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Sample records for sclerosis general features

  1. Multiple sclerosis: general features and pharmacologic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen Lagumersindez, Denis; Martinez Sanchez, Gregorio

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune, inflammatory and desmyelinization disease central nervous system (CNS) of unknown etiology and critical evolution. There different etiological hypotheses talking of a close interrelation among predisposing genetic factors and dissimilar environmental factors, able to give raise to autoimmune response at central nervous system level. Hypothesis of autoimmune pathogeny is based on study of experimental models, and findings in biopsies of affected patients by disease. Accumulative data report that the oxidative stress plays a main role in pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Oxygen reactive species generated by macrophages has been involved as mediators of demyelinization and of axon damage, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and strictly in multiple sclerosis. Disease diagnosis is difficult because of there is not a confirmatory unique test. Management of it covers the treatment of acute relapses, disease modification, and symptoms management. These features require an individualized approach, base on evolution of this affection, and tolerability of treatments. In addition to diet, among non-pharmacologic treatments for multiple sclerosis it is recommended physical therapy. Besides, some clinical assays have been performed in which we used natural extracts, nutrition supplements, and other agents with promising results. Pharmacology allowed neurologists with a broad array of proved effectiveness drugs; however, results of research laboratories in past years make probable that therapeutical possibilities increase notably in future. (Author)

  2. Multiple sclerosis: general features and pharmacologic approach; Esclerosis multiple: aspectos generales y abordaje farmacologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen Lagumersindez, Denis; Martinez Sanchez, Gregorio [Instituto de Farmacia y Alimentos, Universidad de La Habana, La Habana (Cuba)

    2009-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune, inflammatory and desmyelinization disease central nervous system (CNS) of unknown etiology and critical evolution. There different etiological hypotheses talking of a close interrelation among predisposing genetic factors and dissimilar environmental factors, able to give raise to autoimmune response at central nervous system level. Hypothesis of autoimmune pathogeny is based on study of experimental models, and findings in biopsies of affected patients by disease. Accumulative data report that the oxidative stress plays a main role in pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Oxygen reactive species generated by macrophages has been involved as mediators of demyelinization and of axon damage, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and strictly in multiple sclerosis. Disease diagnosis is difficult because of there is not a confirmatory unique test. Management of it covers the treatment of acute relapses, disease modification, and symptoms management. These features require an individualized approach, base on evolution of this affection, and tolerability of treatments. In addition to diet, among non-pharmacologic treatments for multiple sclerosis it is recommended physical therapy. Besides, some clinical assays have been performed in which we used natural extracts, nutrition supplements, and other agents with promising results. Pharmacology allowed neurologists with a broad array of proved effectiveness drugs; however, results of research laboratories in past years make probable that therapeutical possibilities increase notably in future. (Author)

  3. Esclerosis múltiple: aspectos generales y abordaje farmacológico Multiple sclerosis: general features and pharmacologic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Lagumersindez Denis

    2009-08-01

    disease of central nervous system (CNS of unknown etiology and critical evolution. There are different etiological hypotheses talking of a close interrelation among predisposing genetic factors and dissimilar environmental factors, able to give raise to autoimmune response at central nervous system level. Hypothesis of autoimmune pathogeny is based on study of experimental models, and findings in biopsies of affected patients by disease. Accumulative data report that the oxidative stress plays a main role in pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Oxygen reactive species generated by macrophages has been involved as mediators of demyelinization and of axon damage, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and strictly in multiple sclerosis. Disease diagnosis is difficult because of there is not a confirmatory unique test. Management of it covers the treatment of acute relapses, disease modification, and symptoms management. These features require an individualized approach, base on evolution of this affection, and tolerability of treatments. In addition to diet, among non-pharmacologic treatments for multiple sclerosis it is recommended physical therapy. Besides, some clinical assays have been performed in which we used natural extracts, nutrition supplements, and other agents with promising results. Pharmacology allowed neurologists with a broad array of proved effectiveness drugs; however, results of research laboratories in past years make probable that therapeutical possibilities increase notably in future.

  4. Hippocampal sclerosis in advanced age: clinical and pathological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter T; Schmitt, Frederick A; Lin, Yushun; Abner, Erin L; Jicha, Gregory A; Patel, Ela; Thomason, Paula C; Neltner, Janna H; Smith, Charles D; Santacruz, Karen S; Sonnen, Joshua A; Poon, Leonard W; Gearing, Marla; Green, Robert C; Woodard, John L; Van Eldik, Linda J; Kryscio, Richard J

    2011-05-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is a relatively common neuropathological finding (∼10% of individuals over the age of 85 years) characterized by cell loss and gliosis in the hippocampus that is not explained by Alzheimer's disease. Hippocampal sclerosis pathology can be associated with different underlying causes, and we refer to hippocampal sclerosis in the aged brain as hippocampal sclerosis associated with ageing. Much remains unknown about hippocampal sclerosis associated with ageing. We combined three different large autopsy cohorts: University of Kentucky Alzheimer's Disease Centre, the Nun Study and the Georgia Centenarian Study to obtain a pool of 1110 patients, all of whom were evaluated neuropathologically at the University of Kentucky. We focused on the subset of cases with neuropathology-confirmed hippocampal sclerosis (n=106). For individuals aged≥95 years at death (n=179 in our sample), each year of life beyond the age of 95 years correlated with increased prevalence of hippocampal sclerosis pathology and decreased prevalence of 'definite' Alzheimer's disease pathology. Aberrant TAR DNA protein 43 immunohistochemistry was seen in 89.9% of hippocampal sclerosis positive patients compared with 9.7% of hippocampal sclerosis negative patients. TAR DNA protein 43 immunohistochemistry can be used to demonstrate that the disease is usually bilateral even when hippocampal sclerosis pathology is not obvious by haematoxylin and eosin stains. TAR DNA protein 43 immunohistochemistry was negative on brain sections from younger individuals (n=10) after hippocampectomy due to seizures, who had pathologically confirmed hippocampal sclerosis. There was no association between cases with hippocampal sclerosis associated with ageing and apolipoprotein E genotype. Age of death and clinical features of hippocampal sclerosis associated with ageing (with or without aberrant TAR DNA protein 43) were distinct from previously published cases of frontotemporal lobar degeneration TAR

  5. Hippocampal sclerosis in advanced age: clinical and pathological features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Frederick A.; Lin, Yushun; Abner, Erin L.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Patel, Ela; Thomason, Paula C.; Neltner, Janna H.; Smith, Charles D.; Santacruz, Karen S.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Poon, Leonard W.; Gearing, Marla; Green, Robert C.; Woodard, John L.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Kryscio, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is a relatively common neuropathological finding (∼10% of individuals over the age of 85 years) characterized by cell loss and gliosis in the hippocampus that is not explained by Alzheimer’s disease. Hippocampal sclerosis pathology can be associated with different underlying causes, and we refer to hippocampal sclerosis in the aged brain as hippocampal sclerosis associated with ageing. Much remains unknown about hippocampal sclerosis associated with ageing. We combined three different large autopsy cohorts: University of Kentucky Alzheimer’s Disease Centre, the Nun Study and the Georgia Centenarian Study to obtain a pool of 1110 patients, all of whom were evaluated neuropathologically at the University of Kentucky. We focused on the subset of cases with neuropathology-confirmed hippocampal sclerosis (n = 106). For individuals aged ≥95 years at death (n = 179 in our sample), each year of life beyond the age of 95 years correlated with increased prevalence of hippocampal sclerosis pathology and decreased prevalence of ‘definite’ Alzheimer’s disease pathology. Aberrant TAR DNA protein 43 immunohistochemistry was seen in 89.9% of hippocampal sclerosis positive patients compared with 9.7% of hippocampal sclerosis negative patients. TAR DNA protein 43 immunohistochemistry can be used to demonstrate that the disease is usually bilateral even when hippocampal sclerosis pathology is not obvious by haematoxylin and eosin stains. TAR DNA protein 43 immunohistochemistry was negative on brain sections from younger individuals (n = 10) after hippocampectomy due to seizures, who had pathologically confirmed hippocampal sclerosis. There was no association between cases with hippocampal sclerosis associated with ageing and apolipoprotein E genotype. Age of death and clinical features of hippocampal sclerosis associated with ageing (with or without aberrant TAR DNA protein 43) were distinct from previously published cases of frontotemporal lobar

  6. Imaging features of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ti, Joanna P

    2010-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to present the spectrum of radiologic findings of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). CONCLUSION: Although a rare diagnosis, encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis in patients undergoing CAPD has a high morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is often delayed because clinical features are insidious and nonspecific. Radiologic imaging may be helpful in the early diagnosis of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis and in facilitating timely intervention for CAPD patients with encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis.

  7. Clinical features of tuberous sclerosis complex in children with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong LI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the clinical features of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC in children with epilepsy.  Methods The clinical data of 36 TSC children complicated with epilepsy were analyzed retrospectively.  Results All children had epilepsy as first symptom: 23 cases of seizures happened on age less than one year old (63.89%, 8 cases on age 1-3 years old (22.22%, and 5 cases on age more than 3 years old (13.89% . Main attack types were as follows: 12 cases with focal seizures (33.33% , 5 cases with generalized seizures (13.89% , 7 cases with spasms (19.44% and 12 cases (33.33% with mixed seizures. Mental retardation was found in 19 cases (67.86%. Among 30 cases who received brain MRI examination, all had subependymal nodules, 26 cases (86.67% were complicated with cortical and subcortical nodules, 2 cases (6.67% with subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA, one case (3.33% with pachygyria. EEG examination showed interictal epileptiform discharges in 34 cases (94.44% , including multifocal discharges in 12 patients (35.29% , generalized discharges in 8 patients (23.53% , focal discharges and hypsarrhythmia in 7 patients (20.59% respectively. Seizures were monitored in 8 patients, and the types included spasms in 4 cases, focal seizures in 3 cases, and myoclonic seizures in one case. Seventeen cases (47.22% took one single antiepileptic drug, 12 cases (33.33% took two drugs, and 7 cases (19.44% took three drugs, while one of them underwent surgical treatment. After 0.50-10 year follow-up, seizures free happened in 7 cases (19.44%, improved in 16 cases (44.44%, and invalid in 13 cases (36.11%.  Conclusions Epilepsy is the most common nervous system performance in children TSC, and most seizures begin to happen in infants. The main types of onset are partial seizures and spasms. Most of the patients get improved with antiepileptic drugs. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.12.011

  8. Clinical and MRI features in pediatric multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Cailei; Xie Sheng; Xiao Jiangxi; Wang Shuang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical and MRI features of multiple sclerosis in children, including the clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and relapse. Methods: In total, 16 cases of pediatric multiple sclerosis were included in this study. Of them, 11 patients were female and 5 were male, with the mean onset age of 10.1 years. They were followed up for 4 months to 7 years and found to have 1- 5 relapses. The clinical manifestations of CIS and relapse were analyzed by a pediatric neurologist. An experienced neuroradiologist reviewed the MRI images of CIS and relapse. Information on the location, size, and pattern of the lesions was gathered. The location of lesions included subcortical, central, and periventricular white matter, cortex, deep gray matter, brain stem, and cerebellum. Results: CIS episode presented acute onsets in 13/16 cases, with symptoms of cortices in 10 cases and visual impairment in 6 cases. Relapse occurred in 14/16 cases within one year. The incidence of symptoms of cortices was less frequent and severe in the second episode of MS, whereas the visual impairment had a high incidence. All patients had full recovery after the last episode. MRI of CIS showed confluent subcortical white matter lesions in 13/16 cases, abutting on central white matter lesions. The most frequently involved brain part was the frontal lobe, followed by the parietal lobe. Cortical involvement was observed in 9/16 cases. In 6 cases, periventricular white matter lesions were detected. Bilateral deep gray matter was abnormal in 4 cases. Other abnormalities included brain stem lesions in 5 cases, cerebellum lesions in 3 cases, optic nerve involvement in 3 cases, and pyramidal tract lesions in 2 cases. MRI of relapse revealed more small lesions in the subcortical and periventricular white matter in the patients. In the second episode, only 2 cases presented cortical involvement. Lesions were found in the brain stem in 4 cases and in the cerebellum in 5 cases. Pyramidal tract

  9. Hand and wrist involvement in systemic sclerosis: US features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Véronique; Bazeli, Ramin; Elhai, Muriel; Campagna, Raphaël; Pessis, Éric; Avouac, Jérôme; Allanore, Yannick; Drapé, Jean-Luc; Guérini, Henri

    2013-12-01

    To characterize ultrasonographic (US) features in the hand of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and to evaluate the sensitivity of US in the detection of calcinosis and acroosteolysis. The local ethics committee approved this study, and oral informed consent was obtained. A total of 44 consecutive patients with SSc (34 women; mean age, 56.1 years ± 12.1 [standard deviation]; 10 men; mean age, 45.0 years ± 14.0) and 30 healthy control subjects (20 women; mean age, 46.3 years ± 12.1; 10 men; mean age, 39.6 years ± 10.8) were included between October 2010 and December 2011. Bilateral US, including Doppler assessment of the wrists, hands, and fingers, was performed, and presence of synovitis, tenosynovitis with or without a layered appearance, calcifications, acroosteolysis, and distal vascularization was recorded. Radiography of both hands was performed to assess for acroosteolysis and calcinosis. Frequency of US features, sensitivity of US for calcinosis and acroosteolysis, and respective confidence intervals were calculated. Synovitis was found in 17 patients (39%). Tenosynovitis was found in 12 patients (27%), and it had a layered pattern in 15 (41%) of 37 cases. Calcinosis was found in 17 patients (39%) with US, with a sensitivity of 89%. Acroosteolysis was found in nine (20%) patients with US and in 10 (23%) patients with radiography, with 90% sensitivity for US. Distal vascularization was detected in 26 patients (59%) and 30 control subjects (100%) and was in contact with the acroosteolysis bed in seven (78%) of nine patients with SSc. US can be used to assess features of SSc, including synovitis, tenosynovitis, calcinosis, acroosteolysis, and distal vascularization and is sensitive for calcinosis and acroosteolysis detection. A layered pattern (similar to the appearance of an artichoke heart) of tenosynovitis was seen commonly. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2013.

  10. Temporal lobe sclerosis associated with hippocampal sclerosis in temporal lobe epilepsy: neuropathological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Maria; Eriksson, Sofia; Martinian, Lillian; Caboclo, Luis O; McEvoy, Andrew W; Duncan, John S; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2009-08-01

    Widespread changes involving neocortical and mesial temporal lobe structures can be present in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis. The incidence, pathology, and clinical significance of neocortical temporal lobe sclerosis (TLS) are not well characterized. We identified TLS in 30 of 272 surgically treated cases of hippocampal sclerosis. Temporal lobe sclerosis was defined by variable reduction of neurons from cortical layers II/III and laminar gliosis; it was typically accompanied by additional architectural abnormalities of layer II, that is, abnormal neuronal orientation and aggregation. Quantitative analysis including tessellation methods for the distribution of layer II neurons supported these observations. In 40% of cases, there was a gradient of TLS with more severe involvement toward the temporal pole, possibly signifying involvement of hippocampal projection pathways. There was a history of a febrile seizure as an initial precipitating injury in 73% of patients with TLS compared with 36% without TLS; no other clinical differences between TLS and non-TLS cases were identified. Temporal lobe sclerosis was not evident preoperatively by neuroimaging. No obvious effect of TLS on seizure outcome was noted after temporal lobe resection; 73% became seizure-free at 2-year follow-up. In conclusion, approximately 11% of surgically treated hippocampal sclerosis is accompanied by TLS. Temporal lobe sclerosis is likely an acquired process with accompanying reorganizational dysplasia and an extension of mesial temporal sclerosis rather than a separate pathological entity.

  11. Relapses in Multiple Sclerosis: Definition, Pathophysiology, Features, Imitators, and Treatment

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    Serhan Sevim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Relapse in multiple sclerosis (MS is defined as a neurologic deficit associated with an acute inflammatory demyelinating event that lasts at least 24 hours in the absence of fever and infection. Myelinoclasis and axonal transection occur in relapses. Diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and many other features of the disease are directly related to the relapses. MS starts as the relapsing-remitting (RRMS form in 85% of patients. A large number of relapses in the first years, polysymptomatic relapses, and pyramidal system, brain stem, and spinal cord involvement are signs of a poor outcome. The average frequency of relapses is approximately one per year during the first years of RRMS. The frequency of relapses increases during systemic infections, psychological stress, and in the postpartum first 3 months. Seventy-five percent of relapses are monosymptomatic. Pseudo-relapses and paroxysmal symptoms are distinguished from relapses by their sudden onset, sudden termination, and shorter duration. Contrast enhancement is valuable in imaging, but undetectable in most relapses. The regression in the first few weeks of relapses is explained by reduction of the edema, and by remyelination in the following months. Relapses and their features are also among the main determinants of treatment. High-dose methylprednisolone and early treatment with adrenocorticotropic hormone reduce post-relapse disability and shorten the duration of relapses. Plasmapheresis is a good option for patients who do not respond to steroid treatment. Identification of relapses by patients and physicians, distinguishing them from imitators, proper evaluation, treatment when necessary, and monitoring the results are of great importance for patients with MS. The educational levels of patients and physicians regarding these parameters should be increased. Well-designed studies that evaluate the long-term effect of relapse treatment on disability are needed.

  12. Clinical features and genetic analysis of tuberous sclerosis pedigrees

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    LI Ya-qin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective In order to understand tuberous sclerosis complex better, the clinical manifestation, imaging characteristics, and genetic characteristics of tuberous sclerosis complex from 3 pedigrees were investigated. Methods The clinical data of patients from 3 tuberous sclerosis families were collected. The gene mutation type of TSC2 of proband in pedigree one was determined by PCR and direct gene sequencing. Results All of the 3 probands went to our clinic for the reason of epilepsy. Brain imaging examination noted intracranial nodular calcification. EEG showed comprehensive spines and slow waves, sharp waves. The pedigree 1 has family history, two male patients and 3 female patients, all had facial angiofibromas and epilepsy. Gene mutation analysis of TSC2 demonstrated the c.1444-2A > C mutation in index patient. All the 3 index patients had mental retardation, autism and hypopigmented macule. Conclusion For infants and young children with epilepsy as the first symptom, accompanied by mental retardation, autism, facial angiofibromas or hypopigmented macule and other skin abnormalities, brain imaging examination noted intracranial nodular calcification are highly suggestive of tuberous sclerosis complex. TSC1 and TSC2 gene analysis contribute to the diagnosis of this disease, genentic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.

  13. Multiple Sclerosis in Malaysia: Demographics, Clinical Features, and Neuroimaging Characteristics

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    S. Viswanathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS is an uncommon disease in multiracial Malaysia. Diagnosing patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases has been greatly aided by the evolution in diagnostic criterion, the identification of new biomarkers, and improved accessibility to neuroimaging in the country. Objectives. To investigate the spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia. Methods. Retrospective analysis with longitudinal follow-up of patients referred to a single tertiary medical center with neurology services in Malaysia. Results. Out of 245 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease, 104 patients had multiple sclerosis. Female to male ratio was 5 : 1. Mean age at onset was 28.6 ± 9.9 years. The Malays were the predominant racial group affected followed by the Chinese, Indians, and other indigenous groups. Subgroup analysis revealed more Chinese having neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders rather than multiple sclerosis. Positive family history was reported in 5%. Optic neuritis and myelitis were the commonest presentations at onset of disease, and relapsing remitting course was the commonest disease pattern observed. Oligoclonal band positivity was 57.6%. At disease onset, 61.5% and 66.4% fulfilled the 2005 and 2010 McDonald’s criteria for dissemination in space. Mean cord lesion length was 1.86 ± 1.65 vertebral segments in the relapsing remitting group as opposed to 6.25 ± 5.18 vertebral segments in patients with neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders. Conclusion. The spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia has changed over the years. Further advancement in diagnostic criteria will no doubt continue to contribute to the evolution of this disease here.

  14. Multiple Sclerosis in Malaysia: Demographics, Clinical Features, and Neuroimaging Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, S.; Rose, N.; Masita, A.; Dhaliwal, J. S.; Puvanarajah, S. D.; Rafia, M. H.; Muda, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an uncommon disease in multiracial Malaysia. Diagnosing patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases has been greatly aided by the evolution in diagnostic criterion, the identification of new biomarkers, and improved accessibility to neuroimaging in the country. Objectives. To investigate the spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia. Methods. Retrospective analysis with longitudinal follow-up of patients referred to a single tertiary medical center with neurology services in Malaysia. Results. Out of 245 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease, 104 patients had multiple sclerosis. Female to male ratio was 5 : 1. Mean age at onset was 28.6 ± 9.9 years. The Malays were the predominant racial group affected followed by the Chinese, Indians, and other indigenous groups. Subgroup analysis revealed more Chinese having neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders rather than multiple sclerosis. Positive family history was reported in 5%. Optic neuritis and myelitis were the commonest presentations at onset of disease, and relapsing remitting course was the commonest disease pattern observed. Oligoclonal band positivity was 57.6%. At disease onset, 61.5% and 66.4% fulfilled the 2005 and 2010 McDonald's criteria for dissemination in space. Mean cord lesion length was 1.86 ± 1.65 vertebral segments in the relapsing remitting group as opposed to 6.25 ± 5.18 vertebral segments in patients with neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders. Conclusion. The spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia has changed over the years. Further advancement in diagnostic criteria will no doubt continue to contribute to the evolution of this disease here. PMID:24455266

  15. Features of Coping with Disease in Iranian Multiple Sclerosis Patients: a Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Ali; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Ebadi, Abbas

    2018-03-01

    Introduction: Coping with disease is of the main components improving the quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients. Identifying the characteristics of this concept is based on the experiences of patients. Using qualitative research is essential to improve the quality of life. This study was conducted to explore the features of coping with the disease in patients with multiple sclerosis. Method: In this conventional content analysis study, eleven multiple sclerosis patients from Iran MS Society in Tehran (Iran) participated. Purposive sampling was used to select participants. Data were gathered using semi structured interviews. To analyze data, a conventional content analysis approach was used to identify meaning units and to make codes and categories. Results: Results showed that features of coping with disease in multiple sclerosis patients consists of (a) accepting the current situation, (b) maintenance and development of human interactions, (c) self-regulation and (d) self-efficacy. Each of these categories is composed of sub-categories and codes that showed the perception and experience of patients about the coping with disease. Conclusion: Accordingly, a unique set of features regarding features of coping with the disease were identified among the patients with multiple sclerosis. Therefore, working to ensure the emergence of, and subsequent reinforcement of these features in MS patients can be an important step in improving the adjustment and quality of their lives.

  16. MRI and clinical features in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waragai, M.

    1997-01-01

    MRI of the brain and spinal cord was performed in 21 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), 8 normal volunteers and 16 neurological disease controls. High signal was seen in the intracranial corticospinal tract in 16 of the 21 patients on T2-weighted and in 10 on proton density (PD)-weighted images. In one patient, the high signal on T2-weighted images became less marked with progression of the disease. Low signal intensity was seen in the motor cortex in 12 of the 21 patients. High signal in the anterolateral column of the spinal cord on T1 weighted images was seen in 14, and high signal in the lateral corticospinal tract on T2 weighted images was seen in 7 of the 21 patients. The relationship between the abnormal images and upper motor neurone signs remained unclear. High signal intensity was seen in the corticospinal tract in the brain on T2-weighted images in two normal volunteers and four disease controls, and on PD weighted images in three disease controls.Low signal intensity in the motor cortex on T2 weighted images was seen in three normal volunteers and four disease controls. However, high signal intensity was seen in the intracranial corticospinal tract on T1 weighted images in five patients with ALS who showed pronounced upper motor neurone signs including spastic paraparesis, but not in controls. Thus, abnormalities on MRI in the brain and spinal cord should be considered in the diagnosis of ALS, and high signal intensity of the intracranial corticospinal tract on T1-weighted images may reflect the severe pathological changes of the upper motor neurones in ALS. (orig.)

  17. MRI and clinical features in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

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    Waragai, M. [Department of Neurology, Chiba University (Japan)

    1997-12-01

    MRI of the brain and spinal cord was performed in 21 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), 8 normal volunteers and 16 neurological disease controls. High signal was seen in the intracranial corticospinal tract in 16 of the 21 patients on T2-weighted and in 10 on proton density (PD)-weighted images. In one patient, the high signal on T2-weighted images became less marked with progression of the disease. Low signal intensity was seen in the motor cortex in 12 of the 21 patients. High signal in the anterolateral column of the spinal cord on T1 weighted images was seen in 14, and high signal in the lateral corticospinal tract on T2 weighted images was seen in 7 of the 21 patients. The relationship between the abnormal images and upper motor neurone signs remained unclear. High signal intensity was seen in the corticospinal tract in the brain on T2-weighted images in two normal volunteers and four disease controls, and on PD weighted images in three disease controls.Low signal intensity in the motor cortex on T2 weighted images was seen in three normal volunteers and four disease controls. However, high signal intensity was seen in the intracranial corticospinal tract on T1 weighted images in five patients with ALS who showed pronounced upper motor neurone signs including spastic paraparesis, but not in controls. Thus, abnormalities on MRI in the brain and spinal cord should be considered in the diagnosis of ALS, and high signal intensity of the intracranial corticospinal tract on T1-weighted images may reflect the severe pathological changes of the upper motor neurones in ALS. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 19 refs.

  18. Association between MRI structural features and cognitive measures in pediatric multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, N.; Bellotti, R.; Fanizzi, A.; Lombardi, A.; Monaco, A.; Liguori, M.; Margari, L.; Simone, M.; Viterbo, R. G.; Tangaro, S.

    2017-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and demyelinating disease associated with neurodegenerative processes that lead to brain structural changes. The disease affects mostly young adults, but 3-5% of cases has a pediatric onset (POMS). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is generally used for diagnosis and follow-up in MS patients, however the most common MRI measures (e.g. new or enlarging T2-weighted lesions, T1-weighted gadolinium- enhancing lesions) have often failed as surrogate markers of MS disability and progression. MS is clinically heterogenous with symptoms that can include both physical changes (such as visual loss or walking difficulties) and cognitive impairment. 30-50% of POMS experience prominent cognitive dysfunction. In order to investigate the association between cognitive measures and brain morphometry, in this work we present a fully automated pipeline for processing and analyzing MRI brain scans. Relevant anatomical structures are segmented with FreeSurfer; besides, statistical features are computed. Thus, we describe the data referred to 12 patients with early POMS (mean age at MRI: 15.5 +/- 2.7 years) with a set of 181 structural features. The major cognitive abilities measured are verbal and visuo-spatial learning, expressive language and complex attention. Data was collected at the Department of Basic Sciences, Neurosciences and Sense Organs, University of Bari, and exploring different abilities like the verbal and visuo-spatial learning, expressive language and complex attention. Different regression models and parameter configurations are explored to assess the robustness of the results, in particular Generalized Linear Models, Bayes Regression, Random Forests, Support Vector Regression and Artificial Neural Networks are discussed.

  19. Generalized seizures in the right hippocampus sclerosis combined with hypoplasia of the right vertebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchev, L.; Toneva, J.; Manolova, T.; Manchev, I.; Valcheva, V.

    2016-01-01

    We present a clinical case of generalized epileptic seizures, occurring suddenly. The common finding from MRI of the brain is sclerosis of the right hippocampus, while MR angiography shows hypoplasia of the right vertebral artery. There are EEG signs for single foci of abnormal activity more on the right side. An anticonvulsant and symptomatic treatment demonstrate a favorable result. Under discussion is the question of surgery treatment. Key words: Hippocampal Sclerosis. MRI. Epileptic Seizures

  20. Epidemiological and clinical features of patients with disseminated sclerosis in Perm region

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    Zhelnin A.V.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to identify the epidemiological and clinical features of disseminated sclerosis (DS in Perm region. Material and methods: Data have been analyzed in 932 patients with DS. Among them there were 607 women (65% and 325 men (35%. The age of patients with DS varied from 17 to 68 years, in average 44,5±4,5years. All the patients have experienced comprehensive clinical and neurological study, MRI study of brain and spinal cord. Calculation of prevalence and incidence has been conducted among 100,000 people. Results: The prevalence of DS in Perm region on January 1, 2011 amounted to 35.1 cases perthe population of 100,000 people, which can be attributed to our region to the zone of medium risk of DS developing. The growth of incidence of DS in Perm region has been revealed. It has been determined that in 1997 the incidence of DS averaged 3.2. Risk factors have been identified. Conclusion: The data on the prevalence and incidence of disseminated sclerosis help improve the quality of treatment and preventive care for patients with disseminated sclerosis.

  1. Spastic paretic hemifacial contracture as a presenting feature of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsis, Georgios; Breza, Marianthi; Evangelopoulos, Maria-Eleftheria; Anagnostouli, Maria; Andreadou, Elisavet; Karagiorgis, Georgios; Kokotis, Panagiotis; Kilidireas, Costas; Karandreas, Nikolaos

    2017-04-01

    Spastic paretic hemifacial contracture (SPHC) is characterized by sustained unilateral contraction of the facial muscles associated with mild ipsilateral facial paresis. Rarely described in the context of multiple sclerosis (MS), it has never been reported as presenting symptom of MS. Two patients developed SPHC within the context of a clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of MS. EMG revealed continuous resting activity of irregularly firing motor unit potentials, associated with impaired recruitment upon voluntary contraction. SPHC remitted fully in both patients. SPHC, a rare but distinct clinical and EMG entity, can occasionally be the presenting feature of MS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mucocutaneous and demographic features of systemic sclerosis: A profile of 46 patients from Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Kumar Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systemic sclerosis (SSc is a multisystem connective tissue disorder of uncertain etiology. The clinical picture is frequently dominated by prominent cutaneous manifestations that have diagnostic and prognostic significance. The objective of the present study was to find out the demographic profile and the relative frequencies and characteristics of different mucocutaneous features of SSc in a group of patients from eastern India. In addition, we sought to compare the frequency and pattern of the findings in the limited versus the diffuse variety of the disease. Materials and Methods:This was a cross-sectional, clinical observational study. Consecutive patients of SSc attending the dermatology O.P.D. of a tertiary care hospital of eastern India over 3 years were enrolled to the present study. Results:A total of 46 patients (41 females and 5 males; mean age 29.6±12.3 years of SSc were evaluated. Among mucocutaneous manifestations Raynaud′s phenomenon was present in 39 (84.8% patients. Other cutaneous features included dyspigmentation (40, 86.9%, sclerodactyly (38, 82.6%, inability to open the mouth (38,82.6%, mat-like telangiectasia (11,23.1%, fingertip ulceration and scarring (29,63%, cutaneous calcinosis (1,2.2%, digital gangrene in (2,4.3%, generalized pruritus (4,8.7%, cutaneous small vessel vasculitis (2,4.3%, chronic urticaria (2,4.3%, flexion contractures of the fingers (13,28.3%, and amputation of the digits (3,6.5%. Mucosal changes were observed in 10 (21.7% patients and nail changes were seen in 13 (28.2% patients. Diffuse cutaneous SSc was noted in 27 (58.7% patients and limited cutaneous SSc was seen in the remainder. Thirty-six (78.2% patients tested positive for ANA. Conclusion: The present study provides a snapshot of the spectrum of the demographic and mucocutaneous manifestations of SSc in the eastern Indian population. We have not observed any statistically significant differences between dcSSc and lcSSc in terms

  3. Central nervous system infectious diseases mimicking multiple sclerosis: recognizing distinguishable features using MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Jose da Rocha

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The current diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS confirm the relevant role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, supporting the possibility of characterizing the dissemination in space (DIS and the dissemination in time (DIT in a single scan. To maintain the specificity of these criteria, it is necessary to determine whether T2/FLAIR visible lesions and the gadolinium enhancement can be attributed to diseases that mimic MS. Several diseases are included in the MS differential diagnosis list, including diseases with exacerbation, remitting periods and numerous treatable infectious diseases, which can mimic the MRI features of MS. We discuss the most relevant imaging features in several infectious diseases that resemble MS and examine the primary spatial distributions of lesions and the gadolinium enhancement patterns related to MS. Recognizing imaging "red flags" can be useful for the proper diagnostic evaluation of suspected cases of MS, facilitating the correct differential diagnosis by assessing the combined clinical, laboratory and MR imaging information.

  4. Sjögren Syndrome Which Simulates Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Features: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk Gümüş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren syndrome (SS is a chronic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease. It emerges as a dry mouth and eyes (sicca symptoms because, it fundamentally affects exocrine glands, frequently, salivary gland and lachrymal gland. Neurological involvement in Sjögren syndrome is observed in the approximately 20-25% of cases. 87% of the neurological involvements are peripheral nervous system involvement and around 13% of the neurological involvements are central nervous system involvement. Cerebral involvement represents heterogeneous features in terms of both localization (focal or diffuse and progress of the statement (acute, progressive or reversible. Affected central nervous system can show clinical and radiological signs similar to Multiple sclerosis (MS. In this paper, the case, which has a complaint of difficulty in walking and instability and MS like lesions in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and is diagnosed as Sjögren syndrome by further research, is discussed

  5. Features of systemic sclerosis-rheumatoid arthritis overlap syndrome (SS-RA overlap syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Desinova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To reveal clinico-laboratory, immunologic and immunogenetic features of systemic sclerosis-rheumatoid arthritis overlap syndrome (SS-RA.Material and methods. 32 pts with SS-RA (1 male, 31 female aged 22 to 74 years with disease onset at 18 to 69 years and disease duration from 1 to 35 years were included. Complex laboratory and instrumental examination was performed including nailfold capillaroscopy. A part of pts was also evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging of hands. Serum level of rheumatoid factor, antinuclear factor, circulating immune complexes, C-reactive protein, antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (ACCP was evaluated. Genotyping of DRB1 alleles was performed.Results. Characteristic features of SS-RA were prevalence of limited skin damage, less prominent peripheral and visceral symptoms of SS, presence of anti-topoisomerase antibodies and erosive arthritis, high laboratory and immunological activity, more frequent association with DRB1*01.Conclusion. SS-RA possesses its own clinical features and can be considered as a distinct subtype of SS.

  6. General unifying features of controlled quantum phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechen, Alexander; Brif, Constantin; Wu, Rebing; Chakrabarti, Raj; Rabitz, Herschel

    2010-01-01

    Many proposals have been put forth for controlling quantum phenomena, including open-loop, adaptive feedback, and real-time feedback control. Each of these approaches has been viewed as operationally, and even physically, distinct from the others. This work shows that all such scenarios inherently share the same fundamental control features residing in the topology of the landscape relating the target physical observable to the applied controls. This unified foundation may provide a basis for development of hybrid control schemes that would combine the advantages of the existing approaches to achieve the best overall performance.

  7. Tuberous sclerosis: Ultrasound, CT and MRI features of two cases with multiple organ involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslan, A.; Ciftci, E.; Cetin, A.; Selcuk, H.; Demirci, A.

    1998-01-01

    The cases of two patients with tuberous sclerosis with multiple sites of involvement are presented. Both patients had characteristic cerebral lesions of tuberous sclerosis associated with bilateral renal angiomyolipomas and hepatic hamartomas. Additionally there were diffuse pulmonary cystic changes in one patient and cardiac rhabdomyoma in the other. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  8. Distinctive MRI features of the epileptogenic zone in children with tuberous sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahodova, A.; Krsek, P.; Kyncl, M.; Jezdik, P.; Kudr, M.; Komarek, V.; Jayakar, P.; Miller, I.; Resnick, T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Localization of the epileptogenic zone (EZ) is challenging in children with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). We sought to ascertain whether brain MRI could identify the EZ in TSC patients independent of the clinical and diagnostic data. Methods: Presurgical MRI's of 34 children with TSC who underwent epilepsy surgery at Miami Children's Hospital were retrospectively reevaluated by experts blinded to all other data. Changes typical of TSC (tubers, calcifications, cystic changes) and abnormalities of the perituberal cortex typical of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) (increased cortical thickness, abnormal gyration, transmantle change, gray/white matter junction blurring) were identified and their localization was compared with the resection site. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of individual MRI features to localize the EZ were determined and statistically compared between postoperatively seizure-free and non-seizure-free patients as well as clusters of features typical of FCD and TSC. Results: MRI alone correctly localized the resection cavity in all 19 postoperatively seizure-free patients and 12 of 15 non-seizure-free subjects. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI features typical of FCD to localize EZ (90%, 96% and 96%, respectively) were superior to those typical of TCS (79%, 75% and 75%, p < 0.0001). Increased cortical thickness and abnormal gyral formation outside tubers occurred only in the resection site. Resection sites were better predicted by MRI in seizure-free than in non-seizure-free patients. Conclusion: Thorough MRI evaluation identifies the EZ in a significant proportion of TSC patients. Epileptogenic regions were mostly characterized by “FCD-like” changes outside cortical tubers. The findings may have important practical consequences for surgical planning in TSC

  9. Distinctive MRI features of the epileptogenic zone in children with tuberous sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahodova, A., E-mail: a.jagoda@email.cz [Department of Pediatric Neurology, Charles University, Second Medical School, Motol University Hospital, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5 150 06 (Czech Republic); Krsek, P., E-mail: pavel.krsek@post.cz [Department of Pediatric Neurology, Charles University, Second Medical School, Motol University Hospital, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5 150 06 (Czech Republic); Kyncl, M., E-mail: martinkyn@seznam.cz [Department of Radiology, Charles University, Second Medical School, Motol University Hospital, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5 150 06 (Czech Republic); Jezdik, P., E-mail: jezdip1@feld.cvut.cz [Department of Measurement, Faculty of Electric, Czech Technical University Prague, Technicka 2, CZ 166 27 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Kudr, M., E-mail: mat.kudr@gmail.com [Department of Pediatric Neurology, Charles University, Second Medical School, Motol University Hospital, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5 150 06 (Czech Republic); Komarek, V., E-mail: vladimir.komarek@fnmotol.cz [Department of Pediatric Neurology, Charles University, Second Medical School, Motol University Hospital, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5 150 06 (Czech Republic); Jayakar, P., E-mail: Prasanna.Jayakar@mch.com [Department of Neurology and Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, Brain Institute, Miami Children' s Hospital, 3200 S.W. 60th Court, Miami, FL (United States); Miller, I., E-mail: ian.miller@mchdocs.com [Department of Neurology and Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, Brain Institute, Miami Children' s Hospital, 3200 S.W. 60th Court, Miami, FL (United States); Resnick, T., E-mail: trevor.resnick@mch.com [Department of Neurology and Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, Brain Institute, Miami Children' s Hospital, 3200 S.W. 60th Court, Miami, FL (United States); Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); and others

    2014-04-15

    Objective: Localization of the epileptogenic zone (EZ) is challenging in children with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). We sought to ascertain whether brain MRI could identify the EZ in TSC patients independent of the clinical and diagnostic data. Methods: Presurgical MRI's of 34 children with TSC who underwent epilepsy surgery at Miami Children's Hospital were retrospectively reevaluated by experts blinded to all other data. Changes typical of TSC (tubers, calcifications, cystic changes) and abnormalities of the perituberal cortex typical of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) (increased cortical thickness, abnormal gyration, transmantle change, gray/white matter junction blurring) were identified and their localization was compared with the resection site. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of individual MRI features to localize the EZ were determined and statistically compared between postoperatively seizure-free and non-seizure-free patients as well as clusters of features typical of FCD and TSC. Results: MRI alone correctly localized the resection cavity in all 19 postoperatively seizure-free patients and 12 of 15 non-seizure-free subjects. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI features typical of FCD to localize EZ (90%, 96% and 96%, respectively) were superior to those typical of TCS (79%, 75% and 75%, p < 0.0001). Increased cortical thickness and abnormal gyral formation outside tubers occurred only in the resection site. Resection sites were better predicted by MRI in seizure-free than in non-seizure-free patients. Conclusion: Thorough MRI evaluation identifies the EZ in a significant proportion of TSC patients. Epileptogenic regions were mostly characterized by “FCD-like” changes outside cortical tubers. The findings may have important practical consequences for surgical planning in TSC.

  10. Generalized morphea, lichen sclerosis et atrophicus associated with oral submucosal fibrosis in an adult male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virdi Sarvjit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized morphea is a disease characterized by wide-spread sclerosis of the skin. A 39-year-old man presented with history of multiple pigmented and bound-down plaques on the body along with mucosal involvement. Dermatological examination showed multiple indurated and sclerosed plaques with follicular plugging in few of them and gross thickened eroded and glazed tongue. The constellation of these findings with histopathological correlation led us to diagnosis of this spectrum of cutaneous involvement. The coexistence of localized morphea with lichen sclerosis et atrophicus has been reported earlier but existence of these entities with submucosal fibrosis in a same patient is documented here and is the first of its kind.

  11. Clinical and laboratory features of systemic sclerosis complicated with localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toki, Sayaka; Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Kanai, Sahori; Yamanaka, Masayoshi; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2015-03-01

    Localized scleroderma (LSc) primarily affects skin, whereas systemic sclerosis (SSc) affects skin and various internal organs. LSc and SSc are considered to be basically different diseases, and there is no transition between them. However, LSc and SSc have several common characteristics, including endothelial cell dysfunction, immune activation, and excess fibrosis of the skin, and there exist several SSc cases complicated with LSc during the course of SSc. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of SSc patients with LSc remain unclear. We investigated the clinical and laboratory features of 8 SSc patients with LSc among 220 SSc patients (3.6%). The types of LSc included plaque (5/8), guttate (2/8), and linear type (1/8). All cases were diagnosed as having SSc within 5 years before or after the appearance of LSc. In three cases of SSc with LSc (37.5%), LSc skin lesions preceded clinical symptoms of SSc. Young age, negative antinuclear antibody, and positive anti-RNA polymerase III antibody were significantly prevalent in SSc patients with LSc. The positivity of anticentromere antibody tended to be prevalent in SSc patients without LSc. No significant difference in the frequency of complications, such as interstitial lung disease, reflux esophagitis, and pulmonary artery hypertension, was observed. The awareness of these characteristic of SSc with LSc are essential to establish an early diagnosis and treatment. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  12. An Integrated Account of Generalization across Objects and Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Charles; Shafto, Patrick; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2012-01-01

    Humans routinely make inductive generalizations about unobserved features of objects. Previous accounts of inductive reasoning often focus on inferences about a single object or feature: accounts of causal reasoning often focus on a single object with one or more unobserved features, and accounts of property induction often focus on a single…

  13. Depression and anxiety in a case series of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: frequency and association with clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Laura de Godoy Rousseff; Bicalho, Isabella Carolina Santos; Vidigal-Lopes, Mauro; Prado, Vitor de Godoy Rousseff; Gomez, Rodrigo Santiago; de Souza, Leonardo Cruz; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of anxiety and depression and their association with clinical features of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This is a cross-sectional and descriptive study including a consecutive series of patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis according to Awaji's criteria. Patients underwent clinical and psychiatric assessment (anxiety and depression symptoms). We included 76 patients. The men/women ratio was 1.6:1. Participants' mean age at disease onset was 55 years (SD±12.1). Sixty-six patients (86.8%) were able to complete psychiatric evaluation. Clinically significant anxiety was found in 23 patients (34.8%) while clinically significant depression was found in 24 patients (36.4%). When we compared patients with and without depression a significant difference was seen only in the frequency of anxiety symptoms (pescala funcional. Foi encontrada correlação positiva entre os sintomas de ansiedade e depressão (pescala funcional.

  14. Tracheostomy mechanical ventilation in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: clinical features and survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spataro, Rossella; Bono, Valeria; Marchese, Santino; La Bella, Vincenzo

    2012-12-15

    Tracheostomy mechanical ventilation (TMV) is performed in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with a respiratory failure or when the non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is no longer effective. We evaluated the clinical characteristics and survival of a cohort of tracheostomized ALS patients, followed in a single ALS Clinical Center. Between 2001 and 2010, 87 out of 279 ALS patients were submitted to TMV. Onset was spinal in 62 and bulbar in 25. After tracheostomy, most patients were followed up through telephone interviews to caregivers. A complete survival analysis could be performed in fifty-two TMV patients. 31.3% ALS patients underwent tracheostomy, with a male prevalence (M/F=1.69) and a median age of 61 years (interquartile range=47-66). After tracheostomy, nearly all patients were under home care. TMV ALS patients were more likely than non-tracheostomized (NT) patients to be implanted with a PEG device, although the bulbar-/spinal-onset ratio did not differ between the two groups. Kaplan-Meyer analysis showed that tracheostomy increases median survival (TMV, 47 months vs NT, 31 months, p=0.008), with the greatest effect in patients younger than 60 at onset (TMV ≤ 60 years, 57.5 months vs NT ≤ 60 years, 38.5 months, p=0.002). TMV is increasingly performed in ALS patients. Nearly all TMV patients live at home and most of them are fed through a PEG device. Survival after tracheostomy is generally increased, with the stronger effect in patients younger than 60. This survival advantage is apparently lost when TMV is performed in patients older than 60. The results of this study might be useful for the decision-making process of patients and their families about this advanced palliative care. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Correlation of Creatine Kinase Levels with Clinical Features and Survival in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongfei Tai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate serum creatine kinase (CK levels of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS patients and to explore the relationship between CK levels and the clinical characteristics and survival prognosis of ALS patients.MethodsWe analyzed the CK levels of 185 ALS patients who underwent long-term follow-up. The relationship between CK levels and clinical features including sex, age, disease duration, site of onset, body mass index (BMI, serum creatinine (Cr, and spontaneous electromyographic activity was analyzed by univariate analysis and multiple linear regression. Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used to explore whether CK levels were independently correlated with survival prognosis of ALS.ResultsBaseline serum CK was raised in 43% of participants. The median CK level was 160 U/L (range: 20–2,574 U/L, and 99% of patients had a baseline serum CK level less than 1,000 U/L. CK levels were significantly higher in male patients than in female patients [204 (169 versus 117 (111 U/L, p < 0.001] and in patients with limb onset ALS than with bulbar onset ALS (p < 0.001. CK levels were also correlated with serum Cr (p = 0.011 and the spontaneous potential score of electromyography (EMG (p = 0.037 but not correlated with age (p = 0.883, disease duration (p = 0.116, or BMI (p = 0.481. Log CK was independently correlated with survival of ALS patients (HR = 0.457, 95% confidence interval 0.221–0.947, p = 0.035 after adjusting for age, sex, site of onset, serum Cr, and BMI.ConclusionSerum CK levels of ALS patients were correlated with sex, site of onsite, serum Cr, and spontaneous activity in EMG. Serum CK could be an independent prognostic factor for survival of ALS patients.

  16. Comparison study of imaging features of multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianguo; Zhang Hailing; Zheng Kuihong; Zhang Wenluo; Dong Qinwen; Qi Xiaokun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the imaging characteristics of multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) for better diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Methods: The brain and spinal MRI images of 60 MS and 48 NMO cases were retrospectively reviewed. The imaging characteristics including the predilection site, morphological features, enhancement manifestations were summarized. All data was analyzed by using t test and Chi square test with SPSS 13.0. Results: (1) The three top predilection sites of brain in head MRI of MS patients were periventricular white matter (34 cases in 60), subcortical white matter (27 cases in 60), brain stem (23 cases in 60). MS lesions also were found in basal ganglia, cerebellum, corpus callosum and thalamus,as well as cortex (9 cases in 60). By contrast, brain lesions were observed in 59.4% (19/32) of NMO patients, and the three top predilection sites of NMO by turns were brain stem (13 cases in 19), periventricular white matter (12 cases in 19), subcortical white matter (7 cases in 19). Furthermore, the lesions surrounding third ventricle (6 cases in 19) and the tegmentum of brain stem near peri-aqueduct (8 cases in 19) in NMO were not found in patients of MS. The involvement of brain stem and thalamus was more frequent in NMO than in MS (χ 2 =5.267, 6.004, P<0.05, respectively). (2) The lesions of spinal cord in MS patients were typically oval, peripheral, and asymmetric, but in NMO patients they were longitudinally extensive and centrally located. The mean number of involved vertebral segments in NMO patients was significantly more than that in MS patients (7.3 vs 2.2, t=-9.288, P<0.01). Furthermore, the number of spinal cord lesions in MS patients was remarkably more than that in NMO (2.0 vs 1.3, t=4.565, P<0.01). The ratios of occurrence of spinal cord swelling and distension of NMO patients was 58.3% (28/48), which was significantly higher than 21.9% in MS (7/32, χ 2 =10.370, P<0.01). (3) The enhancement pattern in MS was

  17. Polish Qualitative Sociology: The General Features and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Konecki, Krzysztof Tomasz

    2005-01-01

    The article explores the development of Polish qualitative sociology in Poland by presenting its main intellectual routes and some of the general features of Polish sociology. Romanticism and inductionmethod are crucial elements for the development of this discipline in Poland and contribute to its. unigueness. The role of Florian Znaniecki in creating the Polish qualitative sociology is also underlined. Krzysztof Konecki

  18. The 7-item generalized anxiety disorder scale as a tool for measuring generalized anxiety in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Alexandra L; Hartoonian, Narineh; Beier, Meghan; Salem, Rana; Alschuler, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is common in multiple sclerosis (MS) but understudied. Reliable and valid measures are needed to advance clinical care and expand research in this area. The objectives of this study were to examine the psychometric properties of the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) in individuals with MS and to analyze correlates of GAD. Participants (N = 513) completed the anxiety module of the Patient Health Questionnaire (GAD-7). To evaluate psychometric properties of the GAD-7, the sample was randomly split to conduct exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Based on the exploratory factor analysis, a one-factor structure was specified for the confirmatory factor analysis, which showed excellent global fit to the data (χ(2) 12 = 15.17, P = .23, comparative fit index = 0.99, root mean square error of approximation = 0.03, standardized root mean square residual = 0.03). The Cronbach alpha (0.75) indicated acceptable internal consistency for the scale. Furthermore, the GAD-7 was highly correlated with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety (r = 0.70). Age and duration of MS were both negatively associated with GAD. Higher GAD-7 scores were observed in women and individuals with secondary progressive MS. Individuals with higher GAD-7 scores also endorsed more depressive symptoms. These findings support the reliability and internal validity of the GAD-7 for use in MS. Correlational analyses revealed important relationships with demographics, disease course, and depressive symptoms, which suggest the need for further anxiety research.

  19. Polish Qualitative Sociology: The General Features and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Konecki, Krzysztof Tomasz; Kacperczyk, Anna; Marciniak, Łukasz

    2005-01-01

    Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research,2005, 6(3) The article explores the development of Polish qualitative sociology in Poland by presenting its main intellectual routes and some of the general features of Polish sociology. Romanticism and inductionmethod are crucial elements for the development of this discipline in Poland and contribute to its. unigueness. The role of Florian Znaniecki in creating the Polish qualitative sociology is also underlined.

  20. Deep 3D Convolutional Encoder Networks With Shortcuts for Multiscale Feature Integration Applied to Multiple Sclerosis Lesion Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosch, Tom; Tang, Lisa Y W; Youngjin Yoo; Li, David K B; Traboulsee, Anthony; Tam, Roger

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel segmentation approach based on deep 3D convolutional encoder networks with shortcut connections and apply it to the segmentation of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions in magnetic resonance images. Our model is a neural network that consists of two interconnected pathways, a convolutional pathway, which learns increasingly more abstract and higher-level image features, and a deconvolutional pathway, which predicts the final segmentation at the voxel level. The joint training of the feature extraction and prediction pathways allows for the automatic learning of features at different scales that are optimized for accuracy for any given combination of image types and segmentation task. In addition, shortcut connections between the two pathways allow high- and low-level features to be integrated, which enables the segmentation of lesions across a wide range of sizes. We have evaluated our method on two publicly available data sets (MICCAI 2008 and ISBI 2015 challenges) with the results showing that our method performs comparably to the top-ranked state-of-the-art methods, even when only relatively small data sets are available for training. In addition, we have compared our method with five freely available and widely used MS lesion segmentation methods (EMS, LST-LPA, LST-LGA, Lesion-TOADS, and SLS) on a large data set from an MS clinical trial. The results show that our method consistently outperforms these other methods across a wide range of lesion sizes.

  1. Feature Import Vector Machine: A General Classifier with Flexible Feature Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Samiran; Wang, Yazhen

    2015-02-01

    The support vector machine (SVM) and other reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) based classifier systems are drawing much attention recently due to its robustness and generalization capability. General theme here is to construct classifiers based on the training data in a high dimensional space by using all available dimensions. The SVM achieves huge data compression by selecting only few observations which lie close to the boundary of the classifier function. However when the number of observations are not very large (small n ) but the number of dimensions/features are large (large p ), then it is not necessary that all available features are of equal importance in the classification context. Possible selection of an useful fraction of the available features may result in huge data compression. In this paper we propose an algorithmic approach by means of which such an optimal set of features could be selected. In short, we reverse the traditional sequential observation selection strategy of SVM to that of sequential feature selection. To achieve this we have modified the solution proposed by Zhu and Hastie (2005) in the context of import vector machine (IVM), to select an optimal sub-dimensional model to build the final classifier with sufficient accuracy.

  2. The risk of fracture in patients with multiple sclerosis: The UK general practice research database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bazelier, Marloes T; van Staa, Tjeerd; Uitdehaag, Bernard Mj

    2011-01-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be at an increased risk of fracture owing to a greater risk of falling and decreased bone mineral density when compared with the general population. This study was designed to estimate the relative and absolute risk of fracture in patients with MS. We...... were used to derive adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for fracture associated with MS. Time-dependent adjustments were made for age, comorbidity, and drug use. Absolute 5- and 10-year risks of fracture were estimated for MS patients as a function of age. Compared with controls, MS patients had an almost...... threefold increased risk of hip fracture [HR = 2.79,95% confidence interval (CI) 1.83-4.26] and a risk of osteoporotic fracture that was increased 1.4-fold (HR = 1.35,95% CI 1.13-1.62). Risk was greater in patients who had been prescribed oral/intravenous glucocorticoids (GCs; HR = 1.85, 95% CI 1...

  3. Clinical Features of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Chen

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The different CSF features combined with clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and serum characteristics between Chinese patients with MS and NMOSD could assist in the differential diagnosis.

  4. The investigation of genetic and clinical features in Chinese patients with juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z-J; Lin, H-X; Liu, G-L; Tao, Q-Q; Ni, W; Xiao, B-G; Wu, Z-Y

    2017-09-01

    Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (JALS) occurs at an age of onset below 25 years with a heterogeneous disease onset location, variable progression and survival time. To investigate whether an ALS gene profile could resolve any aspects of clinical symptom heterogeneity, we have used targeted sequencing technology in a cohort of 12 JALS patients of Chinese descent. We detected 5 likely pathogenic mutations, 2 in familial probands and 3 in sporadic patients. One was a known TARDBP mutation (p.G348V) and 4 were FUS frameshift mutations including a known p.Gln519Ilefs*9 mutation and 3 novel mutations, p.Gly515Valfs*14, p.Gly486Profs*30, and p.Arg498Alafs*32. Of the 4 FUS mutations, 2 were able to be confirmed as de novo mutations. The TARDBP mutation carrier showed a classic ALS phenotype. All patients with FUS mutations experienced limb weakness at an early age and developed bulbar symptoms during the disease course. FUS mutations have previously been associated with increased JALS disease progression, however, we found a large range 12 to 84 months in disease survival (mean 58.2 months). Our results justify future screening for variants in FUS as it remains the most frequent genetic determinant of early onset, JALS (found in 30% of our patients). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The co-occurrence of multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes: shared aetiologic features and clinical implication for MS aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tettey, Prudence; Simpson, Steve; Taylor, Bruce V; van der Mei, Ingrid A F

    2015-01-15

    We reviewed the evidence for the co-occurrence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) and multiple sclerosis (MS), and assessed the clinical significance of this association and the shared aetiological features of the two diseases. T1D and MS contribute considerably to the burden of autoimmune diseases in young adults. The co-occurrence of MS and T1D has been reported by a number of studies, suggesting that the two conditions share one or more aetiological components. Both conditions have been associated with distinct human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes but share a number of similarities in clinical, epidemiological and immunological features, leading to suggestions of possible common mechanisms of development. While underlying genetic factors may be important for the co-occurrence of both conditions, some evidence suggests that environmental factors such as vitamin D deficiency may also modulate an individual's risk for the development of both conditions. Evidence on whether the co-occurrence of the two autoimmune conditions will affect the disease course and severity of MS is merely absent. Further studies need to be conducted to ascertain whether the neuropathology associated with T1D might influence the disease course and contribute to the severity of MS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging features of the spinal cord in pediatric multiple sclerosis: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhey, Leonard H. [Hospital for Sick Children, Neuroscience and Mental Health, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Branson, Helen M.; Shroff, Manohar [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Neuroradiology), Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Makhija, Monica [Hospital for Sick Children, Neuroscience and Mental Health, Toronto, ON (Canada); Banwell, Brenda [Hospital for Sick Children, Neuroscience and Mental Health, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Pediatrics (Neurology), Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    Spinal cord lesions in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) are thought to contribute to disability. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance and clinical correlates of spinal cord lesions in children with MS have not been reported. T1-weighted pre- and post-gadolinium and T2-weighted TSE/FSE spine MR images of 36 children (age, 14.3 {+-} 3.3) with relapsing-remitting MS (annualized relapse rate, 0.7; disease duration, 7.5 {+-} 3.3 years) were analyzed for total lesion count, lesion location and length, intramedullary extent, and gadolinium enhancement. Clinical, demographic, laboratory, and MRI data were correlated. Lesions preferentially involved the cervical region, were predominantly focal, and involved only a portion of the transverse cord diameter. However, ten of 36 patients demonstrated longitudinally extensive lesions. Children with the highest clinical relapse rate also tended to have more spinal cord lesions and were more likely to accrue new lesions on serial spinal scans. These preliminary data suggest that MS lesions of the spinal cord in children are radiographically similar to that of adult-onset MS - supporting a common biology of pediatric- and adult-onset disease. However, children with relapsing-remitting MS can also develop longitudinally extensive lesions, suggesting that such lesions may be less specific for diseases such as neuromyelitis optica in pediatric patients. All patients recovered well from spinal cord attacks, and the presence of spinal cord lesions in the first few years of disease did not correlate with physical disability. Measures of spinal cord atrophy and longer periods of observation are required to determine the impact of spinal cord involvement in pediatric-onset MS. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging features of the spinal cord in pediatric multiple sclerosis: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhey, Leonard H.; Branson, Helen M.; Shroff, Manohar; Makhija, Monica; Banwell, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord lesions in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) are thought to contribute to disability. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance and clinical correlates of spinal cord lesions in children with MS have not been reported. T1-weighted pre- and post-gadolinium and T2-weighted TSE/FSE spine MR images of 36 children (age, 14.3 ± 3.3) with relapsing-remitting MS (annualized relapse rate, 0.7; disease duration, 7.5 ± 3.3 years) were analyzed for total lesion count, lesion location and length, intramedullary extent, and gadolinium enhancement. Clinical, demographic, laboratory, and MRI data were correlated. Lesions preferentially involved the cervical region, were predominantly focal, and involved only a portion of the transverse cord diameter. However, ten of 36 patients demonstrated longitudinally extensive lesions. Children with the highest clinical relapse rate also tended to have more spinal cord lesions and were more likely to accrue new lesions on serial spinal scans. These preliminary data suggest that MS lesions of the spinal cord in children are radiographically similar to that of adult-onset MS - supporting a common biology of pediatric- and adult-onset disease. However, children with relapsing-remitting MS can also develop longitudinally extensive lesions, suggesting that such lesions may be less specific for diseases such as neuromyelitis optica in pediatric patients. All patients recovered well from spinal cord attacks, and the presence of spinal cord lesions in the first few years of disease did not correlate with physical disability. Measures of spinal cord atrophy and longer periods of observation are required to determine the impact of spinal cord involvement in pediatric-onset MS. (orig.)

  8. Morphometric MRI features are associated with surgical outcome in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Maria Teresa Fernandes Castilho; Gaça, Larissa Botelho; Sandim, Gabriel Barbosa; Assunção Leme, Idaiane Batista; Carrete, Henrique; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Sato, João Ricardo; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2017-05-01

    Corticoamygdalohippocampectomy (CAH) improves seizure control, quality of life, and decreases mortality for refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS). One-third of patients continue having seizures, and it is pivotal to determine structural abnormalities that might influence the postoperative outcome. Studies indicate that nonhippocampal regions may play a role in the epileptogenic network in MTLE-HS and could generate seizures postoperatively. The aim of this study is to analyze areas of atrophy, not always detected on routine MRI, comparing patients who became seizure free (SF) with those non seizure free (NSF) after CAH, in an attempt to establish possible predictors of surgical outcome. 105 patients with refractory MTLE-HS submitted to CAH (59 left MTLE; 46 males) and 47 controls were enrolled. FreeSurfer was performed for cortical thickness and volume estimation comparing patients to controls and SF versus NSF patients. The final sample after post processing procedures resulted in 99 patients. Cortical thickness analyses showed reductions in left insula in NSF patients compared to those SF. Significant volume reductions in SF patients were present in bilateral thalami, hippocampi and pars opercularis, left parahippocampal gyrus and right temporal pole. In NSF patients reductions were present bilaterally in thalami, hippocampi, entorhinal cortices, superior frontal and supramarginal gyri; on the left: superior and middle temporal gyri, temporal pole, parahippocampal gyrus, pars opercularis and middle frontal gyrus; and on the right: precentral, superior, middle and inferior temporal gyri. Comparison between SF and NSF patients showed ipsilateral gray matter reductions in the right entorhinal cortex (p=0.003) and contralateral parahippocampal gyrus (p=0.05) in right MTLE-HS. Patients NSF had a longer duration of epilepsy than those SF (p=0.028). NSF patients exhibited more extensive areas of atrophy than SF ones. As entorhinal

  9. Metabolomic approach to human brain spectroscopy identifies associations between clinical features and the frontal lobe metabolome in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingara, Lisa K.; Yu, Hui Jing; Wagshul, Mark E.; Serafin, Dana; Christodoulou, Christopher; Pelczer, István; Krupp, Lauren B.; Maletić-Savatić, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) is capable of noninvasively detecting metabolic changes that occur in the brain tissue in vivo. Its clinical utility has been limited so far, however, by analytic methods that focus on independently evaluated metabolites and require prior knowledge about which metabolites to examine. Here, we applied advanced computational methodologies from the field of metabolomics, specifically partial least squares discriminant analysis and orthogonal partial least squares, to in vivo 1H-MRS from frontal lobe white matter of 27 patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and 14 healthy controls. We chose RRMS, a chronic demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, because its complex pathology and variable disease course make the need for reliable biomarkers of disease progression more pressing. We show that in vivo MRS data, when analyzed by multivariate statistical methods, can provide reliable, distinct profiles of MRS-detectable metabolites in different patient populations. Specifically, we find that brain tissue in RRMS patients deviates significantly in its metabolic profile from that of healthy controls, even though it appears normal by standard MRI techniques. We also identify, using statistical means, the metabolic signatures of certain clinical features common in RRMS, such as disability score, cognitive impairments, and response to stress. This approach to human in vivo MRS data should promote understanding of the specific metabolic changes accompanying disease pathogenesis, and could provide biomarkers of disease progression that would be useful in clinical trials. PMID:23751863

  10. General tensor discriminant analysis and gabor features for gait recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong; Wu, Xindong; Maybank, Stephen J

    2007-10-01

    The traditional image representations are not suited to conventional classification methods, such as the linear discriminant analysis (LDA), because of the under sample problem (USP): the dimensionality of the feature space is much higher than the number of training samples. Motivated by the successes of the two dimensional LDA (2DLDA) for face recognition, we develop a general tensor discriminant analysis (GTDA) as a preprocessing step for LDA. The benefits of GTDA compared with existing preprocessing methods, e.g., principal component analysis (PCA) and 2DLDA, include 1) the USP is reduced in subsequent classification by, for example, LDA; 2) the discriminative information in the training tensors is preserved; and 3) GTDA provides stable recognition rates because the alternating projection optimization algorithm to obtain a solution of GTDA converges, while that of 2DLDA does not. We use human gait recognition to validate the proposed GTDA. The averaged gait images are utilized for gait representation. Given the popularity of Gabor function based image decompositions for image understanding and object recognition, we develop three different Gabor function based image representations: 1) the GaborD representation is the sum of Gabor filter responses over directions, 2) GaborS is the sum of Gabor filter responses over scales, and 3) GaborSD is the sum of Gabor filter responses over scales and directions. The GaborD, GaborS and GaborSD representations are applied to the problem of recognizing people from their averaged gait images.A large number of experiments were carried out to evaluate the effectiveness (recognition rate) of gait recognition based on first obtaining a Gabor, GaborD, GaborS or GaborSD image representation, then using GDTA to extract features and finally using LDA for classification. The proposed methods achieved good performance for gait recognition based on image sequences from the USF HumanID Database. Experimental comparisons are made with nine

  11. Behçet's disease patients with multiple sclerosis-like features: discriminative value of Barkhof criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman-Demir, Gulsen; Mutlu, Melike; Kiyat-Atamer, Asli; Shugaiv, Erkingul; Kurtuncu, Murat; Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur; Tuzun, Erdem; Eraksoy, Mefkure; Bahar, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a systemic auto-inflammatory disorder of unknown cause, which may affect the central nervous system in around 5% of the patients [neuro-BD (NBD)], usually causing large lesions encompassing brainstem, diencephalon and basal ganglia regions. Occasionally NBD patients present with white matter lesions necessitating differential diagnosis from multiple sclerosis (MS). In this study, the efficacy of Barkhof criteria was tested in diagnostic differentiation of NBD and MS. Charts and MRIs of 84 NBD patients were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical and radiological features of NBD patients fulfilling (Barkhof+) and not fulfilling Barkhof criteria (Barkhof-) were compared. While the Barkhof- patients (n=73) mostly displayed typical large lesions covering brainstem, diencephalon and basal ganglia regions and neurological findings consistent with brainstem involvement, all Barkhof+ (n=11) patients demonstrated MS-like white matter lesions, fulfilled McDonald's criteria and showed reduced frequency of brainstem symptoms and increased frequency of hemiparesis, hemihypesthesia and spinal cord symptoms. Moreover, the Barkhof+ group had more female patients, increased number of attacks, higher rate of oligoclonal band positivity and less patients with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis. A subgroup of BD patients with neurological complaints displays MS-like lesions, fulfills the clinical and radiological criteria of MS and presents with clinical and laboratory features resembling those of MS rather than NBD. These results suggest that Barkhof+ patients are either an overlapping group between NBD and MS, or they represent MS patients with concomitant systemic findings of BD, rather than NBD. Barkhof criteria appear to be effective in discriminating these patients.

  12. Optimization of a murine and human tissue model to recapitulate dermal and pulmonary features of systemic sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Watanabe

    Full Text Available The murine bleomycin (BLM-induced fibrosis model is the most widely used in systemic sclerosis (SSc studies. It has been reported that systemic delivery of BLM via continuous diffusion from subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps can cause fibrosis of the skin, lungs, and other internal organs. However, the mouse strain, dosage of BLM, administration period, and additional important features differ from one report to the next. In this study, by employing the pump model in C57BL/6J mice, we show a dose-dependent increase in lung fibrosis by day 28 and a transient increase in dermal thickness. Dermal thickness and the level of collagen in skin treated with high-dose BLM was significantly higher than in skin treated with low dose BLM or vehicle. A reduction in the thickness of the adipose layer was noted in both high and low dose groups at earlier time points suggesting that the loss of the fat layer precedes the onset of fibrosis. High-dose BLM also induced dermal fibrosis and increased expression of fibrosis-associated genes ex vivo in human skin, thus confirming and extending the in vivo findings, and demonstrating that a human organ culture model can be used to assess the effect of BLM on skin. In summary, our findings suggest that the BLM pump model is an attractive model to analyze the underlying mechanisms of fibrosis and test the efficacy of potential therapies. However, the choice of mouse strain, duration of BLM administration and dose must be carefully considered when using this model.

  13. Influence of clinical features, serum antinuclear antibodies, and lung function on survival of patients with systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Ullman, S; Shen, G Q

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the independent contribution of several clinical and laboratory variables to the mortality of a cohort of Danish patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). METHODS: A cohort of 174 patients with incident SSc was retrospectively identified using clinical charts and study record...

  14. Subcutaneous interferon β-1a in pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis: Regional differences in clinical features, disease management, and treatment outcomes in an international retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupp, Lauren B; Pohl, Daniela; Ghezzi, Angelo; Boyko, Alexey; Tenembaum, Silvia; Chen, Liang; Aycardi, Ernesto; Banwell, Brenda

    2016-04-15

    To further understand management of pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), we examined disease features, clinical practice patterns, and response to treatment in the United States (US) and seven other countries ('rest of World'; ROW). Anonymized data, recorded as part of routine clinical practice, were obtained from medical records (1997-2009) of study participants (who received subcutaneous interferon β-1a before age 18 years) from the US and ROW. Samples were stratified by age (preadolescents [managed differently, compared with ROW patients. Future prospective studies are needed to confirm these observations and ascertain their clinical significance. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadashima, Hiromichi; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Imai, Terukuni; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Matsumoto, Sadayuki; Yamamoto, Toru; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Maya, Kiyomi

    1986-01-01

    Eleven patients with a definite diagnosis of multiple sclerosis were examined in terms of correlations between the clinical features and the results of cranial computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: In 5 of the 11 patients, both CT and MRI demonstrated lesions consistent with a finding of multiple sclerosis. In 3 patients, only MRI demonstrated lesions. In the remaining 3 patients, neither CT nor MRI revealed any lesion in the brain. All 5 patients who showed abnormal findings on both CT and MRI had clinical signs either of cerebral or brainstem - cerebellar lesions. On the other hand, two of the 3 patients with normal CT and MRI findings had optic-nerve and spinal-cord signs. Therefore, our results suggested relatively good correlations between the clinical features, CT, and MRI. MRI revealed cerebral lesions in two of the four patients with clinical signs of only optic-nerve and spinal-cord lesions. MRI demonstrated sclerotic lesions in 3 of the 6 patients whose plaques were not detected by CT. In conclusion, MRI proved to be more helpful in the demonstration of lesions attributable to chronic multiple sclerosis. (author)

  16. Elastic properties of uniaxial-fiber reinforced composites - General features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subhendu; Ledbetter, Hassel; Lei, Ming

    The salient features of the elastic properties of uniaxial-fiber-reinforced composites are examined by considering the complete set of elastic constants of composites comprising isotropic uniaxial fibers in an isotropic matrix. Such materials exhibit transverse-isotropic symmetry and five independent elastic constants in Voigt notation: C(11), C(33), C(44), C(66), and C(13). These C(ij) constants are calculated over the entire fiber-volume-fraction range 0.0-1.0, using a scattered-plane-wave ensemple-average model. Some practical elastic constants such as the principal Young moduli and the principal Poisson ratios are considered, and the behavior of these constants is discussed. Also presented are the results for the four principal sound velocities used to study uniaxial-fiber-reinforced composites: v(11), v(33), v(12), and v(13).

  17. [General features of the patient-physician relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, H; Bueno, G

    1997-03-01

    The communication between physicians and patients is often deficient. Little time is devoted to it and the patient receives scanty information with a low emotional content. Some features of our medicine can explain this situation. The rationalist and mechanistic biological model, allows to study only those things that can be undertaken with the scientific method. Psychological, social and spiritual aspects are surpassed. It only looks at material aspects of people, limiting the communication. Patients express their symptoms in an emotional way, with multiple beliefs and fears. The physician converts them to a precise, scientific, measurable and rational medical logical type. This language is not understood by patients, generating hesitancy in the communication. The paternalism is based in the power that physicians have over patients. We give knowledge and ask the patient to subordinate and accept our power. The patient loses his moral right to be informed, to ask, to have doubts or to disagree. Our personal communication is almost always formal, unemotional and with no explanations, further limiting communication.

  18. Synchrotron radiation sources: general features and vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craievich, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    In the last years the electron or positron storage rings, which were until 1970 only used for high energy physics experiments, begun to be built in several countries exclusively as electromagnetic radiation source (synchrotron radiation). The sources are generally made up by injector (linear accelerator or microtron), 'booster' (synchrotron), storage ring, insertions ('Wigglers' and ondulators) and light lines. The interest by these sources are due to the high intensity, large spectrum (from infrared to the X-rays), polarization and pulsed structure of the produced radiation. For the ultra-vacuum obtainement, necessary for the functioning storage rings (p=10 -9 Torr), several special procedures are used. In Brazil the Synchrotron Radiation National Laboratory of the CNPq worked out a conceptual project of synchrotron radiation source, whose execution should begin by the construction of the several components prototypes. (L.C.) [pt

  19. Epidemiological investigations into multiple sclerosis in southern Hesse. II. The distribution of cases in relation to exogenous features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, K; Firnhaber, W

    1984-10-01

    In order to discover possible exogenous variables associated with a higher multiple sclerosis risk, the distribution of cases with definite and probable multiple sclerosis ascertained in the course of a micro-epidemiologic study in Southern Hesse was evaluated and compared with some environmental factors. The prevalence in 1980, the prevalence of cases with disease-onset within the region according to locality of onset and the rate of native Southern Hesse patients according to childhood residence all showed a similar geographical distribution, with the highest values in the south-eastern, mountainous part of the region. This district has a lower annual mean temperature, more annual snow-days and a higher annual precipitation compared to the remaining area. A statistical comparison revealed no association with industrial or agricultural activities, with a particular type of land use, with cattle, pig- or horse-breeding, or with sanitary or housing standards. On the other hand, a slight association with the soil type could be demonstrated, with higher rates on loam and clay subsoils when compared to predominantly sandy regions. Whether this finding has any significance or not remains to be clarified.

  20. [Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in a myotrophic lateral sclerosis. Experience in a district general hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior-Sánchez, Inmaculada; Herrera-Martínez, Aura Dulcinea; Tenorio Jiménez, Carmen; Molina Puerta, María José; Calañas Continente, Alfonso Jesús; Manzano García, Gregorio; Gálvez Moreno, María Ángeles

    2014-12-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative disorder that affects the pyramidal tract, producing progressive motor dysfunctions leading to paralysis. These patients can present with dysphagia, requiring nutritional support with a nasogastric tube or Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG). PEG is associated with increased survival rates. However, the timing of PEG placement remains a significant issue for clinicians. To analyse the characteristics of ALS patients at the moment of PEG placement and their progression. Descriptive retrospective study including patients diagnosed with ALS and PEG who were assessed during the 2005-2014 period in our hospital. Nutritional parameters and respiratory function were assessed for all patients, as well as their progression. The data was analysed using SPSS15. 37 patients were included (56.8% men, 43.2% women) with an average age of 60 at diagnosis, and an average age of 63.1 at PEG placement. 48.6% started with spinal affection and 51.4%, with bulbar affection. 43.2% of the patients received oral nutritional supplements prior to PEG placement for a mean period of 11.3 months. The mean forced vital capacity at diagnosis was 65.45±13.67%, with a negative progression up to 39.47±14.69% at the moment of PEG placement. 86.5% of patients required non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation. 86.5% presented with dysphagia, 64.9% with weight loss > 5-10% from their usual weight, 8.1% with low Body Mass Index, 27% with malnutrition and 73% with aworsened breathing function; therefore, 100% met the criteria for PEG placement according to our protocol. The period on enteral feeding was extended for 10.1 months with a mortality of 50% during the first 6 months from PEG placement. There is evidence of a 3-year delay between diagnosis and PEG placement, with a survival rate of 50% at 6 months from PEG insertion. Further studies are required to establish whether an earlier placement might increase survival rates. Copyright AULA

  1. Regularized generalized eigen-decomposition with applications to sparse supervised feature extraction and sparse discriminant analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Xixuan; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2015-01-01

    We propose a general technique for obtaining sparse solutions to generalized eigenvalue problems, and call it Regularized Generalized Eigen-Decomposition (RGED). For decades, Fisher's discriminant criterion has been applied in supervised feature extraction and discriminant analysis, and it is for...

  2. Impaired quality of life in patients with systemic sclerosis compared to the general population and chronic dermatoses

    OpenAIRE

    Bretterklieber, Agnes; Painsi, Clemens; Avian, Alexander; Wutte, Nora; Aberer, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare and potentially life threatening autoimmune disorder. The burden of disease compared to other dermatoses is unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess both the quality of life in patients with SSc and the variables that are associated with poor quality of life. Forty-one patients with systemic sclerosis (29 limited, 2 diffuse, 10 undifferentiated forms) were assessed with respect to their health status and compared to published data for the ...

  3. Clinical features and lifestyle of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in Campania: brief overview of an Italian database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Trojsi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physical activity and occupational exposures appeared to play a relevant role in pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, a neurodegenerative disease of unknown origin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We aimed to make an overview of the clinical characteristics and lifestyle (occupation and sport of a population of 395 patients with ALS from Campania, in southern Italy. RESULTS: ALS onset resulted anticipated of about 11 years in industry workers, whilst the more frequent site of onset among farmers was upper limbs. Compared to non-athletes, athletes, particularly soccer players, showed a 7 years anticipation of ALS onset, with higher mortality after 5 years. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that subjects genetically prone to abnormal response to hypoxia during strenuous physical activity or exposed to neurotoxic agents, such as athletes, farmers or industry workers, might present increased risk to develop ALS. Future case-control and follow-up studies on our population should be implemented to deepen the present results.

  4. Features of amygdala in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis: An MRI volumetric and histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yoko; Masuda, Hiroshi; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Ito, Yosuke; Higashijima, Takefumi; Kitaura, Hiroki; Fujii, Yukihiko; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Fukuda, Masafumi

    2017-09-01

    It is well-known that there is a correlation between the neuropathological grade of hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and neuroradiological atrophy of the hippocampus in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) patients. However, there is no strict definition or criterion regarding neuron loss and atrophy of the amygdala neighboring the hippocampus. We examined the relationship between HS and neuronal loss in the amygdala. Nineteen mTLE patients with neuropathological proof of HS were assigned to Group A, while seven mTLE patients without HS were assigned to Group B. We used FreeSurfer software to measure amygdala volume automatically based on pre-operation magnetic resonance images. Neurons observed using Klüver-Barrera (KB) staining in resected amygdala tissue were counted. and the extent of immunostaining with stress marker antibodies was semiquantitatively evaluated. There was no significant difference in amygdala volume between the two groups (Group A: 1.41±0.24; Group B: 1.41±0.29cm 3 ; p=0.98), nor in the neuron cellularity of resected amygdala specimens (Group A: 3.98±0.97; Group B: 3.67±0.67 10× -4 number of neurons/μm 2 ; p=0.40). However, the HSP70 level, representing acute stress against epilepsy, in Group A patients was significantly larger than that in Group B. There was no significant difference in the level of Bcl-2, which is known as a protein that inhibits cell death, between the two groups. Neuronal loss and volume loss in the amygdala may not necessarily follow hippocampal sclerosis. From the analysis of stress proteins, epileptic attacks are as likely to damage the amygdala as the hippocampus but do not lead to neuronal death in the amygdala. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Imaging features of tuberous sclerosis complex with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: a contiguous gene syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, Susan J.; Andronikou, Savvas; Kilborn, Tracy; Kaplan, Bernard S.; Darge, Kassa

    2015-01-01

    Genes for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) type 2 and autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) type 1 are both encoded over a short segment of chromosome 16. When deletions involve both genes, an entity known as the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome, variable phenotypes of TSC and ADPKD are exhibited. This syndrome has not been reviewed in the radiology literature. Unlike renal cysts in TSC, cystic disease in TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome results in hypertension and renal failure. A radiologist might demonstrate polycystic kidney disease before the patient develops other stigmata of TSC. Conversely, in patients with known TSC, enlarged and polycystic kidneys should signal the possibility of the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome and not simply TSC. Distinguishing these diagnoses has implications in prognosis, treatment and genetic counseling. To describe the clinical and imaging findings of tuberous sclerosis complex and polycystic kidney disease in seven pediatric patients. We retrospectively reviewed renal and brain imaging of children and young adults with genetically proven or high clinical suspicion for TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome. We included seven pediatric patients from two referral institutions. Ages ranged from birth to 21 years over the course of imaging. The mean follow-up period was 9 years 8 months (4 years 6 months to 20 years 6 months). No child progressed to end-stage renal disease during this period. Three patients were initially imaged for stigmata of TSC, three for abdominal distension and one for elevated serum creatinine concentration. All patients developed enlarged, polycystic kidneys. The latest available imaging studies demonstrated that in 12 of the 14 kidneys 50% or more of the parenchyma was ultimately replaced by >15 cysts, resulting in significant cortical thinning. The largest cysts in each kidney ranged from 2.4 cm to 9.3 cm. Echogenic lesions were present in 13 of the 14 kidneys, in keeping with

  6. Imaging features of tuberous sclerosis complex with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: a contiguous gene syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Susan J. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Andronikou, Savvas [University of the Witwatersrand, Radiology Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Johannesburg (South Africa); Kilborn, Tracy [University of Cape Town, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Kaplan, Bernard S. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Nephrology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Darge, Kassa [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Genes for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) type 2 and autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) type 1 are both encoded over a short segment of chromosome 16. When deletions involve both genes, an entity known as the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome, variable phenotypes of TSC and ADPKD are exhibited. This syndrome has not been reviewed in the radiology literature. Unlike renal cysts in TSC, cystic disease in TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome results in hypertension and renal failure. A radiologist might demonstrate polycystic kidney disease before the patient develops other stigmata of TSC. Conversely, in patients with known TSC, enlarged and polycystic kidneys should signal the possibility of the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome and not simply TSC. Distinguishing these diagnoses has implications in prognosis, treatment and genetic counseling. To describe the clinical and imaging findings of tuberous sclerosis complex and polycystic kidney disease in seven pediatric patients. We retrospectively reviewed renal and brain imaging of children and young adults with genetically proven or high clinical suspicion for TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome. We included seven pediatric patients from two referral institutions. Ages ranged from birth to 21 years over the course of imaging. The mean follow-up period was 9 years 8 months (4 years 6 months to 20 years 6 months). No child progressed to end-stage renal disease during this period. Three patients were initially imaged for stigmata of TSC, three for abdominal distension and one for elevated serum creatinine concentration. All patients developed enlarged, polycystic kidneys. The latest available imaging studies demonstrated that in 12 of the 14 kidneys 50% or more of the parenchyma was ultimately replaced by >15 cysts, resulting in significant cortical thinning. The largest cysts in each kidney ranged from 2.4 cm to 9.3 cm. Echogenic lesions were present in 13 of the 14 kidneys, in keeping with

  7. Comparison between Flail Arm Syndrome and Upper Limb Onset Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Clinical Features and Electromyographic Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Byung-Nam; Choi, Seong Hye; Rha, Joung-Ho; Kang, Sa-Yoon; Lee, Kwang-Woo; Sung, Jung-Joon

    2014-09-01

    Flail arm syndrome (FAS), an atypical presentation of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is characterized by progressive, predominantly proximal, weakness of upper limbs, without involvement of the lower limb, bulbar, or respiratory muscles. When encountering a patient who presents with this symptomatic profile, possible diagnoses include upper limb onset ALS (UL-ALS), and FAS. The lack of information regarding FAS may make differential diagnosis between FAS and UL-ALS difficult in clinical settings. The aim of this study was to compare clinical and electromyographic findings from patients diagnosed with FAS with those from patients diagnosed with UL-ALS. To accomplish this, 18 patients with FAS and 56 patients with UL-ALS were examined. Significant differences were observed between the 2 groups pertaining to the rate of fasciculation, patterns of predominantly affected muscles, and the Medical Research Council scale of the weakest muscle. The presence of upper motor neuron signs and lower motor neuron involvement evidenced through electromyography showed no significant between-group differences.

  8. Multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indwelling catheter Osteoporosis or thinning of the bones Pressure sores Side effects of medicines used to treat the ... Daily bowel care program Multiple sclerosis - discharge Preventing pressure ulcers Swallowing problems Images Multiple sclerosis MRI of the ...

  9. Tuberous sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan S

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Although tuberous sclerosis has been described with a diagnostic triad, it is not present consistently in all cases. Variety of skin manifestations were reported in tuberous sclerosis. This studay was undertaken to assess the frequency of various skin changes in tuberous sclerosis. Ten consecutive cases of tuberous sclerosis were studied. Angiofibroma was the commonest cutaneous manifestation. Atypical fibroxanthoma, dermatofibroma and neurofibroma were also noticed as interesting associations.

  10. Influence of antibody profile in clinical features and prognosis in a cohort of Spanish patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta Arandia, Nerea; Simeón-Aznar, Carmen Pilar; Guillén Del Castillo, Alfredo; Colunga Argüelles, Dolores; Rubio-Rivas, Manuel; Trapiella Martínez, Luis; García Hernández, Francisco José; Sáez Comet, Luis; Egurbide Arberas, María Victoria; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Freire, Mayka; Marí Alfonso, Begoña; Vargas Hitos, José Antonio; Ríos Blanco, Juan José; Todolí Parra, José Antonio; Rodríguez-Carballeira, Monica; Marín Ballvé, Adela; Chamorro Fernández, Antonio Javier; Pla Salas, Xavier; Madroñero Vuelta, Ana Belen; Ruiz Muñoz, Manuel; Fonollosa Pla, Vicent; Espinosa, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    To assess the clinical manifestations and prognosis of Spanish patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) according to their immunological profile. From the Spanish Scleroderma Study Group or RESCLE (Registro de ESCLErodermia as Spanish nomenclature) Registry we selected those patients in which anti-centromere (ACA), anti-topoisomerase I (ATA), and anti-RNA polymerase III (ARA) antibodies had been determined, and a single positivity for each SSc specific antibody was detected. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and survival data were compared according to the serologic status of these antibodies. Overall, 209 SSc patients were included. In 128 (61%) patients ACA was the only positive antibody, 46 (22%) were only positive for ATA, and 35 (17%) for ARA. Of note, the three groups were mutually exclusive. In univariate analysis, patients with ACA presented more frequently limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc) (p<0.001), whereas diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc) was the most frequent subtype in patients with ATA (54%) and ARA (62%) (both p<0.001). Positive patients for ARA showed the highest prevalence of joint involvement (p<0.001) and those from ATA group had a higher prevalence of interstitial lung disease (ILD) (p<0.001). Scleroderma renal crisis was more frequent in the ARA group (p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, ACA were associated with female gender and were protective for dcSSc and ILD. ATA were found to be protective for lcSSc and they were independently associated with interstitial reticular pattern. ARA positivity was independently associated with dcSSc. We did not find differences in mortality between the three groups. In Spanish SSc patients, the presence of SSc specific antibodies conferred a distinctive clinical profile.

  11. FUS-immunoreactive inclusions are a common feature in sporadic and non-SOD1 familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Han-Xiang; Zhai, Hong; Bigio, Eileen H; Yan, Jianhua; Fecto, Faisal; Ajroud, Kaouther; Mishra, Manjari; Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Heller, Scott; Sufit, Robert; Siddique, Nailah; Mugnaini, Enrico; Siddique, Teepu

    2010-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal disorder of motor neuron degeneration. Most cases of ALS are sporadic (SALS), but about 5 to 10% of ALS cases are familial (FALS). Recent studies have shown that mutations in FUS are causal in approximately 4 to 5% of FALS and some apparent SALS cases. The pathogenic mechanism of the mutant FUS-mediated ALS and potential roles of FUS in non-FUS ALS remain to be investigated. Immunostaining was performed on postmortem spinal cords from 78 ALS cases, including SALS (n = 52), ALS with dementia (ALS/dementia, n = 10), and FALS (n = 16). In addition, postmortem brains or spinal cords from 22 cases with or without frontotemporal lobar degeneration were also studied. In total, 100 cases were studied. FUS-immunoreactive inclusions were observed in spinal anterior horn neurons in all SALS and FALS cases, except for those with SOD1 mutations. The FUS-containing inclusions were also immunoreactive with antibodies to TDP43, p62, and ubiquitin. A fraction of tested FUS antibodies recognized FUS inclusions, and specific antigen retrieval protocol appeared to be important for detection of the skein-like FUS inclusions. Although mutations in FUS account for only a small fraction of FALS and SALS, our data suggest that FUS protein may be a common component of the cellular inclusions in non-SOD1 ALS and some other neurodegenerative conditions, implying a shared pathogenic pathway underlying SALS, non-SOD1 FALS, ALS/dementia, and related disorders. Our data also indicate that SOD1-linked ALS may have a pathogenic pathway distinct from SALS and other types of FALS.

  12. Clinical commentary on "Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia-like phenotype in multiple sclerosis" and "Secondary paroxysmal dyskinesia in multiple sclerosis: Clinical-radiological features and treatment. Case report of seven patients".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareés, Isabel

    2017-11-01

    This clinical commentary discusses the phenomenology and treatment of paroxysmal dyskinesia in patients with multiple sclerosis. It calls for a consensus on the definition as well as for larger studies to better understand this unusual clinical association.

  13. Balo's concentric sclerosis; value of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.; Kuruvilla, A.; Korah, I.P.; Alexander, M.

    1999-01-01

    We report two cases of Balo's concentric sclerosis that demonstrate the typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of concentric rings of demyelination involving the superficial and deep white matter and sparing the cortex. In both cases biopsy was not performed as MRI findings and multi-mode evoked potential studies were consistent with demyelinating illness. The theories regarding the pathogenesis of this peculiar appearance are briefly reviewed. Balo's concentric sclerosis is a very rare type of demyelinating disease characterized pathologically by large alternating lamellae of demyelinated and myelinated white matter arranged in a concentric pattern. This progressive disease is more often found in young male adults and is more common in the Philippines. Balo's concentric sclerosis is considered an unusual variant of multiple sclerosis (MS); however, some authors believe it to be a different entity. Although the pathogenesis of the concentric sclerosis is debated, the cause of demyelination is generally presumed to be the same as that of multiple sclerosis. There is striking resemblance between the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance and the histopathological features of MS. Not all cases may show a typical MR appearance. Prior to MR imaging, most of them were diagnosed at post-mortem. To our knowledge, few cases have been diagnosed by MR imaging in life. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. Feature extraction with deep neural networks by a generalized discriminant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhlsatz, André; Lippel, Jens; Zielke, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    We present an approach to feature extraction that is a generalization of the classical linear discriminant analysis (LDA) on the basis of deep neural networks (DNNs). As for LDA, discriminative features generated from independent Gaussian class conditionals are assumed. This modeling has the advantages that the intrinsic dimensionality of the feature space is bounded by the number of classes and that the optimal discriminant function is linear. Unfortunately, linear transformations are insufficient to extract optimal discriminative features from arbitrarily distributed raw measurements. The generalized discriminant analysis (GerDA) proposed in this paper uses nonlinear transformations that are learnt by DNNs in a semisupervised fashion. We show that the feature extraction based on our approach displays excellent performance on real-world recognition and detection tasks, such as handwritten digit recognition and face detection. In a series of experiments, we evaluate GerDA features with respect to dimensionality reduction, visualization, classification, and detection. Moreover, we show that GerDA DNNs can preprocess truly high-dimensional input data to low-dimensional representations that facilitate accurate predictions even if simple linear predictors or measures of similarity are used.

  15. Mathieu's Equation and its Generalizations: Overview of Stability Charts and their Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacic, Ivana; Rand, Richard H.; Sah, Si Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    This work is concerned with Mathieu's equation - a classical differential equation, which has the form of a linear second-order ordinary differential equation with Cosine-type periodic forcing of the stiffness coefficient, and its different generalizations/extensions. These extensions include...... and features, and how it differs from that of the classical Mathieu's equation....

  16. A General Purpose Feature Extractor for Light Detection and Ranging Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin B. Olson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Feature extraction is a central step of processing Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR data. Existing detectors tend to exploit characteristics of specific environments: corners and lines from indoor (rectilinear environments, and trees from outdoor environments. While these detectors work well in their intended environments, their performance in different environments can be poor. We describe a general purpose feature detector for both 2D and 3D LIDAR data that is applicable to virtually any environment. Our method adapts classic feature detection methods from the image processing literature, specifically the multi-scale Kanade-Tomasi corner detector. The resulting method is capable of identifying highly stable and repeatable features at a variety of spatial scales without knowledge of environment, and produces principled uncertainty estimates and corner descriptors at same time. We present results on both software simulation and standard datasets, including the 2D Victoria Park and Intel Research Center datasets, and the 3D MIT DARPA Urban Challenge dataset.

  17. A general purpose feature extractor for light detection and ranging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yangming; Olson, Edwin B

    2010-01-01

    Feature extraction is a central step of processing Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data. Existing detectors tend to exploit characteristics of specific environments: corners and lines from indoor (rectilinear) environments, and trees from outdoor environments. While these detectors work well in their intended environments, their performance in different environments can be poor. We describe a general purpose feature detector for both 2D and 3D LIDAR data that is applicable to virtually any environment. Our method adapts classic feature detection methods from the image processing literature, specifically the multi-scale Kanade-Tomasi corner detector. The resulting method is capable of identifying highly stable and repeatable features at a variety of spatial scales without knowledge of environment, and produces principled uncertainty estimates and corner descriptors at same time. We present results on both software simulation and standard datasets, including the 2D Victoria Park and Intel Research Center datasets, and the 3D MIT DARPA Urban Challenge dataset.

  18. Generalizations of the subject-independent feature set for music-induced emotion recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan-Pin; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Duann, Jeng-Ren; Lin, Chin-Teng; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG)-based emotion recognition has been an intensely growing field. Yet, how to achieve acceptable accuracy on a practical system with as fewer electrodes as possible is less concerned. This study evaluates a set of subject-independent features, based on differential power asymmetry of symmetric electrode pairs [1], with emphasis on its applicability to subject variability in music-induced emotion classification problem. Results of this study have evidently validated the feasibility of using subject-independent EEG features to classify four emotional states with acceptable accuracy in second-scale temporal resolution. These features could be generalized across subjects to detect emotion induced by music excerpts not limited to the music database that was used to derive the emotion-specific features.

  19. Evaluation of features to support safety and quality in general practice clinical software

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Electronic prescribing is now the norm in many countries. We wished to find out if clinical software systems used by general practitioners in Australia include features (functional capabilities and other characteristics) that facilitate improved patient safety and care, with a focus on quality use of medicines. Methods Seven clinical software systems used in general practice were evaluated. Fifty software features that were previously rated as likely to have a high impact on safety and/or quality of care in general practice were tested and are reported here. Results The range of results for the implementation of 50 features across the 7 clinical software systems was as follows: 17-31 features (34-62%) were fully implemented, 9-13 (18-26%) partially implemented, and 9-20 (18-40%) not implemented. Key findings included: Access to evidence based drug and therapeutic information was limited. Decision support for prescribing was available but varied markedly between systems. During prescribing there was potential for medicine mis-selection in some systems, and linking a medicine with its indication was optional. The definition of 'current medicines' versus 'past medicines' was not always clear. There were limited resources for patients, and some medicines lists for patients were suboptimal. Results were provided to the software vendors, who were keen to improve their systems. Conclusions The clinical systems tested lack some of the features expected to support patient safety and quality of care. Standards and certification for clinical software would ensure that safety features are present and that there is a minimum level of clinical functionality that clinicians could expect to find in any system.

  20. Feature binding in visual short term memory: A General Recognition Theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitousi, Daniel

    2017-05-23

    Creating and maintaining accurate bindings of elementary features (e.g., color and shape) in visual short-term memory (VSTM) is fundamental for veridical perception. How are low-level features bound in memory? The present work harnessed a multivariate model of perception - the General Recognition Theory (GRT) - to unravel the internal representations underlying feature binding in VSTM. On each trial, preview and target colored shapes were presented in succession, appearing in either repeated or altered spatial locations. Participants gave two same/different responses: one with respect to color and one with respect to shape. Converging GRT analyses on the accuracy confusion matrices provided substantial evidence for binding in the form of violations of perceptual independence at the level of the individual stimulus, such that positive correlations were obtained when both features repeated or alternated together, while negative correlations were obtained when one feature repeated and the other alternated. This "cloverleaf" GRT pattern of binding was similar whether the spatial location of the preview and target repeated or altered. The current results are consistent with: (a) the discrete memory "slots" model of VSTM, and (b) the notion that spatial location is not necessary for the formation of "object files." The GRT approach presented here offers a viable quantitative model for testing various questions regarding feature binding in VSTM.

  1. EEG features of absence seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: Impact of syndrome, age, and state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadleir, L.G.; Scheffer, I.E.; Smith, S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Factors influencing the electroencephalography (EEG) features of absence seizures in newly presenting children with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) have not been rigorously studied. We examined how specific factors such as state, provocation, age, and epilepsy syndrome affect the EEG...... features of absence seizures. Methods: Children with untreated absence seizures were studied using video-EEG recording. The influence of state of arousal, provocation (hyperventilation, photic stimulation), age, and epilepsy syndrome on specific EEG features was analyzed. Results: Five hundred nine...... seizures were evaluated in 70 children with the following syndromes: childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) 37, CAE+ photoparoxysmal response (PPR) 10, juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE) 8, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) 6, and unclassified 9. Polyspikes occurred in all syndromes but were more common in JME...

  2. Multiple Sclerosis, Personal Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Multiple Sclerosis Personal Stories: Nicole Lemelle, Iris Young, Michael Anthony, ... something quite different for a person living with multiple sclerosis, such as his girlfriend's brother, Chuy. The more ...

  3. What's new in multiple sclerosis spasticity research? Poster session highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Ralf

    2017-11-01

    Each year at the Multiple Sclerosis Experts Summit, relevant research in the field of multiple sclerosis spasticity is featured in poster sessions. The main studies presented at this year's meeting are summarized herein.

  4. Multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunwald, I.Q.; Kuehn, A.L.; Backens, M.; Papanagiotou, P.; Shariat, K.; Kostopoulos, P.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common chronic inflammatory disease of myelin with interspersed lesions in the white matter of the central nervous system. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the diagnosis and monitoring of white matter diseases. This article focuses on key findings in multiple sclerosis as detected by MRI. (orig.) [de

  5. Impaired quality of life in patients with systemic sclerosis compared to the general population and chronic dermatoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretterklieber, Agnes; Painsi, Clemens; Avian, Alexander; Wutte, Nora; Aberer, Elisabeth

    2014-09-02

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare and potentially life threatening autoimmune disorder. The burden of disease compared to other dermatoses is unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess both the quality of life in patients with SSc and the variables that are associated with poor quality of life. Forty-one patients with systemic sclerosis (29 limited, 2 diffuse, 10 undifferentiated forms) were assessed with respect to their health status and compared to published data for the normal population, SSc patients from other studies, and patients with chronic skin diseases. For the most part, our SSc patients had better outcomes in all 8 dimensions of the SF-36 than SSc patients from other studies, and poorer scores than the healthy population and those with occupational contact dermatitis, ichthyosis, non-melanoma skin cancer, contact dermatitis, atopic eczema, chronic nail disease, vitiligo, health care workers with work-related disease, and those with other chronic skin diseases, but significantly better scores for mental health than those with nail disease, vitiligo, and health-care workers. Patients with atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and pemphigus had significantly poorer mean scores in social function and mental health than SSc patients. Patients with pemphigus were also significantly impaired in their physical and emotional roles. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) had the significantly poorest mean scores for QoL in all 8 domains except bodily pain and emotional role. Besides SLE, SSc is one of the most severe chronic dermatologic diseases in terms of reduced QoL. Since SSc cannot be cured, treatment strategies should include therapeutic interventions such as psychotherapy, social support, physiotherapy, and spiritual care. Their beneficial effects could be studied in future.

  6. CHAMBER VOCAL CREATIONS BY SNEJANA PÎSLARI: GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS, GENRE AND STYLE FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    COADĂ TATIANA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The author suggests a general characterization of the chamber vocal creations by Snejana Pîslari. The present work represents a detailed analysis of the romances, written by the composer on lyrics by M. Eminescu and N. Labiş. The author reveals the genre and style features of the chamber vocal works composed by S. Pîslari and the eccentricity of the musical language. Another landmark of the present work is S. Pîslari’s individual composition style which is distinguishable by the use of experimental ideas with elements of folklore, as well as by the use of new means of musical expressivity.

  7. Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the myelin sheath, the material that surrounds and protects your nerve cells. This damage slows down ...

  8. Tuberous Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Esclerosis tuberosa Order NINDS Publications Patient Organizations Child Neurology ... National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Esclerosis tuberosa Order NINDS Publications Definition Tuberous sclerosis (TSC) ...

  9. The clinical features of EDNOS: relationship to mood, health status and general functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Hannah; Bryant-Waugh, Rachel; Peveler, Robert

    2010-04-01

    Eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) remains poorly evaluated in terms of eating disorder features and relationship to mood, health status and general functioning. This study investigated the clinical profiles of a sample of EDNOS patients, and how they compared to patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). The sample consisted of 178 patients. All completed the Eating Disorder Examination, Beck Depression Inventory, Work and Social Adjustment Scale and Sf-36. ANOVAs were conducted to explore group differences. No differences were found for depression. No differences were found between BN and EDNOS on measures of health status and general functioning. AN patients reported greater role limitations due to physical health and experienced greater physical pain compared with BN or EDNOS patients, and reported poorer social functioning, lower vitality and higher functional impairment compared with EDNOS patients. EDNOS patients are generally no less clinically impaired than those with BN. However AN patients may be more impaired in some aspects of general functioning compared with BN or EDNOS patients. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comorbidity of Bipolar Disorder and Multiple Sclerosis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Keskin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is a chronic demyelinating disease of a central nervous system. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in multiple sclerosis and bipolar disorder is one of the most common psychiatric disorders that coexist with multiple sclerosis. Manic episodes may be the first presenting symptom of multiple sclerosis as comorbid pathology or as an adverse effect of pharmacotherapies used in multiple sclerosis. The comorbidity of bipolar disorder and multiple sclerosis is well-proven but its etiology is not known and investigated accurately. Recent studies support a common genetic susceptibility. Management of bipolar disorder in multiple sclerosis is based on evidence provided by case reports and treatment should be individualized. In this report, the association between bipolar disorder and multiple sclerosis, epidemiology, ethiology and treatment is discussed through a case had diagnosed as multiple sclerosis and had a manic episode with psychotic features. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 832-836

  11. Assessment of esophageal involvement in systemic sclerosis and morphea (localized scleroderma) by clinical, endoscopic, manometric and pH metric features: a prospective comparative hospital based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Tasleem; Masood, Qazi; Singh, Jaswinder; Hassan, Iffat

    2015-02-15

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a generalized disorder of unknown etiology affecting the connective tissue of the body. It affects the skin and various internal organs. Gastrointestinal tract involvement is seen in almost 90% of the patients. Esophagus is the most frequently affected part of the gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal motility disturbance classically manifests as a reduced lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) and loss of distal esophageal body peristalsis. Consequently, SSc patients may be complicated by erosive esophagitis and eventually by Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Morphea, also known as localized scleroderma, is characterized by predominant skin involvement, with occasional involvement of subjacent muscles and usually sparing the internal organs. The involvement of esophagus in morphea has been studied very scarcely. The proposed study will investigate the esophageal involvement in the two forms of scleroderma (systemic and localized), compare the same and address any need of upper gastrointestinal evaluation in morphea (localized scleroderma) patients. 56 and 31 newly and already diagnosed cases of SSc and morphea respectively were taken up for the study. All the patients were inquired about the dyspeptic symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation and/or dysphagia). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, esophageal manometry and 24-hour pH monitoring were done in 52, 47 and 41 patients of SSc; and 28, 25 and 20 patients of morphea respectively. Esophageal symptoms were present in 39 cases (69.6%) of SSc which were mild in 22 (39.3%), moderate in 14 (25%), severe in three (5.3%); while only four cases (7.1%) of morphea had esophageal symptoms all of which were mild in severity. Reflux esophagitis was seen in 17 cases (32.7%) of SSc and only two cases (7.14%) of morphea. Manometric abnormalities were seen in 32 cases (68.1%) of SSc and none in morphea. Ambulatory 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring documented abnormal reflux in

  12. Survey of diagnostic and treatment practices for multiple sclerosis (MS) in Europe. Part 2: Progressive MS, paediatric MS, pregnancy and general management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, O; Delvecchio, M; Edan, G; Fredrikson, S; Giovannoni, G; Hartung, H-P; Havrdova, E; Kappos, L; Pozzilli, C; Soerensen, P S; Tackenberg, B; Vermersch, P; Comi, G

    2018-05-01

    The European Charcot Foundation supported the development of a set of surveys to understand current practice patterns for the diagnosis and management of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Europe. Part 2 of the report summarizes survey results related to secondary progressive MS (SPMS), primary progressive MS (PPMS), pregnancy, paediatric MS and overall patient management. A steering committee of MS neurologists developed case- and practice-based questions for two sequential surveys distributed to MS neurologists throughout Europe. Respondents generally favoured changing rather than stopping disease-modifying treatment (DMT) in patients transitioning from relapsing-remitting MS to SPMS, particularly with active disease. Respondents would not initiate DMT in patients with typical PPMS symptoms, although the presence of ≥1 spinal cord or brain gadolinium-enhancing lesion might affect that decision. For patients considering pregnancy, respondents were equally divided on whether to stop treatment before or after conception. Respondents strongly favoured starting DMT in paediatric MS with active disease; recommended treatments included interferon, glatiramer acetate and, in John Cunningham virus negative patients, natalizumab. Additional results regarding practice-based questions and management are summarized. Results of part 2 of the survey of diagnostic and treatment practices for MS in Europe largely mirror results for part 1, with neurologists in general agreement about the treatment and management of SPMS, PPMS, pregnancy and paediatric MS as well as the general management of MS. However, there are also many areas of disagreement, indicating the need for evidence-based recommendations and/or guidelines. © 2018 EAN.

  13. Initial presentation with dilated cardiomyopathy in a patient of tuberous sclerosis: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmendra Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old man presented with dilated cardiomyopathy, an unusual association with tuberous sclerosis. Clinical history and examination were consistent with tuberous sclerosis including major features of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC like facial angiofibroma, shagreen patch, subependymal nodules, and angiomyolipoma of kidney. The clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and evaluation of tuberous sclerosis are discussed.

  14. General features of the retinal connectome determine the computation of motion anticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jamie; Lagnado, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Motion anticipation allows the visual system to compensate for the slow speed of phototransduction so that a moving object can be accurately located. This correction is already present in the signal that ganglion cells send from the retina but the biophysical mechanisms underlying this computation are not known. Here we demonstrate that motion anticipation is computed autonomously within the dendritic tree of each ganglion cell and relies on feedforward inhibition. The passive and non-linear interaction of excitatory and inhibitory synapses enables the somatic voltage to encode the actual position of a moving object instead of its delayed representation. General rather than specific features of the retinal connectome govern this computation: an excess of inhibitory inputs over excitatory, with both being randomly distributed, allows tracking of all directions of motion, while the average distance between inputs determines the object velocities that can be compensated for. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06250.001 PMID:25786068

  15. Some general features of alpha-particle pick-up reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becchetti, F.D.; Jaenecke, J.

    1982-01-01

    The general features of single- and multi-α transfer reactions are discussed. While there are numerous difficulties in extracting α-particle ''spectroscopic'' factors, the reduced α-widths extracted appear to be meaningful. These can be related, in an absolute fashion, to α-decay widths (or α-decay lifetimes). Simpler theories describing α-particle transfer reactions are needed and should be formulated in terms of α-widths, i.e. α-particle densities in the nuclear periphery. These are the quantities measured in most experiments. IBA and SU 3 models appear to be most relevant and should be extended to α-transfer reactions for heavy nuclei. (Auth.)

  16. Clinical features of multiple sclerosis in the south of Brazil: a partial analysis Características clínicas da esclerose múltipla no sul do Brasil: uma análise parcial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Finkelsztejn

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There are no published studies on the characteristics of multiple sclerosis (MS patients from the south of Brazil. OBJECTIVE: To identify the clinical features of a series of MS patients and to compare to other Brazilian series. METHOD: Retrospective study with 67 patients followed in The MS Reference Center - RS, Brazil during the year of 2008. We analyzed demographic and clinical data. RESULTS: Most were women (74.6%, the general average age was 43.5 years old, and the general average EDSS score was 4.1. Of those patients, 81.8% had relapsing-remitting MS. Sexual dysfunction prevalence was 31.1% in men and 68.9% in women (pNão há dados publicados sobre as características clínicas da esclerose múltipla (EM no estado do Rio Grande do Sul (RS. OBJETIVO: Identificar e comparar as características clínicas de uma série de pacientes com EM no RS com as de outras séries nacionais. MÉTODO: Foram coletados e avaliados dados demográficos e clínicos de 67 pacientes atendidos em nosso centro. RESULTADOS: Houve predomínio de mulheres (74,6%, idade média geral foi de 43,5 anos e EDSS médio de 4,1. O tipo surto-remissão correpondeu a 81,8%. A prevalência de disfunção sexual foi de 31,1% nos homens e 68,9% nas mulheres (p<0,01. Encontrou-se correlação de 0,444 (p<0,05 entre depressão e EDSS. CONCLUSÃO: Este estudo demonstrou uma amostra semelhante às demais amostras brasileiras, apresentando, adicionalmente, elevada prevalência de sintomas sexuais e a estreita associação entre depressão e o grau de incapacidade.

  17. CLINICAL-EPIDEMIOLOGICAL FEATURES AND OUTCOME OF GENERALIZED FORMS OF MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Martynova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to study clinical and epidemiological features and outcomes of generalized forms of meningococcal infection in children from Krasnoyarsk and Krasnoyarsk Territory during the period from 2012 to 2016. Materials and methods. A retrospective analysis of 57 medical records of hospital patients with generalized forms of meningococcal infection was carried out in the infectious and resuscitative departments of the Krasnoyarsk Clinical Hospital No. 1 from 2012 to 2016, including 12 protocols of pathologoanatomical studies of the deceased patients and 45 medical cards of ambulatory patients – convalescents of the disease from 2012 to 2016. Results. The epidemic situation for meningococcal infection in Krasnoyarsk Territory from 2012 to 2016 is characterized by signs of inter-epidemic period. Children of the first 3 years of life are in the group of high risk for the development of GFMI, which accounts for 74% of the total number of cases of children aged 14. There are signs of meningococcal infection «aging» – in the age structure the number of children in the first year of life decreased, while the proportion of children aged 4–7 and 7–14 increased compared to previous decades. There is a tendency to a decrease in the proportion of the combined forms with an increase in the frequency of «pure» meningococcemia. In recent years there has been an «atypical» course of generalized forms of the disease, when classical hemorrhagic necrotic rashes appear only on the 3rd – 4th day of the disease. In convalescents who underwent a combined form of MI and «pure» meningitis severe residual effects leading patients to disability are possible to develop. Conclusion. The use of polyvalent conjugated vaccines in potential risk groups will allow us to reduce the morbidity and mortality from generalized forms of meningococcal infection, including younger children.

  18. General topological features and instanton vacuum in quantum Hall and spin liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruisken, A.M.M.; Shankar, R.; Surendran, Naveen

    2005-01-01

    We introduce the concept of superuniversality in quantum Hall liquids and spin liquids. This concept has emerged from previous studies of the quantum Hall effect and states that all the fundamental features of the quantum Hall effect are generically displayed as general topological features of the θ parameter in nonlinear σ models in two dimensions. To establish superuniversality in spin liquids we revisit the mapping by Haldane who argued that the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin-s chain in 1+1 space-time dimensions is effectively described by the O(3) nonlinear σ model with a θ term. By combining the path integral representation for the dimerized spin s=1/2 chain with renormalization-group decimation techniques we generalize the Haldane approach to include a more complicated theory, the fermionic rotor chain, involving four different renormalization-group parameters. We show how the renormalization-group calculation technique can be used to build a bridge between the fermionic rotor chain and the O(3) nonlinear σ model with the θ term. As an integral and fundamental aspect of the mapping we establish the topological significance of the dangling spin at the edge of the chain. The edge spin in spin liquids is in all respects identical to the massless chiral edge excitations in quantum Hall liquids. We consider various different geometries of the spin chain such as open and closed chains, chains with an even and odd number of sides. We show that for each of the different geometries the θ term has a distinctly different physical meaning. We compare each case with a topologically equivalent quantum Hall liquid

  19. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: the Midwestern surgical experience with the diaphragm pacing stimulation system shows that general anesthesia can be safely performed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onders, Raymond P; Carlin, Arthur M; Elmo, MaryJo; Sivashankaran, Subhalakashmi; Katirji, Bashar; Schilz, Robert

    2009-03-01

    There is a paucity of literature concerning general anesthesia and surgery in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease). This report summarizes the largest series of surgical cases in ALS during multicenter prospective trials of the laparoscopic diaphragm pacing system (DPS) to delay respiratory failure. The overall strategy outlined includes the use of rapidly reversible short-acting analgesic and amnestic agents with no neuromuscular relaxants. Fifty-one patients were implanted from March 2005 to March 2008 at 2 sites. Age at implantation ranged from 42 to 73 years and the percent predicted forced vital capacity (FVC) ranged from 20% to 87%. On preoperative blood gases, Pco(2) was as high as 60. Using this protocol, there were no failures to extubate or 30-day mortalities. The DPS system increases the respiratory system compliance by decreasing posterior lobe atelectasis and can stimulate respirations at the end of each case. Laparoscopic surgery with general anesthesia can be safely performed in patients with ALS undergoing DPS.

  20. Features of Representations in General Chemistry Textbooks: A Peek through the Lens of the Cognitive Load Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyachwaya, James M.; Gillaspie, Merry

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) determine the prevalence of various features of representations in five general chemistry textbooks used in the United States, and (2) use cognitive load theory to draw implications of the various features of analyzed representations. We adapted the Graphical Analysis Protocol (GAP) (Slough et al., 2010) to look at…

  1. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, Egon; Stenager, E N; Knudsen, Lone

    1994-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 117 randomly selected patients (52 men, 65 women) with definite multiple sclerosis, it was found that 76 percent were married or cohabitant, 8 percent divorced. Social contacts remained unchanged for 70 percent, but outgoing social contacts were reduced for 45 percent......, need for structural changes in home and need for pension became greater with increasing physical handicap. No significant differences between gender were found. It is concluded that patients and relatives are under increased social strain, when multiple sclerosis progresses to a moderate handicap...

  2. On general features of warm dark matter with reduced relativistic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipólito-Ricaldi, W. S.; vom Marttens, R. F.; Fabris, J. C.; Shapiro, I. L.; Casarini, L.

    2018-05-01

    Reduced relativistic gas (RRG) is a useful approach to describe the warm dark matter (WDM) or the warmness of baryonic matter in the approximation when the interaction between the particles is irrelevant. The use of Maxwell distribution leads to the complicated equation of state of the Jüttner model of relativistic ideal gas. The RRG enables one to reproduce the same physical situation but in a much simpler form. For this reason RRG can be a useful tool for the theories with some sort of a "new Physics". On the other hand, even without the qualitatively new physical implementations, the RRG can be useful to describe the general features of WDM in a model-independent way. In this sense one can see, in particular, to which extent the cosmological manifestations of WDM may be dependent on its Particle Physics background. In the present work RRG is used as a complementary approach to derive the main observational features for the WDM in a model-independent way. The only assumption concerns a non-negligible velocity v for dark matter particles which is parameterized by the warmness parameter b. The relatively high values of b ( b^2˜ 10^{-6}) erase the radiation (photons and neutrinos) dominated epoch and cause an early warm matter domination after inflation. Furthermore, RRG approach enables one to quantify the lack of power in linear matter spectrum at small scales and in particular, reproduces the relative transfer function commonly used in context of WDM with accuracy of ≲ 1%. A warmness with b^2≲ 10^{-6} (equivalent to v≲ 300 km/s) does not alter significantly the CMB power spectrum and is in agreement with the background observational tests.

  3. Clinical Usefulness of Aripiprazole and Lamotrigine in Schizoaffective Presentation of Tuberous Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Min, Jung-Ah; Lee, In Goo; Kim, Jung Jin

    2016-08-31

    Tuberous sclerosis is not as rare as once thought and has high psychiatric comorbidities. However, bipolar or psychotic features associated with tuberous sclerosis have been rarely reported. This report first presents a tuberous sclerosis patient, resembling a schizoaffective disorder of bipolar type. A patient with known tuberous sclerosis displayed mood fluctuation and psychotic features. Her symptoms did not remit along with several psychiatric medications. After hospitalization, the patient responded well with lamotrigine and aripiprazole without exacerbation. As demonstrated in this case, tuberous sclerosis may also encompass bipolar affective or psychotic features. We would like to point out the necessity to consider bipolarity in evaluating and treating tuberous sclerosis.

  4. Balo`s concentric sclerosis; value of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.; Kuruvilla, A.; Korah, I.P. [Christian Medical College and Hospital, Vellore, Tamilnadu, (India). Department of Radiodiagnosis; Alexander, M. [Christian Medical College and Hospital, Vellore, Tamilnadu, (India). Department of Neurosciences

    1999-08-01

    We report two cases of Balo`s concentric sclerosis that demonstrate the typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of concentric rings of demyelination involving the superficial and deep white matter and sparing the cortex. In both cases biopsy was not performed as MRI findings and multi-mode evoked potential studies were consistent with demyelinating illness. The theories regarding the pathogenesis of this peculiar appearance are briefly reviewed. Balo`s concentric sclerosis is a very rare type of demyelinating disease characterized pathologically by large alternating lamellae of demyelinated and myelinated white matter arranged in a concentric pattern. This progressive disease is more often found in young male adults and is more common in the Philippines. Balo`s concentric sclerosis is considered an unusual variant of multiple sclerosis (MS); however, some authors believe it to be a different entity. Although the pathogenesis of the concentric sclerosis is debated, the cause of demyelination is generally presumed to be the same as that of multiple sclerosis. There is striking resemblance between the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance and the histopathological features of MS. Not all cases may show a typical MR appearance. Prior to MR imaging, most of them were diagnosed at post-mortem. To our knowledge, few cases have been diagnosed by MR imaging in life. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 15 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Does vagotomy protect against multiple sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundbøll, Jens; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Adelborg, Kasper; Svensson, Elisabeth

    2017-07-01

    To examine the association between vagotomy and multiple sclerosis. We conducted a matched cohort study of all patients who underwent truncal or super-selective vagotomy and a comparison cohort, by linking Danish population-based medical registries (1977-1995). Hazard ratios (HRs) for multiple sclerosis, adjusting for potential confounders were computed by means of Cox regression analysis. Median age of multiple sclerosis onset corresponded to late onset multiple sclerosis. No association with multiple sclerosis was observed for truncal vagotomy (0-37 year adjusted HR=0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.48-1.74) or super-selective vagotomy (0-37 year adjusted HR=1.28, 95% CI: 0.79-2.09) compared with the general population. We found no association between vagotomy and later risk of late onset multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1988-01-01

    Forty-two (12%) of a total of 366 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) had psychiatric admissions. Of these, 34 (81%) had their first psychiatric admission in conjunction with or after the onset of MS. Classification by psychiatric diagnosis showed that there was a significant positive correlation...

  7. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Knudsen, L; Jensen, K

    1991-01-01

    In a cross-sectional investigation of 116 patients with multiple sclerosis, the social and sparetime activities of the patient were assessed by both patient and his/her family. The assessments were correlated to physical disability which showed that particularly those who were moderately disabled...

  8. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1990-01-01

    An investigation on the correlation between ability to read TV subtitles and the duration of visual evoked potential (VEP) latency in 14 patients with definite multiple sclerosis (MS), indicated that VEP latency in patients unable to read the TV subtitles was significantly delayed in comparison...

  9. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Knudsen, L; Jensen, K

    1994-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 94 patients (42 males, 52 females) with definite multiple sclerosis (MS) in the age range 25-55 years, the correlation of neuropsychological tests with the ability to read TV-subtitles and with the use of sedatives is examined. A logistic regression analysis reveals...

  10. Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on multiple sclerosis is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  11. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis and tuberous sclerosis with pulmonary involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrosa, I.; Saiz, A.; Bustos, A.; Hernando, F.

    2000-01-01

    We present two cases of pulmonary lumphangioleiomyomatosis and one case of tuberous sclerosis with pulmonary involvement describing the most characteristic features according to plain chest X-ray and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). (Author) 14 refs

  12. Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Multiple Sclerosis Hope Through Research Past Issues / Spring 2012 Table ... that television journalist Neil Cavuto was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) more than 15 years ago. And that ...

  13. The Big Bluff of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Diagnosis: The Role of Neurodegenerative Disease Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicchi, Ilaria; Emiliani, Carla; Vescovi, Angelo; Martino, Sabata

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases include a significant number of pathologies affecting the nervous system. Generally, the primary cause of each disease is specific; however, recently, it was shown that they may be correlated at molecular level. This aspect, together with the exhibition of similar symptoms, renders the diagnosis of these disorders difficult. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is one of these pathologies. Herein, we report several cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis misdiagnosed as a consequence of features that are common to several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's, Huntington's and Alzheimer's disease, spinal muscular atrophy, progressive bulbar palsy, spastic paraplegia and frontotemporal dementia, and mostly with the lysosomal storage disorder GM2 gangliosidosis. Overall reports highlight that the differential diagnosis for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis should include correlated mechanisms. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Core features of personality disorder: differentiating general personality dysfunctioning from personality traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghuis, H.; Kamphuis, J.H.; Verheul, R.

    2012-01-01

    The distinction between general personality dysfunctioning (GPD) and specific personality traits (SPT) is an important focus of attention in the proposed revisions of the DSM-5. The present study explores the distinction between GPD and SPT using the self-report questionnaires General Assessment of

  15. Algebraic features of some generalizations of the Lotka-Volterra system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibik, Yu. V.; Sarancha, D. A.

    2010-10-01

    For generalizations of the Lotka-Volterra system, an integration method is proposed based on the nontrivial algebraic structure of these generalizations. The method makes use of an auxiliary first-order differential equation derived from the phase curve equation with the help of this algebraic structure. Based on this equation, a Hamiltonian approach can be developed and canonical variables (moreover, action-angle variables) can be constructed.

  16. Generalized subcutaneous edema as a rare manifestation of dermatomyositis: clinical lesson from a rare feature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2011-04-01

    Generalized subcutaneous edema is a very rare manifestation of inflammatory myopathies. A 61-year-old woman presented with classic signs and symptoms of dermatomyositis. She was also noted to have generalized edema that was so florid that an alternative diagnosis was considered. Her disease was resistant to corticosteroids, azathioprine, and mycophenolate mofetil. Intravenous administration of immunoglobulins was started because of marked worsening of her disease-muscle weakness, generalized anasarca, and involvement of her bulbar muscles. This led to dramatic resolution of her subcutaneous edema and significant improvement of her skin and muscle disease. As the initial screen for malignancy was negative, a positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was requested, which interestingly showed a metabolically active cervical tumor. Anasarca is an unusual manifestation of dermatomyositis. In treatment-refractory cases, it seems reasonable to consider positron emission tomography scan in excluding underlying malignant disease.

  17. Features of General Reactive Potential of the Body in Infants with BCG lymphadenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Bobrovitskaia

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions. When using BCG vaccine of Russian production, there is far less significant overload of blood flow by products of intoxication and inflammation, more pronounced body’s ability to respond to antigenic stimulus generalization and no risk of infection, especially in infants, compared with Danish BCG vaccine. For vaccination of infants against tuberculosis, it is advisable to use more refined, with high immunogenicity and less reactogenic BCG vaccine of Russian production. Despite the presence of complications when using BCG vaccine, protection of the body from the development of generalized forms of tuberculosis in young children is possible by vaccination in the neonatal period.

  18. Darier′s disease - Oral, general and histopathological features in a 7 year old child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreedevi Dharman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Darier′s disease, also known as keratosis follicularis, is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis, manifesting clinically as hyperkeratotic, firm papule that predominates in the seborrheic areas and flexures with accompanying nail abnormalities. Heat, sweating, sunlight, and stress are exacerbating factors of the lesion. The oral lesions are asymptomatic and comprise multiple white papules in the buccal mucosa and hard palate, giving a cobblestone appearance, and it is characterized histologically by loss of desmosomal adhesion and abnormal keratinization resulting in mucocutaneous abnormalities. Pruritus, recurrent infections, and malodor can decrease the quality of life. We report a case of a 7-year-old boy with clinical and histological features of Darier′s disease.

  19. Primordial inhomogeneities in the expanding universe. II - General features of spherical models at late times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D. W.; Silk, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper studies the density profile that forms around a spherically symmetric bound central core immersed in a homogeneous-background k = 0 or k = -1 Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model, with zero pressure. Although the density profile in the linearized regime is almost arbitrary, in the nonlinear regime certain universal features of the density profile are obtained that are independent of the details of the initial conditions. The formation of 'halos' ('holes') with densities greater than (less than) the average cosmological density is discussed. It is shown that in most regions 'halos' form, and universal values are obtained for the slope of the ln (density)-ln (radius) profile in those 'halos' at late times, independently of the shape of the initial density profile. Restrictions are derived on where it is possible for 'holes' to exist at late times and on how such 'holes' must have evolved.

  20. RW Aur A FROM THE X-WIND POINT OF VIEW: GENERAL FEATURES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chun-Fan; Shang, Hsien

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the RW Aur A microjet is studied from the point of view of X-wind models. The archived Hubble Space Telescope/STIS spectra of the optical forbidden lines [O I], [S II], and [N II] from RW Aur A, taken in Cycle 8 with seven parallel slits along the jet axis, spaced at 0.''07 apart, were analyzed. Images, position-velocity diagrams, and line ratios among the species were constructed, and compared with synthetic observations generated by selected solutions of the X-wind. Prominent features arising in a steady-state X-wind could be identified within the convolved images and position-velocity diagrams, including FWHM and high-velocity peaks on both of the redshifted and blueshifted jets. The well-known asymmetric velocity profiles of the opposite jets were built into the selected models. We discuss model selections within the existing uncertainties of the stellar parameters and inclination angle of the system. In this framework, the mass-loss rates that were inferred to be decreasing along the jet axis in the literature are the results of slowly decreasing excitation conditions and electron density profiles. Despite the apparent asymmetry in the terminal velocities, line intensities and mass-loss rates, the average linear momenta from the opposite sides of the jet are actually balanced. These previously hard-to-explain features of the asymmetric RW Aur A jet system can now be interpreted in a different but self-consistent manner within the X-wind framework.

  1. RW Aur A FROM THE X-WIND POINT OF VIEW: GENERAL FEATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chun-Fan [Graduate Institute of Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Shang, Hsien, E-mail: shang@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Theoretical Institute for Advanced Research in Astrophysics (TIARA), Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10641, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-20

    In this paper, the RW Aur A microjet is studied from the point of view of X-wind models. The archived Hubble Space Telescope/STIS spectra of the optical forbidden lines [O I], [S II], and [N II] from RW Aur A, taken in Cycle 8 with seven parallel slits along the jet axis, spaced at 0.''07 apart, were analyzed. Images, position-velocity diagrams, and line ratios among the species were constructed, and compared with synthetic observations generated by selected solutions of the X-wind. Prominent features arising in a steady-state X-wind could be identified within the convolved images and position-velocity diagrams, including FWHM and high-velocity peaks on both of the redshifted and blueshifted jets. The well-known asymmetric velocity profiles of the opposite jets were built into the selected models. We discuss model selections within the existing uncertainties of the stellar parameters and inclination angle of the system. In this framework, the mass-loss rates that were inferred to be decreasing along the jet axis in the literature are the results of slowly decreasing excitation conditions and electron density profiles. Despite the apparent asymmetry in the terminal velocities, line intensities and mass-loss rates, the average linear momenta from the opposite sides of the jet are actually balanced. These previously hard-to-explain features of the asymmetric RW Aur A jet system can now be interpreted in a different but self-consistent manner within the X-wind framework.

  2. A supervised framework with intensity subtraction and deformation field features for the detection of new T2-w lesions in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Salem

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: The performance of the proposed method shows the benefits of using DF operators as features to train a supervised learning model. Compared to other methods, the proposed model decreases the number of false-positives while increasing the number of true-positives, which is relevant for clinical settings.

  3. Correlation Immunity, Avalanche Features, and Other Cryptographic Properties of Generalized Boolean Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    satisfying the strict avalanche criterion,” Discrete Math ., vol. 185, pp. 29–39, 1998. [2] R.C. Bose, “On some connections between the design of... Discrete Appl. Math ., vol. 149, pp. 73–86, 2005. [11] T.W. Cusick and P. Stănică, Cryptographic Boolean Functions and Applications, 2nd ed., San Diego...Stănică, “Bisecting binomial coefficients,” Discrete Appl. Math ., vol. 227, pp. 70–83, 2017. [28] T. Martinsen, W. Meidl, and P. Stănică, “Generalized

  4. Fatigue and Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society Sign In In Your Area Donate Donate ... of MS What Causes MS? Who Gets MS? Multiple Sclerosis FAQs Types of MS Related Conditions Symptoms & Diagnosis ...

  5. Hydatid disease of the Central Nervous System: imaging characteristics and general features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbassioun, K.; Amirjamshidi, A.; Sabouri Deylamie, M.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Hydatid disease primarily affects the liver and typically demonstrates characteristic imaging findings. Secondary involvement due to hematogenous dissemination may be seen in almost any locations, e.g., lung, kidney, spleen, bone and central nervous system. Objectives: To review the different aspects of hydatidosis of the central nervous system briefly and discuss the pathognomonic features and rare varieties of radiological findings useful in preoperative diagnosis of the disease in the human central nervous system. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study, the records of almost 100 cases of central nervous system hydatidosis were analyzed . The available images were reviewed by independent observers, either a radiologist or a neurosurgeon, and reported separately. Results: In skull x-ray films, nonspecific changes denoted increased intracranial pressure, skull asymmetry and curvilinear calcification in rare instances. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the round or oval, well-defined cystic mass with an attenuation or signal intensity similar to that of cerebrospinal fluid, with no associated perifocal edema, and no contrast enhancement as the pathognomonic findings of brain hydatidosis. Similar findings were detected in hydatid cysts involving the orbit, spinal column and spinal cord with some variations. Such findings as mild perifocal edema, non homogenous contrast enhancement, non-uniform shapes, calcification and multiplicity or septations have been the atypical radiological findings. Conclusion: In endemic areas, familiarity with typical and atypical radiological manifestations of hydatid disease of the central nervous system, will be helpful in making prompt and correct preoperative diagnosis leading to a better surgical outcome

  6. Suicide among Danes with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, H; Stenager, E; Nylev Stenager, E

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the suicide risk among Danish citizens with multiple sclerosis with that of the general population, and to evaluate changes over 45 years. METHODS: The study was based on linkage of the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry to the Cause of Death Registry. It comprised all 10...... taken their own lives, whereas the expected number of suicides was 54.2 (29.1 men, 25.1 women). Thus the suicide risk among persons with multiple sclerosis was more than twice that of the general population (SMR = 2.12). The increased risk was particularly high during the first year after diagnosis (SMR...... = 3.15). CONCLUSIONS: The risk of suicide in multiple sclerosis was almost twice as high as expected more than 20 years after diagnosis. The excess suicide risk has not declined since 1953....

  7. Atypical findings on computed tomography in tuberous sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Mendelsohn, D.B.; Hertzanu, Y.

    1984-01-01

    In 3 patients with tuberous sclerosis computed tomography showed numerous low-density areas suggestive of brain demyelination. In addition, solitary small subependymal calcifications were noted. These features in an infant or child with unexplained seizures should alert one to the diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis

  8. Transferring Pre-Trained Deep CNNs for Remote Scene Classification with General Features Learned from Linear PCA Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs have been widely used to obtain high-level representation in various computer vision tasks. However, in the field of remote sensing, there are not sufficient images to train a useful deep CNN. Instead, we tend to transfer successful pre-trained deep CNNs to remote sensing tasks. In the transferring process, generalization power of features in pre-trained deep CNNs plays the key role. In this paper, we propose two promising architectures to extract general features from pre-trained deep CNNs for remote scene classification. These two architectures suggest two directions for improvement. First, before the pre-trained deep CNNs, we design a linear PCA network (LPCANet to synthesize spatial information of remote sensing images in each spectral channel. This design shortens the spatial “distance” of target and source datasets for pre-trained deep CNNs. Second, we introduce quaternion algebra to LPCANet, which further shortens the spectral “distance” between remote sensing images and images used to pre-train deep CNNs. With five well-known pre-trained deep CNNs, experimental results on three independent remote sensing datasets demonstrate that our proposed framework obtains state-of-the-art results without fine-tuning and feature fusing. This paper also provides baseline for transferring fresh pretrained deep CNNs to other remote sensing tasks.

  9. [Importance of the hyperuricaemia, gout and gender nosological features in the activity of general practitioner - family doctor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudichenko, V M

    2012-01-01

    In this article there were analyzed gender data about features of hyperuricaemia and gout: women are much older at the onset of gout arthritis (one of main reasons, probably, makes menopause by itself), have more associated comorbid deseases as hypertension and kidney failure and drinks less alcoholic beverages. It was noticed, that typical localisation of the lesion on the first toe is less often in women, and women are more inclined to use diuretics among medical drugs. Abovementioned clinical features are of some importance for the broad activity of general practitioners - family doctors. Gender features of polyarthicular gout are not uniformed. Scientific researches confirmed possibility of the genetic basis of the uric acid metabolism, which influences some fenotypical features of the organism. Several genes are known for their influence on serum uric acid: PDZK1, GCKR, SLC2A9, ABCG2, LRRC16A, SLC17A3, SLC16A9 and SLC22A12. However, conclusions of the research works confirm the necessity of scientific clarification of the importance of different factors of gender differences.

  10. Stable micron-scale holes are a general feature of canonical holins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savva, Christos G; Dewey, Jill S; Moussa, Samir H; To, Kam H; Holzenburg, Andreas; Young, Ry

    2014-01-01

    At a programmed time in phage infection cycles, canonical holins suddenly trigger to cause lethal damage to the cytoplasmic membrane, resulting in the cessation of respiration and the non-specific release of pre-folded, fully active endolysins to the periplasm. For the paradigm holin S105 of lambda, triggering is correlated with the formation of micron-scale membrane holes, visible as interruptions in the bilayer in cryo-electron microscopic images and tomographic reconstructions. Here we report that the size distribution of the holes is stable for long periods after triggering. Moreover, early triggering caused by an early lysis allele of S105 formed approximately the same number of holes, but the lesions were significantly smaller. In contrast, early triggering prematurely induced by energy poisons resulted in many fewer visible holes, consistent with previous sizing studies. Importantly, the unrelated canonical holins P2 Y and T4 T were found to cause the formation of holes of approximately the same size and number as for lambda. In contrast, no such lesions were visible after triggering of the pinholin S(21) 68. These results generalize the hole formation phenomenon for canonical holins. A model is presented suggesting the unprecedentedly large size of these holes is related to the timing mechanism. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Planimetric Features Generalization for the Production of Small-Scale Map by Using Base Maps and the Existing Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Modiri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cartographic maps are representations of the Earth upon a flat surface in the smaller scale than it’s true. Large scale maps cover relatively small regions in great detail and small scale maps cover large regions such as nations, continents and the whole globe. Logical connection between the features and scale map must be maintained by changing the scale and it is important to recognize that even the most accurate maps sacrifice a certain amount of accuracy in scale to deliver a greater visual usefulness to its user. Cartographic generalization, or map generalization, is the method whereby information is selected and represented on a map in a way that adapts to the scale of the display medium of the map, not necessarily preserving all intricate geographical or other cartographic details. Due to the problems facing small-scale map production process and the need to spend time and money for surveying, today’s generalization is used as executive approach. The software is proposed in this paper that converted various data and information to certain Data Model. This software can produce generalization map according to base map using the existing algorithm. Planimetric generalization algorithms and roles are described in this article. Finally small-scale maps with 1:100,000, 1:250,000 and 1:500,000 scale are produced automatically and they are shown at the end.

  12. Central Hemodynamic Features in Elderly Patients During General Anesthesia with Sevoflurane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Petrov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reduce the number of perioperative cardiovascular events in elderly patients during traditional cholecystectomy, by using anesthesia based on sevoflurane (SF and fentanyl (FL. Subjects and methods. Forty-eight patients aged 60 to 75 years, who were divided into 2 groups, operated on by a classical surgical technique for chronic calculous cholecystitis in the presence of concomitant coronary heart disease and essential hypertension, and had grade 3 surgical risk according to the classification of the Moscow Research Society of Anesthesiologists and Reanimatologists, were examined. Premedicaton was routine. The induction of anesthesia was as follows: intravenous propofol (PF (1.8±0.2 mg/kg and FL (2.2±0.4 mg/kg in Groups 1 and 2. General anesthesia (GA was maintained by SF (1.1±0.2 MAC and FL (2.4±0.4 jBg/kg/hr in Group 1 (n=25 and by PF (2.0—4.0 mg/kg/hr and FL (3.5±0.7 ^Bg/kg/hr in Group 2 (n=23. In both groups, mechanical ventilation was as follows: N2O:O2 = 2:1; air flow, 6 l/min. Myoplegia was rocuronium bromide (RB (0.075—0.1 mg/kg in Group 1 and RB (0.15 mg/kg in Group 2. Hemodynamics was studied during 5 stages of surgery. Results. Central hemodynamics (CH was rather stable in patients after GA with SF. Significant CH changes were noted only during the traumatic stage of surgery, which were less pronounced than those in patients following GA with PF. CH parameters returned gradually to the baseline values at the end of surgery and virtually to the background values after tracheal extubation. The patients under GA with PF showed significant CH changes at all stages of the study. Conclusion. Analysis of the systemic hemodynamic changes induced by the use of SF and PF suggests that GA with SF in elderly patients is more preferable than that in those with PF. Key words: sevoflurane, hemodynamics, elderly.

  13. Multiple sclerosis and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Anthony; Pavisian, Bennis

    2017-06-01

    Mortality rates are elevated in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) relative to the general population. There is, however, some uncertainty whether suicide contributes to this. Epidemiological data suggest that the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for suicide in MS is approximately twice that of the general population with younger males in the first few years following diagnosis most at risk. Rates of suicidal intent, a potential harbinger of more self-destructive behavior, are also elevated, but the frequency with which intent is followed by suicide is not known. Depression, severity of depression, social isolation, and alcohol abuse are associated with thoughts of suicide. The variables linked with suicide and suicidal intent are therefore well defined and should be readily available from routine clinical inquiry. While vigilance on the part of clinicians is required, particularly in the context of high-risk patients, it is also recognized that prevention is dependent on full disclosure of intent.

  14. Bullying among Jordanian schoolchildren, its effects on school performance, and the contribution of general physical and dentofacial features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bitar, Zaid B; Al-Omari, Iyad K; Sonbol, Hawazen N; Al-Ahmad, Hazem T; Cunningham, Susan J

    2013-12-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the experience of bullying in a representative sample of Jordanian schoolchildren in Amman, to look at its effect on school attendance and perception of academic performance, and to look at the contribution of general physical and dentofacial features to this phenomenon. This was a cross-sectional study in which a representative sample of sixth-grade students (11-12 years of age) from randomly selected schools was asked to complete questionnaires distributed in the classroom in the presence of the researchers. The final sample size was 920 children (470 girls, 450 boys). The prevalence of bullying was 47% (n = 433); significantly more boys reported being bullied than girls (P bullying reported playing truant from school and disliking school than those who were not bullied. Teeth were the number 1 feature targeted for bullying, followed by strength and weight. The 3 most commonly reported dentofacial features targeted by bullies were spacing between the teeth or missing teeth, shape or color of the teeth, and prominent maxillary anterior teeth. This study demonstrated a high prevalence of bullying in Jordanian schools, with many children experiencing bullying because of their dental or facial appearance. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Microbial landscape features in patients with generalized periodontitis at pre-clinical and radiological stage of its development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vatamanyuk N.V.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a comparative study of microbial landscape features in patients with generalized periodontitis at pre-clinical and radiological stage of its development in 42 patients. The purpose of the study is a comparative study of the composition of microbiocenosis of periodontal tissues in patients with chronic catarrhal gingivitis (CCG and chronic generalized periodontitis (CGP at an early stage of development and development studies of microbiological criteria for early emergence of the destructive process in periodontal structures. We found that the microflora isolated from dento-gingival grooves is of importance in diagnostics to identify the etiology of chronic generalized catarrhal gingivitis (CGCG and chronic generalized periodontitis in the early stages of its development. It was established that the presence of two or more types of fixed parodonto-pathogenic microorganisms in microbial association increases the likelihood of inflammatory and destructive events in periodontal tissues in patients with GCCG and is one of the reasons of is becoming CGP.

  16. [Current description of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Río, Jordi; Montalbán, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a multifocal demyelinating disease leading to progressive neurodegeneration caused by an autoimmune response in genetically predisposed individuals. In the last few years, the knowledge and management of this disease has been revolutionized by a series of findings. The present article reviews pathological features of the disease, in which cortical involvement is increasingly implicated, and aspects related to novel pathogenic mechanisms, such as the role of the microbiota in the genesis of multiple sclerosis, as well as recent contributions from the fields of epidemiology and genetics. Also reviewed are the latest diagnostic criteria, which currently allow a much earlier diagnosis, with clear therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Cognitive deficits in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, H; Jønsson, A; Andresen, Jesper Graubæk

    2012-01-01

    of the cognitive impairment seen in MS and constitute a supplement to traditional measurement of T2 lesion volume. Materials and Methods - Fifty patients with clinically definite MS were included (38 women, 12 men). Patients were MR scanned, neuropsychologically tested, and evaluated clinically with the Kurtzke......Objectives - Although disease load in multiple sclerosis (MS) often is based on T2 lesion volumes, the changes in T2 of normal appearing brain tissue (NABT) are rarely considered. By means of magnetic resonance, (MR) we retrospectively investigated whether T2 changes in NABT explain part...... Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the Multiple Sclerosis Impairment Scale (MSIS). Voxel-wise T2 estimates and total T2 lesion volume were tested for correlations with eight cognitive domains, a general cognitive dysfunction factor (CDF), and the two clinical scales. Results - We found distinct...

  18. Sclerosis: Implications for Interhemispheric Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lunardelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 47-year-old woman with 35-year history of multiple sclerosis, who showed alien hand signs, a rare behavioural disorder that involves unilateral goal-directed movements that are contrary to the individual's intention. Alien hand syndrome has been described in multiple sclerosis (MS only occasionally and is generally suggestive of callosal disconnection. The patient presented also with bilateral limb apraxia and left hand agraphia, raising the possibility of cortical dysfunction or disconnection, in addition to corpus callosum and white matter involvement. Her specific pattern of symptoms supports the role of the corpus callosum in interhemispheric communication for complex as well as fine motor activities and may indicate that it can serve as both an inhibitory and excitatory function depending on task demands.

  19. Tuberous sclerosis complex: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumyabrata Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex is an unusual autosomal dominant neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by the development of benign tumors affecting different body systems affecting the brain, skin, retina, and viscera. It is characterized by cutaneous changes, neurologic conditions, and the formation of hamartomas in multiple organs leading to morbidity and mortality. The most common oral manifestations are fibromas, gingival hyperplasia, and enamel hypoplasia. The management of these patients is often multidisciplinary involving specialists from various fields. Here, we present a case report of a 26-old-year male patient with characteristic clinical, radiological, and histological features of tuberous sclerosis complex.

  20. Aspectos básicos del pterigion para médicos generales integrale Basic features of Pterigium for integral general physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Rojas Álvarez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: el pterigion constituye un motivo de consulta en la atención primaria de salud, es importante que el médico general integral sea capaz de asumir una óptima conducta ante un caso de pterigion, su seguimiento posoperatorio, y más aún, tener las herramientas suficientes para trazar estrategias de prevención y promoción de salud respecto al tema. Objetivo: describir los aspectos básicos del pterigion que debe conocer un médico general integral. Métodos: se realizó un estudio exploratorio sobre los aspectos conceptuales, etiopatogénicos, epidemiológicos, clínicos y terapéuticos del pterigion, en la literatura impresa y digital disponible del tema, durante el mes de mayo de 2007. Resultados: conceptualmente el pterigion es una degeneración corneal no involutiva que parte de la conjuntiva bulbar. El conocimiento de sus factores de riesgo es un elemento imprescindible para la proyección de estrategias de promoción y prevención de salud. El cuadro clínico reúne un espectro que va desde lo asintomático hasta molestias oculares relacionadas con afectación del eje visual. El diagnóstico diferencial del pterigion debe establecerse siempre en la práctica médica, en primer lugar con la pinguécula, para evitar errores diagnósticos. Conclusiones: el cumplimiento del tratamiento posoperatorio en el área de salud contribuye a la disminución del índice de recidivas.Introduction: Pterigium is a reason for consultation of health primary care, it is important that integral physician be able to assume a optimal behavior in face of a case of pterigium, its postoperative follow-up, and even more, to have available the tools enough to design the health prevention and promotion strategies regarding the subject. Objective: To describe the basic features of pterigium known by integral general physician. Methods: During May, 2007, a exploratory study was conducted on conceptual, etiological and pathogenic, epidemiologic, clinical

  1. A novel mouse model with impaired dynein/dynactin function develops amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-like features in motor neurons and improves lifespan in SOD1-ALS mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Teuling (Eva); V. van Dis (Vera); P. Wulf (Phebe); E.D. Haasdijk (Elize); A.S. Akhmanova (Anna); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper); D. Jaarsma (Dick)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAmyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative condition characterized by progressive motor neuron degeneration and muscle paralysis. Genetic evidence from man and mouse has indicated that mutations in the dynein/dynactin motor complex are correlated with motor neuron

  2. The Presenting Feature and Role of General Practitioners and Non-neurosurgeon Physicians in Recognizing Pediatric Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wihasto Suryaningtyas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the presenting features and role of non-neurosurgeon physician in recognizing the signs and symptoms of brain tumours in children. METHOD: Medical records of 31 pediatric brain tumor patients treated in Department of Neurosurgery, Soetomo General Hospital, Airlangga University Faculty of Medicine, Surabaya from August 2005 to September 2006 were reviewed. RESULTS: Thirty five percents f parents went to pediatrician as their first contact physician, 25% to general practitioner, 20% neurologist, 20% to neurosurgeon. Neurosurgeon was the second and third contact physician receiving refferal from non-neurosurgeon physician. The most common symptoms were headache (71%, vomiting (61%, motor weakness (48%, visual disturbance (45%, decrease level of consciousness (45% and seizures (38%, unsteadiness (35%. The most common symptoms that led the parents to find medical help at any time were motor disturbance (48%, vomiting (48%, visual disturbance (45%, unsteadiness (35%, decrease level of consciousness (32%, seizures (32%, headache (32%. All patients had neurological signs at diagnosis; 58% had papilloedema, 48% cranial nerve abnormalities, 35% cerebellar signs, 32% motor disturbance, 29% a reduced level of consciousness, 12% cranial enlargement. Duration of symptoms at admission was 1 months (32%, 2 months (42%, 3-6 months (19%, more than 6 months (7%. A short symptom interval was significantly associated with high grade tumours and patient age 3 years or younger. CONCLUSION: The symptoms and signs are often nonspecific, mimicking more common diseases. Therefore, the possibility of a brain neoplasm should always be considered, it materializes very rarely. Benign neurologic symptoms such as headache, which last for 2 months or more, should indicate the need of additional studies. Our results higlighted the neurologic impairments which might facilitate early recognition of a brain neoplasm. Neurologic problems as the only symptom of brain

  3. Magnetic resonance in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotti, G.; Caputo, D.; Cazzullo, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. (orig.)

  4. SYSTEM OF COMPUTER MODELING OBJECTS AND PROCESSES AND FEATURES OF ITS USE IN THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS OF GENERAL SECONDARY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana G. Lytvynova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the historical aspect of the formation of computer modeling as one of the perspective directions of educational process development. The notion of “system of computer modeling”, conceptual model of system of computer modeling (SCMod, its components (mathematical, animation, graphic, strategic, functions, principles and purposes of use are grounded. The features of the organization of students work using SCMod, individual and group work, the formation of subject competencies are described; the aspect of students’ motivation to learning is considered. It is established that educational institutions can use SCMod at different levels and stages of training and in different contexts, which consist of interrelated physical, social, cultural and technological aspects. It is determined that the use of SCMod in general secondary school would increase the capacity of teachers to improve the training of students in natural and mathematical subjects and contribute to the individualization of the learning process, in order to meet the pace, educational interests and capabilities of each particular student. It is substantiated that the use of SCMod in the study of natural-mathematical subjects contributes to the formation of subject competencies, develops the skills of analysis and decision-making, increases the level of digital communication, develops vigilance, raises the level of knowledge, increases the duration of attention of students. Further research requires the justification of the process of forming students’ competencies in natural-mathematical subjects and designing cognitive tasks using SCMod.

  5. Psychometric Features of the General Aptitude Test-Verbal Part (GAT-V): A Large-Scale Assessment of High School Graduates in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Dimiter M.; Shamrani, Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the psychometric features of a General Aptitude Test-Verbal Part, which is used with assessments of high school graduates in Saudi Arabia. The data supported a bifactor model, with one general factor and three content domains (Analogy, Sentence Completion, and Reading Comprehension) as latent aspects of verbal aptitude.

  6. A novel splice-site mutation in ALS2 establishes the diagnosis of juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in a family with early onset anarthria and generalized dystonias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Siddiqi

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of childhood neurological disorders remains challenging given the overlapping clinical presentation across subgroups and heterogeneous presentation within subgroups. To determine the underlying genetic cause of a severe neurological disorder in a large consanguineous Pakistani family presenting with severe scoliosis, anarthria and progressive neuromuscular degeneration, we performed genome-wide homozygosity mapping accompanied by whole-exome sequencing in two affected first cousins and their unaffected parents to find the causative mutation. We identified a novel homozygous splice-site mutation (c.3512+1G>A in the ALS2 gene (NM_020919.3 encoding alsin that segregated with the disease in this family. Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in ALS2 are known to cause juvenile-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, one of the many neurological conditions having overlapping symptoms with many neurological phenotypes. RT-PCR validation revealed that the mutation resulted in exon-skipping as well as the use of an alternative donor splice, both of which are predicted to cause loss-of-function of the resulting proteins. By examining 216 known neurological disease genes in our exome sequencing data, we also identified 9 other rare nonsynonymous mutations in these genes, some of which lie in highly conserved regions. Sequencing of a single proband might have led to mis-identification of some of these as the causative variant. Our findings established a firm diagnosis of juvenile ALS in this family, thus demonstrating the use of whole exome sequencing combined with linkage analysis in families as a powerful tool for establishing a quick and precise genetic diagnosis of complex neurological phenotypes.

  7. Albumin and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-04-12

    Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furthermore, albumin binds metals and heme thereby limiting their ability to produce reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Albumin also has the potential to worsen disease. Similar to pathogenic processes that occur during epilepsy, extravasated albumin could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and affect the ability of astrocytes to maintain potassium homeostasis thereby possibly making neurons more vulnerable to glutamate exicitotoxicity, which is thought to be a pathogenic mechanism in MS. The albumin quotient, albumin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/albumin in serum, is used as a measure of blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in MS, but it may be inaccurate since albumin levels in the CSF can be influenced by multiple factors including: 1) albumin becomes proteolytically cleaved during disease, 2) extravasated albumin is taken up by macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, and 3) the location of BBB damage affects the entry of extravasated albumin into ventricular CSF. A discussion of the roles that albumin performs during MS is put forth.

  8. Primary lateral sclerosis mimicking atypical parkinsonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlinah, Ibrahim M; Bhatia, Kailash P; Østergaard, Karen

    2007-01-01

    of the atypical parkinsonian syndromes. Here we describe five patients initially referred with a diagnosis of levodopa-unresponsive atypical parkinsonism (n = 4) or primary progressive multiple sclerosis (n = 1), but subsequently found to have features consistent with PLS instead. Onset age varied from 49 to 67......Primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), the upper motor neurone variant of motor neurone disease, is characterized by progressive spinal or bulbar spasticity with minimal motor weakness. Rarely, PLS may present with clinical features resembling parkinsonism resulting in occasional misdiagnosis as one...... in all patients. Anterior horn cell involvement developed in three cases. Early gait disturbances resulting in falls were seen in all patients and none of them responded to dopaminergic medications. Two patients underwent dopamine transporter (DaT) SPECT scanning with normal results. Other features...

  9. Psychiatric co-morbidity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Huong; Laursen, Bjarne; Stenager, Elsebeth N

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of depression and anxiety in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have reported higher rates in MS patients than the general population. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of depression and anxiety and the use of tricyclic antidepressant and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors...

  10. SPATACSIN mutations cause autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Orlacchio, Antonio; Babalini, Carla; Borreca, Antonella; Patrono, Clarice; Massa, Roberto; Basaran, Sarenur; Munhoz, Renato P.; Rogaeva, Ekaterina A.; St George-Hyslop, Peter H.; Bernardi, Giorgio; Kawarai, Toshitaka

    2010-01-01

    The mutation of the spatacsin gene is the single most common cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum. Common clinical, pathological and genetic features between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and hereditary spastic paraplegia motivated us to investigate 25 families with autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and long-term survival for mutations in the spatascin gene. The inclusion criterion was a diagnosis of clinically definite ...

  11. Multiple sclerosis research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglia, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    This volume proceedings contains four contributions which are in INIS scope, dealing with MRI and SPECT in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and assessment of disease activity. (H.W.). refs.; figs.; tabs

  12. Rehabilitation and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    In a chronic and disabling disease like multiple sclerosis, rehabilitation becomes of major importance in the preservation of physical, psychological and social functioning. Approximately 80% of patients have multiple sclerosis for more than 35 years and most will develop disability at some point......, a paradigm shift is taking place and it is now increasingly acknowledged that exercise therapy is both safe and beneficial. Robot-assisted training is also attracting attention in multiple sclerosis rehabilitation. Several sophisticated commercial robots exist, but so far the number of scientific studies...... promising. This drug has been shown to improve walking ability in some patients with multiple sclerosis, associated with a reduction of patients' self-reported ambulatory disability. Rehabilitation strategies involving these different approaches, or combinations of them, may be of great use in improving...

  13. Prevalence of histological features of idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension in general population: a retrospective study of incidental liver biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chunlai; Chumbalkar, Vaibhav; Ells, Peter F; Bonville, Daniel J; Lee, Hwajeong

    2017-09-01

    Idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension (INCPH) is associated with histologic changes secondary to obliterative portal venopathy without cirrhosis. We studied the prevalence of individual histological features of INCPH in liver biopsies obtained incidentally during unrelated elective procedures and in elective liver biopsies with the diagnosis of fatty liver disease. A total of 53 incidental liver biopsies obtained intraoperatively during unrelated elective procedures and an additional 28 elective biopsies with the diagnosis of fatty liver disease without portal hypertension and cirrhosis were studied. Various histologic features of INCPH were evaluated. Shunt vessel (30%), phlebosclerosis (27%), increased number of portal vessels (19%) and incomplete septa (17%) were common in these liver biopsies after confounding factors such as co-existing fatty liver disease or fibrosis were excluded. At least one feature of INCPH was noted in 90% of the biopsies. Eight (10%) biopsies showed 5-6 features of INCPH. In total, 11 (14%) of 81 patients had risk factors associated with INCPH, including hypercoagulability, autoimmune disease, exposure to drugs, and infections. No patient had portal hypertension at the end of the follow-up. The histologic features of INCPH are seen in incidental liver biopsies and fatty liver disease without portal hypertension. Ten percent of the biopsies show 5-6 features of INCPH without portal hypertension. Interpreting histologic features in the right clinical context is important for proper patient care.

  14. Mining gene expression data of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pi Guo

    Full Text Available Microarray produces a large amount of gene expression data, containing various biological implications. The challenge is to detect a panel of discriminative genes associated with disease. This study proposed a robust classification model for gene selection using gene expression data, and performed an analysis to identify disease-related genes using multiple sclerosis as an example.Gene expression profiles based on the transcriptome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of 44 samples from 26 multiple sclerosis patients and 18 individuals with other neurological diseases (control were analyzed. Feature selection algorithms including Support Vector Machine based on Recursive Feature Elimination, Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve, and Boruta algorithms were jointly performed to select candidate genes associating with multiple sclerosis. Multiple classification models categorized samples into two different groups based on the identified genes. Models' performance was evaluated using cross-validation methods, and an optimal classifier for gene selection was determined.An overlapping feature set was identified consisting of 8 genes that were differentially expressed between the two phenotype groups. The genes were significantly associated with the pathways of apoptosis and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction. TNFSF10 was significantly associated with multiple sclerosis. A Support Vector Machine model was established based on the featured genes and gave a practical accuracy of ∼86%. This binary classification model also outperformed the other models in terms of Sensitivity, Specificity and F1 score.The combined analytical framework integrating feature ranking algorithms and Support Vector Machine model could be used for selecting genes for other diseases.

  15. A proposal of criteria for the classification of systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadashkevich, Oleg; Davis, Paul; Fritzler, Marvin J

    2004-11-01

    Sensitive and specific criteria for the classification of systemic sclerosis are required by clinicians and investigators to achieve higher quality clinical studies and approaches to therapy. A clinical study of systemic sclerosis patients in Europe and Canada led to a set of criteria that achieve high sensitivity and specificity. Both clinical and laboratory investigations of patients with systemic sclerosis, related conditions and diseases with clinical features that can be mistaken as part of the systemic sclerosis spectrum were undertaken. Laboratory investigations included the detection of autoantibodies to centromere proteins, Scl-70 (topoisomerase I), and fibrillarin (U3-RNP). Based on the investigation of 269 systemic sclerosis patients and 720 patients presenting with related and confounding conditions, the following set of criteria for the classification of systemic sclerosis was proposed: 1) autoantibodies to: centromere proteins, Scl-70 (topo I), fibrillarin; 2) bibasilar pulmonary fibrosis; 3) contractures of the digital joints or prayer sign; 4) dermal thickening proximal to the wrists; 5) calcinosis cutis; 6) Raynaud's phenomenon; 7) esophageal distal hypomotility or reflux-esophagitis; 8) sclerodactyly or non-pitting digital edema; 9) teleangiectasias. The classification of definite SSc requires at least three of the above criteria. Criteria for the classification of systemic sclerosis have been proposed. Preliminary testing has defined the sensitivity and specificity of these criteria as high as 99% and 100%, respectively. Testing and validation of the proposed criteria by other clinical centers is required.

  16. Cognitive dysfunction in pediatric multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suppiej A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Agnese Suppiej,1 Elisa Cainelli1,2 1Child Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Pediatric University Hospital, Padua, Italy; 2Lifespan Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory (LCNL, Department of General Psychology, University of Padua, Italy Abstract: Cognitive and neuropsychological impairments are well documented in adult ­multiple sclerosis (MS. Research has only recently focused on cognitive disabilities in pediatric cases, highlighting some differences between pediatric and adult cases. Impairments in several functions have been reported in children, particularly in relation to attention, processing speed, visual–motor skills, and language. Language seems to be particularly vulnerable in pediatric MS, unlike in adults in whom it is usually preserved. Deficits in executive functions, which are considered MS-specific in adults, have been inconsistently reported in children. In children, as compared to adults, the relationship between cognitive dysfunctions and the two other main symptoms of MS, fatigue and psychiatric disorders, was poorly explored. Furthermore, data on the correlations of cognitive impairments with clinical and neuroimaging features are scarce in children, and the results are often incongruent; interestingly, involvement of corpus callosum and reduced thalamic volume differentiated patients identified as having a cognitive impairment from those without a cognitive impairment. Further studies about pediatric MS are needed in order to better understand the impact of the disease on brain development and the resulting effect on cognitive functions, particularly with respect to different therapeutic strategies. Keywords: central nervous system, child, deficit, IQ, inflammatory demyelination, neuropsychological

  17. Lung commitment in Tuberous Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo B, Jorge A; Araque G, Julio Mario; Camargo P, Carlos B

    1992-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is a rare hereditary anomaly characterized by hamartomas in many parts of the body. Lung involvement is found in only one of 100 cases. In this case report we present a patient with lung involvement in tuberous sclerosis

  18. Multiple Sclerosis and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Editors David C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD Multiple sclerosis and vitamin D Andrew J. Solomon, MD WHAT ... caused by improper immune responses (autoimmune diseases), including multiple sclerosis (MS). A recent Patient Page in Neurology provided ...

  19. A general procedure to generate models for urban environmental-noise pollution using feature selection and machine learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torija, Antonio J; Ruiz, Diego P

    2015-02-01

    The prediction of environmental noise in urban environments requires the solution of a complex and non-linear problem, since there are complex relationships among the multitude of variables involved in the characterization and modelling of environmental noise and environmental-noise magnitudes. Moreover, the inclusion of the great spatial heterogeneity characteristic of urban environments seems to be essential in order to achieve an accurate environmental-noise prediction in cities. This problem is addressed in this paper, where a procedure based on feature-selection techniques and machine-learning regression methods is proposed and applied to this environmental problem. Three machine-learning regression methods, which are considered very robust in solving non-linear problems, are used to estimate the energy-equivalent sound-pressure level descriptor (LAeq). These three methods are: (i) multilayer perceptron (MLP), (ii) sequential minimal optimisation (SMO), and (iii) Gaussian processes for regression (GPR). In addition, because of the high number of input variables involved in environmental-noise modelling and estimation in urban environments, which make LAeq prediction models quite complex and costly in terms of time and resources for application to real situations, three different techniques are used to approach feature selection or data reduction. The feature-selection techniques used are: (i) correlation-based feature-subset selection (CFS), (ii) wrapper for feature-subset selection (WFS), and the data reduction technique is principal-component analysis (PCA). The subsequent analysis leads to a proposal of different schemes, depending on the needs regarding data collection and accuracy. The use of WFS as the feature-selection technique with the implementation of SMO or GPR as regression algorithm provides the best LAeq estimation (R(2)=0.94 and mean absolute error (MAE)=1.14-1.16 dB(A)). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute form of multiple sclerosis in a child simulation encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niagolova, S.; Karapasheva, V.; Nikolova, M.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered the most common demyelinating process involving the CNS. Although usually considered an adult disease multiple sclerosis can begin to manifest during childhood. The clinical presentation of the disease in early childhood can range from paraesthesias to dramatic presentations, suggesting diffuse encephalopathy with cerebral oedema, meningismus and impaired consciousness. Multiple sclerosis is usually characterized by a typical relapsing-remitting clinical course. But there are acute, clinically fulminant forms with atypical. neurologic symptoms and death in months. MRI has become increasingly relevant in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis in the past years. Yet, the specificity is limited. Atypical forms of MS and other diseases of CNS may show similar patterns on MRI. We report a case of 7 years old boy with clinically fulminant Marburg type of multiple sclerosis that ended with death in two months. The patient was a diagnostic problem despite the certain degree of clinical and radiological suspicion. The postmortem diagnosis is based on pathomorphologic changes (gross pathologic and microscopic features) in CNS.The present case is of clinical, radiological and pathomorphologic interest because of its early onset in childhood, unusual clinical course and acute progression. Awareness of the MRI features of multiple sclerosis and MS-variants (subtypes) may help in such atypical presentations in childhood. (authors)

  1. SPATACSIN mutations cause autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlacchio, Antonio; Babalini, Carla; Borreca, Antonella; Patrono, Clarice; Massa, Roberto; Basaran, Sarenur; Munhoz, Renato P; Rogaeva, Ekaterina A; St George-Hyslop, Peter H; Bernardi, Giorgio; Kawarai, Toshitaka

    2010-02-01

    The mutation of the spatacsin gene is the single most common cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum. Common clinical, pathological and genetic features between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and hereditary spastic paraplegia motivated us to investigate 25 families with autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and long-term survival for mutations in the spatascin gene. The inclusion criterion was a diagnosis of clinically definite amyotrophic lateral sclerosis according to the revised El Escorial criteria. The exclusion criterion was a diagnosis of hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum in line with an established protocol. Additional pathological and genetic evaluations were also performed. Surprisingly, 12 sequence alterations in the spatacsin gene (one of which is novel, IVS30 + 1 G > A) were identified in 10 unrelated pedigrees with autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and long-term survival. The countries of origin of these families were Italy, Brazil, Canada, Japan and Turkey. The variants seemed to be pathogenic since they co-segregated with the disease in all pedigrees, were absent in controls and were associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis neuropathology in one member of one of these families for whom central nervous system tissue was available. Our study indicates that mutations in the spatascin gene could cause a much wider spectrum of clinical features than previously recognized, including autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  2. Hippocampal sclerosis in children younger than 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadom, Nadja [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Tsuchida, Tammy; Gaillard, William D. [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is rarely considered as a diagnosis in children younger than 2 years. To describe imaging features in conjunction with clinical information in patients with hippocampal sclerosis who are younger than 2 years. We retrospectively reviewed MR brain imaging and clinical information in five children in whom the diagnosis of HS was made both clinically and by MRI prior to 2 years of age. Imaging features establishing the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis were bright T2 signal and volume loss, while the internal architecture of the hippocampal formation was preserved in almost all children. Clinically, all children had an infectious trigger. It is necessary for radiologists to consider HS in children with certain clinical features to plan an MRI protocol that is appropriate for detection of hippocampal pathology. (orig.)

  3. Hippocampal sclerosis in children younger than 2 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadom, Nadja; Tsuchida, Tammy; Gaillard, William D.

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is rarely considered as a diagnosis in children younger than 2 years. To describe imaging features in conjunction with clinical information in patients with hippocampal sclerosis who are younger than 2 years. We retrospectively reviewed MR brain imaging and clinical information in five children in whom the diagnosis of HS was made both clinically and by MRI prior to 2 years of age. Imaging features establishing the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis were bright T2 signal and volume loss, while the internal architecture of the hippocampal formation was preserved in almost all children. Clinically, all children had an infectious trigger. It is necessary for radiologists to consider HS in children with certain clinical features to plan an MRI protocol that is appropriate for detection of hippocampal pathology. (orig.)

  4. Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis of Rhodobacter capsulatus NifF: Uncovering General Features of Nitrogen-fixation (nif-Flavodoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Pérez-Dorado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the crystal structure of NifF from Rhodobacter capsulatus and its homologues reported so far reflects the existence of unique structural features in nif flavodoxins: a leucine at the re face of the isoalloxazine, an eight-residue insertion at the C-terminus of the 50’s loop and a remarkable difference in the electrostatic potential surface with respect to non-nif flavodoxins. A phylogenetic study on 64 sequences from 52 bacterial species revealed four clusters, including different functional prototypes, correlating the previously defined as “short-chain” with the firmicutes flavodoxins and the “long-chain” with gram-negative species. The comparison of Rhodobacter NifF structure with other bacterial flavodoxin prototypes discloses the concurrence of specific features of these functional electron donors to nitrogenase.

  5. Structural and phylogenetic analysis of Rhodobacter capsulatus NifF: uncovering general features of nitrogen-fixation (nif)-flavodoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Bortolotti, Ana; Cortez, Néstor; Hermoso, Juan A

    2013-01-09

    Analysis of the crystal structure of NifF from Rhodobacter capsulatus and its homologues reported so far reflects the existence of unique structural features in nif flavodoxins: a leucine at the re face of the isoalloxazine, an eight-residue insertion at the C-terminus of the 50's loop and a remarkable difference in the electrostatic potential surface with respect to non-nif flavodoxins. A phylogenetic study on 64 sequences from 52 bacterial species revealed four clusters, including different functional prototypes, correlating the previously defined as "short-chain" with the firmicutes flavodoxins and the "long-chain" with gram-negative species. The comparison of Rhodobacter NifF structure with other bacterial flavodoxin prototypes discloses the concurrence of specific features of these functional electron donors to nitrogenase.

  6. Computerized tomography in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delouvrier, J.J.; Tritschler, J.L.; Desbleds, M.T.; Cambier, J.; Nahum, H.

    1980-01-01

    The double scan CT method was applied to a homogeneous population of 50 multiple sclerosis patients and the following features were studied: well defined low-density areas, localized contrast enhancements, cerebral atrophy and white matter homogeneity. The analyses of the variance of the white matter (centrum ovale) can disclose those lesions which individually do not surpass the visibility threshold. The lesions that are localized in the white matter are mainly periventricular, most often multiple, and they do not displace the neighbouring structures. By revealing a large number of clinically silent cerebral lesions, the cerebral CT becomes a highly important diagnostic tool. The value of the CT examinations seems to be of major importance each time that the clinical diagnosis is hesitant, particularly when faced with medullary signs or an initial neurological episode. (C.F.)

  7. Cognitive dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana eGuimarães

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In Multiple Sclerosis (MS prevalence studies of community and clinical samples, indicate that 45–60% of patients are cognitively impaired. These cognitive dysfunctions have been traditionally described as heterogeneous, but more recent studies suggest that there is a specific pattern of MS-related cognitive dysfunctions. With the advent of disease-modifying medications for MS and emphasis on early intervention and treatment, detection of cognitive impairment at its earliest stage becomes particularly important. In this review the authors address: the cognitive domains most commonly impaired in MS (memory, attention, executive functions, speed of information processing and visual spatial abilities; the physiopathological mechanism implied in MS cognitive dysfunction and correlated brain MRI features; the importance of neuropsychological assessment of MS patients in different stages of the disease and the influence of its course on cognitive performance; the most used tests and batteries for neuropsychological assessment; therapeutic strategies to improve cognitive abilities.

  8. Tuberous sclerosis complex: Recent advances in manifestations and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wataya-Kaneda, Mari; Uemura, Motohide; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Hirata, Haruhiko; Osuga, Keigo; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Nonomura, Norio

    2017-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by generalized involvement and variable manifestations with a birth incidence of 1:6000. In a quarter of a century, significant progress in tuberous sclerosis complex has been made. Two responsible genes, TSC1 and TSC2, which encode hamartin and tuberin, respectively, were discovered in the 1990s, and their functions were elucidated in the 2000s. Hamartin-Tuberin complex is involved in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin signal transduction pathway, and suppresses mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activity, which is a center for various functions. Constitutive activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 causes variable manifestations in tuberous sclerosis complex. Recently, genetic tests were launched to diagnose tuberous sclerosis complex, and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitors are being used to treat tuberous sclerosis complex patients. As a result of these advances, new diagnostic criteria have been established and an indispensable new treatment method; that is, "a cross-sectional medical examination system," a system to involve many experts for tuberous sclerosis complex diagnosis and treatments, was also created. Simultaneously, the frequency of genetic tests and advances in diagnostic technology have resulted in new views on symptoms. The numbers of tuberous sclerosis complex patients without neural symptoms are increasing, and for these patients, renal manifestations and pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis have become important manifestations. New concepts of tuberous sclerosis complex-associated neuropsychiatric disorders or perivascular epithelioid cell tumors are being created. The present review contains a summary of recent advances, significant manifestations and therapy in tuberous sclerosis complex. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  9. Multiple sclerosis in children: an update on clinical diagnosis, therapeutic strategies, and research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Amy; Ghezzi, Angelo; Bar-Or, Amit; Mikaeloff, Yann; Tardieu, Marc; Banwell, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    The clinical features, diagnostic challenges, neuroimaging appearance, therapeutic options, and pathobiological research progress in childhood—and adolescent—onset multiple sclerosis have been informed by many new insights in the past 7 years. National programmes in several countries, collaborative research efforts, and an established international paediatric multiple sclerosis study group have contributed to revised clinical diagnostic definitions, identified clinical features of multiple sclerosis that differ by age of onset, and made recommendations regarding the treatment of paediatric multiple sclerosis. The relative risks conveyed by genetic and environmental factors to paediatric multiple sclerosis have been the subject of several large cohort studies. MRI features have been characterised in terms of qualitative descriptions of lesion distribution and applicability of MRI aspects to multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria, and quantitative studies have assessed total lesion burden and the effect of the disease on global and regional brain volume. Humoral-based and cell-based assays have identified antibodies against myelin, potassium-channel proteins, and T-cell profiles that support an adult-like T-cell repertoire and cellular reactivity against myelin in paediatric patients with multiple sclerosis. Finally, the safety and efficacy of standard first-line therapies in paediatric multiple sclerosis populations are now appreciated in more detail, and consensus views on the future conduct and feasibility of phase 3 trials for new drugs have been proposed. PMID:25142460

  10. General And Specific Features In Realizing An Essay In English Language – A Case Study Of Essay On Economic Themes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daliana Ecaterina TASCOVICI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper wants to be a systematic and not only a theoretical approach on essays. This type of writing knows several points of view connecting its form, content, specific features and types, rules to be observed in its writing, structures or styles. As we know, it implies freedom of composition, originality, associations of surprising images and propensity for aphorism. We try to frame all its specifications within the economic essay, as economics is a field of exact utterance, where the speaker cannot play with the words and their meaning.

  11. Backbending feature of rotational spectra in the generalized variable-moment-of-inertia model and its equivalence with the Harris model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantri, A.N.

    1975-01-01

    The equivalence of Harris model equations with those of the generalized variable-moment-of-inertia (GVMI) model given by Das et al. is examined in the light of backbending feature of the rotational states. It is shown that this feature is absent in the Harris model taken to any order. The GVMI model equations are found to be consistent and in one-to-one correspondence with an expansion of the square of the angular velocity in terms of a polynomial in the moment of inertia rather than with the Harris expansion and may give a backbending feature in some cases depending on the relative values of the parameters appearing in the potential energy term

  12. The efficiency of training for doctors of general practice — family medicine concerning to features work of teenagers at risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobkova O.V.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Medical personnel provide assistance to teenagers and young people because of understanding their problems and a common search for ways to resolve them to change risky behavior and health. A major problem for doctors of general practice — family medicine is the condition of adolescent morbidity diseases that are transmitted mainly through sexual contact, HIV infection, which requires the formation of the teenagers responsible attitude to their own health. Doctor of general practice — family medicine should actively influence on health status, including reproductive health specified target group of patients. The aim of the study was analysis of the effectiveness of educational training on( monitoring and evaluation M & E within the scientific support project «HIV prevention among young women of sex business, people who inject drugs and young people who live or work on the street» and development of an effective system of improving professional qualification of doctors of general practice — family medicine relative characteristics of health care among risk adolescents. During 2015 there were trainings for doctors, psychologists, social workers and nurses. Investigation of the effectiveness of the activities performed on a specially designed questionnaire monitoring and evaluation (M & E. 53 respondents were interviewed — doctors of general practice — family medicine of the Zaporozhye region and the city. Zaporozhye. Questioning was conducted before and after training exercises investigated by experts of department of medical care teenagers and youth KU «Zaporozhye Regional Children Clinical Hospital.» The rating was given on a 5-point scale. The study made the following findings: therapeutic and preventive work with teenagers and young people, is one of the major problems of medical and social work in Ukraine and practice of general practitioner — family medicine; training on the basis of a single M & E system is an effective means

  13. Multi-objective optimization of generalized reliability design problems using feature models-A concept for early design stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limbourg, Philipp; Kochs, Hans-Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Reliability optimization problems such as the redundancy allocation problem (RAP) have been of considerable interest in the past. However, due to the restrictions of the design space formulation, they may not be applicable in all practical design problems. A method with high modelling freedom for rapid design screening is desirable, especially in early design stages. This work presents a novel approach to reliability optimization. Feature modelling, a specification method originating from software engineering, is applied for the fast specification and enumeration of complex design spaces. It is shown how feature models can not only describe arbitrary RAPs but also much more complex design problems. The design screening is accomplished by a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm for probabilistic objectives. Comparing averages or medians may hide the true characteristics of this distributions. Therefore the algorithm uses solely the probability of a system dominating another to achieve the Pareto optimal set. We illustrate the approach by specifying a RAP and a more complex design space and screening them with the evolutionary algorithm

  14. Light and electron microscopy of the European beaver (Castor fiber) stomach reveal unique morphological features with possible general biological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska, Natalia; Lewczuk, Bogdan; Petryński, Wojciech; Palkowska, Katarzyna; Prusik, Magdalena; Targońska, Krystyna; Giżejewski, Zygmunt; Przybylska-Gornowicz, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Anatomical, histological, and ultrastructural studies of the European beaver stomach revealed several unique morphological features. The prominent attribute of its gross morphology was the cardiogastric gland (CGG), located near the oesophageal entrance. Light microscopy showed that the CGG was formed by invaginations of the mucosa into the submucosa, which contained densely packed proper gastric glands comprised primarily of parietal and chief cells. Mucous neck cells represented beaver stomach was the presence of specific mucus with a thickness up to 950 µm (in frozen, unfixed sections) that coated the mucosa. Our observations suggest that the formation of this mucus is complex and includes the secretory granule accumulation in the cytoplasm of pit cells, the granule aggregation inside cells, and the incorporation of degenerating cells into the mucus.

  15. Esophageal transit scintigraphy in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Chojnowski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disease, distinctive features of which are fibrosis and microangiopathy. The esophagus is one of the most commonly involved internal organs. Most patients experience dysphagia, difficulties in swallowing and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, in up to one third of cases, the initial onset of esophageal disease may be clinically silent. There are several diagnostic modalities available for assessing both morphological and functional abnormalities of the esophagus. If structural abnormalities are suspected, endoscopy is the method of choice. Functional evaluation is best achieved with manometry. Both endoscopy and manometry are invasive techniques, with low patient acceptance. Barium-contrast study is well tolerated, but qualitative assessment of functional abnormalities is imprecise. Esophageal scintigraphy is an easy, non-invasive, sensitive and specific diagnostic modality. It can detect esophageal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. In patients already diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, scintigraphy is useful in evaluating severity and progression of the disease.

  16. Seizures in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Polman, Susan; De Keyser, Jacques

    Seizures have long been recognized to be part of the disease spectrum of multiple sclerosis (MS). While they occur in only a minority of patients with MS, epileptic seizures can have serious consequences. The treatment of MS can be epileptogenic, and antiepileptic treatment can conversely worsen the

  17. Zinc in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredholt, Mikkel; Fredriksen, Jette Lautrup

    2016-01-01

    In the last 35 years, zinc (Zn) has been examined for its potential role in the disease multiple sclerosis (MS). This review gives an overview of the possible role of Zn in the pathogenesis of MS as well as a meta-analysis of studies having measured Zn in serum or plasma in patients with MS...

  18. Vaccines and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, J. L.; Topsøe Mailand, M.

    2017-01-01

    An association between certain vaccinations and onset or relapse of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been debated. Based on PubMed, we made a thorough literature review and included all relevant studies, 51 on MS and 15 on optic neuritis (ON). Case studies were excluded. With the exception of a live...

  19. Vaccines and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailand, Mia Topsøe; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup

    2017-01-01

    on the database PubMed. The study found no change in risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) after vaccination against hepatitis B virus, human papillomavirus, seasonal influenza, measles–mumps–rubella, variola, tetanus, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), polio, or diphtheria. No change in risk of relapse...

  20. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis and tuberous sclerosis with pulmonary involvement; Linfangioleiomiomatosis y esclerosis tuberosa afectacion pulmonar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrosa, I.; Saiz, A.; Bustos, A.; Hernando, F. [Hospital cinico. San Carlos. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    We present two cases of pulmonary lumphangioleiomyomatosis and one case of tuberous sclerosis with pulmonary involvement describing the most characteristic features according to plain chest X-ray and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). (Author) 14 refs.

  1. Connected health and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M

    2018-04-18

    There is as yet no consensual definition of "connected health". In general, the term refers to the growing use of technology and, in particular, mobile technology in medicine. Over the past 10 years, there have been an increasing number of published reports on the wide-ranging and heterogeneous fields involving the application of technology in medicine, ranging from telemedicine to tools to improve patients' evaluation and monitoring by physicians, as well as a multitude of patient-centered applications. They also represent promising tools in the field of clinical research. This report is a review of the importance of using this technology in the management of multiple sclerosis patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. The features of general anesthesia by sevofluran in pediatric vitreoretinal surgery with different diseases and ophthalmosurgeral pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pronin S.N.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: clinical studies of inhalation anesthesia with sevoflurane as the main anesthetic for various diseases in children with vitreoretinal operations. Material and Methods. There was considered the age groups of children from 3 to 16 years old. Among 76 children: 18 with non-prosperrous psycho-emotional statuses, 2 with ICP, 2 with bronchial asthma, 3 with atopic dermatitis, 5 with small anomalies of heart development, 46 were somatically healthy. All of children had different ophthalmosuregery pathology. Results. The performing of general anesthesia by sevoflurane at vitreoretinal surgeries of children with the different diseases and ophthalmological pathologies displayed appropriateness and safety during the surgeries. Conclusion. The appliance of sevoflurane is the reasonable and optimal scheme in modern ophtalmosurgery and anesthesiology.

  3. Interferon Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Alajbegovic, Azra; Deljo, Dervis; Alajbegovic, Salem; Djelilovic-Vranic, Jasminka; Todorovic, Ljubica; Tiric-Campara, Merita

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) differ: treatment of relapse, treatment slow the progression of the disease (immunomodulators and immunosuppression), and symptomatic treatment. The aim: The aim of this study is to analyze the application of interferon therapy in the treatment of MS-E: Process the disease, patients with multiple sclerosis who have passed the commission for multiple sclerosis at the Neurology Clinic of Clinical Center of Sarajevo University as a refere...

  4. Use of Sugammadex in a Patient with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsaka, Ebru; Karakaya, Deniz; Zengin, Eyüp Cağatayn

    2013-01-01

    Objective To report on general anesthesia management in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Case Presentation and Intervention A 47-year-old man presented with fracture of the humerus. The patient was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. General anesthesia was induced with propofol, rocuronium and remifentanil. After uneventful surgical repair, TOF (train-of-four) ratio reached >0.90 at the end of operation. However, muscle strength and tidal volume were inadequate. After sugammadex 2 mg kg−1 i.v. was given, the patient was extubated 120 s later. Conclusion This case highlights that rocuronium and sugammadex can be used safely in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis undergoing surgery with general anesthesia. PMID:23075763

  5. Vascular comorbidities in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thormann, Anja; Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the occurrence of vascular comorbidities before and after the clinical onset of multiple sclerosis. In this combined case-control and cohort study, all Danish born citizens with onset of multiple sclerosis 1980-2005 were identified from the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry...... and randomly matched with controls regarding year of birth, gender, and municipality on January 1st in the year of multiple sclerosis (MS) onset (index date). Individual-level information on comorbidities was obtained from several independent nationwide registries and linked to the study population by unique...

  6. Zebrafish enpp1 mutants exhibit pathological mineralization, mimicking features of generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI and pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Apschner

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years it has become clear that, mechanistically, biomineralization is a process that has to be actively inhibited as a default state. This inhibition must be released in a rigidly controlled manner in order for mineralization to occur in skeletal elements and teeth. A central aspect of this concept is the tightly controlled balance between phosphate, a constituent of the biomineral hydroxyapatite, and pyrophosphate, a physiochemical inhibitor of mineralization. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of a zebrafish mutant, dragonfish (dgf, which is mutant for ectonucleoside pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (Enpp1, a protein that is crucial for supplying extracellular pyrophosphate. Generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI is a fatal human disease, and the majority of cases are thought to be caused by mutations in ENPP1. Furthermore, some cases of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE have recently been linked to ENPP1. Similar to humans, we show here that zebrafish enpp1 mutants can develop ectopic calcifications in a variety of soft tissues – most notably in the skin, cartilage elements, the heart, intracranial space and the notochord sheet. Using transgenic reporter lines, we demonstrate that ectopic mineralizations in these tissues occur independently of the expression of typical osteoblast or cartilage markers. Intriguingly, we detect cells expressing the osteoclast markers Trap and CathepsinK at sites of ectopic calcification at time points when osteoclasts are not yet present in wild-type siblings. Treatment with the bisphosphonate etidronate rescues aspects of the dgf phenotype, and we detected deregulated expression of genes that are involved in phosphate homeostasis and mineralization, such as fgf23, npt2a, entpd5 and spp1 (also known as osteopontin. Employing a UAS-GalFF approach, we show that forced expression of enpp1 in blood vessels or the floorplate of mutant embryos is sufficient to rescue the notochord

  7. Osteopetrosis: Some unusual radiological features with a short review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolawole, T.M.; Hawass, N.D.; Patel, P.J.; Mahdi, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    The radiological features of 27 cases of osteopetrosis were analysed retrospectively. The common features of generalized sclerosis of bones; with metaphyses showing characteristic widening, multiple transverse striations, cortical thickening and medullary calcifications as well as fractures, are seen in most cases. In addition to these changes, a number of rare features of osteopetrosis are seen, viz: Medial and symmetrical metaphyseal cortical defects in the long bones (5 cases), excessive diaphyseal radiodense periosteal new bone formation (5 cases), bone-in-bone appearances (5 cases), and the presence of intracerebral and meningeal calcifications in 7 cases. The significance of these intracranial calcifications as a component of a particular autosomal recessive syndrome in which renal tubular acidosis and carbonic anhydrase II deficiency may coexist, is discussed. (orig.)

  8. Multiple sclerosis with predominant, severe cognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staff, Nathan P.; Lucchinetti, Claudia F.; Keegan, B. Mark

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe the characteristics of multiple sclerosis (MS) presenting with severe cognitive impairment as its primary disabling manifestation. Design Retrospective case series. Setting Tertiary referral center. Patients Patients were identified through the Mayo Clinic data retrieval system (1996–2008) with definite MS (McDonald criteria) and severe cognitive impairment as their primary neurological symptom without accompanying significant MS-related impairment or alternative diagnosis for cognitive dysfunction. Twenty-three patients meeting inclusion criteria were compared regarding demographics, clinical course and radiological features. Main Outcome Measures Demographic, clinical, and radiological characteristics of the disease. Results Twelve patients were men. The median age of the first clinical symptom suggestive of CNS demyelination was 33 years, and severe MS-related cognitive impairment developed at a median of 39 years. Cognitive impairment could be dichotomized as subacute fulminant (n=9) or chronic progressive (n=14) in presentation, which corresponded to subsequent relapsing or progressive MS courses. Study patients commonly exhibited psychiatric (65%), mild cerebellar (57%) and cortical symptoms and signs (e.g. seizure, aphasia, apraxia) (39%). Fourteen of 21 (67%), where documented, smoked cigarettes. Brain MRI demonstrated diffuse cerebral atrophy in 16 and gadolinium enhancing lesions in 11. Asymptomatic spinal cord MRI lesions were present in 12 of 16 patients (75%). Immunomodulatory therapies were generally ineffective in improving these patients. Conclusions We describe patients with MS whose clinical phenotype is characterized by severe cognitive dysfunction and prominent cortical and psychiatric signs presenting as a subacute fulminant or chronic progressive clinical course. Cigarette smokers may be over represented in this phenotype. PMID:19752304

  9. Chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffoli, A.; Micheletti, E.; Capra, R.; Mattioli, F.; Marciano', N.

    1991-01-01

    A long-lasting immunological suppression action seems to be produced by total lymphoid irradiation; some authors emphasize the favorable effect of this treatment on chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. In order to evaluate the actual role of TLI, 6 patients affected with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis were submitted to TLI with shaped and personalized fields at the Istituto del Radio, University of Brescia, Italy. The total dose delivered was 19.8 Gy in 4 weeks, 1.8 Gy/day, 5d/w; a week elapsed between the first and the second irradiation course. Disability according to Kurtzke scale was evaluated, together with blood lymphocyte count and irradiation side-effects, over a mean follow-up period of 20.8 months (range: 13-24). Our findings indicate that: a) disease progression was not markedly reduced by TLI; b) steroid hormones responsivity was restored after irradiation, and c) side-effects were mild and tolerable

  10. Suicide and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E N; Stenager, Egon; Koch-Henriksen, N

    1992-01-01

    In a nationwide investigation the risk of death by suicide for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) was assessed using records kept at the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry (DMSR) and the Danish National Register of Cause of Death. The investigation covers all MS patients registered with DSMR...... with an onset of the disease within the period 1953-85, or for whom MS was diagnosed in the same period. Fifty three of the 5525 cases in the onset cohort group committed suicide. Using the figures from the population death statistics by adjustment to number of subjects, duration of observation, sex, age......, and calendar year at the start of observation, the expected number of suicides was calculated to be nearly 29. The cumulative lifetime risk of suicide from onset of MS, using an actuarial method of calculation, was 1.95%. The standard mortality ratio (SMR) of suicide in MS was 1.83. It was highest for males...

  11. Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Bošnjak-Pašić, Marija; Vidrih, Branka; Miškov, Snježana; Demarin, Vida

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, characterized by multifocal inflammatory destruction of myelin, axonal damage and loss of oligodendrocytes. The disease is carried through two stages: inflammatory and degenerative. The most common form of disease in approximately 85% of the cases is RRMS (relapsing-remitting form). The treatment of MS is divided into: treatment of the acute phase of illness, prevention of new relapses and di...

  12. Midkine and multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune neurological disease characterized by inflammatory demyelination with subsequent neuronal damage in the CNS. MS and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), have been thought as autoreactive Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated diseases. CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T-cell (Treg) plays a pivotal role in autoimmune tolerance, and tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCreg) drive the development of inducible Treg cells. Thus, a dysfunction in the d...

  13. Rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubsik-Gidlewska, Anna M; Klimkiewicz, Paulina; Klimkiewicz, Robert; Janczewska, Katarzyna; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the study is to present a strategy of rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis on the basis of the latest developments in the field of physiotherapy. The publications on the problem discuss a wide range of methods of physiotherapy that can be used in order to reduce the degree of disability and alleviate the symptoms associated with the disease. The complexity of the disease, the difficulty in determining the appropriate treatment and a wide range of symptoms require a comprehensive approach to the patient, which would include both pharmacology and neurorehabilitation. Rehabilitation, which includes psychotherapy and symptomatic therapy, is regarded nowadays as the best form of treatment for multiple sclerosis. An indepth diagnostic assessment of functional status and prognosis should be carried out before the start of the rehabilitation process. The prognosis should take into account the mental state, the neurological status and the awareness of the patient. The kinesiotherapy program in multiple sclerosis is based on a gradation of physiotherapy which assumes a gradual transition from basic movements to more complex ones till global functions are obtained. The most appropriate form of treatment is functional rehabilitation combined with physical procedures. Recent reports indicate the need for aerobic training to be included in the rehabilitation program. The introduction of physical activities, regardless of the severity of the disease, will reduce the negative effects of akinesia, and thus increase the functional capabilities of all body systems.

  14. The enigma of multiple sclerosis: inflammation and neurodegeneration cause heterogeneous dysfunction and damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor

    2003-01-01

    progression correlate with axonal damage, and that brain atrophy resulting from axonal loss is a feature of early multiple sclerosis, and is not restricted to the secondary progressive forms of the disease. Inflammatory mediators (CD8 T cells and antibodies) are implicated in axonal damage, and treatment...... cells for oligodendrocytes. SUMMARY: Oligodendrocyte precursors are abundant in multiple sclerosis lesions, but fail to remyelinate. Oligodendrocyte growth and regeneration are probably compromised by the action of growth inhibitory signals and lack of growth stimuli. Inflammatory cells and mediators......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis has an autoimmune inflammatory component, which has dominated the description of multiple sclerosis. A degenerative component to multiple sclerosis was always apparent, but was underappreciated until recently. Recent work has brought...

  15. MDCT imaging of calcinosis in systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, V.; Becce, F.; Feydy, A.; Guérini, H.; Campagna, R.; Allanore, Y.; Drapé, J.-L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcinosis is a typical feature of systemic sclerosis (SSc) and can be found in many different tissues including the superficial soft tissues, periarticular structures, muscles, and tendons. It can also provoke erosive changes on bones. Investigation is conducted most often with plain radiographs. However, when a more detailed assessment is necessary, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is helpful owing to its multiplanar reformat (MPR) ability. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the various appearances of calcinosis in SSc patients as visualized at MDCT

  16. [Multiple sclerosis in literature, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vazquez, S; Carrillo, J M; Cano-de-la-Cuerda, R

    2016-12-16

    Today, the care of patients with multiple sclerosis and those around them represents a clinical and therapeutic challenge for healthcare professionals. The aim of this study is to analyse the appearance of multiple sclerosis in literature, cinema and television, and to reflect upon the image it has in these media. Several representative works that have addressed multiple sclerosis were reviewed, and many of them were seen to offer a very true-to-life vision of the disease. Likewise, a review was also conducted of the most relevant films and TV series that, on occasions, offer the general public a close look at the impact of the disease on patients or relatives, although they are sometimes somewhat exaggerated for the sake of increased dramatic effect and offer a slightly distorted view of reality. Literature largely reflects the real epidemiology, the symptoms and development of the disease, while less attention seems to be given to the diagnostic and therapeutic options open to patients. Cinema and television have offered a correct image but sometimes with the addition of more dramatic effects. It is important for literature, cinema and television to offer a realistic view of this neurological disease so as to make it better known among the public and to help lessen the stigma attached to it.

  17. Significance of tuber size for complications of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Castroviejo, I; Hernández-Moneo, J L; Pascual-Pascual, S I; Viaño, J; Gutiérrez-Molina, M; Velazquez-Fragua, R; Quiñones Tapia, D; Morales Bastos, C

    2013-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is one of the most frequent neurocutaneous disorders. Cortical tubers are the most common pathological changes in TSC and they are directly related to the disease's main clinical manifestations: seizures, mental retardation, and autistic behaviour. The aim of this study is to establish a correlation between tuber size and the severity of clinical features in TSC. We performed a retrospective study of the clinical and imaging findings from 45 TSC patients (22 females and 23 males) and compared the clinical features with the location, size, and number of the cortical tubers in each patient. Four patients had voluminous tubers located in 1 or both cerebral hemispheres. All of these patients had intractable seizures and severe mental retardation; 3 of these cases also presented with autistic behaviour, despite tubers having been resected in all 4 patients. Thirteen patients had tubers of large-to-average size, and all patients in this group showed intractable seizures and mental retardation. Nine patients who had experienced infantile spasms during the first year of life presented autistic behaviour. Multiple tubers of small to average size were found in 28 patients. In general, this group had seizures that responded well to antiepileptic drugs and a low prevalence of autism. In 3 patients who all presented good seizure control and normal intelligence, single cortical/subcortical tubers were located in the frontal or occipital lobes. Of the total of 45 patients, 13 had cerebellar as well as cerebral tubers; these were generally present in cases with more severe clinical features. Although large tubers are less common than small to medium-sized ones, they are much more likely to be accompanied by severe clinical symptoms (seizures, mental retardation and autistic behaviour), even when the smaller tubers are quite numerous. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Islamic fasting and multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Month-long daytime Ramadan fasting pose s major challenges to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in Muslim countries. Physicians should have practical knowledge on the implications of fasting on MS. We present a summary of database searches (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PubMed) and a mini-symposium on Ramadan fasting and MS. In this symposium, we aimed to review the effect of fasting on MS and suggest practical guidelines on management. Discussion In general, fasting is possible for most stable patients. Appropriate amendment of drug regimens, careful monitoring of symptoms, as well as providing patients with available evidence on fasting and MS are important parts of management. Evidence from experimental studies suggests that calorie restriction before disease induction reduces inflammation and subsequent demyelination and attenuates disease severity. Fasting does not appear to have unfavorable effects on disease course in patients with mild disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score ≤3). Most experts believed that during fasting (especially in summer), some MS symptoms (fatigue, fatigue perception, dizziness, spasticity, cognitive problems, weakness, vision, balance, gait) might worsen but return to normal levels during feasting. There was a general consensus that fasting is not safe for patients: on high doses of anti-convulsants, anti-spastics, and corticosteroids; with coagulopathy or active disease; during attacks; with EDSS score ≥7. Summary These data suggest that MS patients should have tailored care. Fasting in MS patients is a challenge that is directly associated with the spiritual belief of the patient. PMID:24655543

  19. HLA typing in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Faré

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between Systemic Sclerosis (SSc and HLA antigens, and to correlate these antigens with the clinical manifestations of the disease. Materials and methods: 55 patients were stratified according a to the cutaneous involvement b to the positivity of Scl- 70 and anticentromere antibody and c to the internal organ involvement, in particular we used HRCT to demonstrate lung fibrosis, echocardiography for the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension, blood creatinine, urinalysis and arterial hypertension to demonstrate renal failure, and esophagus double-countrast barium swallow for the diagnosis of esophagopathy. The control group consisting of 2000 healthy Caucasian subjects was recruited from the same population. Results: the frequency of the antigens A23 (p=0.003, RR=3.69, B18 (p<0.0001, RR=3.57, and DR11 (p<0.0001, RR=6.18 was statistically increased in the patients population compared with the healthy controls. Although there is no any significant correlation between HLA antigens and different clinical subsets of scleroderma, antigens B18 and DR11 could be associated with more severe clinical features. Conclusions: the presence of a significant association between SSc and specific HLA antigens (A23, B18, and DR11 could link the HLA system with SSc.

  20. CUTANEOUS MYXOID CYST ON THE SCLEROTIC FINGER IN A PATIENT WITH DIFFUSE SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeko Nakamura-Wakatsuki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Skin tumors occurring on the scleroderma fingers are rarely seen. Swollen fingers are hallmarks of systemic sclerosis, and mucin deposition in the lesional skin is a constant feature in systemic sclerosis. Here we describe a case of cutaneous myxoid cyst on the flexor aspect of the sclerotic fingers in a patient with severe diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis. Cutaneous myxoid cyst is a relatively common benign tumor; however, cases of cutaneous myxoid cysts developing on the scleroderma fingers have not been reported to date. Mucin deposition in the sclerotic skin may be a predisposing factor in the induction of myxoid cyst on the scleroderma finger in our patient.

  1. Theoretical Studies of Aqueous Systems above 25 deg C. 1. Fundamental Concepts for Equilibrium Diagrams and some General Features of the Water System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Derek

    1971-09-15

    The illustration of thermodynamic data on aqueous systems is discussed and diagrams are described that are useful for bringing together the large numbers of data that are relevant to technological problems such as corrosion, mass-transport and deposition. Two kinds of logarithmic equilibrium diagram are particularly useful, namely, diagrams depicting the variation with pH or pe of the concentrations of ionic species relative to that of a chosen reference ion and diagrams depicting the fields of conditions of pH and pe in which the various species in any given system predominate or are stable. Such diagrams clearly and concisely illustrate the data and greatly simplify the comparison of the states of a system at different temperatures. Estimates of the equilibrium constants for the redox and the acid-base dissociation of water up to 375 C are reported and some general features of aqueous systems at elevated temperatures are discussed

  2. Introducing a European Partnership. First issue of 'European Nuclear Features'. A joint publication of atw, Nuclear Espana, Revue Generale Nucleare (2004)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    'European Nuclear Features' is a joint publication of the three specialized technical journals, Nuclear Espana (Spain), Revue Generale Nucleaire (France), and atw - International Journal for Nuclear Power (Germany), planned for six issues annually. ENF is to further greatly the international European exchange of information and news about energy and nuclear power. News items, comments, and scientific and technical contributions will cover important aspects of the field. The first issue of ENF contains contributions about these topics, among others: - European Nuclear Society and Foratom: Strengthening the Nuclear Network. - Report: EPR - the European Pressurized Water Reactor. - Finland: Starting Construction of the Fifth Nuclear Power Plant. - Czech Republic: Nuclear Power Report for 2003/2004. - The Decommissioning Project of the Bohunice-1 and -2 Units. - FRM-II: TUM Research Neutron Source Generates Its First Neutrons. (orig.)

  3. A model for abnormal activity recognition and alert generation system for elderly care by hidden conditional random fields using R-transform and generalized discriminant analysis features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zafar Ali; Sohn, Won

    2012-10-01

    The growing population of elderly people living alone increases the need for automatic healthcare monitoring systems for elderly care. Automatic vision sensor-based systems are increasingly used for human activity recognition (HAR) in recent years. This study presents an improved model, tested using actors, of a sensor-based HAR system to recognize daily life activities of elderly people at home and generate an alert in case of abnormal HAR. Datasets consisting of six abnormal activities (falling backward, falling forward, falling rightward, falling leftward, chest pain, and fainting) and four normal activities (walking, rushing, sitting down, and standing up) are generated from different view angles (90°, -90°, 45°, -45°). Feature extraction and dimensions reduction are performed by R-transform followed by generalized discriminant analysis (GDA) methods. R-transform extracts symmetric, scale, and translation-invariant features from the sequences of activities. GDA increases the discrimination between different classes of highly similar activities. Silhouette sequences are quantified by the Linde-Buzo-Gray algorithm and recognized by hidden conditional random fields. Experimental results provide an average recognition rate of 94.2% for abnormal activities and 92.7% for normal activities. The recognition rate for the highly similar activities from different view angles shows the flexibility and efficacy of the proposed abnormal HAR and alert generation system for elderly care.

  4. Clinical Manifestations of Multiple Sclerosis in Taiwanese Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-one patients with multiple sclerosis (MS and onset before 18 years were treated over the past 22 years and their records retrospectively analyzed at the National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, and Min-Sheng General Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

  5. Mortality from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in Finland, 1986-1995

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maasilta, P.; Jokelainen, M.; Löytönen, M.

    2001-01-01

    Objective - To study the possible changes, between 1986 and 1995, in the mortality due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) among Finnish patients. Materials and methods - A total of 1000 deaths from ALS were extracted from the Finnish Death Certificate Register for the study years. General...

  6. Risk of cataract and glaucoma in patients with multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marloes Bazelier; Tjeerd van Staa; Bernard Uitdehaag; Sigrid Mueller-Schotte; Hubert Leufkens; Frank de Vries

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with risk of cataract or glaucoma. We conducted a population-based cohort study utilizing the UK General Practice Research Database (1987–2009) linked to the national hospital registry of England (1997–2008). Incident

  7. Skin scoring in systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Hugh; Bjerring, Peter; Halkier-Sørensen, Lars

    1994-01-01

    Forty-one patients with systemic sclerosis were investigated with a new and simple skin score method measuring the degree of thickening and pliability in seven regions together with area involvement in each region. The highest values were, as expected, found in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis...... (type III SS) and the lowest in limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (type I SS) with no lesions extending above wrists and ancles. A positive correlation was found to the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen, a serological marker for synthesis of type III collagen. The skin score...

  8. [Future challenges in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Óscar

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis occurs in genetically susceptible individuals, in whom an unknown environmental factor triggers an immune response, giving rise to a chronic and disabling autoimmune disease. Currently, significant progress is being made in our knowledge of the frequency and distribution of multiple sclerosis and its risk factors, genetics, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnostic and prognostic markers, and treatment. This has radically changed patients' and clinicians' expectations of multiple sclerosis and has raised hope that there will soon be a way to control the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Association between systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis: lupoid sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Yimy F; Martinez, Jose B; Fernandez, Andres R; Quintana, Gerardo; Restrepo, Jose Felix; Rondon, Federico; Gamarra, Antonio Iglesias

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) with/without antiphospholipid syndrome are autoimmune illnesses. It has been described in many occasions the association of these two illnesses and the clinical picture of MS with characteristics of laboratory of SLE. When they affect to the central nervous system they can make it in a defined form for each illness or they can also make it in interposed or combined form of the two illnesses what has been called lupoid sclerosis; making that in some cases difficult the differentiation of the two illnesses and therefore to address the treatment. We present four cases of lupoid sclerosis, discuss the clinical and laboratory characteristics of this entity and we make a differentiation of the multiple sclerosis with the neurological affectation of SLE especially for images and laboratory results.

  10. Non-stationary signal analysis based on general parameterized time-frequency transform and its application in the feature extraction of a rotary machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng; Peng, Zhike; Chen, Shiqian; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Wenming

    2018-06-01

    With the development of large rotary machines for faster and more integrated performance, the condition monitoring and fault diagnosis for them are becoming more challenging. Since the time-frequency (TF) pattern of the vibration signal from the rotary machine often contains condition information and fault feature, the methods based on TF analysis have been widely-used to solve these two problems in the industrial community. This article introduces an effective non-stationary signal analysis method based on the general parameterized time-frequency transform (GPTFT). The GPTFT is achieved by inserting a rotation operator and a shift operator in the short-time Fourier transform. This method can produce a high-concentrated TF pattern with a general kernel. A multi-component instantaneous frequency (IF) extraction method is proposed based on it. The estimation for the IF of every component is accomplished by defining a spectrum concentration index (SCI). Moreover, such an IF estimation process is iteratively operated until all the components are extracted. The tests on three simulation examples and a real vibration signal demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of our method.

  11. [Local demyelination in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvirkvelia, N; Shakarishvili, R

    2013-02-01

    It is well known that the demyelination of peripheral nerves can be diffuse or local. Pathogenesis of acute or chronic inflamentary demyelination polyneurophathy is based on diffuse demyelination. Local demyelination occured by conduction block with electoneuromyographic (ENMG) researches. It is the main characteristic of multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). Generally it is considered, that conduction block is not usual for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). More over, its existance excludes this diagnosis. The article discribes 3 cases of ALS with conduction block verified with ENMG researches. Article also deals with pathogenetic mechanisms of conduction block in ALS and MMN. In addition it observes the issues of differential diagnosis between ALS and MMW.

  12. Current concepts in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiethoelter, Horst; Dichgans, Johannes

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains 9 articles dealing with the use of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and positron emitted tomography in the diagnosis and staging of multiple sclerosis. (H.W.). refs.; figs.; tabs

  13. Multiple sclerosis and organic solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, J T; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, K

    1998-01-01

    We investigated a possible causal relation between exposure to organic solvents in Danish workers (housepainters, typographers/printers, carpenters/cabinetmakers) and onset of multiple sclerosis. Data on men included in the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Register (3,241 men) were linked with data from......, and butchers. Over a follow-up period of 20 years, we observed no increase in the incidence of multiple sclerosis among men presumed to be exposed to organic solvents. It was not possible to obtain data on potential confounders, and the study design has some potential for selection bias. Nevertheless......, the study does not support existing hypotheses regarding an association between occupational exposure to organic solvents and multiple sclerosis....

  14. Multiple Sclerosis After Infectious Mononucleosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Rasmussen; Rostgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Nete Munk

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious mononucleosis caused by the Epstein-Barr virus has been associated with increased risk of multiple sclerosis. However, little is known about the characteristics of this association. OBJECTIVE: To assess the significance of sex, age at and time since infectious mononucleosis......, and attained age to the risk of developing multiple sclerosis after infectious mononucleosis. DESIGN: Cohort study using persons tested serologically for infectious mononucleosis at Statens Serum Institut, the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Hospital Discharge Register, and the Danish...... Multiple Sclerosis Registry. SETTING: Statens Serum Institut. PATIENTS: A cohort of 25 234 Danish patients with mononucleosis was followed up for the occurrence of multiple sclerosis beginning on April 1, 1968, or January 1 of the year after the diagnosis of mononucleosis or after a negative Paul...

  15. Defining active progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, Finn; Börnsen, Lars; Ammitzbøll, Cecilie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether disease activity according to consensus criteria (magnetic resonance imaging activity or clinical relapses) associate with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) changes in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVE: To compare CSF biomarkers in active and inactive...

  16. Occupational therapy for multiple sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Cardol, M.; Nes, J.C.M. van de; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are referred to occupational therapy with complaints about fatigue, limb weakness, alteration of upper extremity fine motor coordination, loss of sensation and spasticity that causes limitations in performance of activities of daily living and social

  17. Fatal accidents among Danes with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Hansen, Thomas; Koch-Henriksen, Nils

    2006-01-01

    We compared the rate of fatal accidents among Danes with multiple sclerosis (MS) with that of the general population. The study was based on linkage of the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry to the Cause of Death Registry and covered all 10174 persons in whom MS was diagnosed during the period 19...... for deaths from burns (SMR = 8.90) and suffocation (SMR = 5.57). We conclude that persons with MS are more prone to fatal accidents than the general population. The excess risk is due not to traffic accidents but to burns and suffocation.......-1996. The end of follow-up was 1 January 1999. We calculated standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for various types of fatal accidents. A total of 76 persons (48 men and 28 women) died from accidents, whereas the expected number of fatalities from such causes was 55.7 (31.4 men and 24.3 women). Thus, the risk...... for death from accidents among persons with MS was 37% higher than that of the general population (SMR = 1.37). We found no significant excess risk for fatal road accidents (SMR = 0.80). The risk for falls was elevated (SMR = 1.29) but not statistically significantly so. The risks were particularly high...

  18. Neuroendocrine Immunoregulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Deckx

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, it is generally accepted that multiple sclerosis (MS is a complex multifactorial disease involving genetic and environmental factors affecting the autoreactive immune responses that lead to damage of myelin. In this respect, intrinsic or extrinsic factors such as emotional, psychological, traumatic, or inflammatory stress as well as a variety of other lifestyle interventions can influence the neuroendocrine system. On its turn, it has been demonstrated that the neuroendocrine system has immunomodulatory potential. Moreover, the neuroendocrine and immune systems communicate bidirectionally via shared receptors and shared messenger molecules, variously called hormones, neurotransmitters, or cytokines. Discrepancies at any level can therefore lead to changes in susceptibility and to severity of several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Here we provide an overview of the complex system of crosstalk between the neuroendocrine and immune system as well as reported dysfunctions involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, including MS. Finally, possible strategies to intervene with the neuroendocrine-immune system for MS patient management will be discussed. Ultimately, a better understanding of the interactions between the neuroendocrine system and the immune system can open up new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of MS as well as other autoimmune diseases.

  19. [Current therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio García Merino, J

    2014-12-01

    Since the introduction of interferon beta 1 b for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, there has been a progressive increase in the number of drugs available for this disease. Currently, 11 drugs have been approved in Spain, and their indications depend on specific clinical characteristics. The present article reviews these indications and also discusses other medications without official approval that have also been used in multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. A factor analytic investigation of the Mercy Evaluation of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Zachary C; Wright, John D; Vander Wal, Jillon S; Gfeller, Jeffrey D

    2018-01-23

    Neurocognitive deficits commonly are an accompanying feature of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). A brief, yet comprehensive neuropsychological battery is desirable for assessing the extent of these deficits. Therefore, the present study examined the validity of the Mercy Evaluation of Multiple Sclerosis (MEMS) for use with the MS population. Archival data from individuals diagnosed with MS (N = 378) by independent neurologists was examined. Cognitive domains assessed included processing speed and attention, learning, and memory, visuospatial, language, and executive functioning. A mean battery index was calculated to provide a general indicator of cognitive impairment within the current sample. Overall performance across participants was found to be in the lower limits of the average range. Results of factor analytic statistical procedures yielded a four-factor solution, accounting for 67% of total variance within the MEMS. Four neurocognitive measures exhibited the highest sensitivity in detecting cognitive impairment, constituting a psychometrically established brief cognitive screening battery, which accounted for 83% of total variance within the mean battery index score. Overall, the results of the current study suggest appropriate construct validity of the MEMS for use with individuals with MS, as well as provide support for previously established cognitive batteries.

  1. Pure spinal multiple sclerosis: A possible novel entity within the multiple sclerosis disease spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schee, Jie Ping; Viswanathan, Shanthi

    2018-05-01

    We identified five female patients retrospectively with relapsing short-segment partial myelitis whose clinical and paraclinical features were suggestive of cord involvement of multiple sclerosis (MS)-type albeit not rigidly fulfilling the 2017 McDonald criteria. Notably, these patients had not developed any typical MS-like brain lesions despite repeated neuroimaging assessments over years. Comprehensive work-up for differential diagnoses of MS and other causes of transverse myelitis particularly neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders had been consistently negative on longitudinal follow-up. Thus, we postulate a possible entity of pure spinal MS which may represent a novel forme fruste within the MS disease spectrum.

  2. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy.

  3. Increasing occurrence of multiple sclerosis in women correlates to hygiene level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Cendrowski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The increasing incidence of multiple sclerosis, particularly among women in Europe and North America, has a multifactorial aetiology. Method: The aim of the current study was to ascertain the relation between the hygiene level and occurrence of multiple sclerosis in women in Poland. The study was based on a large cohort of 14,200 multiple sclerosis individuals (male – 6,106, female – 8,094 who died in the years 1981–2010 in Poland. The female to male ratio (the F:M ratio in the multiple sclerosis group was calculated using the number of deaths per year. The rate of late mortality in infants (LMI per 1,000 live births yearly was used as a marker of the hygiene level. A correlation analysis was carried out between the rate of LMI and the F:M ratio in the multiple sclerosis cohort in the years 1981–2010. Demographic data were obtained from the Central Statistical Office in Warsaw. Results: The F:M ratio in the multiple sclerosis group evidently increased (range 1.08–1.79 in the years 1981–2010, showing increasing occurrence of multiple sclerosis in women (p < 0.0001. A significant, strong and inverse correlation was found between the marker of the hygiene level (LMI rate and the F:M ratio in the multiple sclerosis group over three decades: linear correlation coefficient by Pearson: r = –0.693, p < 0.0001. By contrast with this result, no correlation was established between the hygiene level marker and proportion of women to men in the general population on account of extremely low variance of the F:M ratio (0.000025. Conclusion: The improvement of the hygiene level showed association with the increasing occurrence of multiple sclerosis in women in the years 1981–2010. The higher the hygiene level was, the greater the occurrence of female multiple sclerosis in Poland.

  4. “Neuropathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and its variants”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Shahram; Stauffer, Jennifer E.; Schulte, Derek J.; Ravits, John

    2015-01-01

    Summary Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a clinical syndrome named for its neuropathological hallmark: degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal anterior horn and motor cortex and loss of axons in the lateral columns of the spinal cord. The signature neuropathological molecular signature common to almost all sporadic ALS and most familial ALS is TDP-43 immunoreactive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions. The neuropathological and molecular neuropathological features of ALS variants primarly lateral sclerosis and progressive muscular atrophy are less certain, but also appear to share the primary features of ALS. A number of genetic causes including mutations in SOD1, FUS, and C9orf72 comprise a disease spectrum and all demonstrate distinctive molecular and neuropathological signatures. Neuropathology will continue to play to a key role in solving the puzzle of ALS pathogenesis. PMID:26515626

  5. Feature Selection by Reordering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiřina, Marcel; Jiřina jr., M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2005), s. 155-161 ISSN 1738-6438 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : feature selection * data reduction * ordering of features Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  6. Vitamin D Levels Predict Multiple Sclerosis Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters February 3, 2014 Vitamin D Levels Predict Multiple Sclerosis Progression Among people ... sclerosis (MS), those with higher blood levels of vitamin D had better outcomes during 5 years of ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: tuberous sclerosis complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 42. Citation on PubMed Northrup H, Koenig MK, Pearson DA, Au KS. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. 1999 Jul ... Tuberous sclerosis complex: advances in diagnosis, genetics, and management. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2007 Aug;57(2): ...

  8. Multiple Sclerosis: Can It Cause Seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... multiple sclerosis and epilepsy? Answers from B Mark Keegan, M.D. Epileptic seizures are more common in ... controlled with anti-seizure medication. With B Mark Keegan, M.D. Lund C, et al. Multiple sclerosis ...

  9. Emotional Disorders in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Evidence-based Guideline for PATIENTS and their FAMILIES EMOTIONAL DISORDERS IN PEOPLE WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS This fact sheet presents the current research on emotional disorders in multiple sclerosis (MS) and summarizes the ...

  10. Cortical Thinning and Clinical Heterogeneity in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mezzapesa, Domenico Maria; D?Errico, Eustachio; Tortelli, Rosanna; Distaso, Eugenio; Cortese, Rosa; Tursi, Marianna; Federico, Francesco; Zoccolella, Stefano; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Dicuonzo, Franca; Simone, Isabella Laura

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has heterogeneous clinical features that could be translated into specific patterns of brain atrophy. In the current study we have evaluated the relationship between different clinical expressions of classical ALS and measurements of brain cortical thickness. Cortical thickness analysis was conducted from 3D-MRI using FreeSurfer software in 29 ALS patients and 20 healthy controls. We explored three clinical traits of the disease, subdividing the patients in...

  11. Oroal manifestations in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grajales González Hilda María

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, characterized by the presence of acute focal inflammatory demyelination, axonal loss and gliosis. It affects predominantly in young adults between 20 and 40 years of age; it is infrequent in the pediatric age. A observational, retrospective and descriptive cohort research was conducted between May 1999 and January 2012 to assess demographic characteristics, and pathological manifestations in the oral cav- ity of children with this condition. Records of 17 patients, under 18 years of age, of either sex were included, who had been evaluated in the Department of Stomatology. Data recorded were age, sex, State of origin, oral and facial pathological features, focal cavity infections and ceod index. There were no patients with trigeminal neuralgia or facial paralysis; a 5.7% ceod index was identified. Most of the patients were under immunopressive treatment. A protocol for stomatological follow-up in patients with multiple sclerosis does not exist. The medical profession must be sensibilized to establish strategies for an integral follow-up in patients with this condition.

  12. Treatment of Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pierson, Susan H.; Griffith, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis is an increasingly recognized entity. This article reviews the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis, its prevalence, its relationship to different types of multiple sclerosis, and its contribution to long-term functional prognosis. The discussion also focuses on the key elements of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis which distinguish it from other forms of cognitive impairment. Therapeutic interventions potentially effective for the co...

  13. Hippocampal Sclerosis in Older Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cykowski, Matthew D.; Powell, Suzanne Z.; Schulz, Paul E.; Takei, Hidehiro; Rivera, Andreana L.; Jackson, Robert E.; Roman, Gustavo; Jicha, Gregory A.; Nelson, Peter T.

    2018-01-01

    Context Autopsy studies of the older population (≥65 years of age), and particularly of the “oldest-old” (≥85 years of age), have identified a significant proportion (~20%) of cognitively impaired patients in which hippocampal sclerosis is the major substrate of an amnestic syndrome. Hippocampal sclerosis may also be comorbid with frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Alzheimer disease, and Lewy body disease. Until recently, the terms hippocampal sclerosis of aging or hippocampal sclerosis dementia were applied in this context. Recent discoveries have prompted a conceptual expansion of hippocampal sclerosis of aging because (1) cellular inclusions of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43) are frequent; (2) TDP-43 pathology may be found outside hippocampus; and (3) brain arteriolosclerosis is a common, possibly pathogenic, component. Objective To aid pathologists with recent recommendations for diagnoses of common neuropathologies in older persons, particularly hippocampal sclerosis, and highlight the recent shift in diagnostic terminology from HS-aging to cerebral age-related TDP-43 with sclerosis (CARTS). Data Sources Peer-reviewed literature and 5 autopsy examples that illustrate common age-related neuropathologies, including CARTS, and emphasize the importance of distinguishing CARTS from late-onset frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 pathology and from advanced Alzheimer disease with TDP-43 pathology. Conclusions In advanced old age, the substrates of cognitive impairment are often multifactorial. This article demonstrates common and frequently comorbid neuropathologic substrates of cognitive impairment in the older population, including CARTS, to aid those practicing in this area of pathology. PMID:28467211

  14. DNA double-strand break response factors influence end-joining features of IgH class switch and general translocation junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchakshari, Rohit A; Zhang, Xuefei; Kumar, Vipul; Du, Zhou; Wei, Pei-Chi; Kao, Jennifer; Dong, Junchao; Alt, Frederick W

    2018-01-23

    Ig heavy chain (IgH) class switch recombination (CSR) in B lymphocytes switches IgH constant regions to change antibody functions. CSR is initiated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) within a donor IgH switch (S) region and a downstream acceptor S region. CSR is completed by fusing donor and acceptor S region DSB ends by classical nonhomologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) and, in its absence, by alternative end-joining that is more biased to use longer junctional microhomologies (MHs). Deficiency for DSB response (DSBR) factors, including ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and 53BP1, variably impair CSR end-joining, with 53BP1 deficiency having the greatest impact. However, studies of potential impact of DSBR factor deficiencies on MH-mediated CSR end-joining have been technically limited. We now use a robust DSB joining assay to elucidate impacts of deficiencies for DSBR factors on CSR and chromosomal translocation junctions in primary mouse B cells and CH12F3 B-lymphoma cells. Compared with wild-type, CSR and c-myc to S region translocation junctions in the absence of 53BP1, and, to a lesser extent, other DSBR factors, have increased MH utilization; indeed, 53BP1-deficient MH profiles resemble those associated with C-NHEJ deficiency. However, translocation junctions between c-myc DSB and general DSBs genome-wide are not MH-biased in ATM-deficient versus wild-type CH12F3 cells and are less biased in 53BP1- and C-NHEJ-deficient cells than CSR junctions or c-myc to S region translocation junctions. We discuss potential roles of DSBR factors in suppressing increased MH-mediated DSB end-joining and features of S regions that may render their DSBs prone to MH-biased end-joining in the absence of DSBR factors.

  15. Viruses and Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Jussi Oskari; Jacobson, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a heterogeneous disease that develops as an interplay between the immune system and environmental stimuli in genetically susceptible individuals. There is increasing evidence that viruses may play a role in MS pathogenesis acting as these environmental triggers. However, it is not known if any single virus is causal, or rather several viruses can act as triggers in disease development. Here, we review the association of different viruses to MS with an emphasis on two herpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6). These two agents have generated the most impact during recent years as possible co-factors in MS disease development. The strongest argument for association of EBV with MS comes from the link between symptomatic infectious mononucleosis and MS and from seroepidemiological studies. In contrast to EBV, HHV-6 has been found significantly more often in MS plaques than in MS normal appearing white matter or non-MS brains and HHV-6 re-activation has been reported during MS clinical relapses. In this review we also suggest new strategies, including the development of new infectious animal models of MS and antiviral MS clinical trials, to elucidate roles of different viruses in the pathogenesis of this disease. Furthermore, we introduce the idea of using unbiased sequence-independent pathogen discovery methodologies, such as next generation sequencing, to study MS brain tissue or body fluids for detection of known viral sequences or potential novel viral agents. PMID:22583435

  16. Falls in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Patricia N; Shumway-Cook, Anne; Bamer, Alyssa M; Johnson, Shana L; Amtmann, Dagmar; Kraft, George H

    2011-07-01

    To examine incidence, associated factors, and health care provider (HCP) response to falls in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Cross-sectional retrospective design. Community setting. Four hundred seventy-four persons with MS. Mailed survey questionnaire examined incidence, risk factors, and HCP response to falls in persons with MS who were dwelling in the community. Univariate and multiple ordinal regression analysis identified variables associated with single and multiple falls. Falls, causes and perceived reasons for falls, and HCP response. A total of 265 participants (58.2%) reported one or more falls in the previous 6 months, and 58.5% of falls were medically injurious. Trips/slips while walking accounted for 48% of falls. Factors associated with falls included use of a cane or walker (odds ratio [OR] 2.62; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.66-4.14), income falls; recommended strategies included safety strategies (53.2%), use of gait assistive devices (42.1%), exercise/balance training (22.2%), and home modifications (16.6%). Factors associated with falls in persons with MS are similar to those in other populations with neurologic diseases. Despite the high incidence of falls, fewer than 50% of people with MS receive information about prevention of falls from an HCP. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment of Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Susan H.; Griffith, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis is an increasingly recognized entity. This article reviews the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis, its prevalence, its relationship to different types of multiple sclerosis, and its contribution to long-term functional prognosis. The discussion also focuses on the key elements of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis which distinguish it from other forms of cognitive impairment. Therapeutic interventions potentially effective for the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis are reviewed including the effects of disease modifying therapies and the use of physical and cognitive interventions. PMID:16720960

  18. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tyagi, A

    2012-02-03

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common, progressive motor neurone disease but is rare in the obstetric population. Only 4 cases have been described in the English literature since 1975. We describe a 29 year old woman who presented with ataxia, lower limb weakness and dysarthria 4 weeks after the birth of her first child. The symptoms had onset during the pregnancy but had not been considered remarkable. There were clinical features of upper and lower motor neurone involvement without any sensory loss. MRI of brain and spine was normal. CSF analysis was negative. EMG studies confirmed the presence of widespread anterior horn cell dysfunction compatible with ALS. The patient was commenced on Riluzole and has progressed clinically, at 12 months post diagnosis.

  19. Increased rate of treatment with antidepressants in patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Harhoff, Mette; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of depression and anxiety is increased in patients with multiple sclerosis, but it has not been investigated whether these conditions are treated in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the rate of treatment with antidepressants is increased...... in patients with multiple sclerosis compared with patients with other chronic illnesses and compared with the general population. By linkage of nationwide case registers, all patients were identified, who had received a main diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or osteoarthritis at first admission or during...... outpatient contact in the period 1995-2000 in Denmark. Rates of subsequent purchase of antidepressants for these patients were calculated. In total, 417 patients with a main diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and 12 127 patients with a main diagnosis of osteoarthritis, at first discharge from hospital...

  20. Midkine and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hideyuki

    2014-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune neurological disease characterized by inflammatory demyelination with subsequent neuronal damage in the CNS. MS and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), have been thought as autoreactive Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated diseases. CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T-cell (Treg) plays a pivotal role in autoimmune tolerance, and tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCreg) drive the development of inducible Treg cells. Thus, a dysfunction in the development of Treg and DCreg leads to the development of autoimmune diseases. However, the factors that regulate Treg and DCreg are largely unknown. We recently showed that removal of midkine (MK) suppressed EAE due to an expansion of the Treg cell population as well as a decrease in the numbers of autoreactive Th1 and Th17 cells. MK decreased the Treg cell population by suppressing the phosphorylation of STAT5, which is essential for the expression of Foxp3, the master transcriptional factor of Treg cell differentiation. Furthermore, MK reduces the DCreg cell population by inhibiting the phosphorylation of STAT3, which is critical for DCreg development. Blockade of MK signalling by a specific RNA aptamer significantly elevated the population of DCreg and Treg cells and ameliorated EAE without detectable adverse effects. Therefore, the inhibition of MK may provide an effective therapeutic strategy against autoimmune diseases including MS. This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. PSNO: Predicting Cysteine S-Nitrosylation Sites by Incorporating Various Sequence-Derived Features into the General Form of Chou’s PseAAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available S-nitrosylation (SNO is one of the most universal reversible post-translational modifications involved in many biological processes. Malfunction or dysregulation of SNO leads to a series of severe diseases, such as developmental abnormalities and various diseases. Therefore, the identification of SNO sites (SNOs provides insights into disease progression and drug development. In this paper, a new bioinformatics tool, named PSNO, is proposed to identify SNOs from protein sequences. Firstly, we explore various promising sequence-derived discriminative features, including the evolutionary profile, the predicted secondary structure and the physicochemical properties. Secondly, rather than simply combining the features, which may bring about information redundancy and unwanted noise, we use the relative entropy selection and incremental feature selection approach to select the optimal feature subsets. Thirdly, we train our model by the technique of the k-nearest neighbor algorithm. Using both informative features and an elaborate feature selection scheme, our method, PSNO, achieves good prediction performance with a mean Mathews correlation coefficient (MCC value of about 0.5119 on the training dataset using 10-fold cross-validation. These results indicate that PSNO can be used as a competitive predictor among the state-of-the-art SNOs prediction tools. A web-server, named PSNO, which implements the proposed method, is freely available at http://59.73.198.144:8088/PSNO/.

  2. The Role of PPAR Gamma in Systemic Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Tavares Dantas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrosis is recognized as an important feature of many chronic diseases, such as systemic sclerosis (SSc, an autoimmune disease of unknown etiology, characterized by immune dysregulation and vascular injury, followed by progressive fibrosis affecting the skin and multiple internal organs. SSc has a poor prognosis because no therapy has been shown to reverse or arrest the progression of fibrosis, representing a major unmet medical need. Recently, antifibrotic effects of PPARγ ligands have been studied in vitro and in vivo and some theories have emerged leading to new insights. Aberrant PPARγ function seems to be implicated in pathological fibrosis in the skin and lungs. This antifibrotic effect is mainly related to the inhibition of TGF-β/Smad signal transduction but other pathways can be involved. This review focused on recent studies that identified PPARγ as an important novel pathway with critical roles in regulating connective tissue homeostasis, with emphasis on skin and lung fibrosis and its role on systemic sclerosis.

  3. Characteristics and correlates of coping with multiple sclerosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramat Kar, Maryam; Whitehead, Lisa; Smith, Catherine M

    2017-10-10

    The purpose of this systematic review was to examine coping strategies that people with multiple sclerosis use, and to identify factors that influence their coping pattern. This systematic review followed the Joanna Briggs Institute guidelines for synthesizing descriptive quantitative research. The following databases were searched from the inception of databases until December 2016: Ovid (Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO), Science Direct, Web of Science, and Scopus. Manual search was also conducted from the reference lists of retrieved articles. Findings related to the patterns of coping with multiple sclerosis and factors influencing coping with multiple sclerosis were extracted and synthesized. The search of the database yielded 455 articles. After excluding duplicates (n = 341) and studies that did not meet the inclusion criteria (n = 27), 71 studies were included in the full-text review. Following the full-text, a further 21 studies were excluded. Quality appraisal of 50 studies was completed, and 38 studies were included in the review. Synthesis of findings indicated that people with multiple sclerosis use emotional and avoidance coping strategies more than other types of coping, particularly in the early stages of the disease. In comparison to the general population, people with multiple sclerosis were less likely to use active coping strategies and used more avoidance and emotional coping strategies. The pattern of coping with multiple sclerosis was associated with individual, clinical and psychological factors including gender, educational level, clinical course, mood and mental status, attitude, personality traits, and religious beliefs. The findings of this review suggest that considering individual or disease-related factors could help healthcare professionals in identifying those less likely to adapt to multiple sclerosis. This information could also be used to provide client-centered rehabilitation for people living with multiple

  4. Neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, J. L.; de Seze, J.; Lana-Peixoto, M.

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that preferentially targets the optic nerves and spinal cord. The clinical presentation may suggest multiple sclerosis (MS), but a highly specific serum autoantibody against the astrocytic water channel...

  5. [Biological treatment of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, P.S.; Sellebjerg, F.

    2008-01-01

    In 1996 interferon (IFN)beta was the first biopharmaceutical product to be approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). In 2006 the more potent monoclonal antibody natalizumab was approved. Presently, a number of monoclonal antibodies are being studied, including ale...

  6. Uric acid in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, M; De Keyser, J

    Peroxynitrite, a reactive oxidant formed by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide at sites of inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS), is capable of damaging tissues and cells. Uric acid, a natural scavenger of peroxynitrite, reduces inflammatory demyelination in experimental allergic

  7. The danish multiple sclerosis registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Stenager, Egon

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The Danish Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Registry was established in 1956. Content: The register comprises data on all Danes who had MS in 1949 or who have been diagnosed since. Data on new cases and updated information on persons with an MS diagnosis already notified are continuously...

  8. The immunogenetics of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejgaard, A.

    2008-01-01

    with complex genetic backgrounds. HLA controls immune response genes and HLA associations indicate the involvement of autoimmunity. Multiple sclerosis (MS) was one of the first conditions proven to be HLA associated involving primarily HLA class II factors. We review how HLA studies give fundamental...

  9. Laboratory diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.; Stovner, L.J.; Rinck, P.A.; Nilsen, G.; Romslo, I.

    1991-01-01

    In 26 patients with multiple sclerosis 100% responded abnormally to magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Lesions in the posterior fossa were observed in 18 patients. The auditory brain stem response was abnormal in 15 patients, and 22 had abnormal immunoglobulins in the cerebrospinal fluid. The correlation between abnormalities of the auditory brain stem response and the magnetic resonance images was greatest in a subgroup where the two investigations were performed within a ten day interval. Results from magnetic resonance imaging, evoked potentials and cerebrospinal fluid investigations were used to reclassify 13 of 15 patients with clinically ''possible'' or ''probable''multiple sclerosis to a higher level using Poser's criteria. Evoked potentials (the auditory brain stem response in particular) correlated best with clinical multiple sclerosis category. The authors recommend that the magnetic resonance imaging is established as a first-hand investigation in evaluation of multiple sclerosis. Evoked potentials and cerebrospinal fluid investigations may prove to be more specific, however, and these investigations should also be performed as a routine. 23 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mimic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Majid

    2016-04-03

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) misdiagnosis has many broad implications for the patient and the neurologist. Potentially curative treatments exist for certain ALS mimic syndromes, but delay in starting these therapies may have an unfavorable effect on outcome. Hence, it is important to exclude similar conditions. In this review, we discuss some of the important mimics of ALS.

  11. Vascular aspects of multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'haeseleer, Miguel; Cambron, Melissa; Vanopdenbosch, Ludo; De Keyser, Jacques

    Three types of vascular dysfunction have been described in multiple sclerosis (MS). First, findings from epidemiological studies suggest that patients with MS have a higher risk for ischaemic stroke than people who do not have MS. The underlying mechanism is unknown, but might involve endothelial

  12. Searching for neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis at clinical onset: Diagnostic value of biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Lenka; Axelsson, Markus; Malmeström, Clas; Imberg, Henrik; Elias, Olle; Zetterberg, Henrik; Nerman, Olle; Lycke, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Neurodegeneration occurs during the early stages of multiple sclerosis. It is an essential, devastating part of the pathophysiology. Tools for measuring the degree of neurodegeneration could improve diagnostics and patient characterization. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic value of biomarkers of degeneration in patients with recent clinical onset of suspected multiple sclerosis, and to evaluate these biomarkers for characterizing disease course. This cross-sectional study included 271 patients with clinical features of suspected multiple sclerosis onset and was the baseline of a prospective study. After diagnostic investigations, the patients were classified into the following disease groups: patients with clinically isolated syndrome (n = 4) or early relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (early RRMS; n = 93); patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis with disease durations ≥2 years (established RRMS; n = 39); patients without multiple sclerosis, but showing symptoms (symptomatic controls; n = 89); and patients diagnosed with other diseases (n = 46). In addition, we included healthy controls (n = 51) and patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (n = 23). We analyzed six biomarkers of neurodegeneration: cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament light chain levels; cerebral spinal fluid glial fibrillary acidic protein; cerebral spinal fluid tau; retinal nerve fiber layer thickness; macula volume; and the brain parenchymal fraction. Except for increased cerebral spinal fluid neurofilament light chain levels, median 670 ng/L (IQR 400-2110), we could not find signs of early degeneration in the early disease group with recent clinical onset. However, the intrathecal immunoglobin G production and cerebral spinal fluid neurofilament light chain levels showed diagnostic value. Moreover, elevated levels of cerebral spinal fluid glial fibrillary acidic protein, thin retinal nerve fiber layers, and low brain parenchymal fractions were associated with

  13. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh P Nigel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disease characterised by progressive muscular paralysis reflecting degeneration of motor neurones in the primary motor cortex, corticospinal tracts, brainstem and spinal cord. Incidence (average 1.89 per 100,000/year and prevalence (average 5.2 per100,000 are relatively uniform in Western countries, although foci of higher frequency occur in the Western Pacific. The mean age of onset for sporadic ALS is about 60 years. Overall, there is a slight male prevalence (M:F ratio~1.5:1. Approximately two thirds of patients with typical ALS have a spinal form of the disease (limb onset and present with symptoms related to focal muscle weakness and wasting, where the symptoms may start either distally or proximally in the upper and lower limbs. Gradually, spasticity may develop in the weakened atrophic limbs, affecting manual dexterity and gait. Patients with bulbar onset ALS usually present with dysarthria and dysphagia for solid or liquids, and limbs symptoms can develop almost simultaneously with bulbar symptoms, and in the vast majority of cases will occur within 1–2 years. Paralysis is progressive and leads to death due to respiratory failure within 2–3 years for bulbar onset cases and 3–5 years for limb onset ALS cases. Most ALS cases are sporadic but 5–10% of cases are familial, and of these 20% have a mutation of the SOD1 gene and about 2–5% have mutations of the TARDBP (TDP-43 gene. Two percent of apparently sporadic patients have SOD1 mutations, and TARDBP mutations also occur in sporadic cases. The diagnosis is based on clinical history, examination, electromyography, and exclusion of 'ALS-mimics' (e.g. cervical spondylotic myelopathies, multifocal motor neuropathy, Kennedy's disease by appropriate investigations. The pathological hallmarks comprise loss of motor neurones with intraneuronal ubiquitin-immunoreactive inclusions in upper motor neurones and TDP-43

  14. Work Disability in Early Systemic Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandqvist, Gunnel; Hesselstrand, Roger; Petersson, Ingemar F

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study work disability (WD) with reference to levels of sick leave and disability pension in early systemic sclerosis (SSc). METHODS: Patients with SSc living in the southern part of Sweden with onset of their first non-Raynaud symptom between 2003 and 2009 and with a followup of 36...... months were included in a longitudinal study. Thirty-two patients (26 women, 24 with limited SSc) with a median age of 47.5 years (interquartile range 43-53) were identified. WD was calculated in 30-day intervals from 12 months prior to disease onset until 36 months after, presented as the prevalence...... of WD per year (0-3) and as the period prevalence of mean net days per month (± SD). Comparisons were made between patients with different disease severity and sociodemographic characteristics, and between patients and a reference group (RG) from the general population. RESULTS: Seventy-eight percent...

  15. Upgrading of analytical method of general sensitivity for feature evaluation of land disposal system. 3. Abstract of report on research entrusted by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-02-01

    In this research, a method to evaluate features of searching type system was analyzed statistically and deterministically by expanding it to nuclide transport in near-field host rocks. Here was described on abstract of methodology by summarizing fundamental concept on procedure and shadow-model of the feature evaluation based on investigation progress in last fiscal year, details on the nuclide transport in near-field host rocks and analytical method of sensitivity using this research, contents of statistical analysis using the shadow-model of nuclide transport, and summaries of contents and results on the deterministic analysis. (G.K.)

  16. Increasing Benefit of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyhtinen, J.; Karttunen, A.; Tikkakoski, T. [Radiologian Klinikka, Oulu (Finland)

    2006-11-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as an essential tool of multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and has opened up completely new prospects in MS research and treatment trials. It is a sensitive method that gives direct evidence of tissue pathology and has greatly increased our knowledge of MS. In clinical work, MRI is used to confirm and exclude the diagnosis of MS. The international recommendation is that every suspected MS patient should undergo at least one brain MRI. T2-weighted images are the standard tool in clinical work, and functional imaging methods are mainly used in MS research. The subtypes and the course of the disease cause variation in MRI findings. Here, we present a general overview of MR findings in MS. Brain, magnetic resonance imaging, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord.

  17. Abnormalities of esophageal and gastric emptying in progressive systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddern, G.J.; Horowitz, M.; Jamieson, G.G.; Chatterton, B.E.; Collins, P.J.; Roberts-Thomson, P.

    1984-01-01

    Gastric and esophageal emptying were assessed using scintigraphic techniques in 12 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis and 22 normal volunteers. Esophageal emptying was significantly delayed in the patient group, with 7 of the 12 patients beyond the normal range. Gastric emptying was slower in patients than in controls, with 9 patients being outside the normal range for solid emptying and 7 patients outside the normal range for liquid emptying. Findings from gastric and esophageal emptying tests generally correlated well with symptoms of dysphagia and gastroesophageal reflux. However, 2 patients with normal emptying studies had symptomatic heartburn, and 2 patients with delay of both solid and liquid gastric emptying gave no history of gastroesophageal reflux. Delayed gastric emptying may be an important factor in the development of upper gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis

  18. Increasing Benefit of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyhtinen, J.; Karttunen, A.; Tikkakoski, T.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as an essential tool of multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and has opened up completely new prospects in MS research and treatment trials. It is a sensitive method that gives direct evidence of tissue pathology and has greatly increased our knowledge of MS. In clinical work, MRI is used to confirm and exclude the diagnosis of MS. The international recommendation is that every suspected MS patient should undergo at least one brain MRI. T2-weighted images are the standard tool in clinical work, and functional imaging methods are mainly used in MS research. The subtypes and the course of the disease cause variation in MRI findings. Here, we present a general overview of MR findings in MS. Brain, magnetic resonance imaging, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord

  19. Abnormalities of esophageal and gastric emptying in progressive systemic sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddern, G.J.; Horowitz, M.; Jamieson, G.G.; Chatterton, B.E.; Collins, P.J.; Roberts-Thomson, P.

    1984-10-01

    Gastric and esophageal emptying were assessed using scintigraphic techniques in 12 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis and 22 normal volunteers. Esophageal emptying was significantly delayed in the patient group, with 7 of the 12 patients beyond the normal range. Gastric emptying was slower in patients than in controls, with 9 patients being outside the normal range for solid emptying and 7 patients outside the normal range for liquid emptying. Findings from gastric and esophageal emptying tests generally correlated well with symptoms of dysphagia and gastroesophageal reflux. However, 2 patients with normal emptying studies had symptomatic heartburn, and 2 patients with delay of both solid and liquid gastric emptying gave no history of gastroesophageal reflux. Delayed gastric emptying may be an important factor in the development of upper gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis.

  20. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis – a motor neuron disease. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Rubinowicz-Zasada

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Charcot’s disease and motor neuron disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes muscle weakness, paralysis, and ultimately, respiratory failure. The aetiology and the pathogenesis of the syndrome remain unknown. Most people live 2–5 years after their first signs of the disease. There is no cure or effective treatment. We present a case of a female patient affected by progressing Charcot’s disease. On the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale – Revised (ALSFRS-R, the patient obtained 21 points. Atrophy and muscle spasm were very extended. Electromyography revealed features of coexisting denervation and reinnervation in the examined muscles. A growing number of Charcot’s disease cases require multidirectional actions to meet patient’s physical, emotional, and nutritional needs. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is an incurable disease. However, it is possible to relieve its symptoms by applying systematic physical rehabilitation.

  1. Hippocampal sclerosis dementia: An amnesic variant of frontotemporal degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiadi U. Onyike

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To describe characteristics of hippocampal sclerosis dementia. Methods: Convenience sample of Hippocampal sclerosis dementia (HSD recruited from the Johns Hopkins University Brain Resource Center. Twenty-four cases with post-mortem pathological diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis dementia were reviewed for clinical characterization. Results: The cases showed atrophy and neuronal loss localized to the hippocampus, amygdala and entorrhinal cortex. The majority (79.2% had amnesia at illness onset, and many (54.2% showed abnormal conduct and psychiatric disorder. Nearly 42% presented with an amnesic state, and 37.5% presented with amnesia plus abnormal conduct and psychiatric disorder. All eventually developed a behavioral or psychiatric disorder. Disorientation, executive dysfunction, aphasia, agnosia and apraxia were uncommon at onset. Alzheimer disease (AD was the initial clinical diagnosis in 89% and the final clinical diagnosis in 75%. Diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia (FTD was uncommon (seen in 8%. Conclusion: HSD shows pathological characteristics of FTD and clinical features that mimic AD and overlap with FTD. The findings, placed in the context of earlier work, support the proposition that HSD belongs to the FTD family, where it may be identified as an amnesic variant.

  2. Hippocampal sclerosis dementia: an amnesic variant of frontotemporal degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyike, Chiadi U.; Pletnikova, Olga; Sloane, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Campbell; Troncoso, Juan C.; Rabins, Peter V.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe characteristics of hippocampal sclerosis dementia. METHODS Convenience sample of Hippocampal sclerosis dementia (HSD) recruited from the Johns Hopkins University Brain Resource Center. Twenty-four cases with post-mortem pathological diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis dementia were reviewed for clinical characterization. RESULTS The cases showed atrophy and neuronal loss localized to the hippocampus, amygdala and entorrhinal cortex. The majority (79.2%) had amnesia at illness onset, and many (54.2%) showed abnormal conduct and psychiatric disorder. Nearly 42% presented with an amnesic state, and 37.5% presented with amnesia plus abnormal conduct and psychiatric disorder. All eventually developed a behavioral or psychiatric disorder. Disorientation, executive dysfunction, aphasia, agnosia and apraxia were uncommon at onset. Alzheimer disease (AD) was the initial clinical diagnosis in 89% and the final clinical diagnosis in 75%. Diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) was uncommon (seen in 8%). CONCLUSION HSD shows pathological characteristics of FTD and clinical features that mimic AD and overlap with FTD. The findings, placed in the context of earlier work, support the proposition that HSD belongs to the FTD family, where it may be identified as an amnesic variant. PMID:24363834

  3. Multiple sclerosis in magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M.; Walecki, J.; Stelmasiak, Z.

    1994-01-01

    The authors analyzed MR examination of 277 patients with multiple sclerosis. White matter hyperintesities in brain were found in 270 of them, in spinal cord in 32. The most frequently they were found in periventricular white matter, in subcortical localization and in the corpus callosum. MR examination allows the estimate the activity of the disease on the basis of the presence of edema around the plaques and their contrast enhancement with Gd-DTPA. About one third of all cases were accompanied by cortical brain atrophy (the most often seen in the frontal lobes), subcortical brain atrophy was less frequent. In about two third of all cases the corpus callosum atrophy was found. MR examination is a highly sensitive method of multiple sclerosis diagnosis, of the assessment of its activity and progression. (author)

  4. Multiple sclerosis and herpesvirus interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Sciascia do Olival

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is the most common autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, and its etiology is believed to have both genetic and environmental components. Several viruses have already been implicated as triggers and there are several studies that implicate members of the Herpesviridae family in the pathogenesis of MS. The most important characteristic of these viruses is that they have periods of latency and exacerbations within their biological sanctuary, the central nervous system. The Epstein-Barr, cytomegalovirus, human herpesvirus 6 and human herpesvirus 7 viruses are the members that are most studied as being possible triggers of multiple sclerosis. According to evidence in the literature, the herpesvirus family is strongly involved in the pathogenesis of this disease, but it is unlikely that they are the only component responsible for its development. There are probably multiple triggers and more studies are necessary to investigate and define these interactions.

  5. Understanding Legacy Features with Featureous

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olszak, Andrzej; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2011-01-01

    Java programs called Featureous that addresses this issue. Featureous allows a programmer to easily establish feature-code traceability links and to analyze their characteristics using a number of visualizations. Featureous is an extension to the NetBeans IDE, and can itself be extended by third...

  6. Multiple sclerosis and birth order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, W H

    1984-01-01

    Studies on the birth order of patients with multiple sclerosis have yielded contradictory conclusions. Most of the sets of data, however, have been tested by biased tests. Data that have been submitted to unbiased tests seem to suggest that cases are more likely to occur in early birth ranks. This should be tested on further samples and some comments are offered on how this should be done. PMID:6707558

  7. Multiple sclerosis and birth order.

    OpenAIRE

    James, W H

    1984-01-01

    Studies on the birth order of patients with multiple sclerosis have yielded contradictory conclusions. Most of the sets of data, however, have been tested by biased tests. Data that have been submitted to unbiased tests seem to suggest that cases are more likely to occur in early birth ranks. This should be tested on further samples and some comments are offered on how this should be done.

  8. Multiple Sclerosis: Pathogenesis and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Loma, Ingrid; Heyman, Rock

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. It affects approximately 400,000 people in the United States and onset is usually during young adulthood. There are four clinical forms of MS, of which relapsing remitting type is the most common. As the etiology of MS is unknown, finding a cure will remain challenging. The main mechanism of injury appears to be inflammation and 8 agents are now FDA approved to help control MS. Th...

  9. Treatment Satisfaction in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Glanz, Bonnie I.; Musallam, Alexander; Rintell, David J.; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L.; Healy, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) are associated with inconvenient methods of administration, significant side effects, and low adherence rates. This study was undertaken to compare treatment satisfaction in MS patients treated with interferon beta-1a intramuscular (IFNβ-1a IM), interferon beta-1a subcutaneous (IFNβ-1a SC), glatiramer acetate (GA), and natalizumab (NTZ), and to examine the associations between treatment satisfaction ra...

  10. Estrogen Treatment in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gold, Stefan M; Voskuhl, Rhonda R

    2009-01-01

    Currently available treatments for multiple sclerosis reduce inflammatory lesions on MRI and decrease clinical relapses but have limited effects on disability. Novel treatment options that target both the inflammatory as well as the neurodegenerative component of the disease are therefore needed. A growing body of evidence from basic science and clinical studies supports the therapeutic potential of estrogens in MS. Mechanisms of action include both immunomodulatory and directly neuroprotecti...

  11. Multiple sclerosis: current immunological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Cuevas-García

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is the most common inflammatory, chronic and degenerative condition of the central nervous system, and represents the first cause of disability in young adults. In Mexico, 11 to 20 out of every 100 000 people suffer from this disease. The causes of multiple sclerosis remain unknown, but several theories have been proposed on its origin: the interaction of environmental factors, viral infectious factors and genetic and immune susceptibility of each individual patient, which induce an autoimmune response and promote neuronal/axonal degeneration. In this review, the immune reaction main components and neurodegeneration present in multiple sclerosis are analyzed, as well as the inflammatory cascade associated with demyelination. Available treatments’ main purpose is to modulate aspects related to the adaptive immune response (B and T cells. The therapeutic challenge will be antigen-specific immune-tolerance induction, for example, with the use of tolerance protocols with peptides or DNA or nanoparticles vaccines. Future therapies should aim to control innate components (microglia, macrophages, astrocytes and to promote remyelination. To optimize the treatment, a combined therapeutic approach targeting the control of inflammatory and neurodegenerative components of the disease and monitoring of biomarkers will be necessary.

  12. Allergies, antibiotics use, and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jinma; Ni, Huijuan; Kim, Minchul; Cooley, Kimberly L; Valenzuela, Reuben M; Asche, Carl V

    2017-08-01

    The associations between allergies, antibiotics use, and multiple sclerosis (MS) remain controversial and their mediating or moderating effects have not yet been examined. We aimed to assess the direct and indirect influences of allergies and antibiotics use on MS development, and their interactions. A 1:3 matched case-control study was performed using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey database from 2006 to 2013 in the USA. Multiple sclerosis was identified based on the ICD-9 code (340.0) in any position. Cases were matched to their controls based on survey year, age, gender, race, payer type, region, and tobacco use. Allergy diseases and antibiotics prescriptions were extracted by ICD-9 code and drug classification code, respectively. Both generalized structural equation model and MacArthur approach were used to examine their intrinsic relationships. The weighted prevalence of MS was 133.7 per 100,000 visits. A total of 829 MS patients and 2441 controls were matched. Both respiratory tract allergies (OR = 0.29, 95% CI: 0.18, 0.49) and other allergies (OR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.19, 0.77) were associated with a reduction of the risk of MS. Patients with respiratory tract allergies were more likely to use penicillin (OR = 8.73, 95% CI: 4.12, 18.53) and other antibiotics (OR = 3.77, 95% CI: 2.72, 5.21), and those with other allergies had a higher likelihood of penicillin use (OR = 4.15, 95% CI: 1.27, 13.54); however, the link between antibiotics use and MS was not confirmed although penicillin use might mediate the relationship between allergies and MS. The findings supported allergy as a protective factor for MS development. We also suggest antibiotics use might not be a suitable indicator of bacterial infection to investigate the cause of MS.

  13. Total lymphoid irradiation for multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devereux, C.K.; Vidaver, R.; Hafstein, M.P.; Zito, G.; Troiano, R.; Dowling, P.C.; Cook, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Although chemical immunosuppression has been shown to benefit patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), it appears that chemotherapy has an appreciable oncogenic potential in patients with multiple sclerosis. Accordingly, we developed a modified total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) regimen designed to reduce toxicity and applied it to a randomized double blind trial of TLI or sham irradiation in MS. Standard TLI regimens were modified to reduce dose to 1,980 rad, lowering the superior mantle margin to midway between the thyroid cartilage and angle of the mandible (to avert xerostomia) and the lower margin of the mantle field to the inferior margin of L1 (to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity by dividing abdominal radiation between mantle and inverted Y), limiting spinal cord dose to 1,000 rad by custom-made spine blocks in the mantle and upper 2 cm of inverted Y fields, and also protecting the left kidney even if part of the spleen were shielded. Clinical efficacy was documented by the less frequent functional scale deterioration of 20 TLI treated patients with chronic progressive MS compared to to 20 sham-irradiated progressive MS patients after 12 months (16% versus 55%, p less than 0.03), 18 months (28% versus 63%, p less than 0.03), and 24 months (44% versus 74%, N.S.). Therapeutic benefit during 3 years follow-up was related to the reduction in lymphocyte count 3 months post-irradiation (p less than 0.02). Toxicity was generally mild and transient, with no instance of xerostomia, pericarditis, herpes zoster, or need to terminate treatment in TLI patients. However, menopause was induced in 2 patients and staphylococcal pneumonia in one

  14. Identification of S-glutathionylation sites in species-specific proteins by incorporating five sequence-derived features into the general pseudo-amino acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Ning, Qiao; Ai, Meiyue; Chai, Haiting; Yang, Guifu

    2016-06-07

    As a selective and reversible protein post-translational modification, S-glutathionylation generates mixed disulfides between glutathione (GSH) and cysteine residues, and plays an important role in regulating protein activity, stability, and redox regulation. To fully understand S-glutathionylation mechanisms, identification of substrates and specific S-Glutathionylated sites is crucial. Experimental identification of S-glutathionylated sites is labor-intensive and time consuming, so establishing an effective computational method is much desirable due to their convenient and fast speed. Therefore, in this study, a new bioinformatics tool named SSGlu (Species-Specific identification of Protein S-glutathionylation Sites) was developed to identify species-specific protein S-glutathionylated sites, utilizing support vector machines that combine multiple sequence-derived features with a two-step feature selection. By 5-fold cross validation, the performance of SSGlu was measured with an AUC of 0.8105 and 0.8041 for Homo sapiens and Mus musculus, respectively. Additionally, SSGlu was compared with the existing methods, and the higher MCC and AUC of SSGlu demonstrated that SSGlu was very promising to predict S-glutathionylated sites. Furthermore, a site-specific analysis showed that S-glutathionylation intimately correlated with the features derived from its surrounding sites. The conclusions derived from this study might help to understand more of the S-glutathionylation mechanism and guide the related experimental validation. For public access, SSGlu is freely accessible at http://59.73.198.144:8080/SSGlu/. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of the correlation relationship of pedagogical tests of general physical training with a set of parameters describing the morphological features and canoeists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flerchuk Viktor Viktorovich

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Correlation connections of tests are certain to on general physical preparation with indexes morphological possibilities of sportsmen. 15 sportsmen took part in research. Propensity of sportsmen is set to certain distances in competition activity. Directions of selection and orientation of sportsmen are recommended to work of different orientation.

  16. Brain MRI screening showing evidences of early central nervous system involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Reem Hamdy A; Sabry, Yousriah Y; Nasef, Amr A

    2011-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a multisystem autoimmune collagen disease where structural and functional abnormalities of small blood vessels prevail. Transient ischemic attacks, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhage have been reported as primary consequence of vascular central nervous system affection in systemic sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered to be the most sensitive diagnostic technique for detecting symptomatic and asymptomatic lesions in the brain in cases of multifocal diseases. The objective of this study is to detect subclinical as well as clinically manifest cerebral vasculopathy in patients with systemic sclerosis using magnetic resonance imaging. As much as 30 female patients with systemic sclerosis aged 27-61 years old, with disease duration of 1-9 years and with no history of other systemic disease or cerebrovascular accidents, were enrolled. Age-matched female control group of 30 clinically normal subjects, underwent brain magnetic resonance examination. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in the form of white matter hyperintense foci of variable sizes were found in significantly abundant forms in systemic sclerosis patients on magnetic resonance evaluation than in age-related control group, signifying a form of CNS vasculopathy. Such foci showed significant correlation to clinical features of organic CNS lesion including headaches, fainting attacks and organic depression as well as to the severity of peripheral vascular disease with insignificant correlation with disease duration. In conclusion, subclinical as well as clinically manifest CNS ischemic vasculopathy is not uncommon in systemic sclerosis patients and magnetic resonance imaging is considered a sensitive noninvasive screening tool for early detection of CNS involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis.

  17. MR imaging features of hemispherical spondylosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicentini, Joao R.T.; Martinez-Salazar, Edgar L.; Chang, Connie Y.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Rosenthal, Daniel I.; Torriani, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Hemispherical spondylosclerosis (HS) is a rare degenerative entity characterized by dome-shaped sclerosis of a single vertebral body that may pose a diagnostic dilemma. The goal of this study was to describe the MR imaging features of HS. We identified spine radiographs and CT examinations of subjects with HS who also had MR imaging for correlation. Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently assessed sclerosis characteristics, presence of endplate erosions, marrow signal intensity, and disk degeneration (Pfirrmann scale). We identified 11 subjects (six males, five females, mean 48 ± 10 years) with radiographic/CT findings of HS. The most commonly affected vertebral body was L4 (6/11; 55%). On MR imaging, variable signal intensity was noted, being most commonly low on T1 (8/11, 73%) and high on fat-suppressed T2-weighted (8/11, 73%) images. In two subjects, diffuse post-contrast enhancement was seen in the lesion. Moderate disk degeneration and endplate bone erosions adjacent to sclerosis were present in all subjects. Erosions of the opposite endplate were present in two subjects (2/11, 18%). CT data from nine subjects showed the mean attenuation value of HS was 472 ± 96 HU. HS appearance on MR imaging is variable and may not correlate with the degree of sclerosis seen on radiographs or CT. Disk degenerative changes and asymmetric endplate erosions are consistent markers of HS. (orig.)

  18. Feature Article

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Feature Article. Articles in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 80-85 Feature Article. What's New in Computers Windows 95 · Vijnan Shastri · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 86-89 Feature ...

  19. Cross-sectional Imaging Review of Tuberous Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Anant; Kaza, Ravi K; Vummidi, Dharshan R

    2016-05-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multisystem, genetic disorder characterized by development of hamartomas in the brain, abdomen, and thorax. It results from a mutation in one of 2 tumor suppressor genes that activates the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. This article discusses the origins of the disorder, the recently updated criteria for the diagnosis of TSC, and the cross-sectional imaging findings and recommendations for surveillance. Familiarity with the diverse radiological features facilitates diagnosis and helps in treatment planning and monitoring response to treatment of this multisystem disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiology of the hand in progressive systemic sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scutellari, P N; Orzincolo, C; Delli Gatti, I. and others

    1986-01-01

    Radiographs and xerographs of the hands of 35 patients with progressive systematic sclerosis (PSS), as defined by the ARA, were reviewed. Patients with ''overlap'' syndromes (i.e., mixed connective tissue disease, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis) have been excluded. Soft tissue changes included atrophy (hidebound skin), and dystrophic calcifications, particularly in CREST patients (calcinosis, Raynaud phenomenon, esophageal dysmobility, sclerodactily and telangectasia). The most common bony change is resorption of distal phalanges; diffuse osteoporosis is also frequent; the distal interphalangeal and first carpometacarpal joints involvement appear as a distinctive feature of this e....

  1. Reproduction and the risk of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils Iørgen; Pfleger, Claudia Christina

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark has doubled in women since 1970, whereas it has been almost unchanged in men.......The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark has doubled in women since 1970, whereas it has been almost unchanged in men....

  2. Demyelination of subcortical nuclei in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krutenkova, E; Aitmagambetova, G; Khodanovich, M; Yarnykh, V; Bowen, J; Gangadharan, B; Henson, L; Mayadev, A; Repovic, P; Qian, P

    2016-01-01

    Myelin containing in basal ganglia in multiple sclerosis patients was evaluated using new noninvasive quantitative MRI method fast whole brain macromolecular proton fraction mapping. Myelin level in globus pallidus and putamen significantly decreased in multiple sclerosis patients as compared with healthy control subjects but not in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus. (paper)

  3. Demyelination of subcortical nuclei in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutenkova, E.; Aitmagambetova, G.; Khodanovich, M.; Bowen, J.; Gangadharan, B.; Henson, L.; Mayadev, A.; Repovic, P.; Qian, P.; Yarnykh, V.

    2016-02-01

    Myelin containing in basal ganglia in multiple sclerosis patients was evaluated using new noninvasive quantitative MRI method fast whole brain macromolecular proton fraction mapping. Myelin level in globus pallidus and putamen significantly decreased in multiple sclerosis patients as compared with healthy control subjects but not in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus.

  4. Multiple sclerosis and other white matter diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) by computerized tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance are shown, including the examination of cerebral spinal fluid. Lymphocytic, foamy histiocytic perivascular cuffing, degenerated oligodendrocytes, and microglia proliferation with relative axonal sparing are presented. In the latter stage of the chronic MS plaque there is sclerosis with microcystic formation with complete demyelination and organization. (author)

  5. [Clinical analysis of 15 pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex complicated by cardiac rhabdomyomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guo-Qiang; Zhai, Qiong-Xiang; Yu, Jun-Hao; Wang, Chun; Zhuo, Mu-Qing; Wang, Lin-Gan

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the clinical features in children with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)-associated cardiac rhabdomyomas (CRM). The clinical data of 15 children with TSC complicated by CRM were collected. The clinical features of the patients were analyzed, and TSC gene mutations were detected. Eleven cases (73%) developed multiple CRM. The majority of the tumors were located in the left and right ventricles. Most tumors presented as a round-like hyperechogenic mass with a clear margin on echocardiography. Arrhythmias occurred in 3 patients and 2 patients experienced heart failure. Gene mutation tests were performed in 2 patients, and pathogenic mutations were detected in both patients, which were TSC1 mutation and TSC2 mutation, respectively. Three patients were followed up for 6 to 38 months, and their CRM shrank or regressed spontaneously. TSC-associated CRM is generally multiple. Heart failure and arrhythmias may occur in some patients. Echocardiography is important for diagnosis of CRM. TSC-associated CRM has an inclination to spontaneous regression. TSC can be diagnosed at a molecular genetic level by TSC gene mutation detection.

  6. Neural correlates of alerting and orienting impairment in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Marrufo, Manuel; Galvao-Carmona, Alejandro; González-Rosa, Javier J; Hidalgo-Muñoz, Antonio R; Borges, Mónica; Ruiz-Peña, Juan Luis; Izquierdo, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    A considerable percentage of multiple sclerosis patients have attentional impairment, but understanding its neurophysiological basis remains a challenge. The Attention Network Test allows 3 attentional networks to be studied. Previous behavioural studies using this test have shown that the alerting network is impaired in multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to identify neurophysiological indexes of the attention impairment in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients using this test. After general slowing had been removed in patients group to isolate the effects of each condition, some behavioral differences between them were obtained. About Contingent Negative Variation, a statistically significant decrement were found in the amplitude for Central and Spatial Cue Conditions for patient group (pmultiple sclerosis. P1 and N1 delayed latencies are evidence of the demyelination process that causes impairment in the first steps of the visual sensory processing. Lastly, P3 amplitude shows a general decrease for the pathological group probably indexing a more central impairment. These results suggest that the Attention Network Test give evidence of multiple levels of attention impairment, which could help in the assessment and treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients.

  7. Demyelination versus remyelination in progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramow, Stephan; Frischer, Josa M; Lassmann, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The causes of incomplete remyelination in progressive multiple sclerosis are unknown, as are the pathological correlates of the different clinical characteristics of patients with primary and secondary progressive disease. We analysed brains and spinal cords from 51 patients with progressive...... multiple sclerosis by planimetry. Thirteen patients with primary progressive disease were compared with 34 with secondary progressive disease. In patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, we found larger brain plaques, more demyelination in total and higher brain loads of active demyelination...... compared with patients with primary progressive disease. In addition, the brain density of plaques with high-grade inflammation and active demyelination was highest in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and remained ~18% higher than in primary progressive multiple sclerosis after adjustments...

  8. Prevalence of benign tumors among patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryan Rafiee Zadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS, an inflammatory autoimmune disease, affects almost 1% of world’s population in which myelin sheaths of neurons are targeted by immune cells. Association of different factors and diseases with MS provides new insights into possible pathogenesis and treatment for this disease. In this regard, we investigated the association of benign tumors with MS disease by studying total Isfehan multiple sclerosis (TIMS records for MS patients registered in Isfahan Multiple Sclerosis Society (IMSS who had developed any kind of benign tumors whether before MS diagnosis or after it. This study was performed in Isfahan province, third large province of Iran, with 4,815,863 populations located 1590 meters above sea level between latitudes 30 and 34 degrees north of the equator, and longitude 49-55 east. Among 4950 registered patients, 28 patients were discovered to have three types of benign tumors; pituitary adenoma in 22, meningioma in 5 and lipoma in 1 patient. The incidence rate of developing pituitary adenoma and meningioma were higher than in general population (OR 95%CI: 1.110; range: 0.731-1.685 and 1.035; range: 0.431-2.487 respectively but these findings were not statistically significant (p= 0.624 for pituitary adenoma and p= 0.939 for meningioma. But the incidence rate for lipoma was lower among MS patients (OR 95%CI: 0.020; range: 0.003-0.143 which was statistically significant (p <0.001.

  9. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in patients with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milenkova, Maria; Milanov, Ivan; Kmetska, Ksenia; Deleva, Sofia; Popova, Ljubomira; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Groudeva, Violeta; Hadjidekova, Savina; Domínguez, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied radiosensitivity to in vitro γ-irradiated lymphocytes from MS patients. • Immunotherapy in RRMS patients reduced the yield of radiation induced MN. • The group of treated RRMS accounts for the low radiosensitivity in MS patients. • Spontaneous yield of MN was similar in treated and untreated RRMS patients. - Abstract: Multiple sclerosis is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease leading to severe neurological disability. Although during the last years many disease-modifying agents as treatment options for multiple sclerosis have been made available, their mechanisms of action are still not fully determined. In the present study radiosensitivity in lymphocytes of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and healthy controls was investigated. Whole blood cultures from multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls were used to analyze the spontaneous and radiation-induced micronuclei in binucleated lymphocytes. A subgroup of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis was treated with immunomodulatory agents, interferon β or glatiramer acetate. The secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients group was not receiving any treatment. Our results reveal that the basal DNA damage was not different between relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls. No differences between gamma-irradiation induced micronuclei frequencies in binucleated cells from relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls were found either. Nevertheless, when we compared the radiation induced DNA damage in binucleated cells from healthy individuals with the whole group of patients, a reduction in the frequency of micronuclei was obtained in the patients group. Induced micronuclei yield was significantly lower in the irradiated samples from treated relapsing–remitting multiple

  10. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milenkova, Maria; Milanov, Ivan; Kmetska, Ksenia [III Neurological Clinic, University Hospital Saint Naum, Sofia (Bulgaria); Deleva, Sofia; Popova, Ljubomira; Hadjidekova, Valeria [Laboratory of Radiation Genetics, NCRRP, Sofia (Bulgaria); Groudeva, Violeta [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University Hospital St. Ekaterina, Sofia (Bulgaria); Hadjidekova, Savina [Department of Medical Genetics, Medical University, Sofia (Bulgaria); Domínguez, Inmaculada, E-mail: idomin@us.es [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Biology, University of Seville, Avda. Reina Mercedes 6, 41012 (Spain)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We studied radiosensitivity to in vitro γ-irradiated lymphocytes from MS patients. • Immunotherapy in RRMS patients reduced the yield of radiation induced MN. • The group of treated RRMS accounts for the low radiosensitivity in MS patients. • Spontaneous yield of MN was similar in treated and untreated RRMS patients. - Abstract: Multiple sclerosis is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease leading to severe neurological disability. Although during the last years many disease-modifying agents as treatment options for multiple sclerosis have been made available, their mechanisms of action are still not fully determined. In the present study radiosensitivity in lymphocytes of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and healthy controls was investigated. Whole blood cultures from multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls were used to analyze the spontaneous and radiation-induced micronuclei in binucleated lymphocytes. A subgroup of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis was treated with immunomodulatory agents, interferon β or glatiramer acetate. The secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients group was not receiving any treatment. Our results reveal that the basal DNA damage was not different between relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls. No differences between gamma-irradiation induced micronuclei frequencies in binucleated cells from relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls were found either. Nevertheless, when we compared the radiation induced DNA damage in binucleated cells from healthy individuals with the whole group of patients, a reduction in the frequency of micronuclei was obtained in the patients group. Induced micronuclei yield was significantly lower in the irradiated samples from treated relapsing–remitting multiple

  11. Comparison of Clinical Features in a Population of Basic Military Trainees Versus the General Department of Defense Beneficiary Population Presenting With Influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuller, H Samuel; Park, Jisuk; Lott, Lisa; Tavish, Michele; Danaher, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Upper respiratory tract infection (URI) is a well-documented cause of morbidity, extra expense, and lost training time among basic military trainees (BMTs). The goal of this study was to characterize the clinical presentation of influenza in the BMT population and to better understand how this presentation differs from that of the general Department of Defense (DoD) beneficiary population (non-BMTs). Clinical and demographic data were collected in a prospective study that enrolled DoD beneficiaries presenting to medical treatment facilities in San Antonio, Texas, with URI symptoms between January 2005 and March 2011. Vital signs and symptom duration were collected at the time of enrollment along with basic demographic information. Among 4,448 participants enrolled, 466 (10.5%) tested positive for influenza: 198 of 3,103 BMTs (6.4%) vs. 268 of 1,345 non-BMTs (20%) (p 0.5°F, p 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3-0.8, p 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3-0.8, p standard deviation = 1.4) symptoms, whereas non-BMTs presented with a mean of 6.9 (standard deviation = 1.3) symptoms (p < 0.01). The pretest probability of a BMT presenting with URI symptoms having influenza is significantly lower than that for the general DoD beneficiary population. BMTs with influenza presented sooner, with higher fever, and with fewer overall symptoms than the general DoD beneficiary population. These differences are likely attributable to early reporting and response bias and less likely attributed to age. Military efforts to identify BMTs with suspected influenza infection early and to refer them for treatment promptly are efficacious. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  12. Clinical, general, hemocoagulation and pathologicanatomical features of patients with moderate and severe community acquired pneumonia by the data of retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertseva T.A.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available According to literature data, patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP fall into several groups of unfavorable prognostic factors. Development of thrombotic complications is one of causes of mortality of hospitalized patients. In this case systemic inflammation, which is always present in moderate and severe CAP, is the starting mechanism of formation of disorders in the hemostasis system. The aim of our work was to determine anamnestic, clinical, laboratory and pathologic anatomical features in patients with CAP, taking into account markers of systemic inflammation and coagulogram indices, as well as predicting the occurrence of complications. In the course of the work, a retrospective analysis of 151 medical histories of hospitalized patients with CAP was made. We analyzed anthropometric indicators, complaints at the time of hospitalization, results of physical examination, results of the chest X-ray, clinical and laboratory indicators, microbiological sputum analysis and to assess the possibility of thrombotic complications a RAM scale was used. It was found that late asking for medical help, the presence of mixed infection, underestimation of the severity of condition and severe systemic inflammation increase the risk of lethal outcome in patients with CAP. Considering a high risk of thrombosis in patients with CAP, it is necessary to assess the risk of thrombotic complications with the help of special scales, as well as timely detection and correction of disorders from the hemostasis system.

  13. Molecular recognition and self-assembly special feature: A general protocol for creating high-throughput screening assays for reaction yield and enantiomeric excess applied to hydrobenzoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Shagufta H; Regan, Clinton J; Anslyn, Eric V

    2009-06-30

    A general approach to high-throughput screening of enantiomeric excess (ee) and concentration was developed by using indicator displacement assays (IDAs), and the protocol was then applied to the vicinal diol hydrobenzoin. The method involves the sequential utilization of what we define herein as screening, training, and analysis plates. Several enantioselective boronic acid-based receptors were screened by using 96-well plates, both for their ability to discriminate the enantiomers of hydrobenzoin and to find their optimal pairing with indicators resulting in the largest optical responses. The best receptor/indicator combination was then used to train an artificial neural network to determine concentration and ee. To prove the practicality of the developed protocol, analysis plates were created containing true unknown samples of hydrobenzoin generated by established Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation reactions, and the best ligand was correctly identified.

  14. ATYPICAL AUTISM IN CHILDREN: THE SPECIFIC FEATURES OF THEIR SOMATIC AND NEUROLOGICAL STATUS AND OUTPATIENT FOLLOW-UP BY A GENERAL PEDIATRICIAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Bobylоva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders in children are attracting the increasing attention of general practitioners, which is due to the specification of diagnostic criteria and to the recognition of the fact that there is atypical autism that is a syndrome of many different diseases. The authors consider in detail the theory of autism and the clinical manifestations of atypical autism, including possible neurological and somatic disorders. Individual attention is placed on the association of autistic disorder with epilepsy or epileptiform activity on the electroencephalogram. An emphasis is made on the need for an interdisciplinary approach and on the interaction of clinicians of different specialties when treating patients with autistic disorder.

  15. Generalized method for computation of true thickness and x-ray intensity information in highly blurred sub-millimeter bone features in clinical CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakdel, Amirreza; Robert, Normand; Fialkov, Jeffrey; Maloul, Asmaa; Whyne, Cari

    2012-12-07

    In clinical computed tomography (CT) images, cortical bone features with sub-millimeter (sub-mm) thickness are substantially blurred, such that their thickness is overestimated and their intensity appears underestimated. Therefore, any inquiry of the geometry or the density of such bones based on these images is severely error prone. We present a model-based method for estimating the true thickness and intensity magnitude of cortical and trabecular bone layers at localized regions of complex shell bones down to 0.25 mm. The method also computes the width of the corresponding point spread function. This approach is applicable on any CT image data, and does not rely on any scanner-specific parameter inputs beyond what is inherently available in the images themselves. The method applied on CT intensity profiles of custom phantoms mimicking shell-bones produced average cortical thickness errors of 0.07 ± 0.04 mm versus an average error of 0.47 ± 0.29 mm in the untreated cases (t(55) = 10.92, p ≪ 0.001)). Similarly, the average error of intensity magnitude estimates of the method were 22 ± 2.2 HU versus an error of 445 ± 137 HU in the untreated cases (t(55) = 26.48, p ≪ 0.001)). The method was also used to correct the CT intensity profiles from a cadaveric specimen of the craniofacial skeleton (CFS) in 15 different regions. There was excellent agreement between the corrections and µCT intensity profiles of the same regions used as a 'gold standard' measure. These results set the groundwork towards restoring cortical bone geometry and intensity information in entire image data sets. This information is essential for the generation of finite element models of the CFS that can accurately describe the biomechanical behavior of its complex thin bone structures.

  16. Multiple sclerosis: a geographical hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlyle, I P

    1997-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis remains a rare neurological disease of unknown aetiology, with a unique distribution, both geographically and historically. Rare in equatorial regions, it becomes increasingly common in higher latitudes; historically, it was first clinically recognized in the early nineteenth century. A hypothesis, based on geographical reasoning, is here proposed: that the disease is the result of a specific vitamin deficiency. Different individuals suffer the deficiency in separate and often unique ways. Evidence to support the hypothesis exists in cultural considerations, in the global distribution of the disease, and in its historical prevalence.

  17. Suicide attempts in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, Elsebeth Nylev; Jensen, Børge; Stenager, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of the study were (1) to estimate the risk of suicide attempts in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in Denmark and compare the risk to the background population in the County of Funen, Denmark; (2) to estimate the risk of suicide attempts in MS patients receiving immunomodulating...... therapy compared with untreated patients. The Danish MS Registry, the Danish MS Treatment Registry and the Suicide Attempt Registry are linked and merged together using a person identification number given to all persons residing in Denmark. Among 404 MS patients, 15 patients had attempted suicide...

  18. [Special cases of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendibe Bilbao, Mar

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic disease that usually occurs in young people and affects them for the rest of their lives. Patients and their families usually have a series of doubts and questions on everyday matters and all types of situations that occur during the distinct stages of life and which can influence the course of the disease. The aim of this review is to provide specific answers to these questions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Symptomatic management in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushkar Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the commonest cause of disability in young adults. While there is increasing choice and better treatments available for delaying disease progression, there are still, very few, effective symptomatic treatments. For many patients such as those with primary progressive MS (PPMS and those that inevitably become secondary progressive, symptom management is the only treatment available. MS related symptoms are complex, interrelated, and can be interdependent. It requires good understanding of the condition, a holistic multidisciplinary approach, and above all, patient education and empowerment.

  20. Clinical neurogenetics: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Matthew B; Baloh, Robert H

    2013-11-01

    Our understanding of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease, is expanding rapidly as its genetic causes are uncovered. The pace of new gene discovery over the last 5 years has accelerated, providing new insights into the pathogenesis of disease and highlighting biological pathways as targets for therapeutic development. This article reviews our current understanding of the heritability of ALS and provides an overview of each of the major ALS genes, highlighting their phenotypic characteristics and frequencies as a guide for clinicians evaluating patients with ALS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical Neurogenetics: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Matthew B.; Baloh, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease, about which our understanding is expanding rapidly as its genetic causes are uncovered. The pace of new gene discovery over the last 5 years has accelerated, providing new insights into the pathogenesis of disease and highlighting biological pathways for target for therapeutic development. This article reviews our current understanding of the heritability of ALS, provides an overview of each of the major ALS genes, highlighting their phenotypic characteristics and frequencies as a guide for clinicians evaluating patients with ALS. PMID:24176417

  2. Comorbidity in US patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards NC

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Natalie C Edwards,1 Michael Munsell,2 Joseph Menzin,2 Amy L Phillips3 1Health Services Consulting Corporation (NCE, Boxborough, MA, USA; 2Boston Health Economics, Inc., Waltham, MA, USA; 3EMD Serono, Inc., Rockland, MA, USA Objective: To assess the trends in the prevalence of comorbidities in US patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, and the association of demographic characteristics with the presence of comorbidities. Study design: A retrospective analysis was conducted from a sample of 5 million patients from the IMS Health Real World Data Adjudicated Claims – US database.Methods: Comorbidity in patients with MS was assessed by year (2006–2014, and logistic regression models evaluated the association of age, sex, and region with select comorbidities.Results: The most common comorbidities from 2006 to 2014 were hyperlipidemia and hypertension (25.9%–29.7% of patients within an individual year, followed by gastrointestinal disease (18.4%–21.2% of patients and thyroid disease (12.9%–17.1% of patients. The proportion with a claim for hyperlipidemia increased from 2006 to 2009, was stable from 2009 to 2011, and then declined from 2011 to 2014. The proportion with a claim for hypertension generally increased from 2006 to 2013, then declined from 2013 to 2014. The proportion with a claim for gastrointestinal disease, thyroid disease, and anxiety generally increased from 2006 to 2014. Claims for comorbidities were statistically significantly more likely among older age groups (p<0.05, with the exception of anxiety and alcohol abuse, which were statistically significantly less likely among older age groups. Claims for gastrointestinal disease (OR=0.75, thyroid disease (OR=0.36, chronic lung disease (OR=0.76, arthritis (OR=0.71, anxiety (OR=0.63, and depression (OR=0.69 were statistically significantly less likely among males versus females (all p<0.05. Claims for hyperlipidemia (OR=1.39, hypertension (OR=1.25, diabetes (OR=1.31, and alcohol

  3. Incorporating Data Link Features into a Multi-Function Display to Support Self-Separation and Spacing Tasks for General Aviation Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine A.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.; Consiglio, Maria C.; WIlliams, Daniel M.

    2005-01-01

    One objective of the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) Higher Volume Operations (HVO) project is to increase the capacity and utilization of small non-towered, non-radar equipped airports by transferring traffic management activities to an automated Airport Management Module (AMM) and separation responsibilities to general aviation (GA) pilots. Implementation of this concept required the development of a research Multi-Function Display (MFD) to support the interactive communications between pilots and the AMM. The interface also had to accommodate traffic awareness, self-separation, and spacing tasks through dynamic messaging and symbology for flight path conformance and conflict detection and alerting (CDA). The display served as the mechanism to support the examination of the viability of executing instrument operations designed for SATS designated airports. Results of simulation and flight experiments conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Langley Research Center indicate that the concept, as facilitated by the research MFD, did not increase pilots subjective workload levels or reduce their situation awareness (SA). Post-test usability assessments revealed that pilots preferred using the enhanced MFD to execute flight procedures, reporting improved SA over conventional instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures.

  4. Health-related quality of life in Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakpour, Amir H.; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Mohammadi, Nastaran Keshavarz

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study aimed to evaluate aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who live in Tehran and to compare data with evaluations of both the general population and MS patients in other countries Material and methods: One hundr...

  5. Health-related quality of life in Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakpour, Amir H.; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Mohammadi, Nastaran Keshavarz

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who live in Tehran and to compare data with evaluations of both the general population and MS patients in other countries. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hund...

  6. Natalizumab treatment for multiple sclerosis: updated recommendations for patient selection and monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappos, Ludwig; Bates, David; Edan, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Natalizumab, a highly specific a4-integrin antagonist, is approved for treatment of patients with active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). It is generally recommended for individuals who have not responded to a currently available first-line disease-modifying therapy or who have very...

  7. Acute and chronic cytokine responses to resistance exercise and training in people with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølhede, Tue; Dalgas, Ulrik; Brolin Gade, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is a well-established part of rehabilitation for people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), and it has been hypothesized to stimulate an anti-inflammatory environment that might be disease modifying. Yet, investigations on exercise-induced immune responses are scarce and generally not paying...

  8. Seizure characteristics in multiple sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate seizure characteristic among multiple sclerosis patients with coexistent seizure activity compared to control group. Materials and Methods : This study is a cross-sectional study which was conducted by reviewing the clinical records of patients with definite diagnosis of MS according to McDonald′s criteria from March 2007 to June 2011, who referred to the MS clinic of the university. Results : A total of 920 patients with a diagnosis of MS were identified, among whom 29 patients (3.15% with seizure activity (case due to MS with the mean age of 32.6 ± 6.23 years were analyzed. Also, fifty MS patients without any seizure occurrence with the mean age of 33.7 ± 7.4 years were used as our control group. In case group, seizure was general tonic clonic in 23 patients (79.3%, complex partial in four (13.8%, and simple partial in two (5.9%. The 26 available interictal EEGs in MS patients showed abnormal EEG pattern in 22 (84.6% of them, including focal epileptic form discharge or focal slowing in 10 (38.5%, generalized discharge (spike-wave, polyspike, or general paroxysmal fast activity in 10 (38.5%, and general slowing activity in 10 record (38.5%. MRI reviews of the 26 available brain MRIs showed subcortical white mater lesions in 22 (84.6% of patients with seizure. All MRIs were performed within one month after the first seizure episode. Amongst 48 available MRIs in our control group, 91.7% (44 cases showed periventricular lesions and in 8.3% (4 cases subcortical white matter lesions were reported. Conclusion : The result of this study demonstrated the higher rate of subcortical whit matter lesion in MS patients with seizure occurrence compared to control group.

  9. Imaging Surrogates of Disease Activity in Neuromyelitis Optica Allow Distinction from Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lucy; Kolind, Shannon; Brazier, Alix; Leite, Maria Isabel; Brooks, Jonathan; Traboulsee, Anthony; Jenkinson, Mark; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Palace, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory demyelinating lesions of the central nervous system are a common feature of both neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis. Despite this similarity, it is evident clinically that the accumulation of disability in patients with neuromyelitis optica is relapse related and that a progressive phase is very uncommon. This poses the question whether there is any pathological evidence of disease activity or neurodegeneration in neuromyelitis optica between relapses. To investigate this we conducted a longitudinal advanced MRI study of the brain and spinal cord in neuromyelitis optica patients, comparing to patients with multiple sclerosis and controls. We found both cross-sectional and longitudinal evidence of diffusely distributed neurodegenerative surrogates in the multiple sclerosis group (including thalamic atrophy, cervical cord atrophy and progressive widespread diffusion and myelin water imaging abnormalities in the normal appearing white matter) but not in those with neuromyelitis optica, where localised abnormalities in the optic radiations of those with severe visual impairment were noted. In addition, between relapses, there were no new silent brain lesions in the neuromyelitis optica group. These findings indicate that global central nervous system neurodegeneration is not a feature of neuromyelitis optica. The work also questions the theory that neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis is a chronic sequela to prior inflammatory and demyelinating pathology, as this has not been found to be the case in neuromyelitis optica where the lesions are often more destructive.

  10. Imaging Surrogates of Disease Activity in Neuromyelitis Optica Allow Distinction from Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Matthews

    Full Text Available Inflammatory demyelinating lesions of the central nervous system are a common feature of both neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis. Despite this similarity, it is evident clinically that the accumulation of disability in patients with neuromyelitis optica is relapse related and that a progressive phase is very uncommon. This poses the question whether there is any pathological evidence of disease activity or neurodegeneration in neuromyelitis optica between relapses. To investigate this we conducted a longitudinal advanced MRI study of the brain and spinal cord in neuromyelitis optica patients, comparing to patients with multiple sclerosis and controls. We found both cross-sectional and longitudinal evidence of diffusely distributed neurodegenerative surrogates in the multiple sclerosis group (including thalamic atrophy, cervical cord atrophy and progressive widespread diffusion and myelin water imaging abnormalities in the normal appearing white matter but not in those with neuromyelitis optica, where localised abnormalities in the optic radiations of those with severe visual impairment were noted. In addition, between relapses, there were no new silent brain lesions in the neuromyelitis optica group. These findings indicate that global central nervous system neurodegeneration is not a feature of neuromyelitis optica. The work also questions the theory that neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis is a chronic sequela to prior inflammatory and demyelinating pathology, as this has not been found to be the case in neuromyelitis optica where the lesions are often more destructive.

  11. Mucocutaneous changes in tuberous sclerosis complex: A clinical profile of 27 Indian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Sudip

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant neurocutaneous disease resulting in a wide array of clinical manifestations, primarily affecting the skin and central nervous system. Mucocutaneous features play a very important role in the recognition of this syndrome. Aims: To review the prevalence and patterns of cutaneous manifestations in tuberous sclerosis, in a group of patients from eastern India. Methods: Observational clinical study on twenty-seven consecutive patients of tuberous sclerosis collected during a period of four years. Results: Most were between 10-20 years of age; the male to female ratio was 2:1. Family history was found in two-thirds. The classical triad of tuberous sclerosis was present in only nine (33.3% patients. Adenoma sebaceum was the most common cutaneous feature (100%, followed by hypomelanotic macules (92.6%, connective tissue nevi (66.6%, and Koenen′s tumors (33.3%. Oral mucosal fibromas were seen in six (22.22% patients. Fibromatous plaque over forehead and scalp was seen in three patients. Limitation of the study was small size of study sample. Conclusion: Prominent mucocutaneous changes are extremely common manifestation of TSC, which may provide crucial diagnostic clues for primary care physicians.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Barker, G J; MacKay, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The theory of relaxation processes and their measurements are described. An overview is presented of the literature on relaxation time measurements in the normal and the developing brain, in experimental diseases in animals, and in patients with multiple sclerosis. RESULTS...... AND CONCLUSION: Relaxation time measurements provide insight into development of multiple sclerosis plaques, especially the occurrence of oedema, demyelination, and gliosis. There is also evidence that normal appearing white matter in patients with multiple sclerosis is affected. What is now needed are fast...

  13. Erasmus Syndrome: Silicosis and Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shubhra; Joshi, Vinod; Rathore, Yogendra S; Khippal, Narendra

    2017-01-01

    Several occupational hazards, especially exposure to silica, have been implicated as causal factors for the development of scleroderma-like disorders. Compared to other connective tissue disorders, silica-associated systemic sclerosis (SA-SS) is relatively rare. Silica-induced scleroderma is indistinguishable from idiopathic systemic sclerosis. However, the former expresses a high predisposition of pulmonary involvement and anti-Scl-70 antibody. We report the case of a 42-year-old male, stone cutter by occupation, who was diagnosed as simple chronic silicosis and developed systemic sclerosis.

  14. Diffusion Tensor Imaging as a Biomarker to Differentiate Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis From Multiple Sclerosis at First Demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Wint Yan; Massoumzadeh, Parinaz; Najmi, Safa; Salter, Amber; Heaps, Jodi; Benzinger, Tammie L S; Mar, Soe

    2018-01-01

    There are no clinical features or biomarkers that can reliably differentiate acute disseminated encephalomyelitis from multiple sclerosis at the first demyelination attack. Consequently, a final diagnosis is sometimes delayed by months and years of follow-up. Early treatment for multiple sclerosis is recommended to reduce long-term disability. Therefore, we intend to explore neuroimaging biomarkers that can reliably distinguish between the two diagnoses. We reviewed prospectively collected clinical, standard MRI and diffusion tensor imaging data from 12 pediatric patients who presented with acute demyelination with and without encephalopathy. Patients were followed for an average of 6.5 years to determine the accuracy of final diagnosis. Final diagnosis was determined using 2013 International Pediatric MS Study Group criteria. Control subjects consisted of four age-matched healthy individuals for each patient. The study population consisted of six patients with central nervous system demyelination with encephalopathy with a presumed diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and six without encephalopathy with a presumed diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or clinically isolated syndrome at high risk for multiple sclerosis. During follow-up, two patients with initial diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis were later diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Diffusion tensor imaging region of interest analysis of baseline scans showed differences between final diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis patients, whereby low fractional anisotropy and high radial diffusivity occurred in multiple sclerosis patients compared with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis patients and the age-matched controls. Fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity measures may have the potential to serve as biomarkers for distinguishing acute disseminated encephalomyelitis from multiple sclerosis at the onset. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  15. Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Etesam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment can emerge in the earliest phases of multiple sclerosis. It strongly impacts different aspects of Multiple Sclerosis (MS patients' lives, like employment, social relationships and the overall quality of life; thus, its on-time recognition and treatment is mandatory. This paper discusses issues, diagnostic methods and treatment options for cognitive dysfunctions in MS. This paper is a descriptive review of the related studies in the recent 10 years, performing a keyword search in the main databases4T. Cognitive impairment mostly involves aspects of information processing, memory and executive functioning in MS. Neuropsychological tests like MACFIMS and BRB-N are recommended for its assessment. Still, there is no fully efficient treatment for cognitive impairment. Researchers have shown some positive effects, using disease-modifying therapies and cognitive rehabilitation. Depression, pain, fatigue and other factors influencing cognitive functions must be paid attention to4T. Recognizing cognitive impairment as a major symptom for MS, makes studying this subject one of the priorities in dealing with the disease. Therefore, a consecutive research for identification and management of this part of quality of life in MS patients is obligatory4T.4T

  16. Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, B.B.; Elsas, L.J.; Wyly, J.B.; Pasquali, M.

    1994-01-01

    Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis (OS-CS) is a specific bone dysplasia manifested by hypertelorism, flat nasal bridge, frontal bossing, large head, hypoplastic maxilla, palate anomalies, chronic otitis media, hearing deficits, nasal obstruction, and neurological changes of deafness, facial palsy, ophthalmoplegia, and mental retardation. We will review the clinical and radiologic findings in a new patient from birth to 20 years; this is believed to be the thirty-fifth patient reported. OS-CS is 2.5 times more common in females and occurs as an autosomal dominant condition or a sporadic dominant mutation with patients presenting for evaluation from the newborn period to the fifth decade. Skeletal abnormalities are distinctive including sclerosis of the skull base and calvarium, linear striated densities in the long bones and pelvis, and poor development of the mastoid and sinus air cells. Radionuclide bone scans with SPECT indicated in our patient increased bone turnover which was supported by biochemical findings of increased pyridinoline excretion. The major complications are due to constriction of essential foramina at the skull base. The condition is not life-threatening but can produce disability. (orig.)

  17. The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, E.A.C.M.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis describes recently developed research methods for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. In Chapter X the use of the CT-scan in the detection of hemispheral or cerebellar lesions is discussed. In chapter XIII the results of the application of all methods to a group of 89 patients with definite, probable or possible multiple sclerosis and to a group of 25 purely optic neuritis patients are presented. With the aid of the CT-scan, hypo- or hyperdense areas in the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres were found in 52% of the 114 patients. Most reports ascribe these lesions to demyelinating cerebral plaques. The CT-scan showed no cerebellar or brainstem lesions. The CT-scan is independent of the duration of, and degree of incapacitation due to, the disease and can be helpful in giving a definite diagnosis in an early stage of the disease. The CT-scan will always play an important role for the differential diagnosis. (Auth.)

  18. Calcium Channel Blockers and Esophageal Sclerosis: Should We Expect Exacerbation of Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Seretis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal sclerosis is the most common visceral manifestation of systemic sclerosis, resulting in impaired esophageal clearance and retention of ingested food; in addition, co-existence of lung fibrosis with esophageal scleroderma is not uncommon. Both the progression of generalized connective tissue disorders and the damaging effect of chronic aspiration due to esophageal dysmotility appear to be involved in this procedure of interstitial fibrosis. Nifedipine is a widely prescribed calcium antagonist in a significant percentage of rheumatologic patients suffering from Raynaud syndrome, in order to inhibit peripheral vasospasm. Nevertheless, blocking calcium channels has proven to contribute to exacerbation of gastroesophageal reflux, which consequently can lead to chronic aspiration. We describe the case of severe exacerbation of interstitial lung disease in a 76-year-old female with esophageal sclerosis who was treated with oral nifedipine for Raynaud syndrome.

  19. Radiological changes of the hands of systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, B.; Serup, J.; Hagdrup, H.

    1983-01-01

    Radiological examination of the hands was performed in 41 patients with systemic sclerosis. Pathological changes were found in 39 patients. Eighteen patients had subcutaneous calcifications and 11 had atrophy of the finger pulps. Bone resorption of ungual tufts was found in 11 patients. Juxta-articular osteoporosis was seen in 9 patients and periarticular bone erosions in 8 patients indicating erosive arthropathy. Osteoarthritis and generalized osteoporosis were seen in 10 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiological examination of the hands is recommended during treatment. (Authors)

  20. Multiple sclerosis pathogenesis: missing pieces of an old puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanzadeh, Reza; Brück, Wolfgang; Minagar, Alireza; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali

    2018-06-08

    Traditionally, multiple sclerosis (MS) was considered to be a CD4 T cell-mediated CNS autoimmunity, compatible with experimental autoimmune encephalitis model, which can be characterized by focal lesions in the white matter. However, studies of recent decades revealed several missing pieces of MS puzzle and showed that MS pathogenesis is more complex than the traditional view and may include the following: a primary degenerative process (e.g. oligodendroglial pathology), generalized abnormality of normal-appearing brain tissue, pronounced gray matter pathology, involvement of innate immunity, and CD8 T cells and B cells. Here, we review these findings and discuss their implications in MS pathogenesis.

  1. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, S.D.; Devereux, C.; Troiano, R.; Hafstein, M.P.; Zito, G.; Hernandez, E.; Lavenhar, M.; Vidaver, R.; Dowling, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI; 1980 cGy) or sham irradiation was given to 40 patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) in a prospective, randomised, double-blind study. During mean follow-up of 21 months, MS patients treated with TLI has less functional decline than sham-irradiated MS patients (p<0.01). A significant relation was noted between absolute blood lymphocyte counts in the first year after TLI and subsequent course, patients with higher lymphocyte counts generally having a worse prognosis (p<0.01). TLI was well tolerated and associated with only mild short-term, and to date, long-term side-effects. (author)

  2. Survival of patients with multiple sclerosis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Hyllested, K

    1994-01-01

    We estimated survival probability and excess death rates for patients with MS on the basis of data from the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry, which includes virtually all patients diagnosed with MS in Denmark (population, five million) since 1948. We reviewed and reclassified all case records...... in women (versus 46 years). The median survival time from diagnosis was 22 years in men (versus 37 years) and 28 years in women (versus 42 years). The excess death rate between onset and follow-up (observed deaths per 1,000 person-years minus the expected number of deaths in a matched general population...

  3. Feature Extraction

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Feature selection and reduction are key to robust multivariate analyses. In this talk I will focus on pros and cons of various variable selection methods and focus on those that are most relevant in the context of HEP.

  4. Solar Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of solar feature datasets contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide.

  5. Site Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of various site features from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times...

  6. Respiratory muscle training for multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietberg, Marc B.; Veerbeek, Janne M.; Gosselink, Rik; Kwakkel, Gert; van Wegen, Erwin E.H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system, affecting approximately 2.5 million people worldwide. People with MS may experience limitations in muscular strength and endurance - including the respiratory muscles, affecting functional performance and

  7. Localized Scleroderma, Systemic Sclerosis and Cardiovascular Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselvig, Jeanette Halskou; Kofoed, Kristian; Wu, Jashin J

    2018-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that patients with systemic sclerosis have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. To determine whether patients with systemic sclerosis or localized scleroderma are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, a cohort study of the entire Danish population aged ≥ 18...... and ≤ 100 years was conducted, followed from 1997 to 2011 by individual-level linkage of nationwide registries. Multivariable adjusted Cox regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) for a composite cardiovascular disease endpoint. A total of 697 patients with localized scleroderma and 1......,962 patients with systemic sclerosis were identified and compared with 5,428,380 people in the reference population. In systemic sclerosis, the adjusted HR was 2.22 (95% confidence interval 1.99-2.48). No association was seen between patients with localized scleroderma and cardiovascular disease. In conclusion...

  8. Defining the clinical course of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lublin, Fred D; Reingold, Stephen C; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Accurate clinical course descriptions (phenotypes) of multiple sclerosis (MS) are important for communication, prognostication, design and recruitment of clinical trials, and treatment decision-making. Standardized descriptions published in 1996 based on a survey of international MS experts...

  9. Recent advances in multiple sclerosis therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonsette, R.E.; Delmotte, P.

    1989-01-01

    Seven papers in this volume are in INIS scope, one dealing with autoradiographic detection of multiple sclerosis plaques with radiologands, and the others with magnetic resonance imaging of MS lesions. (H.W.). refs.; figs.; tabs

  10. Nutritional management of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: intradialytic parenteral nutrition, nutritional management, encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis ... reflection of fluid retention and the underlying inflammatory process, ... The patient appeared weak and frail, with severe generalised muscle ... was recommended on diagnosis of EPS to prevent further peritoneal.

  11. Plasma homocysteine levels in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramsaransing, G S M; Fokkema, M R; Teelken, A; Arutjunyan, A V; Koch, M; De Keyser, J

    Background: There is evidence that homocysteine contributes to various neurodegenerative disorders, and elevated plasma homocysteine levels have been observed in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective: To investigate if and why plasma homocysteine levels are increased in MS, and whether

  12. On the Relation between the General Affective Meaning and the Basic Sublexical, Lexical, and Inter-lexical Features of Poetic Texts-A Case Study Using 57 Poems of H. M. Enzensberger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Susann; Aryani, Arash; Kraxenberger, Maria; Jacobs, Arthur M; Conrad, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The literary genre of poetry is inherently related to the expression and elicitation of emotion via both content and form. To explore the nature of this affective impact at an extremely basic textual level, we collected ratings on eight different general affective meaning scales-valence, arousal, friendliness, sadness, spitefulness, poeticity, onomatopoeia, and liking-for 57 German poems (" die verteidigung der wölfe ") which the contemporary author H. M. Enzensberger had labeled as either "friendly," "sad," or "spiteful." Following Jakobson's (1960) view on the vivid interplay of hierarchical text levels, we used multiple regression analyses to explore the specific influences of affective features from three different text levels (sublexical, lexical, and inter-lexical) on the perceived general affective meaning of the poems using three types of predictors: (1) Lexical predictor variables capturing the mean valence and arousal potential of words; (2) Inter-lexical predictors quantifying peaks, ranges, and dynamic changes within the lexical affective content; (3) Sublexical measures of basic affective tone according to sound-meaning correspondences at the sublexical level (see Aryani et al., 2016). We find the lexical predictors to account for a major amount of up to 50% of the variance in affective ratings. Moreover, inter-lexical and sublexical predictors account for a large portion of additional variance in the perceived general affective meaning . Together, the affective properties of all used textual features account for 43-70% of the variance in the affective ratings and still for 23-48% of the variance in the more abstract aesthetic ratings. In sum, our approach represents a novel method that successfully relates a prominent part of variance in perceived general affective meaning in this corpus of German poems to quantitative estimates of affective properties of textual components at the sublexical, lexical, and inter-lexical level.

  13. On the Relation between the General Affective Meaning and the Basic Sublexical, Lexical, and Inter-lexical Features of Poetic Texts—A Case Study Using 57 Poems of H. M. Enzensberger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Susann; Aryani, Arash; Kraxenberger, Maria; Jacobs, Arthur M.; Conrad, Markus

    2017-01-01

    The literary genre of poetry is inherently related to the expression and elicitation of emotion via both content and form. To explore the nature of this affective impact at an extremely basic textual level, we collected ratings on eight different general affective meaning scales—valence, arousal, friendliness, sadness, spitefulness, poeticity, onomatopoeia, and liking—for 57 German poems (“die verteidigung der wölfe”) which the contemporary author H. M. Enzensberger had labeled as either “friendly,” “sad,” or “spiteful.” Following Jakobson's (1960) view on the vivid interplay of hierarchical text levels, we used multiple regression analyses to explore the specific influences of affective features from three different text levels (sublexical, lexical, and inter-lexical) on the perceived general affective meaning of the poems using three types of predictors: (1) Lexical predictor variables capturing the mean valence and arousal potential of words; (2) Inter-lexical predictors quantifying peaks, ranges, and dynamic changes within the lexical affective content; (3) Sublexical measures of basic affective tone according to sound-meaning correspondences at the sublexical level (see Aryani et al., 2016). We find the lexical predictors to account for a major amount of up to 50% of the variance in affective ratings. Moreover, inter-lexical and sublexical predictors account for a large portion of additional variance in the perceived general affective meaning. Together, the affective properties of all used textual features account for 43–70% of the variance in the affective ratings and still for 23–48% of the variance in the more abstract aesthetic ratings. In sum, our approach represents a novel method that successfully relates a prominent part of variance in perceived general affective meaning in this corpus of German poems to quantitative estimates of affective properties of textual components at the sublexical, lexical, and inter-lexical level

  14. Attributional Style and Depression in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Several etiologic theories have been proposed to explain depression in the general population. Studying these models and modifying them for use in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population may allow us to better understand depression in MS. According to the reformulated learned helplessness (LH) theory, individuals who attribute negative events to internal, stable, and global causes are more vulnerable to depression. This study differentiated attributional style that was or was not related to MS in 52 patients with MS to test the LH theory in this population and to determine possible differences between illness-related and non-illness-related attributions. Patients were administered measures of attributional style, daily stressors, disability, and depressive symptoms. Participants were more likely to list non-MS-related than MS-related causes of negative events on the Attributional Style Questionnaire (ASQ), and more-disabled participants listed significantly more MS-related causes than did less-disabled individuals. Non-MS-related attributional style correlated with stress and depressive symptoms, but MS-related attributional style did not correlate with disability or depressive symptoms. Stress mediated the effect of non-MS-related attributional style on depressive symptoms. These results suggest that, although attributional style appears to be an important construct in MS, it does not seem to be related directly to depressive symptoms; rather, it is related to more perceived stress, which in turn is related to increased depressive symptoms. PMID:24453767

  15. Cognitive impairment in relapsing remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saška Roškar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to identify changes in cognitive abilities that affect patients with relapsing remitting form of multiple sclerosis (MS and to find out which instrument manifests them best. The performance of MS patients was compared to a matched group of healthy people using three neuropsychological tests: Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST, Stroop color and word test and Trail making test (TMT part B. Results on all three tests indicate general cognitive impairments in the group of patients. Compared to the group of healthy people patients with MS exhibited impaired ability of abstract reasoning (WCST, impaired cognitive flexibility and less resistance to irrelevant stimuli (Stroop color and word test, slowed information processing and impaired ability of shifting attention from one symbol to another (TMT. The largest differences between groups occured in Stroop color and word test as well as in TMT. The estimation of cognitive abilities of MS patients is of high importance and sistematicaly observing of changes in those abilities should be considered.

  16. Effects of Sport Climbing on Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Steimer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS with different types of disease courses (relapsing-remitting, secondary-progressive, primary progressive that leads to physical as well as mental disability. The symptoms comprise paresis or/and paralysis, ataxia, bladder dysfunction, visual problems as well as effects on cognition. There is limited data regarding the possible effects of sport climbing respectively therapeutic climbing on patients with MS. Sport climbing offers many potentially beneficial effects for patients with MS since there are effects on coordination, muscular strength, and cognition to name the most relevant ones. Also, disease models in rodents point toward such positive outcomes of climbing. Therefore, we assessed the currently available research literature on general effects of physical exercise, impact of climbing on body and mind and therapeutic climbing for prevention or therapy for the treatment of MS. The sparse published controlled trials that investigated this sport activity on different groups of patients with neurological or geriatric diseases grossly differ in study design and outcome parameters. Nevertheless, it appears that climbing offers the opportunity to improve some of the symptoms of patients with MS and can contribute to an enhanced quality of life.

  17. Unusual renal angiomyolipoma in tuberous sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    A patient with tuberous sclerosis and a normal intravenous urogram 5 years previously presented with a large and palpable upper pole renal mass. Since patients with tuberous sclerosis have small bilateral hamartomas, a Wilms' tumor was suspected. In retrospect, inhomogeneous nephrograms should have alerted the radiologist to the multiplicity of other small lesions. Also, a partially lucent rim should have substantiated that the lesion was not a Wilms' tumor. (orig.) [de

  18. Cavernous angioma associated with ipsilateral hippocampal sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okujava, M.; Ebner, A.; Schmitt, J.; Woermann, F.G.

    2002-01-01

    We report two cases with extratemporal cavernous angioma (CA) and coexisting ipsilateral hippocampal sclerosis. Classically dual pathology is defined as the association of hippocampal sclerosis with an extrahippocampal lesion. Subtle changes in hippocampus might be overlooked in the presence of an unequivocal extrahippocampal abnormality. Seizure outcome after epilepsy surgery in cases with dual pathology is less favourable if only one of the lesions is removed. Dual pathology must always be considered in diagnostic imaging of patients with intractable epilepsy and CA. (orig.)

  19. Cavernous angioma associated with ipsilateral hippocampal sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okujava, M [Institute of Radiology and Interventional Diagnostics, Tbilisi (Georgia); Ebner, A; Schmitt, J; Woermann, F G [Bethel Epilepsy Centre, Mara Hospital, Bielefeld (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    We report two cases with extratemporal cavernous angioma (CA) and coexisting ipsilateral hippocampal sclerosis. Classically dual pathology is defined as the association of hippocampal sclerosis with an extrahippocampal lesion. Subtle changes in hippocampus might be overlooked in the presence of an unequivocal extrahippocampal abnormality. Seizure outcome after epilepsy surgery in cases with dual pathology is less favourable if only one of the lesions is removed. Dual pathology must always be considered in diagnostic imaging of patients with intractable epilepsy and CA. (orig.)

  20. Gait Characteristics in Adolescents With Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalron, Alon; Frid, Lior; Menascu, Shay

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a progressive autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. A presentation of multiple sclerosis before age18 years has traditionally been thought to be rare. However, during the past decade, more cases have been reported. We examined gait characteristics in 24 adolescents with multiple sclerosis (12 girls, 12 boys). Mean disease duration was 20.4 (S.D. = 24.9) months and mean age was 15.5 (S.D. = 1.1) years. The mean expanded disability status scale score was 1.7 (S.D. = 0.7) indicating minimal disability. Outcomes were compared with gait and the gait variability index value of healthy age-matched adolescents. Adolescents with multiple sclerosis walked slower with a wider base of support compared with age-matched healthy control subjects. Moreover, the gait variability index was lower in the multiple sclerosis group compared with the values in the healthy adolescents: 85.4 (S.D. = 8.1) versus 96.5 (S.D. = 7.4). We present gait parameters of adolescents with multiple sclerosis. From a clinical standpoint, our data could improve management of walking dysfunction in this relatively young population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Statin treatment in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl-Jensen, Gorm; Tsakiri, Anna; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that leads to progressive disability. Statins [hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors] are widely prescribed drugs in hypercholesterolemia. They exert immunomodulatory and neurotrophic effects and are attractive...... candidates for MS treatment due to reliable safety profiles and favorable costs. Studies of statins in a murine MS model and in open-label trials in MS have shown decreased disease severity. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to assess current evidence to support statin treatment in MS and clinically isolated......)-β treatment in RRMS, one of statin monotherapy in CIS, one of statin monotherapy in optic neuritis (ON)/CIS, and one of statin monotherapy in secondary progressive MS (SPMS)]. Three trials with eligible characteristics had not been published in peer-reviewed journals and were therefore not included. Due...

  2. Implicit Memory in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Latchford

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of neuropsychological studies have revealed that memory problems are relatively common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. It may be useful to compare MS with conditions such as Huntington's disease (HD, which have been referred to as subcortical dementia. A characteristic of these conditions may be an impairment in implicit (unconscious memory, but not in explicit (conscious memory. The present study examined the functioning of explicit and implicit memory in MS. Results showed that implicit memory was not significantly impaired in the MS subjects, and that they were impaired on recall but not recognition. A correlation was found between implicit memory performance and disability status in MS patients. Findings also suggest the possibility of long-term priming of implicit memory in the control subjects. The implications of these results are discussed.

  3. Recurrent myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis: a case report of a child with Schilder's variant of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, M.J.; Coleman, L.T.

    2000-01-01

    Myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis (MDS, Schilder's disease) is a rare CNS demyelinating disorder affecting mainly children and usually presenting as an intracranial mass lesion. We report the first case of recurrent intracranial MDS where the third episode of demyelination involved the cervical spinal cord. This may represent a subset of the disease, which should be considered as Schilder's variant (childhood form) of multiple sclerosis. (orig.)

  4. Motor neuron disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) arising from longstanding primary lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, R. P.; Koelman, J. H.; Troost, D.; de Jong, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Three men were initially diagnosed as having primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), but eventually developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) after 7.5, 9, and at least 27 years. Non-familial ALS and PLS might be different manifestations of a single disease or constitute completely distinct entities.

  5. No evidence of association between optic neuritis and secondary LHON mtDNA mutations in patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andalib, Sasan; Talebi, Mahnaz; Sakhinia, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) shares features with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Both diseases develop optic lesions. Frequent secondary LHON mutations in MS patients may explain the optic damage. Here, we tested the hypothesis that secondary LHON mutations are associated with optic...

  6. Development of hypomelanotic macules is associated with constitutive activated mTORC1 in tuberous sclerosis complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Schönewolf-Greulich, Bitten; Rosengren, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    TSC1 and TSC2 are genes mutated in the syndrome TSC (tuberous sclerosis complex). We describe a 3-generation family with 17 affected members, all presenting classic TSC features except renal manifestations. The disease segregates with a silent substitution in TSC2, c.4149C>T, p.(Ser1838Ser), whic...

  7. Multimodal exercise training in multiple sclerosis: A randomized controlled trial in persons with substantial mobility disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandroff, Brian M; Bollaert, Rachel E; Pilutti, Lara A; Peterson, Melissa L; Baynard, Tracy; Fernhall, Bo; McAuley, Edward; Motl, Robert W

    2017-10-01

    Mobility disability is a common, debilitating feature of multiple sclerosis (MS). Exercise training has been identified as an approach to improve MS-related mobility disability. However, exercise randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on mobility in MS have generally not selectively targeted those with the onset of irreversible mobility disability. The current multi-site RCT compared the efficacy of 6-months of supervised, multimodal exercise training with an active control condition for improving mobility, gait, physical fitness, and cognitive outcomes in persons with substantial MS-related mobility disability. 83 participants with substantial MS-related mobility disability underwent initial mobility, gait, fitness, and cognitive processing speed assessments and were randomly assigned to 6-months of supervised multimodal (progressive aerobic, resistance, and balance) exercise training (intervention condition) or stretching-and-toning activities (control condition). Participants completed the same outcome assessments halfway through and immediately following the 6-month study period. There were statistically significant improvements in six-minute walk performance (F(2158)=3.12, p=0.05, η p 2 =0.04), peak power output (F(2150)=8.16, pmobility disability. This is critical for informing the development of multi-site exercise rehabilitation programs in larger samples of persons with MS-related mobility disability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Crystallographic computing system JANA2006: General features

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petříček, Václav; Dušek, Michal; Palatinus, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 229, č. 5 (2014), s. 345-352 ISSN 0044-2968 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/0809; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03276S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : JANA2006 * aperiodic structures * magnetic structures * crystallographic computing Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.310, year: 2014

  9. The risk of fracture in incident multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bazelier, Marloes T; Bentzen, Joan; Vestergaard, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be at increased risk of fractures owing to osteoporosis and falling.......Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be at increased risk of fractures owing to osteoporosis and falling....

  10. The role of klotho in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Talotta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to evaluate the role of klotho in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc, through the measurement of its serum concentration in SSc patients compared to healthy controls, and to assess the association with cutaneous and visceral involvement. Blood samples obtained from both SSc patients and healthy controls were analysed by an ELISA assay for the detection of human klotho. SSc patients were globally evaluated for disease activity and assessed through the modified Rodnan’s Skin Score, Medsger’s scale, pulmonary function tests, 2D-echocardiography, nailfold capillaroscopy and laboratory tests. Our cohort consisted of 69 SSc patients (61 females, mean age 64.5±12.5 years, median disease duration 9.0 (IQR 8 years and 77 healthy controls (28 females, mean age 49.7±10.2 years. In the group of SSc patients, 19 (27.5% suffered from a diffuse form of SSc. All patients were receiving IV prostanoids, and some of them were concomitantly treated with immunosuppressive drugs (prednisone, hydroxychloroquine, mofetil mycophenolate, methotrexate, cyclosporin A and azathioprine. The median serum concentration of klotho was significantly lower in patients compared to controls (0.23 ng/mL vs 0.60 ng/mL; p<0.001. However, Spearman’s test showed no significant association between klotho serum levels and disease activity, concerning either clinical, laboratory or instrumental findings. Our data show a significant deficit of klotho in SSc patients although any significant association was detected between klotho serum concentration and the clinical, laboratory or instrumental features of the disease. However, due to the limits of the study, further investigations are required.

  11. Early- versus Late-Onset Systemic Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Marco A.; Velasco, César; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Fonollosa, Vicent; Trapiella, Luis; Egurbide, María Victoria; Sáez, Luis; Castillo, María Jesús; Callejas, José Luis; Camps, María Teresa; Tolosa, Carles; Ríos, Juan José; Freire, Mayka; Vargas, José Antonio; Espinosa, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Peak age at onset of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is between 20 and 50 years, although SSc is also described in both young and elderly patients. We conducted the present study to determine if age at disease onset modulates the clinical characteristics and outcome of SSc patients. The Spanish Scleroderma Study Group recruited 1037 patients with a mean follow-up of 5.2 ± 6.8 years. Based on the mean ± 1 standard deviation (SD) of age at disease onset (45 ± 15 yr) of the whole series, patients were classified into 3 groups: age ≤30 years (early onset), age between 31 and 59 years (standard onset), and age ≥60 years (late onset). We compared initial and cumulative manifestations, immunologic features, and death rates. The early-onset group included 195 patients; standard-onset group, 651; and late-onset, 191 patients. The early-onset group had a higher prevalence of esophageal involvement (72% in early-onset compared with 67% in standard-onset and 56% in late-onset; p = 0.004), and myositis (11%, 7.2%, and 2.9%, respectively; p = 0.009), but a lower prevalence of centromere antibodies (33%, 46%, and 47%, respectively; p = 0.007). In contrast, late-onset SSc was characterized by a lower prevalence of digital ulcers (54%, 41%, and 34%, respectively; p < 0.001) but higher rates of heart conduction system abnormalities (9%, 13%, and 21%, respectively; p = 0.004). Pulmonary hypertension was found in 25% of elderly patients and in 12% of the youngest patients (p = 0.010). After correction for the population effects of age and sex, standardized mortality ratio was shown to be higher in younger patients. The results of the present study confirm that age at disease onset is associated with differences in clinical presentation and outcome in SSc patients. PMID:24646463

  12. Cortical influences drive amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Andrew; Braak, Heiko; Del Tredici, Kelly; Lemon, Roger; Ludolph, Albert C; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2017-11-01

    The early motor manifestations of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), while rarely documented, reflect failure of adaptive complex motor skills. The development of these skills correlates with progressive evolution of a direct corticomotoneuronal system that is unique to primates and markedly enhanced in humans. The failure of this system in ALS may translate into the split hand presentation, gait disturbance, split leg syndrome and bulbar symptomatology related to vocalisation and breathing, and possibly diffuse fasciculation, characteristic of ALS. Clinical neurophysiology of the brain employing transcranial magnetic stimulation has convincingly demonstrated a presymptomatic reduction or absence of short interval intracortical inhibition, accompanied by increased intracortical facilitation, indicating cortical hyperexcitability. The hallmark of the TDP-43 pathological signature of sporadic ALS is restricted to cortical areas as well as to subcortical nuclei that are under the direct control of corticofugal projections. This provides anatomical support that the origins of the TDP-43 pathology reside in the cerebral cortex itself, secondarily in corticofugal fibres and the subcortical targets with which they make monosynaptic connections. The latter feature explains the multisystem degeneration that characterises ALS. Consideration of ALS as a primary neurodegenerative disorder of the human brain may incorporate concepts of prion-like spread at synaptic terminals of corticofugal axons. Further, such a concept could explain the recognised widespread imaging abnormalities of the ALS neocortex and the accepted relationship between ALS and frontotemporal dementia. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Patient perceptions of multiple sclerosis and its treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Seze J, Borgel F, Brudon F

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Jérôme de Seze1, Florent Borgel2, Frédérique Brudon31Department of Neurology CHRU de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, 2Medical Center, Grenoble, 3Clinique du Tonkin, Villeurbanne, FranceBackground: In order to improve the treatment outcome in multiple sclerosis, it is important to document the factors that influence adherence to therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine patient perceptions and awareness of multiple sclerosis and its treatment, treatment adherence, and impact on quality of life and daily living.Methods: This was a cross-sectional observational study performed in France. Each participating neurologist included the first three patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who consulted after the start of the study. Data on clinical features were collected from a physician questionnaire and on disease and treatment perception and on quality of life from a patient autoquestionnaire.Results: A total of 175 neurologists entered 202 patients in the study. The mean duration of disease was 8.0 ± 7.0 years, and immunomodulatory treatment had been administered for a mean duration of 3.0 ± 2.0 years. A total of 166 patients (82.2% were treated with interferon-ß preparations and 36 patients (17.8% with glatiramer acetate. Eighty-five patients (42.1% reported missing their injections from time to time and 36 patients (17.8% reported “drug holidays”. The most frequently given reason for nonadherence was forgetfulness (38.7% of cases. Eighty-six patients (42.6% and 70 patients (34.7% claimed to be well informed about their disease and treatment, respectively. Adherence was significantly higher in well informed patients (P = 0.035. The majority of patients (176 patients, 87.1% intended continuing their current treatment and 49.5% considered that their current treatment might reduce relapses. The most frequently reported side effect was muscle pain (124 patients, 61.4%.Conclusion: Patient understanding of treatment for disease

  14. Quality of life assessment in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisić-Tepavčević Darija

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disease of central nervous system. The main physiopatological feature of MS is demyelination. Multiple sclerosis is one of three most common causes of severe disability in youngest people. In patients with MS, apart from complete psychophysical status and objective neurologic status, a subjective perception of symptoms and signs, known as quality of life, must be considered, too. The aim of this study was to estimate a health related quality of life (HRQoL in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS and to investigate the correlations between scores of HRQoL and selected demographic and clinical parameters. Methods. A cross-sectional study was performed in patients meeting following inclusion criteria: MS diagnosis (McDonald's criteria, age 18-60 years, the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS < 8, and written informed consent. Exclusion criteria were exacerbation of MS in the last month, any preexisting major chronic illness and/or psychiatric disorders and antidepressive and/or corticosteroid therapy in the last month. The quality of life was measured by a disease specific instrument, MSQoL-54 (The Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life. The neurological impairment was assessed using the Expended Disability Status Scale (EDSS and Mini Mental Scale (MMS. The presence and severity of depression was estimated by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS. The presence and severity of fatigue was assessed by the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and correlation analysis. Results. The higher HRQoL score was registered for mental health (56.3 ± 19.5 than for physical one(51.3 ± 17.9, which means that physical disability had more important influence on quality of life deterioration comparing to mental health. The highest values of HRQoL were observed in domains of Cognitive Functioning (77.4 ± 22.5 and Pain (75.7 ± 25.5. The lowest scores of

  15. A System Out of Breath: How Hypoxia Possibly Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Systemic Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    van Hal, T. W.; van Bon, L.; Radstake, T. R. D. J.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease characterized by vascular alterations and immunological disturbances and fibrosis, the order of which remains to be fully determined. Clinically, patients show clear signs of hypoxia in skin and internal organs. The low oxygen tension is potentially caused by a yet to be indentified circuitry involving the three features that typify SSc. In addition, once present, the hypoxia creates a vicious circle of ongoing pathology. In this paper, we pro...

  16. Systemic sclerosis with normal or nonspecific nailfold capillaroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichel, Fanny; Baudot, Nathalie; Gaitz, Jean-Pierre; Trad, Salim; Barbe, Coralie; Francès, Camille; Senet, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    In systemic sclerosis (SSc), a specific nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) pattern is observed in 90% of cases and seems to be associated with severity and progression of the disease. To describe the characteristics of SSc patients with normal or nonspecific (normal/nonspecific) NVC. In a retrospective cohort study, clinical features and visceral involvements of 25 SSc cases with normal/nonspecific NVC were compared to 63 SSc controls with the SSc-specific NVC pattern. Normal/nonspecific NVC versus SSc-specific NVC pattern was significantly associated with absence of skin sclerosis (32 vs. 6.3%, p = 0.004), absence of telangiectasia (47.8 vs. 17.3%, p = 0.006) and absence of sclerodactyly (60 vs. 25.4%, p = 0.002), and less frequent severe pulmonary involvement (26.3 vs. 58.2%, p = 0.017). Normal/nonspecific NVC in SSc patients appears to be associated with less severe skin involvement and less frequent severe pulmonary involvement. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Multiple Sclerosis Relapses: Epidemiology, Outcomes and Management. A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalincik, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Relapses (episodic exacerbations of neurological signs or symptoms) are a defining feature of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), the most prevalent MS phenotype. While their diagnostic value relates predominantly to the definition of clinically definite MS, their prognostic value is determined by their relatively high associated risk of incomplete remission resulting in residual disability. The mechanisms governing a relapse incidence are unknown, but numerous modifiers of relapse risk have been described, including demographic and clinical characteristics, many of which represent opportunities for improved disease management. Also relapse phenotypes have been associated with patient and disease characteristics and an individual predisposition to certain phenotypic presentations may imply individual neuroanatomical disease patterns. While immunomodulatory therapies and corticosteroids represent the mainstay of relapse prevention and acute management, respectively, their effect has only been partial and further search for more efficient relapse therapies is warranted. Other areas of research include pathophysiology and determinants of relapse incidence, recurrence and phenotypes, including the characteristics of the relapsing and non-relapsing multiple sclerosis variants and their responsiveness to therapies. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Cognitive status in patients with multiple sclerosis in Lanzarote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Martín, María Yaiza; Eguia-Del Río, Pablo; González-Platas, Montserrat; Jiménez-Sosa, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common feature in multiple sclerosis affecting ~43%-72% of patients, which involves cognitive functions such as memory, processing speed, attention, and executive function. The aim of this study was to describe the extent and pattern of the involvement of cognitive impairment and psychological status in all patients with multiple sclerosis on a small Spanish island. In all, 70 patients and 56 healthy controls were included in the study between February 2013 and May 2013. All participants were assessed using the Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Test. The patients also completed instruments to evaluate the presence of fatigue, perceived cognitive dysfunction, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. All procedures were performed in a single session. Cognitive impairment, defined as a score <1.5 standard deviation on two subtests of the battery, was present in 35% of the participants. The most frequently affected domain was working memory, followed by verbal memory and processing speed. Disease duration showed a moderate correlation with visuospatial memory and processing speed. The Expanded Disability Status Scale score correlated with verbal and processing speed. Verbal memory was correlated with depression symptoms and fatigue. Cognitive impairment was present in 35% of the study population. The most affected domains were working memory and verbal memory. Working memory and verbal fluency deficit are independent factors of disease evolution. Cognitive decline is related to clinical variables and psychological measures such as fatigue or depression but not to anxiety.

  19. Temporal acuity and speech recognition score in noise in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Maleki

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Multiple sclerosis (MS is one of the central nervous system diseases can be associated with a variety of symptoms such as hearing disorders. The main consequence of hearing loss is poor speech perception, and temporal acuity has important role in speech perception. We evaluated the speech perception in silent and in the presence of noise and temporal acuity in patients with multiple sclerosis.Methods: Eighteen adults with multiple sclerosis with the mean age of 37.28 years and 18 age- and sex- matched controls with the mean age of 38.00 years participated in this study. Temporal acuity and speech perception were evaluated by random gap detection test (GDT and word recognition score (WRS in three different signal to noise ratios.Results: Statistical analysis of test results revealed significant differences between the two groups (p<0.05. Analysis of gap detection test (in 4 sensation levels and word recognition score in both groups showed significant differences (p<0.001.Conclusion: According to this survey, the ability of patients with multiple sclerosis to process temporal features of stimulus was impaired. It seems that, this impairment is important factor to decrease word recognition score and speech perception.

  20. Tuberous sclerosis: Analysis of 24 cases with emphasis on atypical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Ju; Suh, Jung Ho; Joo, Suk Hyun; Chung, Tae Sub

    1990-01-01

    We retrospectively analysed the clinical and CT findings of 24 cases with tuberous sclerosis with special emphasis upon the atypical presentation. The cases with classic clinical triad were accounted for in 21%, while 33% presented with atypical clinical features. The most common and characteristic CT finding is that of the subependymal calcified nodules of the lateral ventricle, which was seen in 85% of our cases. Cortical tuber and white matter lesions were demonstrated in 65% and 55%, respectively. Three cases showed cortical tuber and white matter lesion without subependymal tuber. The cortical tuber usually exhibited low density or calcified lesion, but showed high density in 2 cases. Other findings of tuberous sclerosis included intraventricular tumor, ventriculomegaly, and cortical atrophy. One case clearly demonstrated parenchymal tuber on MR imaging. In conclusion, diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis is usually made on the clinical bases initially. However, CT and MR are also diagnostic even in unusual clinical presentation such as unexplained retardation or epilepsy or when the classic clinical triad is incomplete. If only cortical tuber or white matter lesion is present, it is difficult to diagnose tuberous sclerosis and to differentiate from other cortical mass lesion. Therefore, careful evaluation is required with familiarity with the atypical appearance of the disease

  1. Treatment adherence in multiple sclerosis: a survey of Belgian neurologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decoo D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Danny Decoo,1 Mathieu Vokaer2 1Department of Neurology and Neurorehab, AZ Alma, Sijsele, Belgium; 2Multiple Sclerosis Clinic, Edith Cavell Hospital, CHIREC group, Brussels, Belgium Background: Poor treatment adherence is common among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. This survey evaluated neurologists’ perception of treatment adherence among MS patients.Materials and methods: This questionnaire-based survey of Belgian neurologists treating MS patients was conducted between June and July 2014. Face-to-face interviews with the neurologists were based on a semistructured questionnaire containing questions regarding the perception of the treatment-adherence level.Results: A total of 41 neurologists participated in the survey. Of these, 88% indicated frequent discussions about treatment adherence as beneficial for treatment efficacy. The mean time spent on the treatment-adherence discussion during the initial consultation was 11 minutes, with 24% of doctors spending 5 minutes and 24% of doctors spending 10 minutes discussing this issue. The majority of neurologists (56% perceived the adherence level in MS as good, and 12% perceived it as excellent. The majority of neurologists (64% indicated intolerance as a main cause of poor adherence, and all neurologists reported insufficient efficacy as a consequence of nonadherence. The importance of adherence in the neurologists’ practice was evaluated on a scale of 1–10, with 1= “not very important” and 10= “very important”: 44% of doctors indicated a score of 10, and the mean score was 9.0.Conclusion: Belgian neurologists consider treatment adherence in MS as essential for the benefits of therapies. However, although neurologists are aware of the consequences of nonadherence, they generally spend limited time discussing the importance of treatment adherence with their patients. Keywords: multiple sclerosis, treatment adherence, physician survey

  2. Engineering features of ISX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lousteau, D.C.; Jernigan, T.C.; Schaffer, M.J.; Hussung, R.O.

    1975-01-01

    ISX, an Impurity Study Experiment, is presently being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a joint scientific effort between ORNL and General Atomic Company. ISX is a moderate size tokamak dedicated to the study of impurity production, diffusion, and control. The significant engineering features of this device are discussed

  3. Multiple sclerosis - etiology and diagnostic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, Joanna; Koper, Olga M; Piechal, Kinga; Kemona, Halina

    2017-06-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of autoimmune originate. The main agents responsible for the MS development include exogenous, environmental, and genetic factors. MS is characterized by multifocal and temporally scattered central nervous system (CNS) damage which lead to the axonal damage. Among clinical courses of MS it can be distinguish relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPSM), primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), and progressive-relapsing multiple sclerosis (RPMS). Depending on the severity of signs and symptoms MS can be described as benign MS or malignant MS. MS diagnosis is based on McDonald's diagnostic criteria, which link clinical manifestation with characteristic lesions demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, and visual evoked potentials. Among CSF laboratory tests used to the MS diagnosis are applied: Tibbling & Link IgG index, reinbegrams, and CSF isoelectrofocusing for oligoclonal bands detection. It should be emphasized, that despite huge progress regarding MS as well as the availability of different diagnostics methods this disease is still a diagnostic challenge. It may result from fact that MS has diverse clinical course and there is a lack of single test, which would be of appropriate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for quick and accurate diagnosis.

  4. Multiple sclerosis - etiology and diagnostic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kamińska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of autoimmune originate. The main agents responsible for the MS development include exogenous, environmental, and genetic factors. MS is characterized by multifocal and temporally scattered central nervous system (CNS damage which lead to the axonal damage. Among clinical courses of MS it can be distinguish relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPSM, primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS, and progressive-relapsing multiple sclerosis (RPMS. Depending on the severity of signs and symptoms MS can be described as benign MS or malignant MS. MS diagnosis is based on McDonald’s diagnostic criteria, which link clinical manifestation with characteristic lesions demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis, and visual evoked potentials. Among CSF laboratory tests used to the MS diagnosis are applied: Tibbling & Link IgG index, reinbegrams, and CSF isoelectrofocusing for oligoclonal bands detection. It should be emphasized, that despite huge progress regarding MS as well as the availability of differentdiagnostics methods this disease is still a diagnostic challenge. It may result from fact that MS has diverse clinical course and there is a lack of single test, which would be of appropriate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for quick and accurate diagnosis.

  5. Multiple Sclerosis Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Giovannoni

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is the body fluid closest to the pathology of multiple sclerosis (MS. For many candidate biomarkers CSF is the only fluid that can be investigated. Several factors need to be standardized when sampling CSF for biomarker research: time/volume of CSF collection, sample processing/storage, and the temporal relationship of sampling to clinical or MRI markers of disease activity. Assays used for biomarker detection must be validated so as to optimize the power of the studies. A formal method for establishing whether or not a particular biomarker can be used as a surrogate end-point needs to be adopted. This process is similar to that used in clinical trials, where the reporting of studies has to be done in a standardized way with sufficient detail to permit a critical review of the study and to enable others to reproduce the study design. A commitment must be made to report negative studies so as to prevent publication bias. Pre-defined consensus criteria need to be developed for MS-related prognostic biomarkers. Currently no candidate biomarker is suitable as a surrogate end-point. Bulk biomarkers of the neurodegenerative process such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and neurofilaments (NF have advantages over intermittent inflammatory markers.

  6. [Oral treatments in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meca-Lallana, José Eustasio; Hernández-Clares, Rocío; Carreón-Guarnizo, Ester

    2014-12-01

    The development of new disease-modifying drugs (DMD) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), which share the common denominator of oral administration, considerably improves patient expectations in terms of effectiveness, tolerability and treatment adherence compared with currently available drugs. However, the common route of administration of these drugs does not mean that they are equivalent, since the heading of "oral route" encompasses drugs with distinct indications and mechanisms of action, as well as heterogeneous results in terms of efficacy and safety, allowing treatment to be personalized according to the each patient' s characteristics. Currently, four oral DMD are available or in an advanced stage of clinical development: fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate and laquinimod. In pivotal trials versus placebo, these molecules reduced the annualized rate of exacerbations versus placebo by 54%, 31%, 53% and 23%, respectively, the risk of progression of disability by 31%, 30%, 38% and 36%, and the number of active lesions showing contrast uptake on magnetic resonance imaging by 82%, 80%, 90% and 37%, respectively. Based on the risk/benefit ratio, fingolimod is indicated in patients with suboptimal response to initial DMD or in severe rapidly progressing RRMS, while the remaining drugs can be used as first-line options. Clinical experience with these treatments will provide new data on safety and effectiveness, which will be determinant when establishing therapeutic algorithms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Remyelination Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Danielle E; Honce, Justin M; Miravalle, Augusto A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disorder of the central nervous system that results in destruction of the myelin sheath that surrounds axons and eventual neurodegeneration. Current treatments approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS target the aberrant immune response and successfully reduce the severity of attacks and frequency of relapses. Therapies are still needed that can repair damage particularly for the treatment of progressive forms of MS for which current therapies are relatively ineffective. Remyelination can restore neuronal function and prevent further neuronal loss and clinical disability. Recent advancements in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating myelination, as well as the development of high-throughput screens to identify agents that enhance myelination, have lead to the identification of many potential remyelination therapies currently in preclinical and early clinical development. One problem that has plagued the development of treatments to promote remyelination is the difficulty in assessing remyelination in patients with current imaging techniques. Powerful new imaging technologies are making it easier to discern remyelination in patients, which is critical for the assessment of these new therapeutic strategies during clinical trials. This review will summarize what is currently known about remyelination failure in MS, strategies to overcome this failure, new therapeutic treatments in the pipeline for promoting remyelination in MS patients, and new imaging technologies for measuring remyelination in patients.

  8. Remyelination Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle E. Harlow

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an immune-mediated disorder of the central nervous system that results in destruction of the myelin sheath that surrounds axons and eventual neurodegeneration. Current treatments approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS target the aberrant immune response and successfully reduce the severity of attacks and frequency of relapses. Therapies are still needed that can repair damage particularly for the treatment of progressive forms of MS for which current therapies are relatively ineffective. Remyelination can restore neuronal function and prevent further neuronal loss and clinical disability. Recent advancements in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating myelination, as well as the development of high throughput screens to identify agents that enhance myelination, have lead to the identification of many potential remyelination therapies currently in pre-clinical and early clinical development. One problem that has plagued the development of treatments to promote remyelination is the difficulty in assessing remyelination in patients with current imaging techniques. Powerful new imaging technologies are making it easier to discern remyelination in patients, which is critical for the assessment of these new therapeutic strategies during clinical trials. This review will summarize what is currently known about remyelination failure in MS, strategies to overcome this failure, new therapeutic treatments in the pipeline for promoting remyelination in MS patients, and new imaging technologies for measuring remyelination in patients.

  9. Natalizumab therapy of multiple sclerosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hutchinson, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the commonest disabling neurological disease of young and middle-aged adults affecting 1 million persons world wide. The illness begins with a relapsing-remitting MS course in 85%-90% of patients; the other 10%-15% have a primary progressive onset MS. Our current understanding is that MS is an autoimmune disorder with an inflammatory T-cell attack on myelin or some component of the oligodendrocyte--myelin structure. Relapses of disease activity result in plaques of demyelination with destruction of myelin and, to a lesser, extent axons. Lymphocytes within the central nervous system tissue recruit more cells leading to an inflammatory cascade that causes myelin damage, axonal disruption, and neuronal death. If the plaque occurs in a vocal area of the central nervous system then symptoms relating to that area result. However, magnetic resonance imaging shows that approximately 10 times more lesions occur in asymptomatic areas of the brain. Recovery from an initial relapse may appear relatively complete but persistent inflammation results in axonal injury and residual disability results. With time and accumulated lesion load, secondary degeneration of denuded axons results in the phase of secondary progressive MS usually 15-20 years after onset.

  10. Pediatric multiple sclerosis in Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín A. Peña

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of Venezuelan pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. METHODS: Database records from the National Program for MS were searched for patients with an established diagnosis of MS whose first symptoms appeared before age 18. RESULTS: The national database held records of 1.710 patients; 3.8% had onset of the first symptoms before age 18. 46.7% were boys, yielding an F:M ratio of 1.13:1. Many children had a disease onset characterized by motor impairment (30.7%, brainstem/cerebellum and spinal cord affectation (27.6%, headache (26%. Less frequent symptoms were sensory symptoms (8% and optic neuritis (7%. DISCUSSION: Pediatric MS patients in Venezuela represent a significant proportion of all MS cases. The clinical pattern is characterized by motor symptoms at onset, and predominantly monosymptomatic presentation with a relapsing-remitting pattern. This is the first systematic attempt to estimate the prevalence of pediatric MS in Venezuela.

  11. MRI findings of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Min Yun; Sol, Chang Hyo; Chung, Choon Phill; Kim, Byung Soo; Park, Byung Ho

    1993-01-01

    Nine patients of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS) were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1.0 T. The MS plaques were seen in the brain and spinal cord in eight and three patients, respectively. The frequent sites of MS plaques were periventricular white matter, brain stem, and cervical cord. The shape of most brain MS plaques was round or finger-like configuration. The MS plaques showed high signal intensity on T2 weighted images and low or iso signal intensity on T1 weighted images in all nine cases. Contrast enhancement was seen in 4 cases. Mild brain atrophy was noted in 2 cases and mass effect in 1 case. The sites of cord MS plaques in three patients were C2-C4, C2-C5, and C4-C6 levels respectively. The core MS plaques showed high signal intensity on T2 weighted image and contrast enhancement on Gd-DTPA enhanced T1 weighted images in all 3 case with mild cord expansion in 2 cases. In conclusion, MRI is a useful diagnosis tool in evaluating the MS plaques involved central nervous system

  12. Rehabilitation interventions in multiple sclerosis: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Serafin; Khan, Fary; Kesselring, Jürg

    2012-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex, heterogeneous disease associated with long-term disability. Despite the availability of advanced disease-modifying and symptomatic therapies that may decrease activity and progression of disease and alleviate complaints to a certain extent, there is still a need for comprehensive rehabilitation interventions in order to reduce sequels and symptoms of the disease on personal activities and social participation to achieve the highest possible independence and the best quality of life. Timing and setting of rehabilitation interventions should be selected individually depending on disease phase, functional deficits, personal requirements, as well as specific goals. In addition, limitations and disease-specific characteristics that may influence rehabilitation outcome should be noted. Rehabilitation interventions should be considered early for maintaining functional capacity and reducing risk for losing important abilities or independence. Due to gradual failure of adaptive compensatory mechanisms along the course of disease, benefits of rehabilitation interventions are generally higher in earlier phases of MS. Inpatient and outpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation has been shown to be beneficial in improving disability, participation and quality of life despite progression of the disease. Good evidence exists for different specific interventions improving physical and cognitive performance. Other important issues responsible for beneficial effects of comprehensive rehabilitation in MS include education, instruction, and information of patients and caregivers. Comprehensive assessment of health domains in MS patients using standardized framework and common language for describing the impact of disease at different levels, using International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) core sets may increase the knowledge of needs of these patients for more efficient and adapted rehabilitation interventions meeting these

  13. Multiple sclerosis exceptionally presenting as parkinsonism responds to intravenous methylprednisolone.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saidha, S

    2012-01-31

    Parkinsonism due to multiple sclerosis (MS) is rare. In previously reported patients with MS-induced parkinsonism, MS manifested first, followed a typical clinical course, and parkinsonism developed later in the course of the illness. We report a 52-year-old male presenting with parkinsonism as the initial manifestation of MS, in whom a subsequent MS relapse consisted of marked deterioration in parkinsonism, a clinical pattern not previously described in MS. A brain MRI demonstrated involvement of the substantia nigra and basal ganglia. This patient illustrates that the clinical presentation and progression of MS may rarely be characterised by predominating parkinsonian features which are reversible by treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone and interferon beta1a.

  14. Multiple sclerosis exceptionally presenting as parkinsonism responds to intravenous methylprednisolone.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saidha, S

    2010-05-01

    Parkinsonism due to multiple sclerosis (MS) is rare. In previously reported patients with MS-induced parkinsonism, MS manifested first, followed a typical clinical course, and parkinsonism developed later in the course of the illness. We report a 52-year-old male presenting with parkinsonism as the initial manifestation of MS, in whom a subsequent MS relapse consisted of marked deterioration in parkinsonism, a clinical pattern not previously described in MS. A brain MRI demonstrated involvement of the substantia nigra and basal ganglia. This patient illustrates that the clinical presentation and progression of MS may rarely be characterised by predominating parkinsonian features which are reversible by treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone and interferon beta1a.

  15. From Localized Scleroderma to Systemic Sclerosis: Coexistence or Possible Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilia, Giuggioli; Michele, Colaci; Emanuele, Cocchiara; Amelia, Spinella; Federica, Lumetti; Clodoveo, Ferri

    2018-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) and localized scleroderma (LoS) are two different diseases that may share some features. We evaluated the relationship between SSc and LoS in our case series of SSc patients. We analysed the clinical records of 330 SSc patients, in order to find the eventual occurrence of both the two diseases. Eight (2.4%) female patients presented both the two diagnoses in their clinical histories. Six developed LoS prior to SSc; in 4/6 cases, the presence of autoantibodies was observed before SSc diagnosis. Overall, the median time interval between LoS and SSc diagnosis was 18 (range 0-156) months. LoS and SSc are two distinct clinical entities that may coexist. Moreover, as anecdotally reported in pediatric populations, we suggested the possible development of SSc in adult patients with LoS, particularly in presence of Raynaud's phenomenon or antinuclear antibodies before the SSc onset.

  16. SWI enhances vein detection using gadolinium in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggi, Pietro; Mazzoni, Lorenzo N; Moretti, Marco; Grammatico, Matteo; Chiti, Stefano; Massacesi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) combined with the FLAIR sequence provides the ability to depict in vivo the perivenous location of inflammatory demyelinating lesions – one of the most specific pathologic features of multiple sclerosis (MS). In addition, in MS white matter (WM) lesions, gadolinium-based contrast media (CM) can increase vein signal loss on SWI. This report focuses on two cases of WM inflammatory lesions enhancing on SWI images after CM injection. In these lesions in fact the CM increased the contrast between the parenchyma and the central vein allowing as well, in one of the two cases, the detection of a vein not visible on the same SWI sequence acquired before CM injection

  17. Choroidal sclerosis in localized scleroderma (morphea en plaque).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic, S; Petrovic, L; Risimic, D; Kosanovic-Jakovic, N; Jaksic, V; Djakovic, Z; Stojkovic, M; Risovic, D; Ivankovic, Lj; Ivancevic-Milenkovic, M

    2008-01-01

    Plaque morphea is a superficial type of morphea (localized scleroderma) which is characterized by various fibrotic areas of the dermis without systemic features. We present a 63-year-old man with morphea en plaque. The skin on his forearms and feet was taut, thickened and hidebound with scattered telangiectatic changes. Autoantibody profile was obtained and only ANA were positive (1:80). The patient had a decreased vision in the only functional, left eye. Our case is specific because the patient negated any kind of health problem, meaning the morphea and visual deterioration were of outstanding importance for him. Choroidal sclerosis and fundus appearance was extremely impressive and, to our knowledge, this is the first report of such unique case of ocular involvement in the literature. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Parental Understanding of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samia, Pauline; Donald, Kirsten A; Schlegel, Birgit; Wilmshurst, Jo M

    2015-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic disorder with multisystem involvement that poses significant challenges to the affected child and family. Caregiver knowledge in the South African population has not previously been reported. A prospective study of the parents of 21 children with tuberous sclerosis complex was undertaken. Median parental age was 38 (interquartile range 34.5-45) years. Parents were randomly allocated to receive written information about the condition, or to receive verbal counseling already established in clinic. A significant difference (P = .001) was observed in the change in the mean knowledge scores for the parent group that received written information (34.2 at baseline, 51.7 at the second visit. This impact was higher in parents with an education level of at least grade 8 (P = .003). Parental understanding of tuberous sclerosis complex can be improved by provision of written information and should be routinely available in a readily understandable format. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Selected methods of rehabilitation in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Gerkowicz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis is a chronic connective tissue disease characterized by microvascular abnormalities, immune disturbances and progressive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Skin involvement may result in contractures, leading to marked loss of hand mobility, adversely affecting the performance of daily activities and decreasing the quality of life. Face involvement not only causes functional loss, but also lowers the self-esteem of patients. Increasing attention has recently been focused on the need to rehabilitate patients with systemic sclerosis in order to prevent the development of joint contractures and loss of mobility. The study presents a review of the current literature on rehabilitation possibilities in patients with systemic sclerosis, with a special focus on physiotherapy methods.

  20. Registers of multiple sclerosis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch-Henriksen, N; Magyari, M; Laursen, B

    2015-01-01

    between a number of different environmental exposures in the past and the subsequent risk of MS. Some of these studies have been able to exonerate suspected risk factors. The other register, the nationwide Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register, is a follow-up register for all patients who have......There are two nationwide population-based registers for multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark. The oldest register is The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry (DMSR), which is an epidemiological register for estimation of prevalence and incidence of MS and survival, and for identifying exposures earlier...... received disease-modifying treatments since 1996. It has, in particular, contributed to the knowledge of the role of antibodies against the biological drugs used for the treatment of MS....

  1. Retinal layer segmentation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petzold, Axel; Balcer, Laura J; Calabresi, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Structural retinal imaging biomarkers are important for early recognition and monitoring of inflammation and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis. With the introduction of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), supervised automated segmentation of individual retinal...... layers is possible. We aimed to investigate which retinal layers show atrophy associated with neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis when measured with SD-OCT. METHODS: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched for studies in which SD-OCT was used to look at the retina in people...... with multiple sclerosis with or without optic neuritis in PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar between Nov 22, 1991, and April 19, 2016. Data were taken from cross-sectional cohorts and from one timepoint from longitudinal studies (at least 3 months after onset in studies of optic neuritis). We classified...

  2. Neural correlates of alerting and orienting impairment in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Vázquez-Marrufo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A considerable percentage of multiple sclerosis patients have attentional impairment, but understanding its neurophysiological basis remains a challenge. The Attention Network Test allows 3 attentional networks to be studied. Previous behavioural studies using this test have shown that the alerting network is impaired in multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to identify neurophysiological indexes of the attention impairment in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients using this test. RESULTS: After general slowing had been removed in patients group to isolate the effects of each condition, some behavioral differences between them were obtained. About Contingent Negative Variation, a statistically significant decrement were found in the amplitude for Central and Spatial Cue Conditions for patient group (p<0.05. ANOVAs showed for the patient group a significant latency delay for P1 and N1 components (p<0.05 and a decrease of P3 amplitude for congruent and incongruent stimuli (p<0.01. With regard to correlation analysis, PASAT-3s and SDMT showed significant correlations with behavioral measures of the Attention Network Test (p<0.01 and an ERP parameter (CNV amplitude. CONCLUSIONS: Behavioral data are highly correlated with the neuropsychological scores and show that the alerting and orienting mechanisms in the patient group were impaired. Reduced amplitude for the Contingent Negative Variation in the patient group suggests that this component could be a physiological marker related to the alerting and orienting impairment in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. P1 and N1 delayed latencies are evidence of the demyelination process that causes impairment in the first steps of the visual sensory processing. Lastly, P3 amplitude shows a general decrease for the pathological group probably indexing a more central impairment. These results suggest that the Attention Network Test give evidence of multiple levels of attention

  3. Movement disorders in multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica: A clinical marker of neurological disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candeias da Silva, Carolina; Bichuetti, Denis Bernardi; Azevedo Silva, Sonia Maria Cesar de; Ferraz, Henrique Ballalai; Oliveira, Enedina Maria Lobato de; Borges, Vanderci

    2018-03-03

    Movement disorders are not rare in demyelinating diseases but there are few studies comparing their frequency between multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Our aim was to determine the frequency and the related features of movement disorders in a cohort of patients with multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. It is a cross-sectional study of patients with multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Patients were evaluated by a movement disorder specialist. Data from a personal interview and neurological examination were collected. Fahn-Tolosa-Marin tremor rating scale was used for tremor evaluation. Health-related quality of life was assessed using EuroQol instrument. Two hundred fifty-three patients were included (mean [SD] age, 40 [12] years; 74.3% female; median [IQR] EDSS score 2.5 [1.0-6.0]); 26% presented with movement disorders. Paroxysmal dystonia (n = 32) and tremor (n = 27) were the most common movement disorders. Patients with multiple sclerosis and low Expanded Disability Status Scale score (below 4.0) have fewer movement disorders than patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. The diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder was strongly associated with paroxysmal dystonia (OR = 22.07, 95% CI = 2.56-189.78; p = 0.005). Patients with multiple sclerosis and patients without movement disorders have a slightly better quality of life. Paroxysmal dystonia was the most common movement disorder in demyelinating diseases and strongly associated with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Update on riboflavin and multiple sclerosis: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahshid Naghashpour

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS. Riboflavin plays an important role in myelin formation, and its deficiency is implicated as a risk factor for multiple sclerosis. Here, we systematically reviewed the literature concerning the health benefits of riboflavin on MS. The literature recorded within four main databases, including relevant clinical trials, experimental, and case-control studies from 1976 to 2017 were considered. Both human and animal studies were included for review, with no restrictions on age, gender, or ethnicity.  Experimental studies demonstrated that riboflavin deficiency triggers neurologic abnormalities related to peripheral neuropathies such as demyelinating neuropathy. Moreover, randomized controlled trials (RCT and case-control studies in which MS patients received riboflavin supplementation or had higher dietary riboflavin intake showed improvements in neurological motor disability. Riboflavin is a cofactor of xanthine oxidase and its deficiency exacerbates low uric acid caused by high copper levels, leading to myelin degeneration. The vitamin additionally plays a significant role in the normal functioning of glutathione reductase (GR as an antioxidant enzyme, and conditions of riboflavin deficiency lead to oxidative damage. Riboflavin promotes the gene and protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the CNS of an animal model of MS, suggesting that BDNF mediates the beneficial effect of riboflavin on neurological motor disability. Research to date generally supports the role of riboflavin in MS outcomes. However, further observational and interventional studies on human populations are warranted to validate the effects of riboflavin.

  5. Update on riboflavin and multiple sclerosis: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghashpour, Mahshid; Jafarirad, Sima; Amani, Reza; Sarkaki, Alireza; Saedisomeolia, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Riboflavin plays an important role in myelin formation, and its deficiency is implicated as a risk factor for multiple sclerosis. Here, we systematically reviewed the literature concerning the health benefits of riboflavin on MS. The literature recorded within four main databases, including relevant clinical trials, experimental, and case-control studies from 1976 to 2017 were considered. Both human and animal studies were included for review, with no restrictions on age, gender, or ethnicity. Experimental studies demonstrated that riboflavin deficiency triggers neurologic abnormalities related to peripheral neuropathies such as demyelinating neuropathy. Moreover, randomized controlled trials (RCT) and case-control studies in which MS patients received riboflavin supplementation or had higher dietary riboflavin intake showed improvements in neurological motor disability. Riboflavin is a cofactor of xanthine oxidase and its deficiency exacerbates low uric acid caused by high copper levels, leading to myelin degeneration. The vitamin additionally plays a significant role in the normal functioning of glutathione reductase (GR) as an antioxidant enzyme, and conditions of riboflavin deficiency lead to oxidative damage. Riboflavin promotes the gene and protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the CNS of an animal model of MS, suggesting that BDNF mediates the beneficial effect of riboflavin on neurological motor disability. Research to date generally supports the role of riboflavin in MS outcomes. However, further observational and interventional studies on human populations are warranted to validate the effects of riboflavin. PMID:29085589

  6. High-field MR imaging of spinal cord multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De La Paz, R.L.; Floris, R.; Norman, D.; Enzmann, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Fifty-one high-field MR imaging studies (1.5 T, General Electric Signa) of the spinal cord were performed in 42 patients (27 female, 15 male; mean age, 40 years) with clinically definitive (n = 34) or probable (n = 8) multiple sclerosis and suspected spinal cord lesions. MR imaging showed focal spinal cord abnormalities in 38 (75%) of 51 studies. T2-weighted images were abnormal (showing foci of high signal intensity) in 38 studies, T1-weighted images were abnormal (showing areas of low signal intensity or mass effect) in 16 (42%) of 38, and GRASS images were abnormal (showing foci of high signal intensity) in 9 (82%) of 11 cases. Brain MR imaging showed periventricular lesions typical of multiple sclerosis in 34 (81%) of 42 studies. Spinal cord studies were positive in eight cases with normal brain MR images, and brain studies were positive in 13 instances of normal spinal cord MR images. Four lesions were at the cervicomedullary junction, 44 in the cervical spinal cord, and three in the thoracic cord. Mass effect in cord lesions, simulating neoplasm, was seen in seven patients during the acute symptomatic phase. Serial studies in three patients with decreasing symptoms showed a reduction after 3-4 weeks and resolution of the mass effect after 2-6 months

  7. Anesthetic management of a patient with multiple sclerosis - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Barbin Zuccolotto

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease of the brain and spinal cord, characterized by muscle weakness, cognitive dysfunction, memory loss, and personality disorders. Factors that promote disease exacerbation are stress, physical trauma, infection, surgery, and hyperthermia. The objective is to describe the anesthetic management of a case referred to urological surgery. Case report: A female patient, 44 years of age, with multiple sclerosis, diagnosed with nephrolithiasis, referred for endoscopic ureterolythotripsy. Balanced general anesthesia was chosen, with midazolam, propofol and remifentanil target-controlled infusion; sevoflurane via laryngeal mask airway; and spontaneous ventilation. Because the patient had respiratory difficulty presenting with chest wall rigidity, it was decided to discontinue the infusion of remifentanil. There was no other complication or exacerbation of disease postoperatively. Conclusion: The use of neuromuscular blockers (depolarizing and non-depolarizing is a problem in these patients. As there was no need for muscle relaxation in this case, muscle relaxants were omitted. We conclude that the combination of propofol and sevoflurane was satisfactory, not resulting in hemodynamic instability or disease exacerbation.

  8. Clinical and electrophysiological findings in patients with phenylketonuria and epilepsy: Reflex features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz Celik, Senay; Bebek, Nerses; Gurses, Candan; Baykan, Betul; Gokyigit, Aysen

    2018-03-23

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is the most common form of amino acid metabolism disorders with autosomal recessive inheritance. The brain damage can be prevented by early diagnosis and a phenylalanine-restricted diet. Untreated or late-treated patients may show mental retardation and other cognitive dysfunctions, as well as motor disability and/or epilepsy. Three patients with PKU and epilepsy were recognized to have reflex epileptic features, and there were ten consecutive adult patients with PKU and epilepsy who were evaluated retrospectively. Medical history, ages at diagnosis and therapy onset, age at seizure onset, seizure types and reflex features, neurological findings, cranial imaging, electroencephalography (EEG) findings, and final clinical condition were evaluated. Reflex epilepsy features were examined in detail. The cases (6 females, 4 males) were diagnosed at ages between 3.5months and 12years. All patients had various degrees of mental-motor retardation and focal or generalized seizures with age at seizure onset varied between neonatal period and 15years. Three patients had febrile seizure, 3 patients had myoclonia, and 3 patients had status epilepticus. All patients had abnormal EEG findings except one. There was a slowing of background activity, and generalized discharges were observed in 7 patients; 3 of them had asymmetrical discharges. One patient had right hippocampal sclerosis (HS), and another patient had hypointensities in the basal ganglia and corpus callosum. Reflex features were clinically observed in 3 of the patients; however, EEG results did not show any related findings. One patient had reflex seizures triggered by photic stimuli, hot water, and startling; one by photic stimuli; and the other one by startling. Reports on the clinical and electrophysiological features of adult patients with PKU were scant. We emphasized that reflex clinical features may be observed in this metabolic disease, and focal epileptiform abnormalities and asymmetry

  9. Factor analysis of the Zarit Burden Interview in family caregivers of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Juyeon; Kim, Jung A

    2018-02-01

    The Zarit Burden Interview has been used in many studies to assess caregiver burden in family caregivers of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, but the factor structure of the Zarit Burden Interview in the caregivers of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients is unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the factor structure of the Zarit Burden Interview in family caregivers of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients using exploratory factor analysis. The exploratory factor analysis was performed using generalized least squares with oblique rotation in a sample of 202 family caregivers. Three factors had an eigenvalue greater than 1 and accounted for 60.33% of the total variance. The three factors were named as follows: (factor 1) "Social restrictions" (items 2, 3, and 10-15); (factor 2) "Self-criticism" (items 20-21); and (factor 3) "Anger and frustration" (items 1, 4-6, 9, and 16-19). The correlation between factors 1 and 3 was much higher (r = 0.79) than that between factors 1 and 2 (r = 0.14) or factors 2 and 3 (r = 0.15). The findings of this study enriched our understanding of several meaningful dimensions of the caregiving burden in caregivers of an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis population and provided opportunities for future intervention.

  10. New management algorithms in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Per Soelberg

    2014-01-01

    complex. The purpose of the review has been to work out new management algorithms for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis including new oral therapies and therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent large placebo-controlled trials in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Our current treatment algorithms include only IFN-β and glatiramer as available first-line disease-modifying drugs and natalizumab and fingolimod as second-line therapies. Today, 10 drugs have been approved in Europe and nine in the United States making the choice of therapy more...

  11. Reproductive History and Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, N. M.; Jorgensen, K. T.; Stenager, E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that reproductive factors may be involved in the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied associations of reproductive history with MS risk in a population-based setting. Methods: Using national databases, we established a cohort comprising 4.4 million...... Danish men and women born between 1935 and 1989 and alive in 1968 or later. We obtained information about their live-born children, pregnancy losses, pregnancy complications, and infertility diagnoses. MS cases in the cohort were identified through 2004 in the Danish Register of Multiple Sclerosis...

  12. Examination of the Relationship between Oral Health and Arterial Sclerosis without Genetic Confounding through the Study of Older Japanese Twins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Kurushima

    Full Text Available Although researchers have recently demonstrated a relationship between oral health and arterial sclerosis, the genetic contribution to this relationship has been ignored even though genetic factors are expected to have some effect on various diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate oral health as a significant risk factor related to arterial sclerosis after eliminating genetic confounding through study of older Japanese twins.Medical and dental surveys were conducted individually for 106 Japanese twin pairs over the age of 50 years. Maximal carotid intima-media thickness (IMT-Cmax was measured as a surrogate marker of arterial sclerosis. IMT-Cmax > 1.0 mm was diagnosed as arterial sclerosis. All of the twins were examined for the number of remaining teeth, masticatory performance, and periodontal status. We evaluated each measurement related with IMT-Cmax and arterial sclerosis using generalized estimating equations analysis adjusted for potential risk factors. For non-smoking monozygotic twins, a regression analysis using a "between within" model was conducted to evaluate the relationship between IMT-Cmax and the number of teeth as the environmental factor controlling genetic and familial confounding.We examined 91 monozygotic and 15 dizygotic twin pairs (males: 42, females: 64 with a mean (± standard deviation age of 67.4 ± 10.0 years. Out of all of the oral health-related measurements collected, only the number of teeth was significantly related to arterial sclerosis (odds ratio: 0.72, 95% confidence interval: 0.52-0.99 per five teeth. Regression analysis showed a significant association between the IMT-Cmax and the number of teeth as an environmental factor (p = 0.037.Analysis of monozygotic twins older than 50 years of age showed that having fewer teeth could be a significant environmental factor related to arterial sclerosis, even after controlling for genetic and familial confounding.

  13. Featuring animacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ritter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Algonquian languages are famous for their animacy-based grammatical properties—an animacy based noun classification system and direct/inverse system which gives rise to animacy hierarchy effects in the determination of verb agreement. In this paper I provide new evidence for the proposal that the distinctive properties of these languages is due to the use of participant-based features, rather than spatio-temporal ones, for both nominal and verbal functional categories (Ritter & Wiltschko 2009, 2014. Building on Wiltschko (2012, I develop a formal treatment of the Blackfoot aspectual system that assumes a category Inner Aspect (cf. MacDonald 2008, Travis 1991, 2010. Focusing on lexical aspect in Blackfoot, I demonstrate that the classification of both nouns (Seinsarten and verbs (Aktionsarten is based on animacy, rather than boundedness, resulting in a strikingly different aspectual system for both categories. 

  14. Nutrition Facts in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Riccio

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness.

  15. Hearing disorders in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, Miriam; Levine, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that is both a focal inflammatory and a chronic neurodegenerative disease. The focal inflammatory component is characterized by destruction of central nervous system myelin, including the spinal cord; as such it can impair any central neural system, including the auditory system. While on the one hand auditory complaints in MS patients are rare compared to other senses, such as vision and proprioception, on the other hand auditory tests of precise neural timing are never "silent." Whenever focal MS lesions are detected involving the pontine auditory pathway, auditory tests requiring precise neural timing are always abnormal, while auditory functions not requiring such precise timing are often normal. Azimuth sound localization is accomplished by comparing the timing and loudness of the sound at the two ears. Hence tests of azimuth sound localization must obligatorily involve the central nervous system and particularly the brainstem. Whenever a focal lesion was localized to the pontine auditory pathway, timing tests were always abnormal, but loudness tests were not. Moreover, a timing test that included only high-frequency sounds was very often abnormal, even when there was no detectable focal MS lesion involving the pontine auditory pathway. This test may be a marker for the chronic neurodegenerative aspect of MS, and, as such could be used to complement the magnetic resonance imaging scan in monitoring the neurodegenerative aspect of MS. Studies of MS brainstem lesion location and auditory function have led to advances in understanding how the human brain processes sound. The brain processes binaural sounds independently for time and level in a two-stage process. The first stage is at the level of the superior olivary complex (SOC) and the second at a level rostral to the SOC. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Endothelin-1 in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pizzorni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated endothelin-1 (ET-1 plasma levels in patients affected by primary Raynaud’s phenomenon (PRP, as well as in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc and secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon (SRP. Furthermore, ET-1 levels were investigated in SSc patients with different patterns of peripheral microvascular damage, as evaluated by nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC. Methods: 23 PRP patients, 67 SSc patients according to ACR criteria, and 23 healthy subjects were enrolled. SSc microvascular involvement was classified in three different patterns (Early, Active, and Late by NVC, as previously described. Results: ET-1 was found significantly higher in both PRP and SRP, when compared with controls (median ±IQR: 3.3±2.8, 2.7±2.2, 2.0±2.2, respectively (p=0.05. No statistically significant difference of ET-1 levels was observed between PRP and SRP patients. ET-1 was found higher in patients with Late NVC pattern, when compared with both Active and Early NVC patterns (median±IQR: 3.4±2.5, 2.4±2.2, 2.5±2.1, respectively, but without statistical significance. Patients with Late NVC pattern showed significantly higher ET-1 plasma levels than controls (p=0.03. No correlation was found between ET-1 levels and disease duration in both groups, as well as between ET-1 levels and age of patients. Conclusions: These data support previous studies, reporting increased ET-1 plasma levels in both PRP and SRP patients. Interestingly, patients with the Late NVC pattern of microangiopathy showed higher ET-1 plasma levels than controls. The high levels of ET-1 detected in the Late NVC pattern of microangiopathy might be related to the larger fibrotic involvement typical of the advanced stages of disease.

  17. Tuberous sclerosis complex surveillance and management: recommendations of the 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Darcy A; Northrup, Hope

    2013-10-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic disorder affecting every organ system, but disease manifestations vary significantly among affected individuals. The diverse and varied presentations and progression can be life-threatening with significant impact on cost and quality of life. Current surveillance and management practices are highly variable among region and country, reflective of the fact that last consensus recommendations occurred in 1998 and an updated, comprehensive standard is lacking that incorporates the latest scientific evidence and current best clinical practices. The 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Group, comprising 79 specialists from 14 countries, was organized into 12 separate subcommittees, each led by a clinician with advanced expertise in tuberous sclerosis complex and the relevant medical subspecialty. Each subcommittee focused on a specific disease area with important clinical management implications and was charged with formulating key clinical questions to address within its focus area, reviewing relevant literature, evaluating the strength of data, and providing a recommendation accordingly. The updated consensus recommendations for clinical surveillance and management in tuberous sclerosis complex are summarized here. The recommendations are relevant to the entire lifespan of the patient, from infancy to adulthood, including both individuals where the diagnosis is newly made as well as individuals where the diagnosis already is established. The 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Recommendations provide an evidence-based, standardized approach for optimal clinical care provided for individuals with tuberous sclerosis complex. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Natalizumab treatment for multiple sclerosis: updated recommendations for patient selection and monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappos, Ludwig; Bates, David; Edan, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Natalizumab, a highly specific α4-integrin antagonist, is approved for treatment of patients with active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). It is generally recommended for individuals who have not responded to a currently available first-line disease-modifying therapy or who have very......, based on additional long-term follow-up of clinical studies and post-marketing observations, including appropriate patient selection and management recommendations.......Natalizumab, a highly specific α4-integrin antagonist, is approved for treatment of patients with active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). It is generally recommended for individuals who have not responded to a currently available first-line disease-modifying therapy or who have very...... active disease. The expected benefits of natalizumab treatment have to be weighed against risks, especially the rare but serious adverse event of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. In this Review, we revisit and update previous recommendations on natalizumab for treatment of patients with RRMS...

  19. Tuberous sclerosis: A clinicoradiological evaluation of 110 cases with particular reference to atypical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingsley, D.P.E.; Kendall, B.E.; Fitz, C.R.; Hospital for Sick Children, London

    1986-01-01

    CT scans on 110 children with a diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis have been compared with the clinical features of the disease. Patients with definite radiological as well as definite or suggestive clinical features accounted for only 80% of cases. 16% had positive radiological and negative clinical features and 4% had positive clinical and negative radiological features. There is little relationship between the mental development and the incidence of periventricular tubers or cortical and parenchymal lesions. In 15 patients older than 7 years the diagnosis was only made at the time of CT. Cerebral atrophy was not a prominent feature. Giant cell astrocytomas were present in 14%, one third of whom presented for the first time. (orig.)

  20. Atuoradiographic detection of multiple sclerosis plaques with an ω3 (peripheral type benzodiazepine) binding site radiogland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAUW, J.J.; Sazdovitch, V.; Cornu, P.; Dubois, A.; Benavides, J.; Mac Kenzie, E.; Scatton, B.

    1989-01-01

    In Multiple Sclerosis (MS), the presence of monocyte-macrophages and microglial cells in active plaques is a constant feature. They are numerous at the border of active lesions where they constiture, with other cell types such as lymphocytes and oligodendrocytes the so-called flial wall. Monocyte-macrophages and microglial cells are thought to be directly involved in the process of demyelination. Some macrophages laden with meylin degradation products are also seen in the center of the plaqie, often located in the perivascular cuffs. In addition, astrocytic gliosis occurs in the center of the plaques. As all these cell types are richly endowed with ω3 sites, the feasibility of using ω3 site autoradiagraphy to detect the demyelination plaques in the brain of post-mortem cases of Multiple Sclerosis has been investigated. (Author). 8 refs

  1. Rhinophyma in tuberous sclerosis complex: case report with brief review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich, Reinhard E.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis or tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant inherited disease characterized by the triad epilepsy, hamartomas (angiofibroma and reduced intellectual capacity. Phenotype can vary considerably. Almost all patients with TSC have at least one characteristic dermatologic feature. Facial angiofibroma can cause severe disfigurement. It may involve the cheeks, perioral region and nose, resulting in thick layers of nodular and pustular skin. Aesthetic surgery of the face comprises an individually adapted ablation of the affected skin regions in order to improve physical appearance. Reports on the subject of surgery for nasal angiofibroma confirm the homogenous transformation of the connective tissues by this hamartoma. Hitherto there is only one report in the literature describing the typical epithelial alterations of the nasal skin compatible with a rhinophyma and adjacent angiofibroma. Here we report the successful electrosurgical treatment of a patient with TSC and extensive sebaceous glands giving rise to a rhinophyma in close association with angiofibroma.

  2. Health-related quality of life in Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis: a cross-cultural study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakpour, Amir H; Yekaninejad, Mir S; Mohammadi, Nastaran K

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who live in Tehran and to compare data with evaluations of both the general population and MS patients in other countries. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hund...

  3. Parameter Optimization for Feature and Hit Generation in a General Unknown Screening Method-Proof of Concept Study Using a Design of Experiment Approach for a High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Procedure after Data Independent Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmiger, Marco P; Poetzsch, Michael; Steuer, Andrea E; Kraemer, Thomas

    2018-03-06

    High resolution mass spectrometry and modern data independent acquisition (DIA) methods enable the creation of general unknown screening (GUS) procedures. However, even when DIA is used, its potential is far from being exploited, because often, the untargeted acquisition is followed by a targeted search. Applying an actual GUS (including untargeted screening) produces an immense amount of data that must be dealt with. An optimization of the parameters regulating the feature detection and hit generation algorithms of the data processing software could significantly reduce the amount of unnecessary data and thereby the workload. Design of experiment (DoE) approaches allow a simultaneous optimization of multiple parameters. In a first step, parameters are evaluated (crucial or noncrucial). Second, crucial parameters are optimized. The aim in this study was to reduce the number of hits, without missing analytes. The obtained parameter settings from the optimization were compared to the standard settings by analyzing a test set of blood samples spiked with 22 relevant analytes as well as 62 authentic forensic cases. The optimization lead to a marked reduction of workload (12.3 to 1.1% and 3.8 to 1.1% hits for the test set and the authentic cases, respectively) while simultaneously increasing the identification rate (68.2 to 86.4% and 68.8 to 88.1%, respectively). This proof of concept study emphasizes the great potential of DoE approaches to master the data overload resulting from modern data independent acquisition methods used for general unknown screening procedures by optimizing software parameters.

  4. Onset symptoms in paediatric multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Magnus Spangsberg; Sellebjerg, Finn; Blinkenberg, Morten

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) carries a relatively higher mortality and morbidity than adult MS. Paediatric MS symptoms and paraclinical findings at the first demyelinating event have never before been characterised in a Danish setting. The aim of this study was to compare...

  5. Traces of disease in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraete, E.

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive disease of the motor system involving both upper motor neurons in the brain and lower motor neurons in the spinal cord. Patients suffer from progressive wasting and weakness of limb, bulbar and respiratory muscles. Onset and disease course in ALS

  6. Accelerated Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... questions and enable an era of optimized MS treatment. Read more... The Accelerated Cure Project for MS is a non-profit, 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization whose mission is to accelerate efforts toward a cure for multiple sclerosis by rapidly advancing research that determines its causes ...

  7. Myeloproliferative neoplasms in five multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sigrun; Bjerrum, Ole Weis

    2013-01-01

    The concurrence of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) is unusual. We report five patients from a localized geographic area in Denmark with both MS and MPN; all the patients were diagnosed with MPNs in the years 2007-2012. We describe the patients' history and treatment...

  8. Pharmacologic treatment of depression in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus W.; Glazenborg, Arjon; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Mostert, Jop; De Keyser, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Background Depression is a common problem in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). It is unclear which pharmacologic treatment is the most effective and the least harmful. Objectives To investigate the efficacy and tolerability of pharmacologic treatments for depression in patients with MS. Search

  9. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogojan, C; Frederiksen, J L

    2009-01-01

    Intensive immunosuppresion followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been suggested as potential treatment in severe forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Since 1995 ca. 400 patients have been treated with HSCT. Stabilization or improvement occurred in almost 70% of cases at least...

  10. Quantitative muscle ultrasonography in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, I.M.P.; Rooij, F.G. van; Overeem, S.; Pillen, S.; Janssen, H.M.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether quantitative muscle ultrasonography can detect structural muscle changes in early-stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Bilateral transverse scans were made of five muscles or muscle groups (sternocleidomastoid, biceps brachii/brachialis, forearm flexor group,

  11. Clinical psychology and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pagnini

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis is a fatal and progressive disease, characterized by progressive muscles weakness, with consequent loss of physical capacities. Psychologists can play an important role in ALS care, by providing clinical activities in every step of the disease, including support and counseling activities directed to patients, their caregivers and to physicians.

  12. One year in review 2017: systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsotti, Simone; Bruni, Cosimo; Orlandi, Martina; Della Rossa, Alessandra; Marasco, Emiliano; Codullo, Veronica; Guiducci, Serena

    2017-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare acquired systemic disease characterised by heterogeneous evolution and outcome. Each year novel insights into the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of this severe disease have been published. We herewith provide our overview of the most significant literature contributions published over the last year.

  13. Sleep and Fasciculations in Amyothropic Lateral Sclerosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šonka, K.; Fiksa, J.; Horváth, E.; Kemlink, D.; Süssová, J.; Böhm, J.; Šebesta, Václav; Volná, J.; Nevšímalová, S.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2004), s. 25-30 ISSN 1432-9123 R&D Projects: GA MZd NF5999 Keywords : amyothropic lateral sclerosis ALS * fasciculation * fragmentary myoclonus * periodic leg movements in sleep PLMS * polysomnography PSG * electromyography EMG * REM sleep Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

  14. The risk of multiple sclerosis in nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, Egon; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Koch-Henriksen, Nils

    2003-01-01

    The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in nurses during the period 1980-1996 was calculated in a nationwide study. The cohort consisted of 69,428 nurses, 2185 men and 67,243 women. Sixty (two men and 58 women) with definite MS were observed, whereas 69.3 were expected. We found no significant...

  15. The socioeconomic consequences of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Wanscher, Benedikte; Frederiksen, Jette

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has serious negative effects on health-, social-, and work-related issues for the patients and their families, thus causing significant socioeconomic burden. The objective of the study was to determine healthcare costs and indirect illness costs in MS patient in a national...

  16. The association between multiple sclerosis and uveitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tine Gadegaard; Frederiksen, Jette

    2016-01-01

    The association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and uveitis has been questioned. Nerve tissue and eye tissue develop from the same embryonic cells; thus, MS and uveitis could be etiologically associated. In published studies, the prevalence of MS in patients with uveitis differe from 0.7% to 30...

  17. MYO9B polymorphisms in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemppinen, A.; Suvela, M.; Tienari, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 3' region of myosin IXB (MYO9B) gene have recently been reported to associate with different inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. We monitored for the association of MYO9B variants to multiple sclerosis (MS) in four Northern European populations. First...

  18. Antigen-specific therapies in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, J.M. van

    1998-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the major neurological disease of young adults in the western world, affecting about 1 per 1,000. It is characterised by chronic or recurrent lesions of inflammatory damage in the white matter of the central nervous system. Within such lesions, the protective myelin sheath is

  19. Spinal cord involvement in Balo's concentric sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreft, Karim L.; Mellema, S. Jouke; Hintzen, Rogier Q.

    2009-01-01

    We present a patient with a history of myelitis, who had a steroid refractory attack of CNS inflammatory demyelinating disease that developed into cerebral concentric sclerosis of Balo after plasma exchange. The acute inflammatory disease involved the spinal cord, a phenomenon rarely demonstrated.

  20. White matter abnormalities in tuberous sclerosis complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, P.D. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Academic Dept. of Radiology; Bolton, P. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Section of Developmental Psychiatry; Verity, C. [Addenbrooke`s NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Paediatric Radiology

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and describe the range of white matter abnormalities in children with tuberous sclerosis complex by means of MR imaging. Material and Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed on the basis of MR imaging findings in 20 cases of tuberous sclerosis complex in children aged 17 years or younger. Results: White matter abnormalities were present in 19/20 (95%) cases of tuberous sclerosis complex. These were most frequently (19/20 cases) found in relation to cortical tubers in the supratentorial compartment. White matter abnormalities related to tubers were found in the cerebellum in 3/20 (15%) cases. White matter abnormalities described as radial migration lines were found in relation to 5 tubers in 3 (15%) children. In 4/20 (20%) cases, white matter abnormalities were found that were not related to cortical tubers. These areas had the appearance of white matter cysts in 3 cases and infarction in the fourth. In the latter case there was a definable event in the clinical history, supporting the diagnosis of stroke. Conclusion: A range of white matter abnormalities were found by MR imaging in tuberous sclerosis complex, the commonest being gliosis and hypomyelination related to cortical tubers. Radial migration lines were seen infrequently in relation to cortical tubers and these are thought to represent heterotopic glia and neurons along the expected path of cortical migration. (orig.)

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies for Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blinkenberg, Morten; Soelberg Sørensen, Per

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) has improved considerably over the last decade because of new insights into MS pathology and biotechnological advances. This has led to the development of new potent pharmaceutical compounds targeting different processes in the complex autoimmune pathology...... the context of different treatment strategies. Finally, we consider the most important future developments....

  2. Concordance for multiple sclerosis in Danish twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T; Skytthe, Axel; Stenager, Egon

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in twins has not previously been studied in complete nationwide data sets. The existence of almost complete MS and twin registries in Denmark ensures that essentially unbiased samples of MS cases among twins can be obtained. In this population-based study...

  3. Treating fatigue in multiple sclerosis : Aerobic training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heine, M

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered a chronic and debilitating autoimmune-mediated inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system. It is the number one neurological condition in young adults, affecting approximately 17.000 people in the Netherlands. Patients with MS

  4. Unusual Cutaneous Manifestation of Tuberous Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Shah

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations are found in 60 to 70% cases of tuberous sclerosis and consist of adenoma sebaceum, periungual fibromatas, cafe au lait spots, shagreen patches and white macules. Our patient showed unusual skin manifestations like spotty pigmentation on the chest, back and abdomen and hyperkeratosis palmaris et plantaris.

  5. Feasibility of an International Multiple Sclerosis Rehabilitation Data Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Elissa Held; Baert, Ilse; Finlayson, Marcia; Feys, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) rehabilitation evidence is limited due to methodological factors, which may be addressed by a data repository. We describe the perceived challenges of, motivators for, interest in participating in, and key features of an international MS rehabilitation data repository. Methods: A multimethod sequential investigation was performed with the results of two focus groups, using nominal group technique, and study aims informing the development of an online questionnaire. Percentage agreement and key quotations illustrated questionnaire findings. Subgroup comparisons were made between clinicians and researchers and between participants in North America and Europe. Results: Rehabilitation professionals from 25 countries participated (focus groups: n = 21; questionnaire: n = 166). The top ten challenges (C) and motivators (M) identified by the focus groups were database control/management (C); ethical/legal concerns (C); data quality (C); time, effort, and cost (C); best practice (M); uniformity (C); sustainability (C); deeper analysis (M); collaboration (M); and identifying research needs (M). Percentage agreement with questionnaire statements regarding challenges to, motivators for, interest in, and key features of a successful repository was at least 80%, 85%, 72%, and 83%, respectively, across each group of statements. Questionnaire subgroup analysis revealed a few differences (P < .05), including that clinicians more strongly identified with improving best practice as a motivator. Conclusions: Findings support clinician and researcher interest in and potential for success of an international MS rehabilitation data repository if prioritized challenges and motivators are addressed and key features are included. PMID:29507539

  6. Symptomatic therapy in multiple sclerosis: a review for a multimodal approach in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    de Sa, João Carlos Correia; Airas, Laura; Bartholome, Emmanuel; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Mattle, Heinrich; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; O’Riordan, Jonathan; Sellebjerg, Finn; Stankoff, Bruno; Vass, Karl; Walczak, Agata; Wiendl, Heinz; Kieseier, Bernd C.

    2011-01-01

    As more investigations into factors affecting the quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) are undertaken, it is becoming increasingly apparent that certain comorbidities and associated symptoms commonly found in these patients differ in incidence, pathophysiology and other factors compared with the general population. Many of these MS-related symptoms are frequently ignored in assessments of disease status and are often not considered to be associated with the disease. Resear...

  7. Attributional Style and Depression in Multiple Sclerosis: The Learned Helplessness Model

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas, Gray A.; Arnett, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Several etiologic theories have been proposed to explain depression in the general population. Studying these models and modifying them for use in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population may allow us to better understand depression in MS. According to the reformulated learned helplessness (LH) theory, individuals who attribute negative events to internal, stable, and global causes are more vulnerable to depression. This study differentiated attributional style that was or was not related to MS...

  8. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia secondary to vascular compression in a patient with multiple sclerosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaitour Emil

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Glossopharyngeal neuralgia is an uncommon, painful syndrome, characterized by paroxysms of pain in the sensory distribution of the 9th cranial nerve. Idiopathic glossopharyngeal neuralgia may be due to compression of the glossopharyngeal nerve by adjacent vessels, while secondary glossopharyngeal neuralgia is associated with identifiable lesions affecting the glossopharyngeal nerve at different levels of its neuroanatomic pathway. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia is rare in the general population, but is more common in patients with multiple sclerosis. Case presentation A 56-year-old Caucasian woman with multiple sclerosis and migraine presented to our facility with intermittent lancinating pain to the right of her throat, tongue, and the floor of her mouth that had been occurring for the past year. The pain was intense, sharp, and stabbing, which lasted two to six seconds with radiation to the right ear. Initially, the attacks were infrequent, however, they had become more intense and frequent over time. Our patient reported weight loss, headache, painful swallowing, and the inability to maintain sleep due to painful attacks. A neurological examination revealed a right-handed woman with trigger points in the back of the tongue and throat on the right side. She also had dysphagia, hoarseness, and pain in the distribution of the right glossopharyngeal nerve. Mild right hemiparesis, hyperreflexia, dysmetria, and an ataxic gait were present. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain was consistent with multiple sclerosis and magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated a loop of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery compressing the right glossopharyngeal nerve. She responded satisfactorily to carbamazepine. Microvascular decompression and Gamma Knife® radiosurgery were discussed in case of failure of the medical treatment; however, she declined these options. Conclusions Glossopharyngeal neuralgia in multiple sclerosis may

  9. Strategies to reduce hyperthermia in ambulatory multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Richard F; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Cox, Mary Jude; Long, William B; Winters, Kathryne L; Becker, Daniel G

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 400,000 Americans have multiple sclerosis. Worldwide, multiple sclerosis affects 2.5 million individuals. Multiple sclerosis affects two to three times as many women as men. The adverse effects of hyperthermia in patients with multiple sclerosis have been known since 1890. While most patients with multiple sclerosis experience reversible worsening of their neurologic deficits, some patients experience irreversible neurologic deficits. In fact, heat-induced fatalities have been encountered in multiple sclerosis patients subjected to hyperthermia. Hyperthermia can be caused through sun exposure, exercise, and infection. During the last 50 years, numerous strategies have evolved to reduce hyperthermia in individuals with multiple sclerosis, such as photoprotective clothing, sunglasses, sunscreens, hydrotherapy, and prevention of urinary tract infections. Hydrotherapy has become an essential component of rehabilitation for multiple sclerosis patients in hospitals throughout the world. On the basis of this positive hospital experience, hydrotherapy has been expanded through the use of compact aquatic exercise pools at home along with personal cooling devices that promote local and systemic hypothermia in multiple sclerosis patients. The Multiple Sclerosis Association of America and NASA have played leadership roles in developing and recommending technology that will prevent hyperthermia in multiple sclerosis patients and should be consulted for new technological advances that will benefit the multiple sclerosis patient. In addition, products recommended for photoprotection by The Skin Cancer Foundation may also be helpful to the multiple sclerosis patient's defense against hyperthermia. Infections in the urinary tract, especially detrusor-external sphincter dyssynergia, are initially managed conservatively with intermittent self-catheterization and pharmacologic therapy. In those cases, refractory to conservative therapy, transurethral external

  10. Risks of multiple sclerosis in relatives of patients in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, H; Vlietinck, R; Debruyne, J; DeKeyser, J; DHooghe, MB; Loos, R; Medaer, R; Truyen, L; Yee, IML; Sadovnick, AD

    Objectives - To calculate age adjusted risks for multiple sclerosis in relatives of Flemish patients with multiple sclerosis. Methods - Lifetime risks were calculated using the maximum likelihood approach. Results - Vital information was obtained on 674 probands with multiple sclerosis in Flanders

  11. Features of Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disabilities in FXS include a range from moderate learning disabilities to more severe intellectual disabilities. Physical features may ... intellectual disability. Others may have moderate or mild learning disabilities, emotional/mental health issues, general anxiety and/or ...

  12. Lung volume recruitment in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadim Srour

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pulmonary function abnormalities have been described in multiple sclerosis including reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC and cough but the time course of this impairment is unknown. Peak cough flow (PCF is an important parameter for patients with respiratory muscle weakness and a reduced PCF has a direct impact on airway clearance and may therefore increase the risk of respiratory tract infections. Lung volume recruitment is a technique that improves PCF by inflating the lungs to their maximal insufflation capacity. OBJECTIVES: Our goals were to describe the rate of decline of pulmonary function and PCF in patients with multiple sclerosis and describe the use of lung volume recruitment in this population. METHODS: We reviewed all patients with multiple sclerosis referred to a respiratory neuromuscular rehabilitation clinic from February 1999 until December 2010. Lung volume recruitment was attempted in patients with FVC <80% predicted. Regular twice daily lung volume recruitment was prescribed if it resulted in a significant improvement in the laboratory. RESULTS: There were 79 patients included, 35 of whom were seen more than once. A baseline FVC <80% predicted was present in 82% of patients and 80% of patients had a PCF insufficient for airway clearance. There was a significant decline in FVC (122.6 mL/y, 95% CI 54.9-190.3 and PCF (192 mL/s/y, 95% 72-311 over a median follow-up time of 13.4 months. Lung volume recruitment was associated with a slower decline in FVC (p<0.0001 and PCF (p = 0.042. CONCLUSION: Pulmonary function and cough decline significantly over time in selected patients with multiple sclerosis and lung volume recruitment is associated with a slower rate of decline in lung function and peak cough flow. Given design limitations, additional studies are needed to assess the role of lung volume recruitment in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  13. The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register

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    Magyari M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Melinda Magyari,1,3 Nils Koch-Henriksen,1,2 Per Soelberg Sørensen3 1Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Clinical Institute, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, 3Danish Multiple Sclerosis Center, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Aim of the database: The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register (DMSTR serves as a clinical quality register, enabling the health authorities to monitor the quality of the disease-modifying treatment, and it is an important data source for epidemiological research. Study population: The DMSTR includes all patients with multiple sclerosis who had been treated with disease-modifying drugs since 1996. At present, more than 8,400 patients have been registered in this database. Data are continuously entered online into a central database from all sites in Denmark at start and at regular visits. Main variables: Include age, sex, onset year and year of the diagnosis, basic clinical information, and information about treatment, side effects, and relapses. Descriptive data: Notification is done at treatment start, and thereafter at every scheduled clinical visit 3 months after treatment start, and thereafter every 6 months. The longitudinally collected information about the disease activity and side effects made it possible to investigate the clinical efficacy and adverse events of different disease-modifying therapies. Conclusion: The database contributed to a certain harmonization of treatment procedures in Denmark and will continue to be a major factor in terms of quality in clinical praxis, research and monitoring of adverse events, and plays an important role in research. Keywords: multiple sclerosis, epidemiology, immunomodulatory treatment, neutralizing antibodies, observational studies, registry research, disease modifying therapy

  14. [Multiple sclerosis, loss of functionality and gender].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-González, Félix; Álvarez-Roldán, Arturo

    2017-12-01

    To identify the type of support and assistance that patients with multiple sclerosis need in order to cope with the loss of functionality, and to show how gender affects the perception of these needs. Interpretative-phenomenological qualitative study. Granada (Spain). Year: 2014. Intentional sample: 30 patients and 20 family caregivers. Data were gathered from 26 interviews and 4 focus groups. The data were coded and analysed with the NVivo programme. The multiple sclerosis patients and family caregivers had different perceptions of the loss of capacity to undertake activities of daily living. Being able to self care was considered the last vestige of autonomy. The women with multiple sclerosis tried to take on the responsibility of housework, but the male caregivers became gradually involved in these tasks. Gender roles were redefined with respect to housekeeping. The multiple sclerosis patients showed a need for emotional support. Some of the men had abandoned the stereotype of the strong male as a result of the decline in their health. Adaptations in the home took place without planning them in advance. The use of mobility devices started on an occasional basis. A fear of stigma was an obstacle for regular use of assistive technology. Health care for people with multiple sclerosis should include family caregivers. Gender influences the perception that caregivers and patients have of the assistance they require to maximise their quality of life. This flags up several intervention areas for the follow-up and long-term care of these patients by the healthcare system. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Generalized symmetry algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragon, N.

    1979-01-01

    The possible use of trilinear algebras as symmetry algebras for para-Fermi fields is investigated. The shortcomings of the examples are argued to be a general feature of such generalized algebras. (author)

  16. Characteristics of pediatric multiple sclerosis: The Turkish pediatric multiple sclerosis database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Ünsal; Anlar, Banu; Gücüyener, Kıvılcım

    2017-11-01

    To document the clinical and paraclinical features of pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) in Turkey. Data of MS patients with onset before age 18 years (n = 193) were collected from 27 pediatric neurology centers throughout Turkey. Earlier-onset (<12 years) and later-onset (≥12 years) groups were compared. There were 123 (63.7%) girls and 70 (36.3%) boys aged 4-17 years, median 14 years at disease onset. Family history of MS was 6.5%. The first presentation was polysymptomatic in 55.4% of patients, with brainstem syndromes (50.3%), sensory disturbances (44%), motor symptoms (33.2%), and optic neuritis (26.4%) as common initial manifestations. Nineteen children had facial paralysis and 10 had epileptic seizures at first attack; 21 (11%) were initially diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). Oligoclonal bands were identified in 68% of patients. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed periventricular (96%), cortical/juxtacortical (64.2%), brainstem (63%), cerebellum (51.4%), and spinal cord (67%) involvement. Visual evoked potentials (VEP) were abnormal in 52%; serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were low in 68.5% of patients. The earlier-onset group had a higher rate of infection/vaccination preceding initial attack, initial diagnosis of ADEM, longer interval between first 2 attacks, and more disability accumulating in the first 3 years of the disease. Brainstem and cerebellum are common sites of clinical and radiological involvement in pediatric-onset MS. VEP abnormalities are frequent even in patients without history of optic neuropathy. Vitamin D status does not appear to affect the course in early disease. MS beginning before 12 years of age has certain characteristics in history and course. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fructose Malabsorption in Systemic Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Isabelle; Leroi, Anne-Marie; Gourcerol, Guillaume; Levesque, Hervé; Ménard, Jean-François; Ducrotte, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The deleterious effect of fructose, which is increasingly incorporated in many beverages, dairy products, and processed foods, has been described; fructose malabsorption has thus been reported in up to 2.4% of healthy subjects, leading to digestive clinical symptoms (eg, pain, distension, diarrhea). Because digestive involvement is frequent in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), we hypothesized that fructose malabsorption could be responsible for intestinal manifestations in these patients. The aims of this prospective study were to: determine the prevalence of fructose malabsorption, in SSc; predict which SSc patients are at risk of developing fructose malabsorption; and assess the outcome of digestive symptoms in SSc patients after initiation of standardized low-fructose diet. Eighty consecutive patients with SSc underwent fructose breath test. All SSc patients also completed a questionnaire on digestive symptoms, and a global symptom score (GSS) was calculated. The prevalence of fructose malabsorption was as high as 40% in SSc patients. We also observed a marked correlation between the presence of fructose malabsorption and: higher values of GSS score of digestive symptoms (P = 0.000004); and absence of delayed gastric emptying (P = 0.007). Furthermore, in SSc patients with fructose malabsorption, the median value of GSS score of digestive symptoms was lower after initiation of standardized low-fructose diet (4 before vs. 1 after; P = 0.0009). Our study underscores that fructose malabsorption often occurs in SSc patients. Our findings are thus relevant for clinical practice, highlighting that fructose breath test is a helpful, noninvasive method by: demonstrating fructose intolerance in patients with SSc; and identifying the group of SSc patients with fructose intolerance who may benefit from low-fructose diet. Interestingly, because the present series also shows that low-fructose diet resulted in a marked decrease of gastrointestinal

  18. Cranial Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Hayriye Sorgun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that cranial neuropathy findings could be seen in the neurologic examination of multiple sclerosis (MS patients, although brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may not reveal any lesion responsible for the cranial nerve involvement. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of brainstem and cranial nerve involvement, except for olfactory and optic nerves, during MS attacks, and to investigate the rate of an available explanation for the cranial neuropathy findings by lesion localization on brain MRI. METHODS: Ninety-five attacks of 86 MS patients were included in the study. The patients underwent a complete neurological examination, and cranial nerve palsies (CNP were determined during MS attacks. RESULTS: CNP were found as follows: 3rd CNP in 7 (7.4%, 4th CNP in 1 (1.1%, 5th CNP in 6 (6.3%, 6th CNP in 12 (12.6%, 7th CNP in 5 (5.3%, 8th CNP in 4 (4.2%, and 9th and 10th CNP in 2 (2.1% out of 95 attacks. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO was detected in 5 (5.4%, nystagmus in 37 (38.9%, vertigo in 9 (6.3%, and diplopia in 14 (14.7% out of 95 attacks. Pons, mesencephalon and bulbus lesions were detected in 58.7%, 41.5% and 21.1% of the patients, respectively, on the brain MRI. Cranial nerve palsy findings could not be explained by the localization of the lesions on brainstem MRI in 5 attacks; 2 of them were 3rd CNP (1 with INO, 2 were 6th CNP and 1 was a combination of 6th, 7th and 8th CNP. CONCLUSION: The most frequently affected cranial nerve and brainstem region in MS patients is the 6th cranial nerve and pons, respectively. A few of the MS patients have normal brainstem MRI, although they have cranial neuropathy findings in the neurologic examination.

  19. Determinants of mortality in systemic sclerosis: a focused review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Dilli Ram; Jayakumar, Divya; Danve, Abhijeet; Sehra, Shiv Tej; Derk, Chris T

    2017-11-07

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is an autoimmune rheumatic disorder that is characterized by fibrosis, vascular dysfunction, and autoantibody production that involves most visceral organs. It is characterized by a high morbidity and mortality rate, mainly due to disease-related complications. Epidemiological data describing mortality and survival in this population have been based on both population and observational studies. Multiple clinical and non-clinical factors have been found to predict higher likelihood of death among thepatients. Here, we do an extensive review of the available literature, utilizing the PubMed database, to describe scleroderma and non-scleroderma related determinants of mortality in this population. We found that even though the mortality among the general population has declined, scleroderma continues to carry a very high morbidity and mortality rate, however we have made some slow progress in improving the mortality among scleroderma patients over the last few decades.

  20. Hepatic manifestations of tuberous sclerosis studied by US and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galant, J.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Ripolles, T.; Martinez-Rodrigo, J.; Ferrer, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    Liver hamartomas in tuberous sclerosis (TS) have been uncommonly documented compared with hamartomatous lesions in other organs. We prospectively studied by US 21 patients that fulfilled the established criteria of TS, looking for hepatic and renal lesions. Nine patients (43%) showed multiple, rounded hyperechoic liver lesions. Of these patients, 8 were also studied with CT showing several round low-density fatty lesions. Multiple hyperechoic renal lesions similar to those described in the liver were present in 17 patients (81%). Fat-containing tumors in the liver in TS have been described as liver hamartomas. We believe, considering the high prevalence of liver hamartomas in patients with TS and the scarcity of fat-containing lesions in the general population, that their presence should be considered as a criterion of TS, even in the absence of histological confirmation. (orig.)

  1. The Gas6/TAM System and Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Mattia; Pirisi, Mario; Sainaghi, Pier Paolo

    2016-10-28

    Growth arrest specific 6 (Gas6) is a multimodular circulating protein, the biological actions of which are mediated by the interaction with three transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors: Tyro3, Axl, and MerTK, collectively named TAM. Over the last few decades, many progresses have been done in the understanding of the biological activities of this highly pleiotropic system, which plays a role in the regulation of immune response, inflammation, coagulation, cell growth, and clearance of apoptotic bodies. Recent findings have further related Gas6 and TAM receptors to neuroinflammation in general and, specifically, to multiple sclerosis (MS). In this paper, we review the biology of the Gas6/TAM system and the current evidence supporting its potential role in the pathogenesis of MS.

  2. Cognitive status in patients with multiple sclerosis in Lanzarote

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Martín MY

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available María Yaiza Pérez-Martín,1 Pablo Eguia-del Río,2 Montserrat González-Platas,1 Alejandro Jiménez-Sosa31Service of Neurology, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, 2Service of Neurology, Doctor José Molina Orosa Hospital, Arrecife, Lanzarote, 3Unit of Research, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, SpainObjectives: Cognitive impairment is a common feature in multiple sclerosis affecting ~43%–72% of patients, which involves cognitive functions such as memory, processing speed, attention, and executive function. The aim of this study was to describe the extent and pattern of the involvement of cognitive impairment and psychological status in all patients with multiple sclerosis on a small Spanish island.Patients and methods: In all, 70 patients and 56 healthy controls were included in the study between February 2013 and May 2013. All participants were assessed using the Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Test. The patients also completed instruments to evaluate the presence of fatigue, perceived cognitive dysfunction, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. All procedures were performed in a single session.Results: Cognitive impairment, defined as a score <1.5 standard deviation on two subtests of the battery, was present in 35% of the participants. The most frequently affected domain was working memory, followed by verbal memory and processing speed. Disease duration showed a moderate correlation with visuospatial memory and processing speed. The Expanded Disability Status Scale score correlated with verbal and processing speed. Verbal memory was correlated with depression symptoms and fatigue.Conclusion: Cognitive impairment was present in 35% of the study population. The most affected domains were working memory and verbal memory. Working memory and verbal fluency deficit are independent factors of disease evolution. Cognitive decline is related to clinical variables and

  3. The management of multiple sclerosis in children: a European view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghezzi, Angelo; Banwell, Brenda; Boyko, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    in the paediatric multiple sclerosis population has triggered the use of disease-modifying therapies that have been shown to reduce relapse rate, disease progression and cognitive decline in adult patients with multiple sclerosis. Hard evidence for the right treatment and its appropriate timing is scarce...... in the management of paediatric multiple sclerosis. One of the aims was to generate a common view on the management of paediatric multiple sclerosis patients. The result of this meeting is presented here to help standardize treatment and to support clinicians with less experience in this field.......About 3-5% of all patients with multiple sclerosis experience the onset of their disease under the age of 16. A significant proportion of paediatric multiple sclerosis patients develop significant cognitive disturbances and persistent physical disability. The high relapse rate and the morbidity...

  4. Treatment for ataxia in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, R J; Yap, L; Young, C A

    2007-01-24

    Disabling tremor or ataxia is common in multiple sclerosis (MS) and up to 80% of patients experience tremor or ataxia at some point during their disease. A variety of treatments are available, ranging from pharmacotherapy or stereotactic neurosurgery to neurorehabilitation. To assess the efficacy and tolerability of both pharmacological and non-pharmacologic treatments of ataxia in patients with MS. The following electronic resources were searched: Cochrane MS Group trials register (June 2006), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2, 2006), National Health Service National Research Register (NRR) including the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Directory (Issue 2, 2006), MEDLINE (January 1996 to June 2006), and EMBASE (Jan 1988 to June 2006). Manual searches of bibliographies of relevant articles, pertinent medical and neurology journals and abstract books of major neurology and MS conferences (2001-2006) were also performed. Direct communication with experts and drug companies was sought. Blinded, randomised trials which were either placebo-controlled or which compared two or more treatments were included. Trials testing pharmacological agents must have had both participant and assessor blinding. Trials testing surgical interventions or effects of physiotherapy, where participants could not have been blinded to the treatment, must have had independent assessors who were blinded to the treatment. Cross-over trials were included. Three independent reviewers extracted data and the findings of the trials were summarised. A meta-analysis was not performed due to the inadequacy of outcome measures and methodological problems with the studies reviewed. Ten randomised controlled trials met the inclusion criteria. Six placebo-controlled studies (pharmacotherapy) and four comparative studies (one stereotactic neurosurgery and three neurorehabilitation) were reviewed. No standardised outcome measures were used across the studies. In

  5. Dermatologic and dental aspects of the 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Joyce M C; Cowen, Edward W; Wataya-Kaneda, Mari; Gosnell, Elizabeth S; Witman, Patricia M; Hebert, Adelaide A; Mlynarczyk, Greg; Soltani, Keyoumars; Darling, Thomas N

    2014-10-01

    The 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Clinical Consensus Conference was convened to update the last consensus statement in 1998. Skin and dental lesions are common in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and are a frequent concern for patients. Recognition of these lesions is imperative for early diagnosis, given the treatment advances that may improve patient outcomes. To detail recommendations for the diagnosis, surveillance, and management of skin and dental lesions in TSC. The TSC Dermatology and Dentistry Subcommittee, 1 of 12 subcommittees, reviewed the relevant literature from 1997 to 2012. A consensus on skin and dental issues was achieved within the Dermatology and Dentistry Subcommittee before recommendations were presented, discussed, and agreed on in a group meeting of all subcommittees from June 14 to 15, 2012. Skin and dental findings comprise 4 of 11 major features and 3 of 6 minor features in the diagnostic criteria. A definite diagnosis of TSC is defined as the presence of at least 2 major features or 1 major and 2 or more minor features; in addition, a pathological mutation in TSC1 or TSC2 is diagnostic. Skin and oral examinations should be performed annually and every 3 to 6 months, respectively. Intervention may be indicated for TSC skin or oral lesions that are bleeding, symptomatic, disfiguring, or negatively affecting function. Options presented include surgical excision, laser(s), or use of a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor.

  6. Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutashov V.A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to identify the degree of cognitive impairment (CN and to optimize the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Material and methods. A total of 695 patients (278 men and 417 women were ranged from 18 to 63 years. The mean age was 30.2±0.7 years: women (417 28.5±0.5 years, while for men (278 31.8±0.7 years. Relaps-ing-remitting type (RT of MS was established in 520 patients (74.8%, secondary progressive type (VPT MS in 132 patients (18.9% and primary progressive type (PPT MS in 10 patients (1.5%. Clinically isolated syndrome (CIS was detected in 33 patients (4.8%. The diagnosis of MS 662 patients according to the criteria McDonald etal. (2005. Score of neurologic deficit was carried out on an extended scale of disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale — EDSS. CN were evaluated by conventional tests. To estimate the orientation in time, assessment of short-term and long-term memory, attention and concentration, as well as executive functions, memory, language, evaluation of optical-spatial activities, conceptual thinking, the account used by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Scale (MoCA. For the screening of dementia with a primary lesion of the frontal lobes and subcortical cerebral structures used battery frontal test to assess frontal dysfunction. Results. The ratio of male (265 and female (397 was 1:1.5. The severity of the condition patients EDSS scale ranged from 1.5 to 8.0 points, and the average score was 3.5±1.2. In the group of patients with RT RS average score EDSS was more than a half (2.5±1.1, than in the group of patients with MS VAC (5.5±1.2 and POS PC (6.5±1.2. In the study of history, it was found that the development of the RS (662 patients was preceded by the following conditions: a viral infection in 277 patients (41.84%; fatigue in 147 patients (22.21%; transferred psycho-emotional load from 218 (32.93%; after pregnancy and childbirth in 20 patients (3.02%. Conclusion. Among the patients with MS

  7. Characterization of microcirculation in multiple sclerosis lesions by dynamic texture parameter analysis (DTPA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Kumar Verma

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Texture analysis is an alternative method to quantitatively assess MR-images. In this study, we introduce dynamic texture parameter analysis (DTPA, a novel technique to investigate the temporal evolution of texture parameters using dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced (DSCE imaging. Here, we aim to introduce the method and its application on enhancing lesions (EL, non-enhancing lesions (NEL and normal appearing white matter (NAWM in multiple sclerosis (MS. METHODS: We investigated 18 patients with MS and clinical isolated syndrome (CIS, according to the 2010 McDonald's criteria using DSCE imaging at different field strengths (1.5 and 3 Tesla. Tissues of interest (TOIs were defined within 27 EL, 29 NEL and 37 NAWM areas after normalization and eight histogram-based texture parameter maps (TPMs were computed. TPMs quantify the heterogeneity of the TOI. For every TOI, the average, variance, skewness, kurtosis and variance-of-the-variance statistical parameters were calculated. These TOI parameters were further analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by multiple Wilcoxon sum rank testing corrected for multiple comparisons. RESULTS: Tissue- and time-dependent differences were observed in the dynamics of computed texture parameters. Sixteen parameters discriminated between EL, NEL and NAWM (pAVG = 0.0005. Significant differences in the DTPA texture maps were found during inflow (52 parameters, outflow (40 parameters and reperfusion (62 parameters. The strongest discriminators among the TPMs were observed in the variance-related parameters, while skewness and kurtosis TPMs were in general less sensitive to detect differences between the tissues. CONCLUSION: DTPA of DSCE image time series revealed characteristic time responses for ELs, NELs and NAWM. This may be further used for a refined quantitative grading of MS lesions during their evolution from acute to chronic state. DTPA discriminates lesions beyond features of enhancement or T2

  8. [Prevalence and characteristics of multiple sclerosis in the health district of the Marina Alta].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gallego, A; Morera-Guitart, J

    To determine the prevalence and characteristics of multiple sclerosis (EM) in the Marina Alta health district. A descriptive, retrospective study localizing cases (crossed register method). Day of prevalence: 1/05/01. Registers of the area analyzed: hospital admission, Neurology Clinic, Emergency Department of the hospital and Health Centres. The criteria of Poser were used for diagnosis. We analyzed the demographic, clinical and paraclinical aspects of the episodes and treatment (interferon-beta). Male/female ratio: 2.4. Average age: 46.6 years. Prevalence of definite EM: 40.3/100,000. Prevalence of autochthonous cases of EM: 28.7/100,000. Average age at onset: 32.6 years. Average duration of illness: 12.5 years. Commonest clinical form: remitting relapsing (48.1%), followed by progressive relapsing (7%), benign (5.5%) and primary progressive (1.8%). 5.5% died, all with the progressive secondary form. EDSS disability: greater in the progressive secondary form. Magnetic resonance (MR) was the commonest investigation used (84% of the results in concordance and 13% normal). Positive BOC in 70% of cases. We studied 202 episodes. The systems most affected were: sensory and pyramidal. Worsening of EDSS after recovery from the episode: 51.7%. 29% received interferon-beta, with five cases (31%) of major side effects (one psychotic outbursts, three with neutropenia and one generalized allergic reaction). In the Marina Alta the prevalence of EM adjusted for the autochthonous population is in the medium risk zone. The clinical features and course of the disease in our patients are similar to those seen in other national and foreign series. The most worthwhile tests were cranial MR and BOC CSF. Treatment with interferon-beta requires strict control in view of the high frequency of serious side effects seen.

  9. Infections in patients with multiple sclerosis: Implications for disease-modifying therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celius, E G

    2017-11-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis have an increased risk of infections compared to the general population. The increased risk has been described for decades and is not alone attributed to the use of disease-modifying drugs, but secondary to the disability. The introduction of more potent immunomodulatory drugs may cause an additional challenge, and depending on the mechanism of action, a treatment-induced increased risk of bacterial, viral, fungal or parasitic infections is observed. The choice of treatment in the individual patient with infections and multiple sclerosis must be guided by the drugs' specific mechanism of action, the drug-specific risk of infection and comorbidities. Increased monitoring and follow-up through treatment registries is warranted to increase our understanding and thereby improve management. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Cerebral blood flow and red cell delivery in normal subjects and in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swank, R.L.; Roth, J.G.; Woody, D.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined in 77 normal females and 53 normal males of different ages and in 26 men and 45 women with multiple sclerosis by the inhalation of radioactive Xe133 method. In the normal subjects the CBF was relatively high in the teens and fell, at first rapidly and then slowly in both sexes with age. During adult life the flow in females was significantly higher than in males. The delivery of packed red cells (RCD) was determined by multiplying the CBF by the percentage concentration of red cells (HCT). The RCD for both sexes was nearly the same. In the patients with multiple sclerosis there occurred a progressive generalized decrease in CBF and in RCD with age which was significantly greater than observed in normal subjects. The rate of decrease in CBF and RCD correlated directly with the rate of progress of the disease

  11. Systemic sclerosis: a world wide global analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coral-Alvarado, Paola; Pardo, Aryce L; Castaño-Rodriguez, Natalia; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze epidemiological tendencies of systemic sclerosis (SSc) around the world in order to identify possible local variations in the presentation and occurrence of the disease. A systematic review of the literature was performed through electronic databases using the keywords "Systemic Sclerosis" and "Clinical Characteristics." Out of a total of 167 articles, 41 were included in the analysis. Significant differences in the mean age at the time of diagnosis, subsets of SSc, clinical characteristics, and presence of antibodies were found between different regions of the word. Because variations in both additive and nonadditive genetic factors and the environmental variance are specific to the investigated population, ethnicity and geography are important characteristics to be considered in the study of SSc and other autoimmune diseases.

  12. The Danish multiple sclerosis treatment register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the database: The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register (DMSTR) serves as a clinical quality register, enabling the health authorities to monitor the quality of the diseasemodifying treatment, and it is an important data source for epidemiological research. Study population: The DMSTR...... includes all patients with multiple sclerosis who had been treated with disease-modifying drugs since 1996. At present, more than 8,400 patients have been registered in this database. Data are continuously entered online into a central database from all sites in Denmark at start and at regular visits. Main...... variables: Include age, sex, onset year and year of the diagnosis, basic clinical information, and information about treatment, side effects, and relapses. Descriptive data: Notification is done at treatment start, and thereafter at every scheduled clinical visit 3 months after treatment start...

  13. Thalamic changes with mesial temporal sclerosis: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deasy, N.P.; Jarosz, J.M.; Cox, T.C.S. [Department of Neuroradiology, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Elwes, R.C.D. [Department of Neurology, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Polkey, C.E. [Department of Neurosurgery, King' s College and Maudsley Hospitals, London (United Kingdom)

    2000-05-01

    We reviewed the preoperative images of 28 patients with pathologically proven mesial temporal sclerosis, to assess thalamic asymmetry and signal change. A further 25 nonsurgical patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and unequivocal, unilateral changes of mesial temporal sclerosis, and 20 controls, were also reviewed. None of the control group had unequivocal asymmetry of the thalamus. There was an ipsilateral asymmetrically small thalamus in five (18 %) of the surgical group and in three (12 %) of the nonsurgical patients. In four cases there was thalamic signal change. In three patients with thalamic volume loss there was ipsilateral hemiatrophy. All patients with an asymmetrically small thalamus had an asymmetrically small fornix and all but one a small ipsilateral mamillary body. (orig.)

  14. [Large vessels vasculopathy in systemic sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejera Segura, Beatriz; Ferraz-Amaro, Iván

    2015-12-07

    Vasculopathy in systemic sclerosis is a severe, in many cases irreversible, manifestation that can lead to amputation. While the classical clinical manifestations of the disease have to do with the involvement of microcirculation, proximal vessels of upper and lower limbs can also be affected. This involvement of large vessels may be related to systemic sclerosis, vasculitis or atherosclerotic, and the differential diagnosis is not easy. To conduct a proper and early diagnosis, it is essential to start prompt appropriate treatment. In this review, we examine the involvement of large vessels in scleroderma, an understudied manifestation with important prognostic and therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Pulmonary function and dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, S C; Utell, M J; Rudick, R A; Herndon, R M

    1988-11-01

    Pulmonary function was studied in 25 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis with a range of motor impairment. Forced vital capacity (FVC), maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV), and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) were normal in the ambulatory patients (mean greater than or equal to 80% predicted) but reduced in bedridden patients (mean, 38.5%, 31.6%, and 36.3% predicted; FCV, MVV, and MEP, respectively) and wheelchair-bound patients with upper extremity involvement (mean, 69.4%, 50.4%, and 62.6% predicted; FVC, MVV, and MEP, respectively). Forced vital capacity, MVV, and MEP correlated with Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status scores (tau = -0.72, -0.70, and -0.65) and expiratory muscle weakness occurred most frequently. These findings demonstrate that marked expiratory weakness develops in severely paraparetic patients with multiple sclerosis and the weakness increases as the upper extremities become increasingly involved.

  16. Possibilities of computer tomography in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vymazal, J.; Bauer, J.

    1983-01-01

    Computer tomography was performed in 41 patients with multiple sclerosis, the average age of patients being 40.8 years. Native examinations were made of 17 patients, examinations with contrast medium of 19, both methods were used in the examination of 5 patients. In 26 patients, i.e. in almost two-thirds, cerebral atrophy was found, in 11 of a severe type. In 9 patients atrophy affected only the hemispheres, in 16 also the stem and cerebellum. The stem and cerebellum only were affected in 1 patient. Hypodense foci were found in 21 patients, i.e. more than half of those examined. In 9 there were multiple foci. In most of the 19 examined patients the hypodense changes were in the hemispheres and only in 2 in the cerebellum and brain stem. No hyperdense changes were detected. The value and possibilities are discussed of examinations by computer tomography multiple sclerosis. (author)

  17. SOME NEUROCHEMICAL DISTURBANCES IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Markelov

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe data presented in this manuscript suggest a pivotal role of the central nervous system (CNS in the regulation of immune status. We describe here that some neurochemical disturbances may provoke development of various diseases including multiple sclerosis. Some theoretic and practical backgrounds, how to improve the multiple sclerosis sufferers and patients with other autoimmune disorders, are also given.RESUMENLos datos que presentamos en este manuscrito, sugieren un papel guia del sistema nervioso central (SNC en la regulación del estado inmune. Describimos aquí que varias alteraciones neuroquímicas pueden provocar el desarrollo de varias enfermedades, incluyendo esclerosis múltiple. También se comenta acerca del trasfondo teórico y práctico, y cómo mejorar a víctimas y pacientes con esclerosis múltiple y otras alteraciones autoinmunes.

  18. Type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, N.M.; Westergaard, T.; Frisch, M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) and multiple sclerosis (MS) contribute considerably to the burden of autoimmune diseases in young adults. Although HLA patterns of T1D and MS are considered mutually exclusive, individual and familial co-occurrence of the 2 diseases has been reported...... Multiple Sclerosis Register were used to identify patients with T1D, defined as patients in whom diabetes was diagnosed before age 20 years (N = 6078), and patients with MS (N = 11 862). First-degree relatives (N = 14,771) of patients with MS were identified from family information in the Danish Civil....... OBJECTIVE: To assess the co-occurrence of T1D and MS by estimating the risk for MS in patients with T1D and the risk for T1D in first-degree relatives of patients with MS. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Two population-based disease registers, the Danish Hospital Discharge Register and the Danish...

  19. Sibship characteristics and risk of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, P.; Nielsen, N.M.; Bihrmann, K.

    2006-01-01

    sibling, or exposure to younger siblings under 2 years of age and risk of MS later in life. There was no association of MS risk with multiple birth (vs. singleton birth) or with the age of the mother or father at birth. These results do not lend support to the hypothesis that number of older siblings......It has been hypothesized that age at infection with a common microbial agent may be associated with the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). The authors addressed this hypothesis by using number of older siblings and other sibship characteristics as an approximation of age at exposure to common...... Sclerosis Register. The cohort of 1.9 million Danes was followed for 28.1 million person-years; during that time, 1,036 persons developed MS. Overall, there was no association between number of older siblings, number of younger siblings, total number of siblings, age distance from the nearest younger...

  20. Musical identity of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Shirlene Vianna; França, Cecília Cavalieri; Moreira, Marcos Aurélio; Lana-Peixoto, Marco Aurélio

    2009-03-01

    Musical autobiographies consist of a powerful therapeutic tool by which individuals define themselves. The use of this technique may help (re)construction personal identities and improve quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Eight adult patients on treatment at CIEM Multiple Sclerosis Investigation Center after selecting 10 to 15 pieces of music most significant in their lives were interviewed. The data collected were classified according to Even Rudd categories, which reveal how a person expresses his personal, social, temporal and transpersonal identities. We observed that recall of musical history makes MS patients get better perception both of their feelings and body awareness, as well as provide them with an alternative way to express themselves, activate and contextualize affective memories, and achieving a sense of life continuity in spite of the disease.

  1. The management of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phukan, Julie

    2009-02-01

    The terms amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or motor neuron disease (MND) refer to a condition characterized by motor system degeneration with relative preservation of other pathways. Although there have been advances in symptomatic treatment, ALS remains an incurable condition. Advances in ALS management prolong survival but simultaneously raise challenging ethical dilemmas for physicians, patients and their families. Here, we review current practice in the management of ALS including pharmacological treatment, nutritional management, respiratory care, and evolving strategies in the management of cognitive impairment.

  2. Optimizing treatment success in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ziemssen, T; Derfuss, T; de Stefano, N; Giovannoni, G; Palavra, F; Tomic, D; Vollmer, T; Schippling, S

    2016-01-01

    Despite important advances in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) over recent years, the introduction of several disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), the burden of progressive disability and premature mortality associated with the condition remains substantial. This burden, together with the high healthcare and societal costs associated with MS, creates a compelling case for early treatment optimization with highly efficacious therapies. Often, patients receive several first-line therapie...

  3. Amyloid PET in pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Cabrera-Martín, María Nieves; Cortés-Martínez, Ana; Pytel, Vanesa; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Carreras, José Luis; Matías-Guiu, Jorge

    2017-07-01

    Pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis is a rare form of demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Positron emission tomography (PET) using amyloid-tracers has also been suggested as a marker of damage in white matter lesions in multiple sclerosis due to the nonspecific uptake of these tracers in white matter. We present the case of a 59 year-old woman with a pathological-confirmed pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis, who was studied with the amyloid tracer 18 F-florbetaben. The patient had developed word-finding difficulties and right hemianopia twelve years ago. In that time, MRI showed a lesion on the left hemisphere with an infiltrating aspect in frontotemporal lobes. Brain biopsy showed demyelinating areas and inflammation. During the following years, two new clinical relapses occurred. 18 F-florbetaben PET showed lower uptake in the white matter lesion visualized in the CT and MRI images. Decreased tracer uptake was also observed in a larger area of the left hemisphere beyond the lesions observed on MRI or CT. White matter lesion volume on FLAIR was 44.2mL, and tracer uptake change between damaged white matter and normal appearing white matter was - 40.5%. Standardized uptake value was inferior in the pseudotumoral lesion than in the other white matter lesions. We report the findings of amyloid PET in a patient with pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis. This case provides further evidence on the role of amyloid PET in the assessment of white matter and demyelinating diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mapping and predicting mortality from systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elhai, Muriel; Meune, Christophe; Boubaya, Marouane

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the causes of death and risk factors in systemic sclerosis (SSc). METHODS: Between 2000 and 2011, we examined the death certificates of all French patients with SSc to determine causes of death. Then we examined causes of death and developed a score associated with all-ca....... With the emergence of new therapies, these important observations should help caregivers plan and refine the monitoring and management to prolong these patients' survival....

  5. Optical Elastography of Systemic Sclerosis Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Road, Houston, TX The University of Texas Health Science ...o What was the impact on society beyond science and technology? Nothing to Report. 5.CHANGES/PROBLEMS: o Changes in approach and reasons for...Sclerosis Patient-Derived Data Role: PI Time Commitment: 0.24 calendar mos Supporting Agency: Momenta Pharmaceuticals , Inc Name and Address of the

  6. Visual field abnormalities in multiple sclerosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, V H; Heron, J R

    1980-01-01

    Visual fields were examined with a tangent screen in 54 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) or optic neuritis (ON). Visual fields were abnormal in all patients with definite MS, 94% with probable MS and 81% with possible MS. Three-quarters of the MS patients with no history of visual symptoms had abnormal fields. The commonest defect found was an arcuate scotoma. As a diagnostic test of visual pathway involvement in MS, tangent screen examination compares favourably with more sophisticated ...

  7. Investigation of vertebral ''end plate sclerosis''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.W.; Mathie, A.G.; Jackson, J.E.; Hughes, S.P.F.

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the association between vertebral ''end plate sclerosis'' and neck pain. A retrospective study was carried out of lateral cervical spine radiographs with a Picture Archive and Communication System (PACS). Two hundred patients' files were randomly assessed, comprising four equal groups, A to D. The mean ages of the patients were 62±7.4 years, 61±7.5 years, 40±5.6 years and 23±5.6 years respectively. In group A, all patients had symptoms of neck pain and a radiographic diagnosis of ''end plate sclerosis'' of the cervical spine. In groups B to D, asymptomatic patients were recruited and their age groups were 50-69, 30-49 and 10-29 years respectively. Using the PACS, the radiographic density and the sagittal diameter, thickness and area of the end plates at the C5 level were measured. Results and conclusions: No significant differences were found in the radiographic density of the end plates either between the symptomatic and asymptomatic groups (groups A and B), or between different age groups (groups B, C and D). A significant increase in end plate area and thickness was found, however, in both group B (P<0.005) and group C (P<0.01) in comparison with group D. This indicates that the extent of end plate sclerosis increases with age. Our results suggest that the radiographic density of cervical vertebral end plates correlates neither with neck pain nor with increasing age. The radiological sign of ''end plate sclerosis'' may be over-reported, further limiting its value in the assessment of patients with cervical spondylosis. (orig.)

  8. Effectiveness and Limitations of Unsupervised Home-Based Balance Rehabilitation with Nintendo Wii in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Massimiliano Pau; Giancarlo Coghe; Federica Corona; Bruno Leban; Maria Giovanna Marrosu; Eleonora Cocco

    2015-01-01

    Balance training represents a critical part of the rehabilitation process of individuals living with multiple sclerosis (MS) since impaired postural control is a distinctive symptom of the disease. In recent years, the use of the Nintendo Wii system has become widespread among rehabilitation specialists for this purpose, but few studies have verified the effectiveness of such an approach using quantitative measures of balance. In this study, we analyzed the postural sway features of a cohort ...

  9. Multiple sclerosis: Pregnancy and women's health issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendibe Bilbao, M; Boyero Durán, S; Bárcena Llona, J; Rodriguez-Antigüedad, A

    2016-08-18

    The course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is influenced by sex, pregnancy and hormonal factors. To analyse the influence of the above factors in order to clarify the aetiopathogenic mechanisms involved in the disease. We conducted a comprehensive review of scientific publications in the PubMed database using a keyword search for 'multiple sclerosis', 'MS', 'EAE', 'pregnancy', 'hormonal factors', 'treatment', and related terms. We reviewed the advances presented at the meeting held by the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) in March 2013 in London, as well as recommendations by international experts. We provide recommendations for counselling and treating women with MS prior to and during pregnancy and after delivery. Current findings on the effects of treatment on the mother, fetus, and newborn are also presented. We issue recommendations for future research in order to address knowledge gaps and clarify any inconsistencies in currently available data. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesselring, J.; Ormerod, I.E.C.; Miller, D.H.; Du Boulay, G.H.; McDonald, W.I.

    1989-01-01

    In 1983 the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Great Britain and Northern Ireland set up the Multiple Sclerosis NMR Research Group at the Institute of Neurology and the National Hospital, Queen Square. The first aim of the Group was to define the role of MRI in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, and this Atlas represents a summary of that work. Our strategy was to determine the pattern of MRI abnormalities in clinically definite MS and to compare it with those of isolated clinical syndromes of the kind seen in MS (e.g. optic neuritis) and of other disorders with which MS can be confused clinically or radiologically. We have also been involved in a major program of experimental work designed to elucidate the origin of the abnormal signals in MRI. To describe this in full detail would go beyond the scope of the Atlas, but we have incorporated such results as far as they illuminate our clinical problems. The imager used was a 0.5 Tesla Picker superconducting system. Technical advances have been rapid since we began. Nevertheless, the quality of the images obtained at our relatively low field has enabled us to establish the patterns of abnormality in the brain in MS and the diseases which must be distinguished from it. (orig./MG)

  11. Orthognathic Surgery in a Patient with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bazie, Saleh A

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper was to report a case of orthognathic surgery successfully done in a patient with multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, progressive inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system affecting young adults, characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the brain and spinal cord leading to demyelination and focal axonal damage. Clinically, MS patients present with reversible neurological dysfunction in the early stages, which progresses to irreversible neurological disability and deficit. Oral manifestations of MS include facial numbness or pain, neuralgias, facial paralysis, dysarthria and dysphagia. While dental treatment is not contraindicated in MS patients, it is, however, limited to preventive and supportive dental care. A 23-year-old Saudi male patient with a diagnosis of MS since 2008 reported to the oral and maxillo-facial surgery (OMFS) department for correction of dentofacial deformity. The patient was under follow-up with the neurology department and was being treated with interferon beta-1a. Following consent from the neurologist and the patient, a Lefort 1 segmental osteotomy was done under general anesthesia. The patient was stable throughout the surgical procedure and during the postoperative period. The patient was discharged upon complete surgical recovery and no acute exacerbations of MS were reported during the perioperative period. Based on our observations, orthognathic and maxillofacial surgical procedures can be safely carried out in patients with MS, provided a strict perioperative prophylactic regimen for stress reduction and prevention of acute attacks of MS is adhered to. Due to the stressful nature of dental treatment and oral and maxillofacial surgical procedures, acute exacerbations of MS are very much likely. Hence, it is imperative that dental and oral surgical practitioners are aware of the manifestations of MS and are able to manage such patients with suitable treatment modifications.

  12. Depressive Symptoms in Bariatric Surgery Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Carolyn J; Heinberg, Leslie J; Lapin, Brittany; Aminian, Ali; Sullivan, Amy B

    2018-04-01

    Bariatric surgery has been shown to be a safe and effective intervention for patients with comorbid obesity and multiple sclerosis (MS); however, this sub-population may be at heightened risk for pre- and postoperative depressive symptoms. This current exploratory study aims to describe the prevalence and nature of depressive symptoms in a sample of patients with MS who undergo bariatric surgery. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients who received bariatric surgery and had a diagnosis of MS (n = 31) and a control sample of non-surgical MS patients with severe obesity (n = 828). Longitudinal outcome measures included the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and Multiple Sclerosis Performance Scale (MSPS). There were no significant differences in PHQ-9 total and item scores between groups at baseline. PHQ-9 scores significantly improved at years 1 (p bariatric surgery when compared to non-surgical controls. Higher BMI (p = 0.03) and worse overall quality of life (p bariatric group. When compared to controls, the bariatric group demonstrated improved MSPS scores on a trend level 1 year post-surgery (p = 0.08). Consistent with the literature on more general bariatric surgery populations, current findings highlight the possible early benefits of bariatric surgery for reducing depressive symptoms in this population when compared to controls. Importantly, results should be viewed as preliminary and additional research is needed to examine bariatric surgery and associations with depressive symptoms and performance in the MS population.

  13. Disability, depression and suicide ideation in people with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, V M; Williams, K; KoKo, C; Woolmore, J; Jones, C; Powell, T

    2017-01-15

    Depressive symptoms occur frequently in people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and rates of suicide ideation are higher than the general population. There is evidence for a direct association between disability and depression, disability and suicide ideation, and depression and suicide ideation in MS. However, the relationship between all three, i.e. the mediating role of depression between disability and suicidal ideation, has not been investigated. Exploring this relationship could highlight risk factors, alerting clinicians to the need for timely intervention. Seventy five people with progressive MS attending two out-patient clinics took part in this cross-sectional study. Participants completed the Beck Suicide Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale and Guy's Neurological Disability Scale. Depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between perceived and actual disability and suicide ideation. Different types of disability were associated with suicidality, including: 'tremors' and 'taking longer to do things'. A small sub-group of participants were identified who reported suicide ideation in the presence of only mild levels of depression. There may be a sample bias in this study as all participants were attending out-patient clinics and receiving support which may not be available to everyone with MS. It is important for clinicians to screen regularly for both depression and suicide ideation, to be alert to specific types of disability for which a higher level of suicide ideation might be present and to consider the possibility of suicidal thoughts being present in people who show minimal or no depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Natalizumab for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Rudick

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Richard A Rudick1, Michael A Panzara21Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Biogen Idec, Inc., Cambridge, MA, USAAbstract: Natalizumab is an α4-integrin antagonist approved as monotherapy for patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS, based on demonstrated efficacy in the pivotal AFFIRM study (N = 942. Natalizumab monotherapy reduced risk of disability progression by 42%–54% and annualized relapse rate by 68% during a period of 2 years. Natalizumab was also associated with significant reductions in number of T2-hyperintense, gadolinium-enhancing, and T1-hypointense lesions and in volume of T2-hyperintense lesions (all p < 0.001 on magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, natalizumab-treated patients in AFFIRM experienced significant improvements from baseline in the physical and mental components of the Short Form-36 (p ≤ 0.01 and a 35% reduction in risk of clinically significant vision loss (p = 0.008 vs placebo. Natalizumab was well tolerated in phase 3 studies. Common adverse events were generally mild and included headache, fatigue, urinary tract infections, and arthralgia. Serious adverse events were similar between treatment groups. The incidence of serious hypersensitivity reactions associated with natalizumab was <1%. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy was a rare complication of treatment, observed in 2 patients with MS who received natalizumab plus interferon β-1a. The robust clinical benefits of natalizumab, including benefits on patient-reported quality of life, make it an important addition to disease-modifying therapies available to patients with relapsing MS.Keywords: multiple sclerosis, natalizumab, α4-integrin antagonist

  15. The multiple sclerosis visual pathway cohort: understanding neurodegeneration in MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lapiscina, Elena H; Fraga-Pumar, Elena; Gabilondo, Iñigo; Martínez-Heras, Eloy; Torres-Torres, Ruben; Ortiz-Pérez, Santiago; Llufriu, Sara; Tercero, Ana; Andorra, Magi; Roca, Marc Figueras; Lampert, Erika; Zubizarreta, Irati; Saiz, Albert; Sanchez-Dalmau, Bernardo; Villoslada, Pablo

    2014-12-15

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of the Central Nervous System with two major underlying etiopathogenic processes: inflammation and neurodegeneration. The latter determines the prognosis of this disease. MS is the main cause of non-traumatic disability in middle-aged populations. The MS-VisualPath Cohort was set up to study the neurodegenerative component of MS using advanced imaging techniques by focusing on analysis of the visual pathway in a middle-aged MS population in Barcelona, Spain. We started the recruitment of patients in the early phase of MS in 2010 and it remains permanently open. All patients undergo a complete neurological and ophthalmological examination including measurements of physical and disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale; Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite and neuropsychological tests), disease activity (relapses) and visual function testing (visual acuity, color vision and visual field). The MS-VisualPath protocol also assesses the presence of anxiety and depressive symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), general quality of life (SF-36) and visual quality of life (25-Item National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire with the 10-Item Neuro-Ophthalmic Supplement). In addition, the imaging protocol includes both retinal (Optical Coherence Tomography and Wide-Field Fundus Imaging) and brain imaging (Magnetic Resonance Imaging). Finally, multifocal Visual Evoked Potentials are used to perform neurophysiological assessment of the visual pathway. The analysis of the visual pathway with advance imaging and electrophysilogical tools in parallel with clinical information will provide significant and new knowledge regarding neurodegeneration in MS and provide new clinical and imaging biomarkers to help monitor disease progression in these patients.

  16. Generalized polygons

    CERN Document Server

    Van Maldeghem, Hendrik

    1998-01-01

    Generalized Polygons is the first book to cover, in a coherent manner, the theory of polygons from scratch. In particular, it fills elementary gaps in the literature and gives an up-to-date account of current research in this area, including most proofs, which are often unified and streamlined in comparison to the versions generally known. Generalized Polygons will be welcomed both by the student seeking an introduction to the subject as well as the researcher who will value the work as a reference. In particular, it will be of great value for specialists working in the field of generalized polygons (which are, incidentally, the rank 2 Tits-buildings) or in fields directly related to Tits-buildings, incidence geometry and finite geometry. The approach taken in the book is of geometric nature, but algebraic results are included and proven (in a geometric way!). A noteworthy feature is that the book unifies and generalizes notions, definitions and results that exist for quadrangles, hexagons, octagons - in the ...

  17. Designing an Electronic Patient Management System for Multiple Sclerosis: Building a Next Generation Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Raimar; Haase, Rocco; Eisele, Judith Christina; Thomas, Katja; Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2016-01-08

    Technologies like electronic health records or telemedicine devices support the rapid mediation of health information and clinical data independent of time and location between patients and their physicians as well as among health care professionals. Today, every part of the treatment process from diagnosis, treatment selection, and application to patient education and long-term care may be enhanced by a quality-assured implementation of health information technology (HIT) that also takes data security standards and concerns into account. In order to increase the level of effectively realized benefits of eHealth services, a user-driven needs assessment should ensure the inclusion of health care professional perspectives into the process of technology development as we did in the development process of the Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System 3D. After analyzing the use of information technology by patients suffering from multiple sclerosis, we focused on the needs of neurological health care professionals and their handling of health information technology. Therefore, we researched the status quo of eHealth adoption in neurological practices and clinics as well as health care professional opinions about potential benefits and requirements of eHealth services in the field of multiple sclerosis. We conducted a paper-and-pencil-based mail survey in 2013 by sending our questionnaire to 600 randomly chosen neurological practices in Germany. The questionnaire consisted of 24 items covering characteristics of participating neurological practices (4 items), the current use of network technology and the Internet in such neurological practices (5 items), physicians' attitudes toward the general and MS-related usefulness of eHealth systems (8 items) and toward the clinical documentation via electronic health records (4 items), and physicians' knowledge about the Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System (3 items). From 600 mailed surveys, 74 completed surveys were returned

  18. Neuromyelitis optica: clinical features, immunopathogenesis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarius, S; Wildemann, B; Paul, F

    2014-01-01

    The term ‘neuromyelitis optica’ (‘Devic's syndrome’, NMO) refers to a syndrome characterized by optic neuritis and myelitis. In recent years, the condition has raised enormous interest among scientists and clinical neurologists, fuelled by the detection of a specific serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G reactivity (NMO-IgG) in up to 80% of patients with NMO. These autoantibodies were later shown to target aquaporin-4 (AQP4), the most abundant water channel in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we give an up-to-date overview of the clinical and paraclinical features, immunopathogenesis and treatment of NMO. We discuss the widening clinical spectrum of AQP4-related autoimmunity, the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and new diagnostic means such as optical coherence tomography in the diagnosis of NMO, the role of NMO-IgG, T cells and granulocytes in the pathophysiology of NMO, and outline prospects for new and emerging therapies for this rare, but often devastating condition. Other Articles published in this series Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 336–48. Disease-modifying therapy in multiple sclerosis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: common and divergent current and future strategies. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 359–72. Monoclonal antibodies in treatment of multiple sclerosis. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 373–84. CLIPPERS: chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids. Review of an increasingly recognized entity within the spectrum of inflammatory central nervous system disorders. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 385–96. Requirement for safety monitoring for approved multiple sclerosis therapies: an overview. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 397–407. Myasthenia gravis: an update for the clinician. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 408

  19. Computed tomographic feature of tuberculous arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hak Hee; Lee, Hae Giu; Cha, Eun Suk; Kang, Kyung Jin; Jeon, Jeong Su; Park, Young Ha; Yim, Jung Ik; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1992-01-01

    The sparsity of publication concerning CT findings of tuberculous arthritis prompted authors to retrospectively evaluate 12 patients with tuberculous arthritis for characteristic CT findings. In each patients, the diagnosis of tuberculous arthritis was confirmed by surgery or biopsy. The CT examinations were evaluated by two radiologists retrospectively. Involved joints were the hip joint in seven patients, the sacroiliac joint in three patients, and the shoulder and ankle joint in one patient each. CT features included subchondral bony erosion(12 patients), soft tissue mass in the joint space(nine), widening of the joint space(eight), ipsilateral music atrophy(eight), thickening of the joint capsule(seven), intra-articular effusion(six), soft tissue abscess(five), and bony sclerosis(four). In seven patients with the duration of symptoms less than 1 year, thickening of joint capsule and intra-articular effusion were the predominant findings, while bony sclerosis, gross bone destruction, and soft tissue mass in joint space were seen in five patients with the duration of symptoms longer than 1 year. Our results indicate that CT is useful in the diagnosis of tuberculous arthritis by demonstrating characteristic pathologic changes of the joint space, soft tissue abnormality and bony involvement

  20. Cardiometabolic health and risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Hannah C; Saw, Wilfred; Cheah, Benjamin C; Lin, Cindy S Y; Vucic, Steve; Ahmed, Rebekah M; Kiernan, Matthew C; Park, Susanna B

    2017-10-01

    Patients diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) generally have a limited medical history and a normal body mass index, raising the possibility of a premorbid ALS phenotype. The prevalence of cardiometabolic factors was analyzed in 58 ALS patients via comprehensive cardiovascular assessments and compared with Australian population norms. ALS patients had good cardiac fitness and no reported cardiovascular events. Average blood pressure, heart rate, PR interval, and corrected QT interval were in the normal range. There were significantly fewer obese women in the ALS cohort (13.6%, P < 0.05) and more men with a normal body mass index than in the general population (47.2%, P < 0.001). The percentage of individuals who had never smoked was greater for the ALS cohort (55.8%, P ≤ 0.001), and the prevalence of dyslipidemia was lower (38.7%) compared with the general population (74.4%, P < 0.001). ALS patients had good cardiometabolic health, with evidence of a reduced vascular risk profile. Muscle Nerve 56: 721-725, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The burden of multiple sclerosis: A community health survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turpin Karen VL

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-related quality of life (HRQL in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS who reside within the community relative to the general population is largely unknown. Data from the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 1.1 (CCHS 1.1 were used to compare HRQL of persons with MS and the general population. Methods A representative sample of adults (18 years or older from the cross sectional population health survey, CCHS 1.1, was examined to compare scores on the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3, a generic preference-based HRQL measure, of respondents with (n = 302 and without (n = 109,741 MS. Selected sociodemographic covariates were adjusted for in ANCOVA models. Normalized sampling weights and bootstrap variance estimates were used in the analysis. Results The mean difference in overall HUI3 scores between respondents with and without MS was 0.25 (95% CI: 0.20, 0.31; eight times greater than the clinically important difference. The largest differences in scores were seen with the ambulation (0.26; 95% CI: 0.20, 0.32 and pain attributes (0.14; 95% CI: 0.09, 0.19. Clinically important differences with dexterity and cognition were also observed. Conclusion While the proportion of the Canadian population with MS is relatively small in comparison to other diseases, the magnitude of the burden is severe relative to the general population.

  2. Patterns of Weakness, Classification of Motor Neuron Disease, and Clinical Diagnosis of Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statland, Jeffrey M; Barohn, Richard J; McVey, April L; Katz, Jonathan S; Dimachkie, Mazen M

    2015-11-01

    When approaching a patient with suspected motor neuron disease (MND), the pattern of weakness on examination helps distinguish MND from other diseases of peripheral nerves, the neuromuscular junction, or muscle. MND is a clinical diagnosis supported by findings on electrodiagnostic testing. MNDs exist on a spectrum, from a pure lower motor neuron to mixed upper and lower motor neuron to a pure upper motor neuron variant. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive mixed upper and lower motor neuron disorder, most commonly sporadic, which is invariably fatal. This article describes a pattern approach to identifying MND and clinical features of sporadic ALS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The natural history of primary progressive multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus; Kingwell, Elaine; Rieckmann, Peter; Tremlett, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Background: Primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) carries the worst prognosis of the multiple sclerosis (MS) subtypes and is currently untreatable. A previous analysis of the British Columbia MS database challenged the view that disability progression is rapid in PPMS, but identified few

  4. The risk of multiple sclerosis in bereaved parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, J; Johansen, C; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that psychological stress may play a role in the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), but the evidence is very limited.......Previous studies have suggested that psychological stress may play a role in the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), but the evidence is very limited....

  5. Epidemiological and biochemical aspects of progression in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus Werner

    2008-01-01

    Patients with a progressive form of multiple sclerosis have the worst prognosis. They can expect that their symptoms will steadily worsen, and there is currently no treatment that has a proven effect on progressive multiple sclerosis. The underlying pathophysiology of the progressive forms of

  6. Incidence of multiple sclerosis in Denmark 1948-1982

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Hyllested, K

    1992-01-01

    The incidence rates of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark were estimated as a result of a continuous nationwide epidemiological survey since 1948 by the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry (DMSR). Among cases notified to the DMSR, 6,478 met the diagnostic criteria and had onset of MS from 1948...

  7. Disconnection as a Mechanism for Cognitive Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineen, R. A.; Vilisaar, J.; Hlinka, J.; Bradshaw, C. M.; Morgan, P. S.; Constantinescu, C. S.; Auer, D. P.

    2009-01-01

    Disconnection of cognitively important processing regions by injury to the interconnecting white matter provides a potential mechanism for cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. The contribution of tract-specific white matter injury to dysfunction in different cognitive domains in patients with multiple sclerosis has not previously been…

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnostics of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, J.P.; Tjoerstad, K.; Kaass, B.; Oedegaard, H.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an important and frequent neurological disease and the diagnosis might be difficult. The clinical criteria of multiple sclerosis and the role of laboratory examinations in the diagnosis of the disease are discussed. In particular the help offered by the magnetic resonance imaging method is the subject of this paper. Three patients are reported and discussed

  9. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, T B; Wittenhagen, P

    2007-01-01

    To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta).......To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta)....

  10. The management of multiple sclerosis in children: a European view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghezzi, Angelo; Banwell, Brenda; Boyko, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    About 3-5% of all patients with multiple sclerosis experience the onset of their disease under the age of 16. A significant proportion of paediatric multiple sclerosis patients develop significant cognitive disturbances and persistent physical disability. The high relapse rate and the morbidity i...

  11. Clustering of multiple sclerosis in Galion, Ohio, 1982-1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingalls, T.H. (Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Epidemiologic evidence indicates that the outbreak of 30-40 cases of multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating syndromes in Galion, Ohio, USA, during 1982-1985 was related to an excess concentration of heavy-metal wastes, especially of cadmium and chromium in sewage and river water. Both multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis were diagnosed by board-certified neurologists.

  12. Abundance of Stress, Anxiety and Depression in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dehghan

    2013-05-01

    Conclusion: The findings of this research revealed high stress, anxiety and depression in Multiple Sclerosis Patients that can jeopardize their health. Hence the providing appropriate education for coping and adapting with the symptoms in Multiple Sclerosis Patients seems to be necessary.

  13. Environmental Mycobiome Modifiers of Inflammation and Fibrosis in Systemic Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    autoimmune systemic sclerosis and cancer: disease stratification, co-expression networks and genetic polymorphisms” Cancer Mechanisms Program, Norris ...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This project is focused on Systemic Sclerosis (SSc), a progressive fibrotic disease characterized by skin fibrosis and damage to...quantitative manner. Our studies suggest that disease pathogenesis includes a common environmental fungal trigger, Rhodotorula glutinis, which we

  14. Challenges in the management of a case of tuberous sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhav Rathi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex is a multi-system disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance, which can affect the brain, heart, skin, kidneys, lungs, and retina. We hereby report therapeutic challenges faced in a case of an adolescent male suffering from tuberous sclerosis.

  15. European Nuclear Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, B.; Gonzalez, E.; Diaz Diaz, J.L.; Jimenez, J.L.; Velarde, G.; Navarro, J.M.; Hittner, D.; Dominguez, M.T.; Bollini, G.; Martin, A.; Suarez, J.; Traini, E.; Lang-Lenton, J.

    2004-01-01

    ''European Nuclear Features - ENF'' is a joint publication of the three specialized technical journals, Nuclear Espana (Spain), Revue General Nucleaire (France), and atw - International Journal of Nuclear Power (Germany). The ENF support the international Europeen exchange of information and news about energy and nuclear power. News items, comments, and scientific and technical contributions will cover important aspects of the field. The second issue of ENF contains contributions about theses topics, among others: Institutional and Political Changes in the EU. - CIEMAT Department of Nuclear Fission: A General Overview. - Inertial Fusion Energy at DENIM. - High Temperature Reactors. European Research Programme. - On Site Assistance to Khmelnitsky NPP 1 and 2 (Ukraine). - Dismantling and Decommissioning of Vandellos I. (orig.)

  16. Enhancing facial features by using clear facial features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofoo, Fanar Fareed Hanna

    2017-09-01

    The similarity of features between individuals of same ethnicity motivated the idea of this project. The idea of this project is to extract features of clear facial image and impose them on blurred facial image of same ethnic origin as an approach to enhance a blurred facial image. A database of clear images containing 30 individuals equally divided to five different ethnicities which were Arab, African, Chines, European and Indian. Software was built to perform pre-processing on images in order to align the features of clear and blurred images. And the idea was to extract features of clear facial image or template built from clear facial images using wavelet transformation to impose them on blurred image by using reverse wavelet. The results of this approach did not come well as all the features did not align together as in most cases the eyes were aligned but the nose or mouth were not aligned. Then we decided in the next approach to deal with features separately but in the result in some cases a blocky effect was present on features due to not having close matching features. In general the available small database did not help to achieve the goal results, because of the number of available individuals. The color information and features similarity could be more investigated to achieve better results by having larger database as well as improving the process of enhancement by the availability of closer matches in each ethnicity.

  17. Online feature selection with streaming features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xindong; Yu, Kui; Ding, Wei; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Xingquan

    2013-05-01

    We propose a new online feature selection framework for applications with streaming features where the knowledge of the full feature space is unknown in advance. We define streaming features as features that flow in one by one over time whereas the number of training examples remains fixed. This is in contrast with traditional online learning methods that only deal with sequentially added observations, with little attention being paid to streaming features. The critical challenges for Online Streaming Feature Selection (OSFS) include 1) the continuous growth of feature volumes over time, 2) a large feature space, possibly of unknown or infinite size, and 3) the unavailability of the entire feature set before learning starts. In the paper, we present a novel Online Streaming Feature Selection method to select strongly relevant and nonredundant features on the fly. An efficient Fast-OSFS algorithm is proposed to improve feature selection performance. The proposed algorithms are evaluated extensively on high-dimensional datasets and also with a real-world case study on impact crater detection. Experimental results demonstrate that the algorithms achieve better compactness and higher prediction accuracy than existing streaming feature selection algorithms.

  18. Socket sclerosis--an obstacle for orthodontic space closure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgaertel, Sebastian

    2009-07-01

    Socket sclerosis is a rare reaction to tooth extraction resulting in high-density bone in the center of the alveolar process, where, under normal circumstances, cancellous bone is to be expected. In an adult orthodontic patient, routine extractions of the mandibular first permanent bicuspids were performed, resulting in socket sclerosis and unsuccessful orthodontic space closure. Orthodontic mini-implants were inserted to augment anchorage and aid in space closure. In the presence of socket sclerosis, conventional orthodontic mechanics failed to close the extraction spaces. However, with absolute anchorage in place, space closure occurred at a nearly normal rate. After treatment, no signs of socket sclerosis were discernible on the periapical radiographs. Socket sclerosis can be an obstacle for orthodontic space closure if traditional mechanics are employed. However, mini-implant-reinforced anchorage can lead to successful space closure, resulting in complete resolution of the sclerotic sites.

  19. Diagnosis and Management of Systemic Sclerosis: A Practical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason J; Pope, Janet E

    2016-02-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a devastating multisystem rheumatologic condition that is characterized by autoimmunity, tissue fibrosis, obliterative vasculopathy and inflammation. Clinical presentation and course of the condition vary greatly, which complicates both diagnosis and corresponding treatment. In this regard, recent advances in disease understanding, both clinically and biochemically, have led to newer classification criteria for systemic sclerosis that are more inclusive than ever before. Still, significant disease modifying therapies do not yet exist for most patients. Therefore, organ-based management strategies are employed and research has been directed within this paradigm focusing on either the most debilitating symptoms, such as Raynaud's phenomenon, digital ulcers and cutaneous sclerosis, or life-threatening organ involvement such as interstitial lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The current trends in systemic sclerosis diagnosis, evidence-based treatment recommendations and potential future directions in systemic sclerosis treatment are discussed.

  20. Generalized Superconductivity. Generalized Levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciobanu, B.; Agop, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the recent papers, the gravitational superconductivity is described. We introduce the concept of generalized superconductivity observing that any nongeodesic motion and, in particular, the motion in an electromagnetic field, can be transformed in a geodesic motion by a suitable choice of the connection. In the present paper, the gravitoelectromagnetic London equations have been obtained from the generalized Helmholtz vortex theorem using the generalized local equivalence principle. In this context, the gravitoelectromagnetic Meissner effect and, implicitly, the gravitoelectromagnetic levitation are given. (authors)