study, the Endoscrew (646.39 ± 72.38 N required a significantly greater ultimate load prior to failure (p < 0.05 when compared with the interference screw (489.72 ± 138.64 N. With regard to pullout stiffness, there was no statistically significant difference (p < 0.13 between the Endoscrew group (99.15 ± 12.16 N/mm and the interference screw group (87.96 ± 11.12 N/mm. The cyclic stiffness was also not significantly different (p < 0.44 between the Endoscrew group (93.09 ± 16.07 N/mm and the interference screw group (85.78 ± 14.76 N/mm. The axial pullout test showed that the strength of the Endoscrew was close to the fixation strength required for daily activities, but it is

  8. Influence of cement compressive strength and porosity on augmentation performance in a model of orthopedic screw pull-out.

    Pujari-Palmer, Michael; Robo, Celine; Persson, Cecilia; Procter, Philip; Engqvist, Håkan

    2018-01-01

    Disease and injuries that affect the skeletal system may require surgical intervention and internal fixation, i.e. orthopedic plate and screw insertion, to stabilize the injury and facilitate tissue repair. If the surrounding bone quality is poor the screws may migrate, or the bone may fail, resulting in fixation failure. While numerous studies have shown that cement augmentation of the interface between bone and implant can increase screw pull-out force, the physical properties of cement that influence pull-out force have not been investigated. The present study sought to determine how the physical properties of high strength calcium phosphate cements (hsCPCs, specifically dicalcium phosphate) affected the corresponding orthopedic screw pull-out force in urethane foam models of "healthy" and "osteoporotic" synthetic bone (Sawbones). In the simplest model, where only the bond strength between screw thread and cement (without Sawbone) was tested, the correlation between pull-out force and cement compressive strength (R 2 = 0.79) was weaker than correlation with total cement porosity (R 2 = 0.89). In open pore Sawbone that mimics "healthy" cancellous bone density the stronger cements produced higher pull-out force (50-60% increase). High strength, low porosity cements also produced higher pull-out forces (50-190% increase) in "healthy" Sawbones with cortical fixation if the failure strength of the cortical material was similar to, or greater than (a metal shell), actual cortical bone. This result is of particular clinical relevance where fixation with a metal plate implant is indicated, as the nearby metal can simulate a thicker cortical shell, thereby increasing the pull-out force of screws augmented with stronger cements. The improvement in pull-out force was apparent even at low augmentation volumes of 0.5mL (50% increase), which suggest that in clinical situations where augmentation volume is limited the stronger, lower porosity calcium phosphate cement (CPC) may

  9. Training Distal Locking Screw Insertion Skills to Novice Trainees: A Comparison Between Fluoroscopic- and Electromagnetic-Guided Techniques.

    Leroux, Timothy; Khoshbin, Amir; Nousiainen, Markku T

    2015-10-01

    To compare the effect fluoroscopy or electromagnetic (EM) guidance has on the learning of locking screw insertion in tibial nails in surgical novices. A randomized, prospective, controlled trial was conducted involving 18 surgical trainees with no prior experience inserting locking screws in intramedullary nails. After a training session using fluoroscopy, participants underwent a pretest using fluoroscopic guidance. Participants were then randomized into either the fluoroscopy or EM group and were further trained using their respective technique. Post, retention, and transfer tests were conducted. Outcomes included task completion, drill attempts, screw changes, and radiation time. Intragroup comparisons revealed that the EM group used significantly less drill attempts during the post and retention tests compared with the pretest (P = 0.016 and P = 0.016, respectively). Intergroup comparisons revealed that the EM group was (1) more likely to complete the task during the retention test (P = 0.043) and (2) had significantly less radiation time during the post and retention tests (P = 0.002 and P = 0.003, respectively). Radiation time in the EM group during the transfer test increased to a level equal to what the fluoroscopy group used during the post and retention tests (P = 0.71 and P = 0.92, respectively). No other significant between-group differences occurred. EM guidance may be safely used to assist in the training of surgical novices in the skill of distal locking screw insertion. Not only does this technology significantly improve the ability to complete the task and decrease radiation use but also it does so without compromising skill acquisition. Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  10. Precise placement of lag screws in operative treatment of trochanteric femoral fractures with a new guide system.

    Poyanli, Oguz S; Soylemez, Salih; Ozkut, Afsar T; Uygur, Esat; Kemah, Bahattin; Unal, Omer K

    2015-11-01

    We assessed the accuracy of a new guide system that we developed to place lag screws in the proper position with the minimum number of attempts for operative treatment of trochanteric femoral fractures. A total of 55 consecutive trochanteric femoral fractures were treated with a cephalomedullary nail. The first 27 consecutive patients were treated with the standard operation (group A), while the new guide system was used in the last 28 consecutive patients (group B). The numbers of attempts to place K wires and the duration of surgery were noted. Accuracy of lag screw placement was evaluated by measuring the angle of deviation from the central axis of the femoral head. Deviation values ranged from -11̊ to +15̊ for the 27 cases in group A, with a median absolute deviation of 8̊±6̊. That in the 28 cases after the introduction of the new guide system (group B) ranged from -5̊ to +6̊, with a median absolute deviation of 0.5̊±3̊ (Pfractures. The present study indicated that this new guide system and nail facilitate accurate placement of lag screws in the appropriate position with the minimum number of attempts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Simple Technique for Removing Broken Pedicular Screws

    A Agrawal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The procedure for removing a broken pedicle screw should ideally be technically easy and minimally invasive, as any damage to the pedicle, during removal of the broken screw, may weaken the pedicle, thus compromising on the success of re-instrumentation. We describe the case of a 32-year old man who had undergone surgery for traumatic third lumbar vertebral body fracture three years prior to current admission and had developed the complication of pedicle screw breakage within the vertebral body. The patient underwent re-exploration and removal of the distal screws. Through a paravertebral incision and muscle separation, the screws and rods were exposed and the implants were removed.

  12. A demonstration of applying ATS thermal screw technology to the processing of separated construction and other waste materials

    Jones, D.; Golan, A.; Bosschieter, H.A.

    1991-06-01

    A demonstration was carried out by Spider Recycling, a waste haulage company, to determine how to sort, process and recycle or reuse waste disposed of by the company, using a new processing system based on the ATS thermal screw press technology. Selected loads of waste totalling one thousand tonnes from construction, sawmill, landscape and tire industries located around greater Toronto were delivered to a pilot separation and processing site and separated into piles of similar material such as wood, drywall and tires. The separated piles were drawn on as feedstock for processing through the ATS thermal screw press system to produce useable forms of product and raw material. The applications included: turning wood waste into firelogs or wood fuel; yard waste into mulch; waste drywall into gypsum powder; tires into crumb rubber; asphalt shingles into a bitumix; and mixed garbage into densified logs or flakes. Wide ranges of throughput were found depending on the material processed, material size, density, moisture content and model of the ATS thermal screw press used. It was shown that it is practical to separate selected wastes from industry and process them with the ATS machine, and that the system could probably offer recycling and reuse solutions to separable waste where product markets are available and in some cases where the operation could collect the estimated $100/tonne tipping fees available in southern Ontario. 37 figs., 20 tabs.

  13. The Use of Percutaneous Lumbar Fixation Screws for Bilateral Pedicle Fractures with an Associated Dislocation of a Lumbar Disc Prosthesis

    William D. Harrison

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design. Case report. Objective. To identify a safe technique for salvage surgery following complications of total disc replacement. Summary of Background Data. Lumbar total disc replacement (TDR is considered by some as the gold standard for discogenic back pain. Revision techniques for TDR and their complications are in their infancy. This case describes a successful method of fixation for this complex presentation. Methods and Results. A 48-year-old male with lumbar degenerative disc disease and no comorbidities. Approximately two weeks postoperatively for a TDR, the patient represented with acute severe back pain and the TDR polyethylene inlay was identified as dislocated anteriorly. Subsequent revision surgery failed immediately as the polyethylene inlay redislocated intraoperatively. Further radiology identified bilateral pedicle fractures, previously unseen on the plain films. The salvage fusion of L5/S1 reutilized the anterior approach with an interbody fusion cage and bone graft. The patient was then turned intraoperatively and redraped. The percutaneous pedicle screws were used to fix L5 to the sacral body via the paracoccygeal corridor. Conclusion. The robust locking screw in the percutaneous screw allowed a complete fixation of the pedicle fractures. At 3-year followup, the patient has an excellent result and has returned to playing golf.

  14. Arthrodesis of the thumb interphalangeal joint and finger distal interphalangeal joints with a headless compression screw.

    Cox, Christopher; Earp, Brandon E; Floyd, W Emerson; Blazar, Philip E

    2014-01-01

    To study the results of using a small, headless compression screw (AcuTwist) for thumb interphalangeal (IP) joint and finger distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint arthrodeses. Between November 2007 and January 2012, 48 primary arthrodeses of the thumb IP joint or DIP joint in the other digits were performed in 29 consecutive patients with AcuTwist devices. Indications for arthrodesis included 19 cases of osteoarthritis in 25 fingers, 3 cases of lupus in 9 fingers, 2 cases of post-traumatic osteoarthritis in 2 fingers, and 1 case and finger each of acute trauma, neuromuscular disorder, postinfectious osteoarthritis, boutonniere deformity, and Dupuytren contracture. Charts were reviewed for clinical data, and radiographs were assessed for alignment and healing. Age averaged 59 years and follow-up averaged 12 months (range, 2-50 mo). Union occurred in 43 out of 46 fingers (94%). There were no cases of nail deformity, wound complications, tip hypersensitivity, or clinically notable malalignment. Three arthrodeses failed to fuse, including 2 asymptomatic nonunions and 1 fixation loss requiring revision with autograft. The complication rate was 9%. Distal digital joint arthrodesis with the AcuTwist resulted in a fusion rate of 94% with a complication rate of 9%. Our rate of fusion compares favorably with prior series using other methods of fixation. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Product diversification of banana cv. Mas Kirana off grade by using a double rotating screw extruder

    Setyadjit, S.; Sukasih, E.; Risfaheri, R.

    2018-01-01

    Extrusion technology is today’s favorite technology since it has a varied, practical and consistent product form. The purpose of this research was to get precise composite flour composition so that the quality of the resulted product has optimum quality for breakfast meals. The experimental design used was Design Expert vs. 7 with response surface box-behnken. The flour composition and level to be inputted to the program were banana flour (10-50g), mung beans (10-30g), egg flour (10-20g). Formula made was based on 200 g with addition of maize flour if the amount is less than 200 g. The extrusion tool used is a Thermo Scientific double rotating screw; with Haake Reomax OS. The best results in terms of carbohydrate content is the Formula 8 with a composition of 60 g of banana flour, 20 g eggs, 20 g of green beans and 100 g maize flour. The proximate chemical content of this formula is carbohydrate 84.04%, protein 8.55%, fat 5.49%, ash content 1.24%. K-calories per 100 g is 419.5 which is higher than the standard of breakfast meals calories.

  16. [Direct repair of adolescent lumbar spondylolysis using a pedicle screw-laminar hook system by paramedian approach].

    Wang, Bin; Tang, Yong-hua; Tang, Hong-chao; Jin, Cai-yi

    2011-08-01

    To discuss the indication and clinical effect of direct repair of adolescent lumbar spondylolysis by screw-laminar hook system. From August 2003 to December 2008, 28 patients (13 males and 15 females,ranging in age from 15 and 26 years, averaged 21.6 years) with lumbar spondylolysis were treated with isthmic bone grafting and internal fixation with a pedicle screw-laminar hook system. Three patients had spondylolysis at L3, L4; 5 patients had spondylolysis at L4, L5; 8 patients had spondylolysis at L4; and 12 patients had spondylolysis at L5. All the patients had low back pain and lasted over 6 months. According to preoperative and postoperative plain radiograph, CT scan and Macnab criteria, the fusion rate and clinical effect of this technique were evaluated. All the patients were followed up with a mean period of 14.9 months, ranging from 9 to 24 months. All the patients had bony union according to the X-rays and CT scan. According to the calculation results of Macnab criteria, 22 patients got an excellent result, 5 good and 1 fair. The direct repair of adolescent lumbar spondylolysis with pedicle screw-laminar hook system can shorten length of operation,decrease blood loss, preserve more posterior structures of spine and avoid iatrogenic instability of spine. The postoperative immediate stability of vertebral segment is acquired and the mobility of adjacent intervertebral discs is reserved. The screw-laminar hook system for the treatment of adolescent spondylolisthesis can get satisfactory clinical results.

  17. Clinical effects of posterior pedicle screw fixation on spinal deformity in growing period: a report of 360 cases

    Zheng-lei WANG

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of a new kind of pedicle screw frame system with sliding terminus and locked middle segment on spinal deformity in growing period.Methods Three hundred and sixty patients in growing period were involved in the present study,and among them 82 were suffering from congenital scoliosis,218 idiopathic scoliosis and 60 kyphosis.All the patients were treated with the pedicle screw frame system with sliding terminus and locked middle segment.The treatment effects and postoperative complications were observed,and the Cobb angle before and after the operation was compared.Results The Cobb angle of 300 scoliosis patients was corrected from 53°±3° to 8°±2°,and the Cobb angle of 60 kyphosis patients was corrected from 60°±2° to 25°±3°,and the corrective effect was satisfactory.The correction rate of patients with Cobb angle ≤50° was 80%.Two hundred and ten patients were followed-up for 1 to 6 years,and the longitudinal growth of spine was 1.5-4.0cm.No severe complication,such as screw fracture,rod fracture or nerve injury,occurred.Conclusion The pedicle screw frame system with sliding terminus had a favorable three-dimensional correction effect,and the spine growth would not be restricted,and there was no stiffness,vertebral rotation,or distortion of shaft after operation.

  18. The use of a continuous-action centrifugal-screw mixer for improving the quality of flour baking mixes for functional purposes

    D. M. Borodulin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the number of screw turns of a centrifugal-screw mixer, the number of holes in the screw turns and the rotor speed on the quality of mixing of flour baking mixes of functional purpose enriched with amino acids was studied. Flour baking mix is composed of wheat flour, whole wheat flour, chickpeas flour, rye flour, buckwheat flour, oat bran, gluten, dry milk powder, sesame seeds, flax seed, dried onions, table salt and sugar. The homogeneity of the mixture reflects table salt because it has a minimal weight relative to other components of the mix. The coefficient of heterogeneity was calculated to assess the quality of mixing. The centrifugal-screw mixer optimal operation parameters were investigated for different flour baking mixes. For the mix № 1 and mix № 2 optimal parameters are rotor rotating speed of 900 rpm, the number of turns of the screw 4 and the number of holes on the threads of the screw 4. For the mix № 3 optimal parameters are rotor speed of 500 rpm, the number of turns of the screw 2 and the number of holes on the threads of the screw 8. The centrifugal–screw mixer allow to obtain enriched with amino acids flour baking mix of good quality. The coefficient of heterogeneity of mixes does not exceed 5%. For all samples of bread amino acid content is significantly higher compared to the control sample. Depending on the bread recipe contents of amino acids increased by 83–97% for arginine, 52–61% for tyrosine, 52–66% for phenylalanine, 72–74% for histidine, 91% for leucine+ isoleucine, 53–56% for methionine, 90–97% for valine, 64–72% for proline, 87–93% for threonine, 58–87% for serine and 74% for alanine. The greatest biological value is attributed to flour the baking mix № 1 and № 2. The economic effect of selling an enriched flour bakery mixture prepared on a centrifugal–screw mixer has been determined. It is established that the operating costs for the production of 1 kg of such

  19. Radiofrequency-activated PMMA-augmentation through cannulated pedicle screws: A cadaver study to determine the biomechanical benefits in the osteoporotic spine.

    Karius, T; Deborre, C; Wirtz, D C; Burger, C; Prescher, A; Fölsch, A; Kabir, K; Pflugmacher, R; Goost, H

    2017-01-01

    PMMA-augmentation of pedicle screws strengthens the bone-screw-interface reducing cut-out risk. Injection of fluid cement bears a higher risk of extravasation, with difficulty of application because of inconsistent viscosity and limited injection time. To test a new method of cement augmentation of pedicle screws using radiofrequency-activated PMMA, which is suspected to be easier to apply and have less extravasations. Twenty-seven fresh-frozen human cadaver lumbar spines were divided into 18 osteoporotic (BMD ≤ 0.8 g/cm2) and 9 non-osteoporotic (BMD > 0.8 g/cm2) vertebral bodies. Bipedicular cannulated pedicle screws were implanted into the vertebral bodies; right screws were augmented with ultra-high viscosity PMMA, whereas un-cemented left pedicle screws served as negative controls. Cement distribution was controlled with fluoroscopy and CT scans. Axial pullout forces of the screws were measured with a material testing machine, and results were analyzed statistically. Fluoroscopy and CT scans showed that in all cases an adequately big cement depot with homogenous form and no signs of extravasation was injected. Pullout forces showed significant differences (p < 0.001) between the augmented and non-augmented pedicle screws for bone densities below 0.8 g/cm2 (661.9 N ± 439) and over 0.8 g/cm2 (744.9 N ± 415). Pullout-forces were significantly increased in osteoporotic as well as in non-osteoporotic vertebral bodies without a significant difference between these groups using this standardized, simple procedure with increased control and less complications like extravasation.

  20. A new palatal distractor device for bodily movement of maxillary bones by rigid self-locking miniplates and screws system.

    Cortese, Antonio; Savastano, Mauro; Cantone, Antonio; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2013-07-01

    A new palatal distractor device for bodily movement of the maxillary bones after complete segmented Le Fort I osteotomy for 1-stage transversal distraction and tridimensional repositioning on 1 patient is presented. The new distractor has an intrinsic tridimensional rigidity also in the fixation system by self-locking miniplates and screws for better control of the 2 maxillary fragments during distraction. Le Fort I distraction and repositioning procedure in association with a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy were performed on 1 patient with complete solution of the cross-bite and class III malocclusion. Results of dental and cephalometric analysis performed before surgery (T1), after surgery and distraction time (T2), and 18 months after surgery and orthodontic appliance removal (T3) are reported. No complications were encountered using the new distractor device. Advantages of this device and technique are presented including improved rigidity of both distraction (jackscrew) and fixation (4 self-locking miniplates and screws) systems resulting in complete control of the position of the 2 maxillary fragments during distraction and surgery. In addition, this new device allows resuming palatal distraction in the event of cross-bite relapse without causing dental-related problems or the risks of screw slackening.

  1. Percutaneous anterior C1/2 transarticular screw fixation: salvage of failed percutaneous odontoid screw fixation for odontoid fracture

    Wu, Ai-Min; Jin, Hai-Ming; Lin, Zhong-Ke; Chi, Yong-Long; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to investigate the outcomes and safety of using percutaneous anterior C1/2 transarticular screw fixation as a salvage technique for odontoid fracture if percutaneous odontoid screw fixation fails. Methods Fifteen in 108 odontoid fracture patients (planned to be treated by percutaneous anterior odontoid screw fixation) were failed to introduce satisfactory odontoid screw trajectory. To salvage this problem, we chose the percutaneous anterior C1/2 trans...

  2. Extraction of sunflower oil by twin screw extruder: screw configuration and operating condition effects

    Kartika, I.A. [FATETA-IPB, Bogor (Indonesia). Department of Agroindustrial Technology; Pontalier, P.Y.; Rigal, L. [Laboratoire de Chimie Agro-Industrielle, UMR 1010 INRA/INP-ENSIACET, Toulouse (France)

    2006-12-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the screw configuration allowing oil extraction from sunflower seeds with a twin-screw extruder. Experiments were conducted using a co-rotating twin-screw extruder. Five screw profiles were examined to define the best performance (oil extraction yield, specific mechanical energy and oil quality) by studying the influence of operating conditions, barrel temperature, screw speed and feed rate. Generally, the position and spacing between two reversed screw elements affected oil extraction yield. An increase of oil extraction yield was observed as the reversed screw elements were moved with increased spacing between two elements and with smaller pitch elements. In addition, oil extraction yield increased as barrel temperature, screw speed and feed rate were decreased. Highest oil extraction yield (85%) with best cake meal quality (residual oil content lower than 13%) was obtained under operating conditions of 120 {sup o}C, 75 rpm and 19 kg/h. Furthermore, the operating parameters influenced energy input. A decrease in barrel temperature and feed rate followed by an increase in screw speed increased energy input, particularly specific mechanical energy input. Effect of the operating parameters on oil quality was less important. In all experiments tested, the oil quality was very good. The acid value was below 2 mg of KOH/g of oil and total phosphorus content was low, below 100 mg/kg. (author)

  3. A computed tomographic anatomical study of the upper sacrum. Application for a user guide of pelvic fixation with iliosacral screws in adult spinal deformity.

    Dubory, Arnaud; Bouloussa, Houssam; Riouallon, Guillaume; Wolff, Stéphane

    2017-12-01

    Widely used in traumatic pelvic ring fractures, the iliosacral (IS) screw technique for spino-pelvic fixation remains anecdotal in adult spinal deformity. The objective of this study was to assess anatomical variability of the adult upper sacrum and to provide a user guide of spino-pelvic fixation with IS screws in adult spinal deformity. Anatomical variability of the upper sacrum according to age, gender, height and weight was sought on 30 consecutive pelvic CT-scans. Thus, a user guide of spino-pelvic fixation with IS screws was modeled and assessed on ten CT-scans as described below. Two invariable landmarks usable during the surgical procedure were defined: point A (corresponding to the connector binding the IS screw to the spinal rod), equidistant from the first posterior sacral hole and the base of the S1 articular facet and 10 mm-embedded into the sacrum; point B (corresponding to the tip of the IS screw) located at the junction of the anterior third and middle third of the sacral endplate in the sagittal plane and at the middle of the endplate in the coronal plane. Point C corresponded to the intersection between the A-B direction and the external facet of the iliac wing. Three-dimensional reconstructions modeling the IS screw optimal direction according to the A-B-C straight line were assessed. Age had no effect on the anatomy of the upper sacrum. The distance between the base of the S1 superior articular facet and the top of the first posterior sacral hole was correlated with weight (r = 0.6; 95% CI [0.6-0.9]); p guide of spinopelvic fixation with IS screws seems to be reliable and reproducible independently of age, gender and morphologic characteristics but needs clinical assessment. Level IV.

  4. A novel computed method to reconstruct the bilateral digital interarticular channel of atlas and its use on the anterior upper cervical screw fixation

    Ai-Min Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate a novel computed method to reconstruct the bilateral digital interarticular channel of atlas and its potential use on the anterior upper cervical screw fixation. Methods. We have used the reverse engineering software (image-processing software and computer-aided design software to create the approximate and optimal digital interarticular channel of atlas for 60 participants. Angles of channels, diameters of inscribed circles, long and short axes of ellipses were measured and recorded, and gender-specific analysis was also performed. Results. The channels provided sufficient space for one or two screws, and the parameters of channels are described. While the channels of females were smaller than that of males, no significant difference of angles between males and females were observed. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates the radiological features of approximate digital interarticular channels, optimal digital interarticular channels of atlas, and provides the reference trajectory of anterior transarticular screws and anterior occiput-to-axis screws. Additionally, we provide a protocol that can help make a pre-operative plan for accurate placement of anterior transarticular screws and anterior occiput-to-axis screws.

  5. C-2 anterior plate-screw fixation: a quantitative anatomical and morphometric evaluation.

    Senoglu, M; Ozbag, D; Gumusalan, Y

    2010-01-01

    Discectomy and inter-vertebral body fusion combined with the anterior plate-screw fixa tion is the common procedure in cervical spine surgery. But the anterior plate-screw fixation of the C2 spine has been the uncommon surgical procedure. In this study, we analyze the anatomy of the C2 body relevant to C2 anterior plate-screw fixation. Eighty-six dried C2 spines were evaluated directly for this study. Measurements were made on the C2 body width and midsagittal anteroposterior (AP) depth and the anteroposterior parasagittal depth 5 mm lateral to midline on the inferior endplates, in addition to on the middle body. Measurements also were made of anteroposterior parasagittal vertebral depth with both medial and lateral inclination of 10 degrees, with respect to the parasagittal plane of the vertebral body. The ideal maximum screw length and trajectory was found to be AP medial parasagittal depth of inferior surface of the C2 body [Right: 13.7 +/- 1.4 mm (11.0-17.9), Left: 13.6 +/- 1.5 mm (10.7-17.8)]. We report the measurements of the vertebral body of the C2. We think these measurements provide guidelines for operating on the anterior C2 spine, and enhance the confidence interval for the surgeon (Tab. 3, Fig. 1, Ref. 24).

  6. Sacroiliac Screw Fixation

    E.W. van den Bosch

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this thesis is to evaluate three major aspects of the use of sacroiliac screws in patients with unstable pelvic ring fractures: the optimal technique for sacroiliac screw fixation, the reliability of peroperative fluoroscopy and the late results. We focused on the questions

  7. Loosening torque of Universal Abutment screws after cyclic loading: influence of tightening technique and screw coating.

    Bacchi, Atais; Regalin, Alexandre; Bhering, Claudia Lopes Brilhante; Alessandretti, Rodrigo; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of tightening technique and the screw coating on the loosening torque of screws used for Universal Abutment fixation after cyclic loading. Forty implants (Titamax Ti Cortical, HE, Neodent) (n=10) were submerged in acrylic resin and four tightening techniques for Universal Abutment fixation were evaluated: A - torque with 32 Ncm (control); B - torque with 32 Ncm holding the torque meter for 20 seconds; C - torque with 32 Ncm and retorque after 10 minutes; D - torque (32 Ncm) holding the torque meter for 20 seconds and retorque after 10 minutes as initially. Samples were divided into subgroups according to the screw used: conventional titanium screw or diamond like carbon-coated (DLC) screw. Metallic crowns were fabricated for each abutment. Samples were submitted to cyclic loading at 10(6) cycles and 130 N of force. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). The tightening technique did not show significant influence on the loosening torque of screws (P=.509). Conventional titanium screws showed significant higher loosening torque values than DLC (P=.000). The use of conventional titanium screw is more important than the tightening techniques employed in this study to provide long-term stability to Universal Abutment screws.

  8. Screwed Up

    2014-01-01

    About the (Im)material Artefacts project by Sarah Younan: Emerging digital technologies provide new ways to engage with artefacts and recent developments in 3D print are rapidly bridging the gap between digital and physical objects. For the (Im)material Artefacts project ceramic artefacts from...... practice Hansen combines digital processing with an intuitive grasp of form and materials. Hansen develops software and models his born-digital objects from scratch before 3D printing them. His participation in the (Im)material Artefacts project presented Hansen with a different challenge; to re...

  9. A universal pedicle screw and V-rod system for lumbar isthmic spondylolysis: a retrospective analysis of 21 cases.

    Xiong-sheng Chen

    Full Text Available To investigate the surgical outcome of a universal pedicle screw-V rod system and isthmic bone grafting for isthmic spondylolysis.Twenty-four patients with isthmic spondylolysis at L5 and grade 0-I spondylolisthesis (Meyerding classification received isthmic bone graft and stabilization using the universal pedicle screw-V rod system. Back pain was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS and time to bone healing, improvement in spondylolisthesis and intervertebral space height at L5/S1 and L4/L5 were assessed.Twenty-one patients were followed up for 24 months and included in the analysis. Back pain was markedly improved at 3 months postoperatively with a statistical difference in VAS scores compared with preoperative VAS scores (P<0.001. The VAS scores were 0 to 3 at 6 months postoperatively in all patients and no back pain was reported in all patients except 2 patients who complained of back pain after prolonged sitting. X-ray examination showed a bone graft healing time of 3 to 12 months. Grade I spondylolisthesis improved to grade 0 in 4 patients and no noticeable change was observed in the remaining 17 cases. The intervertebral space height at L5/S1 was statistically increased (P<0.05 while no statistically significant change was seen at L4/L5. There was no statistically significant difference in the ROM of the intervertebral disks of L5/S1 and L4/5 before and after surgery.The universal pedicle screw-V rod system and isthmic bone grafting directly repairs isthmic spondylolysis and reduces back pain, prevents anterior displacement of the diseased segment and maintains intervertebral space height, thus offering a promising alternative to current approaches for isthmic spondylolysis.

  10. Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of loblolly pine using a continuous, reactive twin-screw extruder

    Hoekman, S. Kent; Broch, Amber; Felix, Larry; Farthing, William

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of biomass was conducted continuously in a TSE-based reactor system. • The fast HTC (FHTC) reactor system produces hydrochar in higher yields than a batch reactor system. • Severity factor (SF) is a useful metric for characterizing reaction conditions in different reactor systems. - Abstract: Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) has become an accepted means of converting a wide variety of lignocellulosic feedstocks into solid hydrochars, which have improved physical and chemical properties compared to raw biomass. To date, HTC applications have involved batch or semi-continuous process systems, which has limited their economic viability. The work presented here describes a fully-continuous HTC process, made possible by use of a specially modified twin-screw extruder (TSE). The reaction time within this fast HTC (FHTC) reactor system is very short (20–30 sec) as compared to a typical batch reactor. Therefore, the concept of reaction ‘severity factor’ is used when comparing the FHTC products with those produced in other reactor systems. While solid hydrochar produced in the FHTC system has different physical properties than hydrochar from batch reactor systems, these materials exhibit similar energy densification and pelletization behavior, when produced under comparable severity conditions. However, total hydrochar yields are considerably higher from the FHTC reactor compared to batch reactor systems. This is a consequence of the de-pressurization process in the FHTC system, whereby most water-soluble organic products are retained in the hydrochar, rather than exiting the process in a separate aqueous product stream. FHTC treatment of loblolly pine at a severity factor of 5.3 (290 °C) produced a hydrochar yield of nearly 85% (based on dry feedstock mass). Condensation of the flashed vapor products provided a relatively clean water stream, containing only 1.2% organics – primarily furfural and acetic acid

  11. A simplified method to reduce prosthetic misfit for a screw-retained, implant-supported complete denture using a luting technique and laser welding.

    Longoni, Salvatore; Sartori, Matteo; Davide, Roberto

    2004-06-01

    An important aim of implant-supported prostheses is to achieve a passive fit of the framework with the abutments to limit the amount of stress transfer to the bone-implant interface. An efficient and standardized technique is proposed. A definitive screw-retained, implant-supported complete denture was fabricated for an immediately loaded provisional screw-retained implant-supported complete denture. Precise fit was achieved by the use of industrial titanium components and the passivity, by an intraoral luting sequence and laser welding.

  12. A hybrid twin screw extrusion/electrospinning method to process nanoparticle-incorporated electrospun nanofibres

    Erisken, Cevat; Kalyon, Dilhan M; Wang Hongjun

    2008-01-01

    A new hybrid methodology that fully integrates the processing capabilities of the twin screw extrusion process (conveying solids, melting, dispersive and distributive mixing, pressurization, temperature profiling, devolatilization) with electrospinning is described. The hybrid process is especially suited to the dispersion of nanoparticles into polymeric binders and the generation of nanoparticle-incorporated fibres and nanofibres. The new technology base is demonstrated with the dispersion of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) nanoparticles into poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) to generate biodegradable non-woven meshes that can be targeted as scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. The new hybrid method yielded fibre diameters in the range of 200-2000 nm for both PCL and β-TCP/PCL (35% by weight) composite scaffolds. The degree of crystallinity of polycaprolactone meshes could be manipulated in the 35.1-41% range, using the voltage strength as a parameter. The electrospinning process, integrated with dispersive kneading disc elements, facilitated the decrease of the cluster sizes and allowed the continuous compounding of the nanoparticles into the biodegradable polymer prior to electrospinning. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the non-woven meshes validated the continuous incorporation of 35 ± 1.5% (by weight) β-TCP nanoparticles for a targeted concentration of 35%. Uniaxial tensile testing of the meshes with and without the nanoparticles indicated that the ultimate tensile strength at break of the meshes increased from 0.47 ± 0.04 to 0.79 ± 0.08 MPa upon the incorporation of the β-TCP nanoparticles. This demonstration study suggests that the new technology base is particularly suitable for the concomitant dispersion and electrospinning of nanoparticles in the generation of myriad types of functional nanofibres

  13. Vertical-Screw-Auger Conveyer Feeder

    Walton, Otis (Inventor); Vollmer, Hubert J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A conical feeder is attached to a vertically conveying screw auger. The feeder is equipped with scoops and rotated from the surface to force-feed regolith the auger. Additional scoops are possible by adding a cylindrical section above the conical funnel section. Such then allows the unit to collect material from swaths larger in diameter than the enclosing casing pipe of the screw auger. A third element includes a flexible screw auger. All three can be used in combination in microgravity and zero atmosphere environments to drill and recover a wide area of subsurface regolith and entrained volatiles through a single access point on the surface.

  14. Development of a thermodynamic low order model for a twin screw expander with emphasis on pulsations in the inlet pipe

    Papes, Iva; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A multi-chamber model is developed from the mass and energy conservation laws. • To better predict inlet pipe pulsations a 3D inlet pipe model is coupled to it. • Flow coefficients are derived from 3D CFD calculations. • Maximal deviation between the full CFD and the presented model is around 5%. • This model is a good compromise between accuracy and computational resources. - Abstract: A twin screw expander is a positive displacement machine used in various applications of waste heat recovery. The performance of this machine is influenced by internal leakages, gas pulsations formed in the inlet pipe and the properties of the refrigerant. In this paper a multi-chamber mathematical model of a twin screw expander is presented to predict its performance. From the mass and energy conservation laws, differential equations are derived which are then solved together with the appropriate Equation of State (EoS) in the instantaneous control volumes. In order to calculate the mass flow rates through leakage paths more accurately, flow coefficients used in the converging nozzle model were derived from 3D Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) calculation. Due to high gas pulsation levels at the inlet port, a coupling with a 3D CFD inlet pipe model is introduced in order to better predict throttling losses. The maximal deviation between predictions by the developed model and 3D CFD calculations of the complete machine is around 5% for the mass flow rate and the power output.

  15. A multi-level rapid prototyping drill guide template reduces the perforation risk of pedicle screw placement in the lumbar and sacral spine.

    Merc, Matjaz; Drstvensek, Igor; Vogrin, Matjaz; Brajlih, Tomaz; Recnik, Gregor

    2013-07-01

    The method of free-hand pedicle screw placement is generally safe although it carries potential risks. For this reason, several highly accurate computer-assisted systems were developed and are currently on the market. However, these devices have certain disadvantages. We have developed a method of pedicle screw placement in the lumbar and sacral region using a multi-level drill guide template, created with the rapid prototyping technology and have validated it in a clinical study. The aim of the study was to manufacture and evaluate the accuracy of a multi-level drill guide template for lumbar and first sacral pedicle screw placement and to compare it with the free-hand technique under fluoroscopy supervision. In 2011 and 2012, a randomized clinical trial was performed on 20 patients. 54 screws were implanted in the trial group using templates and 54 in the control group using the fluoroscopy-supervised free-hand technique. Furthermore, applicability for the first sacral level was tested. Preoperative CT-scans were taken and templates were designed using the selective laser sintering method. Postoperative evaluation and statistical analysis of pedicle violation, displacement, screw length and deviation were performed for both groups. The incidence of cortex perforation was significantly reduced in the template group; likewise, the deviation and displacement level of screws in the sagittal plane. In both groups there was no significantly important difference in deviation and displacement level in the transversal plane as not in pedicle screw length. The results for the first sacral level resembled the main investigated group. The method significantly lowers the incidence of cortex perforation and is therefore potentially applicable in clinical practice, especially in some selected cases. The applied method, however, carries a potential for errors during manufacturing and practical usage and therefore still requires further improvements.

  16. The screw propeller

    Larrabee, E. E.

    1980-07-01

    Marine and air screw propellers are considered in terms of theoretical hydrodynamics as developed by Joukowsky, Prandtl, and Betz. Attention is given to the flow around wings of finite span where spanwise flow exists and where lift and the bound vorticity must all go smoothly to zero at the wing tips. The concept of a trailing vortex sheet made up of infinitesimal line vortexes roughly aligned with the direction of flight is discussed in this regard. Also considered is induced velocity, which tends to convect the sheet downward at every stage in the roll-up process, the vortex theory of propellers and the Betz-Prandtl circulation distribution. The performance of the Gossamer Albatross and of a pedal-driven biplane called the Chrysalis are also discussed.

  17. Recombination-related properties of a-screw dislocations in GaN: A combined CL, EBIC, TEM study

    Medvedev, O. S., E-mail: o.s.medvedev@spbu.ru; Mikhailovskii, V. Yu. [V.A. Fok Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); IRC for Nanotechnology, Research Park, St.-Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Vyvenko, O. F.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Ubyivovk, E. V. [V.A. Fok Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Peretzki, P.; Seibt, M. [IV. Physikalisches Institut Georg-August Universität Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-06-17

    Cathodoluminescence (CL), electron beam current (EBIC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques have been applied to investigate recombination properties and structure of freshly introduced dislocations in low-ohmic GaN crystals. It was confirmed that the only a-screw dislocations exhibited an intense characteristic dislocation-related luminescence (DRL) which persisted up to room temperature and was red-shifted by about 0.3 eV with respect to the band gap energy not only in HVPE but also in MOCVD grown samples. EBIC contrast of the dislocations was found to be temperature independent indicating that the dislocation-related recombination level is situated below 200 meV with respect of conduction band minimum. With the increasing of the magnification of the dislocation TEM cross-sectional images they were found to disappear, probably, due to the recombination enhanced dislocation glide (REDG) under electron beam exposure which was immediately observed in CL investigations on a large scale. The stacking fault ribbon in the core of dissociated a-screw dislocation which form a quantum well for electrons was proposed to play an important role both in DRL spectrum formation and in REDG.

  18. Use of palatally inserted mini-screw for upper molar distalization: A case series

    Valliollah Arash

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract Reports have shown that molars can be distalized successfully with virtually no orthodontic anchorage loss with an intraosseous anchorage, even with fully erupted second molars. The purpose of this study was evaluating the effects of mini-screws as skeletal anchorage for upper molar distalization. In this case series, three patients needing maxillary first molar distalization, were selected. mini-screw was inserted in the anterior part of the palate. The screws were anchored to the first premolars by transpalatal arch and immediately loaded (150-160 g by 0.018-inch arch-wire and steel open-coil spring to distalize maxillary molars. The skeletal and dental changes were measured on cephalograms obtained before and after distalization. The amount of first molar distalization in the patients was 4 mm with 2°of tipping, 4 mm with 5°of tipping, and 3.5 mm with 2°of tipping respectively. Upper incisors and first premolars were stable during distalization.       

  19. Accuracy of computer-assisted cervicle pedicle screw installation

    Zhang Honglei; Zhou Dongsheng; Jang Zhensong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the accuracy of computer-assisted cervical pedicle screw installation and the reason of screw malposition. Methods: A total of 172 cervical pedicle screws were installed by computer-assisted navigation for 30 patients with lower cervical spinal diseases. All the patients were examined by X-ray and CT after operation. Screw's position and direction were measured on the sagittal and transectional images of intraoperative navigation and post-operative CT. Then linear regression analysis was taken between navigational and post-operative CT's images. Results: Two screws perforated the upper pedicle wall, 3 perforated the lateral pedicle wall.There was a positive linear correlation between navigational and post-operative CT's images. Conclusion: Computer-assisted navigation can provide the high accuracy of cervical pedicle screw installation and excursion phenomenon is reason of screw malposition. (authors)

  20. A locking compression plate versus the gold-standard non-locking plate with lag screw for first metatarsophalangeal fusion: A biomechanical comparison.

    Mandell, Daniel; Karbassi, John; Zhou, Hanbing; Burroughs, Brian; Aurigemma, Philip; Patel, Abhay R

    2018-03-01

    The treatment of end-stage first metatarso-phalangeal joint (MTP) arthritis has been arthrodesis. A dorsal non-locking plate with a lag screw has been the standard traditional fixation method. This study compares the biomechanical strength of a locking compression plate (LCP) with and without internal compression versus this known gold standard. In group 1, six matched pairs of cadaver great toes were used to compare the standard non-locking dorsal plate and 3.5mm lag screw to an anatomic locking compression plate in which a lag screw was utilized rather than the internal compression features of the plate. In group 2, another six matched pairs of cadaver great toes were used to compare the gold standard to the locking compression plate, utilizing the plate's internal compression feature instead of a lag screw. A material testing system (MTS) machine applied loads to the MTP joints and measured displacement and stiffness of the constructs. The stiffness of the constructs (Young's modulus) was calculated from the force-displacement curves, and the displacement was measured. The locking compression plate group that used the compression features of the plate, without the lag screw, had less joint displacement and higher stiffness than control (p<0.05). The same plating construct in which a lag screw was used rather than internal compression of the plate was found to be stiffer than the control (p<0.05), but displacement was not statistically significant. The results suggest that a locking compression plate alone provides the stiffest construct for a first MTP joint fusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Anterior screw fixation of a dislocated type II odontoid fracture facilitated by transoral and posterior cervical manual reduction.

    Piedra, Mark P; Hunt, Matthew A; Nemecek, Andrew N

    2009-10-01

    Early fixation of type II odontoid fractures has been shown to provide high rates of long-term stabilization and osteosynthesis. In this report, the authors present the case of a patient with a locked type II odontoid fracture treated by anterior screw fixation facilitated by closed transoral and posterior cervical manual reduction. While transoral intraoperative reduction of a partially displaced odontoid fracture has previously been described, the authors present the first case utilizing this technique in the treatment of a completely dislocated type II odontoid fracture.

  2. Are We Underestimating the Significance of Pedicle Screw Misplacement?

    Sarwahi, Vishal; Wendolowski, Stephen F; Gecelter, Rachel C; Amaral, Terry; Lo, Yungtai; Wollowick, Adam L; Thornhill, Beverly

    2016-05-01

    A retrospective review of charts, x-rays (XRs) and computed tomography (CT) scans was performed. To evaluate the accuracy of pedicle screw placement using a novel classification system to determine potentially significant screw misplacement. The accuracy rate of pedicle screw (PS) placement varies from 85% to 95% in the literature. This demonstrates technical ability but does not represent the impact of screw misplacement on individual patients. This study quantifies the rate of screw misplacement on a per-patient basis to highlight its effect on potential morbidity. A retrospective review of charts, XRs and low-dose CT scans of 127 patients who underwent spinal fusion with pedicle screws for spinal deformity was performed. Screws were divided into four categories: screws at risk (SAR), indeterminate misplacements (IMP), benign misplacements (BMP), accurately placed (AP). A total of 2724 screws were placed in 127 patients. A total of 2396 screws were placed accurately (87.96%). A total of 247 screws (9.07%) were BMP, 52 (1.91%) were IMP, and 29 (1.06%) were considered SAR. Per-patient analysis showed 23 (18.11%) of patients had all screws AP. Thirty-five (27.56%) had IMP and 18 (14.17%) had SAR. Risk factor analysis showed smaller Cobb angles increased likelihood of all screws being AP. Sub-analysis of adolescent idiopathic scoliotic patients showed no curve or patient characteristic that correlated with IMP or SAR. Over 40% of patients had screws with either some/major concern. Overall reported screw misplacement is low, but it does not reflect the potential impact on patient morbidity. Per-patient analysis reveals more concerning numbers toward screw misplacement. With increasing pedicle screw usage, the number of patients with misplaced screws will likely increase proportionally. Better strategies need to be devised for evaluation of screw placement, including establishment of a national database of deformity surgery, use of intra-operative image guidance, and

  3. A new angle and its relationship with early fixation failure of femoral neck fractures treated with three cannulated compression screws.

    Zhang, Y L; Zhang, W; Zhang, C Q

    2017-04-01

    The Pauwels angle has been used widely, however an accurate evaluation of this angle is difficult because of deformity of the affected lower extremity. Therefore we designed a new measurement of the orientation of femoral neck fracture and applied this in a retrospective study to assess: (1) its reproducibility, (2) its advantages compared with the Pauwels angle, (3) its relationship with the short-term prognosis treated with three cannulated compression screws. This new measurement is reproducible and has some reference meaning for the treatment of femoral neck fractures. Two hundred and twenty-eight patients with femoral neck fractures treated with three cannulated compression screws were retrospectively analyzed. The VN angle, which was the angle between the fracture line and the vertical of the neck axis, and the Pauwels angle were measured respectively. The method of ICC was performed to assess the reproducibility of the two angles, and the absolute value of difference in pre-operative and post-operative radiographs was used to evaluate the uniformity of the two angles. These fractures were divided into four groups according to VN angle (VN50°) were respectively 0%, 1.46% (95% CI: 1.42-1.50) and 36.24% (95% CI: 34.93-37.54). The VN angle has a good inter-rater reproducibility, a higher reliability than the Pauwels angle and is closely related to the short-term prognosis of femoral neck fractures treated with cannulated compression screws. Level IV, retrospective diagnostic study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Screw Placement and Osteoplasty Under Computed Tomographic–Fluoroscopic Guidance in a Case of Advanced Metastatic Destruction of the Iliosacral Joint

    Trumm, Christoph Gregor; Rubenbauer, Bianca; Piltz, Stefan; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    We present a case of combined surgical screw placement and osteoplasty guided by computed tomography–fluoroscopy (CTF) in a 68-year-old man with unilateral osteolytic destruction and a pathological fracture of the iliosacral joint due to a metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. The patient experienced intractable lower back pain that was refractory to analgesia. After transarterial particle and coil embolization of the tumor-feeding vessels in the angiography unit, the procedure was performed under general anesthesia by an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologists and trauma surgeons. Under intermittent single-shot CTF, two K wires were inserted into the left iliosacral joint from a lateral transiliac approach at the S1 level followed by two self-tapping surgical screws. Continuous CTF was used for monitoring of the subsequent polymethylmethacrylate injection through two vertebroplasty cannulas for further stabilization of the screw threads within the osteolytic sacral ala. Both the screw placement and cement injection were successful, with no complications occurring during or after the procedure. With additional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and opioid medication, the patient reported a marked decrease in his lower back pain and was able to move independently again at the 3-month follow-up assessment. In our patient with intolerable back pain due to tumor destruction and consequent pathological fracture of the iliosacral joint, CTF-guided iliosacral screw placement combined with osteoplasty was successful with respect to joint stabilization and a reduction in the need for analgesic therapy.

  5. Percutaneous medial hemi-epiphysiodesis using a transphyseal screw for caput valgum associated with developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    Shin, Chang Ho; Hong, Wan Kee; Lee, Doo Jae; Yoo, Won Joon; Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2017-11-14

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiologic outcome of percutaneous medial hemi-epiphysiodesis using a transphyseal screw for the management of caput valgum associated with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Eighteen hips (18 patients) having caput valgum treated with screw hemi-epiphysiodesis were followed for more than 2 years, and were included in this study. The mean age at the time of the index operation was 8.3 years (range, 4.3 to 10.7 years) and age at the latest follow-up was 12.2 years (range, 9.4 to 16.4 years). The screw in 5 hips was changed into a longer one at postoperative 21.8 months (range, 14 to 29 months) because the proximal femur outgrew the screw. The screws in 11 hips were removed at the mean age of 10.9 years (range, 8.0 to 14.5 years). We retrospectively analyzed the change in various radiologic parameters over time. The mean Hilgenreiner-epiphyseal angle (HEA) of the operated side was 5.1 ± 11.3° preoperatively, and increased to 20.6 ± 11.3° at the latest follow-up (p = 0.001). The mean difference of the HEA between the operated and contralateral sides was 16.9 ± 15.1° preoperatively, which decreased to 2.4 ± 12.4° at the latest follow-up (p = 0.008). The mean articulo-trochanteric distance of the operated side, which was 3.2 ± 5.5 mm longer than that of the contralateral side preoperatively, became 5.6 ± 9.1 mm shorter at the latest follow-up (p = 0.001). The ratio of femoral neck length of the operated side to that of the contralateral side decreased over the follow-up period. Acetabular shape as measured by the Sharp angle and acetabular roof angle and femoral head coverage as measured by lateral center-edge angle did not change significantly by the index operation. The ratio of medial joint space width of the operated side to that of the contralateral side did not change significantly. Screw medial hemi-epiphysiodesis can effectively correct caput valgum

  6. Intramedullary screw fixation with bone autografting to treat proximal fifth metatarsal metaphyseal-diaphyseal fracture in athletes: a case series

    Tsukada Sachiyuki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delayed unions or refractures are not rare following surgical treatment for proximal fifth metatarsal metaphyseal-diaphyseal fractures. Intramedullary screw fixation with bone autografting has the potential to resolve the issue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the result of the procedure. Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed 15 athletes who underwent surgical treatment for proximal fifth metatarsal metaphyseal-diaphyseal fracture. Surgery involved intramedullary cannulated cancellous screw fixation after curettage of the fracture site, followed by bone autografting. Postoperatively, patients remain non weight-bearing in a splint or cast for two weeks and without immobilization for an additional two weeks. Full weight-bearing was allowed six weeks postoperatively. Running was permitted after radiographic bone union, and return-to-play was approved after gradually increasing the intensity. Results All patients returned to their previous level of athletic competition. Mean times to bone union, initiation of running, and return-to-play were 8.4, 8.8, and 12.1 weeks, respectively. Although no delayed unions or refractures was observed, distal diaphyseal stress fractures at the distal tip of the screw occurred in two patients and a thermal necrosis of skin occurred in one patient. Conclusions There were no delayed unions or refractures among patients after carrying out a procedure in which bone grafts were routinely performed, combined with adequate periods of immobilization and non weight-bearing. These findings suggest that this procedure may be useful option for athletes to assuring return to competition level.

  7. The Free-Hand Technique for S2-Alar-Iliac Screw Placement: A Safe and Effective Method for Sacropelvic Fixation in Adult Spinal Deformity.

    Shillingford, Jamal N; Laratta, Joseph L; Tan, Lee A; Sarpong, Nana O; Lin, James D; Fischer, Charla R; Lehman, Ronald A; Kim, Yongjung J; Lenke, Lawrence G

    2018-02-21

    Spinopelvic fixation is an integral part of achieving solid fusion across the lumbosacral junction, especially in deformity procedures requiring substantial correction or long-segment constructs. Traditional S2-alar-iliac (S2AI) screw-placement techniques utilize fluoroscopy, increasing operative time and radiation exposure to the patient and surgeon. We describe a novel free-hand technique for S2AI screw placement in patients with adult spinal deformity. We reviewed the records of 45 consecutive patients who underwent spinopelvic fixation performed with use of S2AI screws by the senior surgeon and various fellows or residents over a 12-month period (2015 to 2016). In each case, the S2AI screws were placed utilizing a free-hand technique without fluoroscopic or image guidance. Screw position and accuracy were assessed by intraoperative O-arm imaging and analyzed using 3-dimensional interactive manipulation of computed tomography images. A total of 100 screws were placed, 51 by the senior surgeon and 49 by trainees. The mean patient age was 57.4 ± 12.7 years at the time of surgery; 37 (82.2%) of the patients were female. Preoperative diagnoses included adult idiopathic scoliosis (n = 19), adult degenerative scoliosis (n = 15), flatback syndrome (n = 2), fixed sagittal imbalance (n = 6), and distal junctional kyphosis (n = 3). Five (5%) of the screws were placed with moderate to severe cortical breaches, all of which perforated the pelvis posteriorly, with no clinically notable neurovascular or visceral complications. The breach rate did not differ significantly between the senior surgeon and trainees. The free-hand technique for S2AI screw placement, when performed in a standardized manner, was demonstrated to be safe and reliable in constructs requiring spinopelvic fixation. The accuracy of screw placement relies on visible and palpable anatomic landmarks that obviate the need for intraoperative fluoroscopy or image guidance, potentially reducing operative time

  8. Efficacy of open reduction and internal fixation with a miniplate and hollow screw in the treatment of Lisfranc injury

    Li Baoliang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate efficacy of open reduction and internal fixation with the miniplate and hollow screw in the treatment of Lisfranc injury. Methods: Ten cases of Lisfranc injury treated by open reduction, miniplate and hollow screw in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. There were 6 males and 4 females with age ranging from 25 to 45 years (mean 32 years. Among them, one case was classified as Type A, six Type B and three Type C. Injury mechanism included road traffic accidents (3 cases, fall from height (5 cases and hit by heavy object (2 cases. All injuries were closed without cerebral trauma or other complicated injuries. The time interval between injury and operation was 6e10 days (average 6.6 days. Postoperatively, the foot function was assessed using Visual Analogue Scales (VAS and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS Scales. Healing time and complications were observed. Results: All patients were followed up for 18e24 months (average 20 months. Anatomic reduction was achieved in all patients on images. There was statistical significance between preoperative score (7.89 ± 0.34 and score at postoperative 8 weeks (0.67 ± 0.13. According to the AOFAS score, 5 cases were defined as excellent, 3 cases as good and 2 cases as fair. During follow-up, there was no wound infection or complications except for osteoarthritis in 2 cases. Healing time ranged from 3 to 6 months with an average of 3.6 months. Conclusion: Anatomical reduction of Lisfranc injury can be achieved by open reduction and internal fixation with the miniplate and hollow screw. Normal structure of Lisfranc joint is regained to a great extent; injured ligaments were also repaired. Therefore, this method offers excellent curative effect and can avoid postoperative complications and improve the patients' quality of life.

  9. A General Case to Determine Dimensions and Their Tolerance Zones for the Thread Parts of Epicyclic Roller-Screw Mechanisms

    D. S. Blinov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important trend in the development of aerospace industry is to increase load capacity of mechanisms, assemblies, and parts without increasing their size and weight. The above is also true for widely used in aircrafts and the most promising up to date Epicyclic Roller-Screw Mechanisms (ERSM that convert rotational movement into translational one. Previously (in the article, it was proposed to increase the load capacity (approximately by 15% through reduction of included angle of ERSM threaded parts from 90° to 70°.However, such improvement of ERSM will change dimensions of the mechanism parts and its parameters and characteristics (efficiency factor, position of initial point of contact of the conjugated thread turns and parameters of their contact interaction, as well as kinematic parameters, which will require additional studies. If we take into account the priority of these studies, then surely we must begin with development of technique to determine dimensions of the ERSM main parts and their tolerance zones because we need drawings to manufacture and test the upgraded ERSM. We have developed a technique to calculate dimensions of the main parts of ERSM and associated tolerance zones that takes in to account the change of included angle of threaded parts of the mechanism and radius of circular arc according to which roller thread profile has been fulfilled. So the proposed technique is the general one in comparison with the previous ones.This technique uses various conditions and equations to determine dimensions of parts and associated tolerance zones. For example, a nut encircles a screw with rollers, and their dimensions form a closed dimension chain, in which the dimensions and associated tolerances must be such as to ensure ERSM assembling, on the one hand, and, on the other hand the backlash of the mechanism should be minimal to ensure high load capacity, kinematic accuracy, and rigidity of ERSM. We used the following

  10. Tapping insertional torque allows prediction for better pedicle screw fixation and optimal screw size selection.

    Helgeson, Melvin D; Kang, Daniel G; Lehman, Ronald A; Dmitriev, Anton E; Luhmann, Scott J

    2013-08-01

    There is currently no reliable technique for intraoperative assessment of pedicle screw fixation strength and optimal screw size. Several studies have evaluated pedicle screw insertional torque (IT) and its direct correlation with pullout strength. However, there is limited clinical application with pedicle screw IT as it must be measured during screw placement and rarely causes the spine surgeon to change screw size. To date, no study has evaluated tapping IT, which precedes screw insertion, and its ability to predict pedicle screw pullout strength. The objective of this study was to investigate tapping IT and its ability to predict pedicle screw pullout strength and optimal screw size. In vitro human cadaveric biomechanical analysis. Twenty fresh-frozen human cadaveric thoracic vertebral levels were prepared and dual-energy radiographic absorptiometry scanned for bone mineral density (BMD). All specimens were osteoporotic with a mean BMD of 0.60 ± 0.07 g/cm(2). Five specimens (n=10) were used to perform a pilot study, as there were no previously established values for optimal tapping IT. Each pedicle during the pilot study was measured using a digital caliper as well as computed tomography measurements, and the optimal screw size was determined to be equal to or the first size smaller than the pedicle diameter. The optimal tap size was then selected as the tap diameter 1 mm smaller than the optimal screw size. During optimal tap size insertion, all peak tapping IT values were found to be between 2 in-lbs and 3 in-lbs. Therefore, the threshold tapping IT value for optimal pedicle screw and tap size was determined to be 2.5 in-lbs, and a comparison tapping IT value of 1.5 in-lbs was selected. Next, 15 test specimens (n=30) were measured with digital calipers, probed, tapped, and instrumented using a paired comparison between the two threshold tapping IT values (Group 1: 1.5 in-lbs; Group 2: 2.5 in-lbs), randomly assigned to the left or right pedicle on each

  11. Twin Screw Mixer/Fine Grind Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 40-mm Twin-Screw Mixer/Extruder (TSE) pilot plant is a continuous, remotely operated, flexible facility that can significantly enhance safety and environmental...

  12. Correction Capability in the 3 Anatomic Planes of Different Pedicle Screw Designs in Scoliosis Instrumentation.

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Aubin, Carl-Eric; Coleman, John; Rawlinson, Jeremy

    2017-05-01

    Computer simulations to compare the correction capabilities of different pedicle screws in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) instrumentations. To compare the correction and resulting bone-screw forces associated with different pedicle screws in scoliosis instrumentations. Pedicle screw fixation is widely used in surgical instrumentation for spinal deformity treatment. Screw design, correction philosophies, and surgical techniques are constantly evolving to achieve better control of the vertebrae and correction of the spinal deformity. Yet, there remains a lack of biomechanical studies that quantify the effects and advantages of different screw designs in terms of correction kinematics. The correction capabilities of fixed-angle, multiaxial, uniaxial, and saddle axial screws were kinematically analyzed, simulated, and compared. These simulations were based on the screw patterns and correction techniques proposed by 2 experienced surgeons for 2 AIS cases. Additional instrumentations were assessed to compare the correction and resulting bone-screw forces associated with each type of screw. The fixed-angle, uniaxial and saddle axial screws had similar kinematic behavior and performed better than multiaxial screws in the coronal and transverse planes (8% and 30% greater simulated corrections, respectively). Uniaxial and multiaxial screws were less effective than fixed-angle and saddle axial screws in transmitting compression/distraction to the anterior spine because of their sagittal plane mobility between the screw head and shank. Only the saddle axial screws allow vertebra angle in the sagittal plane to be independently adjusted. Pedicle screws of different designs performed differently for deformity corrections or for compensating screw placement variations in different anatomic planes. For a given AIS case, screw types should be determined based on the particular instrumentation objectives, the deformity's stiffness and characteristics so as to make the best of

  13. Effects on Subtalar Joint Stress Distribution After Cannulated Screw Insertion at Different Positions and Directions.

    Yuan, Cheng-song; Chen, Wan; Chen, Chen; Yang, Guang-hua; Hu, Chao; Tang, Kang-lai

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects on subtalar joint stress distribution after cannulated screw insertion at different positions and directions. After establishing a 3-dimensional geometric model of a normal subtalar joint, we analyzed the most ideal cannulated screw insertion position and approach for subtalar joint stress distribution and compared the differences in loading stress, antirotary strength, and anti-inversion/eversion strength among lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion, traditional screw insertion, and ideal cannulated screw insertion. The screw insertion approach allowing the most uniform subtalar joint loading stress distribution was lateral screw insertion near the border of the talar neck plus medial screw insertion close to the ankle joint. For stress distribution uniformity, antirotary strength, and anti-inversion/eversion strength, lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion was superior to traditional double-screw insertion. Compared with ideal cannulated screw insertion, slightly poorer stress distribution uniformity and better antirotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength were observed for lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion. Traditional single-screw insertion was better than double-screw insertion for stress distribution uniformity but worse for anti-rotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength. Lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion was slightly worse for stress distribution uniformity than was ideal cannulated screw insertion but superior to traditional screw insertion. It was better than both ideal cannulated screw insertion and traditional screw insertion for anti-rotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength. Lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion is an approach with simple localization, convenient operation, and good safety. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of reconstruction plate screw fixation and percutaneous cannulated screw fixation in treatment of Tile B1 type pubic symphysis diastasis: a finite element analysis and 10-year clinical experience.

    Yu, Ke-He; Hong, Jian-Jun; Guo, Xiao-Shan; Zhou, Dong-Sheng

    2015-09-22

    The objective of this study is to compare the biomechanical properties and clinical outcomes of Tile B1 type pubic symphysis diastasis (PSD) treated by percutaneous cannulated screw fixation (PCSF) and reconstruction plate screw fixation (RPSF). Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to compare the biomechanical properties between PCSF and RPSF. CT scan data of one PSD patient were used for three-dimensional reconstructions. After a validated pelvic finite element model was established, both PCSF and RPSF were simulated, and a vertical downward load of 600 N was loaded. The distance of pubic symphysis and stress were tested. Then, 51 Tile type B1 PSD patients (24 in the PCSF group; 27 in the RPSF group) were reviewed. Intra-operative blood loss, operative time, and the length of the skin scar were recorded. The distance of pubic symphysis was measured, and complications of infection, implant failure, and revision surgery were recorded. The Majeed scoring system was also evaluated. The maximum displacement of the pubic symphysis was 0.408 and 0.643 mm in the RPSF and PCSF models, respectively. The maximum stress of the plate in RPSF was 1846 MPa and that of the cannulated screw in PCSF was 30.92 MPa. All 51 patients received follow-up at least 18 months post-surgery (range 18-54 months). Intra-operative blood loss, operative time, and the length of the skin scar in the PCSF group were significantly different than those in the RPSF group. No significant differences were found in wound infection, implant failure, rate of revision surgery, distance of pubic symphysis, and Majeed score. PCSF can provide comparable biomechanical properties to RPSF in the treatment of Tile B1 type PSD. Meanwhile, PCSF and RPSF have similar clinical and radiographic outcomes. Furthermore, PCSF also has the advantages of being minimally invasive, has less blood loss, and has shorter operative time and skin scar.

  15. Capturing a Sense of Place.

    Riley, Cheryl K.

    1995-01-01

    Outdoor educators can help students, program participants, and colleagues find a special place in nature that enables them to cherish nature's gifts, its healing power, and its ability to bring inner peace. Becoming emotionally connected with nature promotes development of an environmental ethic and a sense of stewardship for the land. (LP)

  16. Screw piles for cold climate foundations

    Schmidt, R.; Sakr, M. [Almita Manufacturing Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Almita Manufacturing is an Alberta-based company that designs and builds screw piles with its own installation teams. It also engineers and supplies piles to numerous other companies and independent installers. The company services industries such as oil and gas; power transmission and distribution; and commercial construction. This presentation discussed the design and technical aspects of screw piles. A screw pile was defined as a steel pipe shaft with a 45 degree cut at the bottom and a formed helical plate welded to the outside of the pipe near the base and at a selected point on the shaft. The pile is screwed into the ground with a planetary drive head of suitable torque rating. The helical plate or helix helps facilitate the installation of the pile and gives the screw pile increased bearing capacity and pull-out resistance over a traditional straight-shaft pile. Screw piles were compared against cast in place concrete piles and steel driven piles. Screw piles were reported to have no tailings; no concrete curing time; no rebar, anchor belts, and no liners; and no dewatering. Screw piles can also be installed in all types of weather. Rhe Cree Burn Camp case study near Fort McMurray, Alberta was also presented. This residential camp and recreation complex consists of pre-fabricated units that make up three storey housing buildings and a single floor multi-use building. The case study provided information on soil; design parameter inputs; load testing program and pile configuration; geotechnical and structural design results; compression load test arrangement; pile test setup; and test results. The presentation also discussed fabrication as well as installation equipment. Various applications were also presented through a series of project pictures. Last, the presentation provided a simple cost analysis. tabs., figs.

  17. Sensing our Environment: Remote sensing in a physics classroom

    Isaacson, Sivan; Schüttler, Tobias; Cohen-Zada, Aviv L.; Blumberg, Dan G.; Girwidz, Raimund; Maman, Shimrit

    2017-04-01

    Remote sensing is defined as data acquisition of an object, deprived physical contact. Fundamentally, most remote sensing applications are referred to as the use of satellite- or aircraft-based sensor technologies to detect and classify objects mainly on Earth or other planets. In the last years there have been efforts to bring the important subject of remote sensing into schools, however, most of these attempts focused on geography disciplines - restricting to the applications of remote sensing and to a less extent the technique itself and the physics behind it. Optical remote sensing is based on physical principles and technical devices, which are very meaningful from a theoretical point of view as well as for "hands-on" teaching. Some main subjects are radiation, atom and molecular physics, spectroscopy, as well as optics and the semiconductor technology used in modern digital cameras. Thus two objectives were outlined for this project: 1) to investigate the possibilities of using remote sensing techniques in physics teaching, and 2) to identify its impact on pupil's interest in the field of natural sciences. This joint project of the DLR_School_Lab, Oberpfaffenhofen of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Earth and Planetary Image Facility (EPIF) at BGU, was conducted in 2016. Thirty teenagers (ages 16-18) participated in the project and were exposed to the cutting edge methods of earth observation. The pupils on both sides participated in the project voluntarily, knowing that at least some of the project's work had to be done in their leisure time. The pupil's project started with a day at EPIF and DLR respectively, where the project task was explained to the participants and an introduction to remote sensing of vegetation was given. This was realized in lectures and in experimental workshops. During the following two months both groups took several measurements with modern optical remote sensing systems in their home region with a special focus on flora

  18. A Nearly Lethal Screw: An Unusual Cause of Recurrent Bradycardia and Asystole Episodes after Fixation of the Cervical Spine

    Amit Frenkel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 51-year-old man who was injured in a bicycle accident. His main injury was an unstable fracture of the cervical and thoracic vertebral column. Several hours after his arrival to the hospital the patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF of the cervical and thoracic spine. The patient was hospitalized in our critical care unit for 99 days. During this time patient had several episodes of severe bradycardia and asystole; some were short with spontaneous return to sinus and some required pharmacological treatment and even Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR. Initially, these episodes were attributed to the high cervical spine injury, but, later on, CT scan suggested that a fixation screw abutted on the esophagus and activated the vagus nerve by direct pressure. After repositioning of the cervical fixation, the bradycardia and asystole episodes were no longer observed and the patient was released to a rehabilitation ward. This case is presented in order to alert practitioners to the possibility that, after operative fixation of cervical spine injuries, recurrent episodes of bradyarrhythmia can be caused by incorrect placement of the fixation screws and might be confused with the natural history of the high cervical cord injury.

  19. Treatment of unicameral calcaneal bone cysts in children: review of literature and results using a cannulated screw for continuous decompression of the cyst.

    Saraph, Vinay; Zwick, Ernst-Bernhard; Maizen, Claudia; Schneider, Frank; Linhart, Wolfgang E

    2004-01-01

    Nine unicameral bone cysts of the calcaneus in children were managed surgically using the technique of continuous decompression with titanium cannulated cancellous screws. The average age of the patients at surgery was 12.8 years. At follow-up a minimum of 2 years after surgery, eight cysts showed complete healing; one patient showed healing with residuals. Irritation at the screw insertion site necessitated early removal of the screw in one patient; implant-related problems were not observed in the other patients. Patients were allowed to bear weight after surgery. Implant extraction was performed after full consolidation of the cyst and was uneventful in all patients. A review of the literature and the different treatment modalities used for managing calcaneal cysts is also presented.

  20. A Biomechanical Study Comparing Helical Blade with Screw Design for Sliding Hip Fixations of Unstable Intertrochanteric Fractures

    Qiang Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic hip screw (DHS is a well-established conventional implant for treating intertrochanteric fracture. However, revision surgery sometimes still occurs due to the cutting out of implants. A helical blade instead of threaded screw (DHS blade was designed to improve the fixation power of the osteoporotic intertrochanteric fracture. In this study, the biomechanical properties of DHS blade compared to the conventional DHS were evaluated using an unstable AO/OTA 31-A2 intertrochanteric fracture model. Fifty synthetic proximal femoral bone models with such configuration were fixed with DHS and DHS blade in five different positions: centre-centre (CC, superior-centre (SC, inferior-center (IC, centre-anterior (CA, and centre-posterior (CP. All models had undergone mechanical compression test, and the vertical and rotational displacements were recorded. The results showed that DHS blade had less vertical or rotational displacement than the conventional DHS in CC, CA, and IC positions. The greatest vertical and rotational displacements were found at CP position in both groups. Overall speaking, DHS blade was superior in resisting vertical or rotational displacement in comparison to conventional DHS, and the centre-posterior position had the poorest performance in both groups.

  1. Gas flow research at a plane screw type machine model. Pt. 2; Gasspaltstroemungen in einem ebenen Schraubenmaschinenmodell. T. 2

    Kauder, K.; Sachs, R. [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). FG Fluidenergiemaschinen

    1998-12-31

    Gas flows in screw-type machines are effecting the energy conversion of the machine by the leakage mass flows and entropy flows inside the machine. The profile meshing clearance and the housing gap have an essential influence. Here the gas flow at the housing gap with non moving gap bounds is investigated. The used and developed measuring and image analysis technique is explained. Qualitative Schlieren pictures of the flow at three different tooth tips, i.e. gap styles are following to enable a comparison of the flow shapes. The application of a plane screw type machine model with moving gap bounds will be meant to be a contribution towards the investigation of the gas flow conditions in the gaps. (orig.) [Deutsch] Gasspaltstroemungen in Schraubenmaschinen wirken als Leckmassen- und Entropiestroeme erheblich auf die Energiewandlungsguete der Maschine. Besonderen Einfluss haben der Profileingriffs- sowie der Gehaeusespalt. In diesem Beitrag wird die Gehaeusespaltstroemung am Nebenrotor mit feststehender Stroemungsberandung untersucht. Nach Erlaeuterungen zur verwendeten und entwickelten Mess- und Bildverarbeitungstechnik folgen qualitative Schlierenbilder der Stroemung an drei unterschiedlichen Zahnkopf- und damit Spaltformen, die einen Vergleich der Stroemungsformen ermoeglichen. Der naechste Schritt zur Klaerung der Stroemungsverhaeltnisse in den Spalten besteht aus der Einfuehrung eines ebenen Schraubenmaschinenmodells mit drehenden Rotorscheiben. (orig.)

  2. 2D and 3D assessment of sustentaculum tali screw fixation with or without Screw Targeting Clamp.

    De Boer, A Siebe; Van Lieshout, Esther M M; Vellekoop, Leonie; Knops, Simon P; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan; Verhofstad, Michael H J

    2017-12-01

    Precise placement of sustentaculum tali screw(s) is essential for restoring anatomy and biomechanical stability of the calcaneus. This can be challenging due to the small target area and presence of neurovascular structures on the medial side. The aim was to evaluate the precision of positioning of the subchondral posterior facet screw and processus anterior calcanei screw with or without a Screw Targeting Clamp. The secondary aim was to evaluate the added value of peroperative 3D imaging over 2D radiographs alone. Twenty Anubifix™ embalmed, human anatomic lower limb specimens were used. A subchondral posterior facet screw and a processus anterior calcanei screw were placed using an extended lateral approach. A senior orthopedic trauma surgeon experienced in calcaneal fracture surgery and a senior resident with limited experience in calcaneal surgery performed screw fixation in five specimens with and in five specimens without the clamp. 2D lateral and axial radiographs and a 3D recording were obtained postoperatively. Anatomical dissection was performed postoperatively as a diagnostic golden standard in order to obtain the factual screw positions. Blinded assessment of quality of fixation was performed by two surgeons. In 2D, eight screws were considered malpositioned when placed with the targeting device versus nine placed freehand. In 3D recordings, two additional screws were malpositioned in each group as compared to the golden standard. As opposed to the senior surgeon, the senior resident seemed to get the best results using the Screw Targeting Clamp (number of malpositioned screws using freehand was eight, and using the targeting clamp five). In nine out of 20 specimens 3D images provided additional information concerning target area and intra-articular placement. Based on the 3D assessment, five additional screws would have required repositioning. Except for one, all screw positions were rated equally after dissection when compared with 3D examinations

  3. The applicability of PEEK-based abutment screws.

    Schwitalla, Andreas Dominik; Abou-Emara, Mohamed; Zimmermann, Tycho; Spintig, Tobias; Beuer, Florian; Lackmann, Justus; Müller, Wolf-Dieter

    2016-10-01

    The high-performance polymer PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone) is more and more being used in the field of dentistry, mainly for removable and fixed prostheses. In cases of screw-retained implant-supported reconstructions of PEEK, an abutment screw made of PEEK might be advantageous over a conventional metal screw due to its similar elasticity. Also in case of abutment screw fracture, a screw of PEEK could be removed more easily. M1.6-abutment screws of four different PEEK compounds were subjected to tensile tests to set their maximum tensile strengths in relation to an equivalent stress of 186MPa, which is aused by a tightening torque of 15Ncm. Two screw types were manufactured via injection molding and contained 15% short carbon fibers (sCF-15) and 40% (sCF-40), respectively. Two screw types were manufactured via milling and contained 20% TiO2 powder (TiO2-20) and >50% parallel orientated, continuous carbon fibers (cCF-50). A conventional abutments screw of Ti6Al4V (Ti; CAMLOG(®) abutment screw, CAMLOG, Wimsheim, Germany) served as control. The maximum tensile strength was 76.08±5.50MPa for TiO2-20, 152.67±15.83MPa for sCF-15, 157.29±20.11MPa for sCF-40 and 191.69±36.33MPa for cCF-50. The maximum tensile strength of the Ti-screws amounted 1196.29±21.4MPa. The results of the TiO2-20 and the Ti screws were significantly different from the results of the other samples, respectively. For the manufacturing of PEEK abutment screws, PEEK reinforced by >50% continuous carbon fibers would be the material of choice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Calculating Characteristics of the Screws with Constant And Variable Step

    B. N. Zotov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to creating a technique for calculating power characteristics of the screws with constant and variable step for the centrifugal pumps. The technique feature is that the reverse currents, which are observed in screws working at low flow, are numerically taken into account. The paper presents a diagram of the stream in the screw with flow to the network Q=0, and the static pressure of the screw in this mode is computed according to reverse current parameters. Maximum flow of screw is determined from the known formulas. When calculating the power characteristics and computing the overall efficiency of the screw, for the first time a volumetric efficiency of the screw is introduced. It is defined as a ratio between the flow into the network and the sum of the reverse current flows and a flow into the network. This approach allowed us to determine the efficiency of the screw over the entire range of flows.A comparison of experimental characteristics of the constant step screw with those of calculated by the proposed technique shows their good agreement.The technique is also used in calculating characteristics of the variable step screws. The variable step screw is considered as a screw consisting of two screws with a smooth transition of the blades from the inlet to the outlet. Screws in which the step at the inlet is less than that of at the outlet as well as screws with the step at the inlet being more than that of at the outlet were investigated. It is shown that a pressure of the screw with zero step and the value of the reverse currents depend only on the parameters of the input section of the screw, and the maximum flow, if the step at the inlet is more than the step at the outlet, is determined by the parameters of the output part of the screw. Otherwise, the maximum flow is determined a little bit differently.The paper compares experimental characteristics with characteristics calculated by the technique for variable step

  5. Safety screw fixation technique in a case of coracoid base fracture with acromioclavicular dislocation and coracoid base cross-sectional size data from a computed axial tomography study.

    Kawasaki, Yoshiteru; Hirano, Tetsuya; Miyatake, Katsutoshi; Fujii, Koji; Takeda, Yoshitsugu

    2014-07-01

    Coracoid base fracture accompanied by acromioclavicular joint dislocation with intact coracoclavicular ligaments is a rare injury. Generally, an open reduction with screw fixation is the first treatment choice, as it protects the important structures around the coracoid process. This report presents a new technique of screw fixation for coracoid base fracture and provides anatomic information on cross-sectional size of the coracoid base obtained by computed tomography (CT). An axial image of the coracoid base was visualized over the neck of the scapula, and a guidewire was inserted into this circle under fluoroscopic guidance. The wire was inserted easily into the neck of scapula across the coracoid base fracture with imaging in only 1 plane. In addition, 25 measurements of the coracoid base were made in 25 subjects on axial CT images. Average length of the long and short axes at the thinnest part of the coracoid base was 13.9 ± 2.0 mm (range 10.6-17.0) and 10.5 ± 2.2 mm (6.6-15.1), respectively. This new screw fixation technique and measurement data on the coracoid base may be beneficial for safety screw fixation of coracoid base fracture.

  6. A sense of green

    Nigten, Anne

    2015-01-01

    This booklet is a short reflection on the workshop activities by the research group, Popular culture Sustainability and Innovation (PSI), of the Hanze University in Groningen for the CCC Reloaded: CREALAB project over the last one and half years. Based on a series of explorative workshops this

  7. Avulsion Fracture of the Calcaneus Treated With a Soft Anchor Bridge and Lag Screw Technique: A Report of Two Cases.

    Yoshida, Kazushige; Kasama, Kentaro; Akahane, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    The displaced extra-articular avulsion fracture of the calcaneus has been classified as a Böhler type 1c calcaneal fracture, and most cases will require surgical repair. In the present report, we describe 2 patients in whom we performed the soft anchor bridge technique using single loaded suture anchors with lag screws for the repair of Böhler type 1c avulsion fractures of the calcaneus. In one of these patients, clinically relevant osteoporosis complicated the injury. In both cases, bone union was achieved, and by 1.5 months after surgery satisfactory recovery was observed. To our knowledge, the soft anchor bridge technique was first used for the treatment of rotator cuff tears, and the greatest merit of this technique is the ability to generate vertical compression force to the pulled out rotator cuff through the use of knotting sutures. In recent years, the soft anchor bridge technique using 4 suture anchors has also been used for fractures of the greater tuberosity of the humerus, an injury that poses operative difficulties similar to those encountered with an avulsion fracture of the calcaneus owing to the traction force of the rotator cuff and relative weakness of adjacent bone. The outcomes of our patients suggest that the soft anchor bridge technique combined with adjunct lag screws is useful in the fixation of avulsion fractures of the calcaneus. In addition, the result in the elderly patient indicates the possibility of using this technique for patients with osteoporosis. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence of sacral dysmorphia in a prospective trauma population: Implications for a "safe" surgical corridor for sacro-iliac screw placement.

    Hasenboehler, Erik A; Stahel, Philip F; Williams, Allison; Smith, Wade R; Newman, Justin T; Symonds, David L; Morgan, Steven J

    2011-05-10

    Percutaneous sacro-iliac (SI) screw fixation represents a widely used technique in the management of unstable posterior pelvic ring injuries and sacral fractures. The misplacement of SI-screws under fluoroscopic guidance represents a critical complication for these patients. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of sacral dysmorphia and the radiographic anatomy of surgical S1 and S2 corridors in a representative trauma population. Prospective observational cohort study on a consecutive series of 344 skeletally mature trauma patients of both genders enrolled between January 1, 2007, to September 30, 2007, at a single academic level 1 trauma center. Inclusion criteria included a pelvic CT scan as part of the initial diagnostic trauma work-up. The prevalence of sacral dysmorphia was determined by plain radiographic pelvic films and CT scan analysis. The anatomy of sacral corridors was analyzed on 3 mm reconstruction sections derived from multislice CT scan, in the axial, coronal, and sagittal plane. "Safe" potential surgical corridors at S1 and S2 were calculated based on these measurements. Radiographic evidence of sacral dysmorphia was detected in 49 patients (14.5%). The prevalence of sacral dysmorphia was not significantly different between male and female patients (12.2% vs. 19.2%; P = 0.069). In contrast, significant gender-related differences were detected with regard to radiographic analysis of surgical corridors for SI-screw placement, with female trauma patients (n = 99) having significantly narrower corridors at S1 and S2 in all evaluated planes (axial, coronal, sagittal), compared to male counterparts (n = 245; P dysmorphia. These findings emphasize a high prevalence of sacral dysmorphia in a representative trauma population and imply a higher risk of SI-screw misplacement in female patients. Preoperative planning for percutaneous SI-screw fixation for unstable pelvic and sacral fractures must include a detailed CT scan analysis to determine

  9. Kinematics of Planetary Roller Screw Mechanism considering Helical Directions of Screw and Roller Threads

    Shangjun Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the differential principle of thread transmission, an analytical model considering helical directions between screw and roller threads in planetary roller screw mechanism (PRSM is presented in this work. The model is critical for the design of PRSM with a smaller lead and a bigger pitch to realize a higher transmission accuracy. The kinematic principle of planetary transmission is employed to analyze the PRSM with different screw thread and roller thread directions. In order to investigate the differences with different screw thread and roller thread directions, the numerical model is developed by using the software Adams to validate the analytical solutions calculated by the presented model. The results indicate, when the helical direction of screw thread is identical with the direction of roller thread, that the lead of PRSM is unaffected regardless of whether sliding between screw and rollers occurs or not. Only when the direction of screw thread is reverse to the direction of roller thread, the design of PRSM with a smaller lead can be realized under a bigger pitch. The presented models and numerical simulation method can be used to research the transmission accuracy of PRSM.

  10. Passage of an Anterior Odontoid Screw through Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Leitner, L; Brückmann, C I; Gilg, M M; Bratschitsch, G; Sadoghi, P; Leithner, A; Radl, R

    2017-01-01

    Purpose . Anterior screw fixation has become a popular surgical treatment method for instable odontoid fractures. Screw loosening and migration are a rare, severe complication following anterior odontoid fixation, which can lead to esophagus perforation and requires revision operation. Methods . We report a case of screw loosening and migration after anterior odontoid fixation, which perforated the esophagus and was excreted without complications in a 78-year-old male patient. Results . A ventral dislocated anterior screw perforated through the esophagus after eight years after implantation and was excreted through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. At a 6-month follow-up after the event the patient was asymptomatic. Conclusion . Extrusion via the GI tract is not safe enough to be considered as a treatment option for loosened screws. Some improvements could be implemented to prevent such an incident. Furthermore, this case is a fine example that recent preoperative imaging is mandatory before revision surgery for screw loosening.

  11. Passage of an Anterior Odontoid Screw through Gastrointestinal Tract

    L. Leitner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Anterior screw fixation has become a popular surgical treatment method for instable odontoid fractures. Screw loosening and migration are a rare, severe complication following anterior odontoid fixation, which can lead to esophagus perforation and requires revision operation. Methods. We report a case of screw loosening and migration after anterior odontoid fixation, which perforated the esophagus and was excreted without complications in a 78-year-old male patient. Results. A ventral dislocated anterior screw perforated through the esophagus after eight years after implantation and was excreted through the gastrointestinal (GI tract. At a 6-month follow-up after the event the patient was asymptomatic. Conclusion. Extrusion via the GI tract is not safe enough to be considered as a treatment option for loosened screws. Some improvements could be implemented to prevent such an incident. Furthermore, this case is a fine example that recent preoperative imaging is mandatory before revision surgery for screw loosening.

  12. Measurement of Tip Apex Distance and Migration of Lag Screws and Novel Blade Screw Used for the Fixation of Intertrochanteric Fractures.

    Jesse Chieh-Szu Yang

    Full Text Available Fixation with a dynamic hip screw (DHS is one of the most common methods for stabilizing intertrochanteric fractures, except for unstable and reverse oblique fracture types. However, failure is often observed in osteoporotic patients whereby the lag screw effectively 'cuts out' through the weak bone. Novel anti-migration blades have been developed to be used in combination with a lag screw ('Blade Screw' to improve the fixation strength in osteoporotic intertrochanteric fractures. An in-vitro biomechanical study and a retrospective clinical study were performed to evaluate lag screw migration when using the novel Blade Screw and a traditional threaded DHS. The biomechanical study showed both the Blade Screw and DHS displayed excessive migration (≥10 mm before reaching 20,000 loading cycles in mild osteoporotic bone, but overall migration of the Blade Screw was significantly less (p ≤ 0.03. Among the patients implanted with a Blade Screw in the clinical study, there was no significant variation in screw migration at 3-months follow-up (P = 0.12. However, the patient's implanted with a DHS did display significantly greater migration (P<0.001 than those implanted with the Blade Screw. In conclusion, the Blade Screw stabilizes the bone fragments during dynamic loading so as to provide significantly greater resistance to screw migration in patients with mild osteoporosis.

  13. Risk Aversion and Skewness Preference: a comment

    G.T. Post (Thierry); P. van Vliet (Pim)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractEmpirically, co-skewness of asset returns seems to explain a substantial part of the cross-sectional variation of mean return not explained by beta. Thisfinding is typically interpreted in terms of a risk averse representativeinvestor with a cubic utility function. This comment questions

  14. Hydraulic screw fastening devices - design, maintenance, operational experience

    Lachner.

    1976-01-01

    With hydraulic screw fastening devices, pretension values with a maximum deviation of +-2.5% from the rated value can be achieved. This high degree of pretension accuracy is of considerable importance with regard to the safety factor required for the screw connection between reactor vessel head and reactor vessel. The operating rhythm of a nuclear power station with its refuelling art regular intervals makes further demands on the screw fastening device, in particular in connection with the transport of screws and for nuts. The necessary installations extend the screw fastening device into a combination of a high-pressure hydraulic cylinder system with an electrical or pneumoelectrical driving unit and an electrical control unit. Maintenance work is complicated by the large number of identical, highly stressed structural elements in connection with an unfavourable relation operating time/outage time. The problems have been perpetually reduced by close cooperation between the manufacturers and users of screw fastening devices. (orig./AK) [de

  15. A clinical evaluation of a headless, titanium, variable-pitched, tapered, compression screw for repair of nondisplaced lateral condylar fractures in thoroughbred racehorses.

    Galuppo, Larry D; Simpson, Edwin L; Greenman, Sylvia L; Dowd, Joseph P; Ferraro, Gregory L; Meagher, Dennis M

    2006-07-01

    To report clinical evaluation of headless compression screws for repair of metacarpal/metatarsal (MC/MT3) condylar fractures in horses. Retrospective case study. Racing Thoroughbreds (n=16) with nondisplaced lateral condylar fractures of MC/MT 3. Medical records (1999-2004) of horses with nondisplaced longitudinal fractures of the lateral condyle of MC/MT3 were reviewed. Pre-operative variables retrieved were: patient age, gender, limb involvement, injury occurrence, fracture length, and width, evidence of palmar comminution and degenerative joint disease, number of pre-injury starts, and pre-injury earnings. Post-operative variables retrieved were: surgical complications, surgical time, number of race starts, and post-operative earnings. MC3 (n=11) and MT3 (5) nondisplaced longitudinal fractures of the lateral condyle were repaired with Acutrak Equine (AE) screws. Left front limb fractures were most common (8) followed by left hind (5) and right front (3). Nine fractures occurred during training and 7 during racing; 4 fractures had palmar comminution. No surgical complications occurred. Of 15 horses that returned to training, 11 (73%) raced 306+/-67 days after injury and had greater mean (+/-SD) post-injury earnings/start ($5290.00+/-$8124.00) than pre-injury ($4971.00+/-$2842.00). Screw removal was not required in any horse. The AE screw is a viable option for repair of nondisplaced lateral condylar MC/MT3 fractures in Thoroughbred racehorses. Adequate stability of nondisplaced lateral condylar fractures can be achieved with a headless tapered compression screw while avoiding impingement on the collateral ligaments and joint capsule of the fetlock joint.

  16. Complications of syndesmotic screw removal

    Schepers, Tim; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; de Vries, Mark R.; van der Elst, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the metallic syndesmotic screw is the gold standard in the treatment of syndesmotic disruption. Whether or not this screw needs to be removed remains debatable. The aim of the current study was to determine the complications which occur following routine removal of the syndesmotic screw

  17. Insertion profiles of 4 headless compression screws.

    Hart, Adam; Harvey, Edward J; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; Barthelat, Francois; Rabiei, Reza; Martineau, Paul A

    2013-09-01

    In practice, the surgeon must rely on screw position (insertion depth) and tactile feedback from the screwdriver (insertion torque) to gauge compression. In this study, we identified the relationship between interfragmentary compression and these 2 factors. The Acutrak Standard, Acutrak Mini, Synthes 3.0, and Herbert-Whipple implants were tested using a polyurethane foam scaphoid model. A specialized testing jig simultaneously measured compression force, insertion torque, and insertion depth at half-screw-turn intervals until failure occurred. The peak compression occurs at an insertion depth of -3.1 mm, -2.8 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.5 mm for the Acutrak Mini, Acutrak Standard, Herbert-Whipple, and Synthes screws respectively (insertion depth is positive when the screw is proud above the bone and negative when buried). The compression and insertion torque at a depth of -2 mm were found to be 113 ± 18 N and 0.348 ± 0.052 Nm for the Acutrak Standard, 104 ± 15 N and 0.175 ± 0.008 Nm for the Acutrak Mini, 78 ± 9 N and 0.245 ± 0.006 Nm for the Herbert-Whipple, and 67 ± 2N, 0.233 ± 0.010 Nm for the Synthes headless compression screws. All 4 screws generated a sizable amount of compression (> 60 N) over a wide range of insertion depths. The compression at the commonly recommended insertion depth of -2 mm was not significantly different between screws; thus, implant selection should not be based on compression profile alone. Conically shaped screws (Acutrak) generated their peak compression when they were fully buried in the foam whereas the shanked screws (Synthes and Herbert-Whipple) reached peak compression before they were fully inserted. Because insertion torque correlated poorly with compression, surgeons should avoid using tactile judgment of torque as a proxy for compression. Knowledge of the insertion profile may improve our understanding of the implants, provide a better basis for comparing screws, and enable the surgeon to optimize compression. Copyright

  18. Comparison of effectiveness between cork-screw and peg-screw electrodes for transcranial motor evoked potential monitoring using the finite element method.

    Tomio, Ryosuke; Akiyama, Takenori; Ohira, Takayuki; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of motor evoked potentials by transcranial electric stimulation is popular in neurosurgery for monitoring motor function preservation. Some authors have reported that the peg-screw electrodes screwed into the skull can more effectively conduct current to the brain compared to subdermal cork-screw electrodes screwed into the skin. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of electrode design on transcranial motor evoked potential monitoring. We estimated differences in effectiveness between the cork-screw electrode, peg-screw electrode, and cortical electrode to produce electric fields in the brain. We used the finite element method to visualize electric fields in the brain generated by transcranial electric stimulation using realistic three-dimensional head models developed from T1-weighted images. Surfaces from five layers of the head were separated as accurately as possible. We created the "cork-screws model," "1 peg-screw model," "peg-screws model," and "cortical electrode model". Electric fields in the brain radially diffused from the brain surface at a maximum just below the electrodes in coronal sections. The coronal sections and surface views of the brain showed higher electric field distributions under the peg-screw compared to the cork-screw. An extremely high electric field was observed under cortical electrodes. Our main finding was that the intensity of electric fields in the brain are higher in the peg-screw model than the cork-screw model.

  19. Experimental study of pedicle screw stability on low BMD vertebrae

    Li Qi; Yang Huilin; Tang Tiansi; Wu Yiwei; Wang Yijin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To conduct biomechanical study of different pedicle screws stability on spinal specimen, discuss the relationship between design parameter of screw, insertion torgue and BMD, establish the theoretical foundation for application of pedicle screw on osteoporotic patients. Methods: Six fixed lumbar cadavers were collected, the effects of design parameter, insertion torque and etc on fixation stability were determined under various BMD by using biomechanical ways. Results: According to in vitro study: (1) There was a significant difference among pullout strength of all screws (P 2 >U 1 >SF 1 >SF 2 >RF. Conclusions: There is a close correlated between type of screw, BMD and stability. The U-type screw displays the best fixation effect on specimen of low BMD. (authors)

  20. Translaminar screw fixation in the lumbar spine: technique, indications, results

    Grob, D.; Humke, T.

    1998-01-01

    Translaminar screw fixation of the lumbar spine represents a simple and effective technique for short segment fusion in the degenerative spine. Clinical experience with 173 patients who underwent translaminar screw fixation revealed a fusion rate of 94%. The indications for translaminar screw fixation as a primary fixation procedure are: segmental dysfunction, lumbar spinal stenosis with painful degenerative changes, segmental revision surgery after discectomies, and painful disc-related synd...

  1. Experimental study of the density distribution of the particles of the material in screw installation

    Demidov S. F.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available the experimental studies of density distribution of the particles of a mixture of wheat, oats, rye to feed pigs by infrared heating at the time of stay and temperature at the exit of the installation. The purpose of the work is to study the quality of treatment of the product with the settings with the screw and the screw with installed round jumper on the pen of the screw. Screw installations with infrared emitters of selected wavelength give the opportunity for intense and continuous heat treatment process. The authors used the optimal parameters of the process with the screw and the screw with installed round jumper on the pen of the screw. The parameters of screw installation during the study were the following: the number of revolutions of the screw was 10 rpm, density of heat flux was 12 kW/m2, output capacity – 250 kg/h.

  2. Development and Testing of X-Ray Imaging-Enhanced Poly-L-Lactide Bone Screws.

    Wei-Jen Chang

    Full Text Available Nanosized iron oxide particles exhibit osteogenic and radiopaque properties. Thus, iron oxide (Fe3O4 nanoparticles were incorporated into a biodegradable polymer (poly-L-lactic acid, PLLA to fabricate a composite bone screw. This multifunctional, 3D printable bone screw was detectable on X-ray examination. In this study, mechanical tests including three-point bending and ultimate tensile strength were conducted to evaluate the optimal ratio of iron oxide nanoparticles in the PLLA composite. Both injection molding and 3D printing techniques were used to fabricate the PLLA bone screws with and without the iron oxide nanoparticles. The fabricated screws were implanted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand White rabbits. Bone blocks containing the PLLA screws were resected 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. Histologic examination of the surrounding bone and the radiopacity of the iron-oxide-containing PLLA screws were evaluated. Our results indicated that addition of iron oxide nanoparticles at 30% significantly decreased the ultimate tensile stress properties of the PLLA screws. The screws with 20% iron oxide exhibited strong radiopacity compared to the screws fabricated without the iron oxide nanoparticles. Four weeks after surgery, the average bone volume of the iron oxide PLLA composite screws was significantly greater than that of PLLA screws without iron oxide. These findings suggested that biodegradable and X-ray detectable PLLA bone screws can be produced by incorporation of 20% iron oxide nanoparticles. Furthermore, these screws had significantly greater osteogenic capability than the PLLA screws without iron oxide.

  3. Process and apparatus for optimizing screwing position for closure stud

    Bourdonne, J.C.; Briand, A.

    1987-01-01

    The stud is fixed to a screwing and unscrewing device. The vertical position and alignment of the stud with the axis of the threated hole is checking. The stud is descended into the hole and rotated in the unscrewing direction. After detection of the point of engagement, the stud is rotated in the screwing direction. When a gamming is detected the descent is stopped and the screwing device is positioned in a new position. When the screwing couple returns below the disconnection couple, the stud is rotated with a reduced speed and then with a normal speed until the end [fr

  4. Comment

    2001-07-01

    schools and colleges are exploring electronic learning through the internet and virtual labs (see Steve Mellema's use of IT in his Lecture for the 21st Century). We aim to provide useful material for everybody at and in between the extremes. But some words of caution, sounded by Robertson in Stirling: today we might find that our classes are motivated and interested when we use computers, but how long will the excitement last? If every lesson faces children with computer screens will they soon get bored and demotivated? Individual learning, through worksheets, was a great success when it was developed in the 70s, but when every lesson faced a child with yet another worksheet, students were turned off. It became known as 'death by a thousand worksheets'. Let's not abuse computers in the same way. Physics for the beach and the igloo Physics is about being cool, as we are always trying to tell our students! In this 'summer' issue we have two papers which allow us to demonstrate this practically. I should also like to remind readers that Physics Education is available online (www.iop.org/Journals/pe) in addition to the paper version. The electronic version has the advantages of hotlinks to websites, search facilities and the ability to download teaching materials. My guess is that we haven't begun to explore the possibilities of the electronic journal as a teaching resource for teachers. If it can be stored electronically, we can include it as a multimedia clip pictures, worksheets, spreadsheets, videos, sounds... But there are also many advantages of paper—convenience and permanence being just two. Physics Education is a worthwhile publication and it feels like that in your hand. Having a journal like this, to put in my bag, or stack on my bookshelf, still feels good to me. And judging by readers' comments, you agree. IOPP will, no doubt, support both formats for a long time to come. So, this summer, enjoy the format you are reading, read Physics Education on screen or on

  5. Economics of water injected air screw compressor systems

    Madhav, K. V.; Kovacevic, A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need for compressed air free of entrained oil to be used in industry. In many cases it can be supplied by oil flooded screw compressors with multi stage filtration systems, or by oil free screw compressors. However, if water injected screw compressors can be made to operate reliably, they could be more efficient and therefore cheaper to operate. Unfortunately, to date, such machines have proved to be insufficiently reliable and not cost effective. This paper describes an in...

  6. Comment

    2001-01-01

    Physics...fun? 'Physics is Fun' - it's a book, a course, a summer school... Physics, with a reputation for hard maths, nonsensical equations and crazy teachers living with a permanent bad hair day, yes, PHYSICS IS FUN! Maybe if we say it often enough our students will believe us. PHYSICS IS FUN! Keep saying it, and try to believe it. But we are scientists, and we have to look at the evidence and acknowledge the truth: when most people recall the fun times they had at school-how many think about their physics classes? Try asking them. Let's face it - although our students enjoy our exciting demonstrations, the well-structured development of concepts in our classes, and the cooperative and supportive atmosphere of our classrooms and laboratories, even when they find that their physics teachers are the most kind, considerate and approachable of people, even then, when we've done all we can to make physics pleasant, fun and exciting, our students have to fathom out physics... and that can be hard! 'Physics isn't fun in the trivial sense, it's hard work: but you get a fantastic sense of achievement when you make progress.' This is my counsel to most young people who come to discuss whether or not to opt for physics. We try our best to make the material accessible and interesting, but at the end of the day, struggling with something that intially you can't do, but eventually you can do, is part of developing in physics. But what about the teachers? November's meeting of physics teachers from across Europe, Physics on Stage, featured many of the best innovations in physics teaching from the 22 countries which sent delegations (see News). It is probably no surprise, but we need to take note that the most popular stands, talks and lectures were the ones which were most fun. And there is lots of fun to be had doing physics. Whether it is toys, music, poetry, or simply talking about the symmetry in particle physics-the most popular stands, workshops and lectures were those

  7. Evaluation of the Structural Safety of a Vessel with Different Material(Cr-13)-Supplemented Screw Thread

    Choi, Yong Hoon; Bae, Jun Ho; Kim, Chul [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The dome and neck part of a vessel is generally formed by a hot spinning process with a seamless tube. However, as studies on and design data from the hot spinning process are insufficient, this process has been performed based on trial and error and the experiences of field engineers. Changes in the inner diameter from the bottom to the top of the neck have occurred mainly because of the characteristics of the hot spinning process due to the high-speed rotation of the rollers. In this study, a theoretical and finite element analysis of the vessel is conducted with different material(Cr-13)-supplemented screw threads for tapping and to reduce shape errors. Based on the results, the structural safety under the operating conditions is evaluated.

  8. Transparent predictive modelling of the twin screw granulation process using a compensated interval type-2 fuzzy system.

    AlAlaween, Wafa' H; Khorsheed, Bilal; Mahfouf, Mahdi; Gabbott, Ian; Reynolds, Gavin K; Salman, Agba D

    2018-03-01

    In this research, a new systematic modelling framework which uses machine learning for describing the granulation process is presented. First, an interval type-2 fuzzy model is elicited in order to predict the properties of the granules produced by twin screw granulation (TSG) in the pharmaceutical industry. Second, a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) is integrated in the framework in order to characterize the error residuals emanating from the fuzzy model. This is done to refine the model by taking into account uncertainties and/or any other unmodelled behaviour, stochastic or otherwise. All proposed modelling algorithms were validated via a series of Laboratory-scale experiments. The size of the granules produced by TSG was successfully predicted, where most of the predictions fit within a 95% confidence interval. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Upscaling of a Batch De-Vulcanization Process for Ground Car Tire Rubber to a Continuous Process in a Twin Screw Extruder

    Sitisaiyidah Saiwari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As a means to decrease the amount of waste tires and to re-use tire rubber for new tires, devulcanization of ground passenger car tires is a promising process. Being an established process for NR and EPDM, earlier work has shown that for ground passenger car tire rubber with a relatively high amount of SBR, a devulcanization process can be formulated, as well. This was proven for a laboratory-scale batch process in an internal mixer, using diphenyl disulfide as the devulcanization aid and powder-sized material. In this paper, the devulcanization process for passenger car tire rubber is upscaled from 15 g per batch and transformed into a continuous process in a co-rotating twin screw extruder with a capacity of 2 kg/h. As SBR is rather sensitive to devulcanization process conditions, such as thermal and mechanical energy input, the screw design was based on a low shear concept. A granulate with particle sizes from 1–3.5 mm was chosen for purity, as well as economic reasons. The devulcanization process conditions were fine-tuned in terms of: devulcanization conditions (time/temperature profile, concentration of devulcanization aid, extruder parameters (screw configuration, screw speed, fill factor and ancillary equipment (pre-treatment, extrudate handling. The influence of these parameters on the devulcanization efficiency and the quality of the final product will be discussed. The ratio of random to crosslink scission as determined by a Horikx plot was taken for the evaluation of the process and material. A best practice for continuous devulcanization will be given.

  10. The Reclaim Screw in Mammoth Silos Operating on a Free Surface: Comparison Between Horizontal and Inclined Operation on Free Flowing Bulk Solids

    Oosterhuis, E.J.; Schott, Dingena; van Wijk, Arjen

    2004-01-01

    Although the screw conveyor, operating on a free surface, has been used for years as reclaim and storage equipment in mammoth silos, there is no documented knowledge about its spill characteristics. Research at Delft University of Technology together with ESI Eurosilo B.V. on the inclined use of the

  11. Effect of technique and impression material on the vertical misfit of a screw-retained, three-unit implant bridge: An in vitro study

    Hamidreza Rajati Haghi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the following conclusions can be drawn: The impression method had no effect on marginal discrepancy of 3-unit screw retained fixed partial dentures. A higher marginal accuracy was obtained using polyether impression material compared to polyvinyl siloxane.

  12. Minimally Invasive Technique for PMMA Augmentation of Fenestrated Screws

    Jan-Helge Klingler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the minimally invasive technique for cement augmentation of cannulated and fenestrated screws using an injection cannula as well as to report its safety and efficacy. Methods. A total of 157 cannulated and fenestrated pedicle screws had been cement-augmented during minimally invasive posterior screw-rod spondylodesis in 35 patients from January to December 2012. Retrospective evaluation of cement extravasation and screw loosening was carried out in postoperative plain radiographs and thin-sliced triplanar computed tomography scans. Results. Twenty-seven, largely prevertebral cement extravasations were detected in 157 screws (17.2%. None of the cement extravasations was causing a clinical sequela like a new neurological deficit. One screw loosening was noted (0.6% after a mean follow-up of 12.8 months. We observed no cementation-associated complication like pulmonary embolism or hemodynamic insufficiency. Conclusions. The presented minimally invasive cement augmentation technique using an injection cannula facilitates convenient and safe cement delivery through polyaxial cannulated and fenestrated screws during minimally invasive screw-rod spondylodesis. Nevertheless, the optimal injection technique and design of fenestrated screws have yet to be identified. This trial is registered with German Clinical Trials DRKS00006726.

  13. Torque Removal Evaluation of Screw in One-Piece and Two-Piece Abutments Tightened with a Handheld screwdriver

    Jalil Ghanbarzadeh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some clinicians use a handheld screw driver instead of a torque wrench to definitively tighten abutment screws. The aim of this study was to compare the removal torque of one-piece and two-piece abutments tightened with a handheld driver and a torque control ratchet. Methods: 40 ITI implants were placed in acrylic blocks and divided into 4 groups. In groups one and two, 10 ITI one-piece abutments (Solid® and in groups three and four, 10 ITI two-piece abutments (Synocta® were placed on the implants. In groups one and three abutments were tightened by 5 experienced males and 5 experienced females using a handheld driver. In groups two and four abutments were tightened using a torque wrench with torque values of 10, 20 and 35 N.cm. Insertion torque and removal torque values of the abutments were measured with a digital torque meter. Results: The insertion torque values (ITVs of males in both abutments were significantly higher than those of females. ITVs in both Solid® and Synocta® abutments tightened with a handheld screwdriver were similar to the torque of 20 N.cm in the torque wrench. Removal torque values (RTVs of solid® abutments were higher than those of synocta® abutments. Conclusion: The one- piece abutments (solid® showed higher RTVs than the two-piece abutments (synocta®. Hand driver does not produce sufficient preload force for the final tightening of the abutment

  14. Preload, Coefficient of Friction, and Thread Friction in an Implant-Abutment-Screw Complex.

    Wentaschek, Stefan; Tomalla, Sven; Schmidtmann, Irene; Lehmann, Karl Martin

    To examine the screw preload, coefficient of friction (COF), and tightening torque needed to overcome the thread friction of an implant-abutment-screw complex. In a customized load frame, 25 new implant-abutment-screw complexes including uncoated titanium alloy screws were torqued and untorqued 10 times each, applying 25 Ncm. Mean preload values decreased significantly from 209.8 N to 129.5 N according to the number of repetitions. The overall COF increased correspondingly. There was no comparable trend for the thread friction component. These results suggest that the application of a used implant-abutment-screw complex may be unfavorable for obtaining optimal screw preload.

  15. A proposed radiographic classification scheme for congenital thoracic vertebral malformations in brachycephalic "screw-tailed" dog breeds.

    Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo; Guevar, Julien; Stalin, Catherine; Faller, Kiterie; Yeamans, Carmen; Penderis, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Congenital vertebral malformations are common in brachycephalic "screw-tailed" dog breeds such as French bulldogs, English bulldogs, Boston terriers, and pugs. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether a radiographic classification scheme developed for use in humans would be feasible for use in these dog breeds. Inclusion criteria were hospital admission between September 2009 and April 2013, neurologic examination findings available, diagnostic quality lateral and ventro-dorsal digital radiographs of the thoracic vertebral column, and at least one congenital vertebral malformation. Radiographs were retrieved and interpreted by two observers who were unaware of neurologic status. Vertebral malformations were classified based on a classification scheme modified from a previous human study and a consensus of both observers. Twenty-eight dogs met inclusion criteria (12 with neurologic deficits, 16 with no neurologic deficits). Congenital vertebral malformations affected 85/362 (23.5%) of thoracic vertebrae. Vertebral body formation defects were the most common (butterfly vertebrae 6.6%, ventral wedge-shaped vertebrae 5.5%, dorsal hemivertebrae 0.8%, and dorso-lateral hemivertebrae 0.5%). No lateral hemivertebrae or lateral wedge-shaped vertebrae were identified. The T7 vertebra was the most commonly affected (11/28 dogs), followed by T8 (8/28 dogs) and T12 (8/28 dogs). The number and type of vertebral malformations differed between groups (P = 0.01). Based on MRI, dorsal, and dorso-lateral hemivertebrae were the cause of spinal cord compression in 5/12 (41.6%) of dogs with neurologic deficits. Findings indicated that a modified human radiographic classification system of vertebral malformations is feasible for use in future studies of brachycephalic "screw-tailed" dogs. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  16. Atomic structure of screw dislocations intersecting the Au(111) surface: A combined scanning tunneling microscopy and molecular dynamics study

    Engbæk, Jakob; Schiøtz, Jakob; Dahl-Madsen, Bjarke

    2006-01-01

    The atomic-scale structure of naturally occurring screw dislocations intersecting a Au(111) surface has been investigated both experimentally by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and theoretically using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The step profiles of 166 dislocations were measured using...... STM. Many of them exhibit noninteger step-height plateaus with different widths. Clear evidence was found for the existence of two different populations at the surface with distinct (narrowed or widened) partial-splitting widths. All findings are fully confirmed by the MD simulations. The MD...... simulations extend the STM-, i.e., surface-, investigation to the subsurface region. Due to this additional insight, we can explain the different partial-splitting widths as the result of the interaction between the partial dislocations and the surface....

  17. Process design and control of a twin screw hot melt extrusion for continuous pharmaceutical tamper-resistant tablet production.

    Baronsky-Probst, J; Möltgen, C-V; Kessler, W; Kessler, R W

    2016-05-25

    Hot melt extrusion (HME) is a well-known process within the plastic and food industries that has been utilized for the past several decades and is increasingly accepted by the pharmaceutical industry for continuous manufacturing. For tamper-resistant formulations of e.g. opioids, HME is the most efficient production technique. The focus of this study is thus to evaluate the manufacturability of the HME process for tamper-resistant formulations. Parameters such as the specific mechanical energy (SME), as well as the melt pressure and its standard deviation, are important and will be discussed in this study. In the first step, the existing process data are analyzed by means of multivariate data analysis. Key critical process parameters such as feed rate, screw speed, and the concentration of the API in the polymers are identified, and critical quality parameters of the tablet are defined. In the second step, a relationship between the critical material, product and process quality attributes are established by means of Design of Experiments (DoEs). The resulting SME and the temperature at the die are essential data points needed to indirectly qualify the degradation of the API, which should be minimal. NIR-spectroscopy is used to monitor the material during the extrusion process. In contrast to most applications in which the probe is directly integrated into the die, the optical sensor is integrated into the cooling line of the strands. This saves costs in the probe design and maintenance and increases the robustness of the chemometric models. Finally, a process measurement system is installed to monitor and control all of the critical attributes in real-time by means of first principles, DoE models, soft sensor models, and spectroscopic information. Overall, the process is very robust as long as the screw speed is kept low. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Atomistic simulation of ideal shear strength, point defects, and screw dislocations in bcc transition metals: Mo as a prototype

    Xu, W.; Moriarty, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Using multi-ion interatomic potentials derived from first-principles generalized pseudopotential theory, we have studied ideal shear strength, point defects, and screw dislocations in the prototype bcc transition metal molybdenum (Mo). Many-body angular forces, which are important to the structural and mechanical properties of such central transition metals with partially filled d bands, are accounted for in the present theory through explicit three- and four-ion potentials. For the ideal shear strength of Mo, our computed results agree well with those predicted by full electronic-structure calculations. For point defects in Mo, our calculated vacancy-formation and activation energies are in excellent agreement with experimental results. The energetics of six self-interstitial configurations have also been investigated. The left-angle 110 right-angle split dumbbell interstitial is found to have the lowest formation energy, in agreement with the configuration found by x-ray diffuse scattering measurements. In ascending order, the sequence of energetically stable interstitials is predicted to be left-angle 110 right-angle split dumbbell, crowdion, left-angle 111 right-angle split dumbbell, tetrahedral site, left-angle 001 right-angle split dumbbell, and octahedral site. In addition, the migration paths for the left-angle 110 right-angle dumbbell self-interstitial have been studied. The migration energies are found to be 3 endash 15 times higher than previous theoretical estimates obtained using simple radial-force Finnis-Sinclair potentials. Finally, the atomic structure and energetics of left-angle 111 right-angle screw dislocations in Mo have been investigated. We have found that the so-called open-quote open-quote easy close-quote close-quote core configuration has a lower formation energy than the open-quote open-quote hard close-quote close-quote one, consistent with previous theoretical studies. (Abstract Truncated)

  19. Human versus Robot: A Propensity-Matched Analysis of the Accuracy of Free Hand versus Robotic Guidance for Placement of S2 Alar-Iliac (S2AI) Screws.

    Shillingford, Jamal N; Laratta, Joseph L; Park, Paul J; Lombardi, Joseph M; Tuchman, Alexander; Saifi, Comron S; Lehman, Ronald A; Lenke, Lawrence G

    2018-04-18

    Retrospective matched cohort analysis. To compare the accuracy of S2 alar-iliac (S2AI) screw placement by robotic guidance versus free hand technique. Spinopelvic fixation utilizing S2AI screws provides optimal fixation across the lumbosacral junction allowing for solid fusion, especially in long segment fusion constructs. Traditionally, S2AI screw placement has required fluoroscopic guidance for accurate screw placement. Herein, we present the first series comparing a free hand and robotic-guided technique for S2AI screw placement. Sixty-eight consecutive patients who underwent S2AI screw placement by either a free hand or robotic technique between 2015 and 2016 were reviewed. Propensity score-matching was utilized to control for preoperative characteristic imbalances. Screw position and accuracy were evaluated using three-dimensional manipulation of CT reconstructions from intraoperative O-arm imaging. A total of 51 patients (105 screws) were matched, 28 (59 screws) in the free hand group (FHG) and 23 (46 screws) in the robot group (RG). The mean age in the FHG and RG were 57.9[REPLACEMENT CHARACTER]± 14.6 years and 61.6[REPLACEMENT CHARACTER]± 12.0 years (P = 0.342), respectively. The average caudal angle in the sagittal plane was significantly larger in the RG (31.0[REPLACEMENT CHARACTER]± 10.0° vs. 25.7[REPLACEMENT CHARACTER]± 8.8°, P =[REPLACEMENT CHARACTER]0.005). There was no difference between the FHG and RG in the horizontal angle, measured in the axial plane using the posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS) as a reference (41.1[REPLACEMENT CHARACTER]± 8.1° vs. 42.8[REPLACEMENT CHARACTER]± 6.6°, P =[REPLACEMENT CHARACTER]0.225), or the S2AI to S1 screw angle (9.4[REPLACEMENT CHARACTER]± 7.0° vs. 11.3[REPLACEMENT CHARACTER]± 9.9°, P =[REPLACEMENT CHARACTER]0.256), respectively. There was no difference in the overall accuracy between FHG and RG (94.9% vs. 97.8%, P =[REPLACEMENT CHARACTER]0.630). Additionally, there

  20. A comparative study of ground tire rubber devulcanization using twin screw extruder and internal mixer

    Ujianto, O.; Putri, D. B.; Jayatin; AWinarto, D.

    2017-07-01

    Devulcanization of ground tire rubber (GTR) was done using twin screw extruder (TSE) and internal mixer (IM). Processing parameters were varied to analyze its effect on gel content. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis was performed as qualitative technique to confirm structural change. The devulcanized rubbers with the least gel content percentage produced in both TSE and IM were then used as filler in natural rubber (NR)/coconut coir (CC) composite preparation. Effects of gel content percentage on NR/CC composite tensile strength and elongation at break were analyzed. The results show that the gel content decreased by 41% for sample processed in TSE and 50% in IM compared to control sample. Overall, the devulcanization is influenced by high energy generated by thermal or thermo-mechanical process. FTIR spectra show chemically structural changes of GTR as C=C, CH2, CH3 with higher intensity for IM sample than its counterpart indicated devulcanization. The replacement of GTR to DGTR on NR/CC/GTR composites provided less network structures and resulted better tensile strength and elongation at break.

  1. A comparison of two fixation methods for femoral trochanteric fractures: a new generation intramedullary system vs sliding hip screw.

    Carulli, Christian; Piacentini, Federico; Paoli, Tommaso; Civinini, Roberto; Innocenti, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Trochanteric fractures are frequent and generally associated with bone fragility. There is still debate on the best fixation device to treat stable or rather stable trochanteric fractures: we report our clinical and radiological results of fixation with Proximal Femoral Nail "antirotation" (PFNa) in a population of patients compared to a control group treated by Sliding Hip Screw (SHS). A prospective study was conducted in 71 consecutive patients treated by PFNa (group A), and 69 by a SHS (group B), with a mean age of 81.6 and 83.4 years respectively. Short Form 12 was administered to check postoperative results, and the following parameters were evaluated: range of motion, evaluation of pain, gait ability, X-rays, and Tip Apex Distance Index. A minimum follow-up was conducted in 128 patients: 66 subjects belonging to the PFNa group and 62 to the DHS group. All patients in the group A were able to reach partial or full weight-bearing on the operated leg before leaving the hospital. Forty-four patients (63.8%) of the group B were able to walk with partial weight-bearing before discharge. We recorded 17 complications with a final overall percentage of 17.2% on the overall study population with one single case of failure in both the two groups. A statistical significance (ptrochanteric fractures as well as DHS. The light superiority of PFNa may be principally related to its mechanical advantages.

  2. Twin screw wet granulation: Binder delivery.

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-06-20

    The effects of three ways of binder delivery into the twin screw granulator (TSG) on the residence time, torque, properties of granules (size, shape, strength) and binder distribution were studied. The binder distribution was visualised through the transparent barrel using high speed imaging as well as quantified using offline technique. Furthermore, the effect of binder delivery and the change of screw configuration (conveying elements only and conveying elements with kneading elements) on the surface velocity of granules across the screw channel were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The binder was delivered in three ways; all solid binder incorporated with powder mixture, 50% of solid binder mixed with powder mixture and 50% mixed with water, all the solid binder dissolved in water. Incorporation of all solid binder with powder mixture resulted in the relatively longer residence time and higher torque, narrower granule size distribution, more spherical granules, weaker big-sized granules, stronger small-sized granules and better binder distribution compared to that in other two ways. The surface velocity of granules showed variation from one screw to another as a result of uneven liquid distribution as well as shown a reduction while introducing the kneading elements into the screw configuration. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Development of structural schemes of parallel structure manipulators using screw calculus

    Rashoyan, G. V.; Shalyukhin, K. A.; Gaponenko, EV

    2018-03-01

    The paper considers the approach to the structural analysis and synthesis of parallel structure robots based on the mathematical apparatus of groups of screws and on a concept of reciprocity of screws. The results are depicted of synthesis of parallel structure robots with different numbers of degrees of freedom, corresponding to the different groups of screws. Power screws are applied with this aim, based on the principle of static-kinematic analogy; the power screws are similar to the orts of axes of not driven kinematic pairs of a corresponding connecting chain. Accordingly, kinematic screws of the outlet chain of a robot are simultaneously determined which are reciprocal to power screws of kinematic sub-chains. Solution of certain synthesis problems is illustrated with practical applications. Closed groups of screws can have eight types. The three-membered groups of screws are of greatest significance, as well as four-membered screw groups [1] and six-membered screw groups. Three-membered screw groups correspond to progressively guiding mechanisms, to spherical mechanisms, and to planar mechanisms. The four-membered group corresponds to the motion of the SCARA robot. The six-membered group includes all possible motions. From the works of A.P. Kotelnikov, F.M. Dimentberg, it is known that closed fifth-order screw groups do not exist. The article presents examples of the mechanisms corresponding to the given groups.

  4. Health values and prospect theory: a comment.

    Stratmann-Schoene, D; Klose, T

    2001-01-01

    In a recent volume of Medical Decision Making, Treadwell and Lenert stated that under prospect theory, community members compared with patients underestimate the utility of health improvements. In this comment, the authors show that this statement holds only for a subset of possible preference functions. Furthermore, the authors provide arguments that, in general, the rater's current health state is not the appropriate reference level if applying prospect theory to health valuations.

  5. Screw expander for light duty diesel engines

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary selection and sizing of a positive displacement screw compressor-expander subsystem for a light-duty adiabatic diesel engine; development of a mathematical model to describe overall efficiencies for the screw compressor and expander; simulation of operation to establish overall efficiency for a range of design parameters and at given engine operating points; simulation to establish potential net power output at light-duty diesel operating points; analytical determination of mass moments of inertia for the rotors and inertia of the compressor-expander subsystem; and preparation of engineering layout drawings of the compressor and expander are discussed. As a result of this work, it was concluded that the screw compressor and expander designed for light-duty diesel engine applications are viable alternatives to turbo-compound systems, with acceptable efficiencies for both units, and only a moderate effect on the transient response.

  6. Influence of bacterial colonization of the healing screws on peri-implant tissue

    Simonetta D'Ercole

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: The healing screws left in situ for a period of 90 days caused a peri-implant inflammation and the presence of periodontal pathogenic bacteria in the peri-implant sulcus, due to the plaque accumulation on screw surfaces.

  7. Percutaneous Sacroiliac Screw Placement: A Prospective Randomized Comparison of Robot-assisted Navigation Procedures with a Conventional Technique

    Jun-Qiang Wang

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Accuracy of the robot-assisted technique was superior to that of the freehand technique. Robot-assisted navigation is safe for unstable posterior pelvic ring stabilization, especially in S1, but also in S2. SI screw insertion with robot-assisted navigation is clinically feasible.

  8. Evaluation of two styles of slotted, flat-head screws

    Reeves, C.A. Jr.; Johnson, W.B.

    1979-01-01

    A series of torque tests were performed to evaluate the relative merits of two different flat-head screws fabricated from a uranium--6% niobium alloy. The screws tested were machined with both normal, straight-through slots in the head and with slots having radiused bottoms. Test results indicate that both designs easily surpass the required 20-inch-pound-proof torque

  9. The movement of screw dislocations in tungsten

    Tian Xiaogeng; Woo Chungho

    2004-01-01

    Using Acland potential for tungsten, the movement of 1/2a screw dislocation under shear stress was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Equilibrated core structure was obtained by relaxation of screw dislocation with proper boundary conditions. We found that the equilibrium dislocation core has three-fold symmetry and spread out in three direction on {1 1 0} planes. The screw dislocation core could not keep the original shape when the shear stress applied. The dislocation could not move until the shear stress became large enough. The dislocation moved in zigzag when the shear stress neared the Peierls stress. When the shear stress became larger, the dislocation moved in zigzag at the beginning and than moved almost in straight line in [2-bar11] direction. The large shear stress applied, the long distance moved before the dislocation stilled in z-direction and the large velocity in y-direction

  10. Electromagnetic Lead Screw for Potential Wave Energy Application

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Wu, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new type electromagnetic lead screw (EMLS) intended for wave energy application. Similar to the mechanical lead screw, this electromagnetic version can transfer slow linear motion to high-rotational motion, offering gearing effects. Compared with the existing pure magnetic...

  11. Prevalence of sacral dysmorphia in a prospective trauma population: Implications for a "safe" surgical corridor for sacro-iliac screw placement

    Newman Justin T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Percutaneous sacro-iliac (SI screw fixation represents a widely used technique in the management of unstable posterior pelvic ring injuries and sacral fractures. The misplacement of SI-screws under fluoroscopic guidance represents a critical complication for these patients. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of sacral dysmorphia and the radiographic anatomy of surgical S1 and S2 corridors in a representative trauma population. Methods Prospective observational cohort study on a consecutive series of 344 skeletally mature trauma patients of both genders enrolled between January 1, 2007, to September 30, 2007, at a single academic level 1 trauma center. Inclusion criteria included a pelvic CT scan as part of the initial diagnostic trauma work-up. The prevalence of sacral dysmorphia was determined by plain radiographic pelvic films and CT scan analysis. The anatomy of sacral corridors was analyzed on 3 mm reconstruction sections derived from multislice CT scan, in the axial, coronal, and sagittal plane. "Safe" potential surgical corridors at S1 and S2 were calculated based on these measurements. Results Radiographic evidence of sacral dysmorphia was detected in 49 patients (14.5%. The prevalence of sacral dysmorphia was not significantly different between male and female patients (12.2% vs. 19.2%; P = 0.069. In contrast, significant gender-related differences were detected with regard to radiographic analysis of surgical corridors for SI-screw placement, with female trauma patients (n = 99 having significantly narrower corridors at S1 and S2 in all evaluated planes (axial, coronal, sagittal, compared to male counterparts (n = 245; P P = 0.06, implying S2 as a safe surgical corridor of choice in patients with sacral dysmorphia. Conclusions These findings emphasize a high prevalence of sacral dysmorphia in a representative trauma population and imply a higher risk of SI-screw misplacement in female patients

  12. Ball Screw Actuator Including an Axial Soft Stop

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Forrest, Steven Talbert (Inventor); Abel, Steve (Inventor); Woessner, George (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An actuator includes an actuator housing, a ball screw, and an axial soft stop assembly. The ball screw extends through the actuator housing and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw is coupled to receive a drive force and is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively move in a retract direction and an extend direction. The axial soft stop assembly is disposed within the actuator housing. The axial soft stop assembly is configured to be selectively engaged by the ball screw and, upon being engaged thereby, to translate, with compliance, a predetermined distance in the extend direction, and to prevent further movement of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  13. On Helical Projection and Its Application in Screw Modeling

    Riliang Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As helical surfaces, in their many and varied forms, are finding more and more applications in engineering, new approaches to their efficient design and manufacture are desired. To that end, the helical projection method that uses curvilinear projection lines to map a space object to a plane is examined in this paper, focusing on its mathematical model and characteristics in terms of graphical representation of helical objects. A number of interesting projective properties are identified in regard to straight lines, curves, and planes, and then the method is further investigated with respect to screws. The result shows that the helical projection of a cylindrical screw turns out to be a Jordan curve, which is determined by the screw's axial profile and number of flights. Based on the projection theory, a practical approach to the modeling of screws and helical surfaces is proposed and illustrated with examples, and its possible application in screw manufacturing is discussed.

  14. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Screw dislocations of laser speckle fields in interferograms with a circular line structure

    Bobrov, B. D.

    1991-07-01

    Experimental results are used to show that circular interferograms are of interest in studies of screw dislocations of speckle-distorted laser beams because of a close correspondence between the symmetry of these interferograms and defects. The presence of dislocations transforms a system of the usual rings into a split network. Typical structure elements of such interferograms are right- and left-handed spirals connecting singular points of dislocations. Spiral fragments can be used in the diagnostics of dislocations regarded as independent defects. A method is suggested for the formation of highly directed optical beams with a low level of the usual aberrations, but with a complex phase surface topology. Screw dislocations are shown to be a natural analog of helical waves known in optics and capable of deliberate generation.

  15. The Analysis of Soil Resistance During Screw Displacement Pile Installation

    Krasinski, Adam

    2015-02-01

    The application of screw displacement piles (SDP) is still increasing due to their high efficiency and many advantages. However, one technological problem is a serious disadvantage of those piles. It relates to the generation of very high soil resistance during screw auger penetration, especially when piles are installed in non-cohesive soils. In many situations this problem causes difficulties in creating piles of designed length and diameter. It is necessary to find a proper method for prediction of soil resistance during screw pile installation. The analysis of screw resistances based on model and field tests is presented in the paper. The investigations were carried out as part of research project, financed by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education. As a result of tests and analyses the empirical method for prediction of rotation resistance (torque) during screw auger penetration in non-cohesive subsoil based on CPT is proposed.

  16. The Analysis of Soil Resistance During Screw Displacement Pile Installation

    Krasinski Adam

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The application of screw displacement piles (SDP is still increasing due to their high efficiency and many advantages. However, one technological problem is a serious disadvantage of those piles. It relates to the generation of very high soil resistance during screw auger penetration, especially when piles are installed in non-cohesive soils. In many situations this problem causes difficulties in creating piles of designed length and diameter. It is necessary to find a proper method for prediction of soil resistance during screw pile installation. The analysis of screw resistances based on model and field tests is presented in the paper. The investigations were carried out as part of research project, financed by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education. As a result of tests and analyses the empirical method for prediction of rotation resistance (torque during screw auger penetration in non-cohesive subsoil based on CPT is proposed.

  17. Comparison of the Pullout Strength of Different Pedicle Screw Designs and Augmentation Techniques in an Osteoporotic Bone Model.

    Kiyak, Gorkem; Balikci, Tevfik; Heydar, Ahmed Majid; Bezer, Murat

    2018-02-01

    Mechanical study. To compare the pullout strength of different screw designs and augmentation techniques in an osteoporotic bone model. Adequate bone screw pullout strength is a common problem among osteoporotic patients. Various screw designs and augmentation techniques have been developed to improve the biomechanical characteristics of the bone-screw interface. Polyurethane blocks were used to mimic human osteoporotic cancellous bone, and six different screw designs were tested. Five standard and expandable screws without augmentation, eight expandable screws with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or calcium phosphate augmentation, and distal cannulated screws with PMMA and calcium phosphate augmentation were tested. Mechanical tests were performed on 10 unused new screws of each group. Screws with or without augmentation were inserted in a block that was held in a fixture frame, and a longitudinal extraction force was applied to the screw head at a loading rate of 5 mm/min. Maximum load was recorded in a load displacement curve. The peak pullout force of all tested screws with or without augmentation was significantly greater than that of the standard pedicle screw. The greatest pullout force was observed with 40-mm expandable pedicle screws with four fins and PMMA augmentation. Augmented distal cannulated screws did not have a greater peak pullout force than nonaugmented expandable screws. PMMA augmentation provided a greater peak pullout force than calcium phosphate augmentation. Expandable pedicle screws had greater peak pullout forces than standard pedicle screws and had the advantage of augmentation with either PMMA or calcium phosphate cement. Although calcium phosphate cement is biodegradable, osteoconductive, and nonexothermic, PMMA provided a significantly greater peak pullout force. PMMA-augmented expandable 40-mm four-fin pedicle screws had the greatest peak pullout force.

  18. Myiasis by Screw Worm Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a Wild Maned Wolf Chrysocyon brachyurus (Mammalia: Canidae), in Brasília, Brazil

    Cansi, ER; Bonorino, R; Ataíde, HS; Pujol-Luz, JR

    2011-01-01

    In April 2009, a wild maned wolf, Chrysocyon brachyurus, was captured in an area of cerrado in Brasília, DF, Brazil, with screw worm maggots in external wounds. Fifty larvae were bred in the laboratory and eight adults of Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) emerged 10 days after pupation. This is the first report of a myiasis by C. hominivorax in a free-living maned wolf in Brazil.

  19. Myiasis by screw worm Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a wild maned wolf Chrysocyon brachyurus (Mammalia: Canidae), in Brasília, Brazil.

    Cansi, E R; Bonorino, R; Ataíde, H S; Pujol-Luz, J R

    2011-01-01

    In April 2009, a wild maned wolf, Chrysocyon brachyurus, was captured in an area of cerrado in Brasília, DF, Brazil, with screw worm maggots in external wounds. Fifty larvae were bred in the laboratory and eight adults of Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) emerged 10 days after pupation. This is the first report of a myiasis by C. hominivorax in a free-living maned wolf in Brazil.

  20. Effect of Stiffness of Rolling Joints on the Dynamic Characteristic of Ball Screw Feed Systems in a Milling Machine

    Dazhong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic characteristic of ball screw feed system in a milling machine is studied numerically in this work. In order to avoid the difficulty in determining the stiffness of rolling joints theoretically, a dynamic modeling method for analyzing the feed system is discussed, and a stiffness calculation method of the rolling joints is proposed based on the Hertz contact theory. Taking a 3-axis computer numerical control (CNC milling machine set ermined as a research object, the stiffness of its fixed joint between the column and the body together with the stiffness parameters of the rolling joints is evaluated according to the Takashi Yoshimura method. Then, a finite element (FE model is established for the machine tool. The correctness of the FE model and the stiffness calculation method of the rolling joints are validated by theoretical and experimental modal analysis results of the machine tool’s workbench. Under the two modeling methods of joints incorporating the stiffness parameters and rigid connection, a theoretical modal analysis is conducted for the CNC milling machine. The natural frequencies and modal shapes reveal that the joints’ dynamic characteristic has an important influence on the dynamic performance of a whole machine tool, especially for the case with natural frequency and higher modes.

  1. A Novel Sensing Circuit with Large Sensing Margin for Embedded Spin-Transfer Torque MRAMs

    Bagheriye, Leila; Toofan, Siroos; Saeidi, Roghayeh

    -disturbance and high yield. In this paper, to deal with the read reliability challenge, a high sensing margin sensing circuit with strong positive feedback is proposed. It improves the sensing margin (SM) by 10.42X/3.3X and a with 1.24X/1.59X lower read energy at iso-sensing time (2ns) in comparison...

  2. The Impact of Nitinol Staples on the Compressive Forces, Contact Area, and Mechanical Properties in Comparison to a Claw Plate and Crossed Screws for the First Tarsometatarsal Arthrodesis.

    Aiyer, Amiethab; Russell, Nicholas A; Pelletier, Matthew H; Myerson, Mark; Walsh, William R

    2016-06-01

    Background The optimal fixation method for the first tarsometatarsal arthrodesis remains controversial. This study aimed to develop a reproducible first tarsometatarsal testing model to evaluate the biomechanical performance of different reconstruction techniques. Methods Crossed screws or a claw plate were compared with a single or double shape memory alloy staple configuration in 20 Sawbones models. Constructs were mechanically tested in 4-point bending to 1, 2, and 3 mm of plantar displacement. The joint contact force and area were measured at time zero, and following 1 and 2 mm of bending. Peak load, stiffness, and plantar gapping were determined. Results Both staple configurations induced a significantly greater contact force and area across the arthrodesis than the crossed screw and claw plate constructs at all measurements. The staple constructs completely recovered their plantar gapping following each test. The claw plate generated the least contact force and area at the joint interface and had significantly greater plantar gapping than all other constructs. The crossed screw constructs were significantly stiffer and had significantly less plantar gapping than the other constructs, but this gapping was not recoverable. Conclusions Crossed screw fixation provides a rigid arthrodesis with limited compression and contact footprint across the joint. Shape memory alloy staples afford dynamic fixation with sustained compression across the arthrodesis. A rigid polyurethane foam model provides an anatomically relevant comparison for evaluating the interface between different fixation techniques. Clinical Relevance The dynamic nature of shape memory alloy staples offers the potential to permit early weight bearing and could be a useful adjunctive device to impart compression across an arthrodesis of the first tarsometatarsal joint. Therapeutic, Level V: Bench testing. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. Correlation between femoral offset loss and dynamic hip screw cut-out complications after pertrochanteric fractures: a case-control study.

    Boukebous, Baptiste; Guillon, Pascal; Vandenbussche, Eric; Rousseau, Marc Antoine

    2018-04-27

    Screw-plates disassembly incidence after pertrochanteric fracture (PF) amounts to 1 and 16% among the elderly population. The main occurrence is early cervical screw cut-out. The population at highest risk of disassembly remains difficult to identify. The correlation between femoral offset loss and disassembly occurrence has never been surveyed. A radiological prognosis score for screw plate disassembly was defined to reflect trochanteric impaction (TI); it was based on a femoral offset ratio. Our single-centre retrospective case-control study surveyed patients suffering from Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS, Synthes ® ) disassembly following osteosynthesis of non-pathological osteoporotic PF between 2004 and 2014. All cases were categorised by age and gender and paired to three patients in the control group. The primary endpoint was TI measurement, corresponding to offset loss on the operated hip compared to healthy hip offset and expressed as a percentage. The measurement was done on an immediate postoperative X-ray. The secondary endpoints were tip apex distance (TAD) measurement, Ender and AO classifications, as well as postoperative weight-bearing prescription. Twenty-three cases and 69 controls were surveyed. The case group's average age was 87; 70% of the cases were women. The main disassembly occurrence delay was after 27 days. Average TI was 26% within the patients global group and 12% within the control group (p  21%. Using the offset ratio tool, TI measurement was associated with a greater risk of DHS disassembly when it was higher than 21%. The exclusive use of a DHS device does not seem optimal for a TI > 21%. Weight-bearing may be prescribed for all the patients with a TI < 21%, provided good implant positioning is secured.

  4. Surgical results of a one-stage combined anterior lumbosacral fusion and posterior percutaneous pedicle screw fixation

    Chien-Yuan Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Lumbosacral fusion through either an anterior or a posterior approach to achieve good lordosis and stability is always a challenging surgical operation and is often accompanied by a higher rate of pseudarthrosis than when other lumbar segments are involved. This study evaluated the clinical and radiological results of lumbosacral fusions achieved through a combined anterior and posterior approach. Materials and Methods: From June 2008 to 2012, 20 patients who had L5–S1 instability and stenosis were consecutively treated, first by anterior interbody fusion using an allogenous strut bone graft through the pararectus approach and then by posterior pedicle screw fixation. A minimum of 1-year of clinical and radiological follow-up was conducted. Intraoperative blood loss, surgical time, and any surgery-related complications were recorded. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS and the patient's Oswestry Disability Index (ODI score. After 1 year, radiological outcomes were assessed by analyzing pelvic incidence, lumbar lordosis, and segmental lordosis using static plain films, while fusion stability was assessed using dynamic plain films. Results: The mean operative time and blood loss were 215 min and 325 cc, respectively. After 1 year, the VAS and ODI scores had significantly improved, and stable fusion with good lordotic curvature was obtained in all cases. Conclusion: The surgical results of the combined procedure are satisfactory in terms of the functional and radiological outcomes. Our method offers advantages regarding both anterior fusion and posterior fixation.

  5. Internal bone transport using a cannulated screw as a mounting device in the treatment of a post-infective ulnar defect.

    Tsitskaris, Konstantinos; Havard, Heledd; Bijlsma, Paulien; Hill, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Bone transport techniques can be used to address the segmental bone loss occurring after debridement for infection. Secure fixation of the bone transport construct to the bone transport segment can be challenging, particularly if the bone is small and osteopenic. We report a case of a segmental ulnar bone defect in a young child treated with internal bone transport using a cannulated screw as the mounting device. We found this technique particularly useful in the treatment of bone loss secondary to infection, where previous treatment and prolonged immobilisation had led to osteopenia. This technique has not been previously reported.

  6. Multivariate statistical process control of a continuous pharmaceutical twin-screw granulation and fluid bed drying process.

    Silva, A F; Sarraguça, M C; Fonteyne, M; Vercruysse, J; De Leersnyder, F; Vanhoorne, V; Bostijn, N; Verstraeten, M; Vervaet, C; Remon, J P; De Beer, T; Lopes, J A

    2017-08-07

    A multivariate statistical process control (MSPC) strategy was developed for the monitoring of the ConsiGma™-25 continuous tablet manufacturing line. Thirty-five logged variables encompassing three major units, being a twin screw high shear granulator, a fluid bed dryer and a product control unit, were used to monitor the process. The MSPC strategy was based on principal component analysis of data acquired under normal operating conditions using a series of four process runs. Runs with imposed disturbances in the dryer air flow and temperature, in the granulator barrel temperature, speed and liquid mass flow and in the powder dosing unit mass flow were utilized to evaluate the model's monitoring performance. The impact of the imposed deviations to the process continuity was also evaluated using Hotelling's T 2 and Q residuals statistics control charts. The influence of the individual process variables was assessed by analyzing contribution plots at specific time points. Results show that the imposed disturbances were all detected in both control charts. Overall, the MSPC strategy was successfully developed and applied. Additionally, deviations not associated with the imposed changes were detected, mainly in the granulator barrel temperature control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment for Trochanteric Fracture of the Femur with Short Femoral Nail: A Comparison between the Asian Intramedullary Hip Screw (IMHS) and the Conventional IMHS.

    Kawaji, Hidemi; Uematsu, Takuya; Oba, Ryosuke; Satake, Yoshihiko; Hoshikawa, Naoya; Takai, Shinro

    2016-01-01

    We usually use short femoral nails for the treatment of trochanteric fracture of the femur. In this retrospective study, we investigated and compared the clinical results of the conventional intramedullary hip screw (IMHS) and the Asian IMHS, which is a redesigned version of the former. The subjects were 42 patients; 21 treated with the Asian IMHS and 21 were treated with the conventional IMHS. From the clinical records, we retrospectively investigated the patients' age, sex, in-hospital waiting period for operation, operating time, intraoperative blood loss, walking ability before fracture and at discharge, and complication pertaining to the operation. The 21 patients (4 men and 17 women) receiving the Asian IMHS and the 21 patients (5 men and 16 women) receiving the conventional IMHS did not differ significantly in mean age, sex ratio, preoperative waiting period, mean postoperative hospital stay, mean operation time, or mean intraoperative blood loss. Among patients receiving the Asian IMHS, the complications of intraoperative fractures of the femur developed in 3 patients and breakage of the implant occurred in 1 patient. No complications occurred in patients receiving the conventional IMHS. Compared with the conventional IMHS, the Asian IMHS is smaller, has increased variations in the shaft/neck angle of the lag screw, and has a titanium-alloy construction, allowing magnetic resonance imaging. The intraoperative fracture may have occurred because of the configuration of the distal interlocking screw in the Asian IMHS. Breakage of the implant likely occurred because the nail was too small in diameter, and too short in length for the unstable AO 31-A3 fracture. If careful attention is paid to the configuration of its distal interlocking screw intraoperatively and a nail of appropriate size is selected, the Asian IMHS is better suited than the conventional IMHS for treating Japanese patients, who generally have a small physique, because of its many variations in

  8. Complications of syndesmotic screw removal

    T. Schepers (Tim); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); M.R. de Vries (Mark); M. van der Elst (Maarten)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Currently, the metallic syndesmotic screw is the gold standard in the treatment of syndesmotic disruption. Whether or not this screw needs to be removed remains debatable. The aim of the current study was to determine the complications which occur following routine removal of

  9. Volumetric error modeling, identification and compensation based on screw theory for a large multi-axis propeller-measuring machine

    Zhong, Xuemin; Liu, Hongqi; Mao, Xinyong; Li, Bin; He, Songping; Peng, Fangyu

    2018-05-01

    Large multi-axis propeller-measuring machines have two types of geometric error, position-independent geometric errors (PIGEs) and position-dependent geometric errors (PDGEs), which both have significant effects on the volumetric error of the measuring tool relative to the worktable. This paper focuses on modeling, identifying and compensating for the volumetric error of the measuring machine. A volumetric error model in the base coordinate system is established based on screw theory considering all the geometric errors. In order to fully identify all the geometric error parameters, a new method for systematic measurement and identification is proposed. All the PIGEs of adjacent axes and the six PDGEs of the linear axes are identified with a laser tracker using the proposed model. Finally, a volumetric error compensation strategy is presented and an inverse kinematic solution for compensation is proposed. The final measuring and compensation experiments have further verified the efficiency and effectiveness of the measuring and identification method, indicating that the method can be used in volumetric error compensation for large machine tools.

  10. A new geometrical model for mixing of highly viscous fluids by combining two-blade and helical screw agitators

    Hadjeb Abdessalam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mixing processes are becoming today a huge concern for industrialists in various domains like the pharmaceutical production, oil refining, food industry and manufacture of cosmetic products especially when the processes are related to the mixing of highly viscous products. So the choice of a stirring system for this category of products or fluids must be rigorously examined before use because of the flows which are laminar in the most cases, something that is not good to obtain homogeneous particles or suspensions after the mixing operation. This CFD study allows developing a new geometrical model of mechanical agitator with high performance for mixing of highly viscous fluids. It consists of a combination of two bladed and helical screw agitators. The investigations of the flow structure generated in the vessel are made by using the computer code ANSYS CFX (version 13.0, which allows us to realize and test the effectiveness of the new stirrer on the resulting mixture and power consumption.

  11. Experimental analysis of the material degradation of PET on a co-rotating twin-screw extruder for varying vacuum pressures

    Herken, T.; Fecke, N.; Schöppner, V., E-mail: Tobias.Herken@ktp.uni-paderborn.de, E-mail: Nikolas.Fecke@ktp.uni-paderborn.de, E-mail: Volker.Schoeppner@ktp.uni-paderborn.de [KTP, University of Paderborn (Germany)

    2015-05-22

    Plastics, starting from inexpensive mass-produced articles to technical high-end applications, are being used in ever more areas of life. The main drivers are their flexible product properties and the resultant broad application possibilities. To be able to offer plastic products inexpensively and conserve the environment at the same time, more and more attention is being paid to plastics recycling. Polyethylene terephthalate – in short PET – is of particular significance here because of its frequent application in the film and packaging industry and its special material properties. The recycling of PET, however, can only be carried out a limited number of times because it’s processing necessarily results in both thermal and mechanical stresses on the material. This is the basis for the reactions at molecular level, which result in a shortening of the molecule chains (material degradation) and exert a negative effect on the product properties. The aim of this study is to identify the factors that influence the material degradation of PET in twin-screw extrusion. To do this, various screw configurations and different speed and throughput conditions are examined in a series of experiments. Furthermore, material specimens are removed along the length of the screw in order to evaluate the influence of individual screw sections. By determining the intrinsic viscosity of the specimens, it is possible to measure the mean molecular weight and thus the material damage. Based on the test results, guidelines are drawn up for the compounding of PET so as to ensure as little damage as possible to the material.

  12. Experimental analysis of the material degradation of PET on a co-rotating twin-screw extruder for varying vacuum pressures

    Herken, T.; Fecke, N.; Schöppner, V.

    2015-01-01

    Plastics, starting from inexpensive mass-produced articles to technical high-end applications, are being used in ever more areas of life. The main drivers are their flexible product properties and the resultant broad application possibilities. To be able to offer plastic products inexpensively and conserve the environment at the same time, more and more attention is being paid to plastics recycling. Polyethylene terephthalate – in short PET – is of particular significance here because of its frequent application in the film and packaging industry and its special material properties. The recycling of PET, however, can only be carried out a limited number of times because it’s processing necessarily results in both thermal and mechanical stresses on the material. This is the basis for the reactions at molecular level, which result in a shortening of the molecule chains (material degradation) and exert a negative effect on the product properties. The aim of this study is to identify the factors that influence the material degradation of PET in twin-screw extrusion. To do this, various screw configurations and different speed and throughput conditions are examined in a series of experiments. Furthermore, material specimens are removed along the length of the screw in order to evaluate the influence of individual screw sections. By determining the intrinsic viscosity of the specimens, it is possible to measure the mean molecular weight and thus the material damage. Based on the test results, guidelines are drawn up for the compounding of PET so as to ensure as little damage as possible to the material

  13. Experimental analysis of the material degradation of PET on a co-rotating twin-screw extruder for varying vacuum pressures

    Herken, T.; Fecke, N.; Schöppner, V.

    2015-05-01

    Plastics, starting from inexpensive mass-produced articles to technical high-end applications, are being used in ever more areas of life. The main drivers are their flexible product properties and the resultant broad application possibilities. To be able to offer plastic products inexpensively and conserve the environment at the same time, more and more attention is being paid to plastics recycling. Polyethylene terephthalate - in short PET - is of particular significance here because of its frequent application in the film and packaging industry and its special material properties. The recycling of PET, however, can only be carried out a limited number of times because it's processing necessarily results in both thermal and mechanical stresses on the material. This is the basis for the reactions at molecular level, which result in a shortening of the molecule chains (material degradation) and exert a negative effect on the product properties. The aim of this study is to identify the factors that influence the material degradation of PET in twin-screw extrusion. To do this, various screw configurations and different speed and throughput conditions are examined in a series of experiments. Furthermore, material specimens are removed along the length of the screw in order to evaluate the influence of individual screw sections. By determining the intrinsic viscosity of the specimens, it is possible to measure the mean molecular weight and thus the material damage. Based on the test results, guidelines are drawn up for the compounding of PET so as to ensure as little damage as possible to the material.

  14. A measurement of deuterium neutral by the Balmer-series in the STP-2 high beta screw pinch tokamak

    Yamaguchi, S.; Hirano, K.

    1980-06-01

    The Balmer-alpha and beta are measured with a calibrated spectrograph in STP-2 screw pinch tokamak operated under the maximum toroidal field being 9.2 kG, peak plasma current 30 kA and filling pressure 5 mtorr. The electron temperature and density profiles are obtained by ruby laser Thomson scattering. It is shown that electron temperature is about 10 eV and density is of the order of 10 14 /cm 3 . A non-cylindrical symmetric Abel-inversion technique is used to deduce the emission coefficient profiles from that of the line intensity of the Balmer's. In the present parameter range the neutral deuterium density is almost equal to the population density of the ground state, so that it is obtainable from measured intensities of D sub(α) and D sub(β) which give the population densities of the upper levels i = 3 and 4. The Collisional Radiative (CR) model is applied to the rate equations to estimate the ground state population density. It is found that at 4 μsec from the start of the discharge the deuterium neutral density may be approximately 2 x 10 12 /cm 3 at the center of plasma and 2 x 10 14 /cm 3 at the periphery. These values may contain an error of about factor two. Time history of neutral deuterium density is consistent with the increase of plasma density. (author)

  15. Formation of stacking faults and the screw dislocation-driven growth: a case study of aluminum nitride nanowires.

    Meng, Fei; Estruga, Marc; Forticaux, Audrey; Morin, Stephen A; Wu, Qiang; Hu, Zheng; Jin, Song

    2013-12-23

    Stacking faults are an important class of crystal defects commonly observed in nanostructures of close packed crystal structures. They can bridge the transition between hexagonal wurtzite (WZ) and cubic zinc blende (ZB) phases, with the most known example represented by the "nanowire (NW) twinning superlattice". Understanding the formation mechanisms of stacking faults is crucial to better control them and thus enhance the capability of tailoring physical properties of nanomaterials through defect engineering. Here we provide a different perspective to the formation of stacking faults associated with the screw dislocation-driven growth mechanism of nanomaterials. With the use of NWs of WZ aluminum nitride (AlN) grown by a high-temperature nitridation method as the model system, dislocation-driven growth was first confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Meanwhile numerous stacking faults and associated partial dislocations were also observed and identified to be the Type I stacking faults and the Frank partial dislocations, respectively, using high-resolution TEM. In contrast, AlN NWs obtained by rapid quenching after growth displayed no stacking faults or partial dislocations; instead many of them had voids that were associated with the dislocation-driven growth. On the basis of these observations, we suggest a formation mechanism of stacking faults that originate from dislocation voids during the cooling process in the syntheses. Similar stacking fault features were also observed in other NWs with WZ structure, such as cadmium sulfide (CdS) and zinc oxide (ZnO).

  16. Definition of a safe zone for antegrade lag screw fixation of fracture of posterior column of the acetabulum by 3D technology.

    Feng, Xiaoreng; Zhang, Sheng; Luo, Qiang; Fang, Jintao; Lin, Chaowen; Leung, Frankie; Chen, Bin

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to define a safe zone for antegrade lag screw fixation of fracture of posterior column of the acetabulum using a novel 3D technology. Pelvic CT data of 59 human subjects were obtained to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) models. The transparency of 3D models was then downgraded along the axial perspective (the view perpendicular to the cross section of the posterior column axis) to find the largest translucent area. The outline of the largest translucent area was drawn on the iliac fossa. The line segments of OA, AB, OC, CD, the angles of OAB and OCD that delineate the safe zone (ABDC) were precisely measured. The resultant line segments OA, AB, OC, CD, and angles OAB and OCD were 28.46mm(13.15-44.97mm), 45.89mm (34.21-62.85mm), 36.34mm (18.68-55.56mm), 53.08mm (38.72-75.79mm), 37.44° (24.32-54.96°) and 55.78° (43.97-79.35°) respectively. This study demonstrates that computer-assisted 3D modelling techniques can aid in the precise definition of the safe zone for antegrade insertion of posterior column lag screws. A full-length lag screw can be inserted into the zone (ABDC), permitting a larger operational error. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Combined circular external fixation and open reduction internal fixation with pro-syndesmotic screws for repair of a diabetic ankle fracture

    Zacharia Facaros

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The surgical management of ankle fractures among the diabetic population is associated with higher complication rates compared to the general population. Efforts toward development of better methods in prevention and treatment are continuously evolving for these injuries. The presence of peripheral neuropathy and the possible development of Charcot neuroarthropathy in this high risk patient population have stimulated much surgical interest to create more stable osseous constructs when open reduction of an ankle fracture/dislocation is required. The utilization of multiple syndesmotic screws (pro-syndesmotic screws to further stabilize the ankle mortise has been reported by many foot and ankle surgeons. In addition, transarticular Steinmann pins have been described as an adjunct to traditional open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF of the ankle to better stabilize the talus, thus minimizing risk of further displacement, malunion, and Charcot neuroarthropathy. The authors present a unique technique of ORIF with pro-syndesmotic screws and the application of a multi-plane circular external fixator for management of a neglected diabetic ankle fracture that prevented further deformity while allowing a weight-bearing status. This technique may be utilized for the management of complex diabetic ankle fractures that are prone to future complications and possible limb loss.

  18. Clinical evaluation of immediate loading of electroeroded screw-retained titanium fixed prostheses supported by tilted implant: a multicenter retrospective study.

    Acocella, Alessandro; Ercoli, Carlo; Geminiani, Alessandro; Feng, Changyong; Billi, Mauro; Acocella, Gabriele; Giannini, Domenico; Sacco, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    Immediate occlusal loading of dental implants in the edentulous mandible has proven to be an effective, reliable, and predictable treatment protocol. However, there is limited long-term data available in the literature, when an electroeroded definitive cast-titanium fixed prosthesis is used for this treatment protocol. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of dental implants (Astra Tech Dental, Mölndal, Sweden) in the edentulous mandible immediately loaded with an electroeroded cast-titanium screw-retained fixed prosthesis. Forty-five patients received five implants each in the interforaminal area. All the implants were inserted with torque up to 40 Ncm and the distal implants were distally tilted approximately 20 to 30 degrees to minimize the length of posterior cantilevers. Implants were loaded within 48 hours of placement with an acrylic resin-titanium screw-retained prosthesis fabricated by electroerosion. Two of the 225 inserted implants failed after 3 and 16 months of healing, respectively, with a cumulative survival rate of 99.1% and a prosthetic survival rate of 97.8%. Immediate loading of tilted dental implants inserted in the edentulous mandible with a screw-retained titanium definitive prosthesis fabricated with electrical discharge machining provide reliable and predictable results. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effect of feed moisture, extrusion temperature and screw speed on properties of soy white flakes based aquafeed: a response surface analysis.

    Singh, Sushil K; Muthukumarappan, Kasiviswanathan

    2016-04-01

    Soy white flakes (SWF) is an intermediate product during soy bean processing. It is an untoasted inexpensive product and contains around 51% of crude protein. It can be a potential source of protein to replace fish meal for developing aquafeed. The extrusion process is versatile and is used for the development of aquafeed. Our objective was to study the effects of inclusion of SWF (up to 50%) and other extrusion processing parameters such as barrel temperature and screw speed on the properties of aquafeed extrudates using a single-screw extruder. Extrudate properties, including pellet durability index, bulk density, water absorption and solubility indices and mass flow rate, were significantly (P < 0.05) affected by the process variables. SWF was the most significant variable with quadratic effects on most of the properties. Increasing temperature and screw speed resulted in increase in durability and mass flow rate of extrudates. Response surface regression models were established to correlate the properties of extrudates to the process variables. SWF was used as an alternative protein source of fish meal. Our study shows that aquafeed with high durability, lower bulk density and lower water absorption and higher solubility indices can be obtained by adding SWF up to 40%. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Interpretative commenting.

    Vasikaran, Samuel

    2008-08-01

    * Clinical laboratories should be able to offer interpretation of the results they produce. * At a minimum, contact details for interpretative advice should be available on laboratory reports.Interpretative comments may be verbal or written and printed. * Printed comments on reports should be offered judiciously, only where they would add value; no comment preferred to inappropriate or dangerous comment. * Interpretation should be based on locally agreed or nationally recognised clinical guidelines where available. * Standard tied comments ("canned" comments) can have some limited use.Individualised narrative comments may be particularly useful in the case of tests that are new, complex or unfamiliar to the requesting clinicians and where clinical details are available. * Interpretative commenting should only be provided by appropriately trained and credentialed personnel. * Audit of comments and continued professional development of personnel providing them are important for quality assurance.

  1. Project THEMIS: A Center for Remote Sensing.

    This report summarizes the technical work accomplished under Project THEMIS, A Center for Remote Sensing at the University of Kansas during the...period 16 September 1967 through 15 September 1973. The highlights of the four major areas forming the remote sensing system are presented. A detailed description of the latest radar spectrometer results is presented.

  2. Comment

    1972-01-01

    Our opening article in this issue celebrates the first operation, on 1 March, of the proton synchrotron at the National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, at its design energy of 200 GeV. The article gives a short description of the machine and some of its building and commissioning story. It is a great achievement to reach the highest energy in the world from a particle accelerator and NAL have done it in a style which is all their own.

  3. Sacroiliac screw fixation for tile B fractures.

    Bosch, E.W. van den; Zwienen, C.M. van; Hoek van Dijke, G.A.; Snijders, C.J.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this comparative cadaveric study was to investigate whether the stability of partially unstable pelvic fractures can be improved by combining plate fixation of the symphysis with a posterior sacroiliac screw. METHODS: In six specimens, a Tile B1 (open-book) pelvic fracture

  4. Comment

    Wasawo, David

    1973-01-01

    Presents a discussion showing that scientific development and technological innovation is feasible in sub-Saharan Africa. Stresses need for meaningful science education for pre-primary through adult levels as well as need for such organizations as the Organization of African Unity to formulate scientific and technological policy continent-wide.…

  5. Comment

    2001-03-01

    Virtual reality - whose reality? There is an old joke about a farmer who wanted to improve his milk yields and employed an engineer, a psychologist and a physicist to make suggestions. They all went away for a month and came back with their proposals. The engineer had measured the size of the milking stalls, the ambient temperature and the milking process. She suggested a modest rise in ambient temperature and an alteration in the pumping equipment. The psychologist decided to paint the stalls green and play a tape-recording of birdsong to the cows to make them feel more content and release their milk more easily. The physicist explained that he had decided to look at things more fundamentally: 'Let us assume that the cow is a sphere' ... he began. And that's the joke. Some people think that this is the funniest thing out - a physicist can't recognize a cow when they see one. What troubles me is that I didn't get the joke straight away. I am so used to the language and the often-ludicrous assumptions in physics that it did not seem particularly strange or funny. What did you think? The joke, for me, illustrates the essence of our problem in physics teaching. In a very real way, physics is about another world. It isn't about the real world in which ordinary people live, and they know it. Physics has its own language, its own laws and its own values. Depleted uranium has been in the news of late. It is interesting to compare the casual way in which physics teachers have discussed the possibilitiy that one atom of uranium can kill someone with the shock-horror reporting of this fact in the press. We are caricatured, sometimes for good reason, being callous, calculating, cold people - out of touch with the things that really matter. And then there's that other 'real world' - of really tough people who make serious money. Our friends who work out in the worlds of commerce and industry like to mutter, with some superiority, that teachers would never survive in the real

  6. Force-Sensing Actuator with a Compliant Flexure-Type Joint for a Robotic Manipulator

    Mathieu Grossard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the mechatronic design of a novel self-sensing motor-to-joint transmission to be used for the actuation of robotic dexterous manipulators. Backdrivability, mechanical simplicity and efficient flexure joint structures are key concepts that have guided the mechanical design rationale to provide the actuator with force sensing capabilities. Indeed, a self-sensing characteristic is achieved by the specific design of high-resolution cable-driven actuators based on a DC motor, a ball-screw and a monolithic compliant anti-rotation system together with a novel flexure pivot providing a frictionless mechanical structure. That novel compliant pivot with a large angular range and a small center shift has been conceived of to provide the inter-phalangeal rotational degree of freedom of the fingers’ joints to be used for integration in a multi-fingered robotic gripper. Simultaneously, it helps to remove friction at the joint level of the mechanism. Experimental tests carried out on a prototype show an accurate matching between the model and the real behavior. Overall, this mechatronic design contributes to the improvement of the manipulation skills of robotic grippers, thanks to the combination of high performance mechanics, high sensitivity to external forces and compliance control capability.

  7. Use of computed tomography to define a sacral safe corridor for placement of 2.7 mm cortical screws in feline sacroiliac luxation.

    Philp, Helen; Durand, Alexane; De Vicente, Felipe

    2018-06-01

    Objectives This study aimed to define a safe corridor for 2.7 mm cortical sacroiliac screw insertion in the dorsal plane (craniocaudal direction) using radiography and CT, and in the transverse plane (dorsoventral direction) using CT in feline cadavers. A further aim was to compare the values obtained by CT with those previously reported by radiography in the transverse plane. Methods Thirteen pelvises were retrieved from feline cadavers and dissected to expose one of the articular surfaces of the sacrum. A 2.7 mm screw was placed in the sacrum to a depth of approximately 1 cm in each exposed articular surface. Dorsoventral radiography and CT scanning of each specimen were performed. Multiplanar reconstructions were performed to allow CT evaluation in both the dorsal and transverse planes. Calculations were made to find the maximum, minimum and optimum angles for screw placement in craniocaudal (radiography and CT) and dorsoventral (CT) directions when using a 2.7 mm cortical screw. Results Radiographic measurement showed a mean optimum craniocaudal angle of 106° (range 97-112°). The mean minimum angle was 95° (range 87-107°), whereas the mean maximum angle was 117° (108-124°). Measurement of the dorsal CT scan images showed a mean optimum craniocaudal angle of 101° (range 94-110°). The mean minimum angle was 90° (range 83-99°), whereas the mean maximum angle was 113° (104-125°). The transverse CT scan images showed a mean dorsoventral minimum angle of 103° (range 95-113°), mean maximum angle of 115° (104-125°) and mean optimum dorsoventral angle of 111° (102-119°). Conclusions and relevance An optimum craniocaudal angle of 101° is recommended for 2.7 mm cortical screw placement in the feline sacral body, with a safety margin between 99° and 104°. No single angle can be recommended in the dorsoventral direction and therefore preoperative measuring on individual cats using CT images is recommended to establish the ideal individual angle in the

  8. A biomechanical comparison of headless tapered variable pitch compression and ao cortical bone screws for fixation of a simulated midbody transverse fracture of the proximal sesamoid bone in horses.

    Eddy, Alison L; Galuppo, Larry D; Stover, Susan M; Taylor, Kenneth T; Jensen, David G

    2004-01-01

    To compare mechanical properties and failure characteristics of 2 methods of fixation for repair of a transverse, midbody fracture of the proximal sesamoid bone (PSB): 4.5-mm AO cortical bone screw (AO) placed in lag fashion and 4/5-mm Acutrak (AT) self-compressing screw. An in vitro biomechanical evaluation of intact forelimb preparations and forelimb preparations with a simulated midbody PSB fracture stabilized by a bone screw. Sixteen paired and 8 unilateral cadaveric equine forelimbs. A midbody transverse osteotomy was created in the medial PSB of bilateral forelimbs of 8 equine cadavers. The osteotomized PSB in 1 forelimb from each cadaver was repaired with an AO screw. The osteotomized PSB in each contralateral limb was repaired with an AT screw. Eight unilateral intact control limbs were also studied. Mechanical properties were determined from axial compression, single cycle to failure, load-deformation curves. Failure characteristics were determined by evaluation of video images and radiographs. No statistically significant differences were found between repair groups. Both AO and AT groups had significantly lower mechanical properties than intact limbs except for stiffness. AO and AT constructs were mechanically comparable when used to stabilize a simulated midbody fracture of the medial PSB. Both constructs were mechanically inferior to intact limbs. Clinical Relevance- The AT screw should be considered for clinical use because of the potential for less soft tissue impingement and superior biocompatibility compared with the stainless-steel AO screw. However, postoperative external coaptation is necessary to augment initial fracture stability for either fixation method, and to maintain a standing metacarpophalangeal joint dorsiflexion angle between 150 degrees and 155 degrees.

  9. Comment.

    Cossey, D

    1993-01-01

    In the UK, the Chairwoman of the Family Planning Association (FPA) praises the staff and volunteers with whom she has worked for their incessant inability to meet the many challenges they face. During her 6 years, however, the FPA had to reduce the number of regional offices and staff. It did not need to reduce salaries, however. FPA membership directly elects the National Executive Council which is now smaller. FPA is exploring new sources of funding and is adapting to the purchaser/provider relationship in the statutory sector, resulting in its successful financial strategy. The Department of Health helps in maintaining FPA's ability to continue to operate. The Chairwoman sees indications of needing to fight old battles again, e.g., some officials have suggested limiting the range of oral contraceptives available from prescription by the National Health Services (NHS) which would be the end of almost 20 years of free contraception and free choice under the NHS. The government is not open to including sex education the school curriculum. The NHS gives the impression in its report "The Health of the Nation" that it is committed to reducing adolescent pregnancies among the youngest teenagers and to recognizing the importance of good policies on sexual health. Yet, its actions exhibit no compassion for single parents. Participants at FPA's 1992 conference agree that variety, quality, and sensitivity of family planning provisions are needed and that family planning clinics and general practitioners should work together. FPA has contributed to the UK the clinic network; the concept of family planning being an integral part of a comprehensive health service; and the notion that family planning includes contraception, empowerment of women, sexual health, rights, and responsibilities. FPA should reaffirm these ideas and secure the future for informed choice and planned pregnancy.

  10. Confronting Prejudiced Comments: Effectiveness of a Role-Playing Exercise

    Lawson, Timothy J.; McDonough, Tracy A.; Bodle, James H.

    2010-01-01

    We examined whether a role-playing exercise, similar to that developed by Plous (2000), increases students' ability to generate effective responses to prejudiced comments. We assessed social psychology students' (n = 23) ability to respond to prejudiced comments before and after the exercise, and compared their performance to that of 2 other…

  11. Enhancement of Orthodontic Anchor Screw Stability Under Immediate Loading by Ultraviolet Photofunctionalization Technology.

    Takahashi, Maiko; Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Inaba, Mizuki; Hagiwara, Yoshiyuki; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    Ultraviolet (UV)-mediated photofunctionalization technology is intended to enhance the osseointegration capability of titanium implants. There are concerns about orthodontic anchor screws loosening under immediate loading protocols in adolescent orthodontic treatment. The purpose of this in vivo study was to evaluate the effects of photofunctionalization on the intrabony stability of orthodontic titanium anchor screws and bone-anchor screw contact under immediate loading in growing rats. Custom-made titanium anchor screws (1.4 mm in diameter and 4.0 mm in length) with or without photofunctionalization pretreatment were placed on the proximal epiphysis of the tibial bone in 6-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats and were loaded immediately after placement. After 2 weeks of loading, the stability of the anchor screws was evaluated using a Periotest device, and the bone-anchor screw contact ratio (BSC) was assessed by a histomorphometric analysis using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. In the unloaded group, Periotest values (PTVs) were ~25 for UV-untreated screws and 13 for UVtreated screws (P < .01), while in the immediate-loading group, PTVs were 28 for UV-untreated screws and 16 for UV-treated screws (P < .05). Significantly less screw mobility was observed in both UV-treated groups regardless of the loading protocol. The BSC was increased ~1.8 fold for UV-treated screws, compared with UV-untreated screws, regardless of the loading protocol. Photofunctionalization enhanced the intrabony stability of orthodontic anchor screws under immediate loading in growing rats by increasing bone-anchor screw contact.

  12. Experiments on screw-pinch plasmas with elongated cross section

    Lassing, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis experiments are described carried out with SPICA II, a toroidal screw-pinch plasma device. this device is the last one in a series of plasma machines of the toroidal screw-pinch differing from its predecessor in its race-track shaped section. In devices of the type toroidal screw-pinch stable confinement is possible of plasmas with larger β values than in a tokamak discharge. In a pinch the plasma is screwed up, during the formation, in such a way that in a relatively small volume a plasma is formated with a high pressure. During the screwing up the plasma is heated by shock heating as well as adiabatic compression. With the modified snowplow model the density and temperature after the formation can be calculated, starting from the initial conditions. When all ions arrive into the plasma column, the density in the column is determined by the volume compression. First purpose of the experiments was to find a stable discharge. Subsequently discharges have been made with a high as possible β in order to investigate at which maximum β it is possible to confine screw-pinch plasmas stably. When these had been found, the nature and importance could be investigated of the processes following which the screw-pinch plasma looses its energy. (author), 75 res.; 95 figs.; 8 tabs

  13. Screw-released roller brake

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A screw-released roller brake including an input drive assembly, an output drive assembly, a plurality of locking sprags, a mechanical tripper nut for unlocking the sprags, and a casing therefor. The sprags consist of three dimensional (3-D) sprag members having pairs of contact surface regions which engage respective pairs of contact surface regions included in angular grooves or slots formed in the casing and the output drive assembly. The sprags operate to lock the output drive assembly to the casing to prevent rotation thereof in an idle mode of operation. In a drive mode of operation, the tripper is either self actuated or motor driven and is translated linearly up and down against a spline and at the limit of its travel rotates the sprags which unlock while coupling the input drive assembly to the output drive assembly so as to impart a turning motion thereto in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

  14. C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation for atlantoaxial instability due to rheumatoid arthritis: a seven-year analysis of outcome.

    Nagaria, Jabir

    2009-12-15

    STUDY DESIGN.: Observational study. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. OBJECTIVE.: The purpose of this article was to report long-term (minimum 7 years) clinical and radiologic outcome of our series of patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis who underwent transarticular screw fixation to treat atlantoaxial subluxation. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: The indications for intervention in patients with atlantoaxial instability are pain, myelopathy, and progressive neurologic deficit. The various treatment options available for these patients are isolated C1-C2 fusion, occipitocervical fusion with or without transoral surgery. Review of current literature suggests that C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation has significant functional benefits, although there is discrepancy in this literature regarding improvement in function following surgery. METHODS.: Myelopathy was assessed using Ranawat myelopathy score and Myelopathy Disability Index. Pain scores were assessed using Visual Analogue Scale. The radiologic imaging was assessed and the following data were extracted; atlanto-dens interval, space available for cord, presence of signal change on T2 weighted image, and fusion rates. RESULTS.: Thirty-seven patients, median age 56, were included in the study. Average duration of neck symptoms was 15.8 months. Average duration of rheumatoid arthritis before surgery was 20.6 years. Preoperative symptoms: suboccipital pain in 26 patients; neck pain, 32; myelopathy, 22; and 5 were asymptomatic. After surgery: suboccipital pain, 2; neck pain, 3; and myelopathy, 10. Ninety percent patients with neck and suboccipital pain improved after surgery in their Visual Analogue pain scores, with all of them having >50% improvement in VAS scores (6.94-2.12 [P < 0.05]).Preoperative Ranawat grade was as follows: grade 1 in 15 patients, grade 2 in 7, and grade 3a in 14, grade 3b in 1.After surgery: grade 1 in 27 patients, grade 2 in 7, grade 3a in 1, and grade 3b in 2. The mean

  15. Scapula fracture incidence in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty using screws above or below metaglene central cage: clinical and biomechanical outcomes.

    Kennon, Justin C; Lu, Caroline; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Crosby, Lynn A

    2017-06-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) is a viable treatment option for rotator cuff tear arthropathy but carries a complication risk of scapular fracture. We hypothesized that using screws above the central glenoid axis for metaglene fixation creates a stress riser contributing to increased scapula fracture incidence. Clinical type III scapular fracture incidence was determined with screw placement correlation: superior screw vs. screws placed exclusively below the glenoid midpoint. Cadaveric RTSA biomechanical modeling was employed to analyze scapular fractures. We reviewed 318 single-surgeon single-implant RTSAs with screw correlation to identify type III scapular fractures. Seventeen cadaveric scapula specimens were matched for bone mineral density, metaglenes implanted, and fixation with 2 screw configurations: inferior screws alone (group 1 INF ) vs. inferior screws with one additional superior screw (group 2 SUP ). Biomechanical load to failure was analyzed. Of 206 patients, 9 (4.4%) from the superior screw group experienced scapula fractures (type III); 0 fractures (0/112; 0%) were identified in the inferior screw group. Biomechanically, superior screw constructs (group 2 SUP ) demonstrated significantly (P < .05) lower load to failure (1077 N vs. 1970 N) compared with constructs with no superior screws (group 1 INF ). There was no significant age or bone mineral density discrepancy. Clinical scapular fracture incidence significantly decreased (P < .05) for patients with no screws placed above the central cage compared with patients with superior metaglene screws. Biomechanical modeling demonstrates significant construct compromise when screws are used above the central cage, fracturing at nearly half the ultimate load of the inferior screw constructs. We recommend use of inferior screws, all positioned below the central glenoid axis, unless necessary to stabilize the metaglene construct. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

  16. Process and remote device for unscrewing and extracting an assembly screw

    Lagarrigue, F.

    1990-01-01

    The device comprises a C-shaped frame, with two parallel arms and a joining section fixed at one end of a long support, an extraction screw engaged in a hole through one arm and having one end made of a centre punch directed towards the inside of the frame and a remote mean for screwed or unscrewed the extraction screw. A supporting and centering piece can also be fixed to the second branch of the frame. The screw is extracted by exerting a moment about the axis of the screw through the support and frame after tightening the extraction screw. This device can be used particularly for the unscrewing and the extraction of the screw of the springs of a nuclear fuel assembly [fr

  17. Influence of a Stone and a Screw in the Soil on Electrodialytic Remediation

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Henrik; Ribeiro, Alexandre B.

    1999-01-01

    It is common to find pieces of construction waste in abandoned industrial sites. Experimental work confirm that both metallic pieces and non-conducting pieces as e.g. a large stone will influence the electrodialytic remediation.......It is common to find pieces of construction waste in abandoned industrial sites. Experimental work confirm that both metallic pieces and non-conducting pieces as e.g. a large stone will influence the electrodialytic remediation....

  18. Occam paradox? A variation of tapia syndrome and an unreported complication of guidewire-assisted pedicle screw insertion.

    Emohare, Osa; Peterson, Erik; Slinkard, Nathaniel; Janus, Seth; Morgan, Robert

    2013-10-01

    Study Design Case report. Clinical Question The clinical aim is to report on a previously unknown association between guidewire-assisted pedicle screw insertion and neuropraxia of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), and how this may overlap with the signs of Tapia syndrome; we also report our approach to the clinical management of this patient. Methods A 17-year-old male patient with idiopathic scoliosis experienced Tapia syndrome after posterior instrumentation and arthrodesis at the level of T1-L1. After extubation, the patient had a hoarse voice and difficulty in swallowing. Imaging showed a breach in the cortex of the anterior body of T1 corresponding to the RLN on the right. Results Otolaryngological examination noted right vocal fold immobility, decreased sensation of the endolarynx, and pooling of secretions on flexible laryngoscopy that indicated right-sided cranial nerve X injury and left-sided tongue deviation. Aspiration during a modified barium swallow prompted insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube before the patient was sent home. On postoperative day 20, a barium swallow demonstrated reduced aspiration, and the patient reported complete resolution of symptoms. The feeding tube was removed, and the patient resumed a normal diet 1 month later. Tapia syndrome, or persistent unilateral laryngeal and hypoglossal paralysis, is an uncommon neuropraxia, which has previously not been observed in association with a breached vertebral body at T1 along the course of the RLN. Conclusion Tapia syndrome should be a differential diagnostic consideration whenever these symptoms persist postoperatively and spine surgeons should be aware of this as a potential complication of guidewires in spinal instrumentation.

  19. Keepin and Kats - a comment

    Kinderman, E.M.; Schumacher, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    We consider the arguments of Keepin and Kats that nuclear power and conservation are mutually exclusive methods of reducing CO 2 emissions from coal-fired electric power generation. In contrast to their approach, we suggest that a combination of nuclear power and conservation can reduce CO 2 . Nuclear power is appropriate and economic in some regions. The gradual introduction of equipment and techniques for improving the efficiency of electricity consumption will continue to be made and they will eventually reduce growth in electricity demand. Introducing about 600 GW of nuclear power in 35 years and efficiency improvements that reduce growth in world electricity demand by two-thirds (to an average of 1.5% per year) would hold CO 2 emissions from electric power production to levels similar to today's. (author)

  20. Sliding hip screw versus the Targon PFT nail for trochanteric hip fractures: a randomised trial of 400 patients.

    Parker, M J; Cawley, S

    2017-09-01

    To compare the outcomes for trochanteric fractures treated with a sliding hip screw (SHS) or a cephalomedullary nail. A total of 400 patients with a trochanteric hip fracture were randomised to receive a SHS or a cephalomedullary nail (Targon PFT). All surviving patients were followed up to one year from injury. Functional outcome was assessed by a research nurse blinded to the implant used. Recovery of mobility, as assessed by a mobility scale, was superior for those treated with the intramedullary nail compared with the SHS at eight weeks, three and nine months (p-values between 0.01 and 0.04), the difference at six and 12 months was not statistically significant (p = 0.15 and p = 0.18 respectively). The mean difference was around 0.4 points (0.3 to 0.5) on a nine point scale. Surgical time for the nail was four minutes less than that for the SHS (p Fracture healing complications were similar for the two groups. There were no statistically significant differences between implants for any other recorded outcomes including the need for post-operative blood transfusion, wound healing complications, general medical complications, hospital stay or mortality. This study confirms the findings of a previous study that both methods of treatment produce similar results, although intramedullary fixation does result in marginally improved regain of mobility in comparison with the SHS. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1210-15. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  1. Positioning of pedicle screws in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis using electromyography

    Bruno Moreira Gavassi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the occurrence of poor positioning of pedicle screws inserted with the aid of intraoperative electromyographic stimulation in the treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS.METHODS: This is a prospective observational study including all patients undergoing surgical treatment for AIS, between March and December 2013 at a single institution. All procedures were monitored by electromyography of the inserted pedicle screws. The position of the screws was evaluated by assessment of postoperative CT and classified according to the specific AIS classification system.RESULTS: Sixteen patients were included in the study, totalizing 281 instrumented pedicles (17.5 per patient. No patient had any neurological deficit or complaint after surgery. In the axial plane, 195 screws were found in ideal position (69.4% while in the sagittal plane, 226 screws were found in ideal position (80.4%. Considering both the axial and the sagittal planes, it was observed that 59.1% (166/281 of the screws did not violate any cortical wall.CONCLUSION: The use of pedicle screws proved to be a safe technique without causing neurological damage in AIS surgeries, even with the occurrence of poor positioning of some implants.

  2. Active latent heat storage with a screw heat exchanger - experimental results for heat transfer and concept for high pressure steam

    Zipf, Verena; Willert, Daniel; Neuhäuser, Anton

    2016-05-01

    An innovative active latent heat storage concept was invented and developed at Fraunhofer ISE. It uses a screw heat exchanger (SHE) for the phase change during the transport of a phase change material (PCM) from a cold to a hot tank or vice versa. This separates heat transfer and storage tank in comparison to existing concepts. A test rig has been built in order to investigate the heat transfer coefficients of the SHE during melting and crystallization of the PCM. The knowledge of these characteristics is crucial in order to assess the performance of the latent heat storage in a thermal system. The test rig contains a double shafted SHE, which is heated or cooled with thermal oil. The overall heat transfer coefficient U and the convective heat transfer coefficient on the PCM side hPCM both for charging and discharging have been calculated based on the measured data. For charging, the overall heat transfer coefficient in the tested SHE was Uch = 308 W/m2K and for discharging Udis = 210 W/m2K. Based on the values for hPCM the overall heat transfer coefficients for a larger SHE with steam as heat transfer fluid and an optimized geometry were calculated with Uch = 320 W/m2K for charging and Udis = 243 W/m2K for discharging. For pressures as high as p = 100 bar, an SHE concept has been developed, which uses an organic fluid inside the flight of the SHE as working media. With this concept, the SHE can also be deployed for very high pressure, e.g. as storage in solar thermal power plants.

  3. Mini-screws, a viable adjunct along with Incognito lingual appliance: A case series

    Wei Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Invisible orthodontics have been around for too long, and with the advent of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology appliances such as Incognito TM has made the whole treatment experience more pleasant and aesthetic. However, even in lingual orthodontics, biomechanics play the most important role, and the use of temporary anchorage devices (TADs has made the whole treatment more effective and efficient. This article focuses on cases where TADs in lingual appliances play a critical role in the treatment of various malocclusions.

  4. A bistable mechanism for directional sensing

    Beta, C; Amselem, G; Bodenschatz, E

    2008-01-01

    We present a generic mechanism for directional sensing in eukaryotic cells that is based on bistable dynamics. As the key feature of this modeling approach, the velocity of trigger waves in the bistable sensing system changes its sign across cells that are exposed to an external chemoattractant gradient. This is achieved by combining a two-component activator/inhibitor system with a bistable switch that induces an identical symmetry breaking for arbitrary gradient input signals. A simple kinetic example is designed to illustrate the dynamics of a bistable directional sensing mechanism in numerical simulations

  5. Economics of water injected air screw compressor systems

    Venu Madhav, K.; Kovačević, A.

    2015-08-01

    There is a growing need for compressed air free of entrained oil to be used in industry. In many cases it can be supplied by oil flooded screw compressors with multi stage filtration systems, or by oil free screw compressors. However, if water injected screw compressors can be made to operate reliably, they could be more efficient and therefore cheaper to operate. Unfortunately, to date, such machines have proved to be insufficiently reliable and not cost effective. This paper describes an investigation carried out to determine the current limitations of water injected screw compressor systems and how these could be overcome in the 15-315 kW power range and delivery pressures of 6-10 bar. Modern rotor profiles and approach to sealing and cooling allow reasonably inexpensive air end design. The prototype of the water injected screw compressor air system was built and tested for performance and reliability. The water injected compressor system was compared with the oil injected and oil free compressor systems of the equivalent size including the economic analysis based on the lifecycle costs. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that water injected screw compressor systems could be designed to deliver clean air free of oil contamination with a better user value proposition than the oil injected or oil free screw compressor systems over the considered range of operations.

  6. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF A CONICAL-SCREW BRIQUETTING MACHINE FOR THE BRIQUETTING OF CARBONIZED COTTON STALKS IN SUDAN

    YOUSIF A. ABAKR

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Briquetting of the carbonized agricultural residues represents one of the possible solutions to the local energy shortages in many developing countries. It constitutes a positive solution to the problem of increasing rates of desertification in many areas worldwide. Agricultural residues are not attractive as a household fuel source for urban areas because they are very bulky and have low energy intensity. Also, to eliminate the smoke generation when burning agricultural residues requires processing it by carbonization before being used as a house-hold indoor fuel. Previously investigated, briquetting machines lacked high productivity and were of complicated designs. The present study puts forward a machine of simple design which could be manufactured locally in Sudan and of much higher productivity. The local Sudanese briquetting experience was overviewed, studying all the alternative available options and the market potential. The study presents a detailed design study of the new briquetting machine. The prototype was made and tested in the field at Al-Gazeera area in Sudan. The investigation results show that the new machine has a production rate better than all the previous alternatives. This low pressure screw briquetting machine was found to have a production rate equivalent to about eight times better than the production rate of the best local competitor. The production cost was found to be lower due to the lower binder requirement for the new machine, which is lower by about 65%. The initial moisture content of the feed stock required for this machine is lower by about 30 % compared to the best alternative, which results in shorter drying time for the fuel briquettes produced. The quality of the produced briquettes was found to be better and of lower smoke generation when burned due to the lower binder content.

  7. The pullout performance of pedicle screws

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-01-01

    This brief book systematically discusses all subjects that affect the pullout strength of pedicle screws. These screws are used in spinal surgeries to stabilize the spine. The holding strength of the pedicle screw is vital since loosening of the pedicle screws can cause revision surgeries. Once the pedicle screw is pulled out, it is harder to obtain same stabilization for the fused vertebrae. The book reviews the effect of screw designs, application techniques, cement augmentation, coating of the screw and test conditions on the pullout strength. The studies with finite element analysis were also included.

  8. Fracture resistance of abutment screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone, and carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone

    Eduardo Aloisio Fleck NEUMANN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fractured abutment screws may be replaced; however, sometimes, the screw cannot be removed and the entire implant must be surgically removed and replaced. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of abutment retention screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone (PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK, using an external hexagonal implant/UCLA-type abutment interface assembly. UCLA-type abutments were fixed to implants using titanium screws (Group 1, polyetheretherketone (PEEK screws (Group 2, and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (Group 3. The assemblies were placed on a stainless steel holding apparatus to allow for loading at 45o off-axis, in a universal testing machine. A 200 N load (static load was applied at the central point of the abutment extremity, at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/minute, until failure. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey’s range test. The titanium screws had higher fracture resistance, compared with PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (p 0.05. Finally, visual analysis of the fractions revealed that 100% of them occurred at the neck of the abutment screw, suggesting that this is the weakest point of this unit. PEEK abutment screws have lower fracture resistance, in comparison with titanium abutment screws.

  9. Fracture resistance of abutment screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone, and carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone.

    Neumann, Eduardo Aloisio Fleck; Villar, Cristina Cunha; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Fractured abutment screws may be replaced; however, sometimes, the screw cannot be removed and the entire implant must be surgically removed and replaced. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of abutment retention screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK, using an external hexagonal implant/UCLA-type abutment interface assembly. UCLA-type abutments were fixed to implants using titanium screws (Group 1), polyetheretherketone (PEEK) screws (Group 2), and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (Group 3). The assemblies were placed on a stainless steel holding apparatus to allow for loading at 45o off-axis, in a universal testing machine. A 200 N load (static load) was applied at the central point of the abutment extremity, at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/minute, until failure. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's range test. The titanium screws had higher fracture resistance, compared with PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (p 0.05). Finally, visual analysis of the fractions revealed that 100% of them occurred at the neck of the abutment screw, suggesting that this is the weakest point of this unit. PEEK abutment screws have lower fracture resistance, in comparison with titanium abutment screws.

  10. Design of platform for removing screws from LCD display shields

    Tu, Zimei; Qin, Qin; Dou, Jianfang; Zhu, Dongdong

    2017-11-01

    Removing the screws on the sides of a shield is a necessary process in disassembling a computer LCD display. To solve this issue, a platform has been designed for removing the screws on display shields. This platform uses virtual instrument technology with LabVIEW as the development environment to design the mechanical structure with the technologies of motion control, human-computer interaction and target recognition. This platform removes the screws from the sides of the shield of an LCD display mechanically thus to guarantee follow-up separation and recycle.

  11. Adapted preparation technique for screw-type implants: explorative in vitro pilot study in a porcine bone model.

    Beer, Andreas; Gahleitner, André; Holm, Anders; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Homolka, Peter

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of adapted preparation on the insertion torque of self-tapping implants in cancellous bone. In adapted preparation, bone condensation - and thus, insertion torque - is controlled by changing the diameter of the drilling. After preparation of cancellous porcine vertebral bone with drills of 2.85, 3, 3.15 or 3.35 mm final diameters, Brånemark sytem Mk III implants (3.75 x 11.5 mm) were inserted in 141 sites. During implantation, the insertion torque was recorded. Prior to implant insertion, bone mineralization (bone mineral density (BMD)) was measured with dental quantative computed tomography. The BMD values measured at the implant position were correlated with insertion torque for varying bone condensation. Based on the average torque recorded during implant insertion into the pre-drilled canals with a diameter of 3 mm, torque increased by approximately 17% on reducing the diameter of the drill by 5% (to 2.85 mm). On increasing the diameter of the osteotomy to 3.15 mm (5%) or 3.35 mm (12%), torque values decreased by approximately 21% and 50%, respectively. The results demonstrate a correlation between primary stability (average insertion torque) and the diameter of the implant bed on using a screw-shaped implant. Thus, using an individualized bone mineralization-dependent drilling technique, optimized torque values could be achieved in all tested bone qualities with BMDs ranging from 330 to 500 mg/cm(3). The results indicate that using a bone-dependent drilling technique, higher torque values can also be achieved in poor bone using an individualized drilling resulting in higher bone condensation. As immediate function is dependent on primary stability (high insertion torque), this indicates that primary stability can be increased using a modified drilling technique in lesser mineralized bone.

  12. Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak) in a laboratory screw type reactor and secondary thermal/catalytic tar decomposition

    Haydary, J., E-mail: juma.haydary@stuba.sk [Institute of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Radlinského 9, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Susa, D.; Dudáš, J. [Institute of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Radlinského 9, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Pyrolysis of aseptic packages was carried out in a laboratory flow reactor. ► Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields was obtained. ► Composition of the pyrolysis products was estimated. ► Secondary thermal and catalytic decomposition of tars was studied. ► Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak cartons) in a laboratory apparatus using a flow screw type reactor and a secondary catalytic reactor for tar cracking was studied. The pyrolysis experiments were realized at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 850 °C aimed at maximizing of the amount of the gas product and reducing its tar content. Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields at different conditions was obtained. The presence of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and light hydrocarbons, HCx, in the gas product was observed. The Aluminum foil was easily separated from the solid product. The rest part of char was characterized by proximate and elemental analysis and calorimetric measurements. The total organic carbon in the tar product was estimated by elemental analysis of tars. Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used for catalytic thermal tar decomposition. Three series of experiments (without catalyst in a secondary cracking reactor, with dolomite and with AFRC) at temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850 °C were carried out. Both types of catalysts have significantly affected the content of tars and other components in pyrolytic gases. The effect of catalyst on the tetrapack distribution into the product yield on the composition of gas and on the total organic carbon in the tar product is presented in this work.

  13. Multiaxial pedicle screw designs: static and dynamic mechanical testing.

    Stanford, Ralph Edward; Loefler, Andreas Herman; Stanford, Philip Mark; Walsh, William R

    2004-02-15

    Randomized investigation of multiaxial pedicle screw mechanical properties. Measure static yield and ultimate strengths, yield stiffness, and fatigue resistance according to an established model. Compare these measured properties with expected loads in vivo. Multiaxial pedicle screws provide surgical versatility, but the complexity of their design may reduce their strength and fatigue resistance. There is no published data on the mechanical properties of such screws. Screws were assembled according to a vertebrectomy model for destructive mechanical testing. Groups of five assemblies were tested in static tension and compression and subject to three cyclical loads. Modes of failure, yield, and ultimate strength, yield stiffness, and cycles to failure were determined for six designs of screw. Static compression yield loads ranged from 217.1 to 388.0 N and yield stiffness from 23.7 to 38.0 N/mm. Cycles to failure ranged from 42 x 10(3) to 4,719 x 10(3) at 75% of static ultimate load. There were significant differences between designs in all modes of testing. Failure occurred at the multiaxial link in static and cyclical compression. Bending yield strengths just exceeded loads expected in vivo. Multiaxial designs had lower static bending yield strength than fixed screw designs. Five out of six multiaxial screw designs achieved one million cycles at 200 N in compression bending. "Ball-in-cup" multiaxial locking mechanisms were vulnerable to fatigue failure. Smooth surfaces and thicker material appeared to be protective against fatigue failure.

  14. Air conditioning in a CINEMAXX cinema. Innovative solution involving a screw compressor and direct evaporation; Klimatisierung in einem CINEMAXX-Kino. Innovative Loesung mit Schraubenverdichter und Direktverdampfung

    Anon.

    2001-03-01

    The new CINEMAXX cinema building in the Trier city centre has fully glazed walls and a modern air conditioning system. The system was installed by local organisations. Its key components are two Comer-Dorin screw compressors. [German] Im Trierer Stadtzentrum befindet sich ein neues CINEMAXX-Kino, hinter dessen glaeserner Fassade die Klimaanlage diskret verborgen bleibt. Oertliche Firmen der Branche konnten die Ausschreibung der Klimaanlage zu ihren Gunsten entscheiden und mit Erfahrung und handwerklichem Koennen unter Verwendung zweier Comer-Dorin-Schraubenverdichter eine nachahmenswerte Loesung planen und installieren. (orig.)

  15. Two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. A minimum 3-year follow-up study

    Lee, Dong-Yeob; Lee, Sang-Ho; Maeng, Dae-Hyeon

    2010-01-01

    The clinical and radiological outcomes of two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PSF) were evaluated in 24 consecutive patients who underwent two level ALIF with percutaneous PSF for segmental instability and were followed up for more than 3 years. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) score and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Sagittal alignment, bone union, and adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) were assessed using radiography and magnetic resonance imaging. The mean age of the patients at the time of operation was 56.3 years (range 39-70 years). Minor complications occurred in 2 patients in the perioperative period. At a mean follow-up duration of 39.4 months (range 36-42 months), VAS scores for back pain and leg pain, and ODI score decreased significantly (from 6.5, 6.8, and 46.9% to 3.0, 1.9, and 16.3%, respectively). Clinical success was achieved in 22 of the 24 patients. The mean segmental lordosis, whole lumbar lordosis, and sacral tilt significantly increased after surgery (from 25.1deg, 39.2deg, and 32.6deg to 32.9deg, 44.5deg, and 36.6deg, respectively). Solid fusion was achieved in 21 patients. ASD was found in 8 of the 24 patients. No patient underwent revision surgery due to nonunion or ASD. Two-level ALIF with percutaneous PSF yielded satisfactory clinical and radiological outcomes and could be a useful alternative to posterior fusion surgery. (author)

  16. Two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. A minimum 3-year follow-up study

    Lee, Dong-Yeob; Lee, Sang-Ho; Maeng, Dae-Hyeon [Wooridul Spine Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    The clinical and radiological outcomes of two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PSF) were evaluated in 24 consecutive patients who underwent two level ALIF with percutaneous PSF for segmental instability and were followed up for more than 3 years. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) score and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Sagittal alignment, bone union, and adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) were assessed using radiography and magnetic resonance imaging. The mean age of the patients at the time of operation was 56.3 years (range 39-70 years). Minor complications occurred in 2 patients in the perioperative period. At a mean follow-up duration of 39.4 months (range 36-42 months), VAS scores for back pain and leg pain, and ODI score decreased significantly (from 6.5, 6.8, and 46.9% to 3.0, 1.9, and 16.3%, respectively). Clinical success was achieved in 22 of the 24 patients. The mean segmental lordosis, whole lumbar lordosis, and sacral tilt significantly increased after surgery (from 25.1deg, 39.2deg, and 32.6deg to 32.9deg, 44.5deg, and 36.6deg, respectively). Solid fusion was achieved in 21 patients. ASD was found in 8 of the 24 patients. No patient underwent revision surgery due to nonunion or ASD. Two-level ALIF with percutaneous PSF yielded satisfactory clinical and radiological outcomes and could be a useful alternative to posterior fusion surgery. (author)

  17. Screw Remaining Life Prediction Based on Quantum Genetic Algorithm and Support Vector Machine

    Xiaochen Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To predict the remaining life of ball screw, a screw remaining life prediction method based on quantum genetic algorithm (QGA and support vector machine (SVM is proposed. A screw accelerated test bench is introduced. Accelerometers are installed to monitor the performance degradation of ball screw. Combined with wavelet packet decomposition and isometric mapping (Isomap, the sensitive feature vectors are obtained and stored in database. Meanwhile, the sensitive feature vectors are randomly chosen from the database and constitute training samples and testing samples. Then the optimal kernel function parameter and penalty factor of SVM are searched with the method of QGA. Finally, the training samples are used to train optimized SVM while testing samples are adopted to test the prediction accuracy of the trained SVM so the screw remaining life prediction model can be got. The experiment results show that the screw remaining life prediction model could effectively predict screw remaining life.

  18. Noninvasive method for retrieval of broken dental implant abutment screw

    Jagadish Reddy Gooty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants made of titanium for replacement of missing teeth are widely used because of ease of technical procedure and high success rate, but are not free of complications and may fail. Fracturing of the prosthetic screw continues to be a problem in restorative practice and great challenge to remove the fractured screw conservatively. This case report describes and demonstrates the technique of using an ultrasonic scaler in the removal of the fracture screw fragment as a noninvasive method without damaging the hex of implants.

  19. Grid deformation strategies for CFD analysis of screw compressors

    Rane, S.; Kovacevic, A.; Stosic, N.; Kethidi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Customized grid generation of twin screw machines for CFD analysis is widely used by the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry today, but is currently not suitable for topologies such as those of single screw, variable pitch or tri screw rotors. This paper investigates a technique called key-frame re-meshing that supplies pre-generated unstructured grids to the CFD solver at different time steps. To evaluate its accuracy, the results of an isentropic compression-expansion process in a r...

  20. Analysis of Material Flow in Screw Extrusion of Aluminum

    Haugen, Bjoern; Oernskar, Magnus; Welo, Torgeir; Wideroee, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    Screw extrusion of aluminum is a new process for production of aluminum profiles. The commercial potential could be large. Little experimental and numerical work has been done with respect to this process.The material flow of hot aluminum in a screw extruder has been analyzed using finite element formulations for the non-Newtonian Navier-Stokes equations. Aluminum material properties are modeled using the Zener-Holloman material model. Effects of stick-slip conditions are investigated with respect to pressure build up and mixing quality of the extrusion process.The numerical results are compared with physical experiments using an experimental screw extruder.

  1. Bioresorbable screws reinforced with phosphate glass fibre: manufacturing and mechanical property characterisation.

    Felfel, R M; Ahmed, I; Parsons, A J; Rudd, C D

    2013-01-01

    Use of bioresorbable screws could eliminate disadvantages associated with metals such as removal operations, corrosion, MRI interference and stress shielding. Mechanical properties of bioresorbable polymers alone are insufficient for load bearing applications application as screws. Thus, reinforcement is necessary to try and match or surpass the mechanical properties of cortical bone. Phosphate based glass fibres were used to reinforce polylactic acid (PLA) in order to produce unidirectionally aligned (UD) and unidirectionally plus randomly distributed (UD/RM) composite screws (P40 UD and P40 UD/RM). The maximum flexural and push-out properties for the composite screws (P40 UD and P40 UD/RM) increased by almost 100% in comparison with the PLA screws. While the pull-out strength and stiffness of the headless composite screws were ∼80% (strength) and ∼130% (stiffness) higher than for PLA, those with heads exhibited properties lower than those for PLA alone as a result of failure at the heads. An increase in the maximum shear load and stiffness for the composite screws (∼30% and ∼40%) in comparison to the PLA screws was also seen. Maximum torque for the PLA screws was ∼1000 mN m, while that for the composite screws were slightly lower. The SEM micrographs for P40 UD and P40 UD/RM screws revealed small gaps around the fibres, which were suggested to be due to buckling of the UD fibres during the manufacturing process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of diameter of the drill hole on torque of screw insertion and pushout strength for headless tapered compression screws in simulated fractures of the lateral condyle of the equine third metacarpal bone.

    Carpenter, Ryan S; Galuppo, Larry D; Stover, Susan M

    2006-05-01

    To compare variables for screw insertion, pushout strength, and failure modes for a headless tapered compression screw inserted in standard and oversize holes in a simulated lateral condylar fracture model. 6 pairs of third metacarpal bones from horse cadavers. Simulated lateral condylar fractures were created, reduced, and stabilized with a headless tapered compression screw by use of a standard or oversize hole. Torque, work, and time for drilling, tapping, and screw insertion were measured during site preparation and screw implantation. Axial load and displacement were measured during screw pushout. Effects of drill hole size on variables for screw insertion and screw pushout were assessed by use of Wilcoxon tests. Drill time was 59% greater for oversize holes than for standard holes. Variables for tapping (mean maximum torque, total work, positive work, and time) were 42%, 70%, 73%, and 58% less, respectively, for oversize holes, compared with standard holes. Variables for screw pushout testing (mean yield load, failure load, failure displacement, and failure energy) were 40%, 40%, 47%, and 71% less, respectively, for oversize holes, compared with standard holes. Screws could not be completely inserted in 1 standard and 2 oversize holes. Enlarging the diameter of the drill hole facilitated tapping but decreased overall holding strength of screws. Therefore, holes with a standard diameter are recommended for implantation of variable pitch screws whenever possible. During implantation, care should be taken to ensure that screw threads follow tapped bone threads.

  3. Comparison of open reduction versus minimally invasive surgical approaches on screw position in canine sacroiliac lag-screw fixation.

    Déjardin, Loïc M; Marturello, Danielle M; Guiot, Laurent P; Guillou, Reunan P; DeCamp, Charles E

    2016-07-19

    To compare accuracy and consistency of sacral screw placement in canine pelves treated for sacroiliac luxation with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) or minimally invasive osteosynthesis (MIO) techniques. Unilateral sacroiliac luxations created experimentally in canine cadavers were stabilized with an iliosacral lag screw applied via ORIF or MIO techniques (n = 10/group). Dorsoventral and craniocaudal screw angles were measured using computed tomography multiplanar reconstructions in transverse and dorsal planes, respectively. Ratios between pilot hole length and sacral width (PL/SW-R) were obtained. Data between groups were compared statistically (p sacroiliac luxations provides more accurate and consistent sacral screw placement than ORIF. With proper techniques, iatrogenic neurological damage can be avoided with both techniques. The PL /SW-R, which relates to safe screw fixation, also demonstrates that screw penetration of at least 60% of the sacral width is achievable regardless of surgical approach. These findings, along with the limited dissection needed for accurate sacral screw placement, suggest that MIO of sacroiliac luxations is a valid alternative to ORIF.

  4. Using three-dimensional rapid prototyping in the design and development of orthopaedic screws in standardised pull-out tests.

    Leslie, Laura Jane; Connolly, Ashley; Swadener, John G; Junaid, Sarah; Theivendran, Kanthan; Deshmukh, Subodh C

    2018-05-01

    The majority of orthopaedic screws are designed, tested and manufactured by existing orthopaedics companies and are predominantly developed with healthy bone in mind. The timescales and costs involved in the development of a new screw design, for example, for osteoporotic bone, are high. In this study, standard wood screws were used to analyse the concept of using three-dimensional printing, or rapid prototyping, as a viable stage of development in the design of a new bone screw. Six wood screws were reverse engineered and printed in polymeric material using stereolithography. Three of the designs were also printed in Ti6Al4V using direct metal laser sintering; however, these were not of sufficient quality to test further. Both the original metal screws (metal) and polymeric rapid prototyping screws were then tested using standard pull-out tests from low-density polyurethane blocks (Sawbones). Results showed the highest pull-out strengths for screws with the longest thread length and the smallest inner diameter. Of the six screw designs tested, five showed no more than a 17% variance between the metal and rapid prototyping results. A similar pattern of results was shown between the screw designs for both the metal and rapid prototyping screws in five of the six cases. While not producing fully comparable pull-out results to orthopaedic screws, the results from this study do provide evidence of the potential usefulness and cost-effectiveness of rapid prototyping in the early stages of design and testing of orthopaedic screws.

  5. Minimally Invasive Sacroiliac Joint Fusion Using a Novel Hydroxyapatite-Coated Screw: Preliminary 1-Year Clinical and Radiographic Results of a 2-Year Prospective Study.

    Rappoport, Louis H; Luna, Ingrid Y; Joshua, Gita

    2017-05-01

    Proper diagnosis and treatment of sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain remains a clinical challenge. Dysfunction of the SIJ can produce pain in the lower back, buttocks, and extremities. Triangular titanium implants for minimally invasive surgical arthrodesis have been available for several years, with reputed high levels of success and patient satisfaction. This study reports on a novel hydroxyapatite-coated screw for surgical treatment of SIJ pain. Data were prospectively collected on 32 consecutive patients who underwent minimally invasive SIJ fusion with a novel hydroxyapatite-coated screw. Clinical assessments and radiographs were collected and evaluated at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Mean (standard deviation) patient age was 55.2 ± 10.7 years, and 62.5% were female. More patients (53.1%) underwent left versus right SIJ treatment, mean operative time was 42.6 ± 20.4 minutes, and estimated blood loss did not exceed 50 mL. Overnight hospital stay was required for 84% of patients, and the remaining patients needed a 2-day stay (16%). Mean preoperative visual analog scale back and leg pain scores decreased significantly by 12 months postoperatively (P sacroiliac joint pain. Future clinical studies with larger samples are warranted to assess long-term patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Development and Optimization of a Wet Granulation Process at Elevated Temperature for a Poorly Compactible Drug Using Twin Screw Extruder for Continuous Manufacturing.

    Meena, Anuprabha K; Desai, Divyakant; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance tabletability of a poorly compactible drug, acetaminophen, by wet granulation using twin screw extruder at high temperature. It was desired that there would be minimum amounts of excipients used and the granules obtained after extrusion would be dry and fall within a size range suitable for tableting without any further processing. Mixtures of acetaminophen (95%) with binders (5% povidone or partially pregelatinized starch) were wet granulated through twin screw extruder at 70°C by adding 7% w/w water. The process had a short granulation time (processing temperature used, no drying after extrusion was needed. By optimizing formulation and processing parameters, >90% granules in the size range of 125 to 1000 μm (1.7 MPa, which was superior to that of tablets prepared by conventional high shear wet granulation. As the granules could be extruded continuously and did not require drying and milling, the method was amenable to continuous processing. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Lumbar pedicle screw placement: Using only AP plane imaging

    Anil Sethi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Placement of pedicle screws under fluoroscopic guidance using AP plane imaging alone with tactile guidance is safe, fast, and reliable. However, a good understanding of the radiographic landmarks is a prerequisite.

  8. Hollow Mill for Extraction of Stripped Titanium Screws: An Easy ...

    countries. The known alternative in such condition is ... Key words: Hollow mill, stripped screws, titanium locked plates ... used a locally manufactured stainless steel hollow mill, ... head ‑ plate hole” assembly as a mono‑block single unit. In.

  9. Comparison of accuracy of lag screw placement in cephalocondylic nails and sliding hip screw plate fixation for extracapsular fractures of the neck of femur

    Shyam Kumar, A. J.; Parmar, V.; Bankart, J.; Williams, S. C.; Harper, W. M.

    2006-01-01

    This study compared the accuracy of lag screw placement between extracapsular femoral fractures fixed with sliding hip screw plate systems and those fixed with cephalocondylic nails. It involved 75 retrospective radiographs of fractures fixed with either a cephalocondylic nail (32) or a sliding hip screw plate system (43). Postoperative anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of the hip were scanned using a digital X-ray scanner and measured using computer software. Measurements were conducte...

  10. Learning and Chaining of Motor Primitives for Goal-directed Locomotion of a Snake-Like Robot with Screw-Drive Units

    Chatterjee, Sromona; Nachstedt, Timo; Tamosiunaite, Minija

    2015-01-01

    -directed locomotion for the robot. The behavioural primitives of the robot are generated using a reinforcement learning approach called "Policy Improvement with Path Integrals" (PI2). PI2 is numerically simple and has the ability to deal with high-dimensional systems. Here, PI2 is used to learn the robot’s motor...... controls by finding proper locomotion control parameters, like joint angles and screw-drive unit velocities, in a coordinated manner for different goals. Thus, it is able to generate a large repertoire of motor primitives, which are selectively stored to form a primitive library. The learning process...

  11. The Hot-gas screw-type engine - Simulation as a basis for construction. Pt. 3; Die Heissgasschraubenmaschine - simulationsgestuetzte Auslegung. T. 3

    Kauder, K.; Unwerth, T. von [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). FG Fluidenergiemaschinen

    1998-12-31

    In this paper new results of the research regarding the design of the first experimental plant for a hot-gas screw-type machine are reported. Target of the development is the verification of operating behaviour as well as the thermal and mechanical behaviour of the screw-type motor parts. The selection and dimensioning of the plant components is described with a main focus on the construction of the thermally high-loaded hot-gas screw-type engine. Its manufacturing tolerances are based on simulations, with which the mechanical deformations of the rotors and the casing respective the resulting clearance-heights can be calculated. With inclusion of an efficient cooling method for the motor parts, for the, in the article documented, projected nominal working condition with a material-depending limit for the entrance temperature at {theta}{sub E,} {sub M}=600 C, a pressure ratio {pi}=6 and a male rotor peripheral speed u{sub HR}=120 ms{sup -1}, each rotor should be decreased by 0.07 mm. (orig.) [Deutsch] Es wird ueber neue Forschungsergebnisse im Hinblick auf die konstruktive Realisierung der ersten Versuchsanlage einer Heissgasschraubenmaschine berichtet. Ziel der daran durchgefuehrten Untersuchungen ist die Verifikation des Betriebsverhaltens sowie des thermischen und mechanischen Bauteilverhaltens des Heissgasschraubenmotors. Nachzulesen ist die Auswahl und Dimensionierung der Anlagenkomponenten, wobei ein Hauptaugenmerk auf der Auslegung des thermisch hoch belasteten Schraubenmotors liegt. Dessen Dimensionierung liegen Simulationsrechnungen zugrunde, mit deren Hilfe die mechanischen Verformungen der Rotoren und des Gehaeuses respektive der daraus resultierenden Spalthoehen a priori angegeben werden koennen. Fuer den hier dokumentierten, angestrebten Nennbetriebszustand mit einer werkstoffbedingt begrenzten Motoreintrittstemperatur von {theta}{sub E,} {sub M}=600 C, einem Druckverhaeltnis von {pi}=6 und einer Hauptrotorumfangsgeschwindigkeit von u{sub HR}=120 ms

  12. Clinical performance of provisional screw-retained metal-free acrylic restorations in an immediate loading implant protocol: a 242 consecutive patients' report.

    Suarez-Feito, Jose-María; Sicilia, Alberto; Angulo, Jorge; Banerji, Subir; Cuesta, Isabel; Millar, Brian

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical performance of provisional screw-retained metal-free acrylic restorations in an immediate loading implant protocol. Two hundred and forty-two consecutive patients were selected retrospectively, who received 1011 implants and 311 immediate provisional screw-retained implant restorations (2-4 h after implant surgery). The patients were monitored for a period of 2-3 months, until they were referred for a final restoration. The primary variables recorded include the survival time and the appearance of fractures in the provisional restoration, and the independent variables included age, sex, dental arch, type of restoration, type of attachment and components used, as well as cantilevers and opposing dentition. A survival analysis (Kaplan-Meier) and a Cox regression analysis were performed. Twenty-three restorations in 20 patients (8.26%, 95% CI 4.8-11.7) showed at least one fracture (7.39%). More than half of the new fractures (52%, 12 cases) occurred in the first 4 weeks. The cumulative survival probability observed was greater in mandible (P=0.05) and non-cantilever restorations (P=0.001), and in those opposed by full restorations or natural teeth (P=0.001). With an opposing implant-supported prosthesis, the risk of fracture was multiplied by 4.7, and the use of cantilevers as well as the location of the restoration in the maxilla multiply the risk by 3.4-3.5. Immediate provisional screw-retained metal-free implant-supported restorations can be considered a reliable restoration (92.6% remain intact) for the healing period of 3 months. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Axial displacement of abutments into implants and implant replicas, with the tapered cone-screw internal connection, as a function of tightening torque.

    Dailey, Bruno; Jordan, Laurence; Blind, Olivier; Tavernier, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The passive fit of a superstructure on implant abutments is essential to success. One source of error when using a tapered cone-screw internal connection may be the difference between the tightening torque level applied to the abutments by the laboratory technician compared to that applied by the treating clinician. The purpose of this study was to measure the axial displacement of tapered cone-screw abutments into implants and their replicas as a function of the tightening torque level. Twenty tapered cone-screw abutments were selected. Two groups were created: 10 abutments were secured into 10 implants, and 10 abutments were secured into 10 corresponding implant replicas. Each abutment was tightened in increasing increments of 5 Ncm, from 0 Ncm to 45 Ncm, with a torque controller. The length of each sample was measured repeatedly with an Electronic Digital Micrometer. The mean axial displacement for the implant group and the replica group was calculated. The data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney and Spearman tests. For both groups, there was always an axial displacement of the abutment upon each incremental application of torque. The mean axial displacement values varied between 7 and 12 microm for the implant group and between 6 and 21 microm for the replica group at each 5-Ncm increment. From 0 to 45 Ncm, the total mean axial displacement values were 89 microm for the implant group and 122 microm for the replica group. There was a continuous axial displacement of the abutments into implants and implant replicas when the applied torque was raised from 0 to 45 Ncm. Torque applied above the level recommended by the manufacturer increased the difference in displacement between the two groups.

  14. A new screw-type compressor capacity class for industrial and business application; Eine neue Schraubenverdichter-Leistungsklasse fuer Industrie- und Gewerbeanwendung

    Blumhardt, R. [BITZER Kuehlmaschinenbau GmbH, Sindelfingen (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Small screw-type compressors in a volumetric displacement range from 84 up to 250 m-3 per hour have been offered since more than 22 years as open and half-hermetic machines. At that time new profile geometries and modern manufacturing methods enabled amongst other the smallest gap widths between rotors and housing in this new capacity range for screw-type compressors. This enabled to reach efficiency factors with relatively small rotor diameters, which fall in the range of large industrial compressors. A new half-hermetic construction series and the corresponding open versions with a volumetric displacement of 315 m-3 per hour directly follow the former capacity range and reach up to 410 m-3 per hour. The newly developed rotor profile and the experience gained in the field of compact screw compressor for air conditioning applications were the basis of the new construction. A step-by-step or an infinitely variable valve is used for capacity control, which also takes over the automatic start load alleviation. Economiser operation is possible in the complete full load and partial load range. Important components, which had to be installed externally up to now, were now integrated in the compressor. Thus the expenditure of assembly is reduced and risk of leaks is minimised. Oil separators for plants with single compressors and for combined plants complete the variety of offers. The extended version of the BITZER software enabled the exact design of the compressor for conventional coolants. A new additional module is used for selecting the matching oil separator. (orig.)

  15. Studying Canonical Analysis: A Reply to Thorndike's Comments

    Barcikowski, Robert S.; Stevens, James P.

    1976-01-01

    This article is a rejoinder to TM 502 249. Each of Thorndike's comments are examined. A possible solution to the large number of subjects necessary for stable weights and variate-variable correlations using ridge regression procedures is suggested. (RC)

  16. Optimizing the performance of small-scale organic Rankine cycle that utilizes a single-screw expander

    Ziviani, D.; Gusev, S.; Lecompte, S.; Groll, E.A.; Braun, J.E.; Horton, W.T.; Broek, M. van den; De Paepe, M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A total of 102 steady-state points with R245fa and SES336 have been collected. • R245fa led to 10% higher power output despite lower expander isentropic efficiency. • The ORC running with SES36 presented a better matching between expander and cycle. • The theoretical matching between expander volume ratio and cycle efficiency is determined. • Steady-state performance maps are used to build a feed-forward controller. - Abstract: This paper deals with the operation and optimization of a down-scaled industrial organic Rankine cycle (ORC) for low-grade waste heat recovery. The system is a sub-critical regenerative ORC with a nominal power output of 11 kW. The ORC unit has been assembled using off-the-shelf components including three identical plate heat exchangers, a liquid receiver, a multi-stage centrifugal pump and a single-screw compressor adapted to operate as an expander. The experimental results are used to evaluate the influence of the expander performance on the behavior of the ORC system at nominal and part-load conditions. The matching between the volumetric expander and the system operating conditions is also analyzed. Results showed that in the case of SES36, both the expander efficiency and system performance were maximized for a pressure ratio between 7 and 9. In the case of R245fa, while the system efficiency achieved values similar to SES36, but the expander maximum isentropic efficiency was 17% lower. Two analyses are carried out to optimize the operation of the ORC unit with R245fa. At first, the insights gained by analyzing the experimental data are used to evaluate the theoretical matching between volumetric expander and the system maximum efficiency in terms of the Second Law of thermodynamics. Secondly, a control-oriented steady-state cycle model based on empirical correlations calibrated on the experimental results is developed. The model is used to implement a feed-forward control strategy based on predetermined steady

  17. Effect of twin-screw extrusion parameters on mechanical hardness ...

    A 2-level–4-factor factorial experimental design was used to investigate the influ- ... ture content, screw speed and temperature are found to influence, while feed rate ... of the food product that can be adequately evaluated by the consumer.

  18. Bioresorbable pins and interference screws for fixation of hamstring tendon grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Stengel, Dirk; Casper, Dirk; Bauwens, Kai; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Wich, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Biodegradable cross-pins have been shown to provide higher failure loads than do screws for fixation of hamstring tendons under laboratory conditions. To compare the clinical results of biodegradable pins (RigidFix) and interference screws (BioCryl) for fixation of hamstring grafts in arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Study Design Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. To test the hypothesis of a difference of 1.0 +/- 1.2 mm in anterior knee laxity between the two fixation options, 54 patients were randomly assigned to groups via a block randomization scheme and sealed envelopes. All patients underwent standardized hamstring graft reconstruction and had similar postoperative aftercare by an accelerated rehabilitation protocol. Measures assessed at baseline and after 1 and 2 years of follow-up included (1) the side-to-side difference in anterior laxity (KT-1000 arthrometer), (2) Short Form 36 physical and mental component scores, and (3) the International Knee Documentation Committee form scores. After 1 and 2 years, 26 and 21 patients in the BioCryl group and 28 and 24 patients in the RigidFix group were available for follow-up examination. No significant difference was noted in instrumented anterior translation between BioCryl and RigidFix fixation: 1 year, 0.11 (95% CI, -0.60 to 0.82; P = .7537); 2 years, 0.33 (95% CI, -0.43 to 1.08 mm; P = .3849). Also, there were no significant differences in the mean physical and mental component scores and International Knee Documentation Committee form scores and in overall complication and surgical revision rates. A pin dislocation was classified as the sole procedure-specific serious adverse event. Bioresorbable pins do not provide better clinical results than do resorbable interference screws for hamstring graft fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

  19. 78 FR 44536 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Licensing of Private Remote-Sensing Space Systems

    2013-07-24

    ... a current information collection). Affected Public: Business or other for-profit organizations... application; 10 hours for the submission of a data protection plan; 5 hours for the submission of a plan... operations plan for restricting collection or dissemination of imagery of Israeli territory; 3 hours for...

  20. Three-dimensional reconstructions in spine and screw trajectory simulation on 3D digital images: a step by step approach by using Mimics software.

    Chen, Dong; Chen, Chun-Hui; Tang, Li; Wang, Kai; Li, Yu-Zhe; Phan, Kevin; Wu, Ai-Min

    2017-12-01

    There is a rapidly increasing amount of literature outlining the use of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and printing technologies in recent years. However, precise instructive articles which describe step-by-step methods of reconstructing 3D images from computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remain limited. To address these issues, this article describes a detailed protocol which will allow the reader to easily perform the 3D reconstruction in their future research, to allow investigation of the appropriate surgical anatomy and allow innovative designs of novel screw fixation techniques or pre-operative surgical planning.

  1. Probing and Tapping: Are We Inserting Pedicle Screws Correctly?

    Prasad, Vishal; Mesfin, Addisu; Lee, Robert; Reigrut, Julie; Schmidt, John

    2016-11-01

    Although there are a significant number of research publications on the topic of bone morphology and the strength of bone, the clinical significance of a failed pedicle screw is often revision surgery and the potential for further postoperative complications; especially in elderly patients with osteoporotic bone. The purpose of this report is to quantify the mechanical strength of the foam-screw interface by assessing probe/pilot hole diameter and tap sizes using statistically relevant sample sizes under highly controlled test conditions. The study consisted of two experiments and used up to three different densities of reference-grade polyurethane foam (ASTM 1839), including 0.16, 0.24, and 0.32 g/cm 3 . All screws and rods were provided by K2M Inc. and screws were inserted to a depth of 25 mm. A series of pilot holes, 1.5, 2.2, 2.7, 3.2, 3.7, 4.2, 5.0, and 6.0 mm in diameter were drilled through the entire depth of the material. A 6.5 × 45-mm pedicle screw was inserted and axially pulled from the material (n = 720). A 3.0-mm pilot hole was drilled and tapped with: no tap, 3.5-, 4.5-, 5.5-, and 6.5-mm taps. A 6.5 × 45-mm pedicle screw was inserted and axially pulled from the material (n = 300). The size of the probe/pilot hole had a nonlinear, parabolic effect on pullout strength. This shape suggests an optimum-sized probe hole for a given size pedicle screw. Too large or too small of a probe hole causes a rapid falloff in pullout strength. The tap data demonstrated that not tapping and undertapping by two or three sizes did not significantly alter the pullout strength of the screws. The data showed an exponential falloff of pullout strength when as tap size increased to the diameter of the screw. In the current study, the data show that an ideal pilot hole size half the diameter of the screw is a starting point. Also, that if tapping was necessary, to use a tap two sizes smaller than the screw being implanted. A similar optimum pilot hole or tap size may be

  2. Intermaxillary Fixation Screw Morbidity in Treatment of Mandibular Fractures

    Florescu, Vlad-Andrei; Kofod, Thomas; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present retrospective study was to investigate the morbidity of screws used for intermaxillary fixation (IMF) in the treatment of mandibular fractures. A review of the published data was also performed for a comparison of outcomes. Our hypothesis was that the use of screws...... for IMF of mandibular fractures would result in minimal morbidity. Materials and Methods Patients treated for mandibular fractures from 2007 to 2013, using screws for IMF, using the international diagnosis code for mandibular fracture, DS026, were anonymously selected (Department of Oral and Maxillofacial...... Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark). The fracture type, radiographic findings, treatment modality, screw type and number, and root damage were recorded. For the outcome comparison, a review of the published data regarding iatrogenic dental root damage caused...

  3. CT-guided percutaneous screw fixation plus cementoplasty in the treatment of painful bone metastases with fractures or a high risk of pathological fracture

    Pusceddu, Claudio; Ballicu, Nicola; Fele, Rosa Maria; Sotgia, Barbara; Melis, Luca [Oncological Hospital ' ' A. Businco' ' , Regional Referral Center for Oncologic Diseases, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Oncological Radiology, Cagliari (Italy); Fancellu, Alessandro [University of Sassari, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Sassari (Italy)

    2017-04-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous screw fixation plus cementoplasty (PSFPC), for either treatment of painful metastatic fractures or prevention of pathological fractures, in patients who are not candidates for surgical stabilization. Twenty-seven patients with 34 metastatic bone lesions underwent CT-guided PSFPC. Bone metastases were located in the vertebral column, femur, and pelvis. The primary end point was the evaluation of feasibility and complications of the procedure, in addition to the length of hospital stay. Pain severity was estimated before treatment and 1 and 6 months after the procedure using the visual analog scale (VAS). Functional outcome was assessed by improved patient walking ability. All sessions were completed and well tolerated. There were no complications related to either incorrect positioning of the screws during bone fixation or leakage of cement. All patients were able to walk within 6 h after the procedure and the average length of hospital stay was 2 days. The mean VAS score decreased from 7.1 (range, 4-9) before treatment to 1.6 (range, 0-6), 1 month after treatment, and to 1.4 (range 0-6) 6 months after treatment. Neither loosening of the screws nor additional bone fractures occurred during a median follow-up of 6 months. Our results suggest that PSFPC might be a safe and effective procedure that allows the stabilization of the fracture and the prevention of pathological fractures with significant pain relief and good recovery of walking ability, although further studies are required to confirm this preliminary experience. (orig.)

  4. 75 FR 32360 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Licensing of Private Remote-Sensing Space Systems

    2010-06-08

    ... Review: Regular submission. Affected Public: Business or other for-profit organizations. Estimated Number...; 10 hours for the submission of a data protection plan; 5 hours for the submission of a plan... operations plan for restricting collection or dissemination of imagery of Israeli territory; 3 hours for...

  5. Evaluation of apical root resorption in orthodontic patients with maxillary anterior intrusion using utility arches and mini screws: A comparative clinical trial

    Muraleedhara Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the amount of apical root resorption in orthodontic patients undergoing maxillary anterior intrusion using utility arches and mini screws; and to compare the efficacy of mini screws and utility arches in reducing over bite. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 20 patients, divided in two groups. Group A consisted of ten patients in whom titanium mini-screws were used Group B consisted of 10 patients in whom utility arches made of 0.017 × 0.25" TMA were used. Diagnostic records (study models and radiovisiography [RVG] were taken at 2 time intervals, T1 (just before implant/utility arch placement and T2 (at the end of intrusion 6 months later. The pre and post radiographic images were measured from incisal tip to the root apex with the help of intrascan DC software. Root resorption was computed as the difference between the pre-treatment total tooth length and the post treatment total tooth length. These values were subjected to statistical analyses using SPSS 16.00 statistical software. (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, IBM Corporation, December 2007 Results: The results showed that root resorption was seen in both groups. Amount of resorption seen was higher in mini implant group than utility arch group. Mini implants were more efficient in reducing the overbite when compared to utility arches. Conclusion: It was concluded from the study that intrusion using mini implant resulted in more root resorption than utility arch; and mini implant was more effective in intruding the incisors than utility arch.

  6. Fixation of fractures of the condylar head of the mandible with a new magnesium-alloy biodegradable cannulated headless bone screw.

    Leonhardt, H; Franke, A; McLeod, N M H; Lauer, G; Nowak, A

    2017-07-01

    It is difficult to fix fractures of the condylar head of the mandible. Several techniques have been described which show satisfactory outcomes, but stability can be questionable, and some can cause irritation of the soft tissues. We describe a technique and first results of treating such fractures with resorbable magnesium-based headless bone screws (Magnezix ® 2.7mm CS; Syntellix AG, Hanover, Germany). Copyright © 2017 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Can the possibility of transverse iliosacral screw fixation for first sacral segment be predicted preoperatively? Results of a computational cadaveric study.

    Jeong, Jin-Hoon; Jin, Jin Woo; Kang, Byoung Youl; Jung, Gu-Hee

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict the possibility of transverse iliosacral (TIS) screw fixation into the first sacral segment (S 1 ) and introduce practical anatomical variables using conventional computed tomography (CT) scans. A total of 82 cadaveric sacra (42 males and 40 females) were used for continuous 1.0-mm slice CT scans, which were imported into Mimics ® software to produce a three-dimensional pelvis model. The anterior height (BH) and superior width (BW) of the elevated sacral segment was measured, followed by verification of the safe zone (SZ S1 and SZ S2 ) in a true lateral view. Their vertical (VD S1 and VD S2 ) and horizontal (HD S1 and HD S2 ) distances were measured. VD S1 less than 7mm was classified as impossible sacrum, since the transverse fixation of 7.0 mm-sized IS screw could not be done safely. Fourteen models (16.7%; six females, eight males) were assigned as the impossible sacrum. There was no statistical significance regarding gender (p=0.626) and height (p=0.419). The average values were as follows: BW, 31.4mm (SD 2.9); BH, 16.7mm (SD 6.8); VD S1 , 13.4mm (SD 6.1); HD S1 , 22.5mm (SD 4.5); SZ S1 , 239.5mm 2 (SD 137.1); VD S2 , 15.5mm (SD 3.0); HD S2 , 18.3mm (SD 2.9); and SZ S2 , 221.1mm 2 (SD 68.5). Logistic regression analysis identified BH (p=0.001) and HD S1 (p=0.02) as the only statistically significant variables to predict the possibility. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis established a cut-off value for BH and HD S1 of impossible sacrum of 20.6mm and 18.6mm, respectively. BH and HD S1 could be used to predict the possibility of TIS screw fixation. If the BH exceeds 20.6mm or HD S1 is less than 18.6mm, TIS screw fixation for S 1 should not be undertaken because of narrowed SZ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of migration behavior between single and dual lag screw implants for intertrochanteric fracture fixation

    Katonis Pavlos G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lag screw cut-out failure following fixation of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in osteoporotic bone remains an unsolved challenge. This study tested if resistance to cut-out failure can be improved by using a dual lag screw implant in place of a single lag screw implant. Migration behavior and cut-out resistance of a single and a dual lag screw implant were comparatively evaluated in surrogate specimens using an established laboratory model of hip screw cut-out failure. Methods Five dual lag screw implants (Endovis, Citieffe and five single lag screw implants (DHS, Synthes were tested in the Hip Implant Performance Simulator (HIPS of the Legacy Biomechanics Laboratory. This model simulated osteoporotic bone, an unstable fracture, and biaxial rocking motion representative of hip loading during normal gait. All constructs were loaded up to 20,000 cycles of 1.45 kN peak magnitude under biaxial rocking motion. The migration kinematics was continuously monitored with 6-degrees of freedom motion tracking system and the number of cycles to implant cut-out was recorded. Results The dual lag screw implant exhibited significantly less migration and sustained more loading cycles in comparison to the DHS single lag screw. All DHS constructs failed before 20,000 cycles, on average at 6,638 ± 2,837 cycles either by cut-out or permanent screw bending. At failure, DHS constructs exhibited 10.8 ± 2.3° varus collapse and 15.5 ± 9.5° rotation around the lag screw axis. Four out of five dual screws constructs sustained 20,000 loading cycles. One dual screw specimens sustained cut-out by medial migration of the distal screw after 10,054 cycles. At test end, varus collapse and neck rotation in dual screws implants advanced to 3.7 ± 1.7° and 1.6 ± 1.0°, respectively. Conclusion The single and double lag screw implants demonstrated a significantly different migration resistance in surrogate specimens under gait loading simulation with

  9. Some specific features of a surface-screw plasma instability in semiconductors

    Karavaev, G.F.; Tsipivka, Yu.I.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the dispersion relation has been carried out, which enables to discover some new peculiarities in the behaviour of the surface helical instability (SHI) of a semiconductor plasma. To simplify the dispersion relation a semiconductor with nearly equal electron and hole mobilities has been considered. The dependences of threshold characteristics of SHI on a magnetic field H for different angular harmonics are represented graphically. A comparison of the formulas obtained shows that the approximation of truncated series yields an incorrect qualitative dependence of the wavelength on H, whereas asymptotic formulas in the range of strong magnetic fields yield not only a correct qualitative dependence of the threshold characteristics on H, but also a good quantitative agreement

  10. Using a database to manage resolution of comments on standards

    Holloran, R.W.; Kelley, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    Features of production systems that would enhance development and implementation of procedures and other standards were first suggested in 1988 described how a database could provide the features sought for managing the content of structured documents such as standards and procedures. This paper describes enhancements of the database that manage the more complex links associated with resolution of comments. Displaying the linked information on a computer display aids comment resolvers. A hardcopy report generated by the database permits others to independently evaluate the resolution of comments in context with the original text of the standard, the comment, and the revised text of the standard. Because the links are maintained by the database, consistency between the agreed-upon resolutions and the text of the standard can be maintained throughout the subsequent reviews of the standard. Each of the links is bidirectional; i.e., the relationships between any two documents can be viewed from the perspective of either document

  11. Kinematic analysis of parallel manipulators by algebraic screw theory

    Gallardo-Alvarado, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    This book reviews the fundamentals of screw theory concerned with velocity analysis of rigid-bodies, confirmed with detailed and explicit proofs. The author additionally investigates acceleration, jerk, and hyper-jerk analyses of rigid-bodies following the trend of the velocity analysis. With the material provided in this book, readers can extend the theory of screws into the kinematics of optional order of rigid-bodies. Illustrative examples and exercises to reinforce learning are provided. Of particular note, the kinematics of emblematic parallel manipulators, such as the Delta robot as well as the original Gough and Stewart platforms are revisited applying, in addition to the theory of screws, new methods devoted to simplify the corresponding forward-displacement analysis, a challenging task for most parallel manipulators. Stands as the only book devoted to the acceleration, jerk and hyper-jerk (snap) analyses of rigid-body by means of screw theory; Provides new strategies to simplify the forward kinematic...

  12. A STUDY OF POSTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION WITH LOCALLY HARVESTED SPINOLAMINECTOMY BONE GRAFT AND PEDICLE SCREW FIXATION IN SPONDYLOLISTHESIS

    Pardhasaradhi M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF create intervertebral fusion by means of a posterior approach. Successful results have been reported with allograft, various cages (for interbody support, autograft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein‐2. Interbody fusion techniques facilitate reduction and enhance fusion. Corticocancellous laminectomy bone chips alone can be used as a means of spinal fusion in patients with single level instrumented PLIF. This has got a good fusion rate. PLIF with cage gives better fusion on radiology than PLIF with iliac bone graft, but no statistical difference in the clinical outcome. Cage use precludes complications associated with iliac bone harvesting. The reported adjacent segment degeneration was 40.5% and reoperation was 8.1% after 10 years of follow up. MATERIALS AND METHODS 30 cases of spondylolisthesis who attended the Orthopaedic Outpatient Department of Andhra Medical College, Visakhapatnam, from 2014 to 2016 were taken up for study. All the cases were examined clinically and confirmed radiologically. The patient’s age, sex, symptoms and duration were noted and were examined clinically for the status of the spine. Straight leg raising test was done and neurological examination of the lower limbs performed. All the patients were subjected to the radiological examination of the lumbosacral spine by taking anteroposterior, lateral (flexion and extension views, oblique views to demonstrate spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. MRI and x-rays studies were done in all the cases to facilitate evaluation of the root compression disk changes and spinal cord changes. RESULTS In our study, we followed all the 30 patients after the surgery following procedure of removal of loose lamina, spinous process and fibrocartilaginous mass, PLIF with only the laminectomy bone mass and CD screw system fixation up to 2 years. 12 patients (40% had excellent

  13. Anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament anatomical repair and augmentation versus trans-syndesmosis screw fixation for the syndesmotic instability in external-rotation type ankle fracture with posterior malleolus involvement: A prospective and comparative study.

    Zhan, Yu; Yan, Xiaoyu; Xia, Ronggang; Cheng, Tao; Luo, Congfeng

    2016-07-01

    Syndesmosis injury is common in external-rotation type ankle fractures (ERAF). Trans-syndesmosis screw fixation, the gold-standard treatment, is currently controversial for its complications and biomechanical disadvantages. The purpose of this study was to introduce a new method of anatomically repairing the anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) and augmentation with anchor rope system to treat the syndesmotic instability in ERAF with posterior malleolus involvement and to compare its clinical outcomes with that of trans-syndesmosis screw fixation. 53 ERAFs with posterior malleolus involvement received surgery, and the syndesmosis was still unstable after fracture fixation. They were randomised into screw fixation group and AITFL anatomical repair with augmentation group. Reduction quality, syndesmosis diastasis recurrence, pain (VAS score), time back to work, Olerud-Molander ankle score and range of motion (ROM) of ankle were investigated. Olerud-Molander score in AITFL repair group and screw group was 90.4 and 85.8 at 12-month follow-up (P>0.05). Plantar flexion was 31.2° and 34.3° in repair and screw groups (P=0.04). Mal-reduction happened in 5 cases (19.2%) in screw group while 2 cases (7.4%) in repair group. Postoperative syndesmosis re-diastasis occurred in 3 cases in screw group while zero in repair group (P>0.05). Pain score was similar between the two groups (P>0.05). Overall complication rate and back to work time were 26.9% and 3.7% (P=0.04), 7.15 months and 5.26 months (P=0.02) in screw group and repair group, respectively. For syndesmotic instability in ERAF with posterior malleolus involvement, the method of AITFL anatomical repair and augmentation with anchor rope system had an equivalent functional outcome and reduction, earlier rehabilitation and less complication compared with screw fixation. It can be selected as an alternative. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of Modeling Parameters on Threaded Screws.

    Vigil, Miquela S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brake, Matthew Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vangoethem, Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Assembled mechanical systems often contain a large number of bolted connections. These bolted connections (joints) are integral aspects of the load path for structural dynamics, and, consequently, are paramount for calculating a structure's stiffness and energy dissipation prop- erties. However, analysts have not found the optimal method to model appropriately these bolted joints. The complexity of the screw geometry cause issues when generating a mesh of the model. This paper will explore different approaches to model a screw-substrate connec- tion. Model parameters such as mesh continuity, node alignment, wedge angles, and thread to body element size ratios are examined. The results of this study will give analysts a better understanding of the influences of these parameters and will aide in finding the optimal method to model bolted connections.

  15. Adjacent-segment disease after thoracic pedicle screw fixation.

    Agarwal, Nitin; Heary, Robert F; Agarwal, Prateek

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Pedicle screw fixation is a technique widely used to treat conditions ranging from spine deformity to fracture stabilization. Pedicle screws have been used traditionally in the lumbar spine; however, they are now being used with increasing frequency in the thoracic spine as a more favorable alternative to hooks, wires, or cables. Although safety concerns, such as the incidence of adjacent-segment disease (ASD) after cervical and lumbar fusions, have been reported, such issues in the thoracic spine have yet to be addressed thoroughly. Here, the authors review the literature on ASD after thoracic pedicle screw fixation and report their own experience specifically involving the use of pedicle screws in the thoracic spine. METHODS Select references from online databases, such as PubMed (provided by the US National Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health), were used to survey the literature concerning ASD after thoracic pedicle screw fixation. To include the authors' experience at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database was performed to determine the incidence of complications over a 13-year period in 123 consecutive adult patients who underwent thoracic pedicle screw fixation. Children, pregnant or lactating women, and prisoners were excluded from the review. By comparing preoperative and postoperative radiographic images, the occurrence of thoracic ASD and disease within the surgical construct was determined. RESULTS Definitive radiographic fusion was detected in 115 (93.5%) patients. Seven incidences of instrumentation failure and 8 lucencies surrounding the screws were observed. One patient was observed to have ASD of the thoracic spine. The mean follow-up duration was 50 months. CONCLUSIONS This long-term radiographic evaluation revealed the use of pedicle screws for thoracic fixation to be an effective stabilization modality. In particular, ASD seems to be less of a problem in the

  16. Group Distal Movement of Teeth using Micro-Screw-Implant Anchorage-A Case Report.

    Kalarickal, Biju

    2014-05-01

    This case report describes a case of orthodontic tooth movement of a 29-year-old female patient utilizing maxillary posterior edentulous area. Micro-implants were placed at buccal edentulous spaces and inter-radicular space for retraction of entire maxillary dentition. An overjet reduction of 8mm and good posterior occlusion were achieved.

  17. Pedicle Screw Fixation Study in Immature Porcine Spines to Improve Pullout Resistance during Animal Testing.

    Sophie Le Cann

    Full Text Available The porcine model is frequently used during development and validation of new spinal devices, because of its likeness to the human spine. These spinal devices are frequently composed of pedicle screws with a reputation for stable fixation but which can suffer pullouts during preclinical implantation on young animals, leading to high morbidity. With a view to identifying the best choices to optimize pedicle screw fixation in the porcine model, this study evaluates ex vivo the impact of weight (age of the animal, the level of the vertebrae (lumbar or thoracic and the type of screw anchorage (mono- or bi-cortical on pedicle screw pullouts. Among the 80 pig vertebrae (90- and 140-day-old tested in this study, the average screw pullout forces ranged between 419.9N and 1341.2N. In addition, statistical differences were found between test groups, pointing out the influence of the three parameters stated above. We found that the the more caudally the screws are positioned (lumbar level, the greater their pullout resistance is, moreover, screw stability increases with the age, and finally, the screws implanted with a mono-cortical anchorage sustained lower pullout forces than those implanted with a bi-cortical anchorage. We conclude that the best anchorage can be obtained with older animals, using a lumbar fixation and long screws traversing the vertebra and inducing bi-cortical anchorage. In very young animals, pedicle screw fixations need to be bi-cortical and more numerous to prevent pullout.

  18. Pedicle Screw Fixation Study in Immature Porcine Spines to Improve Pullout Resistance during Animal Testing.

    Le Cann, Sophie; Cachon, Thibaut; Viguier, Eric; Miladi, Lotfi; Odent, Thierry; Rossi, Jean-Marie; Chabrand, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The porcine model is frequently used during development and validation of new spinal devices, because of its likeness to the human spine. These spinal devices are frequently composed of pedicle screws with a reputation for stable fixation but which can suffer pullouts during preclinical implantation on young animals, leading to high morbidity. With a view to identifying the best choices to optimize pedicle screw fixation in the porcine model, this study evaluates ex vivo the impact of weight (age) of the animal, the level of the vertebrae (lumbar or thoracic) and the type of screw anchorage (mono- or bi-cortical) on pedicle screw pullouts. Among the 80 pig vertebrae (90- and 140-day-old) tested in this study, the average screw pullout forces ranged between 419.9N and 1341.2N. In addition, statistical differences were found between test groups, pointing out the influence of the three parameters stated above. We found that the the more caudally the screws are positioned (lumbar level), the greater their pullout resistance is, moreover, screw stability increases with the age, and finally, the screws implanted with a mono-cortical anchorage sustained lower pullout forces than those implanted with a bi-cortical anchorage. We conclude that the best anchorage can be obtained with older animals, using a lumbar fixation and long screws traversing the vertebra and inducing bi-cortical anchorage. In very young animals, pedicle screw fixations need to be bi-cortical and more numerous to prevent pullout.

  19. Helicobacter pylori displays spiral trajectories while swimming like a cork-screw in solutions

    Constantino, Maira A.; Hardcastle, Joseph M.; Bansil, Rama; Jabbarzadeh, Mehdi; Fu, Henry C.

    Helicobacter pylori is a helical shaped bacterium that causes gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer in humans and other animals. In order to colonize the harsh acidic environment of the stomach H. pylori has evolved a unique biochemical mechanism to go across the viscoelastic gel-like gastric mucus layer. Many studies have been conducted on the swimming of H. pylori in viscous media. However a yet unanswered question is if the helical cell shape influences bacterial swimming dynamics or confers any advantage when swimming in viscous solution. We will present measurements of H. pylori trajectories displaying cork