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Sample records for sclerosis gene-environment interaction

  1. Gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis: innate and adaptive immune responses to human endogenous retrovirus and herpesvirus antigens and the lectin complement activation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove; Petersen, Thor; Thiel, Steffen

    2006-01-01

    Aspects of gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis (MS) were analysed in serum samples from 46 MS families (25 sporadic MS cases and 42 familial MS cases): antibodies to the MS-associated human endogenous retrovirus HERV-H, and levels of three components in the innate pathogen...

  2. Finding gene-environment interactions for Phobias

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, Alice M.; Lau, Jennifer Y. F.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2008-01-01

    Phobias are common disorders causing a great deal of suffering. Studies of gene-environment interaction (G × E) have revealed much about the complex processes underlying the development of various psychiatric disorders but have told us little about phobias. This article describes what is already known about genetic and environmental influences upon phobias and suggests how this information can be used to optimise the chances of discovering G × Es for phobias. In addition to the careful concep...

  3. Gene-environment interactions on growth trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Xiong, Wei; Ma, Weiping; Chanock, Stephen; Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Wu, Rongling; Perera, Frederica P

    2012-04-01

    It has been suggested that children with larger brains tend to perform better on IQ tests or cognitive function tests. Prenatal head growth and head growth in infancy are two crucial periods for subsequent intelligence. Studies have shown that environmental exposure to air pollutants during pregnancy is associated with fetal growth reduction, developmental delay, and reduced IQ. Meanwhile, genetic polymorphisms may modify the effect of environment on head growth. However, studies on gene-environment or gene-gene interactions on growth trajectories have been quite limited partly due to the difficulty to quantitatively measure interactions on growth trajectories. Moreover, it is known that assessing the significance of gene-environment or gene-gene interactions on cross-sectional outcomes empirically using the permutation procedures may bring substantial errors in the tests. We proposed a score that quantitatively measures interactions on growth trajectories and developed an algorithm with a parametric bootstrap procedure to empirically assess the significance of the interactions on growth trajectories under the likelihood framework. We also derived a Wald statistic to test for interactions on growth trajectories and compared it to the proposed parametric bootstrap procedure. Through extensive simulation studies, we demonstrated the feasibility and power of the proposed testing procedures. We applied our method to a real dataset with head circumference measures from birth to age 7 on a cohort currently being conducted by the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) in Krakow, Poland, and identified several significant gene-environment interactions on head circumference growth trajectories. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Finding gene-environment interactions for phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Alice M; Lau, Jennifer Y F; Eley, Thalia C

    2008-03-01

    Phobias are common disorders causing a great deal of suffering. Studies of gene-environment interaction (G x E) have revealed much about the complex processes underlying the development of various psychiatric disorders but have told us little about phobias. This article describes what is already known about genetic and environmental influences upon phobias and suggests how this information can be used to optimise the chances of discovering G x Es for phobias. In addition to the careful conceptualisation of new studies, it is suggested that data already collected should be re-analysed in light of increased understanding of processes influencing phobias.

  5. Gene-environment interactions involving functional variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Rudolph, Anja; Hopper, John L

    2017-01-01

    epidemiological breast cancer risk factors in relation to breast cancer. Analyses were conducted on up to 58,573 subjects (26,968 cases and 31,605 controls) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, in one of the largest studies of its kind. Analyses were carried out separately for estrogen receptor (ER.......01. The strongest interaction result in relation to overall breast cancer risk was found between CFLAR-rs7558475 and current smoking (ORint  = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.67-0.88, pint  = 1.8 × 10(-4) ). The interaction with the strongest statistical evidence was found between 5q14-rs7707921 and alcohol consumption (ORint =1.......36, 95% CI: 1.16-1.59, pint  = 1.9 × 10(-5) ) in relation to ER- disease risk. The remaining two gene-environment interactions were also identified in relation to ER- breast cancer risk and were found between 3p21-rs6796502 and age at menarche (ORint  = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.12-1.43, pint =1.8 × 10...

  6. Environmental confounding in gene-environment interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderweele, Tyler J; Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2013-07-01

    We show that, in the presence of uncontrolled environmental confounding, joint tests for the presence of a main genetic effect and gene-environment interaction will be biased if the genetic and environmental factors are correlated, even if there is no effect of either the genetic factor or the environmental factor on the disease. When environmental confounding is ignored, such tests will in fact reject the joint null of no genetic effect with a probability that tends to 1 as the sample size increases. This problem with the joint test vanishes under gene-environment independence, but it still persists if estimating the gene-environment interaction parameter itself is of interest. Uncontrolled environmental confounding will bias estimates of gene-environment interaction parameters even under gene-environment independence, but it will not do so if the unmeasured confounding variable itself does not interact with the genetic factor. Under gene-environment independence, if the interaction parameter without controlling for the environmental confounder is nonzero, then there is gene-environment interaction either between the genetic factor and the environmental factor of interest or between the genetic factor and the unmeasured environmental confounder. We evaluate several recently proposed joint tests in a simulation study and discuss the implications of these results for the conduct of gene-environment interaction studies.

  7. Animal models of gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan, Yavuz; Sawa, Akira; Ross, Christopher A; Pletnikov, Mikhail V

    2009-12-07

    The pathogenesis of schizophrenia and related mental illnesses likely involves multiple interactions between susceptibility genes of small effects and environmental factors. Gene-environment interactions occur across different stages of neurodevelopment to produce heterogeneous clinical and pathological manifestations of the disease. The main obstacle for mechanistic studies of gene-environment interplay has been the paucity of appropriate experimental systems for elucidating the molecular pathways that mediate gene-environment interactions relevant to schizophrenia. Recent advances in psychiatric genetics and a plethora of experimental data from animal studies allow us to suggest a new approach to gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia. We propose that animal models based on identified genetic mutations and measurable environment factors will help advance studies of the molecular mechanisms of gene-environment interplay.

  8. Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis: Genes, Environment, and a Comprehensive Therapeutic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappa, Ryan; Theroux, Liana; Brenton, J Nicholas

    2017-10-01

    Pediatric multiple sclerosis is an increasingly recognized and studied disorder that accounts for 3% to 10% of all patients with multiple sclerosis. The risk for pediatric multiple sclerosis is thought to reflect a complex interplay between environmental and genetic risk factors. Environmental exposures, including sunlight (ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D levels), infections (Epstein-Barr virus), passive smoking, and obesity, have been identified as potential risk factors in youth. Genetic predisposition contributes to the risk of multiple sclerosis, and the major histocompatibility complex on chromosome 6 makes the single largest contribution to susceptibility to multiple sclerosis. With the use of large-scale genome-wide association studies, other non-major histocompatibility complex alleles have been identified as independent risk factors for the disease. The bridge between environment and genes likely lies in the study of epigenetic processes, which are environmentally-influenced mechanisms through which gene expression may be modified. This article will review these topics to provide a framework for discussion of a comprehensive approach to counseling and ultimately treating the pediatric patient with multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gene-Environment Interaction in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuang, Yu-Hsuan; Lill, Christina M; Lee, Pei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Drinking caffeinated coffee has been reported to provide protection against Parkinson's disease (PD). Caffeine is an adenosine A2A receptor (encoded by the gene ADORA2A) antagonist that increases dopaminergic neurotransmission and Cytochrome P450 1A2 (gene: CYP1A2......) metabolizes caffeine; thus, gene polymorphisms in ADORA2A and CYP1A2 may influence the effect coffee consumption has on PD risk. METHODS: In a population-based case-control study (PASIDA) in Denmark (1,556 PD patients and 1,606 birth year- and gender-matched controls), we assessed interactions between...... lifetime coffee consumption and 3 polymorphisms in ADORA2A and CYP1A2 for all subjects, and incident and prevalent PD cases separately using logistic regression models. We also conducted a meta-analysis combining our results with those from previous studies. RESULTS: We estimated statistically significant...

  10. A flexible Bayesian model for studying gene-environment interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An important follow-up step after genetic markers are found to be associated with a disease outcome is a more detailed analysis investigating how the implicated gene or chromosomal region and an established environment risk factor interact to influence the disease risk. The standard approach to this study of gene-environment interaction considers one genetic marker at a time and therefore could misrepresent and underestimate the genetic contribution to the joint effect when one or more functional loci, some of which might not be genotyped, exist in the region and interact with the environment risk factor in a complex way. We develop a more global approach based on a Bayesian model that uses a latent genetic profile variable to capture all of the genetic variation in the entire targeted region and allows the environment effect to vary across different genetic profile categories. We also propose a resampling-based test derived from the developed Bayesian model for the detection of gene-environment interaction. Using data collected in the Environment and Genetics in Lung Cancer Etiology (EAGLE study, we apply the Bayesian model to evaluate the joint effect of smoking intensity and genetic variants in the 15q25.1 region, which contains a cluster of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor genes and has been shown to be associated with both lung cancer and smoking behavior. We find evidence for gene-environment interaction (P-value = 0.016, with the smoking effect appearing to be stronger in subjects with a genetic profile associated with a higher lung cancer risk; the conventional test of gene-environment interaction based on the single-marker approach is far from significant.

  11. Robust Tests for Additive Gene-Environment Interaction in Case-Control Studies Using Gene-Environment Independence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Gang; Lee, Seunggeun; Lee, Alice W

    2018-01-01

    There have been recent proposals advocating the use of additive gene-environment interaction instead of the widely used multiplicative scale, as a more relevant public health measure. Using gene-environment independence enhances the power for testing multiplicative interaction in case...... in a data-adaptive way, to the additive scale. An EB estimator of Relative Excess Risk due to Interaction is derived and the corresponding Wald test is proposed with general regression setting under a retrospective likelihood framework. We study the impact of gene-environment association on the resultant...... test with case-control data. Our simulation studies suggest that the EB approach uses the gene-environment independence assumption in a data-adaptive way and provides power gain compared to the standard logistic regression analysis and better control of Type I error when compared to the analysis...

  12. Gene-Environment Interactions in Severe Mental Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf eUher

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe mental illness is a broad category that includes schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and severe depression. Both genetic disposition and environmental exposures play important roles in the development of severe mental illness. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the roles of genetic and environmental depend on each other. Gene-environment interactions may underlie the paradox of strong environmental factors for highly heritable disorders, the low estimates of shared environmental influences in twin studies of severe mental illness and the heritability gap between twin and molecular heritability estimates. Sons and daughters of parents with severe mental illness are more vulnerable to the effects of prenatal and postnatal environmental exposures, suggesting that the expression of genetic liability depends on environment. In the last decade, gene-environment interactions involving specific molecular variants in candidate genes have been identified. Replicated findings include an interaction between a polymorphism in the AKT1 gene and cannabis use in the development of psychosis and an interaction between the length polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene and childhood maltreatment in the development of persistent depressive disorder. Bipolar disorder has been underinvestigated, with only a single study showing an interaction between a functional polymorphism in BDNF and stressful life events triggering bipolar depressive episodes. The first systematic search for gene-environment interactions has found that a polymorphism in CTNNA3 may sensitise the developing brain to the pathogenic effect of cytomegalovirus in utero, leading to schizophrenia in adulthood. Strategies for genome-wide investigations will likely include coordination between epidemiological and genetic research efforts, systematic assessment of multiple environmental factors in large samples, and prioritization of genetic variants.

  13. Animal model for schizophrenia that reflects gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Taku; Ibi, Daisuke; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating psychiatric disorder that impairs mental and social functioning and affects approximately 1% of the population worldwide. Genetic susceptibility factors for schizophrenia have recently been reported, some of which are known to play a role in neurodevelopment; these include neuregulin-1, dysbindin, and disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1). Moreover, epidemiologic studies suggest that environmental insults, such as prenatal infection and perinatal complication, are involved in the development of schizophrenia. The possible interaction between environment and genetic susceptibility factors, especially during neurodevelopment, is proposed as a promising disease etiology of schizophrenia. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (polyI : C) is a synthetic analogue of double-stranded RNA that leads to the pronounced but time-limited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Maternal immune activation by polyI : C exposure in rodents is known to precipitate a wide spectrum of behavioral, cognitive, and pharmacological abnormalities in adult offspring. Recently, we have reported that neonatal injection of polyI : C in mice results in schizophrenia-like behavioral alterations in adulthood. In this review, we show how gene-environment interactions during neurodevelopment result in phenotypic changes in adulthood by injecting polyI : C into transgenic mice that express a dominant-negative form of human DISC1 (DN-DISC1). Our findings suggest that polyI : C-treated DN-DISC1 mice are a well-validated animal model for schizophrenia that reflects gene-environment interactions.

  14. Gene-environment interaction and male reproductive function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Jonatan; Bonde, Jens Peter; Giwercman, Yvonne L

    2010-01-01

    , but the number of studies is still limited. This type of interaction studies may improve our understanding of normal physiology and help us to identify the risk factors to male reproductive malfunction. We also shortly discuss other aspects of gene-environment interaction specifically associated with the issue......As genetic factors can hardly explain the changes taking place during short time spans, environmental and lifestyle-related factors have been suggested as the causes of time-related deterioration of male reproductive function. However, considering the strong heterogeneity of male fecundity between...... and within populations, genetic variants might be important determinants of the individual susceptibility to the adverse effects of environment or lifestyle. Although the possible mechanisms of such interplay in relation to the reproductive system are largely unknown, some recent studies have indicated...

  15. Gene-environment interactions and alcohol use and dependence: current status and future challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaluw, C.S. van der; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2009-01-01

    To discuss the current status of gene-environment interaction research with regard to alcohol use and dependence. Further, we highlight the difficulties concerning gene-environment studies. Overview of the current evidence for gene-environment interactions in alcohol outcomes, and of the associated

  16. Sleep Duration and Depressive Symptoms: A Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Harden, Kathryn Paige; Buchwald, Dedra; Vitiello, Michael V.; Pack, Allan I.; Strachan, Eric; Goldberg, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We used quantitative genetic models to assess whether sleep duration modifies genetic and environmental influences on depressive symptoms. Method: Participants were 1,788 adult twins from 894 same-sex twin pairs (192 male and 412 female monozygotic [MZ] pairs, and 81 male and 209 female dizygotic [DZ] pairs] from the University of Washington Twin Registry. Participants self-reported habitual sleep duration and depressive symptoms. Data were analyzed using quantitative genetic interaction models, which allowed the magnitude of additive genetic, shared environmental, and non-shared environmental influences on depressive symptoms to vary with sleep duration. Results: Within MZ twin pairs, the twin who reported longer sleep duration reported fewer depressive symptoms (ec = -0.17, SE = 0.06, P sleep duration interaction effect on depressive symptoms (a'c = 0.23, SE = 0.08, P sleep duration and depressive symptoms. Among individuals with sleep duration within the normal range (7-8.9 h/night), the total heritability (h2) of depressive symptoms was approximately 27%. However, among individuals with sleep duration within the low (sleep duration extremes (5 h/night: h2 = 53%; 10 h/night: h2 = 49%). Conclusion: Genetic contributions to depressive symptoms increase at both short and long sleep durations. Citation: Watson NF; Harden KP; Buchwald D; Vitiello MV; Pack AI; Stachan E; Goldberg J. Sleep duration and depressive symptoms: a gene-environment interaction. SLEEP 2014;37(2):351-358. PMID:24497663

  17. Study of oral clefts: Indication of gene-environment interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, S.J.; Beaty, T.H.; Panny, S. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    In this study of infants with isolated birth defects, 69 cleft palate-only (CPO) cases, 114 cleft lip with or without palate (CL/P), and 284 controls with non-cleft birth defects (all born in Maryland during 1984-1992) were examined to test for associations among genetic markers and different oral clefts. Modest associations were found between transforming growth factor {alpha} (TGF{alpha}) marker and CPO, as well as that between D17S579 (Mfd188) and CL/P in this study. The association between TGF{alpha} marker and CPO reflects a statistical interaction between mother`s smoking and child`s TGF{alpha} genotype. A significantly higher risk of CPO was found among those reporting maternal smoking during pregnancy and carrying less common TGF{alpha} TaqI allele (odds ratio=7.02 with 95% confidence interval 1.8-27.6). This gene-environment interaction was also found among those who reported no family history of any type of birth defect (odds ratio=5.60 with 95% confidence interval 1.4-22.9). Similar associations were seen for CL/P, but these were not statistically significant.

  18. Gene-environment interaction and male reproductive function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Jonatan; Bonde, Jens Peter; Giwercman, Yvonne L.; Rylander, Lars; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2010-01-01

    As genetic factors can hardly explain the changes taking place during short time spans, environmental and lifestyle-related factors have been suggested as the causes of time-related deterioration of male reproductive function. However, considering the strong heterogeneity of male fecundity between and within populations, genetic variants might be important determinants of the individual susceptibility to the adverse effects of environment or lifestyle. Although the possible mechanisms of such interplay in relation to the reproductive system are largely unknown, some recent studies have indicated that specific genotypes may confer a larger risk of male reproductive disorders following certain exposures. This paper presents a critical review of animal and human evidence on how genes may modify environmental effects on male reproductive function. Some examples have been found that support this mechanism, but the number of studies is still limited. This type of interaction studies may improve our understanding of normal physiology and help us to identify the risk factors to male reproductive malfunction. We also shortly discuss other aspects of gene-environment interaction specifically associated with the issue of reproduction, namely environmental and lifestyle factors as the cause of sperm DNA damage. It remains to be investigated to what extent such genetic changes, by natural conception or through the use of assisted reproductive techniques, are transmitted to the next generation, thereby causing increased morbidity in the offspring. PMID:20348940

  19. Music training and speech perception: a gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, E Glenn

    2015-03-01

    Claims of beneficial side effects of music training are made for many different abilities, including verbal and visuospatial abilities, executive functions, working memory, IQ, and speech perception in particular. Such claims assume that music training causes the associations even though children who take music lessons are likely to differ from other children in music aptitude, which is associated with many aspects of speech perception. Music training in childhood is also associated with cognitive, personality, and demographic variables, and it is well established that IQ and personality are determined largely by genetics. Recent evidence also indicates that the role of genetics in music aptitude and music achievement is much larger than previously thought. In short, music training is an ideal model for the study of gene-environment interactions but far less appropriate as a model for the study of plasticity. Children seek out environments, including those with music lessons, that are consistent with their predispositions; such environments exaggerate preexisting individual differences. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  20. Eating disorders, gene-environment interactions and epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Iain C; Mill, Jonathan; Uher, Rudolf; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    This review describes the various subtypes of eating disorders and examines factors associated with the risk of illness. It considers evidence that the development and maintenance of eating disorders is due to gene-environment interactions (GxE) that alter genetic expression via epigenetic processes. It describes how environmental factors such as those associated with nutrition and/or stress may cause epigenetic changes which have transcriptional and phenotypic effects, which, in turn, alter the long term risk of developing an eating disorder. It reviews theoretical and practical issues associated with epigenetic studies in psychiatry and how these are relevant to eating disorders. It examines the limited number of epigenetic studies which have been conducted in eating disorders and suggests directions for further research. Understanding the relationship between epigenetic processes and the risk of an eating disorder opens possibilities for preventive and/or therapeutic interventions. For example, epigenetic changes associated with diet and weight may be reversible and those associated with cognitive processes may be accessible to pharmacological interventions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Meta-analysis of gene-environment interaction exploiting gene-environment independence across multiple case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Jason P; Rice, John D; Li, Shi; Stringham, Heather M; Boehnke, Michael; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2017-10-30

    Multiple papers have studied the use of gene-environment (G-E) independence to enhance power for testing gene-environment interaction in case-control studies. However, studies that evaluate the role of G-E independence in a meta-analysis framework are limited. In this paper, we extend the single-study empirical Bayes type shrinkage estimators proposed by Mukherjee and Chatterjee (2008) to a meta-analysis setting that adjusts for uncertainty regarding the assumption of G-E independence across studies. We use the retrospective likelihood framework to derive an adaptive combination of estimators obtained under the constrained model (assuming G-E independence) and unconstrained model (without assumptions of G-E independence) with weights determined by measures of G-E association derived from multiple studies. Our simulation studies indicate that this newly proposed estimator has improved average performance across different simulation scenarios than the standard alternative of using inverse variance (covariance) weighted estimators that combines study-specific constrained, unconstrained, or empirical Bayes estimators. The results are illustrated by meta-analyzing 6 different studies of type 2 diabetes investigating interactions between genetic markers on the obesity related FTO gene and environmental factors body mass index and age. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in the Etiology of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adegoke, Olufemi

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this CDA is to evaluate the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in the etiology of breast cancer in two ongoing case-control studies, the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study (SBCS...

  3. Modelling gene-environment interaction in first episodes of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Miguel; Bioque, Miquel; Cabrera, Bibiana; Lobo, Antonio; González-Pinto, Ana; Pina, Laura; Corripio, Iluminada; Sanjuán, Julio; Mané, Anna; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Vieta, Eduard; Arango, Celso; Mezquida, Gisela; Gassó, Patricia; Parellada, Mara; Saiz-Ruiz, Jerónimo; Cuesta, Manuel J; Mas, Sergi

    2017-11-01

    Recent research demonstrates the heterogeneous etiology of psychotic disorders, where gen-environment (GxE) interaction plays a key role. Large genetic studies have linked many genetic variants with schizophrenia, but each variant is only associated with a small effect and the GxE interaction contribution has not been evaluated. The PEPs Project was designed to carefully collect a large amount of genetic and environmental exposure data of 335 FEP patients and 253 matched healthy controls.780single-nucleotide polymorphisms (from 159 candidate genes)and 16 environmental variables previously reported as the main psychosis non-genetic risk factors were analyzed together using entropy-based measures of information gain. Our analyses identified an interaction between nine SNPs and the exposition to the environmental risk factors of psychosis, showing a clear enrichment of genes linked to serotonin neurotransmission and neurodevelopmental processes. This study has allowed the identification of several GxE-environment interactions involved in the risk of presenting a FEP. Our results highlight the importance of serotonin neurotransmission interacting with certain environmental stimuli. The serotoninergic system may be playing a key role in the regulatory network of stress and other systems implicated in the emergence and development of psychotic disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene-environment interactions in sarcoidosis: challenge and opportunity

    OpenAIRE

    Culver, Daniel A.; Newman, Lee S.; Kavuru, Mani S.

    2007-01-01

    Susceptibility to most human diseases is polygenic, with complex interactions between functional polymorphisms of single genes governing disease incidence, phenotype, or both. In this context, the contribution of any discrete gene is generally modest for a single individual, but may confer substantial attributable risk on a population level. Environmental exposure can modify the effects of a polymorphism, either by providing a necessary substrate for development of human disease or because th...

  5. Gene-environment interactions in early life and adulthood : implications for cocaine intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Rixt van der

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the research described in this thesis was to demonstrate the role of gene-environment interactions in the emergence of individual differences in cocaine use. For this purpose we used two inbred mouse strains, the C57Bl/6 (C57) and DBA/2 (DBA), which are known to differ in

  6. A novel approach to simulate gene-environment interactions in complex diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicodemi Mario

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex diseases are multifactorial traits caused by both genetic and environmental factors. They represent the major part of human diseases and include those with largest prevalence and mortality (cancer, heart disease, obesity, etc.. Despite a large amount of information that has been collected about both genetic and environmental risk factors, there are few examples of studies on their interactions in epidemiological literature. One reason can be the incomplete knowledge of the power of statistical methods designed to search for risk factors and their interactions in these data sets. An improvement in this direction would lead to a better understanding and description of gene-environment interactions. To this aim, a possible strategy is to challenge the different statistical methods against data sets where the underlying phenomenon is completely known and fully controllable, for example simulated ones. Results We present a mathematical approach that models gene-environment interactions. By this method it is possible to generate simulated populations having gene-environment interactions of any form, involving any number of genetic and environmental factors and also allowing non-linear interactions as epistasis. In particular, we implemented a simple version of this model in a Gene-Environment iNteraction Simulator (GENS, a tool designed to simulate case-control data sets where a one gene-one environment interaction influences the disease risk. The main aim has been to allow the input of population characteristics by using standard epidemiological measures and to implement constraints to make the simulator behaviour biologically meaningful. Conclusions By the multi-logistic model implemented in GENS it is possible to simulate case-control samples of complex disease where gene-environment interactions influence the disease risk. The user has full control of the main characteristics of the simulated population and a Monte

  7. A methodology to establish a database to study gene environment interactions for childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCormick Jonathan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene-environment interactions are likely to explain some of the heterogeneity in childhood asthma. Here, we describe the methodology and experiences in establishing a database for childhood asthma designed to study gene-environment interactions (PAGES - Paediatric Asthma Gene Environment Study. Methods Children with asthma and under the care of a respiratory paediatrician are being recruited from 15 hospitals between 2008 and 2011. An asthma questionnaire is completed and returned by post. At a routine clinic visit saliva is collected for DNA extraction. Detailed phenotyping in a proportion of children includes spirometry, bronchodilator response (BDR, skin prick reactivity, exhaled nitric oxide and salivary cotinine. Dietary and quality of life questionnaires are completed. Data are entered onto a purpose-built database. Results To date 1045 children have been invited to participate and data collected in 501 (48%. The mean age (SD of participants is 8.6 (3.9 years, 57% male. DNA has been collected in 436 children. Spirometry has been obtained in 172 children, mean % predicted (SD FEV1 97% (15 and median (IQR BDR is 5% (2, 9. There were differences in age, socioeconomic status, severity and %FEV1 between the different centres (p≤0.024. Reasons for non-participation included parents not having time to take part, children not attending clinics and, in a small proportion, refusal to take part. Conclusions It is feasible to establish a national database to study gene-environment interactions within an asthmatic paediatric population; there are barriers to participation and some different characteristics in individuals recruited from different centres. Recruitment to our study continues and is anticipated to extend current understanding of asthma heterogeneity.

  8. Gene-Environment Interactions in Stress Response Contribute Additively to a Genotype-Environment Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Matsui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available How combinations of gene-environment interactions collectively give rise to genotype-environment interactions is not fully understood. To shed light on this problem, we genetically dissected an environment-specific poor growth phenotype in a cross of two budding yeast strains. This phenotype is detectable when certain segregants are grown on ethanol at 37°C ('E37', a condition that differs from the standard culturing environment in both its carbon source (ethanol as opposed to glucose and temperature (37°C as opposed to 30°C. Using recurrent backcrossing with phenotypic selection, we identified 16 contributing loci. To examine how these loci interact with each other and the environment, we focused on a subset of four loci that together can lead to poor growth in E37. We measured the growth of all 16 haploid combinations of alleles at these loci in all four possible combinations of carbon source (ethanol or glucose and temperature (30 or 37°C in a nearly isogenic population. This revealed that the four loci act in an almost entirely additive manner in E37. However, we also found that these loci have weaker effects when only carbon source or temperature is altered, suggesting that their effect magnitudes depend on the severity of environmental perturbation. Consistent with such a possibility, cloning of three causal genes identified factors that have unrelated functions in stress response. Thus, our results indicate that polymorphisms in stress response can show effects that are intensified by environmental stress, thereby resulting in major genotype-environment interactions when multiple of these variants co-occur.

  9. Gene-Environment Interactions in Stress Response Contribute Additively to a Genotype-Environment Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takeshi; Ehrenreich, Ian M

    2016-07-01

    How combinations of gene-environment interactions collectively give rise to genotype-environment interactions is not fully understood. To shed light on this problem, we genetically dissected an environment-specific poor growth phenotype in a cross of two budding yeast strains. This phenotype is detectable when certain segregants are grown on ethanol at 37°C ('E37'), a condition that differs from the standard culturing environment in both its carbon source (ethanol as opposed to glucose) and temperature (37°C as opposed to 30°C). Using recurrent backcrossing with phenotypic selection, we identified 16 contributing loci. To examine how these loci interact with each other and the environment, we focused on a subset of four loci that together can lead to poor growth in E37. We measured the growth of all 16 haploid combinations of alleles at these loci in all four possible combinations of carbon source (ethanol or glucose) and temperature (30 or 37°C) in a nearly isogenic population. This revealed that the four loci act in an almost entirely additive manner in E37. However, we also found that these loci have weaker effects when only carbon source or temperature is altered, suggesting that their effect magnitudes depend on the severity of environmental perturbation. Consistent with such a possibility, cloning of three causal genes identified factors that have unrelated functions in stress response. Thus, our results indicate that polymorphisms in stress response can show effects that are intensified by environmental stress, thereby resulting in major genotype-environment interactions when multiple of these variants co-occur.

  10. The genetics of music accomplishment: evidence for gene-environment correlation and interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambrick, David Z; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M

    2015-02-01

    Theories of skilled performance that emphasize training history, such as K. Anders Ericsson and colleagues' deliberate-practice theory, have received a great deal of recent attention in both the scientific literature and the popular press. Twin studies, however, have demonstrated evidence for moderate-to-strong genetic influences on skilled performance. Focusing on musical accomplishment in a sample of over 800 pairs of twins, we found evidence for gene-environment correlation, in the form of a genetic effect on music practice. However, only about one quarter of the genetic effect on music accomplishment was explained by this genetic effect on music practice, suggesting that genetically influenced factors other than practice contribute to individual differences in music accomplishment. We also found evidence for gene-environment interaction, such that genetic effects on music accomplishment were most pronounced among those engaging in music practice, suggesting that genetic potentials for skilled performance are most fully expressed and fostered by practice.

  11. Gene-environment interaction involving recently identified colorectal cancer susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Elizabeth D.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Minnier, Jessica; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brenner, Hermann; Caan, Bette J.; Campbell, Peter T.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Du, Mengmeng; Duggan, David; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gong, Jian; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jiao, Shuo; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lemire, Mathieu; Ma, Jing; Newcomb, Polly A.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Pflugeisen, Bethann M.; Potter, John D.; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Stelling, Deanna L.; Thomas, Fridtjof; Thornquist, Mark; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Warnick, Greg S.; Zanke, Brent W.; Peters, Ulrike; Hsu, Li; White, Emily

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genome-wide association studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Prior research has evaluated the presence of gene-environment interaction involving the first 10 identified susceptibility loci, but little work has been conducted on interaction involving SNPs at recently identified susceptibility loci, including: rs10911251, rs6691170, rs6687758, rs11903757, rs10936599, rs647161, rs1321311, rs719725, rs1665650, rs3824999, rs7136702, rs11169552, rs59336, rs3217810, rs4925386, and rs2423279. METHODS Data on 9160 cases and 9280 controls from the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO) and Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) were used to evaluate the presence of interaction involving the above-listed SNPs and sex, body mass index (BMI), alcohol consumption, smoking, aspirin use, post-menopausal hormone (PMH) use, as well as intake of dietary calcium, dietary fiber, dietary folate, red meat, processed meat, fruit, and vegetables. Interaction was evaluated using a fixed-effects meta-analysis of an efficient Empirical Bayes estimator, and permutation was used to account for multiple comparisons. RESULTS None of the permutation-adjusted p-values reached statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS The associations between recently identified genetic susceptibility loci and CRC are not strongly modified by sex, BMI, alcohol, smoking, aspirin, PMH use, and various dietary factors. IMPACT Results suggest no evidence of strong gene-environment interactions involving the recently identified 16 susceptibility loci for CRC taken one at a time. PMID:24994789

  12. Gene-environment interactions of CETP gene variation in a high cardiovascular risk Mediterranean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corella, Dolores; Carrasco, Paula; Fitó, Montserrat; Martínez-González, Miguel Angel; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Arós, Fernando; Lapetra, José; Guillén, Marisa; Ortega-Azorín, Carolina; Warnberg, Julia; Fiol, Miquel; Ruiz-Gutierrez, Valentina; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Martínez, J Alfredo; Ros, Emilio; Estruch, Ramón

    2010-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies show that cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are more strongly associated with HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations than any other loci across the genome. However, gene-environment interactions for clinical applications are still largely unknown. We studied gene-environment interactions between CETP SNPs and dietary fat intake, adherence to the Mediterranean diet, alcohol consumption, smoking, obesity, and diabetes on HDL-C in 4,210 high cardiovascular risk subjects from a Mediterranean population. We focused on the -4,502C>T and the TaqIB SNPs in partial linkage disequilibrium (D'= 0.88; P < 0.001). They were independently associated with higher HDL-C (P < 0.001); this clinically relevant association was greater when their diplotype was considered (14% higher in TT/B2B2 vs. CC/B1B1). No gene-gene interaction was observed. We also analyzed the association of these SNPs with blood pressure, and no clinically relevant associations were detected. No statistically significant interactions of these SNPs with obesity, diabetes, and smoking in determining HDL-C concentrations were found. Likewise, alcohol, dietary fat, and adherence to the Mediterranean diet did not statistically interact with the CETP variants (independently or as diplotype) in determining HDL-C. In conclusion, the strong association of the CETP SNPs and HDL-C was not statistically modified by diet or by the other environmental factors.

  13. Assessment of Multifactor Gene-Environment Interactions and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usset, Joseph L; Raghavan, Rama; Tyrer, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk factors relate to hormone exposure and elevated estrogen levels are associated with obesity in postmenopausal women. Therefore, we hypothesized that gene-environment interactions related to hormone-related risk factors could differ between obese......, and estrogen use) and assessed whether these interactions differed between obese and non-obese women. Interactions were assessed using logistic regression models and data from 14 case-control studies (6,247 cases; 10,379 controls). Histotype-specific analyses were also completed. RESULTS: SNPs in the following...... candidate genes showed notable interaction: IGF1R (rs41497346, estrogen plus progesterone hormone therapy, histology = all, P = 4.9 × 10(-6)) and ESR1 (rs12661437, endometriosis, histology = all, P = 1.5 × 10(-5)). The most notable obesity-gene-hormone risk factor interaction was within INSR (rs113759408...

  14. The impact of imprecisely measured covariates on estimating gene-environment interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilthorpe Mark S

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of measurement error in epidemiological exposures and confounders on estimated effects of exposure are well described, but the effects on estimates for gene-environment interactions has received rather less attention. In particular, the effects of confounder measurement error on gene-environment interactions are unknown. Methods We investigate these effects using simulated data and illustrate our results with a practical example in nutrition epidemiology. Results We show that the interaction regression coefficient is unchanged by confounder measurement error under certain conditions, but biased by exposure measurement error. We also confirm that confounder measurement error can lead to estimated effects of exposure biased either towards or away from the null, depending on the correlation structure, with associated effects on type II errors. Conclusion Whilst measurement error in confounders does not lead to bias in interaction coefficients, it may still lead to bias in the estimated effects of exposure. There may still be cost implications for epidemiological studies that need to calibrate all error-prone covariates against a valid reference, in addition to the exposure, to reduce the effects of confounder measurement error.

  15. Gene-environment interactions in early life and adulthood: implications for cocaine intake

    OpenAIRE

    Veen, Rixt van der

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the research described in this thesis was to demonstrate the role of gene-environment interactions in the emergence of individual differences in cocaine use. For this purpose we used two inbred mouse strains, the C57Bl/6 (C57) and DBA/2 (DBA), which are known to differ in drug-intake and to be differentially sensitive to several stressors. We studied the impact of early life experiences (long-term influence) as well as a later life psychosocial stressor (short-term influence)...

  16. [The role of gene-environment interaction in the development of eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gáti, Agnes; Abrahám, Ildikó

    2009-01-01

    The biological research predominant in the last decades have not brought a solution in the discovery of risk factors contributing to the development of eating disorders, and elaborating a more effective therapy. The large amount of molecular genetic studies, however, by showing the various genetic vulnerability, contributed significantly to recognizing a more specific effect of the environmental factors. The authors evaluate the genetic studies of eating disorders and present environmental factors having a role in the development of eating disorders. They report about recently published data of gene-environment interaction and conclude from the data clinically applicable consequences.

  17. Gene-environment interaction in the etiology of mathematical ability using SNP sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, Sophia J; Kovas, Yulia; Plomin, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Mathematics ability and disability is as heritable as other cognitive abilities and disabilities, however its genetic etiology has received relatively little attention. In our recent genome-wide association study of mathematical ability in 10-year-old children, 10 SNP associations were nominated from scans of pooled DNA and validated in an individually genotyped sample. In this paper, we use a 'SNP set' composite of these 10 SNPs to investigate gene-environment (GE) interaction, examining whether the association between the 10-SNP set and mathematical ability differs as a function of ten environmental measures in the home and school in a sample of 1888 children with complete data. We found two significant GE interactions for environmental measures in the home and the school both in the direction of the diathesis-stress type of GE interaction: The 10-SNP set was more strongly associated with mathematical ability in chaotic homes and when parents are negative.

  18. From 'omics' to complex disease: a systems biology approach to gene-environment interactions in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knox Sarah S

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is a complex disease that involves a sequence of gene-environment interactions in a progressive process that cannot occur without dysfunction in multiple systems, including DNA repair, apoptotic and immune functions. Epigenetic mechanisms, responding to numerous internal and external cues in a dynamic ongoing exchange, play a key role in mediating environmental influences on gene expression and tumor development. Hypothesis The hypothesis put forth in this paper addresses the limited success of treatment outcomes in clinical oncology. It states that improvement in treatment efficacy requires a new paradigm that focuses on reversing systemic dysfunction and tailoring treatments to specific stages in the process. It requires moving from a reductionist framework of seeking to destroy aberrant cells and pathways to a transdisciplinary systems biology approach aimed at reversing multiple levels of dysfunction. Conclusion Because there are many biological pathways and multiple epigenetic influences working simultaneously in the expression of cancer phenotypes, studying individual components in isolation does not allow an adequate understanding of phenotypic expression. A systems biology approach using new modeling techniques and nonlinear mathematics is needed to investigate gene-environment interactions and improve treatment efficacy. A broader array of study designs will also be required, including prospective molecular epidemiology, immune competent animal models and in vitro/in vivo translational research that more accurately reflects the complex process of tumor initiation and progression.

  19. The role of gene-environment correlations and interactions in middle childhood depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Paul O; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Haworth, Claire M A; Eley, Thalia C

    2013-02-01

    Depression is known to be associated with a wide array of environmental factors. Such associations are due at least in part to genetic influences on both. This issue has been little explored with preadolescent children. Measures of family chaos and parenting style at age 9 and child depressive symptoms at age 12 were completed by 3,258 twin pairs from the Twins Early Development Study and their parents. Quantitative genetic modeling was used to explore common and unique genetic and environmental influences on both family environment and later depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms at age 12 were significantly heritable. Moderate genetic effects influenced parenting style and family chaos at the age of 9, indicating gene-environment correlation. There were significant genetic correlations between family environment and depressive symptoms. There was some evidence of a Gene × Environment interaction, with stronger genetic effects on depressive symptoms for children with more suboptimal family environment. There was an Environment × Environment interaction, with effects of nonshared environment on depressive symptoms stronger for twins with more adverse parenting experiences. There is some evidence for gene-environment correlation between aspects of family environment in middle childhood and subsequent depressive symptoms. This suggests that one of the mechanisms by which genes lead to depressive symptoms may be by themselves influencing depressogenic environments.

  20. [Detecting gene-gene/environment interactions by model-based multifactor dimensionality reduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Shen, Chao; Guo, Zhirong

    2015-11-01

    This paper introduces a method called model-based multifactor dimensionality reduction (MB-MDR), which was firstly proposed by Calle et al., and can be applied for detecting gene-gene or gene-environment interactions in genetic studies. The basic principle and characteristics of MB-MDR as well as the operation in R program are briefly summarized. Besides, the detailed procedure of MB-MDR is illustrated by using example. Compared with classical MDR, MB-MDR has similar principle, which merges multi-locus genotypes into a one-dimensional construct and can be used in the study with small sample size. However, there is some difference between MB-MDR and classical MDR. First, it has higher statistical power than MDR and other MDR in the presence of different noises due to the different way the genotype cells merged. Second, compared with MDR, it can deal with all binary and quantitative traits, adjust marginal effects of factors and confounders. MBMDR could be a useful method in the analyses of gene-gene/environment interactions.

  1. Bisphenol-A and Female Infertility: A Possible Role of Gene-Environment Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Huo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bisphenol-A (BPA is widely used and ubiquitous in the environment. Animal studies indicate that BPA affects reproduction, however, the gene-environment interaction mechanism(s involved in this association remains unclear. We performed a literature review to summarize the evidence on this topic. Methods: A comprehensive search was conducted in PubMed using as keywords BPA, gene, infertility and female reproduction. Full-text articles in both human and animals published in English prior to December 2014 were selected. Results: Evidence shows that BPA can interfere with endocrine function of hypothalamic-pituitary axis, such as by changing gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH secretion in hypothalamus and promoting pituitary proliferation. Such actions affect puberty, ovulation and may even result in infertility. Ovary, uterus and other reproductive organs are also targets of BPA. BPA exposure impairs the structure and functions of female reproductive system in different times of life cycle and may contribute to infertility. Both epidemiological and experimental evidences demonstrate that BPA affects reproduction-related gene expression and epigenetic modification that are closely associated with infertility. The detrimental effects on reproduction may be lifelong and transgenerational. Conclusions: Evidence on gene-environment interactions, especially from human studies, is still limited. Further research on this topic is warranted.

  2. Environmental and gene-environment interactions and risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Deane, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Multiple environmental factors including hormones, dietary factors, infections and exposure to tobacco smoke as well as gene-environment interactions have been associated with increased risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Importantly, the growing understanding of the prolonged period prior to the first onset of symptoms of RA suggests that these environmental and genetic factors are likely acting to drive the development of RA-related autoimmunity long before the appearance of the first joint symptoms and clinical findings that are characteristic of RA. Herein we will review these factors and interactions, especially those that have been investigated in a prospective fashion prior to the symptomatic onset of RA. We will also discuss how these factors may be explored in future study to further the understanding of the pathogenesis of RA, and ultimately perhaps develop preventive measures for this disease. PMID:22819092

  3. Leveraging gene-environment interactions and endotypes for asthma gene discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Ober, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome that includes subtypes of disease with different underlying causes and disease mechanisms. Asthma is caused by a complex interaction between genes and environmental exposures; early-life exposures in particular play an important role. Asthma is also...... heritable, and a number of susceptibility variants have been discovered in genome-wide association studies, although the known risk alleles explain only a small proportion of the heritability. In this review, we present evidence supporting the hypothesis that focusing on more specific asthma phenotypes......, such as childhood asthma with severe exacerbations, and on relevant exposures that are involved in gene-environment interactions (GEIs), such as rhinovirus infections, will improve detection of asthma genes and our understanding of the underlying mechanisms. We will discuss the challenges of considering GEIs...

  4. Genetic risk for schizophrenia, obstetric complications, and adolescent school outcome: evidence for gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Jennifer K; Ellman, Lauren M; Tanskanen, Antti; Mustonen, Ulla; Huttunen, Matti O; Suvisaari, Jaana; Cannon, Tyrone D

    2013-09-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) and hypoxia are among the environmental factors most reliably associated with schizophrenia; however, the nature of this relationship is unclear and both gene-environment interaction and gene-environment covariation models have been proposed as explanations. High-risk (HR) designs that explore whether obstetric complications differentially predict outcomes in offspring at low risk (LR) vs HR for schizophrenia, while accounting for differences in rates of maternal risk factors, may shed light on this question. This study used prospectively obtained data to examine relationships between LBW and hypoxia on school outcome at age 15-16 years in a Finnish sample of 1070 offspring at LR for schizophrenia and 373 offspring at HR for schizophrenia, based on parental psychiatric history. Controlling for offspring sex, maternal smoking, social support, parity, age, and number of prenatal care visits, HR offspring performed worse than LR offspring across academic, nonacademic, and physical education domains. LBW predicted poorer academic and physical education performance in HR offspring, but not in LR offspring, and this association was similar for offspring of fathers vs mothers with schizophrenia. Hypoxia predicted poorer physical education score across risk groups. Rates of LBW and hypoxia were similar for LR and HR offspring and for offspring of fathers vs mothers with schizophrenia. Results support the hypothesis that genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia confers augmented vulnerability of the developing brain to the effects of obstetric complications, possibly via epigenetic mechanisms.

  5. From a genetic predisposition to an interactive predisposition: rethinking the ethical implications of screening for gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabery, James

    2009-02-01

    In a widely acclaimed study from 2002, researchers found a case of gene-environment interaction for a gene controlling neuroenzymatic activity (low vs. high), exposure to childhood maltreatment, and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). Cases of gene-environment interaction are generally characterized as evincing a genetic predisposition; for example, individuals with low neuroenzymatic activity are generally characterized as having a genetic predisposition to ASPD. I first argue that the concept of a genetic predisposition fundamentally misconstrues these cases of gene-environment interaction. This misconstrual will be diagnosed, and then a new concept--interactive predisposition--will be introduced. I then show how this conceptual shift reconfigures old questions and raises new questions for genetic screening. Attempts to screen embryos or fetuses for the gene associated with low neuroenzymatic activity with an eye toward selecting against the low-activity variant fall prey to the myth of pre-environmental prediction; attempts to screen newborns for the gene associated with low neuroenzymatic activity with an eye toward early intervention will have to face the interventionist's dilemma.

  6. Multiple sclerosis and herpesvirus interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Sciascia do Olival

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is the most common autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, and its etiology is believed to have both genetic and environmental components. Several viruses have already been implicated as triggers and there are several studies that implicate members of the Herpesviridae family in the pathogenesis of MS. The most important characteristic of these viruses is that they have periods of latency and exacerbations within their biological sanctuary, the central nervous system. The Epstein-Barr, cytomegalovirus, human herpesvirus 6 and human herpesvirus 7 viruses are the members that are most studied as being possible triggers of multiple sclerosis. According to evidence in the literature, the herpesvirus family is strongly involved in the pathogenesis of this disease, but it is unlikely that they are the only component responsible for its development. There are probably multiple triggers and more studies are necessary to investigate and define these interactions.

  7. Behavior of QQ-plots and genomic control in studies of gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorman, Arend; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Rice, Kenneth

    2011-05-12

    Genome-wide association studies of gene-environment interaction (GxE GWAS) are becoming popular. As with main effects GWAS, quantile-quantile plots (QQ-plots) and Genomic Control are being used to assess and correct for population substructure. However, in G x E work these approaches can be seriously misleading, as we illustrate; QQ-plots may give strong indications of substructure when absolutely none is present. Using simulation and theory, we show how and why spurious QQ-plot inflation occurs in G x E GWAS, and how this differs from main-effects analyses. We also explain how simple adjustments to standard regression-based methods used in G x E GWAS can alleviate this problem.

  8. Animal models of gene-environment interaction in schizophrenia: A dimensional perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan, Yavuz; McFarland, Ross; Pletnikov, Mikhail V

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia has long been considered as a disorder with multifactorial origins. Recent discoveries have advanced our understanding of the genetic architecture of the disease. However, even with the increase of identified risk variants, heritability estimates suggest an important contribution of non-genetic factors. Various environmental risk factors have been proposed to play a role in the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia. These include season of birth, maternal infections, obstetric complications, adverse events at early childhood, and drug abuse. Despite the progress in identification of genetic and environmental risk factors, we still have a limited understanding of the mechanisms whereby gene-environment interactions (G × E) operate in schizophrenia and psychoses at large. In this review we provide a critical analysis of current animal models of G × E relevant to psychotic disorders and propose that dimensional perspective will advance our understanding of the complex mechanisms of these disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Behavior of QQ-plots and genomic control in studies of gene-environment interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arend Voorman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies of gene-environment interaction (GxE GWAS are becoming popular. As with main effects GWAS, quantile-quantile plots (QQ-plots and Genomic Control are being used to assess and correct for population substructure. However, in G x E work these approaches can be seriously misleading, as we illustrate; QQ-plots may give strong indications of substructure when absolutely none is present. Using simulation and theory, we show how and why spurious QQ-plot inflation occurs in G x E GWAS, and how this differs from main-effects analyses. We also explain how simple adjustments to standard regression-based methods used in G x E GWAS can alleviate this problem.

  10. A combination test for detection of gene-environment interaction in cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Brandon; Basu, Saonli; McGue, Matt

    2017-07-01

    Identifying gene-environment (G-E) interactions can contribute to a better understanding of disease etiology, which may help researchers develop disease prevention strategies and interventions. One big criticism of studying G-E interaction is the lack of power due to sample size. Studies often restrict the interaction search to the top few hundred hits from a genome-wide association study or focus on potential candidate genes. In this paper, we test interactions between a candidate gene and an environmental factor to improve power by analyzing multiple variants within a gene. We extend recently developed score statistic based genetic association testing approaches to the G-E interaction testing problem. We also propose tests for interaction using gene-based summary measures that pool variants together. Although it has recently been shown that these summary measures can be biased and may lead to inflated type I error, we show that under several realistic scenarios, we can still provide valid tests of interaction. These tests use significantly less degrees of freedom and thus can have much higher power to detect interaction. Additionally, we demonstrate that the iSeq-aSum-min test, which combines a gene-based summary measure test, iSeq-aSum-G, and an interaction-based summary measure test, iSeq-aSum-I, provides a powerful alternative to test G-E interaction. We demonstrate the performance of these approaches using simulation studies and illustrate their performance to study interaction between the SNPs in several candidate genes and family climate environment on alcohol consumption using the Minnesota Center for Twin and Family Research dataset. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  11. Multifactor dimensionality reduction software for detecting gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Lance W; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Moore, Jason H

    2003-02-12

    Polymorphisms in human genes are being described in remarkable numbers. Determining which polymorphisms and which environmental factors are associated with common, complex diseases has become a daunting task. This is partly because the effect of any single genetic variation will likely be dependent on other genetic variations (gene-gene interaction or epistasis) and environmental factors (gene-environment interaction). Detecting and characterizing interactions among multiple factors is both a statistical and a computational challenge. To address this problem, we have developed a multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method for collapsing high-dimensional genetic data into a single dimension thus permitting interactions to be detected in relatively small sample sizes. In this paper, we describe the MDR approach and an MDR software package. We developed a program that integrates MDR with a cross-validation strategy for estimating the classification and prediction error of multifactor models. The software can be used to analyze interactions among 2-15 genetic and/or environmental factors. The dataset may contain up to 500 total variables and a maximum of 4000 study subjects. Information on obtaining the executable code, example data, example analysis, and documentation is available upon request. All supplementary information can be found at http://phg.mc.vanderbilt.edu/Software/MDR.

  12. CardioGxE, a catalog of gene-environment interactions for cardiometabolic traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic understanding of complex traits has developed immensely over the past decade but remains hampered by incomplete descriptions of contribution to phenotypic variance. Gene-environment (GxE) interactions are one of these contributors and in the guise of diet and physical activity are important modulators of cardiometabolic phenotypes and ensuing diseases. Results We mined the scientific literature to collect GxE interactions from 386 publications for blood lipids, glycemic traits, obesity anthropometrics, vascular measures, inflammation and metabolic syndrome, and introduce CardioGxE, a gene-environment interaction resource. We then analyzed the genes and SNPs supporting cardiometabolic GxEs in order to demonstrate utility of GxE SNPs and to discern characteristics of these important genetic variants. We were able to draw many observations from our extensive analysis of GxEs. 1) The CardioGxE SNPs showed little overlap with variants identified by main effect GWAS, indicating the importance of environmental interactions with genetic factors on cardiometabolic traits. 2) These GxE SNPs were enriched in adaptation to climatic and geographical features, with implications on energy homeostasis and response to physical activity. 3) Comparison to gene networks responding to plasma cholesterol-lowering or regression of atherosclerotic plaques showed that GxE genes have a greater role in those responses, particularly through high-energy diets and fat intake, than do GWAS-identified genes for the same traits. Other aspects of the CardioGxE dataset were explored. Conclusions Overall, we demonstrate that SNPs supporting cardiometabolic GxE interactions often exhibit transcriptional effects or are under positive selection. Still, not all such SNPs can be assigned potential functional or regulatory roles often because data are lacking in specific cell types or from treatments that approximate the environmental factor of the GxE. With research on metabolic related

  13. Generalized partial linear varying multi-index coefficient model for gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Gao, Bin; Cui, Yuehua

    2017-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested the joint effect of simultaneous exposures to multiple environments on disease risk. However, how environmental mixtures as a whole jointly modify genetic effect on disease risk is still largely unknown. Given the importance of gene-environment (G×E) interactions on many complex diseases, rigorously assessing the interaction effect between genes and environmental mixtures as a whole could shed novel insights into the etiology of complex diseases. For this purpose, we propose a generalized partial linear varying multi-index coefficient model (GPLVMICM) to capture the genetic effect on disease risk modulated by multiple environments as a whole. GPLVMICM is semiparametric in nature which allows different index loading parameters in different index functions. We estimate the parametric parameters by a profile procedure, and the nonparametric index functions by a B-spline backfitted kernel method. Under some regularity conditions, the proposed parametric and nonparametric estimators are shown to be consistent and asymptotically normal. We propose a generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) test to rigorously assess the linearity of the interaction effect between multiple environments and a gene, while apply a parametric likelihood test to detect linear G×E interaction effect. The finite sample performance of the proposed method is examined through simulation studies and is further illustrated through a real data analysis.

  14. Exposure enriched outcome dependent designs for longitudinal studies of gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhichao; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Estes, Jason P; Vokonas, Pantel S; Park, Sung Kyun

    2017-08-15

    Joint effects of genetic and environmental factors have been increasingly recognized in the development of many complex human diseases. Despite the popularity of case-control and case-only designs, longitudinal cohort studies that can capture time-varying outcome and exposure information have long been recommended for gene-environment (G × E) interactions. To date, literature on sampling designs for longitudinal studies of G × E interaction is quite limited. We therefore consider designs that can prioritize a subsample of the existing cohort for retrospective genotyping on the basis of currently available outcome, exposure, and covariate data. In this work, we propose stratified sampling based on summaries of individual exposures and outcome trajectories and develop a full conditional likelihood approach for estimation that adjusts for the biased sample. We compare the performance of our proposed design and analysis with combinations of different sampling designs and estimation approaches via simulation. We observe that the full conditional likelihood provides improved estimates for the G × E interaction and joint exposure effects over uncorrected complete-case analysis, and the exposure enriched outcome trajectory dependent design outperforms other designs in terms of estimation efficiency and power for detection of the G × E interaction. We also illustrate our design and analysis using data from the Normative Aging Study, an ongoing longitudinal cohort study initiated by the Veterans Administration in 1963. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Comparison of weighting approaches for genetic risk scores in gene-environment interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüls, Anke; Krämer, Ursula; Carlsten, Christopher; Schikowski, Tamara; Ickstadt, Katja; Schwender, Holger

    2017-12-16

    Weighted genetic risk scores (GRS), defined as weighted sums of risk alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are statistically powerful for detection gene-environment (GxE) interactions. To assign weights, the gold standard is to use external weights from an independent study. However, appropriate external weights are not always available. In such situations and in the presence of predominant marginal genetic effects, we have shown in a previous study that GRS with internal weights from marginal genetic effects ("GRS-marginal-internal") are a powerful and reliable alternative to single SNP approaches or the use of unweighted GRS. However, this approach might not be appropriate for detecting predominant interactions, i.e. interactions showing an effect stronger than the marginal genetic effect. In this paper, we present a weighting approach for such predominant interactions ("GRS-interaction-training") in which parts of the data are used to estimate the weights from the interaction terms and the remaining data are used to determine the GRS. We conducted a simulation study for the detection of GxE interactions in which we evaluated power, type I error and sign-misspecification. We compared this new weighting approach to the GRS-marginal-internal approach and to GRS with external weights. Our simulation study showed that in the absence of external weights and with predominant interaction effects, the highest power was reached with the GRS-interaction-training approach. If marginal genetic effects were predominant, the GRS-marginal-internal approach was more appropriate. Furthermore, the power to detect interactions reached by the GRS-interaction-training approach was only slightly lower than the power achieved by GRS with external weights. The power of the GRS-interaction-training approach was confirmed in a real data application to the Traffic, Asthma and Genetics (TAG) Study (N = 4465 observations). When appropriate external weights are unavailable, we

  16. Identification of New Genetic Susceptibility Loci for Breast Cancer Through Consideration of Gene-Environment Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeps, Anja; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Dunning, Alison M.; Milne, Roger L.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Andrulis, Irene; Brenner, Hermann; Behrens, Sabine; Orr, Nicholas; Jones, Michael; Ashworth, Alan; Li, Jingmei; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Knight, Julia; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna M.; Dumont, Martine; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Moisse, Matthieu; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Spurdle, Amanda; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Malats, Núria; Arias Perez, JoséI.; Benítez, Javier; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Truong, Théresè; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Braaf, Linde; Atsma, Femke; van den Broek, Alexandra J.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Southey, Melissa C.; Cox, Angela; Simard, Jacques; Giles, Graham G.; Lambrechts, Diether; Mannermaa, Arto; Brauch, Hiltrud; Guénel, Pascal; Peto, Julian; Fasching, Peter A.; Hopper, John; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Couch, Fergus; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Genes that alter disease risk only in combination with certain environmental exposures may not be detected in genetic association analysis. By using methods accounting for gene-environment (G × E) interaction, we aimed to identify novel genetic loci associated with breast cancer risk. Up to 34,475 cases and 34,786 controls of European ancestry from up to 23 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were included. Overall, 71,527 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), enriched for association with breast cancer, were tested for interaction with 10 environmental risk factors using three recently proposed hybrid methods and a joint test of association and interaction. Analyses were adjusted for age, study, population stratification, and confounding factors as applicable. Three SNPs in two independent loci showed statistically significant association: SNPs rs10483028 and rs2242714 in perfect linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 21 and rs12197388 in ARID1B on chromosome 6. While rs12197388 was identified using the joint test with parity and with age at menarche (P-values = 3 × 10−07), the variants on chromosome 21 q22.12, which showed interaction with adult body mass index (BMI) in 8,891 postmenopausal women, were identified by all methods applied. SNP rs10483028 was associated with breast cancer in women with a BMI below 25 kg/m2 (OR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.15–1.38) but not in women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or higher (OR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.72–1.11, P for interaction = 3.2 × 10−05). Our findings confirm comparable power of the recent methods for detecting G × E interaction and the utility of using G × E interaction analyses to identify new susceptibility loci. PMID:24248812

  17. Dissecting gene-environment interactions: A penalized robust approach accounting for hierarchical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cen; Jiang, Yu; Ren, Jie; Cui, Yuehua; Ma, Shuangge

    2018-02-10

    Identification of gene-environment (G × E) interactions associated with disease phenotypes has posed a great challenge in high-throughput cancer studies. The existing marginal identification methods have suffered from not being able to accommodate the joint effects of a large number of genetic variants, while some of the joint-effect methods have been limited by failing to respect the "main effects, interactions" hierarchy, by ignoring data contamination, and by using inefficient selection techniques under complex structural sparsity. In this article, we develop an effective penalization approach to identify important G × E interactions and main effects, which can account for the hierarchical structures of the 2 types of effects. Possible data contamination is accommodated by adopting the least absolute deviation loss function. The advantage of the proposed approach over the alternatives is convincingly demonstrated in both simulation and a case study on lung cancer prognosis with gene expression measurements and clinical covariates under the accelerated failure time model. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Detection of gene-environment interactions in a family-based population using SCAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gwangsu; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Arnett, Donna K; Parnell, Laurence D; Ordovas, Jose M; Kim, Yongdai; Kim, Joungyoun

    2017-09-30

    Gene-environment interaction (GxE) is emphasized as one potential source of missing genetic variation on disease traits, and the ultimate goal of GxE research is prediction of individual risk and prevention of complex diseases. However, there are various challenges in statistical analysis of GxE. In this paper, we focus on the three methodological challenges: (i) the high dimensions of genes; (ii) the hierarchical structure between interaction effects and their corresponding main effects; and (iii) the correlation among subjects from family-based population studies. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that approaches all three challenges simultaneously. This is the first penalized method focusing on an interaction search based on a linear mixed effect model. For verification, we compare the empirical performance of our new method with other existing methods in simulation study. The results demonstrate the superiority of our method under overall simulation setup. In particular, the outperformance obviously becomes greater as the correlation among subjects increases. In addition, the new method provides a robust estimate for the correlation among subjects. We also apply the new method on Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network study data. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. An Efficient Test for Gene-Environment Interaction in Generalized Linear Mixed Models with Family Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazo Lopera, Mauricio A; Coombes, Brandon J; de Andrade, Mariza

    2017-09-27

    Gene-environment (GE) interaction has important implications in the etiology of complex diseases that are caused by a combination of genetic factors and environment variables. Several authors have developed GE analysis in the context of independent subjects or longitudinal data using a gene-set. In this paper, we propose to analyze GE interaction for discrete and continuous phenotypes in family studies by incorporating the relatedness among the relatives for each family into a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) and by using a gene-based variance component test. In addition, we deal with collinearity problems arising from linkage disequilibrium among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by considering their coefficients as random effects under the null model estimation. We show that the best linear unbiased predictor (BLUP) of such random effects in the GLMM is equivalent to the ridge regression estimator. This equivalence provides a simple method to estimate the ridge penalty parameter in comparison to other computationally-demanding estimation approaches based on cross-validation schemes. We evaluated the proposed test using simulation studies and applied it to real data from the Baependi Heart Study consisting of 76 families. Using our approach, we identified an interaction between BMI and the Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma ( PPARG ) gene associated with diabetes.

  20. An Efficient Test for Gene-Environment Interaction in Generalized Linear Mixed Models with Family Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio A. Mazo Lopera

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gene-environment (GE interaction has important implications in the etiology of complex diseases that are caused by a combination of genetic factors and environment variables. Several authors have developed GE analysis in the context of independent subjects or longitudinal data using a gene-set. In this paper, we propose to analyze GE interaction for discrete and continuous phenotypes in family studies by incorporating the relatedness among the relatives for each family into a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM and by using a gene-based variance component test. In addition, we deal with collinearity problems arising from linkage disequilibrium among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs by considering their coefficients as random effects under the null model estimation. We show that the best linear unbiased predictor (BLUP of such random effects in the GLMM is equivalent to the ridge regression estimator. This equivalence provides a simple method to estimate the ridge penalty parameter in comparison to other computationally-demanding estimation approaches based on cross-validation schemes. We evaluated the proposed test using simulation studies and applied it to real data from the Baependi Heart Study consisting of 76 families. Using our approach, we identified an interaction between BMI and the Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARG gene associated with diabetes.

  1. A Nonlinear Model for Gene-Based Gene-Environment Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Sa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A vast amount of literature has confirmed the role of gene-environment (G×E interaction in the etiology of complex human diseases. Traditional methods are predominantly focused on the analysis of interaction between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and an environmental variable. Given that genes are the functional units, it is crucial to understand how gene effects (rather than single SNP effects are influenced by an environmental variable to affect disease risk. Motivated by the increasing awareness of the power of gene-based association analysis over single variant based approach, in this work, we proposed a sparse principle component regression (sPCR model to understand the gene-based G×E interaction effect on complex disease. We first extracted the sparse principal components for SNPs in a gene, then the effect of each principal component was modeled by a varying-coefficient (VC model. The model can jointly model variants in a gene in which their effects are nonlinearly influenced by an environmental variable. In addition, the varying-coefficient sPCR (VC-sPCR model has nice interpretation property since the sparsity on the principal component loadings can tell the relative importance of the corresponding SNPs in each component. We applied our method to a human birth weight dataset in Thai population. We analyzed 12,005 genes across 22 chromosomes and found one significant interaction effect using the Bonferroni correction method and one suggestive interaction. The model performance was further evaluated through simulation studies. Our model provides a system approach to evaluate gene-based G×E interaction.

  2. Gene-environment Interactions in Late Life: Linking Psychosocial Stress with Brain Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannas, Anthony S

    2018-03-05

    Gene-environment interactions (GxE) can have lasting consequences on brain structure and function, potentially contributing to diverse neuropsychiatric phenotypes. This has been extensively demonstrated by studies examining GxE in childhood and early adulthood, whereas much fewer studies have addressed this question in late life. The relative paucity of studies examining GxE in late life may stem from the working hypothesis that brains become less malleable to environmental inputs as life progresses. However, while some components of brain plasticity decline with increasing age, others are retained and may even become more pronounced in old ages. Moreover, the micro- and macro-structural brain changes that accrue as a result of aging-related morbidities are likely to accentuate the susceptibility of neural circuits to environmental stressors as life advances. Supporting this hypothesis, psychosocial stress can increase the risk for late-life neuropsychiatric syndromes, especially when afflicting genetically predisposed individuals. This article reviews evidence showing how gene-stress interactions can impact the aging brain and related phenotypes in late life, and it discusses the potential mechanisms underlying such GxE and their implications for the prevention and treatment of late-life neuropsychiatric syndromes. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Environmental factors as modulators of neurodegeneration: insights from gene-environment interactions in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Christina; Hannan, Anthony J; Renoir, Thibault

    2015-05-01

    Unlike many other neurodegenerative diseases with established gene-environment interactions, Huntington's disease (HD) is viewed as a disorder governed by genetics. The cause of the disease is a highly penetrant tandem repeat expansion encoding an extended polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin protein. In the year 2000, a pioneering study showed that the disease could be delayed in transgenic mice by enriched housing conditions. This review describes subsequent human and preclinical studies identifying environmental modulation of motor, cognitive, affective and other symptoms found in HD. Alongside the behavioral observations we also discuss potential mechanisms and the relevance to other neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. In mouse models of HD, increased sensorimotor and cognitive stimulation can delay or ameliorate various endophenotypes. Potential mechanisms include increased trophic support, synaptic plasticity, adult neurogenesis, and other forms of experience-dependent cellular plasticity. Subsequent clinical investigations support a role for lifetime activity levels in modulating the onset and progression of HD. Stress can accelerate memory and olfactory deficits and exacerbate cellular dysfunctions in HD mice. In the absence of effective treatments to slow the course of HD, environmental interventions offer feasible approaches to delay the disease, however further preclinical and human studies are needed in order to generate clinical recommendations. Environmental interventions could be combined with future pharmacological therapies and stimulate the identification of enviromimetics, drugs which mimic or enhance the beneficial effects of cognitive stimulation and physical activity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Normal and abnormal cerebrovascular development: gene-environment interactions during early life with later life consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    A greater understanding of cerebrovascular health and disease requires the consideration of recent neuroscience advances concerning neuroplasticity in the context of classical developmental neurology principles. Consideration of the ontogenetic interplay of nature and nurture influencing brain development during prenatal and early postnatal time periods should consider the concept of the developmental origins of neurological health and disease. Adaptive and maladaptive effects of neuroplasticity require a systems biology approach integrating molecular, receptor, cellular, neural network, and behavioral perspectives, culminating in the structural and functional cerebrovascular phenotypes that express health or disease across the lifespan. Cognizance of the interrelationships among maternal, placental, fetal, and neonatal factors requires an interdisciplinary appreciation of genetic/epigenetic forces of neuroplasticity during early life that incrementally influence cerebrovascular health or disease throughout childhood and adulthood. Knowledge of the systemic effects of multiorgan function on cerebrovascular development further broadens the systems biology approach to general plasticity of the individual as a whole organism. Short- and long-term consequences of the positive and negative effects of neuroplasticity must consider ongoing gene-environment interactions with maturation and aging, superimposed on earlier fetal/neonatal experiences that sustain neurological health or contribute to disease during childhood and adulthood. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Gene-environment interaction influences attachment-like style in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassi, G; Tucci, V

    2017-07-01

    Attachment styles are established soon after birth and form the basis for a healthy psychological life during adulthood. Here, we investigated whether genetic background (i.e. isogenic strains: C57BL/6N and BALB/c) and parent-of-origin (i.e. reciprocal hybrids) epigenetic effects influence attachment-like styles in mice. We discovered that a specific genetic and epigenetic assortment exerts a role on the development of a secure or insecure attachment-like style. In particular, when biological mothers raise their pups, the attachment-like style is mainly secure, independently of the genetic background. However, when foster mothers raise pups, the attachment-like style can be either secure or insecure, depending on the particular genetic background, and this effect is paternally transmitted. Finally, we observed that secure attachment-like in mice leads to greater sociability during adulthood, while insecure attachment-like leads to reduced sociability. Our study sheds light on gene-environment interactions that shape the attachment-like style early in development and pave the way for a healthy psychological life. © 2017 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior published by International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Multifactor dimensionality reduction for detecting gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in pharmacogenomics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Marylyn D; Motsinger, Alison A

    2005-12-01

    In the quest for discovering disease susceptibility genes, the reality of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions creates difficult challenges for many current statistical approaches. In an attempt to overcome limitations with current disease gene detection methods, the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) approach was previously developed. In brief, MDR is a method that reduces the dimensionality of multilocus information to identify polymorphisms associated with an increased risk of disease. This approach takes multilocus genotypes and develops a model for defining disease risk by pooling high-risk genotype combinations into one group and low-risk combinations into another. Cross-validation and permutation testing are used to identify optimal models. While this approach was initially developed for studies of complex disease, it is also directly applicable to pharmacogenomic studies where the outcome variable is drug treatment response/nonresponse or toxicity/no toxicity. MDR is a nonparametric and model-free approach that has been shown to have reasonable power to detect epistasis in both theoretical and empirical studies. This computational technology is described in detail in this review, and its application in pharmacogenomic studies is demonstrated.

  7. Rethinking expertise: A multifactorial gene-environment interaction model of expert performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullén, Fredrik; Hambrick, David Zachary; Mosing, Miriam Anna

    2016-04-01

    Scientific interest in expertise-superior performance within a specific domain-has a long history in psychology. Although there is a broad consensus that a long period of practice is essential for expertise, a long-standing controversy in the field concerns the importance of other variables such as cognitive abilities and genetic factors. According to the influential deliberate practice theory, expert performance is essentially limited by a single variable: the amount of deliberate practice an individual has accumulated. Here, we provide a review of the literature on deliberate practice, expert performance, and its neural correlates. A particular emphasis is on recent studies indicating that expertise is related to numerous traits other than practice as well as genetic factors. We argue that deliberate practice theory is unable to account for major recent findings relating to expertise and expert performance, and propose an alternative multifactorial gene-environment interaction model of expertise, which provides an adequate explanation for the available empirical data and may serve as a useful framework for future empirical and theoretical work on expert performance. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Cognitive endophenotypes, gene-environment interactions and experience-dependent plasticity in animal models of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Emma L; Hannan, Anthony J

    2016-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating brain disorder caused by a complex and heterogeneous combination of genetic and environmental factors. In order to develop effective new strategies to prevent and treat schizophrenia, valid animal models are required which accurately model the disorder, and ideally provide construct, face and predictive validity. The cognitive deficits in schizophrenia represent some of the most debilitating symptoms and are also currently the most poorly treated. Therefore it is crucial that animal models are able to capture the cognitive dysfunction that characterizes schizophrenia, as well as the negative and psychotic symptoms. The genomes of mice have, prior to the recent gene-editing revolution, proven the most easily manipulable of mammalian laboratory species, and hence most genetic targeting has been performed using mouse models. Importantly, when key environmental factors of relevance to schizophrenia are experimentally manipulated, dramatic changes in the phenotypes of these animal models are often observed. We will review recent studies in rodent models which provide insight into gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia. We will focus specifically on environmental factors which modulate levels of experience-dependent plasticity, including environmental enrichment, cognitive stimulation, physical activity and stress. The insights provided by this research will not only help refine the establishment of optimally valid animal models which facilitate development of novel therapeutics, but will also provide insight into the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, thus identifying molecular and cellular targets for future preclinical and clinical investigations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Identifying gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia: contemporary challenges for integrated, large-scale investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Os, Jim; Rutten, Bart P; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Delespaul, Philippe; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; van Zelst, Catherine; Bruggeman, Richard; Reininghaus, Ulrich; Morgan, Craig; Murray, Robin M; Di Forti, Marta; McGuire, Philip; Valmaggia, Lucia R; Kempton, Matthew J; Gayer-Anderson, Charlotte; Hubbard, Kathryn; Beards, Stephanie; Stilo, Simona A; Onyejiaka, Adanna; Bourque, Francois; Modinos, Gemma; Tognin, Stefania; Calem, Maria; O'Donovan, Michael C; Owen, Michael J; Holmans, Peter; Williams, Nigel; Craddock, Nicholas; Richards, Alexander; Humphreys, Isla; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Leweke, F Markus; Tost, Heike; Akdeniz, Ceren; Rohleder, Cathrin; Bumb, J Malte; Schwarz, Emanuel; Alptekin, Köksal; Üçok, Alp; Saka, Meram Can; Atbaşoğlu, E Cem; Gülöksüz, Sinan; Gumus-Akay, Guvem; Cihan, Burçin; Karadağ, Hasan; Soygür, Haldan; Cankurtaran, Eylem Şahin; Ulusoy, Semra; Akdede, Berna; Binbay, Tolga; Ayer, Ahmet; Noyan, Handan; Karadayı, Gülşah; Akturan, Elçin; Ulaş, Halis; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara; Bernardo, Miguel; Sanjuán, Julio; Bobes, Julio; Arrojo, Manuel; Santos, Jose Luis; Cuadrado, Pedro; Rodríguez Solano, José Juan; Carracedo, Angel; García Bernardo, Enrique; Roldán, Laura; López, Gonzalo; Cabrera, Bibiana; Cruz, Sabrina; Díaz Mesa, Eva Ma; Pouso, María; Jiménez, Estela; Sánchez, Teresa; Rapado, Marta; González, Emiliano; Martínez, Covadonga; Sánchez, Emilio; Olmeda, Ma Soledad; de Haan, Lieuwe; Velthorst, Eva; van der Gaag, Mark; Selten, Jean-Paul; van Dam, Daniella; van der Ven, Elsje; van der Meer, Floor; Messchaert, Elles; Kraan, Tamar; Burger, Nadine; Leboyer, Marion; Szoke, Andrei; Schürhoff, Franck; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Jamain, Stéphane; Tortelli, Andrea; Frijda, Flora; Vilain, Jeanne; Galliot, Anne-Marie; Baudin, Grégoire; Ferchiou, Aziz; Richard, Jean-Romain; Bulzacka, Ewa; Charpeaud, Thomas; Tronche, Anne-Marie; De Hert, Marc; van Winkel, Ruud; Decoster, Jeroen; Derom, Catherine; Thiery, Evert; Stefanis, Nikos C; Sachs, Gabriele; Aschauer, Harald; Lasser, Iris; Winklbaur, Bernadette; Schlögelhofer, Monika; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Borgwardt, Stefan; Walter, Anna; Harrisberger, Fabienne; Smieskova, Renata; Rapp, Charlotte; Ittig, Sarah; Soguel-dit-Piquard, Fabienne; Studerus, Erich; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Paruch, Julia; Julkowski, Dominika; Hilboll, Desiree; Sham, Pak C; Cherny, Stacey S; Chen, Eric Y H; Campbell, Desmond D; Li, Miaoxin; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos María; Emaldi Cirión, Aitziber; Urruela Mora, Asier; Jones, Peter; Kirkbride, James; Cannon, Mary; Rujescu, Dan; Tarricone, Ilaria; Berardi, Domenico; Bonora, Elena; Seri, Marco; Marcacci, Thomas; Chiri, Luigi; Chierzi, Federico; Storbini, Viviana; Braca, Mauro; Minenna, Maria Gabriella; Donegani, Ivonne; Fioritti, Angelo; La Barbera, Daniele; La Cascia, Caterina Erika; Mulè, Alice; Sideli, Lucia; Sartorio, Rachele; Ferraro, Laura; Tripoli, Giada; Seminerio, Fabio; Marinaro, Anna Maria; McGorry, Patrick; Nelson, Barnaby; Amminger, G Paul; Pantelis, Christos; Menezes, Paulo R; Del-Ben, Cristina M; Gallo Tenan, Silvia H; Shuhama, Rosana; Ruggeri, Mirella; Tosato, Sarah; Lasalvia, Antonio; Bonetto, Chiara; Ira, Elisa; Nordentoft, Merete; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Barrantes-Vidal, Neus; Cristóbal, Paula; Kwapil, Thomas R; Brietzke, Elisa; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Gadelha, Ary; Maric, Nadja P; Andric, Sanja; Mihaljevic, Marina; Mirjanic, Tijana

    2014-07-01

    Recent years have seen considerable progress in epidemiological and molecular genetic research into environmental and genetic factors in schizophrenia, but methodological uncertainties remain with regard to validating environmental exposures, and the population risk conferred by individual molecular genetic variants is small. There are now also a limited number of studies that have investigated molecular genetic candidate gene-environment interactions (G × E), however, so far, thorough replication of findings is rare and G × E research still faces several conceptual and methodological challenges. In this article, we aim to review these recent developments and illustrate how integrated, large-scale investigations may overcome contemporary challenges in G × E research, drawing on the example of a large, international, multi-center study into the identification and translational application of G × E in schizophrenia. While such investigations are now well underway, new challenges emerge for G × E research from late-breaking evidence that genetic variation and environmental exposures are, to a significant degree, shared across a range of psychiatric disorders, with potential overlap in phenotype. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Gene-environment interaction and covariation in schizophrenia: the role of obstetric complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Vijay A; Ellman, Lauren M; Cannon, Tyrone D

    2008-11-01

    While genetic factors account for a significant proportion of liability to schizophrenia, a body of evidence attests to a significant environmental contribution. Understanding the mechanisms through which genetic and environmental factors coalesce in influencing schizophrenia is critical for elucidating the pathways underlying psychotic illness and for developing primary prevention strategies. Although obstetric complications (OCs) remain among the most well-documented environmental indicators of risk for schizophrenia, the pathogenic role they play in the etiology of schizophrenia continues to remain poorly understood. A question of major importance is do these factors result from a genetic diathesis to schizophrenia (as in gene-environment covariation), act additively or interactively with predisposing genes for the disorder in influencing disease risk, or independently cause disease onset? In this review, we evaluate 3 classes of OCs commonly related to schizophrenia including hypoxia-associated OCs, maternal infection during pregnancy, and maternal stress during pregnancy. In addition, we discuss several mechanisms by which OCs impact on genetically susceptible brain regions, increasing constitutional vulnerability to neuromaturational events and stressors later in life (ie, adolescence), which may in turn contribute to triggering psychosis.

  11. Shame and Guilt-Proneness in Adolescents: Gene-Environment Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szentágotai-Tătar, Aurora; Chiș, Adina; Vulturar, Romana; Dobrean, Anca; Cândea, Diana Mirela; Miu, Andrei C.

    2015-01-01

    Rooted in people’s preoccupation with how they are perceived and evaluated, shame and guilt are self-conscious emotions that play adaptive roles in social behavior, but can also contribute to psychopathology when dysregulated. Shame and guilt-proneness develop during childhood and adolescence, and are influenced by genetic and environmental factors that are little known to date. This study investigated the effects of early traumatic events and functional polymorphisms in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene and the serotonin transporter gene promoter (5-HTTLPR) on shame and guilt in adolescents. A sample of N = 271 healthy adolescents between 14 and 17 years of age filled in measures of early traumatic events and proneness to shame and guilt, and were genotyped for the BDNF Val66Met and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms. Results of moderator analyses indicated that trauma intensity was positively associated with guilt-proneness only in carriers of the low-expressing Met allele of BDNF Val66Met. This is the first study that identifies a gene-environment interaction that significantly contributes to guilt proneness in adolescents, with potential implications for developmental psychopathology. PMID:26230319

  12. Childhood problem behavior and parental divorce: evidence for gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbers, Sylvana; van Oort, Floor; Huizink, Anja; Verhulst, Frank; van Beijsterveldt, Catharina; Boomsma, Dorret; Bartels, Meike

    2012-10-01

    The importance of genetic and environmental influences on children's behavioral and emotional problems may vary as a function of environmental exposure. We previously reported that 12-year-olds with divorced parents showed more internalizing and externalizing problems than children with married parents, and that externalizing problems in girls precede and predict later parental divorce. The aim of the current study was to investigate as to whether genetic and environmental influences on internalizing and externalizing problems were different for children from divorced versus non-divorced families. Maternal ratings on internalizing and externalizing problems were collected with the Child Behavior Checklist in 4,592 twin pairs at ages 3 and 12 years, of whom 367 pairs had experienced a parental divorce between these ages. Variance in internalizing and externalizing problems at ages 3 and 12 was analyzed with biometric models in which additive genetic and environmental effects were allowed to depend on parental divorce and sex. A difference in the contribution of genetic and environmental influences between divorced and non-divorced groups would constitute evidence for gene-environment interaction. For both pre- and post-divorce internalizing and externalizing problems, the total variances were larger for children from divorced families, which was mainly due to higher environmental variances. As a consequence, heritabilities were lower for children from divorced families, and the relative contributions of environmental influences were higher. Environmental influences become more important in explaining variation in children's problem behaviors in the context of parental divorce.

  13. Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis: Influence of gene-environment interaction

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    Andreassi, Maria Grazia, E-mail: andreas@ifc.cnr.it [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, G. Pasquinucci Hospital, Via Aurelia Sud, Massa (Italy)

    2009-07-10

    Despite remarkable progress in diagnosis and understanding of risk factors, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world's developed countries. The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors (visceral obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension), is increasingly being recognized as a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, there is wide variation in both the occurrence of disease and age of onset, even in individuals who display very similar risk profiles. There is now compelling evidence that a complex interplay between genetic determinants and environmental factors (still largely unknown) is the reason for this large inter-individual variation in disease susceptibility. The purpose of the present review is to describe the current status of our knowledge concerning the gene-environment interactions potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It focuses predominantly on studies of genes (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, alcohol dehydrogenase type 1C, apolipoprotein E, glutathione S-transferases T1 and M1) that are known to be modified by dietary and lifestyle habits (fat diet, intake of alcohol and smoking habit). It also describes the limited current understanding of the role of genetic variants of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and their interactions with environmental toxicants. Additional studies are needed in order to clarify whether inter-individual differences in detoxification of environmental toxicants may have an essential role in the development of CVD and contribute to the emerging field of 'environmental cardiology'. Such knowledge may be particularly relevant for improving cardiovascular risk stratification and conceiving the development of 'personalized intervention program'.

  14. The complement system: a gateway to gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimgaonkar, V L; Prasad, K M; Chowdari, K V; Severance, E G; Yolken, R H

    2017-11-01

    The pathogenesis of schizophrenia is considered to be multi-factorial, with likely gene-environment interactions (GEI). Genetic and environmental risk factors are being identified with increasing frequency, yet their very number vastly increases the scope of possible GEI, making it difficult to identify them with certainty. Accumulating evidence suggests a dysregulated complement pathway among the pathogenic processes of schizophrenia. The complement pathway mediates innate and acquired immunity, and its activation drives the removal of damaged cells, autoantigens and environmentally derived antigens. Abnormalities in complement functions occur in many infectious and autoimmune disorders that have been linked to schizophrenia. Many older reports indicate altered serum complement activity in schizophrenia, though the data are inconclusive. Compellingly, recent genome-wide association studies suggest repeat polymorphisms incorporating the complement 4A (C4A) and 4B (C4B) genes as risk factors for schizophrenia. The C4A/C4B genetic associations have re-ignited interest not only in inflammation-related models for schizophrenia pathogenesis, but also in neurodevelopmental theories, because rodent models indicate a role for complement proteins in synaptic pruning and neurodevelopment. Thus, the complement system could be used as one of the 'staging posts' for a variety of focused studies of schizophrenia pathogenesis. They include GEI studies of the C4A/C4B repeat polymorphisms in relation to inflammation-related or infectious processes, animal model studies and tests of hypotheses linked to autoimmune diseases that can co-segregate with schizophrenia. If they can be replicated, such studies would vastly improve our understanding of pathogenic processes in schizophrenia through GEI analyses and open new avenues for therapy.

  15. DISC1 mouse models as a tool to decipher gene-environment interactions in psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler eCash-Padgett

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available DISC1 was discovered in a Scottish pedigree in which a chromosomal translocation that breaks this gene segregates with psychiatric disorders, mainly depression and schizophrenia. Linkage and association studies in diverse populations support DISC1 as a susceptibility gene to a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. Many Disc1 mouse models have been generated to study its neuronal functions. These mouse models display variable phenotypes, some of them relevant to schizophrenia, others to depression.The Disc1 mouse models are popular genetic models for studying gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia. Five different Disc1 models have been combined with environmental factors. The environmental stressors employed can be classified as either early immune activation or later social paradigms. These studies cover major time points along the neurodevelopmental trajectory: prenatal, early postnatal, adolescence, and adulthood. Various combinations of molecular, anatomical and behavioral methods have been used to assess the outcomes. Additionally, three of the studies sought to rescue the resulting abnormalities.Here we provide background on the environmental paradigms used, summarize the results of these studies combining Disc1 mouse models with environmental stressors and discuss what we can learn and how to proceed. A major question is how the genetic and environmental factors determine which psychiatric disorder will be clinically manifested. To address this we can take advantage of the many Disc1 models available and expose them to the same environmental stressor. The complementary experiment would be to expose the same model to different environmental stressors. DISC1 is an ideal gene for this approach, since in the Scottish pedigree the same chromosomal translocation results in different psychiatric conditions.

  16. Gene-environment interaction in skeletal maturity and body dimensions of urban Oaxaca Mestizo schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Bertis B; Malina, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    The study analyzed the relationship between skeletal age (SA) and the difference between skeletal and chronological ages (SA-CA) and body size among growth-stunted and well-nourished children. Tanner-Whitehouse 2 (TW2) 20 bone, radius-ulna-short (RUS) bone, and carpal SAs were analyzed in three cross-sectional samples of school children aged 6-13 years: Mestizo children (n = 396) from the city of Oaxaca, southern Mexico, and American Black (n = 570) and White (n = 432) from Philadelphia. The Oaxaca children were mild-to-moderately undernourished while the Philadelphia children were well nourished. The total sample included 1398 radiographs assessed with the Tanner-Whitehouse protocol by a single, experienced rater. Maturity scores were converted to TW2 20 bone, RUS and carpal SAs. Correlations of SA and SA-CA differences with body dimensions (height, sitting height, leg length, weight, triceps skinfold, arm and estimated midarm muscle circumferences) were consistent and approximately equal in magnitude for the well-nourished samples but were different among Oaxaca children. SAs of Philadelphia children were significantly more highly correlated with body dimensions than were SA-CA differences compared to Oaxaca Mestizo children. Patterns of RUS and carpal SA correlations with body size (height, sitting height, and leg length) in Oaxaca children were different from the Philadelphia samples. Oaxaca children tended to have advanced RUS SA and delayed carpal SA. Long bone complexes mature earlier than round bone complexes in Oaxaca children compared to Philadelphia Black and White children, resulting in short stature in Oaxaca children. Results suggest a gene-environment interaction effect on the program for skeletal growth and maturation in undernourished Oaxaca children compared to well-nourished Black and White children from Philadelphia.

  17. A model of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions and its implications for targeting environmental interventions by genotype

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace Helen M

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The potential public health benefits of targeting environmental interventions by genotype depend on the environmental and genetic contributions to the variance of common diseases, and the magnitude of any gene-environment interaction. In the absence of prior knowledge of all risk factors, twin, family and environmental data may help to define the potential limits of these benefits in a given population. However, a general methodology to analyze twin data is required becaus...

  18. A model of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions and its implications for targeting environmental interventions by genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Helen M

    2006-10-09

    The potential public health benefits of targeting environmental interventions by genotype depend on the environmental and genetic contributions to the variance of common diseases, and the magnitude of any gene-environment interaction. In the absence of prior knowledge of all risk factors, twin, family and environmental data may help to define the potential limits of these benefits in a given population. However, a general methodology to analyze twin data is required because of the potential importance of gene-gene interactions (epistasis), gene-environment interactions, and conditions that break the 'equal environments' assumption for monozygotic and dizygotic twins. A new model for gene-gene and gene-environment interactions is developed that abandons the assumptions of the classical twin study, including Fisher's (1918) assumption that genes act as risk factors for common traits in a manner necessarily dominated by an additive polygenic term. Provided there are no confounders, the model can be used to implement a top-down approach to quantifying the potential utility of genetic prediction and prevention, using twin, family and environmental data. The results describe a solution space for each disease or trait, which may or may not include the classical twin study result. Each point in the solution space corresponds to a different model of genotypic risk and gene-environment interaction. The results show that the potential for reducing the incidence of common diseases using environmental interventions targeted by genotype may be limited, except in special cases. The model also confirms that the importance of an individual's genotype in determining their risk of complex diseases tends to be exaggerated by the classical twin studies method, owing to the 'equal environments' assumption and the assumption of no gene-environment interaction. In addition, if phenotypes are genetically robust, because of epistasis, a largely environmental explanation for shared sibling

  19. Challenges in the use of literature-based meta-analysis to examine gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Luigi; Higgins, Julian P T; Wareham, Nicholas J; Sharp, Stephen J

    2010-06-01

    Statistical interactions between genes and environmental exposures with respect to disease outcomes may help to identify biologic mechanisms and pathways and inform behavioral interventions. The number of persons required for a single study to have sufficient statistical power to detect such interactions may be considered prohibitively large, making a meta-analysis of published literature an apparently attractive alternative. However, meta-analysis of gene-environment interactions using published literature is challenging, with the conclusions being likely to suffer from bias and lack of generalizability. The authors highlight these challenges and biases using an illustrative example: meta-analysis of interactions between the Pro12Ala variant of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) gene and various diet and lifestyle factors in the risk of diabetes. The authors conclude that literature-based meta-analysis conducted to examine gene-environment interactions is unlikely to provide a meaningful quantitative conclusion. Alternative strategies are required, including analyses in scientific consortia established to assess main genetic effects, where individual participant data can be shared, allowing both greater power and consistency of analysis methods. However, these consortia are likely to be limited by lack of standardization of the measures of environmental factors. This issue may ultimately only be resolvable by the de novo establishment of large single or multicenter cohorts using comparable methods.

  20. Does parental divorce moderate the heritability of body dissatisfaction? An extension of previous gene-environment interaction effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Shannon M; Klump, Kelly L; VanHuysse, Jessica L; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William

    2016-02-01

    Previous research suggests that parental divorce moderates genetic influences on body dissatisfaction. Specifically, the heritability of body dissatisfaction is higher in children of divorced versus intact families, suggesting possible gene-environment interaction effects. However, prior research is limited to a single, self-reported measure of body dissatisfaction. The primary aim of this study was to examine whether these findings extend to a different dimension of body dissatisfaction: body image perceptions. Participants were 1,534 female twins from the Minnesota Twin Family Study, aged 16-20 years. The Body Rating Scale (BRS) was used to assess body image perceptions. Although BRS scores were heritable in twins from divorced and intact families, the heritability estimates in the divorced group were not significantly greater than estimates in the intact group. However, there were differences in nonshared environmental effects, where the magnitude of these environmental influences was larger in the divorced as compared with the intact families. Different dimensions of body dissatisfaction (i.e., negative self-evaluation versus body image perceptions) may interact with environmental risk, such as parental divorce, in discrete ways. Future research should examine this possibility and explore differential gene-environment interactions using diverse measures. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Screening for gene-environment (G×E) interaction using omics data from exposed individuals: an application to gene-arsenic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argos, Maria; Tong, Lin; Roy, Shantanu; Sabarinathan, Mekala; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Md Tariqul; Islam, Tariqul; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Sarwar, Golam; Shahriar, Hasan; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Yunus, Md; Graziano, Joseph H; Jasmine, Farzana; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Zhou, Xiang; Ahsan, Habibul; Pierce, Brandon L

    2018-02-01

    Identifying gene-environment interactions is a central challenge in the quest to understand susceptibility to complex, multi-factorial diseases. Developing an understanding of how inter-individual variability in inherited genetic variation alters the effects of environmental exposures will enhance our knowledge of disease mechanisms and improve our ability to predict disease and target interventions to high-risk sub-populations. Limited progress has been made identifying gene-environment interactions in the epidemiological setting using existing statistical approaches for genome-wide searches for interaction. In this paper, we describe a novel two-step approach using omics data to conduct genome-wide searches for gene-environment interactions. Using existing genome-wide SNP data from a large Bangladeshi cohort study specifically designed to assess the effect of arsenic exposure on health, we evaluated gene-arsenic interactions by first conducting genome-wide searches for SNPs that modify the effect of arsenic on molecular phenotypes (gene expression and DNA methylation features). Using this set of SNPs showing evidence of interaction with arsenic in relation to molecular phenotypes, we then tested SNP-arsenic interactions in relation to skin lesions, a hallmark characteristic of arsenic toxicity. With the emergence of additional omics data in the epidemiologic setting, our approach may have the potential to boost power for genome-wide interaction research, enabling the identification of interactions that will enhance our understanding of disease etiology and our ability to develop interventions targeted at susceptible sub-populations.

  2. Maternal iron metabolism gene variants modify umbilical cord blood lead levels by gene-environment interaction: a birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowski, Mateusz P; Just, Allan C; Bellinger, David C; Jim, Rebecca; Hatley, Earl L; Ettinger, Adrienne S; Hu, Howard; Wright, Robert O

    2014-10-06

    Given the relationship between iron metabolism and lead toxicokinetics, we hypothesized that polymorphisms in iron metabolism genes might modify maternal-fetal lead transfer. The objective of this study was to determine whether maternal and/or infant transferrin (TF) and hemochromatosis (HFE) gene missense variants modify the association between maternal blood lead (MBL) and umbilical cord blood lead (UCBL). We studied 476 mother-infant pairs whose archived blood specimens were genotyped for TF P570S, HFE H63D and HFE C282Y. MBL and UCBL were collected within 12 hours of delivery. Linear regression models were used to examine the association between log-transformed MBL and UCBL, examine for confounding and collinearity, and explore gene-environment interactions. The geometric mean MBL was 0.61 μg/dL (range 0.03, 3.2) and UCBL 0.42 (lead transfer among women with MBL 5 μg/dL. Maternal HFE C282Y gene variant status is associated with greater reductions in placental transfer of lead as MBL increases. The inclusion of gene-environment interaction in risk assessment models may improve efforts to safeguard vulnerable populations.

  3. Ranking and characterization of established BMI and lipid associated loci as candidates for gene-environment interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shungin, Dmitry; Deng, Wei Q; Varga, Tibor V

    2017-01-01

    Phenotypic variance heterogeneity across genotypes at a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) may reflect underlying gene-environment (G×E) or gene-gene interactions. We modeled variance heterogeneity for blood lipids and BMI in up to 44,211 participants and investigated relationships between...... variance effects (Pv), G×E interaction effects (with smoking and physical activity), and marginal genetic effects (Pm). Correlations between Pv and Pm were stronger for SNPs with established marginal effects (Spearman's ρ = 0.401 for triglycerides, and ρ = 0.236 for BMI) compared to all SNPs. When Pv...... and Pm were compared for all pruned SNPs, only BMI was statistically significant (Spearman's ρ = 0.010). Overall, SNPs with established marginal effects were overrepresented in the nominally significant part of the Pv distribution (Pbinomial BMI had...

  4. Characterization of 9p24 risk locus and colorectal adenoma and cancer: gene-environment interaction and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocarnik, Jonathan D; Hutter, Carolyn M; Slattery, Martha L; Berndt, Sonja I; Hsu, Li; Duggan, David J; Muehling, Jill; Caan, Bette J; Beresford, Shirley A A; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Sarto, Gloria E; Marshall, James R; Hammad, Nazik; Wallace, Robert B; Makar, Karen W; Prentice, Ross L; Potter, John D; Hayes, Richard B; Peters, Ulrike

    2010-12-01

    A potential susceptibility locus for colorectal cancer on chromosome 9p24 (rs719725) was initially identified through a genome-wide association study, though replication attempts have been inconclusive. We genotyped this locus and explored interactions with known risk factors as potential sources of heterogeneity, which may explain the previously inconsistent replication. We included Caucasians with colorectal adenoma or colorectal cancer and controls from 4 studies (total 3,891 cases, 4,490 controls): the Women's Health Initiative (WHI); the Diet, Activity and Lifestyle Study (DALS); a Minnesota population-based case-control study (MinnCCS); and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO). We used logistic regression to evaluate the association and test for gene-environment interactions. SNP rs719725 was statistically significantly associated with risk of colorectal cancer in WHI (OR per A allele 1.19; 95% CI, 1.01-1.40; P(trend) = 0.04), marginally associated with adenoma risk in PLCO (OR per A allele 1.11; 95% CI, 0.99-1.25; P(trend) = 0.07), and not associated in DALS and MinnCCS. Evaluating for gene-environment interactions yielded no consistent results across the studies. A meta-analysis of 17 studies (including these 4) gave an OR per A allele of 1.07 (95% CI, 1.03-1.12; P(trend) = 0.001). Our results suggest the Aallele for SNP rs719725 at locus 9p24 is positively associated with a small increase in risk for colorectal tumors. Environmental risk factors for colorectal cancer do not appear to explain heterogeneity across studies. If this finding is supported by further replication and functional studies, it may highlight new pathways underlying colorectal neoplasia. ©2010 AACR.

  5. Multi-factor dimensionality reduction applied to a large prospective investigation on gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuguerra, M; Matullo, G; Veglia, F; Autrup, H; Dunning, A M; Garte, S; Gormally, E; Malaveille, C; Guarrera, S; Polidoro, S; Saletta, F; Peluso, M; Airoldi, L; Overvad, K; Raaschou-Nielsen, O; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Linseisen, J; Boeing, H; Trichopoulos, D; Kalandidi, A; Palli, D; Krogh, V; Tumino, R; Panico, S; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H B; Peeters, P H; Lund, E; Pera, G; Martinez, C; Amiano, P; Barricarte, A; Tormo, M J; Quiros, J R; Berglund, G; Janzon, L; Jarvholm, B; Day, N E; Allen, N E; Saracci, R; Kaaks, R; Ferrari, P; Riboli, E; Vineis, P

    2007-02-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that single-locus effects cannot explain complex multifactorial human diseases like cancer. We applied the multi-factor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method to a large cohort study on gene-environment and gene-gene interactions. The study (case-control nested in the EPIC cohort) was established to investigate molecular changes and genetic susceptibility in relation to air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in non-smokers. We have analyzed 757 controls and 409 cases with bladder cancer (n=124), lung cancer (n=116) and myeloid leukemia (n=169). Thirty-six gene variants (DNA repair and metabolic genes) and three environmental exposure variables (measures of air pollution and ETS at home and at work) were analyzed. Interactions were assessed by prediction error percentage and cross-validation consistency (CVC) frequency. For lung cancer, the best model was given by a significant gene-environment association between the base excision repair (BER) XRCC1-Arg399Gln polymorphism, the double-strand break repair (DSBR) BRCA2-Asn372His polymorphism and the exposure variable 'distance from heavy traffic road', an indirect and robust indicator of air pollution (mean prediction error of 26%, PT (mean prediction error of 22%, PT, MnSOD-Ala9Val and CYP1A1-Ile462Val had a minimum prediction error of 31% (P<0.001) and a maximum CVC of 4.40 (P=0.086). The MDR method seems promising, because it provides a limited number of statistically stable interactions; however, the biological interpretation remains to be understood.

  6. Gene Environment Interaction: A Trigger Point of Developing Polyglandular Autoimmunity in A Minor Girl from Rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dastidar Rinini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A six-year-old girl from rural Bengal was admitted in our hospital with complaints of thirst, frequent micturition, pain in abdomen and constipation. Polyglandular endocrinopathies were identified in the girl thorough clinical and biochemical examination. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis along with Type 1 diabetes mellitus made her a candidate of Polyglandular Autoimmune disease type IIIA. Patient’s history revealed that she was on cow milk since birth. Presence of high risk alleles for T1DM HLA DQA1*0101-DQB1*0302 and DQA1*0301-DQB1*0501 in the girl was disclosed by genetic study. The effect of environmental factors along with genetic susceptibility might contribute to the aggravation and early expression of these rare autoimmune diseases in this girl. This could be a classic example of gene environment interaction in case of unexplained endocrinopathies

  7. Evidence of gene-environment interactions between common breast cancer susceptibility loci and established environmental risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickels, Stefan; Truong, Thérèse; Hein, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    at menarche, parity, breastfeeding, body mass index, height, oral contraceptive use, menopausal hormone therapy use, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, physical activity) in women of European ancestry. We used logistic regression models stratified by study and adjusted for age and performed likelihood......Various common genetic susceptibility loci have been identified for breast cancer; however, it is unclear how they combine with lifestyle/environmental risk factors to influence risk. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess gene-environment interaction for risk of breast cancer....... Data from 24 studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were pooled. Using up to 34,793 invasive breast cancers and 41,099 controls, we examined whether the relative risks associated with 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms were modified by 10 established environmental risk factors (age...

  8. Conceptual shifts needed to understand the dynamic interactions of genes, environment, epigenetics, social processes, and behavioral choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Fatimah L C; Niculescu, Mihai D; Jackson, Robert T

    2013-10-01

    Social and behavioral research in public health is often intimately tied to profound, but frequently neglected, biological influences from underlying genetic, environmental, and epigenetic events. The dynamic interplay between the life, social, and behavioral sciences often remains underappreciated and underutilized in addressing complex diseases and disorders and in developing effective remediation strategies. Using a case-study format, we present examples as to how the inclusion of genetic, environmental, and epigenetic data can augment social and behavioral health research by expanding the parameters of such studies, adding specificity to phenotypic assessments, and providing additional internal control in comparative studies. We highlight the important roles of gene-environment interactions and epigenetics as sources of phenotypic change and as a bridge between the life and social and behavioral sciences in the development of robust interdisciplinary analyses.

  9. Identification of new genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer through consideration of gene-environment interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeps, Anja; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra

    2014-01-01

    recently proposed hybrid methods and a joint test of association and interaction. Analyses were adjusted for age, study, population stratification, and confounding factors as applicable. Three SNPs in two independent loci showed statistically significant association: SNPs rs10483028 and rs2242714...... in perfect linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 21 and rs12197388 in ARID1B on chromosome 6. While rs12197388 was identified using the joint test with parity and with age at menarche (P-values = 3 × 10(-07)), the variants on chromosome 21 q22.12, which showed interaction with adult body mass index (BMI) in 8...... confirm comparable power of the recent methods for detecting G × E interaction and the utility of using G × E interaction analyses to identify new susceptibility loci....

  10. Novel Likelihood Ratio Tests for Screening Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions with Unbalanced Repeated-Measures Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yi-An; Saha-Chaudhuri, Paramita; Park, Sung Kyun; Vokonas, Pantel Steve; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2013-01-01

    There has been extensive literature on modeling gene-gene interaction (GGI) and gene-environment interaction (GEI) in case-control studies with limited literature on statistical methods for GGI and GEI in longitudinal cohort studies. We borrow ideas from the classical two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) literature to address the issue of robust modeling of interactions in repeated-measures studies. While classical interaction models proposed by Tukey and Mandel have interaction structures as a function of main effects, a newer class of models, additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) models, do not have similar restrictive assumptions on the interaction structure. AMMI entails a singular value decomposition of the cell residual matrix after fitting the additive main effects and has been shown to perform well across various interaction structures. We consider these models for testing GGI and GEI from two perspectives: likelihood ratio test based on cell means and a regression based approach using individual observations. Simulation results indicate that both approaches for AMMI models lead to valid tests in terms of maintaining the type I error rate, with the regression approach having better power properties. The performance of these models was evaluated across different interaction structures and 12 common epistasis patterns. In summary, AMMI model is robust with respect to misspecified interaction structure and is a useful screening tool for interaction even in the absence of main effects. We use the proposed methods to examine the interplay between the hemochromatosis gene and cumulative lead exposure on pulse pressure in the Normative Aging Study. PMID:23798480

  11. Gene-Environment Interactions Controlling Energy and Glucose Homeostasis and the Developmental Origins of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouret, Sebastien; Levin, Barry E.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) often occur together and affect a growing number of individuals in both the developed and developing worlds. Both are associated with a number of other serious illnesses that lead to increased rates of mortality. There is likely a polygenic mode of inheritance underlying both disorders, but it has become increasingly clear that the pre- and postnatal environments play critical roles in pushing predisposed individuals over the edge into a disease state. This review focuses on the many genetic and environmental variables that interact to cause predisposed individuals to become obese and diabetic. The brain and its interactions with the external and internal environment are a major focus given the prominent role these interactions play in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis in health and disease. PMID:25540138

  12. Blood lead levels, iron metabolism gene polymorphisms and homocysteine: a gene-environment interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Lee, Mee-Ri; Lim, Youn-Hee; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2017-12-01

    Homocysteine has been causally associated with various adverse health outcomes. Evidence supporting the relationship between lead and homocysteine levels has been accumulating, but most prior studies have not focused on the interaction with genetic polymorphisms. From a community-based prospective cohort, we analysed 386 participants (aged 41-71 years) with information regarding blood lead and plasma homocysteine levels. Blood lead levels were measured between 2001 and 2003, and plasma homocysteine levels were measured in 2007. Interactions of lead levels with 42 genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five genes ( TF , HFE , CBS , BHMT and MTR ) were assessed via a 2-degree of freedom (df) joint test and a 1-df interaction test. In secondary analyses using imputation, we further assessed 58 imputed SNPs in the TF and MTHFR genes. Blood lead concentrations were positively associated with plasma homocysteine levels (p=0.0276). Six SNPs in the TF and MTR genes were screened using the 2-df joint test, and among them, three SNPs in the TF gene showed interactions with lead with respect to homocysteine levels through the 1-df interaction test (phomocysteine levels at an α-level of 0.05, but the associations did not persist after Bonferroni correction. These SNPs did not show interactions with lead levels. Blood lead levels were positively associated with plasma homocysteine levels measured 4-6 years later, and three SNPs in the TF gene modified the association. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Evidence for plasticity genotypes in a gene-gene-environment interaction : the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhof, E; Bouma, Esther; Riese, Harriette; Laceulle, Odilia; Ormel, J.; Oldehinkel, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose was to study how functional polymorphisms in the brain derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF val66met) and the serotonin transporter gene linked promotor region (5-HTTLPR) interact with childhood adversities in predicting Effortful Control. Effortful Control refers to the ability to

  14. Differential susceptibility in longitudinal models of gene-environment interaction for adolescent depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, James J; Berk, Michele S; Lee, Steve S

    2013-11-01

    Although family support reliably predicts the development of adolescent depression and suicidal behaviors, relatively little is known about the interplay of family support with potential genetic factors. We tested the association of the 44 base pair polymorphism in the serotonin transporter linked promoter region gene (5-HTTLPR), family support (i.e., cohesion, communication, and warmth), and their interaction with self-reported depression symptoms and risk for suicide in 1,030 Caucasian adolescents and young adults from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. High-quality family support predicted fewer symptoms of depression and reduced risk for suicidality. There was also a significant interaction between 5-HTTLPR and family support for boys and a marginally significant interaction for girls. Among boys with poor family support, youth with at least one short allele had more symptoms of depression and a higher risk for suicide attempts relative to boys homozygous for the long allele. However, in the presence of high family support, boys with the short allele had the fewest depression symptoms (but not suicide attempts). Results suggest that the short allele may increase reactivity to both negative and positive family influences in the development of depression. We discuss the potential role of interactive exchanges between family support and offspring genotype in the development of adolescent depression and suicidal behaviors.

  15. Gene - environment interactions determine the individual variability in cocaine self-administration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kam, E.L. van der; Ellenbroek, B.A.; Cools, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    Research into factors that determine the propensity to self-administer cocaine has shown that stressors can determine the amount of cocaine self-administered as well as the rate of acquisition. However, the interaction between the genetic make-up of the animal and stress is unknown. This study

  16. The Behavioural Phenotype of Smith-Magenis Syndrome: Evidence for a Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, L.; Oliver, C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Behaviour problems and a preference for adult contact are reported to be prominent in the phenotype of Smith-Magenis syndrome. In this study we examined the relationship between social interactions and self-injurious and aggressive/disruptive behaviour in Smith-Magenis syndrome to explore potential operant reinforcement of problem…

  17. Gene-Environment Interaction in Parkinson's Disease: Coffee, ADORA2A, and CYP1A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yu-Hsuan; Lill, Christina M; Lee, Pei-Chen; Hansen, Johnni; Lassen, Christina F; Bertram, Lars; Greene, Naomi; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Ritz, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Drinking caffeinated coffee has been reported to provide protection against Parkinson's disease (PD). Caffeine is an adenosine A2A receptor (encoded by the gene ADORA2A) antagonist that increases dopaminergic neurotransmission and Cytochrome P450 1A2 (gene: CYP1A2) metabolizes caffeine; thus, gene polymorphisms in ADORA2A and CYP1A2 may influence the effect coffee consumption has on PD risk. In a population-based case-control study (PASIDA) in Denmark (1,556 PD patients and 1,606 birth year- and gender-matched controls), we assessed interactions between lifetime coffee consumption and 3 polymorphisms in ADORA2A and CYP1A2 for all subjects, and incident and prevalent PD cases separately using logistic regression models. We also conducted a meta-analysis combining our results with those from previous studies. We estimated statistically significant interactions for ADORA2A rs5760423 and heavy vs. light coffee consumption in incident (OR interaction = 0.66 [95% CI 0.46-0.94], p = 0.02) but not prevalent PD. We did not observe interactions for CYP1A2 rs762551 and rs2472304 in incident or prevalent PD. In meta-analyses, PD associations with daily coffee consumption were strongest among carriers of variant alleles in both ADORA2A and CYP1A2. We corroborated results from a previous report that described interactions between ADORA2A and CYP1A2 polymorphisms and coffee consumption. Our results also suggest that survivor bias may affect results of studies that enroll prevalent PD cases. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. BDNF Val66Met polymorphism, life stress and depression: A meta-analysis of gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingzhe; Chen, Lu; Yang, Jiarun; Han, Dong; Fang, Deyu; Qiu, Xiaohui; Yang, Xiuxian; Qiao, Zhengxue; Ma, Jingsong; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Shixiang; Song, Xuejia; Zhou, Jiawei; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Mingqi; Qi, Dong; Yang, Yanjie; Pan, Hui

    2018-02-01

    Depression is thought to be multifactorial in etiology, including genetic and environmental components. While a number of gene-environment interaction studies have been carried out, meta-analyses are scarce. The present meta-analysis aimed to quantify evidence on the interaction between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism and stress in depression. Included were 31 peer-reviewed with a pooled total of 21060 participants published before October 2016 and literature searches were conducted using PubMed, Wolters Kluwer, Web of Science, EBSCO, Elsevier Science Direct and Baidu Scholar databases. The results indicated that the Met allele of BDNF Val66Met polymorphism significantly moderated the relationship between stress and depression (Z=2.666, p = 0.003). The results of subgroup analysis concluded that stressful life events and childhood adversity separately interacted with the Met allele of BDNF Val66Met polymorphism in depression (Z = 2.552, p = 0.005; Z = 1.775, p = 0.03). The results could be affected by errors or bias in primary studies which had small sample sizes with relatively lower statistic power. We could not estimate how strong the interaction effect between gene and environment was. We found evidence that supported the hypothesis that BDNF Val66Met polymorphism moderated the relationship between stress and depression, despite the fact that many included individual studies did not show this effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in prostate, breast and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopp, Tine Iskov

    The incidence of cancer in the western world has increased steeply during the last 50 years. For three of the most prevalent cancer types in Denmark, prostate, breast and colorectal cancer (PC, BC and CRC, respectively), only a small fraction (1-15%) of the incidences are caused by highly penetrant......, such as alcohol consumption, smoking, obesity, inflammation and high meat intake; whereas other factors protect against cancer, such as high intake of dietary fibre, fruits and vegetables, and physical activity. Investigating the interactions between genetic variations and environmental factors, such as dietary...... was used to examine gene-gene and geneenvironment interactions in relation to risk of cancer (Paper I-V). A human intervention trial (Paper V) was conducted in order to directly examine the effect on concurrent use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and alcohol consumption on circulating...

  20. Gene-Environment Interaction and Breast Cancer on Long Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Rossner P Jr, Terry MB, Gammon MD, Agrawal M, Zhang FF, Ferris JS, Teitelbaum SL, Eng SM, Gaudet MM, Neugut AI, Santella RM. Plasma protein carbonyl...Santella RM, Gammon MD. Interactions among GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms, cruciferous vegetable intake and breast cancer risk. Carcinogenesis...analytes are enzymatically hydrolyzed , and then concentrated and separated from other urine components by on-line solid phase extraction coupled to

  1. Gene-Environment Interactions in the Development of Complex Disease Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Olden

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of knowledge about the earliest events in disease development is due to the multi-factorial nature of disease risk. This information gap is the consequence of the lack of appreciation for the fact that most diseases arise from the complex interactions between genes and the environment as a function of the age or stage of development of the individual. Whether an environmental exposure causes illness or not is dependent on the efficiency of the so-called “environmental response machinery” (i.e., the complex of metabolic pathways that can modulate response to environmental perturbations that one has inherited. Thus, elucidating the causes of most chronic diseases will require an understanding of both the genetic and environmental contribution to their etiology. Unfortunately, the exploration of the relationship between genes and the environment has been hampered in the past by the limited knowledge of the human genome, and by the inclination of scientists to study disease development using experimental models that consider exposure to a single environmental agent. Rarely in the past were interactions between multiple genes or between genes and environmental agents considered in studies of human disease etiology. The most critical issue is how to relate exposure-disease association studies to pathways and mechanisms. To understand how genes and environmental factors interact to perturb biological pathways to cause injury or disease, scientists will need tools with the capacity to monitor the global expression of thousands of genes, proteins and metabolites simultaneously. The generation of such data in multiple species can be used to identify conserved and functionally significant genes and pathways involved in geneenvironment interactions. Ultimately, it is this knowledge that will be used to guide agencies such as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in decisions regarding biomedical research funding

  2. Gene Environment Interactions and Predictors of Colorectal Cancer in Family-Based, Multi-Ethnic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pamela K. Shiao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available For the personalization of polygenic/omics-based health care, the purpose of this study was to examine the gene–environment interactions and predictors of colorectal cancer (CRC by including five key genes in the one-carbon metabolism pathways. In this proof-of-concept study, we included a total of 54 families and 108 participants, 54 CRC cases and 54 matched family friends representing four major racial ethnic groups in southern California (White, Asian, Hispanics, and Black. We used three phases of data analytics, including exploratory, family-based analyses adjusting for the dependence within the family for sharing genetic heritage, the ensemble method, and generalized regression models for predictive modeling with a machine learning validation procedure to validate the results for enhanced prediction and reproducibility. The results revealed that despite the family members sharing genetic heritage, the CRC group had greater combined gene polymorphism rates than the family controls (p < 0.05, on MTHFR C677T, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G, and DHFR 19 bp except MTHFR A1298C. Four racial groups presented different polymorphism rates for four genes (all p < 0.05 except MTHFR A1298C. Following the ensemble method, the most influential factors were identified, and the best predictive models were generated by using the generalized regression models, with Akaike’s information criterion and leave-one-out cross validation methods. Body mass index (BMI and gender were consistent predictors of CRC for both models when individual genes versus total polymorphism counts were used, and alcohol use was interactive with BMI status. Body mass index status was also interactive with both gender and MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism, and the exposure to environmental pollutants was an additional predictor. These results point to the important roles of environmental and modifiable factors in relation to gene–environment interactions in the prevention of CRC.

  3. Sample size requirements to detect gene-environment interactions in genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcray, Cassandra E; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Conti, David V; Thomas, Duncan C; Gauderman, W James

    2011-04-01

    Many complex diseases are likely to be a result of the interplay of genes and environmental exposures. The standard analysis in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) scans for main effects and ignores the potentially useful information in the available exposure data. Two recently proposed methods that exploit environmental exposure information involve a two-step analysis aimed at prioritizing the large number of SNPs tested to highlight those most likely to be involved in a GE interaction. For example, Murcray et al. ([2009] Am J Epidemiol 169:219–226) proposed screening on a test that models the G-E association induced by an interaction in the combined case-control sample. Alternatively, Kooperberg and LeBlanc ([2008] Genet Epidemiol 32:255–263) suggested screening on genetic marginal effects. In both methods, SNPs that pass the respective screening step at a pre-specified significance threshold are followed up with a formal test of interaction in the second step. We propose a hybrid method that combines these two screening approaches by allocating a proportion of the overall genomewide significance level to each test. We show that the Murcray et al. approach is often the most efficient method, but that the hybrid approach is a powerful and robust method for nearly any underlying model. As an example, for a GWAS of 1 million markers including a single true disease SNP with minor allele frequency of 0.15, and a binary exposure with prevalence 0.3, the Murcray, Kooperberg and hybrid methods are 1.90, 1.27, and 1.87 times as efficient, respectively, as the traditional case-control analysis to detect an interaction effect size of 2.0.

  4. Gene-environment interactions in cancer epidemiology: a National Cancer Institute Think Tank report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Carolyn M; Mechanic, Leah E; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Kraft, Peter; Gillanders, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Cancer risk is determined by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of common (minor allele frequency [MAF] > 0.05) and less common (0.01 Think Tank" on January 10-11, 2012. The objective of the Think Tank was to facilitate discussions on (1) the state of the science, (2) the goals of G × E interaction studies in cancer epidemiology, and (3) opportunities for developing novel study designs and analysis tools. This report summarizes the Think Tank discussion, with a focus on contemporary approaches to the analysis of G × E interactions. Selecting the appropriate methods requires first identifying the relevant scientific question and rationale, with an important distinction made between analyses aiming to characterize the joint effects of putative or established genetic and environmental factors and analyses aiming to discover novel risk factors or novel interaction effects. Other discussion items include measurement error, statistical power, significance, and replication. Additional designs, exposure assessments, and analytical approaches need to be considered as we move from the current small number of success stories to a fuller understanding of the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  5. On meta- and mega-analyses for gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Liu, Yulun; Vitale, Steve; Penning, Trevor M; Whitehead, Alexander S; Blair, Ian A; Vachani, Anil; Clapper, Margie L; Muscat, Joshua E; Lazarus, Philip; Scheet, Paul; Moore, Jason H; Chen, Yong

    2017-12-01

    Gene-by-environment (G × E) interactions are important in explaining the missing heritability and understanding the causation of complex diseases, but a single, moderately sized study often has limited statistical power to detect such interactions. With the increasing need for integrating data and reporting results from multiple collaborative studies or sites, debate over choice between mega- versus meta-analysis continues. In principle, data from different sites can be integrated at the individual level into a "mega" data set, which can be fit by a joint "mega-analysis." Alternatively, analyses can be done at each site, and results across sites can be combined through a "meta-analysis" procedure without integrating individual level data across sites. Although mega-analysis has been advocated in several recent initiatives, meta-analysis has the advantages of simplicity and feasibility, and has recently led to several important findings in identifying main genetic effects. In this paper, we conducted empirical and simulation studies, using data from a G × E study of lung cancer, to compare the mega- and meta-analyses in four commonly used G × E analyses under the scenario that the number of studies is small and sample sizes of individual studies are relatively large. We compared the two data integration approaches in the context of fixed effect models and random effects models separately. Our investigations provide valuable insights in understanding the differences between mega- and meta-analyses in practice of combining small number of studies in identifying G × E interactions. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  6. Plasma selenium levels and oxidative stress biomarkers: a gene-environment interaction population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan-Chilet, Inmaculada; Tellez-Plaza, Maria; Guallar, Eliseo; De Marco, Griselda; Lopez-Izquierdo, Raul; Gonzalez-Manzano, Isabel; Carmen Tormos, M; Martin-Nuñez, Gracia M; Rojo-Martinez, Gemma; Saez, Guillermo T; Martín-Escudero, Juan C; Redon, Josep; Javier Chaves, F

    2014-09-01

    The role of selenium exposure in preventing chronic disease is controversial, especially in selenium-repleted populations. At high concentrations, selenium exposure may increase oxidative stress. Studies evaluating the interaction of genetic variation in genes involved in oxidative stress pathways and selenium are scarce. We evaluated the cross-sectional association of plasma selenium concentrations with oxidative stress levels, measured as oxidized to reduced glutathione ratio (GSSG/GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxo-dG) in urine, and the interacting role of genetic variation in oxidative stress candidate genes, in a representative sample of 1445 men and women aged 18-85 years from Spain. The geometric mean of plasma selenium levels in the study sample was 84.76 µg/L. In fully adjusted models the geometric mean ratios for oxidative stress biomarker levels comparing the highest to the lowest quintiles of plasma selenium levels were 0.61 (0.50-0.76) for GSSG/GSH, 0.89 (0.79-1.00) for MDA, and 1.06 (0.96-1.18) for 8-oxo-dG. We observed nonlinear dose-responses of selenium exposure and oxidative stress biomarkers, with plasma selenium concentrations above ~110 μg/L being positively associated with 8-oxo-dG, but inversely associated with GSSG/GSH and MDA. In addition, we identified potential risk genotypes associated with increased levels of oxidative stress markers with high selenium levels. Our findings support that high selenium levels increase oxidative stress in some biological processes. More studies are needed to disentangle the complexity of selenium biology and the relevance of potential gene-selenium interactions in relation to health outcomes in human populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gene-environment interactions between stress and 5-HTTLPR in depression: A meta-analytic update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleys, Dries; Luyten, Patrick; Soenens, Bart; Claes, Stephan

    2018-01-15

    Meta-analyses have yielded contradictory findings concerning the role of 5-HTTLPR in interaction with stress (GxE) in depression. The current meta-analysis investigates if these contradictory findings are a result of differences between studies in methodological approaches towards the assessment of stress and depression. After performing a systematic database search (February to December 2016), first, a meta-analysis was used to investigate the total effect size and publication bias. Second, stratified meta-analyses were used to investigate the potential moderating influence of different methodological approaches on heterogeneity of study findings. Third, a meta-regression was used to investigate the combined influence of the methodological approaches on the overall effect size. Results showed a small but significant effect of 5-HTTLPR in interaction with stress in the prediction of depression (OR[95%CI] = 1.18[1.09; 1.28], n = 48 effect sizes from 51 studies, totaling 51,449 participants). There was no evidence of publication bias. Heterogeneity of effect sizes was a result of outliers and not due to different methodological approaches towards the assessment of stress and depression. Yet, there was some evidence that studies adopting a categorical and interview approach to the assessment of stress report higher GxE effects, but further replication of this finding is needed. A large amount of heterogeneity (i.e., 46%) was not explained by the methodological factors included in the study and there was a low response rate of invited studies. The current meta-analysis provides new evidence for the robustness of the interaction between stress and 5-HTTLPR in depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Gene-Environment Interactions of Circadian-Related Genes for Cardiometabolic Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, Hassan S; Follis, Jack L; Smith, Caren E; Tanaka, Toshiko; Garaulet, Marta; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Hruby, Adela; Jacques, Paul F; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Scheer, Frank A J L; Bartz, Traci M; Kovanen, Leena; Wojczynski, Mary K; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Perälä, Mia-Maria; Jonsson, Anna; Muka, Taulant; Kalafati, Ioanna P; Mikkilä, Vera; Ordovás, José M

    2015-08-01

    Common circadian-related gene variants associate with increased risk for metabolic alterations including type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about whether diet and sleep could modify associations between circadian-related variants (CLOCK-rs1801260, CRY2-rs11605924, MTNR1B-rs1387153, MTNR1B-rs10830963, NR1D1-rs2314339) and cardiometabolic traits (fasting glucose [FG], HOMA-insulin resistance, BMI, waist circumference, and HDL-cholesterol) to facilitate personalized recommendations. We conducted inverse-variance weighted, fixed-effect meta-analyses of results of adjusted associations and interactions between dietary intake/sleep duration and selected variants on cardiometabolic traits from 15 cohort studies including up to 28,190 participants of European descent from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium. We observed significant associations between relative macronutrient intakes and glycemic traits and short sleep duration (<7 h) and higher FG and replicated known MTNR1B associations with glycemic traits. No interactions were evident after accounting for multiple comparisons. However, we observed nominally significant interactions (all P < 0.01) between carbohydrate intake and MTNR1B-rs1387153 for FG with a 0.003 mmol/L higher FG with each additional 1% carbohydrate intake in the presence of the T allele, between sleep duration and CRY2-rs11605924 for HDL-cholesterol with a 0.010 mmol/L higher HDL-cholesterol with each additional hour of sleep in the presence of the A allele, and between long sleep duration (≥9 h) and MTNR1B-rs1387153 for BMI with a 0.60 kg/m(2) higher BMI with long sleep duration in the presence of the T allele relative to normal sleep duration (≥7 to <9 h). Our results suggest that lower carbohydrate intake and normal sleep duration may ameliorate cardiometabolic abnormalities conferred by common circadian-related genetic variants. Until further mechanistic examination of the nominally

  9. Gene-environment interaction in the onset of eczema in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Simpson, Angela; Palmer, Colin N A

    2008-01-01

    = 0.005), with a further increase in risk related to cat exposure at birth amongst children with FLG mutation (HR 11.11, 95% CI 3.79-32.60, p dog exposure was moderately protective (HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.24-1.01, p = 0.05), but not related to FLG genotype. In Manchester (n = 503) an independent...... of the interaction with dog ownership (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.16-2.20, p = 0.43). Mite-allergen had no effects in either cohort. The observed effects were independent of sensitisation. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated a significant interaction between FLG loss-of-function main mutations (501x and 2282del4) and cat...... ownership at birth on the development of early-life eczema in two independent birth cohorts. Our data suggest that cat but not dog ownership substantially increases the risk of eczema within the first year of life in children with FLG loss-of-function variants, but not amongst those without. FLG...

  10. Evidence of gene-environment interactions between common breast cancer susceptibility loci and established environmental risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Nickels

    Full Text Available Various common genetic susceptibility loci have been identified for breast cancer; however, it is unclear how they combine with lifestyle/environmental risk factors to influence risk. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess gene-environment interaction for risk of breast cancer. Data from 24 studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were pooled. Using up to 34,793 invasive breast cancers and 41,099 controls, we examined whether the relative risks associated with 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms were modified by 10 established environmental risk factors (age at menarche, parity, breastfeeding, body mass index, height, oral contraceptive use, menopausal hormone therapy use, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, physical activity in women of European ancestry. We used logistic regression models stratified by study and adjusted for age and performed likelihood ratio tests to assess gene-environment interactions. All statistical tests were two-sided. We replicated previously reported potential interactions between LSP1-rs3817198 and parity (Pinteraction = 2.4 × 10(-6 and between CASP8-rs17468277 and alcohol consumption (Pinteraction = 3.1 × 10(-4. Overall, the per-allele odds ratio (95% confidence interval for LSP1-rs3817198 was 1.08 (1.01-1.16 in nulliparous women and ranged from 1.03 (0.96-1.10 in parous women with one birth to 1.26 (1.16-1.37 in women with at least four births. For CASP8-rs17468277, the per-allele OR was 0.91 (0.85-0.98 in those with an alcohol intake of <20 g/day and 1.45 (1.14-1.85 in those who drank ≥ 20 g/day. Additionally, interaction was found between 1p11.2-rs11249433 and ever being parous (Pinteraction = 5.3 × 10(-5, with a per-allele OR of 1.14 (1.11-1.17 in parous women and 0.98 (0.92-1.05 in nulliparous women. These data provide first strong evidence that the risk of breast cancer associated with some common genetic variants may vary with environmental risk factors.

  11. C-reactive protein gene polymorphisms and gene-environment interactions in ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongyun; Yu, Dan; Xu, Zhi-Wei; Li, Shan-Shan; Li, Xiao-Feng; Li, Jing; Yang, Xu

    2015-11-01

    Ischaemic stroke is a heterogeneous, multifactorial disease caused by the combination of certain risk factors and genetic factors. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been reported to be associated with serum CRP levels. However, genetic association studies have produced conflicting results regarding the association between these SNPs and ischaemic stroke. In this paper, we conducted a population-based case-control study to determine whether two SNPs of CRP (rs1800947 and rs3093059) are associated with ischaemic stroke in Chinese Han population and to evaluate their interaction with environmental risk factors. We found that the rs1800947 GC genotype is significantly associated with the risk of ischaemic stroke, particularly the small-vessel disease and its subtype. Crossover analysis revealed that patients with the rs1800947 GC genotype and habits of smoking or drinking were more susceptible to ischaemic stroke. No association was found between the rs3093059 and ischaemic stroke.

  12. Measuring epigenetics as the mediator of gene/environment interactions in DOHaD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, M-L; Lin, X; Holbrook, J D

    2015-02-01

    Analysis of DNA methylation data in epigenome-wide association studies provides many bioinformatics and statistical challenges. Not least of these, are the non-independence of individual DNA methylation marks from each other, from genotype and from technical sources of variation. In this review we discuss DNA methylation data from the Infinium450K array and processing methodologies to reduce technical variation. We describe recent approaches to harness the concordance of neighbouring DNA methylation values to improve power in association studies. We also describe how the non-independence of genotype and DNA methylation has been used to infer causality (in the case of Mendelian randomization approaches); suggest the mediating effect of DNA methylation in linking intergenic single nucleotide polymorphisms, identified in genome-wide association studies, to phenotype; and to uncover the widespread influence of gene and environment interactions on methylation levels.

  13. Gene-environment interactions linking air pollution and inflammation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Chen; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Lill, Christina M; Bertram, Lars; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Hansen, Johnni; Ritz, Beate

    2016-11-01

    Both air pollution exposure and systemic inflammation have been linked to Parkinson's disease (PD). In the PASIDA study, 408 incident cases of PD diagnosed in 2006-2009 and their 495 population controls were interviewed and provided DNA samples. Markers of long term traffic related air pollution measures were derived from geographic information systems (GIS)-based modeling. Furthermore, we genotyped functional polymorphisms in genes encoding proinflammatory cytokines, namely rs1800629 in TNFα (tumor necrosis factor alpha) and rs16944 in IL1B (interleukin-1β). In logistic regression models, long-term exposure to NO 2 increased PD risk overall (odds ratio (OR)=1.06 per 2.94μg/m 3 increase, 95% CI=1.00-1.13). The OR for PD in individuals with high NO 2 exposure (≧75th percentile) and the AA genotype of IL1B rs16944 was 3.10 (95% CI=1.14-8.38) compared with individuals with lower NO 2 exposure (environment interactions with TNF rs1800629. Our finds may provide suggestive evidence that a combination of traffic-related air pollution and genetic variation in the proinflammatory cytokine gene IL1B contribute to risk of developing PD. However, as statistical evidence was only modest in this large sample we cannot rule out that these results represent a chance finding, and additional replication efforts are warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Degenerative periodontal-diseases and oral osteonecrosis: The role of gene-environment interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, D.; Izzotti, A.; Bonica, P.; Pera, P.; Pulliero, A.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic-degenerative dentistry diseases, including periodontal diseases and oral osteonecrosis, are widespread in human populations and represent a significant problem for public health. These diseases result from pathogenic mechanisms created by the interaction between environmental genotoxic risk-factors and genetic assets conferring individual susceptibility. Osteonecrosis occurs in subjects undergoing exposure to high doses of DNA-damaging agents for chemo- and radiotherapy of neoplastic diseases. In susceptible patients, ionizing radiation and biphosphonate-chemotherapy induce severe, progressive, and irreversible degeneration of facial bones, resulting in avascular necrosis of the jaw. This may also occur in patients receiving biphosphonate for osteoporosis therapy. Periodontal diseases include chronic, aggressive, and necrotizing periodontitis, often resulting in severe alteration of periodontal tissues and tooth loss. Cigarette smoking and chronic inflammation caused by specific bacteria are the main risk factors for periodontitis. Oxidative damage plays a fundamental pathogenic role, as established by detection of mitochondrial DNA damage in the gingival tissue of patients with periodontitis. Endogenous risk factors in dental diseases include polymorphisms for metabolic enzymes such as glutathione transferases M1 and T1, N-acetyl transferase 2, and CYP 1A1. Other genetic polymorphisms that confer susceptibility to dentistry diseases affect genes encoding metalloproteases (involved in periodontal tissue remodeling and degradation), cytokines (involved in inflammation), prothrombin, and DNA repair activities. These findings provide evidence that dentistry diseases are related to risk factors associated with environmental mutagenesis. This issue warrants future investigations aimed at improving oral health and preventing oral degenerative diseases using molecular and experimental approaches currently utilized in mutagenicity studies.

  15. Degenerative periodontal-diseases and oral osteonecrosis: The role of gene-environment interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldi, D. [Department of Medical, Biophysical, and Dentistry Sciences and Technologies, University of Genoa (Italy); Izzotti, A. [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Via A. Pastore 1 (Italy); Bonica, P.; Pera, P. [Department of Medical, Biophysical, and Dentistry Sciences and Technologies, University of Genoa (Italy); Pulliero, A., E-mail: alessandra.pulliero@unige.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Via A. Pastore 1 (Italy)

    2009-07-10

    Chronic-degenerative dentistry diseases, including periodontal diseases and oral osteonecrosis, are widespread in human populations and represent a significant problem for public health. These diseases result from pathogenic mechanisms created by the interaction between environmental genotoxic risk-factors and genetic assets conferring individual susceptibility. Osteonecrosis occurs in subjects undergoing exposure to high doses of DNA-damaging agents for chemo- and radiotherapy of neoplastic diseases. In susceptible patients, ionizing radiation and biphosphonate-chemotherapy induce severe, progressive, and irreversible degeneration of facial bones, resulting in avascular necrosis of the jaw. This may also occur in patients receiving biphosphonate for osteoporosis therapy. Periodontal diseases include chronic, aggressive, and necrotizing periodontitis, often resulting in severe alteration of periodontal tissues and tooth loss. Cigarette smoking and chronic inflammation caused by specific bacteria are the main risk factors for periodontitis. Oxidative damage plays a fundamental pathogenic role, as established by detection of mitochondrial DNA damage in the gingival tissue of patients with periodontitis. Endogenous risk factors in dental diseases include polymorphisms for metabolic enzymes such as glutathione transferases M1 and T1, N-acetyl transferase 2, and CYP 1A1. Other genetic polymorphisms that confer susceptibility to dentistry diseases affect genes encoding metalloproteases (involved in periodontal tissue remodeling and degradation), cytokines (involved in inflammation), prothrombin, and DNA repair activities. These findings provide evidence that dentistry diseases are related to risk factors associated with environmental mutagenesis. This issue warrants future investigations aimed at improving oral health and preventing oral degenerative diseases using molecular and experimental approaches currently utilized in mutagenicity studies.

  16. The Association between Gene-Environment Interactions and Diseases Involving the Human GST Superfamily with SNP Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinesha L. Hollman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to environmental hazards has been associated with diseases in humans. The identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in human populations exposed to different environmental hazards, is vital for detecting the genetic risks of some important human diseases. Several studies in this field have been conducted on glutathione S-transferases (GSTs, a phase II detoxification superfamily, to investigate its role in the occurrence of diseases. Human GSTs consist of cytosolic and microsomal superfamilies that are further divided into subfamilies. Based on scientific search engines and a review of the literature, we have found a large amount of published articles on human GST super- and subfamilies that have greatly assisted in our efforts to examine their role in health and disease. Because of its polymorphic variations in relation to environmental hazards such as air pollutants, cigarette smoke, pesticides, heavy metals, carcinogens, pharmaceutical drugs, and xenobiotics, GST is considered as a significant biomarker. This review examines the studies on gene-environment interactions related to various diseases with respect to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs found in the GST superfamily. Overall, it can be concluded that interactions between GST genes and environmental factors play an important role in human diseases.

  17. GMDR: Versatile Software for Detecting Gene-Gene and Gene-Environ- ment Interactions Underlying Complex Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hai-Ming; Xu, Li-Feng; Hou, Ting-Ting; Luo, Lin-Feng; Chen, Guo-Bo; Sun, Xi-Wei; Lou, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Identification of multifactor gene-gene (G×G) and gene-environment (G×E) interactions underlying complex traits poses one of the great challenges to today’s genetic study. Development of the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) method provides a practicable solution to problems in detection of interactions. To exploit the opportunities brought by the availability of diverse data, it is in high demand to develop the corresponding GMDR software that can handle a breadth of phenotypes, such as continuous, count, dichotomous, polytomous nominal, ordinal, survival and multivariate, and various kinds of study designs, such as unrelated case-control, family-based and pooled unrelated and family samples, and also allows adjustment for covariates. We developed a versatile GMDR package to implement this serial of GMDR analyses for various scenarios (e.g., unified analysis of unrelated and family samples) and large-scale (e.g., genome-wide) data. This package includes other desirable features such as data management and preprocessing. Permutation testing strategies are also built in to evaluate the threshold or empirical p values. In addition, its performance is scalable to the computational resources. The software is available at http://www.soph.uab.edu/ssg/software or http://ibi.zju.edu.cn/software. PMID:28479868

  18. Refining the Candidate Environment: Interpersonal Stress, the Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism, and Gene-Environment Interactions in Major Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrshek-Schallhorn, Suzanne; Mineka, Susan; Zinbarg, Richard E; Craske, Michelle G; Griffith, James W; Sutton, Jonathan; Redei, Eva E; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate; Hammen, Constance; Adam, Emma K

    2014-05-01

    Meta-analytic evidence supports a gene-environment (G×E) interaction between life stress and the serotonin transporter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) on depression, but few studies have examined factors that influence detection of this effect, despite years of inconsistent results. We propose that the "candidate environment" (akin to a candidate gene) is key. Theory and evidence implicate major stressful life events (SLEs)-particularly major interpersonal SLEs-as well as chronic family stress. Participants ( N = 400) from the Youth Emotion Project (which began with 627 high school juniors oversampled for high neuroticism) completed up to five annual diagnostic and life stress interviews and provided DNA samples. A significant G×E effect for major SLEs and S -carrier genotype was accounted for significantly by major interpersonal SLEs but not significantly by major non-interpersonal SLEs. S -carrier genotype and chronic family stress also significantly interacted. Identifying such candidate environments may facilitate future G×E research in depression and psychopathology more broadly.

  19. Evidence for gene-environment interaction in a genome wide study of isolated, non-syndromic cleft palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Terri H.; Ruczinski, Ingo; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Marazita, Mary L.; Munger, Ronald G.; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B.; Murray, Tanda; Redett, Richard J.; Fallin, M. Daniele; Liang, Kung Yee; Wu, Tao; Patel, Poorav J.; Jin, Sheng C.; Zhang, Tian Xiao; Schwender, Holger; Wu-Chou, Yah Huei; Chen, Philip K; Chong, Samuel S; Cheah, Felicia; Yeow, Vincent; Ye, Xiaoqian; Wang, Hong; Huang, Shangzhi; Jabs, Ethylin W.; Shi, Bing; Wilcox, Allen J.; Lie, Rolv T.; Jee, Sun Ha; Christensen, Kaare; Doheny, Kimberley F.; Pugh, Elizabeth W.; Ling, Hua; Scott, Alan F.

    2011-01-01

    Non-syndromic cleft palate (CP) is a common birth defect with a complex and heterogeneous etiology involving both genetic and environmental risk factors. We conducted a genome wide association study (GWAS) using 550 case-parent trios, ascertained through a CP case collected in an international consortium. Family based association tests of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and three common maternal exposures (maternal smoking, alcohol consumption and multivitamin supplementation) were used in a combined 2 df test for gene (G) and gene-environment (G×E) interaction simultaneously, plus a separate 1 df test for G×E interaction alone. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate effects on risk to exposed and unexposed children. While no SNP achieved genome wide significance when considered alone, markers in several genes attained or approached genome wide significance when G×E interaction was included. Among these, MLLT3 and SMC2 on chromosome 9 showed multiple SNPs resulting in increased risk if the mother consumed alcohol during the peri-conceptual period (3 months prior to conception through the first trimester). TBK1 on chr. 12 and ZNF236 on chr. 18 showed multiple SNPs associated with higher risk of CP in the presence of maternal smoking. Additional evidence of reduced risk due to G×E interaction in the presence of multivitamin supplementation was observed for SNPs in BAALC on chr. 8. These results emphasize the need to consider G×E interaction when searching for genes influencing risk to complex and heterogeneous disorders, such as non-syndromic CP. PMID:21618603

  20. Evaluation of two methods for assessing gene-environment interactions using data from the Danish case-control study of facial clefts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etheredge, Analee J; Christensen, Kaare; Del Junco, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological investigations have begun to consider gene-environment (GE) interactions as potential risk factors for many diseases, including several different birth defects. However, traditional methodological approaches for the analysis of case-control data tend to have low power...

  1. Vulnerability or Sensitivity to the Environment? Methodological Issues, Trends, and Recommendations in Gene-Environment Interactions Research in Human Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Caroline; Botto, Alberto; Silva, Jaime R; Jiménez, Juan Pablo; Luyten, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Research on the potential role of gene-environment interactions (GxE) in explaining vulnerability to psychopathology in humans has witnessed a shift from a diathesis-stress perspective to differential susceptibility approaches. This paper critically reviews methodological issues and trends in this body of research. Databases were screened for studies of GxE in the prediction of personality traits, behavior, and mental health disorders in humans published between January 2002 and January 2015. In total, 315 papers were included. Results showed that 34 candidate genes have been included in GxE studies. Independent of the type of environment studied (early or recent life events, positive or negative environments), about 67-83% of studies have reported significant GxE interactions, which is consistent with a social susceptibility model. The percentage of positive results does not seem to differ depending on the gene studied, although publication bias might be involved. However, the number of positive findings differs depending on the population studied (i.e., young adults vs. older adults). Methodological considerations limit the ability to draw strong conclusions, particularly as almost 90% ( n  = 283/315) of published papers are based on samples from North America and Europe, and about 70% of published studies (219/315) are based on samples that were also used in other reports. At the same time, there are clear indications of methodological improvements over time, as is shown by a significant increase in longitudinal and experimental studies as well as in improved minimum genotyping. Recommendations for future research, such as minimum quality assessment of genes and environmental factors, specifying theoretical models guiding the study, and taking into account of cultural, ethnic, and lifetime perspectives, are formulated.

  2. Multiple Gene-Environment Interactions on the Angiogenesis Gene-Pathway Impact Rectal Cancer Risk and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha Sharafeldin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of gene-environment interactions (GEIs in cancer is limited. We aimed at identifying GEIs in rectal cancer focusing on a relevant biologic process involving the angiogenesis pathway and relevant environmental exposures: cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and animal protein intake. We analyzed data from 747 rectal cancer cases and 956 controls from the Diet, Activity and Lifestyle as a Risk Factor for Rectal Cancer study. We applied a 3-step analysis approach: first, we searched for interactions among single nucleotide polymorphisms on the pathway genes; second, we searched for interactions among the genes, both steps using Logic regression; third, we examined the GEIs significant at the 5% level using logistic regression for cancer risk and Cox proportional hazards models for survival. Permutation-based test was used for multiple testing adjustment. We identified 8 significant GEIs associated with risk among 6 genes adjusting for multiple testing: TNF (OR = 1.85, 95% CI: 1.10, 3.11, TLR4 (OR = 2.34, 95% CI: 1.38, 3.98, and EGR2 (OR = 2.23, 95% CI: 1.04, 4.78 with smoking; IGF1R (OR = 1.69, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.72, TLR4 (OR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.22, 3.60 and EGR2 (OR = 2.12, 95% CI: 1.01, 4.46 with alcohol; and PDGFB (OR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.92 and MMP1 (OR = 2.44, 95% CI: 1.24, 4.81 with protein. Five GEIs were associated with survival at the 5% significance level but not after multiple testing adjustment: CXCR1 (HR = 2.06, 95% CI: 1.13, 3.75 with smoking; and KDR (HR = 4.36, 95% CI: 1.62, 11.73, TLR2 (HR = 9.06, 95% CI: 1.14, 72.11, EGR2 (HR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.42, 4.22, and EGFR (HR = 6.33, 95% CI: 1.95, 20.54 with protein. GEIs between angiogenesis genes and smoking, alcohol, and animal protein impact rectal cancer risk. Our results support the importance of considering the biologic hypothesis to characterize GEIs associated with cancer outcomes.

  3. Research Review: Gene-Environment Interaction Research in Youth Depression--A Systematic Review with Recommendations for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Erin C.; Uddin, Monica; Subramanian, S. V.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Galea, Sandro; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Depression is a major public health problem among youth, currently estimated to affect as many as 9% of US children and adolescents. The recognition that both genes (nature) and environments (nurture) are important for understanding the etiology of depression has led to a rapid growth in research exploring gene-environment interactions…

  4. Gene-environment interaction between the brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism, psychosocial stress and dietary intake in early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattere, Giulia; Stojanovic-Pérez, Alexander; Monseny, Rosa; Martorell, Lourdes; Ortega, Laura; Montalvo, Itziar; Solé, Montse; Algora, María José; Cabezas, Ángel; Reynolds, Rebecca M; Vilella, Elisabet; Labad, Javier

    2016-09-15

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a major participant in the regulation of food intake and may play a role in the regulation of the stress response. We aimed to investigate whether there is a gene-environment interaction in the relationship between stress and BDNF Val66Met polymorphism in relation to dietary patterns in a sample of subjects with early psychosis. We studied 124 early psychotic disorder (PD) patients, 36 At-Risk Mental States (ARMS) and 62 healthy subjects (HS). Dietary patterns were examined by a dietician. Physical activity, life stress and perceived stress were assessed by validated questionnaires. BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (rs6265) was genotyped. A gene-environment interaction was tested with multiple linear regression analysis while adjusting for covariates. Perceived stress was not associated with calorie intake in HS. In ARMS subjects, Met-carriers who presented low-perceived stress were associated with increased caloric intake. Conversely, those who presented high-perceived stress were associated with reduced caloric intake. In PD, perceived stress was neither associated with increased calorie intake without an effect by BDNF genotype nor a gene-environment interaction. Perceived stress was associated with food craving in PD patients, independent of genotype, and in ARMS or HS who were Val homozygous. This study suggests that the common Val66Met polymorphism of the BDNF gene may modulate the relationship between life stress and calorie intake in subjects at risk for psychosis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Power Analysis for Population-Based Longitudinal Studies Investigating Gene-Environment Interactions in Chronic Diseases: A Simulation Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Ma

    was not very low (≥0.1 and the disease of interest was not rare (such as diabetes and dementia. The CLSA had enough power to detect a large effect of the gene-environment interaction only when both risk exposures had relatively high prevalence (0.2 and the disease of interest was very common (such as diabetes. The minimum detectable hazard ratios (MDHR of the CLSA for the environmental and genetic risk exposures obtained from this simulation study were larger than those calculated according to the conventional sample size calculation method. For example, the MDHR for the environmental risk exposure was 1.15 according to the conventional method if the prevalence of the risk exposure was 0.1 and the disease of interest was dementia. In contrast, the MDHR was 1.61 if the same exposure was measured every 3 years with a misclassification rate of 0.1 according to this simulation study. With a given sample size, higher statistical power could be achieved by increasing the measuring frequency in participants with high risk of declining health status or changing risk exposures, and by increasing measurement accuracy of diseases and risk exposures. A properly designed simulation-based sample size calculation is superior to conventional methods when rigorous sample size calculation is necessary.

  6. The Cumulative Effect of Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions on the Risk of Prostate Cancer in Chinese Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is a multifactorial disease involving complex genetic and environmental factors interactions. Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions associated with PCa in Chinese men are less studied. We explored the association between 36 SNPs and PCa in 574 subjects from northern China. Body mass index (BMI, smoking, and alcohol consumption were determined through self-administered questionnaires in 134 PCa patients. Then gene-gene and gene-environment interactions among the PCa-associated SNPs were analyzed using the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR and logistic regression methods. Allelic and genotypic association analyses showed that six variants were associated with PCa and the cumulative effect suggested men who carried any combination of 1, 2, or ≥3 risk genotypes had a gradually increased PCa risk (odds ratios (ORs = 1.79–4.41. GMDR analysis identified the best gene-gene interaction model with scores of 10 for both the cross-validation consistency and sign tests. For gene-environment interactions, rs6983561 CC and rs16901966 GG in individuals with a BMI ≥ 28 had ORs of 7.66 (p = 0.032 and 5.33 (p = 0.046, respectively. rs7679673 CC + CA and rs12653946 TT in individuals that smoked had ORs of 2.77 (p = 0.007 and 3.11 (p = 0.024, respectively. rs7679673 CC in individuals that consumed alcohol had an OR of 4.37 (p = 0.041. These results suggest that polymorphisms, either individually or by interacting with other genes or environmental factors, contribute to an increased risk of PCa.

  7. Interaction between Social/Psychosocial Factors and Genetic Variants on Body Mass Index: A Gene-Environment Interaction Analysis in a Longitudinal Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, which develops over time, is one of the leading causes of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. However, hundreds of BMI (body mass index-associated genetic loci identified through large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS only explain about 2.7% of BMI variation. Most common human traits are believed to be influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Past studies suggest a variety of environmental features that are associated with obesity, including socioeconomic status and psychosocial factors. This study combines both gene/regions and environmental factors to explore whether social/psychosocial factors (childhood and adult socioeconomic status, social support, anger, chronic burden, stressful life events, and depressive symptoms modify the effect of sets of genetic variants on BMI in European American and African American participants in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS. In order to incorporate longitudinal phenotype data collected in the HRS and investigate entire sets of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within gene/region simultaneously, we applied a novel set-based test for gene-environment interaction in longitudinal studies (LGEWIS. Childhood socioeconomic status (parental education was found to modify the genetic effect in the gene/region around SNP rs9540493 on BMI in European Americans in the HRS. The most significant SNP (rs9540488 by childhood socioeconomic status interaction within the rs9540493 gene/region was suggestively replicated in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA (p = 0.07.

  8. The oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) in relation to state levels of loneliness in adolescence: evidence for micro-level gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roekel, Eeske; Verhagen, Maaike; Scholte, Ron H J; Kleinjan, Marloes; Goossens, Luc; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the rs53576 variant of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) is associated with trait levels of loneliness, but results are inconsistent. The aim of the present study is to examine micro-level effects of the OXTR rs53576 variant on state levels of loneliness in early adolescents. In addition, gene-environment interactions are examined between this OXTR variant and positive and negative perceptions of company. Data were collected in 278 adolescents (58% girls), by means of the Experience Sampling Method (ESM). Sampling periods consisted of six days with nine assessments per day. A relation was found between the OXTR rs53576 variant and state loneliness, in girls only. Girls carrying an A allele had higher levels of state loneliness than girls carrying the GG genotype. In addition, adolescents with an A allele were more affected by negative perceptions of company than GG carriers, on weekend days only. No significant gene-environment interactions were found with positive company. Adolescents carrying an A allele were more susceptible to negative environments during weekend days than GG carriers. Our findings emphasize the importance of operationalizing the phenotype and the environment accurately.

  9. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions Involving HLA-DRB1, PTPN22, and Smoking in Two Subsets of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källberg, Henrik; Padyukov, Leonid; Plenge, Robert M.; Rönnelid, Johan; Gregersen, Peter K.; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; Toes, Rene E. M.; Huizinga, Tom W.; Klareskog, Lars; Alfredsson, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions are key features in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other complex diseases. The aim of this study was to use and compare three different definitions of interaction between the two major genetic risk factors of RA—the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE) alleles and the PTPN22 R620W allele—in three large case-control studies: the Swedish Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA) study, the North American RA Consortium (NARAC) study, and the Dutch Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic study (in total, 1,977 cases and 2,405 controls). The EIRA study was also used to analyze interactions between smoking and the two genes. “Interaction” was defined either as a departure from additivity, as interaction in a multiplicative model, or in terms of linkage disequilibrium—for example, deviation from independence of penetrance of two unlinked loci. Consistent interaction, defined as departure from additivity, between HLA-DRB1 SE alleles and the A allele of PTPN22 R620W was seen in all three studies regarding anti-CCP–positive RA. Testing for multiplicative interactions demonstrated an interaction between the two genes only when the three studies were pooled. The linkage disequilibrium approach indicated a gene-gene interaction in EIRA and NARAC, as well as in the pooled analysis. No interaction was seen between smoking and PTPN22 R620W. A new pattern of interactions is described between the two major known genetic risk factors and the major environmental risk factor concerning the risk of developing anti-CCP–positive RA. The data extend the basis for a pathogenetic hypothesis for RA involving genetic and environmental factors. The study also raises and illustrates principal questions concerning ways to define interactions in complex diseases. PMID:17436241

  10. Genetic susceptibility loci, environmental exposures, and Parkinson's disease: a case-control study of gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sun Ju; Armasu, Sebastian M; Anderson, Kari J; Biernacka, Joanna M; Lesnick, Timothy G; Rider, David N; Cunningham, Julie M; Ahlskog, J Eric; Frigerio, Roberta; Maraganore, Demetrius M

    2013-06-01

    Prior studies causally linked mutations in SNCA, MAPT, and LRRK2 genes with familial Parkinsonism. Genome-wide association studies have demonstrated association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in those three genes with sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) susceptibility worldwide. Here we investigated the interactions between SNPs in those three susceptibility genes and environmental exposures (pesticides application, tobacco smoking, coffee drinking, and alcohol drinking) also associated with PD susceptibility. Pairwise interactions between environmental exposures and 18 variants (16 SNPs and two variable number tandem repeats, or "VNTRs") in SNCA, MAPT and LRRK2, were investigated using data from 1098 PD cases from the upper Midwest, USA and 1098 matched controls. Environmental exposures were assessed using a validated telephone interview script. Five pairwise interactions had uncorrected P-values coffee drinking × MAPT H1/H2 haplotype or MAPT rs16940806, and alcohol drinking × MAPT rs2435211. None of these interactions remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Secondary analyses in strata defined by type of control (sibling or unrelated), sex, or age at onset of the case also did not identify significant interactions after Bonferroni correction. This study documented limited pairwise interactions between established genetic and environmental risk factors for PD; however, the associations were not significant after correction for multiple testing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Gene-environment interaction: Does fluoride influence the reproductive hormones in male farmers modified by ERα gene polymorphisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiang; Huang, Hui; Sun, Long; Zhou, Tong; Zhu, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xuemin; Duan, Lijv; Li, Zhiyuan; Cui, Liuxin; Ba, Yue

    2017-12-01

    The occurrence of endemic fluorosis is derived from high fluoride levels in drinking water and industrial fumes or dust. Reproductive disruption is also a major harm caused by fluoride exposure besides dental and skeletal lesions. However, few studies focus on the mechanism of fluoride exposure on male reproductive function, especially the possible interaction of fluoride exposure and gene polymorphism on male reproductive hormones. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional study in rural areas of Henan province in China to explore the interaction between the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) gene and fluoride exposure on reproductive hormone levels in male farmers living in the endemic fluorosis villages. The results showed that fluoride exposure significantly increased the serum level of estradiol in the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis in male farmers. Moreover, the observations indicated that fluoride exposure and genetic markers had an interaction on serum concentration of follicle-stimulating hormone and estradiol, and the interaction among different loci of the ERα gene could impact the serum testosterone level. Findings in the present work suggest that chronic fluoride exposure in drinking water could modulate the levels of reproductive hormones in males living in endemic fluorosis areas, and the interaction between fluoride exposure and ERα polymorphisms might affect the serum levels of hormones in the HPT axis in male farmers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Measuring the genetic influence on human life span: gene-environment interaction and sex-specific genetic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; De Benedictis, G; Yashin, Annatoli

    2001-01-01

    New approaches are needed to explore the different ways in which genes affect the human life span. One needs to assess the genetic effects themselves, as well as gene–environment interactions and sex dependency. In this paper, we present a new model that combines both genotypic and demographicinf...

  13. Physical activity, diet and gene-environment interactions in relation to body mass index and waist circumference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karnehed, Nina; Tynelius, Per; Heitmann, Berit L

    2006-01-01

    dizygotic young adult male twin pairs. Increased knowledge about interactions between genes and environment may provide insight into why some individuals are more prone to obesity than others. DESIGN: Information about PA, BMI, dietary habits, WC and potential confounders was collected by questionnaire...

  14. Toll-like receptors and microbial exposure : gene-gene and gene-environment interaction in the development of atopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmerink, N. E.; Kerkhof, M.; Bottema, R. W. B.; Gerritsen, J.; Stelma, F. F.; Thijs, C.; van Schayck, C. P.; Smit, H. A.; Brunekreef, B.; Postma, D. S.; Koppelman, G. H.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental and genetic factors contribute to atopy development. High microbial exposure may confer a protective effect on atopy. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) bind microbial products and are important in activating the immune system. To assess whether interactions between microbial exposures and

  15. Toll-like receptors and microbial exposure: gene-gene and gene-environment interaction in the development of atopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmerink, N.E.; Kerkhof, M. van de; Bottema, R.W.; Gerritsen, J.; Stelma, F.F.; Thijs, C.; Schayck, C.P. van; Smit, H.A.; Brunekreef, B.; Postma, D.S.; Koppelman, G.H.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental and genetic factors contribute to atopy development. High microbial exposure may confer a protective effect on atopy. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) bind microbial products and are important in activating the immune system. To assess whether interactions between microbial exposures and

  16. Gene-environment interaction in Parkinson’s disease: coffee, ADORA2A, and CYP1A2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yu-Hsuan; Lill, Christina M.; Lee, Pei-Chen; Hansen, Johnni; Lassen, Christina Funch; Bertram, Lars; Greene, Naomi; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Ritz, Beate

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Drinking caffeinated coffee has been reported to protect against Parkinson’s disease (PD). Caffeine is an adenosine A2A receptor (encoded by the gene ADORA2A) antagonist that increases dopaminergic neurotransmission and Cytochrome P450 1A2 (gene: CYP1A2) metabolizes caffeine, thus gene polymorphisms in ADORA2A and CYP1A2 may influence the effect coffee consumption has on PD risk. Methods In a population-based case control study (PASIDA) in Denmark (1,556 PD patients and 1,606 birth year- and sex- matched controls), we assessed interactions between lifetime coffee consumption and three polymorphisms in ADORA2A and CYP1A2 for all subjects and incident and prevalent PD cases separately using logistic regression models. We also conducted a meta-analysis combining our results with those from previous studies. Results We estimated statistically significant interactions for ADORA2A rs5760423 and heavy vs. light coffee consumption in incident (OR interaction=0.66 [0.46–0.94], p=0.02) but not prevalent PD. We did not observe interactions for CYP1A2 rs762551 and rs2472304 in incident or prevalent PD. In meta-analyses, PD associations with daily coffee consumption were strongest among carriers of variant alleles in both ADORA2A and CYP1A2. Conclusion We corroborated results from a previous report that described interactions between ADORA2A and CYP1A2 polymorphisms and coffee consumption. Our results also suggest that survivor bias may affect results of studies that enrol prevalent PD cases. PMID:28135712

  17. A Comparison of Case-Control and Case-Only Designs to Investigate Gene-Environment Interactions Using Breast Cancer Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Hassanzadeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The traditional methods of studying the gene-environment interactions need a control group. However, the selection of an appropriate control group has been associated with problems. Therefore, new methods, such as case-only design, have been created to study such interactions. The objective of this study was to compare the case-only and case-control designs using data from patients with breast cancer.Methods: The interaction of genetic and environmental factor as well as the ratio of control to population odds ratio was calculated for case-only (300 patients with breast cancer and case-control (300 cases of breast cancer and 300 matched controls designs. Results: The confidence intervals and -2log likelihood in all variables in case-only design was smaller than those in the matched case-control design. In case-only design, the standard errors of some variables such as age at menarche, the first delivery at the age of 35 yrs and more or no delivery, the history of having live birth, use of oral contraception pills, breastfeeding history were less than those in the matched case-control design. Conclusion: The findings indicate that the case-only design is an efficient method to investigate the interaction of genetic and environmental factors.

  18. Dopamine transporter DAT and receptor DRD2 variants affect risk of lethal cocaine abuse: a gene-gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, D; Pinsonneault, J K; Papp, A C; Zhu, H; Lemeshow, S; Mash, D C; Sadee, W

    2013-01-22

    Epistatic gene-gene interactions could contribute to the heritability of complex multigenic disorders, but few examples have been reported. Here, we focus on the role of aberrant dopaminergic signaling, involving the dopamine transporter DAT, a cocaine target, and the dopamine D2 receptor, which physically interacts with DAT. Splicing polymorphism rs2283265 of DRD2, encoding D2 receptors, were shown to confer risk of cocaine overdose/death (odds ratio ∼3) in subjects and controls from the Miami Dade County Brain Bank.(1) Risk of cocaine-related death attributable to the minor allele of rs2283265 was significantly enhanced to OR=7.5 (P=0.0008) in homozygous carriers of the main 6-repeat allele of DAT rs3836790, a regulatory VNTR in intron8 lacking significant effect itself. In contrast, carriers of the minor 5-repeat DAT allele showed no significant risk (OR=1.1, P=0.84). DAT rs3836790 and DRD2 rs2283265 also interacted by modulating DAT protein activity in the ventral putamen of cocaine abusers. In high-linkage disequilibrium with the VNTR, DAT rs6347 in exon9 yielded similar results. Assessing the impact of DAT alone, a rare DAT haplotype formed by the minor alleles of rs3836790 and rs27072, a regulatory DAT variant in the 3'-UTR, occurred in nearly one-third of the cocaine abusers but was absent in African American controls, apparently conferring strong risk. These results demonstrate gene-gene-drug interaction affecting risk of fatal cocaine intoxication.

  19. Vulnerability or Sensitivity to the Environment? Methodological Issues, Trends, and Recommendations in Gene?Environment Interactions Research in Human Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Leighton, Caroline; Botto, Alberto; Silva, Jaime R.; Jim?nez, Juan Pablo; Luyten, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Research on the potential role of gene–environment interactions (GxE) in explaining vulnerability to psychopathology in humans has witnessed a shift from a diathesis-stress perspective to differential susceptibility approaches. This paper critically reviews methodological issues and trends in this body of research. Databases were screened for studies of GxE in the prediction of personality traits, behavior, and mental health disorders in humans published between January 2002 and January 2015....

  20. Neuregulin 1: a prime candidate for research into gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia? Insights from genetic rodent models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eKarl

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a multi-factorial disease characterized by a high heritability and environmental risk factors. In recent years, an increasing number of researchers worldwide have started investigating the ‘two-hit hypothesis’ of schizophrenia predicting that genetic and environmental risk factors (GxE interactively cause the development of the disorder. This work is starting to produce valuable new animal models and reveal novel insights into the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. This mini review will focus on recent advancements in the field made by challenging mutant and transgenic rodent models for the schizophrenia candidate gene neuregulin 1 (NRG1 with particular environmental factors. It will outline results obtained from mouse and rat models for various Nrg1 isoforms/isoform types (e.g. transmembrane domain Nrg1, Type II Nrg1, which have been exposed to different forms of stress (acute versus chronic, restraint versus social and housing conditions (standard laboratory versus minimally enriched housing. These studies suggest Nrg1 as a prime candidate for GxE interactions in schizophrenia rodent models and that the use of rodent models will enable a better understanding of GxE interactions and the underlying mechanisms.

  1. Effect of gene-environment Interactions on mental development in African American, Dominican, and Caucasian mothers and newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Chanock, Stephen; Tang, Deliang; Li, Zhigang; Edwards, Susan; Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Perera, Frederica P

    2010-01-01

    The health impact of environmental toxins has gained increasing recognition over the years. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) are known to affect nervous system development in children, but no studies have investigated how polymorphisms in PAH metabolic genes affect child cognitive development following PAH exposure during pregnancy. In two parallel prospective cohort studies of non-smoking African American and Dominican mothers and children in New York City and of Caucasian mothers and children in Krakow, Poland, we explored the effect of gene-PAH interaction on child mental development index (MDI). Genes known to play important roles in the metabolic activation or detoxification of PAHs were selected. Genetic variations in these genes could influence susceptibility to adverse effects of PAHs in polluted air. We explored the effects of interactions between prenatal PAH exposure and 21 polymorphisms or haplotypes in these genes on MDI at 12, 24, and 36 months among 547 newborns and 806 mothers from three different ethnic groups. Significant interaction effects between haplotypes and PAHs were observed in mothers and their newborns in all three ethnic groups after Bonferroni correction. The strongest and most consistent effect observed was between PAH and haplotype ACCGGC of the CYP1B1 gene.

  2. Multivariate dimensionality reduction approaches to identify gene-gene and gene-environment interactions underlying multiple complex traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hai-Ming; Sun, Xi-Wei; Qi, Ting; Lin, Wan-Yu; Liu, Nianjun; Lou, Xiang-Yang

    2014-01-01

    The elusive but ubiquitous multifactor interactions represent a stumbling block that urgently needs to be removed in searching for determinants involved in human complex diseases. The dimensionality reduction approaches are a promising tool for this task. Many complex diseases exhibit composite syndromes required to be measured in a cluster of clinical traits with varying correlations and/or are inherently longitudinal in nature (changing over time and measured dynamically at multiple time points). A multivariate approach for detecting interactions is thus greatly needed on the purposes of handling a multifaceted phenotype and longitudinal data, as well as improving statistical power for multiple significance testing via a two-stage testing procedure that involves a multivariate analysis for grouped phenotypes followed by univariate analysis for the phenotypes in the significant group(s). In this article, we propose a multivariate extension of generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) based on multivariate generalized linear, multivariate quasi-likelihood and generalized estimating equations models. Simulations and real data analysis for the cohort from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment are performed to investigate the properties and performance of the proposed method, as compared with the univariate method. The results suggest that the proposed multivariate GMDR substantially boosts statistical power.

  3. Multivariate dimensionality reduction approaches to identify gene-gene and gene-environment interactions underlying multiple complex traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Ming Xu

    Full Text Available The elusive but ubiquitous multifactor interactions represent a stumbling block that urgently needs to be removed in searching for determinants involved in human complex diseases. The dimensionality reduction approaches are a promising tool for this task. Many complex diseases exhibit composite syndromes required to be measured in a cluster of clinical traits with varying correlations and/or are inherently longitudinal in nature (changing over time and measured dynamically at multiple time points. A multivariate approach for detecting interactions is thus greatly needed on the purposes of handling a multifaceted phenotype and longitudinal data, as well as improving statistical power for multiple significance testing via a two-stage testing procedure that involves a multivariate analysis for grouped phenotypes followed by univariate analysis for the phenotypes in the significant group(s. In this article, we propose a multivariate extension of generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR based on multivariate generalized linear, multivariate quasi-likelihood and generalized estimating equations models. Simulations and real data analysis for the cohort from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment are performed to investigate the properties and performance of the proposed method, as compared with the univariate method. The results suggest that the proposed multivariate GMDR substantially boosts statistical power.

  4. Detection of gene-environment interactions in the presence of linkage disequilibrium and noise by using genetic risk scores with internal weights from elastic net regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüls, Anke; Ickstadt, Katja; Schikowski, Tamara; Krämer, Ursula

    2017-06-12

    For the analysis of gene-environment (GxE) interactions commonly single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are used to characterize genetic susceptibility, an approach that mostly lacks power and has poor reproducibility. One promising approach to overcome this problem might be the use of weighted genetic risk scores (GRS), which are defined as weighted sums of risk alleles of gene variants. The gold-standard is to use external weights from published meta-analyses. In this study, we used internal weights from the marginal genetic effects of the SNPs estimated by a multivariate elastic net regression and thereby provided a method that can be used if there are no external weights available. We conducted a simulation study for the detection of GxE interactions and compared power and type I error of single SNPs analyses with Bonferroni correction and corresponding analysis with unweighted and our weighted GRS approach in scenarios with six risk SNPs and an increasing number of highly correlated (up to 210) and noise SNPs (up to 840). Applying weighted GRS increased the power enormously in comparison to the common single SNPs approach (e.g. 94.2% vs. 35.4%, respectively, to detect a weak interaction with an OR ≈ 1.04 for six uncorrelated risk SNPs and n = 700 with a well-controlled type I error). Furthermore, weighted GRS outperformed the unweighted GRS, in particular in the presence of SNPs without any effect on the phenotype (e.g. 90.1% vs. 43.9%, respectively, when 20 noise SNPs were added to the six risk SNPs). This outperforming of the weighted GRS was confirmed in a real data application on lung inflammation in the SALIA cohort (n = 402). However, in scenarios with a high number of noise SNPs (>200 vs. 6 risk SNPs), larger sample sizes are needed to avoid an increased type I error, whereas a high number of correlated SNPs can be handled even in small samples (e.g. n = 400). In conclusion, weighted GRS with weights from the marginal genetic effects of the

  5. Influence of 5-HTT variation, childhood trauma and self-efficacy on anxiety traits: a gene-environment-coping interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Miriam A; Ziegler, Christiane; Holitschke, Karoline; Schartner, Christoph; Schmidt, Brigitte; Weber, Heike; Reif, Andreas; Romanos, Marcel; Pauli, Paul; Zwanzger, Peter; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    Environmental vulnerability factors such as adverse childhood experiences in interaction with genetic risk variants, e.g., the serotonin transporter gene linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), are assumed to play a role in the development of anxiety and affective disorders. However, positive influences such as general self-efficacy (GSE) may exert a compensatory effect on genetic disposition, environmental adversity, and anxiety traits. We, thus, assessed childhood trauma (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, CTQ) and GSE in 678 adults genotyped for 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 and their interaction on agoraphobic cognitions (Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire, ACQ), social anxiety (Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, LSAS), and trait anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, STAI-T). The relationship between anxiety traits and childhood trauma was moderated by self-efficacy in 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 LALA genotype carriers: LALA probands maltreated as children showed high anxiety scores when self-efficacy was low, but low anxiety scores in the presence of high self-efficacy despite childhood maltreatment. Our results extend previous findings regarding anxiety-related traits showing an interactive relationship between 5-HTT genotype and adverse childhood experiences by suggesting coping-related measures to function as an additional dimension buffering the effects of a gene-environment risk constellation. Given that anxiety disorders manifest already early in childhood, this insight could contribute to the improvement of psychotherapeutic interventions by including measures strengthening self-efficacy and inform early targeted preventive interventions in at-risk populations, particularly within the crucial time window of childhood and adolescence.

  6. Gene-environment Interactions in Human Health: Case Studies and Strategies for developing new paradigms and research methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah L.C. Jackson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The synergistic effects of genes and the environment on health are explored in three case studies: adult lactase persistence, autism spectrum disorders, and the metabolic syndrome, providing examples of the interactive complexities underlying these phenotypes. Since the phenotypes are the initial targets of evolutionary processes, understanding the specific environmental contexts of the genetic, epigenetic, and proteomic changes associated with these phenotypes is essential in predicting their health implications. Robust databases must be developed on the local scale to deconstruct both the population substructure and the unique components of the environment that stimulate geographically-specific changes in gene expression patterns. To produce these databases and make valid predictions, new, locally-focused and information-dense models are needed that incorporate data on evolutionary ecology, environmental complexity, local geographic patterns of gene expression, and population substructure.

  7. Assessing clinical and functional outcomes in a gene-environment interaction study in first episode of psychosis (PEPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Miquel; Bioque, Miquel; Parellada, Mara; Saiz Ruiz, Jerónimo; Cuesta, Manuel J; Llerena, Adrián; Sanjuán, Julio; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Arango, Celso; Cabrera, Bibiana

    2013-01-01

    The PEPs study is a multicenter, naturalistic, prospective, longitudinal study designed to evaluate clinical, neuropsychological, neuroimaging, biochemical, environmental and pharmacogenetic variables in a sample of nearly 350 first episode of psychosis patients and 250 healthy controls. The PEPs project was conducted in Spain from January 2009 to December 2011. This article describes the rationale for the measurement approach adopted, providing an overview of the selected clinical and functional measures. The main objectives are: a) the thorough clinical and neurocognitive characterization of a sample of first episodes of psychosis, and b) the study of the interactions between the genetic and environmental variables selected to predict clinical and brain structural outcomes, and to determine the relationship of genetic polymorphisms involved in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and the responses and adverse effects of treatment. Copyright © 2012 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Urine cadmium levels and albuminuria in a general population from Spain: A gene-environment interaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau-Perez, Maria; Pichler, Gernot; Galan-Chilet, Inma; Briongos-Figuero, Laisa S; Rentero-Garrido, Pilar; Lopez-Izquierdo, Raul; Navas-Acien, Ana; Weaver, Virginia; García-Barrera, Tamara; Gomez-Ariza, Jose L; Martín-Escudero, Juan C; Chaves, F Javier; Redon, Josep; Tellez-Plaza, Maria

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of cadmium with genes involved in oxidative stress, cadmium metabolism and transport pathways on albuminuria can provide biological insight on the relationship between cadmium and albuminuria at low exposure levels. We tested the hypothesis that specific genotypes in candidate genes may confer increased susceptibility to cadmium exposure. Cadmium exposure was estimated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) in urine from 1397 men and women aged 18-85years participating in the Hortega Study, a representative sample of a general population from Spain. Urine albumin was measured by automated nephelometric immunochemistry. Abnormal albuminuria was defined as urine albumin greater than or equal to 30mg/g. The weighted prevalence of abnormal albuminuria was 6.3%. The median level of urine cadmium was 0.39 (IQR, 0.23-0.65) μg/g creatinine. Multivariable-adjusted geometric mean ratios of albuminuria comparing the two highest to the lowest tertile of urine cadmium were 1.62 (95% CI, 1.43-1.84) and 2.94 (95% CI, 2.58-3.35), respectively. The corresponding odds ratios of abnormal albuminuria were 1.58 (0.83, 3.02) and 4.54 (2.58, 8.00). The association between urine cadmium and albuminuria was observed across all participant subgroups evaluated including participants without hypertension, diabetes or chronic kidney disease. We observed Bonferroni-corrected statistically significant interactions between urine cadmium levels and polymorphisms in gene SLC30A7 and RAC1. Increasing urine cadmium concentrations were cross-sectionally associated with increased albuminuria in a representative sample of a general population from Spain. Genetic variation in oxidative stress and cadmium metabolism and transport genes may confer differential susceptibility to potential cadmium effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Gene-environment interactions in male reproductive health: special reference to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon J S Brokken

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, there have been numerous reports of adverse effects on the reproductive health of wildlife and laboratory animals caused by exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs. The increasing trends in human male reproductive disorders and the mounting evidence for causative environmental factors have therefore sparked growing interest in the health threat posed to humans by EDCs, which are substances in our food, environment and consumer items that interfere with hormone action, biosynthesis or metabolism, resulting in disrupted tissue homeostasis or reproductive function. The mechanisms of EDCs involve a wide array of actions and pathways. Examples include the estrogenic, androgenic, thyroid and retinoid pathways, in which the EDCs may act directly as agonists or antagonists, or indirectly via other nuclear receptors. Dioxins and dioxin-like EDCs exert their biological and toxicological actions through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon-receptor, which besides inducing transcription of detoxifying enzymes also regulates transcriptional activity of other nuclear receptors. There is increasing evidence that genetic predispositions may modify the susceptibility to adverse effects of toxic chemicals. In this review, potential consequences of hereditary predisposition and EDCs are discussed, with a special focus on the currently available publications on interactions between dioxin and androgen signaling.

  10. Paternal Aging Affects Behavior in Pax6 Mutant Mice: A Gene/Environment Interaction in Understanding Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaichi Yoshizaki

    Full Text Available Neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD have increased over the last few decades. These neurodevelopmental disorders are characterized by a complex etiology, which involves multiple genes and gene-environmental interactions. Various genes that control specific properties of neural development exert pivotal roles in the occurrence and severity of phenotypes associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. Moreover, paternal aging has been reported as one of the factors that contribute to the risk of ASD and ADHD. Here we report, for the first time, that paternal aging has profound effects on the onset of behavioral abnormalities in mice carrying a mutation of Pax6, a gene with neurodevelopmental regulatory functions. We adopted an in vitro fertilization approach to restrict the influence of additional factors. Comprehensive behavioral analyses were performed in Sey/+ mice (i.e., Pax6 mutant heterozygotes born from in vitro fertilization of sperm taken from young or aged Sey/+ fathers. No body weight changes were found in the four groups, i.e., Sey/+ and wild type (WT mice born to young or aged father. However, we found important differences in maternal separation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations of Sey/+ mice born from young father and in the level of hyperactivity of Sey/+ mice born from aged fathers in the open-field test, respectively, compared to WT littermates. Phenotypes of anxiety were observed in both genotypes born from aged fathers compared with those born from young fathers. No significant difference was found in social behavior and sensorimotor gating among the four groups. These results indicate that mice with a single genetic risk factor can develop different phenotypes depending on the paternal age. Our study advocates for serious considerations on the role of paternal aging in breeding strategies for animal studies.

  11. The role of genes involved in neuroplasticity and neurogenesis in the observation of a gene-environment interaction (GxE) in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Strat, Yann; Ramoz, Nicolas; Gorwood, Philip

    2009-05-01

    Schizophrenia is a multifactorial disease characterized by a high heritability. Several candidate genes have been suggested, with the strongest evidences for genes encoding dystrobrevin binding protein 1 (DTNBP1), neuregulin 1 (NRG1), neuregulin 1 receptor (ERBB4) and disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), as well as several neurotrophic factors. These genes are involved in neuronal plasticity and play also a role in adult neurogenesis. Therefore, the genetic basis of schizophrenia could involve different factors more or less specifically required for neuroplasticity, including the synapse maturation, potentiation and plasticity as well as neurogenesis. Following the model of Knudson in tumors, we propose a two-hit hypothesis of schizophrenia. In this model of gene-environment interaction, a variant in a gene related to neurogenesis is transmitted to the descent (first hit), and, secondarily, an environmental factor occurs during the development of the central nervous system (second hit). Both of these vulnerability and trigger factors are probably necessary to generate a deficit in neurogenesis and therefore to cause schizophrenia. The literature supporting this gene x environment hypothesis is reviewed, with emphasis on some molecular pathways, raising the possibility to propose more specific molecular medicine.

  12. Evidence of gene-environment interaction for two genes on chromosome 4 and environmental tobacco smoke in controlling the risk of nonsyndromic cleft palate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wu

    Full Text Available Nonsyndromic cleft palate (CP is one of the most common human birth defects and both genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to its etiology. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS using 550 CP case-parent trios ascertained in an international consortium. Stratified analysis among trios with different ancestries was performed to test for GxE interactions with common maternal exposures using conditional logistic regression models. While no single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP achieved genome-wide significance when considered alone, markers in SLC2A9 and the neighboring WDR1 on chromosome 4p16.1 gave suggestive evidence of gene-environment interaction with environmental tobacco smoke (ETS among 259 Asian trios when the models included a term for GxE interaction. Multiple SNPs in these two genes were associated with increased risk of nonsyndromic CP if the mother was exposed to ETS during the peri-conceptual period (3 months prior to conception through the first trimester. When maternal ETS was considered, fifteen of 135 SNPs mapping to SLC2A9 and 9 of 59 SNPs in WDR1 gave P values approaching genome-wide significance (10(-6interaction. SNPs rs3733585 and rs12508991 in SLC2A9 yielded P = 2.26×10(-7 in a test for GxETS interaction. SNPs rs6820756 and rs7699512 in WDR1 also yielded P = 1.79×10(-7 and P = 1.98×10(-7 in a 1 df test for GxE interaction. Although further replication studies are critical to confirming these findings, these results illustrate how genetic associations for nonsyndromic CP can be missed if potential GxE interaction is not taken into account, and this study suggest SLC2A9 and WDR1 should be considered as candidate genes for CP.

  13. The interaction between smoking and HLA genes in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedström, Anna Karin; Katsoulis, Michail; Hössjer, Ola

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between environment and genetics may contribute to multiple sclerosis (MS) development. We investigated whether the previously observed interaction between smoking and HLA genotype in the Swedish population could be replicated, refined and extended to include other populations. We used...... populations from the Nordic studies (6265 cases, 8401 controls). In both the pooled analyses and in the combined Nordic material, interactions were observed between HLA-DRB*15 and absence of HLA-A*02 and between smoking and each of the genetic risk factors. Two way interactions were observed between each...... with never smokers without these genetic risk factors (OR 12.7, 95% CI 10.8-14.9). The risk of MS associated with HLA genotypes is strongly influenced by smoking status and vice versa. Since the function of HLA molecules is to present peptide antigens to T cells, the demonstrated interactions strongly...

  14. Gene-environment interactions associated with CYP1A1 MspI and GST polymorphisms and the risk of upper aerodigestive tract cancers in an Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Soya Sisy; Thomas, Vinod; Reddy, K S; Surianarayanan, Gopalakrishnan; Chandrasekaran, Adithan

    2010-06-01

    Genetic risk to tobacco related cancers are associated with polymorphisms in CYP1A1 and GST, which are involved in the metabolic activation and detoxification of carcinogens. The genetic variations in these drug-metabolizing enzymes may alter the susceptibility to UADT cancers triggered by environmental exposures. The hospital-based case-control study evaluated the impact of combined CYP1A1 MspI and GST (M1 & T1) polymorphisms among the individuals exposed to environmental risk factors as modulators in the risk of UADT cancers in Tamilians, a population of south India. The unrelated histopathologically confirmed 408 cases and 220 population-based controls matched by age and gender were genotyped for CYP1A1 MspI, GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms using PCR based methods. To investigate the potential gene-environment interactions, analyses were carried out stratifying by smoking and tobacco chewing status using SPSS software. The combination of genes and environment interactions by stratified analyses revealed significant interactions among the habitual tobacco smokers (CYP1A1 MspI & GSTM1 null: OR 14.06; 95% CI 3.90-50.68, CYP1A1 MspI & GSTT1 null: OR 33.28; 95% CI 4.24-261.19) and tobacco chewers (CYP1A1 MspI & GSTM1 null: OR 20.51; 95% CI 6.77-62.13, CYP1A1 MspI & GSTT1 null: OR 79.35; 95% CI 10.40-605.55) on the multiplicative scale. Our findings have indicated that the individuals polymorphic for CYP1A1 MspI either with GSTM1 null or with GSTT1 null genotypes revealed an increased risk for UADT cancers than that ascribed to a single susceptible gene among the tobacco users in the population [single gene risk among smokers and chewers, respectively, for CYP1A1 MspI (OR 6.43; 95% CI 3.69-11.21); (OR 10.24; 95% CI 5.95-17.60), GSTM1*0 (OR 3.77; 95% CI 1.94-7.37); (OR 7.97 95% CI 4.10-15.76) and GSTT1*0 (OR 6.95 95% CI 2.88-16.77); (OR 25.83 95% CI 7.78-85.76).

  15. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilthey, Alexander T; Xifara, Dionysia K; Ban, Maria; Shah, Tejas S; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Alfredsson, Lars; Anderson, Carl A; Attfield, Katherine E; Baranzini, Sergio E; Barrett, Jeffrey; Binder, Thomas M C; Booth, David; Buck, Dorothea; Celius, Elisabeth G; Cotsapas, Chris; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Dendrou, Calliope A; Donnelly, Peter; Dubois, Bénédicte; Fontaine, Bertrand; Fugger, Lars; Goris, An; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Graetz, Christiane; Hemmer, Bernhard; Hillert, Jan; Kockum, Ingrid; Leslie, Stephen; Lill, Christina M; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Olsson, Tomas; Oturai, Annette; Saarela, Janna; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Spurkland, Anne; Taylor, Bruce; Winkelmann, Juliane; Zipp, Frauke; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Spencer, Chris C A; Stewart, Graeme; Hafler, David A; Ivinson, Adrian J; Harbo, Hanne F; Hauser, Stephen L; De Jager, Philip L; Compston, Alastair; McCauley, Jacob L; Sawcer, Stephen; McVean, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Association studies have greatly refined the understanding of how variation within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes influences risk of multiple sclerosis. However, the extent to which major effects are modulated by interactions is poorly characterized. We analyzed high-density SNP data on 17,465 cases and 30,385 controls from 11 cohorts of European ancestry, in combination with imputation of classical HLA alleles, to build a high-resolution map of HLA genetic risk and assess the evidence for interactions involving classical HLA alleles. Among new and previously identified class II risk alleles (HLA-DRB1*15:01, HLA-DRB1*13:03, HLA-DRB1*03:01, HLA-DRB1*08:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:02) and class I protective alleles (HLA-A*02:01, HLA-B*44:02, HLA-B*38:01 and HLA-B*55:01), we find evidence for two interactions involving pairs of class II alleles: HLA-DQA1*01:01–HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:01–HLA-DQB1*03:02. We find no evidence for interactions between classical HLA alleles and non-HLA risk-associated variants and estimate a minimal effect of polygenic epistasis in modulating major risk alleles. PMID:26343388

  16. Gene-environment interactions on the risk of esophageal cancer among Asian populations with the G48A polymorphism in the alcohol dehydrogenase-2 gene: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long; Jiang, Yingjiu; Wu, Qingcheng; Li, Qiang; Chen, Dan; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Min; Ye, Ling

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the gene-environment interactions between the G48A polymorphism in the alcohol dehydrogenase-2 (ADH2) gene and environmental factors in determining the risk of esophageal cancer (EC). A literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar databases to indentify eligible studies published before November 1, 2013. We performed a meta-analysis of 18 case-control studies with a total of 8,906 EC patients and 13,712 controls. The overall analysis suggested that individuals with the GG genotype were associated with a 2.77-fold increased risk of EC, compared with carriers of the GA and AA genotypes. In a stratified analysis by ethnic group, Japanese, Mainland Chinese, and Taiwan Chinese with the GG genotype had a significantly higher risk of EC, compared with Thai and Iranian populations, indicating ethnic variance in EC susceptibility. An analysis of combined effect indicated that GG genotype of ADH2 G48A was associated with the highest risk of EC in heavy drinkers and smokers. A striking difference was found to exist between males and females, showing gender variance for the association between ADH2 G48A and EC risk. This meta-analysis shows that the GG genotype of ADH2 G48A may be associated with an increased risk of EC in Asian populations. In addition, significant gene-environment interactions were found. Heavy drinkers, smokers, and males with the GG genotype may have a higher EC risk. Thus, our results shed new light on the complex gene-environment interactions that exist between environmental factors and ADH2 G48A polymorphism in EC risk.

  17. Genes, Environment, and Human Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Mark V.; Cutter, Mary Ann; Davidson, Ronald; Dougherty, Michael J.; Drexler, Edward; Gelernter, Joel; McCullough, Laurence B.; McInerney, Joseph D.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Vogler, George P.; Zola, John

    This curriculum module explores genes, environment, and human behavior. This book provides materials to teach about the nature and methods of studying human behavior, raise some of the ethical and public policy dilemmas emerging from the Human Genome Project, and provide professional development for teachers. An extensive Teacher Background…

  18. Impact of variation in the BDNF gene on social stress sensitivity and the buffering impact of positive emotions: replication and extension of a gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Winkel, Mark; Peeters, Frenk; van Winkel, Ruud; Kenis, Gunter; Collip, Dina; Geschwind, Nicole; Jacobs, Nele; Derom, Catherine; Thiery, Evert; van Os, Jim; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Wichers, Marieke

    2014-06-01

    A previous study reported that social stress sensitivity is moderated by the brain-derived-neurotrophic-factor(Val66Met) (BDNF rs6265) genotype. Additionally, positive emotions partially neutralize this moderating effect. The current study aimed to: (i) replicate in a new independent sample of subjects with residual depressive symptoms the moderating effect of BDNF(Val66Met) genotype on social stress sensitivity, (ii) replicate the neutralizing impact of positive emotions, (iii) extend these analyses to other variations in the BDNF gene in the new independent sample and the original sample of non-depressed individuals. Previous findings were replicated in an experience sampling method (ESM) study. Negative Affect (NA) responses to social stress were stronger in "Val/Met" carriers of BDNF(Val66Met) compared to "Val/Val" carriers. Positive emotions neutralized the moderating effect of BDNF(Val66Met) genotype on social stress sensitivity in a dose-response fashion. Finally, two of four additional BDNF SNPs (rs11030101, rs2049046) showed similar moderating effects on social stress-sensitivity across both samples. The neutralizing effect of positive emotions on the moderating effects of these two additional SNPs was found in one sample. In conclusion, ESM has important advantages in gene-environment (GxE) research and may attribute to more consistent findings in future GxE research. This study shows how the impact of BDNF genetic variation on depressive symptoms may be explained by its impact on subtle daily life responses to social stress. Further, it shows that the generation of positive affect (PA) can buffer social stress sensitivity and partially undo the genetic susceptibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic loci for serum magnesium among African-Americans and gene-environment interaction at MUC1 and TRPM6 in European-Americans: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tin, Adrienne; Köttgen, Anna; Folsom, Aaron R; Maruthur, Nisa M; Tajuddin, Salman M; Nalls, Mike A; Evans, Michele K; Zonderman, Alan B; Friedrich, Christopher A; Boerwinkle, Eric; Coresh, Josef; Kao, Wen Hong Linda

    2015-05-29

    Low serum magnesium levels have been associated with multiple chronic diseases. The regulation of serum magnesium homeostasis is not well understood. A previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) of European ancestry (EA) populations identified nine loci for serum magnesium. No such study has been conducted in African-Americans, nor has there been an evaluation of the interaction of magnesium-associated SNPs with environmental factors. The goals of this study were to identify genetic loci associated with serum magnesium in an African-American (AA) population using both genome-wide and candidate region interrogation approaches and to evaluate gene-environment interaction for the magnesium-associated variants in both EA and AA populations. We conducted a GWAS of serum magnesium in 2737 AA participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study and interrogated the regions of the nine published candidate loci in these results. Literature search identified the influence of progesterone on MUC1 expression and insulin on TRPM6 expression. The GWAS approach in African-American participants identified a locus near MUC1 as genome-wide significant (rs2974937, beta=-0.013, p=6.1x10(-9)). The candidate region interrogation approach identified two of the nine loci previously discovered in EA populations as containing SNPs that were significantly associated in African-American participants (SHROOM3 and TRPM6). The index variants at these three loci together explained 2.8 % of the variance in serum magnesium concentration in ARIC African-American participants. On the test of gene-environment interaction in ARIC EA participants, the index variant at MUC1 had 2.5 times stronger association in postmenopausal women with progestin use (beta=-0.028, p=7.3x10(-5)) than in those without any hormone use (beta=-0.011, p=7.0x10(-8), p for interaction 0.03). At TRPM6, the index variant had 1.6 times stronger association in those with lower fasting insulin levels (African

  20. A "candidate-interactome" aggregate analysis of genome-wide association data in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mechelli, Rosella; Umeton, Renato; Policano, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    , may be representative of gene-environment interactions of potential, uncertain or unlikely relevance for multiple sclerosis pathogenesis: Epstein-Barr virus, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, cytomegalovirus, HHV8-Kaposi sarcoma, H1N1-influenza, JC virus, human innate...

  1. The changing demographic pattern of multiple sclerosis epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2010-01-01

    The uneven distribution of multiple sclerosis (MS) across populations can be attributed to differences in genes and the environment and their interaction. Prevalence and incidence surveys could be affected by inaccuracy of diagnosis and ascertainment, and prevalence also depends on survival. Thes...... into gene-environment and gene-gene interactions complicate interpretations of demographic epidemiology and have made obsolete the idea of simple causative associations between genes or the environment and MS....

  2. Gene-environment interaction affects substance P and neurokinin A in the entorhinal cortex and periaqueductal grey in a genetic animal model of depression: implications for the pathophysiology of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husum, Henriette; Wörtwein, Gitta; Andersson, Weronika

    2008-01-01

    Evidence implies a role for corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and tachykinins, e.g. substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) in the pathophysiology of depression. We have previously shown that SP- and NKA-like immunoreactivity (-LI) concentrations were altered in the frontal cortex and striatum...... of the congenitally 'depressed' Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) compared to the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) control rats. It is also known that environmental stress may affect brain levels of tachykinins. In view of these results we decided to superimpose maternal deprivation, an early life environmental stressor......, onto the genetically predisposed 'depressed' FSL rats and the FRL control rats and use this paradigm as a model of gene-environment interaction. The adult animals were sacrificed, adrenal glands and brains dissected out and SP-, NKA- and CRH-LI levels were determined in ten discrete brain regions...

  3. Does accounting for gene-environment (GxE) interaction increase the power to detect the effect of a gene in a multifactorial disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinger-Leneman, Hana; Genin, Emmanuelle; Norris, Jill M; Khlat, Myriam

    2003-04-01

    Despite tremendous efforts, few genes involved in the susceptibility for complex disorders have been identified. One explanation is that these disorders are a result of an interaction between genes and environment, and under such conditions, it may be difficult to measure the true genetic effect without accounting for the interaction. Umbach and Weinberg ([2000] Am. J. Hum. Genet. 66:251-261) proposed an association test which looks at the joint effects of genotype and environment, using case-parent trios. In this study, we explore under which conditions accounting for GxE interaction enhances one's ability to detect the role of genetic factors in complex diseases. Using asymptotic power calculations, we investigate the power to detect the gene effect over varying exposure frequencies and different scenarios of GxE interaction. We show that for a given sample size, interaction scenario, and allele frequency, the actual gain in power while accounting for the interaction depends on the magnitude of the exposure frequency: the largest gains are seen for relatively low exposure frequencies. Moreover, a loss of power can be observed when the exposure is frequent and/or the exposure effect is strong. If we consider a gene with a disease allele frequency of 0.2, with no effect in the absence of exposure, an exposure with a 10-fold increase risk and a GxE relative risk of 2, then when the exposure frequency is 0.1, accounting for GxE interaction increases the power to detect the gene effect in 200 trios by 10%; alternatively, when the exposure frequency is 0.9, it decreases the power by 15%. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Genome-wide gene-environment study identifies glutamate receptor gene GRIN2A as a Parkinson's disease modifier gene via interaction with coffee.

    OpenAIRE

    Taye H Hamza; Honglei Chen; Erin M Hill-Burns; Shannon L Rhodes; Jennifer Montimurro; Denise M Kay; Albert Tenesa; Victoria I Kusel; Patricia Sheehan; Muthukrishnan Eaaswarkhanth; Dora Yearout; Ali Samii; John W Roberts; Pinky Agarwal; Yvette Bordelon

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to identify genes that influence the inverse association of coffee with the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). We used genome-wide genotype data and lifetime caffeinated-coffee-consumption data on 1,458 persons with PD and 931 without PD from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium (NGRC), and we performed a genome-wide association and interaction study (GWAIS), testing each SNP's main-effect plus its interaction with coffee, adjusting for sex, age, and two principal compo...

  5. Gene-gene-environment interactions between drugs, transporters, receptors, and metabolizing enzymes: Statins, SLCO1B1, and CYP3A4 as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadee, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    Pharmacogenetic biomarker tests include mostly specific single gene-drug pairs, capable of accounting for a portion of interindividual variability in drug response and toxicity. However, multiple genes are likely to contribute, either acting independently or epistatically, with the CYP2C9-VKORC1-warfarin test panel, an example of a clinically used gene-gene-dug interaction. I discuss here further instances of gene-gene-drug interactions, including a proposed dynamic effect on statin therapy by genetic variants in both a transporter (SLCO1B1) and a metabolizing enzyme (CYP3A4) in liver cells, the main target site where statins block cholesterol synthesis. These examples set a conceptual framework for developing diagnostic panels involving multiple gene-drug combinations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [Application of multifactor dimensionality reduction on the interactions between gene-gene, gene-environment and the risk sporadic colorectal cancer in Chinese population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ming-Juan; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Shuang-Shuang; Zhang, Yong-Jing; Xu, Mei; Ma, Xin-Yuan; Yao, Kai-Yan; Chen, Kun

    2008-06-01

    To identify the association between risk of sporadic colorectal cancer and the common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repairs genes, gene to gene interactions among them and their gene to environment interactions with common environmental factors. In this population-based case-control study, 206 primary colorectal cancer cases and 845 cancer-free healthy controls were enrolled. Genotyping was carried out using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique, with the status of subjects case or controls unknown. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) and logistic analysis were both used for association analysis. As compared to the younger age group (> or = 42, or = 61 years) increased significantly (OR = 2.04, 95% CI: 1.49-2.80). Similar result was observed in the family cancer history (OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.05-2.17). However, no significant association between any single DNA repair gene SNP and colorectal cancer risk was discovered. Results from MDR analysis only showed a significant interaction among the four following factors: age, alcohol drinking, XRCC1 Arg194Trp and OGG1 Ser326Cys (the cross-validation consistency = 10/10, the average testing accuracy = 0.616, P = 0.011). Using a logistic regression model, the "high-risk" individuals had a significantly elevated risk of colorectal cancer compared to those "low- risk" individuals classified by the above MDR model (OR = 2.72, 95% CI: 1.66-4.47). The impact of polymorphisms in DNA repair genes on the risk of sporadic colorectal cancer exhibited a low-penetrance characteristics while the intricate interactions existing among them and with environmental factors.

  7. Current research trends in early life stress and depression: review of human studies on sensitive periods, gene-environment interactions, and epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Christine; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2012-01-01

    Early life stress, such as childhood abuse, neglect and loss, is a well established major risk factor for developing depressive disorders later in life. We here summarize and discuss current developments in human research regarding the link between early life stress and depression. Specifically, we review the evidence for the existence of sensitive periods for the adverse effects of early life stress in humans. We further review the current state of knowledge regarding gene×environment (G×E) interactions in the effects of early life stress. While multiple genes operate in multiple environments to induce risk for depression after early life stress, these same genes also seem to enhance the beneficial effects of a positive early environment. Also, we discuss the epigenetic mechanisms that might underlie these G×E interactions. Finally, we discuss the potential importance of identifying sensitive time periods of opportunity, as well as G×E interactions and epigenetic mechanisms, for early interventions that might prevent or reverse the detrimental outcomes of early life stress and its transmission across generations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Gene-environment interaction in the onset of eczema in infancy: filaggrin loss-of-function mutations enhanced by neonatal cat exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Bisgaard

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Loss-of-function variants in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG are major determinants of eczema. We hypothesized that weakening of the physical barrier in FLG-deficient individuals may potentiate the effect of environmental exposures. Therefore, we investigated whether there is an interaction between FLG loss-of-function mutations with environmental exposures (pets and dust mites in relation to the development of eczema. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used data obtained in early life in a high-risk birth cohort in Denmark and replicated the findings in an unselected birth cohort in the United Kingdom. Primary outcome was age of onset of eczema; environmental exposures included pet ownership and mite and pet allergen levels. In Copenhagen (n = 379, FLG mutation increased the risk of eczema during the first year of life (hazard ratio [HR] 2.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-4.00, p = 0.005, with a further increase in risk related to cat exposure at birth amongst children with FLG mutation (HR 11.11, 95% CI 3.79-32.60, p < 0.0001; dog exposure was moderately protective (HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.24-1.01, p = 0.05, but not related to FLG genotype. In Manchester (n = 503 an independent and significant association of the development of eczema by age 12 mo with FLG genotype was confirmed (HR 1.95, 95% CI 1.13-3.36, p = 0.02. In addition, the risk increased because of the interaction of cat ownership at birth and FLG genotype (HR 3.82, 95% CI 1.35-10.81, p = 0.01, with no significant effect of the interaction with dog ownership (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.16-2.20, p = 0.43. Mite-allergen had no effects in either cohort. The observed effects were independent of sensitisation. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated a significant interaction between FLG loss-of-function main mutations (501x and 2282del4 and cat ownership at birth on the development of early-life eczema in two independent birth cohorts. Our data suggest that cat but not dog ownership substantially

  9. SLC6A1 gene involvement in susceptibility to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A case-control study and gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fang-Fen; Gu, Xue; Huang, Xin; Zhong, Yan; Wu, Jing

    2017-07-03

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is an early onset childhood neurodevelopmental disorder with an estimated heritability of approximately 76%. We conducted a case-control study to explore the role of the SLC6A1 gene in ADHD. The genotypes of eight variants were determined using Sequenom MassARRAY technology. The participants in the study were 302 children with ADHD and 411 controls. ADHD symptoms were assessed using the Conners Parent Symptom Questionnaire. In our study, rs2944366 was consistently shown to be associated with the ADHD risk in the dominant model (odds ratio [OR]=0.554, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.404-0.760), and nominally associated with Hyperactive index score (P=0.027). In addition, rs1170695 has been found to be associated with the ADHD risk in the addictive model (OR=1.457, 95%CI=1.173-1.809), while rs9990174 was associated with the Hyperactive index score (P=0.010). Intriguingly, gene-environmental interactions analysis consistently revealed the potential interactions of rs1170695 with blood lead (P mul =0.044) to modify the ADHD risk. Expression quantitative trait loci analysis suggested that these positive single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may mediate SLC6A1 gene expression. Therefore, our results suggest that selected SLC6A1 gene variants may have a significant effect on the ADHD risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chronic exposure of mutant DISC1 mice to lead produces sex-dependent abnormalities consistent with schizophrenia and related mental disorders: a gene-environment interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazyan, Bagrat; Dziedzic, Jenifer; Hua, Kegang; Abazyan, Sofya; Yang, Chunxia; Mori, Susumu; Pletnikov, Mikhail V; Guilarte, Tomas R

    2014-05-01

    The glutamatergic hypothesis of schizophrenia suggests that hypoactivity of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is an important factor in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and related mental disorders. The environmental neurotoxicant, lead (Pb(2+)), is a potent and selective antagonist of the NMDAR. Recent human studies have suggested an association between prenatal Pb(2+) exposure and the increased likelihood of schizophrenia later in life, possibly via interacting with genetic risk factors. In order to test this hypothesis, we examined the neurobehavioral consequences of interaction between Pb(2+) exposure and mutant disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (mDISC1), a risk factor for major psychiatric disorders. Mutant DISC1 and control mice born by the same dams were raised and maintained on a regular diet or a diet containing moderate levels of Pb(2+). Chronic, lifelong exposure of mDISC1 mice to Pb(2+) was not associated with gross developmental abnormalities but produced sex-dependent hyperactivity, exaggerated responses to the NMDAR antagonist, MK-801, mildly impaired prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle, and enlarged lateral ventricles. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that environmental toxins could contribute to the pathogenesis of mental disease in susceptible individuals.

  11. A proposal for a new multiaxial model of psychiatric diagnosis. A continuum-based patient model derived from evolutionary developmental gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Hoyle

    2009-01-01

    To review recent genetic and neuroscientific research on psychiatric syndromes based on the current diagnostic scheme, and develop a better-fitting multiaxial patient-oriented diagnostic model. DSM I, published in 1952, considered psychiatric illnesses as reactions or extremes of adaptations of the patient's personality to stressful environmental demands. Personality itself was determined by constitution and psychodynamic development. In 1980, this continuum model gave way to an atheoretical categorical diagnostic scheme (DSM III), based on research diagnostic criteria for obtaining 'pure cultures' of patients for biological research. Subsequent research using the 'pure cultures' suggests that psychiatric syndromes represent a phenotypic continuum determined by genes, childhood traumas, and recent stress, mitigated by childhood nurturance, education, and current social support. Specific gene x childhood abuse x recent stress interactions have been discovered, which may serve as a model of how interacting vulnerability genes may or may not result in a psychiatric syndrome, depending on the individual's developmental history and current stress. A continuum model is proposed, with genes interacting with early experiences of stress or nurturance resulting in brain states that may evince minor but persistent symptoms (neurosis) or maladaptive patterns of behavior (personality disorder). The addition of recent or current stress may precipitate a major psychiatric syndrome. While a severe genetic predisposition, such as a mutation, may be sufficient to cause a major syndrome, major psychiatric syndromes are best conceptualized as dysregulation of evolutionarily adaptive brain functions, such as anxiety and vigilance. A new multiaxial model of psychiatric diagnosis is proposed based on this model: axis I for phenomenological diagnoses that include major psychiatric syndromes (e.g. depressive syndrome, psychosis), neuroses, personality disorders, and isolated symptoms; axis

  12. Genome-wide gene-environment study identifies glutamate receptor gene GRIN2A as a Parkinson's disease modifier gene via interaction with coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Taye H; Chen, Honglei; Hill-Burns, Erin M; Rhodes, Shannon L; Montimurro, Jennifer; Kay, Denise M; Tenesa, Albert; Kusel, Victoria I; Sheehan, Patricia; Eaaswarkhanth, Muthukrishnan; Yearout, Dora; Samii, Ali; Roberts, John W; Agarwal, Pinky; Bordelon, Yvette; Park, Yikyung; Wang, Liyong; Gao, Jianjun; Vance, Jeffery M; Kendler, Kenneth S; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Scott, William K; Ritz, Beate; Nutt, John; Factor, Stewart A; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Payami, Haydeh

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to identify genes that influence the inverse association of coffee with the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). We used genome-wide genotype data and lifetime caffeinated-coffee-consumption data on 1,458 persons with PD and 931 without PD from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium (NGRC), and we performed a genome-wide association and interaction study (GWAIS), testing each SNP's main-effect plus its interaction with coffee, adjusting for sex, age, and two principal components. We then stratified subjects as heavy or light coffee-drinkers and performed genome-wide association study (GWAS) in each group. We replicated the most significant SNP. Finally, we imputed the NGRC dataset, increasing genomic coverage to examine the region of interest in detail. The primary analyses (GWAIS, GWAS, Replication) were performed using genotyped data. In GWAIS, the most significant signal came from rs4998386 and the neighboring SNPs in GRIN2A. GRIN2A encodes an NMDA-glutamate-receptor subunit and regulates excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Achieving P(2df) = 10(-6), GRIN2A surpassed all known PD susceptibility genes in significance in the GWAIS. In stratified GWAS, the GRIN2A signal was present in heavy coffee-drinkers (OR = 0.43; P = 6×10(-7)) but not in light coffee-drinkers. The a priori Replication hypothesis that "Among heavy coffee-drinkers, rs4998386_T carriers have lower PD risk than rs4998386_CC carriers" was confirmed: OR(Replication) = 0.59, P(Replication) = 10(-3); OR(Pooled) = 0.51, P(Pooled) = 7×10(-8). Compared to light coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype, heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype had 18% lower risk (P = 3×10(-3)), whereas heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_TC genotype had 59% lower risk (P = 6×10(-13)). Imputation revealed a block of SNPs that achieved P(2df)coffee-drinkers. This study is proof of concept that inclusion of environmental factors can help identify

  13. UCP2 and UCP3 variants and gene-environment interaction associated with prediabetes and T2DM in a rural population: a case control study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Meifang; Chen, Xiaoying; Chen, Yue; Wang, Congyun; Li, Songtao; Ying, Xuhua; Xiao, Tian; Wang, Na; Jiang, Qingwu; Fu, Chaowei

    2018-03-12

    There are disparities for the association between uncoupling proteins (UCP) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The study was to examine the associations of genetic variants of UCP2 and UCP3 with prediabetes and T2DM in a rural Chinese population. A population-based case-control study of 397 adults with T2DM, 394 with prediabetes and 409 with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) was carried out in 2014 in a rural community in eastern China. Three groups were identified through a community survey and the prediabetes and NGT groups were frequently matched by age and gender with the T2DM group and they were not relatives of T2DM subjects. With r 2  ≥ 0.8 and minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥0.05 for tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with potential function, three (rs660339, rs45560234 and rs643064) and six (rs7930460, rs15763, rs647126, rs1800849, rs3781907 and rs1685356) SNPs were selected respectively for UCP2 and UCP3 and genotyped in real time using the MassARRAY system (Sequenom; USA). The haplotypes, gene-environmental interaction and association between genetic variants of UCP2 and UCP3 and prediabetes or T2DM were explored. There were no significant differences in age and sex among three study groups. After the adjustment for possible covariates, the A allele of rs1800849 in UCP3 was significantly associated with prediabetes (aOR AA vs GG  = 1.68, 95% CI: 1.02-2.78), and the association was also significant under the recessive model (aOR AA vs GA + GG  = 1.64, 95% CI: 1.02-2.66). Also, rs15763 was found to be marginally significantly associated with T2DM under dominant model (OR GA + AA vs GG  = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.52-1.03, P = 0.072). No haplotype was significantly associated with prediabetes or T2DM. Multiplicative interactions for rs660339-overweight on T2DM were observed. In addition, the AA genotype of rs660339 was associated with an increased risk of T2DM in overweight subjects (OR = 1.48, 95%CI: 0.87-2.52) but with a decreased

  14. Peer deviance, parental divorce, and genetic risk in the prediction of drug abuse in a nationwide Swedish sample: evidence of environment-environment and gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Ohlsson, Henrik; Sundquist, Kristina; Sundquist, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Peer deviance (PD) strongly predicts externalizing psychopathologic conditions but has not been previously assessable in population cohorts. We sought to develop such an index of PD and to clarify its effects on risk of drug abuse (DA). To examine how strongly PD increases the risk of DA and whether this community-level liability indicator interacts with key DA risk factors at the individual and family levels. Studies of future DA registration in 1,401,698 Swedish probands born from January 1, 1970, through December 31, 1985, and their adolescent peers in approximately 9200 small community areas. Peer deviance was defined as the proportion of individuals born within 5 years of the proband living in the same small community when the proband was 15 years old who eventually were registered for DA. Drug abuse recorded in medical, legal, or pharmacy registry records. Peer deviance was associated with future DA in the proband, with rates of DA in older and male peers more strongly predictive than in younger or female peers. The predictive power of PD was only slightly attenuated by adding measures of community deprivation, collective efficacy, or family socioeconomic status. Probands whose parents were divorced were more sensitive to the pathogenic effects of high PD environments. A robust positive interaction was also seen between genetic risk of DA (indexed by rates of DA in first-, second-, and third-degree relatives) and PD exposure. With sufficient data, PD can be measured in populations and strongly predicts DA. In a nationwide sample, risk factors at the level of the individual (genetic vulnerability), family (parental loss), and community (PD) contribute substantially to risk of DA. Individuals at elevated DA risk because of parental divorce or high genetic liability are more sensitive to the pathogenic effects of PD. Although the effect of our PD measure on DA liability cannot be explained by standard measures of community or family risk, we cannot, with

  15. Genome-Wide Gene-Environment Study Identifies Glutamate Receptor Gene GRIN2A as a Parkinson's Disease Modifier Gene via Interaction with Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Taye H.; Chen, Honglei; Hill-Burns, Erin M.; Rhodes, Shannon L.; Montimurro, Jennifer; Kay, Denise M.; Tenesa, Albert; Kusel, Victoria I.; Sheehan, Patricia; Eaaswarkhanth, Muthukrishnan; Yearout, Dora; Samii, Ali; Roberts, John W.; Agarwal, Pinky; Bordelon, Yvette; Park, Yikyung; Wang, Liyong; Gao, Jianjun; Vance, Jeffery M.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Scott, William K.; Ritz, Beate; Nutt, John; Factor, Stewart A.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Payami, Haydeh

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to identify genes that influence the inverse association of coffee with the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). We used genome-wide genotype data and lifetime caffeinated-coffee-consumption data on 1,458 persons with PD and 931 without PD from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium (NGRC), and we performed a genome-wide association and interaction study (GWAIS), testing each SNP's main-effect plus its interaction with coffee, adjusting for sex, age, and two principal components. We then stratified subjects as heavy or light coffee-drinkers and performed genome-wide association study (GWAS) in each group. We replicated the most significant SNP. Finally, we imputed the NGRC dataset, increasing genomic coverage to examine the region of interest in detail. The primary analyses (GWAIS, GWAS, Replication) were performed using genotyped data. In GWAIS, the most significant signal came from rs4998386 and the neighboring SNPs in GRIN2A. GRIN2A encodes an NMDA-glutamate-receptor subunit and regulates excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Achieving P2df = 10−6, GRIN2A surpassed all known PD susceptibility genes in significance in the GWAIS. In stratified GWAS, the GRIN2A signal was present in heavy coffee-drinkers (OR = 0.43; P = 6×10−7) but not in light coffee-drinkers. The a priori Replication hypothesis that “Among heavy coffee-drinkers, rs4998386_T carriers have lower PD risk than rs4998386_CC carriers” was confirmed: ORReplication = 0.59, PReplication = 10−3; ORPooled = 0.51, PPooled = 7×10−8. Compared to light coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype, heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype had 18% lower risk (P = 3×10−3), whereas heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_TC genotype had 59% lower risk (P = 6×10−13). Imputation revealed a block of SNPs that achieved P2dfcoffee-drinkers. This study is proof of concept that inclusion of environmental factors can help identify genes that

  16. Genome-wide gene-environment study identifies glutamate receptor gene GRIN2A as a Parkinson's disease modifier gene via interaction with coffee.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taye H Hamza

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to identify genes that influence the inverse association of coffee with the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD. We used genome-wide genotype data and lifetime caffeinated-coffee-consumption data on 1,458 persons with PD and 931 without PD from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium (NGRC, and we performed a genome-wide association and interaction study (GWAIS, testing each SNP's main-effect plus its interaction with coffee, adjusting for sex, age, and two principal components. We then stratified subjects as heavy or light coffee-drinkers and performed genome-wide association study (GWAS in each group. We replicated the most significant SNP. Finally, we imputed the NGRC dataset, increasing genomic coverage to examine the region of interest in detail. The primary analyses (GWAIS, GWAS, Replication were performed using genotyped data. In GWAIS, the most significant signal came from rs4998386 and the neighboring SNPs in GRIN2A. GRIN2A encodes an NMDA-glutamate-receptor subunit and regulates excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Achieving P(2df = 10(-6, GRIN2A surpassed all known PD susceptibility genes in significance in the GWAIS. In stratified GWAS, the GRIN2A signal was present in heavy coffee-drinkers (OR = 0.43; P = 6×10(-7 but not in light coffee-drinkers. The a priori Replication hypothesis that "Among heavy coffee-drinkers, rs4998386_T carriers have lower PD risk than rs4998386_CC carriers" was confirmed: OR(Replication = 0.59, P(Replication = 10(-3; OR(Pooled = 0.51, P(Pooled = 7×10(-8. Compared to light coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype, heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype had 18% lower risk (P = 3×10(-3, whereas heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_TC genotype had 59% lower risk (P = 6×10(-13. Imputation revealed a block of SNPs that achieved P(2df<5×10(-8 in GWAIS, and OR = 0.41, P = 3×10(-8 in heavy coffee-drinkers. This study is proof of

  17. Witnessing Substance Use and Same-Day Antisocial Behavior among At-Risk Adolescents: Gene-Environment Interaction in a 30-Day Ecological Momentary Assessment Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Michael A.; Wang, Lin; Odgers, Candice L.

    2017-01-01

    Many young adolescents are embedded in neighborhoods, schools, and homes where alcohol and drugs are frequently used. However, little is known about (a) how witnessing others’ substance use affects adolescents in their daily lives and (b) which adolescents will be most affected. The current study used ecological momentary assessment with 151 young adolescents (ages 11–15) to examine the daily association between witnessing substance use and antisocial behavior across 38 consecutive days. Results from multilevel logistic regression models indicated that adolescents were more likely to engage in antisocial behavior on days when they witnessed others using substances—an association that held both when substance use was witnessed inside the home as well as outside the home (e.g., at school or in their neighborhoods). A significant gene-by-environment interaction suggested that the same-day association between witnessing substance use and antisocial behavior was significantly stronger among adolescents with, versus without, with the DRD4-7R allele. The implications of our findings for theory and research related to adolescent antisocial behavior are discussed. PMID:26648004

  18. The influence of gene-environment interactions on GHR and IGF-1 expression and their association with growth in brook charr, Salvelinus fontinalis (Mitchill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blier Pierre

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative reaction norm theory proposes that genotype-by-environment interaction (GxE results from inter-individual differences of expression in adaptive suites of genes in distinct environments. However, environmental norms for actual gene suites are poorly documented. In this study, we investigated the effects of GxE interactions on levels of gene transcription and growth by documenting the impact of rearing environment (freshwater vs. saltwater, sex and genotypic (low vs. high estimated breeding value EBV effects on the transcription level of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 and growth hormone receptor (GHR in brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis. Results Males grew faster than females (μ♀ = 1.20 ± 0.07 g·d-1, μ♂ = 1.46 ± 0.06 g·d-1 and high-EBV fish faster than low-EBV fish (μLOW = 0.97 ± 0.05 g·d-1, μHIGH = 1.58 ± 0.07 g·d-1; p FW = 1.52 ± 0.07 g·d-1, μSW = 1.15 ± 0.06 g·d-1, yet GHR mRNA transcription level was significantly higher in saltwater than in freshwater (μSW = 0.85 ± 0.05, μFW = 0.61 ± 0.05. The ratio of actual growth to units in assayed mRNA ('individual transcript efficiency', iTE; g·d-1·u-1 also differed among EBV groups (μLOW = 2.0 ± 0.24 g·d-1·u-1; μHIGH = 3.7 ± 0.24 g·d-1·u-1 and environments (μSW = 2.0 ± 0.25 g·d-1·u-1; μFW = 3.7 ± 0.25 g·d-1·u-1 for GHR. Males had a lower iTE for GHR than females (μ♂ = 2.4 ± 0.29 g·d-1·u-1; μ♀ = 3.1 ± 0.23 g·d-1·u-1. There was no difference in IGF-1 transcription level between environments (p > 0.7 or EBV groups (p > 0.15 but the level of IGF-1 was four times higher in males than females (μ♂ = 2.4 ± 0.11, μ♀ = 0.58 ± 0.09; p ♂ = 1.3 ± 0.59 g·d-1·u-1; μ♀ = 3.9 ± 0.47 g·d-1·u-1, salinities (μSW = 2.3 ± 0.52 g·d-1·u-1; μFW = 3.7 ± 0.53 g·d-1·u-1 and EBV-groups (μLOW = 2.4 ± 0.49 g·d-1·u-1; μHIGH = 3.8 ± 0.49 g·d-1·u-1. Interaction between EBV-group and environment was detected for

  19. Gene-environment effects on hippocampal neurodevelopment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenthal, Eva Helga

    factors. Hence, a deeper understanding is needed of how cortical neurodevelopmental deficiencies can arise from such gene-environment interactions. The convergence of genetic and environmental risk factors is a recent field of research. It is now clear that disease, infection and stress factors may...... disrupt the normal function of neurodevelopmental genes. Here, the transcriptional repressor Zbtb20, which we and others have shown is a master regulator of hippocampal neurodevelopment, deserves special interest. We study the possibility that environmental factors such as steroid hormones, cytokines......Mental disorders like schizophrenia and autism put a heavy load on today’s societies, creating a steady call for revealing underlying disease mechanisms and the development of effective treatments. The etiology of major psychiatric illnesses is complex involving gene by environment susceptibility...

  20. [Impact of gene-environment interaction between the C (-344) T polymorphism of CYP11B2 and drinking index on the risk of hypertension under multifactor dimensionality reduction model in Chinese Mongolian population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xing-qiang; Liu, Yong-yue; Zhang, Xian-yu; Zhang, Yong-hong; Xu, Qun; Qiu, Chang-chun; Tong, Wei-jun

    2009-09-01

    To explore the interaction between C (-344) T polymorphism of CYP11B2 and drinking index (DI) as well as their impact on the risk of hypertension in Chinese Mongolian population. A total of 1575 Mongolian people aged 20 and older including 562 hypertensive and 1013 normal-tensive from agricultural and pastoral areas in Tongliao city of Inner Mongolia, were included in this study. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to collect data by personal interview with local residents, using a standard questionnaire. Fasting blood samples were drawn and height, weight and blood pressure were measured. The variant genotypes of CYP11B2, ACE and eNOS were identified by PCR assays. Gene-environment interactions were analyzed, using multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) model. Based on the result of the best MDR model, a multiple logistic regression model was constructed as the final cause-effect interpretative model. The interaction between CYP11B2 variant genotype and drinking index appeared the best MDR model with statistical significance (chi(2) = 66.35, P or = 168), the genotype (TT) combining the drinking index (> or = 40), the genotype (TT) combining the drinking index (> or = 1) and the genotype (TC) combining the drinking index (> or = 90), were all risk factors of hypertension when comparing with genotype (CC) combining the drinking index (0), and the ORs (95%CI) appeared to be 2.07 (1.15 - 3.70), 2.35 (1.22 - 4.56), 2.05 (1.07 - 3.94) and 5.56 (2.54 - 12.18) respectively. Essential hypertension might positively be affected by the interaction of the C (-344) T polymorphism of CYP11B2 and the drinking index in Chinese Mongolian population.

  1. Identifying Gene-Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Os, Jim; Rutten, Bart P; Myin-Germeys, Inez

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen considerable progress in epidemiological and molecular genetic research into environmental and genetic factors in schizophrenia, but methodological uncertainties remain with regard to validating environmental exposures, and the population risk conferred by individual...... of G × E in schizophrenia. While such investigations are now well underway, new challenges emerge for G × E research from late-breaking evidence that genetic variation and environmental exposures are, to a significant degree, shared across a range of psychiatric disorders, with potential overlap...

  2. Gene environment interactions in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregelj, Peter

    2011-09-01

    It has been estimated that the heritable component of bipolar disorder ranges between 80 and 90%. However, even genome-wide association studies explain only a fraction of phenotypic variability not resolving the problem of "lost heritability". Although direct evidence for epigenetic dysfunction in bipolar disorder is still limited, methodological technologies in epigenomic profiling have advanced, offering even single cell analysing and resolving the problem of cell heterogeneity in epigenetics research. Gene overlapping with other mental disorders represents another problem in identifying potential susceptibility genes in bipolar disorder. Better understanding of the interplay between multiple environmental and genetic factors involved in the patogenesis of bipolar disorder could provide relevant information for treatment of patients with this complex disorder. Future studies on the role of these factors in psychopathological conditions, subphenotypes and endophenotypes may greatly benefit by using more precise clinical data and a combined approach with multiple research tools incorporated into a single study.

  3. Gene-environment interaction in atopic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahr, Niklas; Naeser, Vibeke; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The development of atopic diseases early in life suggests an important role of perinatal risk factors. OBJECTIVES: To study whether early-life exposures modify the genetic influence on atopic diseases in a twin population. METHODS: Questionnaire data on atopic diseases from 850....... Significant predictors of atopic diseases were identified with logistic regression and subsequently tested for genetic effect modification using variance components analysis. RESULTS: After multivariable adjustment, prematurity (gestational age below 32 weeks) [odds ratio (OR) = 1.93, confidence interval (CI...... stratified by exposure status showed no significant change in the heritability of asthma according to the identified risk factors. CONCLUSION: In this population-based study of children, there was no evidence of genetic effect modification of atopic diseases by several identified early-life risk factors...

  4. Gene-Environment Interplay between Number of Friends and Prosocial Leadership Behavior in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivizzigno, Alessandra S.; Brendgen, Mara; Feng, Bei; Vitaro, Frank; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boivin, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Enriched environments may moderate the effect of genetic factors on prosocial leadership (gene-environment interaction, G × E). However, positive environmental experiences may also themselves be influenced by a genetic disposition for prosocial leadership (gene-environment correlation, rGE). Relating these processes to friendships, the present…

  5. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moutsianas, Loukas; Jostins, Luke; Beecham, Ashley H

    2015-01-01

    ,465 cases and 30,385 controls from 11 cohorts of European ancestry, in combination with imputation of classical HLA alleles, to build a high-resolution map of HLA genetic risk and assess the evidence for interactions involving classical HLA alleles. Among new and previously identified class II risk alleles...

  6. Effects of Pilates exercises on sensory interaction, postural control and fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soysal Tomruk, Melda; Uz, Muhammed Zahid; Kara, Bilge; İdiman, Egemen

    2016-05-01

    Decreased postural control, sensory integration deficits and fatigue are important problems that cause functional impairments in patients with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). To examine the effect of modified clinical Pilates exercises on sensory interaction and balance, postural control and fatigue in pwMS. Eleven patients with multiple sclerosis and 12 healthy matched controls were recruited in this study. Limits of stability and postural stability tests were used to evaluate postural control by Biodex Balance System and sensory interaction assessed. Fatigue was assessed by Modified Fatigue Impact Scale. Pilates exercises were applied two times a week for 10 weeks and measurements were repeated to pwMS after exercise training. Postural control and fatigue (except psychosocial parameter) of pwMS were significantly worser than healthy controls (pPilates training (ppilates exercises (p>0.05). Ten-week Pilates training is effective to improve sensory interaction and to decrease fatigue. Pilates exercises can be applied safely in ambulatory pwMS for enhance sensory interaction and balance and combat fatigue. More investigations are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Schizophrenia: genes, environment and neurodevelopment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, K Q

    2013-09-18

    Psychoses are complex diseases resulting from the interaction between genetic vulnerability factors and various environmental risk factors during the brain development and leading to the emergence of the clinical phenotype at the end of adolescence. Among the mechanisms involved, a redox imbalance plays an important role, inducing oxidative stress damaging to developing neurons. As a consequence, the excitatory/inhibitory balance in cortex and the pathways connecting brain areas are both impaired. Childhood and adolescence appear as critical periods of vulnerability for deleterious environmental insults. Antioxidants, applied during the environmental impacts, should allow preventing these impairments as well as their clinical consequences.

  8. Multifactor dimensionality reduction reveals gene–gene interactions associated with multiple sclerosis susceptibility in African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassat, D; Motsinger, AA; Caillier, SJ; Erlich, HA; Walker, K; Steiner, LL; Cree, BAC; Barcellos, LF; Pericak-Vance, MA; Schmidt, S; Gregory, S; Hauser, SL; Haines, JL; Oksenberg, JR; Ritchie, MD

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common disease of the central nervous system characterized by inflammation, myelin loss, gliosis, varying degrees of axonal pathology, and progressive neurological dysfunction. Multiple sclerosis exhibits many of the characteristics that distinguish complex genetic disorders including polygenic inheritance and environmental exposure risks. Here, we used a highly efficient multilocus genotyping assay representing variation in 34 genes associated with inflammatory pathways to explore gene–gene interactions and disease susceptibility in a well-characterized African-American case–control MS data set. We applied the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) test to detect epistasis, and identified single-IL4R(Q576R)- and three-IL4R(Q576R), IL5RA(-80), CD14(-260)- locus association models that predict MS risk with 75–76% accuracy (P < 0.01). These results demonstrate the importance of exploring both main effects and gene–gene interactions in the study of complex diseases. PMID:16625214

  9. Multifactor dimensionality reduction reveals gene-gene interactions associated with multiple sclerosis susceptibility in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassat, D; Motsinger, A A; Caillier, S J; Erlich, H A; Walker, K; Steiner, L L; Cree, B A C; Barcellos, L F; Pericak-Vance, M A; Schmidt, S; Gregory, S; Hauser, S L; Haines, J L; Oksenberg, J R; Ritchie, M D

    2006-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common disease of the central nervous system characterized by inflammation, myelin loss, gliosis, varying degrees of axonal pathology, and progressive neurological dysfunction. Multiple sclerosis exhibits many of the characteristics that distinguish complex genetic disorders including polygenic inheritance and environmental exposure risks. Here, we used a highly efficient multilocus genotyping assay representing variation in 34 genes associated with inflammatory pathways to explore gene-gene interactions and disease susceptibility in a well-characterized African-American case-control MS data set. We applied the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) test to detect epistasis, and identified single-IL4R(Q576R)- and three-IL4R(Q576R), IL5RA(-80), CD14(-260)- locus association models that predict MS risk with 75-76% accuracy (P<0.01). These results demonstrate the importance of exploring both main effects and gene-gene interactions in the study of complex diseases.

  10. The interaction between smoking and HLA genes in multiple sclerosis: replication and refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedström, Anna Karin; Katsoulis, Michail; Hössjer, Ola; Bomfim, Izaura L; Oturai, Annette; Sondergaard, Helle Bach; Sellebjerg, Finn; Ullum, Henrik; Thørner, Lise Wegner; Gustavsen, Marte Wendel; Harbo, Hanne F; Obradovic, Dragana; Gianfrancesco, Milena A; Barcellos, Lisa F; Schaefer, Catherine A; Hillert, Jan; Kockum, Ingrid; Olsson, Tomas; Alfredsson, Lars

    2017-10-01

    Interactions between environment and genetics may contribute to multiple sclerosis (MS) development. We investigated whether the previously observed interaction between smoking and HLA genotype in the Swedish population could be replicated, refined and extended to include other populations. We used six independent case-control studies from five different countries (Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Serbia, United States). A pooled analysis was performed for replication of previous observations (7190 cases, 8876 controls). Refined detailed analyses were carried out by combining the genetically similar populations from the Nordic studies (6265 cases, 8401 controls). In both the pooled analyses and in the combined Nordic material, interactions were observed between HLA-DRB*15 and absence of HLA-A*02 and between smoking and each of the genetic risk factors. Two way interactions were observed between each combination of the three variables, invariant over categories of the third. Further, there was also a three way interaction between the risk factors. The difference in MS risk between the extremes was considerable; smokers carrying HLA-DRB1*15 and lacking HLA-A*02 had a 13-fold increased risk compared with never smokers without these genetic risk factors (OR 12.7, 95% CI 10.8-14.9). The risk of MS associated with HLA genotypes is strongly influenced by smoking status and vice versa. Since the function of HLA molecules is to present peptide antigens to T cells, the demonstrated interactions strongly suggest that smoking alters MS risk through actions on adaptive immunity.

  11. Multifactor dimensionality reduction reveals gene–gene interactions associated with multiple sclerosis susceptibility in African Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Brassat, D; Motsinger, AA; Caillier, SJ; Erlich, HA; Walker, K; Steiner, LL; Cree, BAC; Barcellos, LF; Pericak-Vance, MA; Schmidt, S; Gregory, S; Hauser, SL; Haines, JL; Oksenberg, JR; Ritchie, MD

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common disease of the central nervous system characterized by inflammation, myelin loss, gliosis, varying degrees of axonal pathology, and progressive neurological dysfunction. Multiple sclerosis exhibits many of the characteristics that distinguish complex genetic disorders including polygenic inheritance and environmental exposure risks. Here, we used a highly efficient multilocus genotyping assay representing variation in 34 genes associated with inflammatory p...

  12. Negative interaction between smoking and EBV in the risk of multiple sclerosis: The EnvIMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnevik, Kjetil; Riise, Trond; Bostrom, Inger; Casetta, Ilaria; Cortese, Marianna; Granieri, Enrico; Holmøy, Trygve; Kampman, Margitta T; Landtblom, Anne-Marie; Magalhaes, Sandra; Pugliatti, Maura; Wolfson, Christina; Myhr, Kjell-Morten

    2017-06-01

    Results from previous studies on a possible interaction between smoking and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) are conflicting. To examine the interaction between smoking and infectious mononucleosis (IM) in the risk of MS. Within the case-control study on Environmental Factors In Multiple Sclerosis (EnvIMS), 1904 MS patients and 3694 population-based frequency-matched healthy controls from Norway, Italy, and Sweden reported on prior exposure to smoking and history of IM. We examined the interaction between the two exposures on the additive and multiplicative scale. Smoking and IM were each found to be associated with an increased MS risk in all three countries, and there was a negative multiplicative interaction between the two exposures in each country separately as well as in the pooled analysis ( p = 0.001). Among those who reported IM, there was no increased risk associated with smoking (odds ratio (OR): 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.66-1.37). The direction of the estimated interactions on the additive scale was consistent with a negative interaction in all three countries (relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI): -0.98, 95% CI: -2.05-0.15, p = 0.09). Our findings indicate competing antagonism, where the two exposures compete to affect the outcome.

  13. Gene-environment interplay in the context of romantic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whisman, Mark A; South, Susan C

    2017-02-01

    A growing body of research supports an important role for genetic factors on intimate, romantic relationships. In this article, we review research that has examined the interplay between genetic and environmental influences on romantic relationships and the associations between relationship outcomes and important individual differences related to relationships. We first elaborate on how behavioral genetic and molecular genetic methods can be used to understand the etiology of relationship outcomes. We then review empirical studies that have examined gene-environment correlations and gene-by-environment interactions in predicting romantic relationship outcomes (e.g., relationship formation, relationship quality and functioning, relationship dissolution) and their association with the physical health, mental health, and well-being of relationship partners. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Eye and hand motor interactions with the Symbol Digit Modalities Test in early multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Gro O; de Rodez Benavent, Sigrid A; Harbo, Hanne F; Laeng, Bruno; Sowa, Piotr; Damangir, Soheil; Bernhard Nilsen, Kristian; Etholm, Lars; Tønnesen, Siren; Kerty, Emilia; Drolsum, Liv; Inge Landrø, Nils; Celius, Elisabeth G

    2015-11-01

    Eye and hand motor dysfunction may be present early in the disease course of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), and can affect the results on visual and written cognitive tests. We aimed to test for differences in saccadic initiation time (SI time) between RRMS patients and healthy controls, and whether SI time and hand motor speed interacted with the written version of the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (wSDMT). Patients with RRMS (N = 44, age 35.1 ± 7.3 years), time since diagnosis < 3 years and matched controls (N = 41, age 33.2 ± 6.8 years) were examined with ophthalmological, neurological and neuropsychological tests, as well as structural MRI (white matter lesion load (WMLL) and brainstem lesions), visual evoked potentials (VEP) and eye-tracker examinations of saccades. SI time was longer in RRMS than controls (p < 0.05). SI time was not related to the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT), WMLL or to the presence of brainstem lesions. 9 hole peg test (9HP) correlated significantly with WMLL (r = 0.58, p < 0.01). Both SI time and 9HP correlated negatively with the results of wSDMT (r = -0.32, p < 0.05, r = -0.47, p < 0.01), but none correlated with the results of PASAT. RRMS patients have an increased SI time compared to controls. Cognitive tests results, exemplified by the wSDMT, may be confounded by eye and hand motor function. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Gene-Environment Interplay in Physical, Psychological, and Cognitive Domains in Mid to Late Adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, Chandra A; Gatz, Margaret; Christensen, Kaare

    2016-01-01

    Despite emerging interest in gene-environment interaction (GxE) effects, there is a dearth of studies evaluating its potential relevance apart from specific hypothesized environments and biometrical variance trends. Using a monozygotic within-pair approach, we evaluated evidence of G×E for body m...

  16. Commentary: Gene-Environment Interplay in the Context of Genetics, Epigenetics, and Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To comment on the article in this issue of the Journal by Professor Michael Rutter, "Environmentally Mediated Risks for Psychopathology: Research Strategies and Findings," in the context of current research findings on gene-environment interaction, epigenetics, and gene expression. Method: Animal and human studies are reviewed that…

  17. When chocolate seeking becomes compulsion: gene-environment interplay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Patrono

    Full Text Available Eating disorders appear to be caused by a complex interaction between environmental and genetic factors, and compulsive eating in response to adverse circumstances characterizes many eating disorders.We compared compulsion-like eating in the form of conditioned suppression of palatable food-seeking in adverse situations in stressed C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice, two well-characterized inbred strains, to determine the influence of gene-environment interplay on this behavioral phenotype. Moreover, we tested the hypothesis that low accumbal D2 receptor (R availability is a genetic risk factor of food compulsion-like behavior and that environmental conditions that induce compulsive eating alter D2R expression in the striatum. To this end, we measured D1R and D2R expression in the striatum and D1R, D2R and α1R levels in the medial prefrontal cortex, respectively, by western blot.Exposure to environmental conditions induces compulsion-like eating behavior, depending on genetic background. This behavioral pattern is linked to decreased availability of accumbal D2R. Moreover, exposure to certain environmental conditions upregulates D2R and downregulates α1R in the striatum and medial prefrontal cortex, respectively, of compulsive animals. These findings confirm the function of gene-environment interplay in the manifestation of compulsive eating and support the hypothesis that low accumbal D2R availability is a "constitutive" genetic risk factor for compulsion-like eating behavior. Finally, D2R upregulation and α1R downregulation in the striatum and medial prefrontal cortex, respectively, are potential neuroadaptive responses that parallel the shift from motivated to compulsive eating.

  18. When Chocolate Seeking Becomes Compulsion: Gene-Environment Interplay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patella, Loris; Andolina, Diego; Valzania, Alessandro; Latagliata, Emanuele Claudio; Felsani, Armando; Pompili, Assunta; Gasbarri, Antonella; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Ventura, Rossella

    2015-01-01

    Background Eating disorders appear to be caused by a complex interaction between environmental and genetic factors, and compulsive eating in response to adverse circumstances characterizes many eating disorders. Materials and Methods We compared compulsion-like eating in the form of conditioned suppression of palatable food-seeking in adverse situations in stressed C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice, two well-characterized inbred strains, to determine the influence of gene-environment interplay on this behavioral phenotype. Moreover, we tested the hypothesis that low accumbal D2 receptor (R) availability is a genetic risk factor of food compulsion-like behavior and that environmental conditions that induce compulsive eating alter D2R expression in the striatum. To this end, we measured D1R and D2R expression in the striatum and D1R, D2R and α1R levels in the medial prefrontal cortex, respectively, by western blot. Results Exposure to environmental conditions induces compulsion-like eating behavior, depending on genetic background. This behavioral pattern is linked to decreased availability of accumbal D2R. Moreover, exposure to certain environmental conditions upregulates D2R and downregulates α1R in the striatum and medial prefrontal cortex, respectively, of compulsive animals. These findings confirm the function of gene-environment interplay in the manifestation of compulsive eating and support the hypothesis that low accumbal D2R availability is a “constitutive” genetic risk factor for compulsion-like eating behavior. Finally, D2R upregulation and α1R downregulation in the striatum and medial prefrontal cortex, respectively, are potential neuroadaptive responses that parallel the shift from motivated to compulsive eating. PMID:25781028

  19. Alfa-class prefoldin protein UXT is a novel interacting partner of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis 2 (Als2) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enunlu, Izzet; Ozansoy, Mehmet; Basak, Ayse Nazlı

    2011-09-30

    Mutations in Als2 gene cause several autosomal recessive forms of motor neuron diseases including Juvenile Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (JALS), Juvenile Primary Lateral Sclerosis (PLSJ) and Infantile-onset Ascending Hereditary Spastic Paralysis (IAHSP). To find novel protein-protein interactions of Als2 protein we performed a yeast two hybrid screen and fished out the Ubiquitously Expressed Transcript (UXT) protein. UXT is a novel gene encoding for an α-class prefoldin type chaperone which acts as a co-activator for various transcriptional factors such as Nf-κB and AR. The interaction between Als2 and UXT was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Co-localization between endogenous Als2 and UXT was mainly found in the cytoplasm of neuronal Neuro2a cells with immunofluorescence microscopy. Cell cycle arrest of Neuro2a cells showed that Als2 and Uxt transcriptional levels are synchronously changing. Our results suggest that Als2 is a binding partner of Uxt and Als2/Uxt interaction could be important for the activation of Nf-κB pathway. These results provides basis for future research to investigate the role of Nf-κB pathway in the development of motor neuron diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Microglia Polarization, Gene-Environment Interactions and Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling: Emerging Roles of Glia-Neuron and Glia-Stem/Neuroprogenitor Crosstalk for Dopaminergic Neurorestoration in Aged Parkinsonian Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca L'Episcopo

    2018-02-01

    recent findings unveiling major microglial inflammatory and oxidative stress pathways converging in the regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and reciprocally, the ability of Wnt signaling pathways to modulate microglial activation in PD. Unraveling the key factors and conditons promoting the switch of the proinflammatory M1 microglia status into a neuroprotective and regenerative M2 phenotype will have important consequences for neuroimmune interactions and neuronal outcome under inflammatory and/or neurodegenerative conditions.

  1. Joint testing of genotypic and gene-environment interaction identified novel association for BMP4 with non-syndromic CL/P in an Asian population using data from an International Cleft Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qianqian; Wang, Hong; Schwender, Holger; Zhang, Tianxiao; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B; Chou, Yah-Huei Wu; Ye, Xiaoqian; Yeow, Vincent; Chong, Samuel S; Zhang, Bo; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Parker, Margaret M; Scott, Alan F; Beaty, Terri H

    2014-01-01

    Non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) is a common disorder with complex etiology. The Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 gene (BMP4) has been considered a prime candidate gene with evidence accumulated from animal experimental studies, human linkage studies, as well as candidate gene association studies. The aim of the current study is to test for linkage and association between BMP4 and NSCL/P that could be missed in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) when genotypic (G) main effects alone were considered. We performed the analysis considering G and interactions with multiple maternal environmental exposures using additive conditional logistic regression models in 895 Asian and 681 European complete NSCL/P trios. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that passed the quality control criteria among 122 genotyped and 25 imputed single nucleotide variants in and around the gene were used in analysis. Selected maternal environmental exposures during 3 months prior to and through the first trimester of pregnancy included any personal tobacco smoking, any environmental tobacco smoke in home, work place or any nearby places, any alcohol consumption and any use of multivitamin supplements. A novel significant association held for rs7156227 among Asian NSCL/P and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate (NSCLP) trios after Bonferroni correction which was not seen when G main effects alone were considered in either allelic or genotypic transmission disequilibrium tests. Odds ratios for carrying one copy of the minor allele without maternal exposure to any of the four environmental exposures were 0.58 (95%CI = 0.44, 0.75) and 0.54 (95%CI = 0.40, 0.73) for Asian NSCL/P and NSCLP trios, respectively. The Bonferroni P values corrected for the total number of 117 tested SNPs were 0.0051 (asymptotic P = 4.39*10(-5)) and 0.0065 (asymptotic P = 5.54*10(-5)), accordingly. In European trios, no significant association was seen for any SNPs after Bonferroni

  2. Multiple sclerosis outpatient future groups: improving the quality of participant interaction and ideation tools within service improvement activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Alison; Rivas, Carol; Giovannoni, Gavin

    2015-04-23

    Improving the patient experience is a key focus within the National Health Service. This has led us to consider how health services are experienced, from both staff and patient perspectives. Novel service improvement activities bring staff and patients together to use design-led methods to improve how health services are delivered. The Multiple Sclerosis Outpatient Future Group study aimed to explore how analogies and props can be used to facilitate rich interactions between staff and patients within these activities. This paper will consider how these interactions supported participants to share experiences, generate ideas and suggest service improvements. Qualitative explorative study using 'future groups,' a reinterpretation of the recognised focus groups method directed towards exploring future alternatives through employing analogies and physical props to engage participants to speculate about future service interactions and health experiences. Participants were people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and outpatient staff: staff nurses, nursing assistants, junior sisters and reception staff. Use of future groups, analogies and physical props enabled PwMS and outpatient staff to invest their own ideas and feelings in the service improvement activity and envisage alternative health care scenarios. The combination of participants in the groups with their diverse perspectives and knowledge of the service led to a collaborative approach in which staff highlighted potential practical problems and patients ensured ideas were holistic. Service improvements were prototyped and tested in the outpatient clinic. Design-led methods such as future groups using analogies and physical props can be used to facilitate interactions between staff and patients in service improvement activities, leading to the generation of meaningful ideas. It is hoped that improving the quality of ideation tools within design-led methods can contribute to developing successful service interventions

  3. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis : Concept, content, and pilot results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Sinnige, Ludovicus G.; van Geel, Bjoern M.; Verheul, Freek; Verhagen, Wim I.; van der Kruijk, Ruud A.; Haverkamp, Reinoud; Schrijver, Hans M.; Baart, J. Coby; Visser, Leo H.; Arnoldus, Edo P.; Gilhuis, H. Jacobus; Pop, Paul; Booy, Monique; Lemmens, Wim; Donders, Rogier; Kool, Anton; van Noort, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a growing need to offer persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) possibilities for self-management and to integrate multidisciplinary health data. In 2009-2014 we developed a patient-reported outcome based, interactive, web-based program (MSmonitor) for (self-) monitoring,

  4. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis: concept, content, and pilot results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, P.J.; Sinnige, L.G.; Geel, B.M. van; Verheul, F.; Verhagen, W.I.; Kruijk, R.A. van der; Haverkamp, R.; Schrijver, H.M.; Baart, J.C.; Visser, L.H.; Arnoldus, E.P.J.; Gilhuis, H.J.; Pop, P.; Booy, M.; Lemmens, W.; Donders, R.; Kool, A.; Noort, E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a growing need to offer persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) possibilities for self-management and to integrate multidisciplinary health data. In 2009-2014 we developed a patient-reported outcome based, interactive, web-based program (MSmonitor) for (self-)monitoring,

  5. Gene-environment interaction and male reproductive function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Jonatan; Bonde, Jens Peter; Giwercman, Yvonne L

    2010-01-01

    As genetic factors can hardly explain the changes taking place during short time spans, environmental and lifestyle-related factors have been suggested as the causes of time-related deterioration of male reproductive function. However, considering the strong heterogeneity of male fecundity between...... and within populations, genetic variants might be important determinants of the individual susceptibility to the adverse effects of environment or lifestyle. Although the possible mechanisms of such interplay in relation to the reproductive system are largely unknown, some recent studies have indicated...... that specific genotypes may confer a larger risk of male reproductive disorders following certain exposures. This paper presents a critical review of animal and human evidence on how genes may modify environmental effects on male reproductive function. Some examples have been found that support this mechanism...

  6. Gene-environment interaction and male reproductive function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Jonatan; Bonde, Jens Peter; Giwercman, Yvonne L

    2010-01-01

    that specific genotypes may confer a larger risk of male reproductive disorders following certain exposures. This paper presents a critical review of animal and human evidence on how genes may modify environmental effects on male reproductive function. Some examples have been found that support this mechanism...

  7. Gene-Environment Interplay in Common Complex Diseases: Forging an Integrative Model—Recommendations From an NIH Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookman, Ebony B.; McAllister, Kimberly; Gillanders, Elizabeth; Wanke, Kay; Balshaw, David; Rutter, Joni; Reedy, Jill; Shaughnessy, Daniel; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Paltoo, Dina; Atienza, Audie; Bierut, Laura; Kraft, Peter; Fallin, M. Daniele; Perera, Frederica; Turkheimer, Eric; Boardman, Jason; Marazita, Mary L.; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Suomi, Stephen J.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Jacobson, Kristen C.; Lowe, William L.; Goldman, Lynn R.; Duggal, Priya; Gunnar, Megan R.; Manolio, Teri A.; Green, Eric D.; Olster, Deborah H.; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2011-01-01

    Although it is recognized that many common complex diseases are a result of multiple genetic and environmental risk factors, studies of gene-environment interaction remain a challenge and have had limited success to date. Given the current state-of-the-science, NIH sought input on ways to accelerate investigations of gene-environment interplay in health and disease by inviting experts from a variety of disciplines to give advice about the future direction of gene-environment interaction studies. Participants of the NIH Gene-Environment Interplay Workshop agreed that there is a need for continued emphasis on studies of the interplay between genetic and environmental factors in disease and that studies need to be designed around a multifaceted approach to reflect differences in diseases, exposure attributes, and pertinent stages of human development. The participants indicated that both targeted and agnostic approaches have strengths and weaknesses for evaluating main effects of genetic and environmental factors and their interactions. The unique perspectives represented at the workshop allowed the exploration of diverse study designs and analytical strategies, and conveyed the need for an interdisciplinary approach including data sharing, and data harmonization to fully explore gene-environment interactions. Further, participants also emphasized the continued need for high-quality measures of environmental exposures and new genomic technologies in ongoing and new studies. PMID:21308768

  8. A prospective web-based patient-centred interactive study of long-term disabilities, disabilities perception and health-related quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis in The Netherlands: the Dutch Multiple Sclerosis Study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Heerings, Marco; Lemmens, Wim A; Donders, Rogier; van der Zande, Anneke; van Noort, Esther; Kool, Anton

    2015-08-04

    In the past two decades the widespread use of disease modifying drugs with moderate to strong efficacy has changed the natural course of multiple sclerosis (MS). Health care professionals, researchers, patient organizations and health authorities are in need of recent information about the objectified and subjective long-term clinical outcomes in MS patients. Such information is scarce. We started a prospective, web-based, patient-centred, interactive study of long-term disabilities, disabilities perception and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in MS patients in The Netherlands (Dutch Multiple Sclerosis Study). The study has an on online patient-driven inclusion and online acquisition of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). At six-months intervals participants complete the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Profile (MSIP) (disabilities and disabilities perception in seven domains and four symptoms), the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 items (MSQoL-54), the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale-5 items (MFIS-5) and the Leeds Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-8 items (LMSQoL) questionnaires, and a Medication and Adherence Inventory. Every three years the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score is assessed by phone. The monthly completion of the MFIS-5, LMSQoL and Medication and Adherence Inventory is optional. Completed questionnaires and inventories, and automatically generated scores are made available online to patients for self-monitoring and self-management purposes, and to authorized health care professionals for the evaluation of disease activity and of the effectiveness of treatments. Study duration is planned to be 15 years. Results will be analyzed periodically using means and standard deviations for continuous variables, and frequencies for categorical variables. Relations between time points, variables, patient and treatment characteristics will be evaluated in random effects repeated measures models. The Dutch Multiple Sclerosis Study is characterized by

  9. Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the ... attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins ...

  10. Tuberous Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberous sclerosis is a rare genetic disease that causes benign tumors to grow in the brain and other organs. ... Kidney problems Some people have signs of tuberous sclerosis at birth. In others it can take time ...

  11. Gene-environment correlations in the stress-depression relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittker, Jason

    2010-09-01

    A critical feature of the social stress model is the apparent relationship between stress and depression. Although many studies have demonstrated a connection between the two, the relationship may be contaminated by genes affecting both stress and depression. Using a sample of identical and fraternal twins, this study explores genetic influences on depression and assorted sources of stress while explicitly estimating, and thereby controlling for, gene-environment correlations. I consider both stress and depression in a fine-grained fashion. For the former, the study explores assorted sources of stress, including health and disability, family, unemployment, discrimination, and perceived neighborhood safety, as gene-environment correlations may be stronger for some forms of stress than others. For the latter, the study explores both depressive symptoms and major depressive disorders, as each may entail a different epidemiological process, especially with respect to genes. The results reveal that most, but not all, measures of stress have moderate heritabilities, suggesting that genes influence exposure to the environment in a broad fashion. Yet, despite this, the relationship between stress and depression is generally robust to gene-environment correlations. There are some notable exceptions. For example, allowing for gene-environment correlations, marital conflict is generally unrelated to depression. Moreover, gene-environment correlations are generally stronger for major depression than for depressive symptoms, encouraging further elaboration of the distinction between the onset of depression and its recurrence, especially in the context of genes. These exceptions do not put limits on environmental influence, but do suggest that genes operate in a complex life-course fashion.

  12. Interactions Between the Canonical WNT/Beta-Catenin Pathway and PPAR Gamma on Neuroinflammation, Demyelination, and Remyelination in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Alexandre; Vallée, Jean-Noël; Guillevin, Rémy; Lecarpentier, Yves

    2018-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is marked by neuroinflammation and demyelination with loss of oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. The immune response is regulated by WNT/beta-catenin pathway in MS. Activated NF-kappaB, a major effector of neuroinflammation, and upregulated canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway positively regulate each other. Demyelinating events present an upregulation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway, whereas proper myelinating phases show a downregulation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway essential for the promotion of oligodendrocytes precursors cells proliferation and differentiation. The activation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway results in differentiation failure and impairment in remyelination. However, PI3K/Akt pathway and TCF7L2, two downstream targets of WNT/beta-catenin pathway, are upregulated and promote proper remyelination. The interactions of these signaling pathways remain unclear. PPAR gamma activation can inhibit NF-kappaB, and can also downregulate the WNT/beta-catenin pathway. PPAR gamma and canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway act in an opposite manner. PPAR gamma agonists appear as a promising treatment for the inhibition of demyelination and the promotion of proper remyelination through the control of both NF-kappaB activity and canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway.

  13. Association of human endogenous retroviruses with multiple sclerosis and possible interactions with herpes viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove

    2005-01-01

    may be members of the Herpesviridae. Several herpes viruses, such as HSV-1, VZV, EBV and HHV-6, have been associated with MS pathogenesis, and retroviruses and herpes viruses have complex interactions. The current understanding of HERVs, and specifically the investigations of HERV activation...... and expression in MS are the major subjects of this review, which also proposes to synergise the herpes and HERV findings, and presents several possible pathogenic mechanisms for HERVs in MS. Copyright (c) 2005 ...

  14. Multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunwald, I.Q.; Kuehn, A.L.; Backens, M.; Papanagiotou, P.; Shariat, K.; Kostopoulos, P.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common chronic inflammatory disease of myelin with interspersed lesions in the white matter of the central nervous system. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the diagnosis and monitoring of white matter diseases. This article focuses on key findings in multiple sclerosis as detected by MRI. (orig.) [de

  15. Interactions between Human Antibodies and Synthetic Conformational Peptide Epitopes: Innovative Approach for Electrochemical Detection of Biomarkers of Multiple Sclerosis at Platinum Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellagha-Chenchah, W.; Sella, C.; Fernandez, F. Real; Peroni, E.; Lolli, F.; Amatore, C.

    2015-01-01

    The detection of human antibodies of Multiple Sclerosis patients was investigated based on the electrochemical oxidation of a synthetic antigenic probe, a glycopeptide Fc-CSF114(Glc) bearing a ferrocenyl moiety. Electrochemical measurements were carried out at platinum microband electrodes without any electrode surface modification. A microfluidic device was designed in order to both minimize peptide consumption and increase the number of experiments with low volumes of samples. The specific interactions between Fc-CSF114(Glc) and antibodies were evidenced through comparison with electrochemical responses obtained from the ferrocenyl unglycosylated peptide Fc-CSF114 used as negative control. The interactions between Fc-CSF114(Glc) and autoantibodies were characterized by a shift of the oxidation potential towards positive values. A mechanism for peptide oxidation was proposed based on a diffusion control of mass transport and the formation of adsorbed layers able to mediate electron transfer. Results showed efficient antigen-antibody recognition without any electrode grafting or further addition of labels in solution. Preliminary tests using human sera from Multiple Sclerosis patients and healthy donors validated this new approach aimed at developing innovative and fast diagnostic tools, based on electrochemical synthetic antigenic probes

  16. Is exposure to cyanobacteria an environmental risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurodegenerative diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Walter G.; Borenstein, Amy R.; Nelson, Lorene M.; Codd, Geoffrey A.; Rosen, Barry H.; Stommel, Elijah W.; Cox, Paul Alan

    2013-01-01

    There is a broad scientific consensus that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is caused by gene-environment interactions. Mutations in genes underlying familial ALS (fALS) have been discovered in only 5–10% of the total population of ALS patients. Relatively little attention has been paid to environmental and lifestyle factors that may trigger the cascade of motor neuron death leading to the syndrome of ALS, although exposure to chemicals including lead and pesticides, and to agricultural environments, smoking, certain sports, and trauma have all been identified with an increased risk of ALS. There is a need for research to quantify the relative roles of each of the identified risk factors for ALS. Recent evidence has strengthened the theory that chronic environmental exposure to the neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced by cyanobacteria may be an environmental risk factor for ALS. Here we describe methods that may be used to assess exposure to cyanobacteria, and hence potentially to BMAA, namely an epidemiologic questionnaire and direct and indirect methods for estimating the cyanobacterial load in ecosystems. Rigorous epidemiologic studies could determine the risks associated with exposure to cyanobacteria, and if combined with genetic analysis of ALS cases and controls could reveal etiologically important gene-environment interactions in genetically vulnerable individuals.

  17. Tuberous sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms. Depending on the severity of the mental disability, the child may need special education. Some seizures are controlled ... often do well. However, children with severe mental disability or ... when a child is born with severe tuberous sclerosis, one of ...

  18. Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... read or download the National Academies/Institute of Medicine report, go to: " Multiple Sclerosis: Current Status and Strategies for the Future ." Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus ...

  19. Evidence of reactive gene-environment correlation in preschoolers' prosocial play with unfamiliar peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLalla, Lisabeth Fisher; Bersted, Kyle; John, Sufna Gheyara

    2015-10-01

    The development of prosocial behaviors during the preschool years is essential for children's positive interactions with peers in school and other social situations. Although there is some evidence of genetic influences on prosocial behaviors, very little is known about how genes and environment, independently and in concert, affect prosocial behaviors in young children. This study of 126 twin and sibling pairs examined 5-year-old preschool children's positive behaviors (prosocial and easy-going) while playing freely with an unfamiliar, same-age, same-sex peer. Children were randomly paired, allowing us to rule out passive (parent-influenced environment) and active (child-driven peer choices) gene-environment correlations as potential influences on the results. We found evidence of reactive gene-environment correlation, demonstrating that children who are genetically more likely to act prosocially and to be temperamentally outgoing appear to evoke more prosocial and easy-going behaviors from an unfamiliar peer. We also found that both dominant genetic and nonshared environmental factors were significant influences on preschoolers' prosocial play behaviors, but that neither genetic nor shared environmental factors were significant for easy-going play behaviors. These findings shed important light on influences of prosocial behaviors in preschoolers. Via inherited tendencies, preschool children's positive behaviors evoke similar positive behaviors from their play peers. Given that prosocial behaviors are preludes to a large range of important socially appropriate behaviors, prosocial children should be encouraged to interact with their peers to potentially create a more positive atmosphere within social contexts. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, Egon; Stenager, E N; Knudsen, Lone

    1994-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 117 randomly selected patients (52 men, 65 women) with definite multiple sclerosis, it was found that 76 percent were married or cohabitant, 8 percent divorced. Social contacts remained unchanged for 70 percent, but outgoing social contacts were reduced for 45 percent......, need for structural changes in home and need for pension became greater with increasing physical handicap. No significant differences between gender were found. It is concluded that patients and relatives are under increased social strain, when multiple sclerosis progresses to a moderate handicap...

  1. Gene-Environment Interplay and Psychopathology: Multiple Varieties but Real Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Michael; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Caspi, Avshalom

    2006-01-01

    Gene-environment interplay is a general term that covers several divergent concepts with different meanings and different implications. In this review, we evaluate research evidence on four varieties of gene-environment interplay. First, we consider epigenetic mechanisms by which environmental influences alter the effects of genes. Second, we…

  2. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Knudsen, L; Jensen, K

    1991-01-01

    In a cross-sectional investigation of 116 patients with multiple sclerosis, the social and sparetime activities of the patient were assessed by both patient and his/her family. The assessments were correlated to physical disability which showed that particularly those who were moderately disabled...

  3. Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on multiple sclerosis is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  4. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1988-01-01

    Forty-two (12%) of a total of 366 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) had psychiatric admissions. Of these, 34 (81%) had their first psychiatric admission in conjunction with or after the onset of MS. Classification by psychiatric diagnosis showed that there was a significant positive correlati...

  5. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1990-01-01

    An investigation on the correlation between ability to read TV subtitles and the duration of visual evoked potential (VEP) latency in 14 patients with definite multiple sclerosis (MS), indicated that VEP latency in patients unable to read the TV subtitles was significantly delayed in comparison...

  6. Molecular genetic gene-environment studies using candidate genes in schizophrenia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modinos, Gemma; Iyegbe, Conrad; Prata, Diana; Rivera, Margarita; Kempton, Matthew J; Valmaggia, Lucia R; Sham, Pak C; van Os, Jim; McGuire, Philip

    2013-11-01

    The relatively high heritability of schizophrenia suggests that genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of the disorder. On the other hand, a number of environmental factors significantly influence its incidence. As few direct genetic effects have been demonstrated, and there is considerable inter-individual heterogeneity in the response to the known environmental factors, interactions between genetic and environmental factors may be important in determining whether an individual develops the disorder. To date, a considerable number of studies of gene-environment interactions (G×E) in schizophrenia have employed a hypothesis-based molecular genetic approach using candidate genes, which have led to a range of different findings. This systematic review aims to summarize the results from molecular genetic candidate studies and to review challenges and opportunities of this approach in psychosis research. Finally, we discuss the potential of future prospects, such as new studies that combine hypothesis-based molecular genetic candidate approaches with agnostic genome-wide association studies in determining schizophrenia risk. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alan J; Baranzini, Sergio E; Geurts, Jeroen; Hemmer, Bernhard; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2018-03-22

    Multiple sclerosis continues to be a challenging and disabling condition but there is now greater understanding of the underlying genetic and environmental factors that drive the condition, including low vitamin D levels, cigarette smoking, and obesity. Early and accurate diagnosis is crucial and is supported by diagnostic criteria, incorporating imaging and spinal fluid abnormalities for those presenting with a clinically isolated syndrome. Importantly, there is an extensive therapeutic armamentarium, both oral and by infusion, for those with the relapsing remitting form of the disease. Careful consideration is required when choosing the correct treatment, balancing the side-effect profile with efficacy and escalating as clinically appropriate. This move towards more personalised medicine is supported by a clinical guideline published in 2018. Finally, a comprehensive management programme is strongly recommended for all patients with multiple sclerosis, enhancing health-related quality of life through advocating wellness, addressing aggravating factors, and managing comorbidities. The greatest remaining challenge for multiple sclerosis is the development of treatments incorporating neuroprotection and remyelination to treat and ultimately prevent the disabling, progressive forms of the condition. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadashima, Hiromichi; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Imai, Terukuni; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Matsumoto, Sadayuki; Yamamoto, Toru; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Maya, Kiyomi

    1986-01-01

    Eleven patients with a definite diagnosis of multiple sclerosis were examined in terms of correlations between the clinical features and the results of cranial computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: In 5 of the 11 patients, both CT and MRI demonstrated lesions consistent with a finding of multiple sclerosis. In 3 patients, only MRI demonstrated lesions. In the remaining 3 patients, neither CT nor MRI revealed any lesion in the brain. All 5 patients who showed abnormal findings on both CT and MRI had clinical signs either of cerebral or brainstem - cerebellar lesions. On the other hand, two of the 3 patients with normal CT and MRI findings had optic-nerve and spinal-cord signs. Therefore, our results suggested relatively good correlations between the clinical features, CT, and MRI. MRI revealed cerebral lesions in two of the four patients with clinical signs of only optic-nerve and spinal-cord lesions. MRI demonstrated sclerotic lesions in 3 of the 6 patients whose plaques were not detected by CT. In conclusion, MRI proved to be more helpful in the demonstration of lesions attributable to chronic multiple sclerosis. (author)

  9. ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here Home » Disorders » Patient & Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Fact Sheet What is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis? Who ... Where can I get more information? What is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis? Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a group of ...

  10. Daily negative interactions and mood among patients and partners dealing with multiple sclerosis (MS): the moderating effects of emotional support.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleiboer, A.M.; Kuijer, R.G.; Hox, J.J.; Jongen, P.J.H.; Frequin, S.T.F.M.; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Negative interactions with intimate partners may have adverse consequences for well-being, especially for individuals dealing with chronic illness. However, it is not clear whether negative interactions affect both dimensions of positive and negative well-being and factors that may moderate this

  11. REVIEW: Genome-wide findings in schizophrenia and the role of gene-environment interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Winkel, Ruud; Esquivel, Gabriel; Kenis, Gunter; Wichers, Marieke; Collip, Dina; Peerbooms, Odette; Rutten, Bart; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Van Os, Jim

    2010-10-01

    The recent advent of genome-wide mass-marker technology has resulted in renewed optimism to unravel the genetic architecture of psychotic disorders. Genome-wide association studies have identified a number of common polymorphisms robustly associated with schizophrenia, in ZNF804A, transcription factor 4, major histocompatibility complex, and neurogranin. In addition, copy number variants (CNVs) in 1q21.1, 2p16.3, 15q11.2, 15q13.3, 16p11.2, and 22q11.2 were convincingly implicated in schizophrenia risk. Furthermore, these studies have suggested considerable genetic overlap with bipolar disorder (particularly for common polymorphisms) and neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism (particularly for CNVs). The influence of these risk variants on relevant intermediate phenotypes needs further study. In addition, there is a need for etiological models of psychosis integrating genetic risk with environmental factors associated with the disorder, focusing specifically on environmental impact on gene expression (epigenetics) and convergence of genes and environment on common biological pathways bringing about larger effects than those of genes or environment in isolation (gene-environment interaction). Collaborative efforts that bring together expertise in statistics, genetics, epidemiology, experimental psychiatry, brain imaging, and clinical psychiatry will be required to succeed in this challenging task. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Health-Related Coping and Social Interaction in People with Multiple Sclerosis Supported by a Social Network: Pilot Study With a New Methodological Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorgna, Luigi; Russo, Antonio; De Stefano, Manuela; Lanzillo, Roberta; Esposito, Sabrina; Moshtari, Fatemeh; Rullani, Francesco; Piscopo, Kyrie; Buonanno, Daniela; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo; Gallo, Antonio; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Bonavita, Simona

    2017-07-14

    Social media are a vital link for people with health concerns who find in Web communities a valid and comforting source for information exchange, debate, and knowledge enrichment. This aspect is important for people affected by chronic diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS), who are very well informed about the disease but are vulnerable to hopes of being cured or saved by therapies whose efficacy is not always scientifically proven. To improve health-related coping and social interaction for people with MS, we created an MS social network (SMsocialnetwork.com) with a medical team constantly online to intervene promptly when false or inappropriate medical information are shared. The goal of this study was to assess the impact of SMsocialnetwork.com on the health-related coping and social interaction of people with MS by analyzing areas of interest through a Web-based survey. Referring to previous marketing studies analyzing the online platform's role in targeted health care, we conducted a 39-item Web-based survey. We then performed a construct validation procedure using a factorial analysis, gathering together like items of the survey related to different areas of interest such as utility, proximity, sharing, interaction, solving uncertainty, suggestion attitude, and exploration. We collected 130 Web-based surveys. The areas of interest analysis demonstrated that the users positively evaluated SMsocialnetwork.com to obtain information, approach and solve problems, and to make decisions (utility: median 4.2); improve feeling of closeness (proximity: median 5); catalyze relationships and text general personal opinions (sharing: median 5.6); get in touch with other users to receive innovative, effective, and practical solutions (interaction, solving uncertainty, and suggestion attitude medians were respectively: 4.1, 3, and 3); and share information about innovative therapeutic approaches and treatment options (suggestion attitude: median: 3.3). SMsocialnetwork

  13. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, Egon; Stenager, E N; Knudsen, Lone

    1994-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 117 randomly selected patients (52 men, 65 women) with definite multiple sclerosis, it was found that 76 percent were married or cohabitant, 8 percent divorced. Social contacts remained unchanged for 70 percent, but outgoing social contacts were reduced for 45 percent....... Ninety-five percent lived in own house or flat and 70 percent received disablement pension. More than half of the patients (56.4 percent) were dependent on help from close relatives, most frequently spouse. The need for help, the risk of divorce, loss of contact with relatives, difficulty in going out...

  14. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Knudsen, L; Jensen, K

    1994-01-01

    a significant correlation between results of an attention and perceptual motor speed test i.e. Symbol Digit Modalities test and the ability to read TV-subtitles, but no correlation was found with another attention and perceptual motor speed test, or verbal or visual memory. No correlation between the use......In a cross-sectional study of 94 patients (42 males, 52 females) with definite multiple sclerosis (MS) in the age range 25-55 years, the correlation of neuropsychological tests with the ability to read TV-subtitles and with the use of sedatives is examined. A logistic regression analysis reveals...... of sedatives and results on neuropsychological tests was found. Anxiety was not correlated with the ability to read TV-subtitles. It is concluded that visual deficits but not the use of sedatives may be a confounding factor in neuropsychological testing in MS....

  15. Genes, environment, and dyslexia. The 2005 Norman Geschwind Memorial Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Richard K

    2006-12-01

    This article presents an overview of some methods and results from our continuing studies of genetic and environmental influences on dyslexia, and on individual differences across the normal range that have been conducted over the past 25 years in the Colorado Learning Disabilities Research Center (CLDRC) and in related projects. CLDRC investigators compare the similarities of identical twin pairs who share all their genes and fraternal twins who share half their segregating genes to assess the balance of genetic, shared family environment, and nonshared environment influences on dyslexia and on individual differences across the normal range. We have learned that among the children we have studied in Colorado, group deficits in reading (dyslexia) and individual differences in reading across the normal range are primarily due to genetic influences, and these genetic influences are often shared with some of the same genetic influences on deficits and individual differences in language and ADHD. We have also learned from our molecular-genetic linkage studies that there are regions on several chromosomes likely to contain genes that influence dyslexia. Several specific genes within these regions have been tentatively identified through molecular-genetic association analyses, but much more research is needed to understand the pathways among specific genes, regions of noncoding DNA that regulate the activity of those genes, the brain, and dyslexia. I conclude with a discussion of our research on individual differences in early reading development, on the role of early learning constraints in dyslexia, and on how genetic influences are expressed through their interaction and correlation with the environment.

  16. Multiple sclerosis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000129.htm Multiple sclerosis - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... Your doctor has told you that you have multiple sclerosis (MS). This disease affects the brain and spinal ...

  17. Effect of paternal alcohol and drug dependence on offspring conduct disorder: gene-environment interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Jon Randolph; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Jacob, Theodore; Grant, Julia D; Scherrer, Jeffrey F; Sartor, Carolyn E; Duncan, Alexis E; Heath, Andrew

    2010-09-01

    Not only are substance-use disorders and externalizing disorders frequently comorbid, they often co-occur in families across generations. The current study examined the role of genetic and environmental influences in the relationship between paternal histories of drug dependence or alcohol dependence and offspring conduct disorder using an offspring-of-twins design. Participants were male twins (n = 1,774) from the Vietnam Era Twin Registry, their offspring (n = 1,917), and mothers of the offspring (n = 1,202). Twins had a history of drug dependence, alcohol dependence, or neither. Based on the father's and his co-twin's drug-dependence or alcohol-dependence history and zygosity, risk groups were constructed to reflect different levels of genetic and environmental risk that were then used to predict offspring conduct disorder. After controlling for potentially confounding variables, the offspring of men with a history of drug dependence or alcohol dependence had significantly higher rates of conduct disorder, compared with offspring of men without this history. Offspring at higher genetic risk had higher rates of conduct disorder. High-risk offspring at lower environmental risk had lower rates of conduct disorder but only in the case of paternal drug-dependence risk. Lower environmental risk did not influence rates of offspring conduct disorder when the father had an alcohol-dependence history. Genetic risk associated with both paternal drug-dependence and paternal alcohol-dependence histories predicted offspring conduct-disorder risk, but only risk associated with paternal drug-dependence history was mitigated by having a low-risk environment. These results demonstrated a significant gene-environment interaction effect.

  18. Tuberous sclerosis Anaesthetic considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    SYNDROMIC VIGNETTES IN ANAESTHESIA. Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia & Analgesia - May 2003. 4. Tuberous sclerosis. Anaesthetic considerations. Tuberous sclerosis. Tuberous sclerosis(TS) was first described by Bourneville in. 1880.1 TS is said to be one of the commonest autosomal domi- nant diseases.

  19. Satiety and the self-regulation of food take in children: A potential role for gene-environment interplay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Sheryl O.

    2016-01-01

    Child eating self-regulation refers to behaviors that enable children to start and stop eating in a manner consistent with maintaining energy balance. Perturbations in these behaviors, manifesting as poorer child eating self-regulation, are associated with higher child weight status. Initial research into child eating self-regulation focused on the role of parent feeding styles and behaviors. However, we argue that child eating self-regulation is better understood as arising from a complex interplay between the child and their feeding environment, and highlight newer research into the heritable child characteristics, such as cognitive ability, that play an important role in this dynamic. Therefore, child eating self-regulation arises from gene-environment interactions. Identifying the genes and environmental influences contributing to these will help us tailor our parental feeding advice to the unique nature of the child. In this way, we will devise more effective advice for preventing childhood obesity. PMID:26847550

  20. Gene-Environment Interplay in Internalizing Disorders: Consistent Findings across Six Environmental Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Brian M.; Dirago, Ana C.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Background: Behavior genetic methods can help to elucidate gene-environment (G-E) interplay in the development of internalizing (INT) disorders (i.e., major depression and anxiety disorders). To date, however, no study has conducted a comprehensive analysis examining multiple environmental risk factors with the purpose of delineating general…

  1. Landscape genomics in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar): searching for gene-environment interactions driving local adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Bourret; Dionne, Mélanie; Kent, Matthew P; Lien, Sigbjørn; Bernatchez, Louis

    2013-12-01

    A growing number of studies are examining the factors driving historical and contemporary evolution in wild populations. By combining surveys of genomic variation with a comprehensive assessment of environmental parameters, such studies can increase our understanding of the genomic and geographical extent of local adaptation in wild populations. We used a large-scale landscape genomics approach to examine adaptive and neutral differentiation across 54 North American populations of Atlantic salmon representing seven previously defined genetically distinct regional groups. Over 5500 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped in 641 individuals and 28 bulk assays of 25 pooled individuals each. Genome scans, linkage map, and 49 environmental variables were combined to conduct an innovative landscape genomic analysis. Our results provide valuable insight into the links between environmental variation and both neutral and potentially adaptive genetic divergence. In particular, we identified markers potentially under divergent selection, as well as associated selective environmental factors and biological functions with the observed adaptive divergence. Multivariate landscape genetic analysis revealed strong associations of both genetic and environmental structures. We found an enrichment of growth-related functions among outlier markers. Climate (temperature-precipitation) and geological characteristics were significantly associated with both potentially adaptive and neutral genetic divergence and should be considered as candidate loci involved in adaptation at the regional scale in Atlantic salmon. Hence, this study significantly contributes to the improvement of tools used in modern conservation and management schemes of Atlantic salmon wild populations. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  2. The clinical application of UGT1A1 pharmacogenetic testing: Gene-environment interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques Sara

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the past decade, the number of pharmacogenetic tests has increased considerably, allowing for the development of our knowledge of their clinical application. The uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene (UGT1A1 assay is an example of a pharmacogenetic test. Numerous variants have been found in UGT1A1, the main conjugating enzyme of bilirubin and drugs such as the anticancer drug irinotecan. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA recommended testing for the presence of UGT1A1*28, an allele correlated with decreased transcriptional activity, to predict patients at risk of irinotecan toxicity. The administration of other drugs -- such as inhibitors of the UGT1A1 enzyme -- can clinically mimic the *28 phenotype, whereas inducers of UGT1A1 can increase the glucuronidation rate of the enzyme. The *28 polymorphism is not present in all ethnicities at a similar frequency, which suggests that it is important to study different populations to determine the clinical relevance of testing for UGT1A1*28 and to identify other clinically relevant UGT1A1 variants. Environmental factors such as lifestyle can also affect UGT1A1 activity. This review is a critical analysis of studies on drugs that can be affected by the presence of UGT1A1*28, the distribution of this polymorphism around the globe, distinct variants that may be clinically significant in African and Asian populations and how lifestyle can affect treatment outcomes that depend on UGT1A1 activity.

  3. Identifying gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia: contemporary challenges for integrated, large-scale investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os, Jim; Rutten, Bart P.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Delespaul, Philippe; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; van Zelst, Catherine; Bruggeman, Richard; Reininghaus, Ulrich; Morgan, Craig; Murray, Robin M.; Di Forti, Marta; McGuire, Philip; Valmaggia, Lucia R.; Kempton, Matthew J.; Gayer-Anderson, Charlotte; Hubbard, Kathryn; Beards, Stephanie; Stilo, Simona A.; Onyejiaka, Adanna; Bourque, Francois; Modinos, Gemma; Tognin, Stefania; Calem, Maria; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Owen, Michael J.; Holmans, Peter; Williams, Nigel; Craddock, Nicholas; Richards, Alexander; Humphreys, Isla; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Leweke, F. Markus; Tost, Heike; Akdeniz, Ceren; Rohleder, Cathrin; Bumb, J. Malte; Schwarz, Emanuel; Alptekin, Köksal; Üçok, Alp; Saka, Meram Can; Atbaşoğlu, E. Cem; Gülöksüz, Sinan; Gumus-Akay, Guvem; Cihan, Burçin; Karadağ, Hasan; Soygür, Haldan; Cankurtaran, Eylem Şahin; Ulusoy, Semra; Akdede, Berna; Binbay, Tolga; Ayer, Ahmet; Noyan, Handan; Karadayı, Gülşah; Akturan, Elçin; Ulaş, Halis; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara; Bernardo, Miguel; Sanjuán, Julio; Bobes, Julio; Arrojo, Manuel; Santos, Jose Luis; Cuadrado, Pedro; Rodríguez Solano, José Juan; Carracedo, Angel; García Bernardo, Enrique; Roldán, Laura; López, Gonzalo; Cabrera, Bibiana; Cruz, Sabrina; Díaz Mesa, Eva Ma; Pouso, María; Jiménez, Estela; Sánchez, Teresa; Rapado, Marta; González, Emiliano; Martínez, Covadonga; Sánchez, Emilio; Olmeda, Ma Soledad; de Haan, Lieuwe; Velthorst, Eva; van der Gaag, Mark; Selten, Jean-Paul; van Dam, Daniella; van der Ven, Elsje; van der Meer, Floor; Messchaert, Elles; Kraan, Tamar; Burger, Nadine; Leboyer, Marion; Szoke, Andrei; Schürhoff, Franck; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Jamain, Stéphane; Tortelli, Andrea; Frijda, Flora; Vilain, Jeanne; Galliot, Anne-Marie; Baudin, Grégoire; Ferchiou, Aziz; Richard, Jean-Romain; Bulzacka, Ewa; Charpeaud, Thomas; Tronche, Anne-Marie; de Hert, Marc; van Winkel, Ruud; Decoster, Jeroen; Derom, Catherine; Thiery, Evert; Stefanis, Nikos C.; Sachs, Gabriele; Aschauer, Harald; Lasser, Iris; Winklbaur, Bernadette; Schlögelhofer, Monika; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Borgwardt, Stefan; Walter, Anna; Harrisberger, Fabienne; Smieskova, Renata; Rapp, Charlotte; Ittig, Sarah; Soguel-Dit-Piquard, Fabienne; Studerus, Erich; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Paruch, Julia; Julkowski, Dominika; Hilboll, Desiree; Sham, Pak C.; Cherny, Stacey S.; Chen, Eric Y. H.; Campbell, Desmond D.; Li, Miaoxin; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos María; Emaldi Cirión, Aitziber; Urruela Mora, Asier; Jones, Peter; Kirkbride, James; Cannon, Mary; Rujescu, Dan; Tarricone, Ilaria; Berardi, Domenico; Bonora, Elena; Seri, Marco; Marcacci, Thomas; Chiri, Luigi; Chierzi, Federico; Storbini, Viviana; Braca, Mauro; Minenna, Maria Gabriella; Donegani, Ivonne; Fioritti, Angelo; La Barbera, Daniele; La Cascia, Caterina Erika; Mulè, Alice; Sideli, Lucia; Sartorio, Rachele; Ferraro, Laura; Tripoli, Giada; Seminerio, Fabio; Marinaro, Anna Maria; McGorry, Patrick; Nelson, Barnaby; Amminger, G. Paul; Pantelis, Christos; Menezes, Paulo R.; del-Ben, Cristina M.; Gallo Tenan, Silvia H.; Shuhama, Rosana; Ruggeri, Mirella; Tosato, Sarah; Lasalvia, Antonio; Bonetto, Chiara; Ira, Elisa; Nordentoft, Merete; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Barrantes-Vidal, Neus; Cristóbal, Paula; Kwapil, Thomas R.; Brietzke, Elisa; Bressan, Rodrigo A.; Gadelha, Ary; Maric, Nadja P.; Andric, Sanja; Mihaljevic, Marina; Mirjanic, Tijana

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen considerable progress in epidemiological and molecular genetic research into environmental and genetic factors in schizophrenia, but methodological uncertainties remain with regard to validating environmental exposures, and the population risk conferred by individual molecular

  4. The role of epigenetics in depression and suicide: A platform for gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Laura E; Su, Shaoyong; Youssef, Nagy A

    2015-08-30

    Epigenetics involves functional modifications of genes. The aim of this paper is to explore if an association exists between epigenetics and depression and/or suicide. MedLine/PubMed searches were performed using both Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) and Non-MeSH terms. Based on pre-specified terms and inclusion criteria, sixteen studies met inclusion criteria by the 3 independent reviewers. Epigenetic changes seem to be important in both depression and suicide. All of the studies reviewed herein found significant epigenetic changes associated with depression and suicide except for two. Several studies showed that hypermethylation of BDNF is involved in suicide. TrkB hypermethylation was also shown to be associated with suicide by several studies, specifically in Brodmann's Areas (BA) 8 and 9. Future research is needed in a larger sample to further characterize these changes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Gene-environment interactions in considering physical activity for the prevention of dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristyn Alissa Bates

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, the most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide, ranks as one of the most feared diseases in the world. Similarly, recent studies suggest that AD may be the third leading cause of death in the United States, behind heart disease and cancer. In the absence of a cure or effective treatment, strategies to prevent or delay the onset and progression of the disease are desperately needed. Decades of research have identified key risk and protective factors including genetic polymorphism in the APOE gene, age and lifestyle factors. Physical activity (PA is emerging as an attractive primary prevention strategy. This review will summarise the latest findings supporting the role of physical activity in the prevention of AD, including possible mechanisms and the influence of genetics on disease prevention. Given that AD and other dementias are recognised as a world health priority, public health strategies are needed to incorporate promoting the health benefits of physical activity across the lifespan.

  6. Childhood problem behavior and parental divorce: evidence for gene-environment interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C.C. Robbers (Sylvana); F.V.A. van Oort (Floor); A.C. Huizink (Anja); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); C.E.M. van Beijsterveldt (Toos); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); M. Bartels (Meike)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective: The importance of genetic and environmental influences on children's behavioral and emotional problems may vary as a function of environmental exposure. We previously reported that 12-year-olds with divorced parents showed more internalizing and externalizing problems than

  7. Challenges of Analysing Gene-Environment Interactions in Mouse Models of Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter L. Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The modelling of neuropsychiatric disease using the mouse has provided a wealth of information regarding the relationship between specific genetic lesions and behavioural endophenotypes. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that synergy between genetic and nongenetic factors is a key feature of these disorders that must also be taken into account. With the inherent limitations of retrospective human studies, experiments in mice have begun to tackle this complex association, combining well-established behavioural paradigms and quantitative neuropathology with a range of environmental insults. The conclusions from this work have been varied, due in part to a lack of standardised methodology, although most have illustrated that phenotypes related to disorders such as schizophrenia are consistently modified. Far fewer studies, however, have attempted to generate a “two-hit” model, whereby the consequences of a pathogenic mutation are analysed in combination with environmental manipulation such as prenatal stress. This significant, yet relatively new, approach is beginning to produce valuable new models of neuropsychiatric disease. Focussing on prenatal and perinatal stress models of schizophrenia, this review discusses the current progress in this field, and highlights important issues regarding the interpretation and comparative analysis of such complex behavioural data.

  8. Identifying Gene-Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia : Contemporary Challenges for Integrated, Large-scale Investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os, Jim; Rutten, Bart P.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Delespaul, Philippe; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; van Zelst, Catherine; Bruggeman, Richard; Reininghaus, Ulrich; Morgan, Craig; Murray, Robin M.; Di Forti, Marta; McGuire, Philip; Valmaggia, Lucia R.; Kempton, Matthew J.; Gayer-Anderson, Charlotte; Hubbard, Kathryn; Beards, Stephanie; Stilo, Simona A.; Onyejiaka, Adanna; Bourque, Francois; Modinos, Gemma; Tognin, Stefania; Calem, Maria; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Owen, Michael J.; Holmans, Peter; Williams, Nigel; Craddock, Nicholas; Richards, Alexander; Humphreys, Isla; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Leweke, F. Markus; Tost, Heike; Akdeniz, Ceren; Rohleder, Cathrin; Bumb, J. Malte; Schwarz, Emanuel; Alptekin, Koksal; Ucok, Alp; Saka, Meram Can; Atbasoglu, E. Cem; Guloksuz, Sinan; Gumus-Akay, Guvem; Cihan, Burin; Karadag, Hasan; Soygur, Haldan; Cankurtaran, Eylem Sahin; Ulusoy, Semra; Akdede, Berna; Binbay, Tolga

    Recent years have seen considerable progress in epidemiological and molecular genetic research into environmental and genetic factors in schizophrenia, but methodological uncertainties remain with regard to validating environmental exposures, and the population risk conferred by individual molecular

  9. Identifying Gene-Environment interactions in schizophrenia: Contemporary challenges for integrated, large-scale investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    European Network authors, o.a.; van der Gaag, M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen considerable progress in epidemiological and molecular genetic research into environmental and genetic factors in schizophrenia, but methodological uncertainties remain with regard to validating environmental exposures, and the population risk conferred by individual molecular

  10. Gene-environment interactions of circadian-related genes for cardiometabolic traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Common circadian-related gene variants associate with increased risk for metabolic alterations including type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about whether diet and sleep could modify associations between circadian-related variants (CLOCK-rs1801260, CRY2-rs11605924, MTNR1B-rs1387153,...

  11. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in the Etiology of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    and redissolving in a methanol acetate buffer mixture. Liquid chromatography photo diode array multiple generation mass spectrometry (LC/PDA/MS...delivery liquid chromatography system with multiple channel diode-array detection and a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer model ’Advantage...flour) 1 2 3 4 5 120. Elubo lafu 1 2 3 4 5 121. Kpokpo gari 1 2 3 4 5 122. Cassava /Yuka boiled 1 2 3 4 5 123. Fufu 1 2 3 4 5 124. Starch

  12. Gene-Environment Interactions of Circadian-Related Genes for Cardiometabolic Traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dashti, Hassan S; Follis, Jack L; Smith, Caren E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Common circadian-related gene variants associate with increased risk for metabolic alterations including type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about whether diet and sleep could modify associations between circadian-related variants (CLOCK-rs1801260, CRY2-rs11605924, MTNR1B-rs13871...

  13. Epigenetic understanding of gene-environment interactions in psychiatric disorders: a new concept of clinical genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Kubota, Takeo; Miyake, Kunio; Hirasawa, Takae

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Epigenetics is a mechanism that regulates gene expression independently of the underlying DNA sequence, relying instead on the chemical modification of DNA and histone proteins. Although environmental and genetic factors were thought to be independently associated with disorders, several recent lines of evidence suggest that epigenetics bridges these two factors. Epigenetic gene regulation is essential for normal development, thus defects in epigenetics cause various rare congenital ...

  14. Evidence for gene-environment interaction in a genome wide study of nonsyndromic cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo; Murray, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft palate (CP) is a common birth defect with a complex and heterogeneous etiology involving both genetic and environmental risk factors. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using 550 case-parent trios, ascertained through a CP case collected in an international...

  15. Eating disorders, gene-environment interactions and the epigenome: Roles of stress exposures and nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Howard; Thaler, Lea

    2016-08-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are believed to link environmental exposures to gene expression, and in so doing, to provide a physical basis for the activation, by life experiences, of mental-health problems. This paper provides a background to the hypothesis that epigenetic mechanisms link life stresses (perinatal, childhood and adult) and effects of malnutrition to the eating disorders (EDs). The paper reviews literature bearing upon the putative link between epigenetic factors and ED development, and examines ways in which epigenetic alterations could account for risk of eating disturbances and commonly associated behavioral and emotional problems. Ultimately, we propose that epigenetic processes provide an intriguing (although hypothetical) biological "platform" upon which ED-relevant effects of perinatal insults, life stresses, and consequences of malnutrition may be registered, and argue that an epigenetically informed understanding may explain why EDs are triggered and maintained by excessive caloric restraint, why they coincide so frequently with mood- and impulse-regulation problems, and why they tend to become increasingly entrenched over time. Finally, we comment on the clinical relevance and implications of an epigenetically informed model of ED etiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Coronary heart disease risk : family history and gene-environment interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, J.M.A.

    1999-01-01

    The first part of this thesis describes research into lifestyle, genetic, and biological factors that may underlie the increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) in individuals with a family history of this disorder. The second part of this thesis describes whether levels of plasma

  17. A review of gene-environment correlations and their implications for autism: a conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Shantel E; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Jahromi, Laudan B; Valiente, Carlos

    2013-07-01

    A conceptual model is proposed that explains how gene-environment correlations and the multiplier effect function in the context of social development in individuals with autism. The review discusses the current state of autism genetic research, including its challenges, such as the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder, and its limitations, such as the lack of interdisciplinary work between geneticists and social scientists. We discuss literature on gene-environment correlations in the context of social development and draw implications for individuals with autism. The review expands upon genes, behaviors, types of environmental exposure, and exogenous variables relevant to social development in individuals on the autism spectrum, and explains these factors in the context of the conceptual model to provide a more in-depth understanding of how the effects of certain genetic variants can be multiplied by the environment to cause largely phenotypic individual differences. Using the knowledge gathered from gene-environment correlations and the multiplier effect, we outline novel intervention directions and implications. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Multifactor dimensionality reduction: An analysis strategy for modelling and detecting gene - gene interactions in human genetics and pharmacogenomics studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motsinger Alison A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The detection of gene - gene and gene - environment interactions associated with complex human disease or pharmacogenomic endpoints is a difficult challenge for human geneticists. Unlike rare, Mendelian diseases that are associated with a single gene, most common diseases are caused by the non-linear interaction of numerous genetic and environmental variables. The dimensionality involved in the evaluation of combinations of many such variables quickly diminishes the usefulness of traditional, parametric statistical methods. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR is a novel and powerful statistical tool for detecting and modelling epistasis. MDR is a non-parametric and model-free approach that has been shown to have reasonable power to detect epistasis in both theoretical and empirical studies. MDR has detected interactions in diseases such as sporadic breast cancer, multiple sclerosis and essential hypertension. As this method is more frequently applied, and was gained acceptance in the study of human disease and pharmacogenomics, it is becoming increasingly important that the implementation of the MDR approach is properly understood. As with all statistical methods, MDR is only powerful and useful when implemented correctly. Concerns regarding dataset structure, configuration parameters and the proper execution of permutation testing in reference to a particular dataset and configuration are essential to the method's effectiveness. The detection, characterisation and interpretation of gene - gene and gene - environment interactions are expected to improve the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of common human diseases. MDR can be a powerful tool in reaching these goals when used appropriately.

  19. Multifactor dimensionality reduction: An analysis strategy for modelling and detecting gene - gene interactions in human genetics and pharmacogenomics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The detection of gene - gene and gene - environment interactions associated with complex human disease or pharmacogenomic endpoints is a difficult challenge for human geneticists. Unlike rare, Mendelian diseases that are associated with a single gene, most common diseases are caused by the non-linear interaction of numerous genetic and environmental variables. The dimensionality involved in the evaluation of combinations of many such variables quickly diminishes the usefulness of traditional, parametric statistical methods. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) is a novel and powerful statistical tool for detecting and modelling epistasis. MDR is a non-parametric and model-free approach that has been shown to have reasonable power to detect epistasis in both theoretical and empirical studies. MDR has detected interactions in diseases such as sporadic breast cancer, multiple sclerosis and essential hypertension. As this method is more frequently applied, and was gained acceptance in the study of human disease and pharmacogenomics, it is becoming increasingly important that the implementation of the MDR approach is properly understood. As with all statistical methods, MDR is only powerful and useful when implemented correctly. Concerns regarding dataset structure, configuration parameters and the proper execution of permutation testing in reference to a particular dataset and configuration are essential to the method's effectiveness. The detection, characterisation and interpretation of gene - gene and gene - environment interactions are expected to improve the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of common human diseases. MDR can be a powerful tool in reaching these goals when used appropriately. PMID:16595076

  20. Multifactor dimensionality reduction: an analysis strategy for modelling and detecting gene-gene interactions in human genetics and pharmacogenomics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motsinger, Alison A; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2006-03-01

    The detection of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions associated with complex human disease or pharmacogenomic endpoints is a difficult challenge for human geneticists. Unlike rare, Mendelian diseases that are associated with a single gene, most common diseases are caused by the non-linear interaction of numerous genetic and environmental variables. The dimensionality involved in the evaluation of combinations of many such variables quickly diminishes the usefulness of traditional, parametric statistical methods. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) is a novel and powerful statistical tool for detecting and modelling epistasis. MDR is a non-parametric and model-free approach that has been shown to have reasonable power to detect epistasis in both theoretical and empirical studies. MDR has detected interactions in diseases such as sporadic breast cancer, multiple sclerosis and essential hypertension. As this method is more frequently applied, and was gained acceptance in the study of human disease and pharmacogenomics, it is becoming increasingly important that the implementation of the MDR approach is properly understood. As with all statistical methods, MDR is only powerful and useful when implemented correctly. Concerns regarding dataset structure, configuration parameters and the proper execution of permutation testing in reference to a particular dataset and configuration are essential to the method's effectiveness. The detection, characterisation and interpretation of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions are expected to improve the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of common human diseases. MDR can be a powerful tool in reaching these goals when used appropriately.

  1. Suicide and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E N; Stenager, Egon; Koch-Henriksen, Nils

    1992-01-01

    In a nationwide investigation the risk of death by suicide for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) was assessed using records kept at the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry (DMSR) and the Danish National Register of Cause of Death. The investigation covers all MS patients registered with DSMR...

  2. Tuberous sclerosis complex coexistent with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Min; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    Tuberous sclerosis and hippocampal sclerosis are both well-defined entities associated with medically intractable epilepsy. To our knowledge, there has been only one prior case of these two pathologies being co-existent. We report a 7-month-old boy who presented with intractable seizures at 2 months of age. MRI studies showed diffuse volume loss in the brain with bilateral, multiple cortical tubers and subcortical migration abnormalities. Subependymal nodules were noted without subependymal giant cell astrocytoma. Genetic testing revealed TSC2 and PRD gene deletions. Histopathology of the hippocampus showed CA1 sclerosis marked by loss of neurons in the CA1 region. Sections from the temporal, parietal and occipital lobes showed multiple cortical tubers characterized by cortical architectural disorganization, gliosis, calcifications and increased number of large balloon cells. Focal white matter balloon cells and spongiform changes were also present. The patient underwent resection of the right fronto-parietal lobe and a subsequent resection of the right temporal, parietal and occipital lobes. The patient is free of seizures on anti-epileptic medication 69 months after surgery. Although hippocampal sclerosis is well documented to be associated with coexistent focal cortical dysplasia, the specific co-existence of cortical tubers and hippocampal sclerosis appears to be rare. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Exposure to Environmental Toxicants and Pathogenesis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: State of the Art and Research Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosaria Monsurrò

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a broad scientific consensus that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, a fatal neuromuscular disease, is caused by gene-environment interactions. In fact, given that only about 10% of all ALS diagnosis has a genetic basis, gene-environmental interaction may give account for the remaining percentage of cases. However, relatively little attention has been paid to environmental and lifestyle factors that may trigger the cascade of motor neuron degeneration leading to ALS, although exposure to chemicals—including lead and pesticides—agricultural environments, smoking, intense physical activity, trauma and electromagnetic fields have been associated with an increased risk of ALS. This review provides an overview of our current knowledge of potential toxic etiologies of ALS with emphasis on the role of cyanobacteria, heavy metals and pesticides as potential risk factors for developing ALS. We will summarize the most recent evidence from epidemiological studies and experimental findings from animal and cellular models, revealing that potential causal links between environmental toxicants and ALS pathogenesis have not been fully ascertained, thus justifying the need for further research.

  4. Rehabilitation and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    of their lives, emphasising the importance of rehabilitation in order to maintain quality of life. An important aspect of multiple sclerosis rehabilitation is the preservation of physical functioning. Hot topics in the rehabilitation of physical function include (1) exercise therapy, (2) robot-assisted training......, a paradigm shift is taking place and it is now increasingly acknowledged that exercise therapy is both safe and beneficial. Robot-assisted training is also attracting attention in multiple sclerosis rehabilitation. Several sophisticated commercial robots exist, but so far the number of scientific studies......In a chronic and disabling disease like multiple sclerosis, rehabilitation becomes of major importance in the preservation of physical, psychological and social functioning. Approximately 80% of patients have multiple sclerosis for more than 35 years and most will develop disability at some point...

  5. Estimating Risks and Relative Risks in Case-Base Studies under the Assumptions of Gene-Environment Independence and Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Tina Tsz-Ting; Lee, Wen-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Many diseases result from the interactions between genes and the environment. An efficient method has been proposed for a case-control study to estimate the genetic and environmental main effects and their interactions, which exploits the assumptions of gene-environment independence and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. To estimate the absolute and relative risks, one needs to resort to an alternative design: the case-base study. In this paper, the authors show how to analyze a case-base study under the above dual assumptions. This approach is based on a conditional logistic regression of case-counterfactual controls matched data. It can be easily fitted with readily available statistical packages. When the dual assumptions are met, the method is approximately unbiased and has adequate coverage probabilities for confidence intervals. It also results in smaller variances and shorter confidence intervals as compared with a previous method for a case-base study which imposes neither assumption. PMID:25137392

  6. Adolescent peer choice and cigarette smoking: evidence of active gene-environment correlation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Amanda G; Carey, Gregory

    2013-10-01

    Both peer groups and genetics have been associated with adolescent smoking behavior. Recently, Loehlin (Loehlin, J. C. (2010). Is there an active gene-environment correlation in adolescent drinking behavior? Behavior Genetics, 40, 447-451) reported that twin differences in alcohol use were associated with differences in the number of common friends. Twins with more common friends were more similar in drinking, but only for dizygotic pairs. Using the same sample as Loehlin's (the National Merit twins), we replicated all of these findings for a composite cigarette smoking measure and for smoking initiation, but not persistence. The pattern of results is most consistent with homophily, or the tendency to associate with individuals that are like oneself. If peer influence occurs in the presence of homophily, then active genotype-environment correlation will be induced.

  7. Multiple Sclerosis and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Demyelinating disease ( CNS) http://n.neurology.org//cgi/collection/all_demyelinating_disease_cns Multiple sclerosis http://n.neurology.org//cgi/collection/multiple_sclerosis Information about reproducing this article ...

  8. African Americans and Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Council: nationalMSsociety.org/African- AmericansandMS African Americans & Multiple Sclerosis GENER AL INFORMATION MS STOPS PEOPLE FROM MOVING. ... Judy, diagnosed in 1982 What is MS? Multiple sclerosis (MS), an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the ...

  9. Dynamic Response Genes in CD4+ T Cells Reveal a Network of Interactive Proteins that Classifies Disease Activity in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Hellberg

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disease of the CNS and has a varying disease course as well as variable response to treatment. Biomarkers may therefore aid personalized treatment. We tested whether in vitro activation of MS patient-derived CD4+ T cells could reveal potential biomarkers. The dynamic gene expression response to activation was dysregulated in patient-derived CD4+ T cells. By integrating our findings with genome-wide association studies, we constructed a highly connected MS gene module, disclosing cell activation and chemotaxis as central components. Changes in several module genes were associated with differences in protein levels, which were measurable in cerebrospinal fluid and were used to classify patients from control individuals. In addition, these measurements could predict disease activity after 2 years and distinguish low and high responders to treatment in two additional, independent cohorts. While further validation is needed in larger cohorts prior to clinical implementation, we have uncovered a set of potentially promising biomarkers.

  10. Multiple sclerosis; Multiple Sklerose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, I.Q.; Kuehn, A.L.; Backens, M.; Papanagiotou, P. [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Radiologische Klinik, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Shariat, K. [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Kostopoulos, P. [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Neurologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common chronic inflammatory disease of myelin with interspersed lesions in the white matter of the central nervous system. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the diagnosis and monitoring of white matter diseases. This article focuses on key findings in multiple sclerosis as detected by MRI. (orig.) [German] Die Multiple Sklerose (MS) ist die haeufigste chronisch-entzuendliche Erkrankung des Myelins mit eingesprengten Laesionen im Bereich der weissen Substanz des zentralen Nervensystems. Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) hat bei der Diagnosestellung und Verlaufskontrolle eine Schluesselrolle. Dieser Artikel befasst sich mit Hauptcharakteristika der MR-Bildbebung. (orig.)

  11. Multiple Sclerosis in Children

    OpenAIRE

    INALOO, Soroor; HAGHBIN, Saideh

    2013-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Inaloo S, Haghbin S. Multiple Sclerosis in Children. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Spring;7(2):1-10. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most important immune-mediated demyelinated disease of human which is typically the disease of young adults. A total of 4% to 5% of MS population are pediatric. Pediatric MS is defined as the appearance of MS before the age of sixteen. About 80% of the pediatric cases and nearly all adolescent onset patients present with attacks typical to a...

  12. Is Hypovitaminosis D One of the Environmental Risk Factors for Multiple Sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrot-Deseilligny, Charles; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    The role of hypovitaminosis D as a possible risk factor for multiple sclerosis is reviewed. First, it is emphasized that hypovitaminosis D could be only one of the risk factors for multiple sclerosis and that numerous other environmental and genetic risk factors appear to interact and combine to trigger the disease. Secondly, the classical…

  13. Links between Friends' Physical Aggression and Adolescents' Physical Aggression: What Happens If Gene-Environment Correlations are Controlled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaro, Frank; Brendgen, Mara; Girard, Alain; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boivin, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to deviant friends has been found to be a powerful source of influence on children's and adolescents' aggressive behavior. However, the contribution of deviant friends may have been overestimated because of a possible non-accounted gene-environment correlation (rGE). In this study, we used a cross-lagged design to test whether friends'…

  14. Zinc in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredholt, Mikkel; Fredriksen, Jette Lautrup

    2016-01-01

    In the last 35 years, zinc (Zn) has been examined for its potential role in the disease multiple sclerosis (MS). This review gives an overview of the possible role of Zn in the pathogenesis of MS as well as a meta-analysis of studies having measured Zn in serum or plasma in patients with MS...

  15. Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Anju; Shashiraj

    2006-03-01

    Juvenile amytrophic lateral sclerosis (JALS) is a type of motor neuron disease presenting before 25 years of age. It is characterized by a combination of upper and lower motor signs. It may be familial or sporadic. We are reporting a sporadic case of JALS with onset of symptoms at 4 years of age. Diagnostic criteria and a brief review of literature are presented.

  16. Mesial temporal sclerosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    2005-07-29

    Jul 29, 2005 ... tail of the hippocampus were involved, with associated poor grey- white matter differentiation. In addi- tion, there was atrophy of the hip- pocampus and fornix, with dilatation of the temporal horn (Figs 1 - 4). Discussion. Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) is the commonest cause of temporal lobe epilepsy.

  17. Multiple Sclerosis: Can It Cause Seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it cause seizures? Is there any connection between multiple sclerosis and epilepsy? Answers from B Mark Keegan, M. ... article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/multiple-sclerosis/expert-answers/multiple-sclerosis/FAQ-20058138 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions ...

  18. Vascular comorbidities in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thormann, Anja; Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    and randomly matched with controls regarding year of birth, gender, and municipality on January 1st in the year of multiple sclerosis (MS) onset (index date). Individual-level information on comorbidities was obtained from several independent nationwide registries and linked to the study population by unique......To investigate the occurrence of vascular comorbidities before and after the clinical onset of multiple sclerosis. In this combined case–control and cohort study, all Danish born citizens with onset of multiple sclerosis 1980–2005 were identified from the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry...

  19. Chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffoli, A.; Micheletti, E.; Capra, R.; Mattioli, F.; Marciano', N.

    1991-01-01

    A long-lasting immunological suppression action seems to be produced by total lymphoid irradiation; some authors emphasize the favorable effect of this treatment on chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. In order to evaluate the actual role of TLI, 6 patients affected with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis were submitted to TLI with shaped and personalized fields at the Istituto del Radio, University of Brescia, Italy. The total dose delivered was 19.8 Gy in 4 weeks, 1.8 Gy/day, 5d/w; a week elapsed between the first and the second irradiation course. Disability according to Kurtzke scale was evaluated, together with blood lymphocyte count and irradiation side-effects, over a mean follow-up period of 20.8 months (range: 13-24). Our findings indicate that: a) disease progression was not markedly reduced by TLI; b) steroid hormones responsivity was restored after irradiation, and c) side-effects were mild and tolerable

  20. Suicide and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E N; Stenager, Egon; Koch-Henriksen, Nils

    1992-01-01

    In a nationwide investigation the risk of death by suicide for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) was assessed using records kept at the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry (DMSR) and the Danish National Register of Cause of Death. The investigation covers all MS patients registered with DSMR...... with an onset of the disease within the period 1953-85, or for whom MS was diagnosed in the same period. Fifty three of the 5525 cases in the onset cohort group committed suicide. Using the figures from the population death statistics by adjustment to number of subjects, duration of observation, sex, age......, and calendar year at the start of observation, the expected number of suicides was calculated to be nearly 29. The cumulative lifetime risk of suicide from onset of MS, using an actuarial method of calculation, was 1.95%. The standard mortality ratio (SMR) of suicide in MS was 1.83. It was highest for males...

  1. Physiotherapy in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Łuszczyńska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic, progressive, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. 2.5 million people are affected by MS worldwide; in Poland, the number of patients is approximately 40,000. Patients with multiple sclerosis suffer from a number of symptoms associated with this disease. Aim of the research: To assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy in MS. Material and methods : The study enrolled 25 MS patients aged 27–72 years (including 16 females and 9 males, undergoing 6-week rehabilitation. They were examined twice: before and after rehabilitation. The study used two questionnaires created by the author. Evaluation of the clinical status and disease severity was based on the Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scales (EDSS, the Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL Scale, and the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29. The results were analysed with Student’s t-test and the chi-square (χ 2 test. Results : Statistical analysis showed significant (the level of significance was 0.05 progress in the functional status of the patients after physiotherapy, as evidenced by improved results with respect to the motor efficiency in the Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS, the functional assessment in the Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL Scale, and the influence of MS on patients’ daily life in the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29 seen in the majority of the patients, which confirms a positive impact of the therapy. Conclusions: In the study group, comprehensive rehabilitation had a beneficial influence on the improvement of functional status and the level of motor ability. Physiotherapy turned out to be an extremely effective form of symptomatic treatment of MS patients.

  2. Cognition in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sumowski, James F.; Benedict, Ralph; Enzinger, Christian; Filippi, Massimo; Geurts, Jeroen J.; Hamalainen, Paivi; Hulst, Hanneke; Inglese, Matilde; Leavitt, Victoria M.; Rocca, Maria A.; Rosti-Otajarvi, Eija M.; Rao, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Cognitive decline is recognized as a prevalent and debilitating symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS), especially deficits in episodic memory and processing speed. The field aims to (1) incorporate cognitive assessment into standard clinical care and clinical trials, (2) utilize state-of-the-art neuroimaging to more thoroughly understand neural bases of cognitive deficits, and (3) develop effective, evidence-based, clinically feasible interventions to prevent or treat cognitive dysfunction, whic...

  3. Natural killer cells and their receptors in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurman; Trowsdale, John; Fugger, Lars

    2013-09-01

    The immune system has crucial roles in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. While the adaptive immune cell subsets, T and B cells, have been the main focus of immunological research in multiple sclerosis, it is now important to realize that the innate immune system also has a key involvement in regulating autoimmune responses in the central nervous system. Natural killer cells are innate lymphocytes that play vital roles in a diverse range of infections. There is evidence that they influence a number of autoimmune conditions. Recent studies in multiple sclerosis and its murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, are starting to provide some understanding of the role of natural killer cells in regulating inflammation in the central nervous system. Natural killer cells express a diverse range of polymorphic cell surface receptors, which interact with polymorphic ligands; this interaction controls the function and the activation status of the natural killer cell. In this review, we discuss evidence for the role of natural killer cells in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We consider how a change in the balance of signals received by the natural killer cell influences its involvement in the ensuing immune response, in relation to multiple sclerosis.

  4. Localized cortical bone sclerosis and intramedullar linear sclerosis in neurofibromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuur, E.; Hjarbaek, J.; Teisen, H.

    1988-01-01

    A case of localised cortical bone sclerosis of the left tibia and intramedullar linear sclerosis in the left femur, in association with neurofibromatosis in a 25-year-old female, is presented. The differential diagnostic problems in relation to bone tumours are emphasised. (orig.) [de

  5. Need for online information and support of patients with Systemic Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, R.; Repping-Wuts, Han; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; Knaapen-Hans, Hanneke K.A.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-01-01

    Objective Interactive health communication applications (IHCAs) offer interesting possibilities to support systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients, since SSc is an uncommon, severe disease that needs a multidisciplinary treatment. This study aimed to investigate patients' needs for a hospital-based IHCA.

  6. Angiotensin converting enzyme insertion/deletion genotype, exercise and physical decline: evidence of a gene-environment interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kritchevsky, S.B.; Nicklas, B.J.; Visser, M.; Simonsick, E.M.; Newman, A.B.; Harris, T.B.; Lange, E.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Goodpaster, B.H.; Satterfield, S.; Colbert, L.; Rubin, S; Pahor, M.

    2005-01-01

    Context: Physical performance in response to exercise appears to be influenced by the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) insertion (I)/deletion (D) genotype in young adults, but whether this relationship could help explain variation in older individuals' response to exercise has not been well

  7. Gene/Environment Interaction in Atherosclerosis: An Example of Clinical Medicine as Seen from the Evolutionary Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Mertens

    2010-01-01

    The chronic multifactorial disease of atherosclerosis clearly illustrates the Darwinian paradigm. Recent research, combining the effects of genes and environment, has provided surprising clues to the pathogenesis of this major public health problem. This example makes a strong case for recognizing evolution biology as a basic science for medicine.

  8. Underlying Mechanisms of Gene-Environment Interactions in Externalizing Behavior: A Systematic Review and Search for Theoretical Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeland, J.; Overbeek, G.; Orobio de Castro, B.; Matthys, W.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, several candidate genes (i.e., MAOA, DRD4, DRD2, DAT1, 5-HTTLPR, and COMT) have been extensively studied as potential moderators of the detrimental effects of postnatal family adversity on child externalizing behaviors, such as aggression and conduct disorder. Many studies on

  9. Underlying Mechanisms of Gene-Environment Interactions in Externalizing Behavior : A Systematic Review and Search for Theoretical Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeland, Joyce|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328240583; Overbeek, Geertjan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/25233602X; de Castro, Bram Orobio|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/166985422; Matthys, Walter|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074826484

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, several candidate genes (i.e., MAOA, DRD4, DRD2, DAT1, 5-HTTLPR, and COMT) have been extensively studied as potential moderators of the detrimental effects of postnatal family adversity on child externalizing behaviors, such as aggression and conduct disorder. Many studies on

  10. Investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Anja; Milne, Roger L; Truong, Thérèse

    2015-01-01

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated...

  11. The Dopamine D2 Receptor Gene, Perceived Parental Support, and Adolescent Loneliness: Longitudinal Evidence for Gene-Environment Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roekel, Eeske; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Loneliness is a common problem in adolescence. Earlier research focused on genes within the serotonin and oxytocin systems, but no studies have examined the role of dopamine-related genes in loneliness. In the present study, we focused on the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2). Methods: Associations among the DRD2, sex, parental support,…

  12. Chronic and Acute Stress, Gender, and Serotonin Transporter Gene-Environment Interactions Predicting Depression Symptoms in Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammen, Constance; Brennan, Patricia A.; Keenan-Miller, Danielle; Hazel, Nicholas A.; Najman, Jake M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many recent studies of serotonin transporter gene by environment effects predicting depression have used stress assessments with undefined or poor psychometric methods, possibly contributing to wide variation in findings. The present study attempted to distinguish between effects of acute and chronic stress to predict depressive…

  13. The dopamine D2 receptor gene, perceived parental support, and adolescent loneliness : longitudinal evidence for gene-environment interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roekel, Eeske; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Loneliness is a common problem in adolescence. Earlier research focused on genes within the serotonin and oxytocin systems, but no studies have examined the role of dopamine-related genes in loneliness. In the present study, we focused on the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2). Methods:

  14. Genetic susceptibility to breast cancer in French-Canadians: role of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes and gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajinovic, M; Ghadirian, P; Richer, C; Sinnett, H; Gandini, S; Perret, C; Lacroix, A; Labuda, D; Sinnett, D

    2001-04-15

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy among women. Since genetic factors such as BRCA1 and BRCA2 as well as reproductive history constitute only 30% of the cause, environmental exposure may play a significant role in the development of breast cancer. Likewise, the relevant enzymes involved in the biotransformation of xenobiotics (from tobacco smoke, diet or other environmental sources) might play a role in breast carcinogenesis. Since individuals with modified ability to metabolize these carcinogens could have a different risk for breast cancer, we investigated the role of cytochromes P-450 (CYP1A1, CYP2D6), glutathione-S-transferases (GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1) and N-acetyltransferases (NAT1, NAT2) gene variants in breast carcinogenesis. A case-control study was conducted on 149 women with breast carcinoma and 207 healthy controls, both of French-Canadian origin. The CYP1A1*4 allele was found to be a significant risk determinant of breast carcinoma (OR = 3.3, 95% CI 1.1-9.7), particularly among post-menopausal women (OR = 4.0, 95% CI 1.2-13.8). The frequency of NAT2 rapid acetylators was increased among smokers (OR = 2.6, 95% CI 0.8-8.2), while the NAT1*10 allele conferred a 4-fold increase in risk among women who consumed well-done meat (OR = 4.4, 95% CI 1.0-18.9). These data suggest that CYP1A1*4, NAT1 and NAT2 variants are involved in the susceptibility to breast carcinoma by modifying the impact of exogenous and/or endogenous exposures. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Evidence for gene-environment interaction in a genome wide study of isolated, non-syndromic cleft palate

    OpenAIRE

    Beaty, Terri H.; Ruczinski, Ingo; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Marazita, Mary L.; Munger, Ronald G.; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B.; Murray, Tanda; Redett, Richard J.; Fallin, M. Daniele; Liang, Kung Yee; Wu, Tao; Patel, Poorav J.; Jin, Sheng C.; Zhang, Tian Xiao; Schwender, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Non-syndromic cleft palate (CP) is a common birth defect with a complex and heterogeneous etiology involving both genetic and environmental risk factors. We conducted a genome wide association study (GWAS) using 550 case-parent trios, ascertained through a CP case collected in an international consortium. Family based association tests of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and three common maternal exposures (maternal smoking, alcohol consumption and multivitamin supplementation) were used...

  16. Multiple sclerosis associated with trismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Costa, D. F.; Vania, A. K.; Millac, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the case history of a middle-aged lady who presented with symptoms and signs over one year leading to a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. During one of her relapses, she developed trismus--an association that has not been described before in multiple sclerosis. PMID:2099430

  17. Multiple sclerosis and organic solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, J T; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, K

    1998-01-01

    We investigated a possible causal relation between exposure to organic solvents in Danish workers (housepainters, typographers/printers, carpenters/cabinetmakers) and onset of multiple sclerosis. Data on men included in the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Register (3,241 men) were linked with data from...

  18. The changing demographic pattern of multiple sclerosis epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2010-01-01

    The uneven distribution of multiple sclerosis (MS) across populations can be attributed to differences in genes and the environment and their interaction. Prevalence and incidence surveys could be affected by inaccuracy of diagnosis and ascertainment, and prevalence also depends on survival...

  19. Prior medical conditions and the risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seelen, Meinie; van Doormaal, Perry T. C.; Visser, Anne E.; Huisman, Mark H. B.; Roozekrans, Margot H. J.; de Jong, Sonja W.; van der Kooi, Anneke J.; de Visser, Marianne; Voermans, Nicol C.; Veldink, Jan H.; van den Berg, Leonard H.

    2014-01-01

    Sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is believed to be a complex disease in which multiple exogenous and genetic factors interact to cause motor neuron degeneration. Elucidating the association between medical conditions prior to the first symptoms of ALS could lend support to the theory

  20. Vaccines and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailand, Mia Topsøe; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup

    2017-01-01

    on the database PubMed. The study found no change in risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) after vaccination against hepatitis B virus, human papillomavirus, seasonal influenza, measles-mumps-rubella, variola, tetanus, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), polio, or diphtheria. No change in risk of relapse...... was found for influenza. Further research is needed for the potential therapeutic use of the BCG vaccine in patients in risk of developing MS and for the preventive potential of the tetanus and diphtheria vaccine....

  1. Vaccines and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, J. L.; Topsøe Mailand, M.

    2017-01-01

    An association between certain vaccinations and onset or relapse of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been debated. Based on PubMed, we made a thorough literature review and included all relevant studies, 51 on MS and 15 on optic neuritis (ON). Case studies were excluded. With the exception of a live...... vaccine against yellow fever, vaccinations appear safe in untreated patients with MS and ON. However, most studies were underpowered, and small risks cannot be excluded. One study of BCG vaccination after the first demyelinating event showed even a reduced risk of developing MS. Further studies are needed...

  2. [Future challenges in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Óscar

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis occurs in genetically susceptible individuals, in whom an unknown environmental factor triggers an immune response, giving rise to a chronic and disabling autoimmune disease. Currently, significant progress is being made in our knowledge of the frequency and distribution of multiple sclerosis and its risk factors, genetics, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnostic and prognostic markers, and treatment. This has radically changed patients' and clinicians' expectations of multiple sclerosis and has raised hope that there will soon be a way to control the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. [Optic neuropathy in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Simona; Pascu, Ruxandra; Panea, Cristina; Voinea, Liliana; Badarau, Anca; Nanea, Mariana; Romanitan, Oana; Ciuluvica, R

    2008-01-01

    The inflammation of the optic nerve called optic neuropathy could be an onset marker of multiple sclerosis. The authors review the place of optic neuropathy (neuritis) in the inflammatory demyelinating disease continuum, especially as the onset symptom of multiple sclerosis. We present the clinical symptoms, the aetiology of optic neuritis and the adjacent methods used to investigate optic neuritis. In the article are presented the actual criteria used to establish the multiple sclerosis diagnosis and the revised criteria for optic neuromyelitis, with emphasis on the differential diagnosis between these diseases.

  4. Skin scoring in systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Hugh; Bjerring, Peter; Halkier-Sørensen, Lars

    1994-01-01

    Forty-one patients with systemic sclerosis were investigated with a new and simple skin score method measuring the degree of thickening and pliability in seven regions together with area involvement in each region. The highest values were, as expected, found in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis...... (type III SS) and the lowest in limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (type I SS) with no lesions extending above wrists and ancles. A positive correlation was found to the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen, a serological marker for synthesis of type III collagen. The skin score...

  5. [Biomarkers in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Óscar; Arroyo-González, Rafael; Rodríguez-Antigüedad, Alfredo; García-Merino, Juan A; Comabella, Manuel; Villar, Luisa M; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Tintoré, Mar; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Álvarez-Cermeño, José C; Meca-Lallana, José E; Prieto, José M; Ramió-Torrentà, Lluís; Martínez-Yélamos, Sergio; Montalban, Xavier

    2013-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most frequent disabling neurological disease in young adults. Its development includes independent processes of inflammation, demyelination, neurodegeneration, gliosis and repair, which are responsible for the heterogeneity and individual variability in the expression of the disease, its prognosis and response to treatment. As part of personalised medicine, the progress made in the search for new biomarkers has identified promising candidates that may be useful for the early diagnosis of the disease, for detecting prognostic and developmental profiles of the disease, and for monitoring the response to treatment. Unfortunately, few of them have been validated adequately, which prevents them from being applied in clinical practice. In view of the latest findings, the experts recommend orienting research in another direction, not so much towards the discovery of new molecules or imaging techniques, but instead towards a clinical validation of these markers, with the aim of fostering translational research. This review offers an update on the information about the biomarkers in multiple sclerosis that have currently been validated and are thus potential candidates, as well as looking at their value in the diagnosis, prognosis, evaluation of the development of the disability caused by the disease and the response to therapy.

  6. Idiopatic Osteo Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Salari

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The term of idiopatic osteosclerosis (I.O have been used to describe a localised area of radiopacity of unknown origin. The condition is usually asymptomatic and discovered on a radiograph taken for other reason. The radiopacity is variable in size, shape, outline and density. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the frequncy, age and sex distribution and anatomic location of I.O and its relation to history of extraction of decidious teeth. Materials and Methods: Standard panoramic radiographs of 917 patients(494 female & 423 male were examined at the Department of oral and maxillofacial radiology, Yazd dental college and private clinic. The age, sex as well as the anatomic location of I.O is outlined I.O mass were observed in patients. The radiographs was studies carefully by oral radiologist and sclerosis mass place was marked then clinical examination was done. Results: In total 54 sclerosis mass in 52 mandibuls were observed According to the location of lesions premolars of lower jaws was higher than other (59.6% in female & 40.4% in male P=0.392. Most of cases were occurred in 3rd & forth decade of life (P=0.018. The most prevalence areas were premolar/ molar/ between firstmolar second premolar/ between canin & first premolar. Conclusion: According to the our finding that the most prevalence was belogned to sclerotic mass that was not related to the root, the developing theory in a cause of mass that seems to be accepted.

  7. Association between systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis: lupoid sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Yimy F; Martinez, Jose B; Fernandez, Andres R; Quintana, Gerardo; Restrepo, Jose Felix; Rondon, Federico; Gamarra, Antonio Iglesias

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) with/without antiphospholipid syndrome are autoimmune illnesses. It has been described in many occasions the association of these two illnesses and the clinical picture of MS with characteristics of laboratory of SLE. When they affect to the central nervous system they can make it in a defined form for each illness or they can also make it in interposed or combined form of the two illnesses what has been called lupoid sclerosis; making that in some cases difficult the differentiation of the two illnesses and therefore to address the treatment. We present four cases of lupoid sclerosis, discuss the clinical and laboratory characteristics of this entity and we make a differentiation of the multiple sclerosis with the neurological affectation of SLE especially for images and laboratory results.

  8. Neuroendocrine immunoregulation in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckx, Nathalie; Lee, Wai-Ping; Berneman, Zwi N; Cools, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Currently, it is generally accepted that multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex multifactorial disease involving genetic and environmental factors affecting the autoreactive immune responses that lead to damage of myelin. In this respect, intrinsic or extrinsic factors such as emotional, psychological, traumatic, or inflammatory stress as well as a variety of other lifestyle interventions can influence the neuroendocrine system. On its turn, it has been demonstrated that the neuroendocrine system has immunomodulatory potential. Moreover, the neuroendocrine and immune systems communicate bidirectionally via shared receptors and shared messenger molecules, variously called hormones, neurotransmitters, or cytokines. Discrepancies at any level can therefore lead to changes in susceptibility and to severity of several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Here we provide an overview of the complex system of crosstalk between the neuroendocrine and immune system as well as reported dysfunctions involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, including MS. Finally, possible strategies to intervene with the neuroendocrine-immune system for MS patient management will be discussed. Ultimately, a better understanding of the interactions between the neuroendocrine system and the immune system can open up new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of MS as well as other autoimmune diseases.

  9. Neuroendocrine Immunoregulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Deckx

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, it is generally accepted that multiple sclerosis (MS is a complex multifactorial disease involving genetic and environmental factors affecting the autoreactive immune responses that lead to damage of myelin. In this respect, intrinsic or extrinsic factors such as emotional, psychological, traumatic, or inflammatory stress as well as a variety of other lifestyle interventions can influence the neuroendocrine system. On its turn, it has been demonstrated that the neuroendocrine system has immunomodulatory potential. Moreover, the neuroendocrine and immune systems communicate bidirectionally via shared receptors and shared messenger molecules, variously called hormones, neurotransmitters, or cytokines. Discrepancies at any level can therefore lead to changes in susceptibility and to severity of several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Here we provide an overview of the complex system of crosstalk between the neuroendocrine and immune system as well as reported dysfunctions involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, including MS. Finally, possible strategies to intervene with the neuroendocrine-immune system for MS patient management will be discussed. Ultimately, a better understanding of the interactions between the neuroendocrine system and the immune system can open up new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of MS as well as other autoimmune diseases.

  10. Viral triggers of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakalacheva, Kristina; Münz, Christian; Lünemann, Jan D

    2011-02-01

    Genetic and environmental factors jointly determine the susceptibility to develop Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Collaborative efforts during the past years achieved substantial progress in defining the genetic architecture, underlying susceptibility to MS. Similar to other autoimmune diseases, HLA-DR and HLA-DQ alleles within the HLA class II region on chromosome 6p21 are the highest-risk-conferring genes. Less-robust susceptibility effects have been identified for MHC class I alleles and for non-MHC regions. The role of environmental risk factors and their interaction with genetic susceptibility alleles are much less well defined, despite the fact that infections have long been associated with MS development. Current data suggest that infectious triggers are most likely ubiquitous, i.e., highly prevalent in the general population, and that they require a permissive genetic trait which predisposes for MS development. In this review article, we illustrate mechanisms of infection-induced immunopathologies in experimental animal models of autoimmune CNS inflammation, discuss challenges for the translation of these experimental data into human immunology research, and provide future perspectives on how novel model systems could be utilized to better define the role of viral pathogens in MS. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Occupational therapy for multiple sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Cardol, M.; Nes, J.C.M. van de; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are referred to occupational therapy with complaints about fatigue, limb weakness, alteration of upper extremity fine motor coordination, loss of sensation and spasticity that causes limitations in performance of activities of daily living and social

  12. [Systemic sclerosis: a multisystem disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrevoets, M.A.; Markhorst, J.; Meek, I.; Ede, A.E. van; Vonk, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare, systemic autoimmune disease, characterized by inflammation, vasculopathy and fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. The disease is associated with a significantly increased morbidity and mortality, and can be rapidly progressive. Interstitial lung disease, renal

  13. Multiple sclerosis after infectious mononucleosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Rasmussen; Rostgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Nete Munk

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious mononucleosis caused by the Epstein-Barr virus has been associated with increased risk of multiple sclerosis. However, little is known about the characteristics of this association. OBJECTIVE: To assess the significance of sex, age at and time since infectious mononucleosis......, and attained age to the risk of developing multiple sclerosis after infectious mononucleosis. DESIGN: Cohort study using persons tested serologically for infectious mononucleosis at Statens Serum Institut, the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Hospital Discharge Register, and the Danish...... Multiple Sclerosis Registry. SETTING: Statens Serum Institut. PATIENTS: A cohort of 25 234 Danish patients with mononucleosis was followed up for the occurrence of multiple sclerosis beginning on April 1, 1968, or January 1 of the year after the diagnosis of mononucleosis or after a negative Paul...

  14. Defining active progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, Finn; Börnsen, Lars; Ammitzbøll, Cecilie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether disease activity according to consensus criteria (magnetic resonance imaging activity or clinical relapses) associate with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) changes in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVE: To compare CSF biomarkers in active and inactive...

  15. Multiple sclerosis and organic solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, J T; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, K

    1998-01-01

    We investigated a possible causal relation between exposure to organic solvents in Danish workers (housepainters, typographers/printers, carpenters/cabinetmakers) and onset of multiple sclerosis. Data on men included in the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Register (3,241 men) were linked with data from......, and butchers. Over a follow-up period of 20 years, we observed no increase in the incidence of multiple sclerosis among men presumed to be exposed to organic solvents. It was not possible to obtain data on potential confounders, and the study design has some potential for selection bias. Nevertheless......, the study does not support existing hypotheses regarding an association between occupational exposure to organic solvents and multiple sclerosis....

  16. [Current therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio García Merino, J

    2014-12-01

    Since the introduction of interferon beta 1 b for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, there has been a progressive increase in the number of drugs available for this disease. Currently, 11 drugs have been approved in Spain, and their indications depend on specific clinical characteristics. The present article reviews these indications and also discusses other medications without official approval that have also been used in multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy.

  18. Multiple sclerosis and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Anthony; Pavisian, Bennis

    2017-06-01

    Mortality rates are elevated in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) relative to the general population. There is, however, some uncertainty whether suicide contributes to this. Epidemiological data suggest that the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for suicide in MS is approximately twice that of the general population with younger males in the first few years following diagnosis most at risk. Rates of suicidal intent, a potential harbinger of more self-destructive behavior, are also elevated, but the frequency with which intent is followed by suicide is not known. Depression, severity of depression, social isolation, and alcohol abuse are associated with thoughts of suicide. The variables linked with suicide and suicidal intent are therefore well defined and should be readily available from routine clinical inquiry. While vigilance on the part of clinicians is required, particularly in the context of high-risk patients, it is also recognized that prevention is dependent on full disclosure of intent.

  19. Update on Hippocampal Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Juliana R; Cortés, Etty P; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G

    2015-10-01

    The diagnostic hallmarks of hippocampal sclerosis (HS) are severe volume loss of the hippocampus, severe neuronal loss, and reactive gliosis involving primarily two especially vulnerable fields, CA1 and the subiculum. Occasionally, HS may be the only neuropathological change detected in older individuals with dementia and is known as pure HS. In the majority of cases, HS occurs in the setting of other degenerative changes, usually Alzheimer's disease (AD). In these cases, it is classified as combined HS. Although a clinical profile for HS has been identified, its similarities with AD make the diagnosis during life quite challenging; thus, the diagnosis is often made postmortem. The pathogenesis of HS is not completely understood, but the strong association with transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), in approximately 90%, and the recent discovery of genetic risk factors are important contributions to a better understanding of the disease process.

  20. Employment of patients with multiple sclerosis: the influence of psychosocial-structural coping and context

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayasingham,Lavanya; Mairami,Fatima Fanna

    2018-01-01

    Lavanya Vijayasingham,1,2 Fatima Fanna Mairami1 1Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine, Monash University Malaysia, Bandar Sunway, Malaysia; 2Multiple Sclerosis Society of Malaysia, Petaling Jaya, Malaysia Abstract: Patients with multiple sclerosis tend to report higher levels of work difficulties and negative outcomes, such as voluntary and involuntary work termination and reduced work participation. In this article, we discuss the complex interactions of disease, personal coping strategies, and ...

  1. Ageing, genes, environment and epigenetics: what twin studies tell us now, and in the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steves, Claire Joanne; Spector, Timothy D; Jackson, Stephen H D

    2012-09-01

    Compared with younger people, older people are much more variable in their organ function, and these large individual differences contribute to the complexity of geriatric medicine. What determines this variability? Is it due to the accumulation of different life experiences, or because of the variation in the genes we are born with, or an interaction of both? This paper reviews key findings from ageing twin cohorts probing these questions. Twin studies are the perfect natural experiment to dissect out genes and life experiences. We discuss the paradox that ageing is strongly determined by heritable factors (an influence that often gets stronger with time), yet longevity and lifespan seem not to be so heritable. We then focus on the intriguing question of why DNA sequence-identical twins might age differently. Animal studies are increasingly showing that epigenetic modifications occurring in early development and adulthood, might be key to ageing phenomena but this is difficult to investigate longitudinally in human populations, due to ethical problems of intervention and long lifespan. We propose that identical twin studies using new and existing cohorts may be useful human models in which to investigate the interaction between the environment and genetics, mediated by epigenetic modifications.

  2. Genes, environment and sport performance: why the nature-nurture dualism is no longer relevant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, Keith; Baker, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The historical debate on the relative influences of genes (i.e. nature) and environment (i.e. nurture) on human behaviour has been characterised by extreme positions leading to reductionist and polemic conclusions. Our analysis of research on sport and exercise behaviours shows that currently there is little support for either biologically or environmentally deterministic perspectives on elite athletic performance. In sports medicine, recent molecular biological advances in genomic studies have been over-interpreted, leading to a questionable 'single-gene-as-magic-bullet' philosophy adopted by some practitioners. Similarly, although extensive involvement in training and practice is needed at elite levels, it has become apparent that the acquisition of expertise is not merely about amassing a requisite number of practice hours. Although an interactionist perspective has been mooted over the years, a powerful explanatory framework has been lacking. In this article, we propose how the complementary nature of degenerate neurobiological systems might provide the theoretical basis for explaining the interactive influence of genetic and environmental constraints on elite athletic performance. We argue that, due to inherent human degeneracy, there are many different trajectories to achieving elite athletic performance. While the greatest training responses may be theoretically associated with the most favourable genotypes being exposed to highly specialised training environments, this is a rare and complex outcome. The concept of degeneracy provides us with a basis for understanding why each of the major interacting constraints might act in a compensatory manner on the acquisition of elite athletic performance.

  3. Vitamin D Levels Predict Multiple Sclerosis Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters February 3, 2014 Vitamin D Levels Predict Multiple Sclerosis Progression Among people with ... sclerosis (MS), those with higher blood levels of vitamin D had better outcomes during 5 years of follow- ...

  4. Progressive systemic sclerosis in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun K De

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis is a clinically heterogeneous systemic disease affecting the connective tissues of skin, walls of blood vessels and internal organs like lung, heart and kidneys. Systemic sclerosis is very unusual in pediatric population. Children represent fewer than 10% of all cases. We report a case of 11 years old girl of progressive systemic sclerosis presenting with features of cutaneous sclerosis, microstomia, mask-like facies, sclerodactyly, esophageal dysmotility, Raynaud′s phenomenon, arthralgia and pulmonary fibrosis.

  5. Reactive sclerosis of the pedicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1991-01-01

    The vertebral pedicles of the neural arch represent the 'eyes' through which normal variants, anomalies and acquired pathologic conditions can be detected on lumbar spine radiographs. Close scrutiny of the size, shape, density and margins of the pedicles may permit the radiologist to suggest a wide variety of disease. Radiologic attention is almost always directed at determining of sclerosis or lysis of the pedicle. Numerous conditions causing sclerosis of the pedicle have been reported and among them osteoidosteoma and osteoblastoma are well known tumors. However the real significance of reactive sclerosis of the pedicle related to the unstable neural arch such as contralateral spondyloysis have drawn little attention in the literature. The purpose of this report is to analyze the nature of arch deficiency which is the primary lesion related to the sclerotic pedicle, and emphasizes the significance of radiologic features of reactive pedicular sclerosis for clinical practice. Cautious observation of both sclerotic lesion and the contralateral neural arch is essential in radiologic evaluation of the scleortic pedicle and the presence of a contraslateral pars defect in the same vertebral segment suggests reactive sclerosis of the pedicle

  6. Reactive sclerosis of the pedicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-01-15

    The vertebral pedicles of the neural arch represent the 'eyes' through which normal variants, anomalies and acquired pathologic conditions can be detected on lumbar spine radiographs. Close scrutiny of the size, shape, density and margins of the pedicles may permit the radiologist to suggest a wide variety of disease. Radiologic attention is almost always directed at determining of sclerosis or lysis of the pedicle. Numerous conditions causing sclerosis of the pedicle have been reported and among them osteoidosteoma and osteoblastoma are well known tumors. However the real significance of reactive sclerosis of the pedicle related to the unstable neural arch such as contralateral spondyloysis have drawn little attention in the literature. The purpose of this report is to analyze the nature of arch deficiency which is the primary lesion related to the sclerotic pedicle, and emphasizes the significance of radiologic features of reactive pedicular sclerosis for clinical practice. Cautious observation of both sclerotic lesion and the contralateral neural arch is essential in radiologic evaluation of the scleortic pedicle and the presence of a contraslateral pars defect in the same vertebral segment suggests reactive sclerosis of the pedicle.

  7. [Disseminated sclerosis and sexuality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jønsson, Agnete

    2003-06-23

    Since the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) mainly occurs in younger persons between the age of 20 and 40, sexual dysfunctions have great impact on their quality of life. About 50% of all female and about 75% of all male patients complain of sexual dysfunctions. The primary symptoms among males are erective and ejaculative dysfunctions and reduced libido, while female patients mainly complain of reduced libido, problems achieving orgasm, decreased vaginal lubrication and changes in vaginal sensitivity. Secondary organic symptoms include fatigue, spasticity, muscular weakness, bladder problems, pain, cognitive and behavioural changes. Tertiary dysfunctions refer to general psychosocial problems in relation to chronic, progressive disease. One third of all couples in which either the man or the woman suffers from MS complain of problems in sexual and marital life, where especially the healthy female partner in general has sexual problems. Diagnosing and treating sexual dysfunctions in MS should ideally be carried out by a specialized "MS-team" with the core professionals being the neurologist, urologist, (neuro) psychologist and the nurse. Information about symptoms and their possible causes is an important part of the treatment, and not least learning more efficient coping strategies. Both for the patient and for the couple honest and open informative communication including information about sexual aids and perhaps also medical treatment will often result in minimizing the sexual problems and increasing quality of life.

  8. Cognition in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Ralph; Enzinger, Christian; Filippi, Massimo; Geurts, Jeroen J.; Hamalainen, Paivi; Hulst, Hanneke; Inglese, Matilde; Leavitt, Victoria M.; Rocca, Maria A.; Rosti-Otajarvi, Eija M.; Rao, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Cognitive decline is recognized as a prevalent and debilitating symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS), especially deficits in episodic memory and processing speed. The field aims to (1) incorporate cognitive assessment into standard clinical care and clinical trials, (2) utilize state-of-the-art neuroimaging to more thoroughly understand neural bases of cognitive deficits, and (3) develop effective, evidence-based, clinically feasible interventions to prevent or treat cognitive dysfunction, which are lacking. There are obstacles to these goals. Our group of MS researchers and clinicians with varied expertise took stock of the current state of the field, and we identify several important practical and theoretical challenges, including key knowledge gaps and methodologic limitations related to (1) understanding and measurement of cognitive deficits, (2) neuroimaging of neural bases and correlates of deficits, and (3) development of effective treatments. This is not a comprehensive review of the extensive literature, but instead a statement of guidelines and priorities for the field. For instance, we provide recommendations for improving the scientific basis and methodologic rigor for cognitive rehabilitation research. Toward this end, we call for multidisciplinary collaborations toward development of biologically based theoretical models of cognition capable of empirical validation and evidence-based refinement, providing the scientific context for effective treatment discovery. PMID:29343470

  9. Organochlorine Pesticides Exposure and Bladder Cancer: Evaluation from a Gene-Environment Perspective in a Hospital-Based Case-Control Study in the Canary Islands (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boada, L D; Henríquez-Hernández, L A; Zumbado, M; Almeida-González, M; Álvarez-León, E E; Navarro, P; Luzardo, O P

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of bladder cancer has increased significantly since the 1950s. Pesticide exposure has been linked with increasing bladder cancer incidence, although the evidence is inconclusive. However, most epidemiological studies did not evaluate the potential role played by the organochlorine pesticides, the most widely used pesticides in Western countries from the 1940s to the 1970s. Organochlorine pesticides were banned in the late 1970s because of their persistence in the environment and their carcinogenic and mutagenic effects. Organochlorine pesticides were employed in huge amounts in the Spanish archipelago of the Canary Islands; the authors, therefore, evaluated the role played by organochlorine pesticides exposure on bladder cancer. Serum levels of the most prevalent organochlorine pesticides used in the agriculture of these Islands (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane [p,p'-DDT], and its metabolites dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene [p,p'-DDE] and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane [p,p'-DDD], hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclohexane isomers, aldrin, dieldrin, endrin, heptachlor, cis-chlordane, trans-chlordane, α- and β-endosulfan, endosulfan sulfate, methoxychlor, and mirex) were measured in 140 bladder cancer cases and 206 controls. GST-M1 and GST-T1 gene polymorphisms were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. These results showed that serum levels of organochlorine pesticides did not increase bladder cancer risk. On the contrary, total burden of hexachlorocyclohexanes was found to be negatively associated to bladder cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 0.929, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.865-0.997; P = .041). This effect disappeared when the distribution of the gluthathione S-transferase polymorphisms was introduced in the statistical model. These results indicate that organochlorine pesticides are not a risk factor for bladder cancer. However, these findings provide additional evidence of gene-environment interactions for organochlorine

  10. Breathe (in the air) : pulmonary immunology in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hagemann-Jensen, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, with etiology still unknown. MS is thought to arise from a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. One of the most well established environmental risk factor is smoking, which confers a striking increase in risk of developing MS and especially in interaction with the risk allele HLA-DRB1*15 and absence of the protective allele HLA-A*02. The major part of this thesis is focu...

  11. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... including puppetry and dance. However, the aesthetics of these traditions vary across cultures and carry different associative and interpretive meanings. Puppetry offers a useful frame for understanding the relationship between abstract and imitative gestures and behavior, and instantiates the complex...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  12. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists such as ......The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...... also key figures in the philosophical discussions of nature and science - from philosophical tendencies like logical empiricism via critical rationalism to various neo-Kantian trends....

  13. Laquinimod for multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dian; Han, Kai; Gao, Xiangdong; Dong, Shuai; Chu, Lan; Feng, ZhanHui; Wu, Shan

    2013-08-06

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated, inflammatory, demyelinating, neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system, and it causes major socioeconomic burden for the individual patient and for society. An inflammatory pathology occurs during the early relapsing stage of MS and a neurodegenerative pathology dominates the later progressive stage of the disease. Not all MS patients respond adequately to currently available disease-modifying drugs (DMDs). Alternative MS treatments with new modes of action are required to expand the current options for disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) and to aim for freedom from relapses, inflammatory lesions, disability progression and neurodegeneration. Laquinimod has dual properties of immunomodulation and neuroprotection and is a potentially promising new oral DMD in the treatment of relapsing MS. To assess the effectiveness and safety profile of laquinimod as monotherapy or combination therapy versus placebo or approved DMDs (interferon-β, glatiramer acetate, natalizumab, mitoxantrone, fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate) for modifying the disease course in patients with MS. The Review Group Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the Cochrane Multiple Sclerosis and Rare Diseases of the Central Nervous System Group Specialised Register which, among other sources, contains trials from CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 2), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, PEDro and Clinical trials registries (29 April 2013). We checked references in identified trials and manually searched the reports (2004 to March 2013) from neurological associations and MS societies. We also communicated with researchers participating in trials on laquinimod and contacted Teva Pharmaceutical Industries. All randomised, double-blind, controlled, parallel group clinical trials (RCTs) with a length of follow-up of at least one year evaluating laquinimod, as monotherapy or combination therapy, versus placebo or approved DMDs for

  14. Injectable Multiple Sclerosis Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Zung Vu

    2012-01-01

    Although injection-site reactions (ISRs) occur with US Food and Drug Administration–approved injectable disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for multiple sclerosis, there are currently few reports of real-world data on ISR management strategies or possible correlations between ISRs and patient demographics, disease characteristics, and missed injections. Patient-reported data on the use of DMTs, patient demographic and disease characteristics, missed injections, and ISR reduction strategies were collected via e-mail, a patient registry (www.ms-cam.org), and a Web-based survey. Of the 1380 respondents, 1201 (87%) indicated that they had used injectable DMTs, of whom 377 (31%) had used intramuscular (IM) interferon beta-1a (IFNβ-1a), 172 (14%) had used subcutaneous (SC) IFNβ-1a, 183 (15%) had used SC IFNβ-1b, and 469 (39%) had used glatiramer acetate (GA). The majority of respondents were older (73% were ≥40 years), female (79%), married or living with a partner (72%), white (94%), and nonsmoking (82%). Injection-site reaction incidence, grouped according to severity, varied among DMTs, with IM IFNβ-1a causing significantly (P ISRs than the other therapies. Female sex and younger age were significantly (P ISRs among users of IM IFNβ-1a, SC IFNβ-1b, and GA. Nonwhites reported severe ISRs more often than whites. For all DMTs injection-site massage and avoidance of sensitive sites were the most frequently used strategies to minimize ISRs. These data may help identify patients with characteristics associated with a higher risk for ISRs, allowing health-care professionals to provide anticipatory guidance to patients at risk for decreased adherence or discontinuation. PMID:24453732

  15. Teriflunomide for multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dian; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Yifan; Dai, Qingqing; Li, Yuan; Chu, Lan

    2016-03-22

    This is an update of the Cochrane review "Teriflunomide for multiple sclerosis" (first published in The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 12).Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system. It is clinically characterized by recurrent relapses or progression, or both, often leading to severe neurological disability and a serious decline in quality of life. Disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for MS aim to prevent occurrence of relapses and disability progression. Teriflunomide is a pyrimidine synthesis inhibitor approved by both the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) as a DMT for adults with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). To assess the absolute and comparative effectiveness and safety of teriflunomide as monotherapy or combination therapy versus placebo or other disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) (interferon beta (IFNβ), glatiramer acetate, natalizumab, mitoxantrone, fingolimod, dimethyl fumarate, alemtuzumab) for modifying the disease course in people with MS. We searched the Cochrane Multiple Sclerosis and Rare Diseases of the CNS Group Specialised Trials Register (30 September 2015). We checked reference lists of published reviews and retrieved articles and searched reports (2004 to September 2015) from the MS societies in Europe and America. We also communicated with investigators participating in trials of teriflunomide and the pharmaceutical company, Sanofi-Aventis. We included randomized, controlled, parallel-group clinical trials with a length of follow-up of one year or greater evaluating teriflunomide, as monotherapy or combination therapy, versus placebo or other approved DMDs for people with MS without restrictions regarding dose, administration frequency and duration of treatment. We used the standard methodological procedures of Cochrane. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Disagreements were discussed and resolved by consensus among

  16. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... including puppetry and dance. However, the aesthetics of these traditions vary across cultures and carry different associative and interpretive meanings. Puppetry offers a useful frame for understanding the relationship between abstract and imitative gestures and behavior, and instantiates the complex...

  17. Uric acid in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, M; De Keyser, J

    Peroxynitrite, a reactive oxidant formed by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide at sites of inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS), is capable of damaging tissues and cells. Uric acid, a natural scavenger of peroxynitrite, reduces inflammatory demyelination in experimental allergic

  18. Laboratory diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.; Stovner, L.J.; Rinck, P.A.; Nilsen, G.; Romslo, I.

    1991-01-01

    In 26 patients with multiple sclerosis 100% responded abnormally to magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Lesions in the posterior fossa were observed in 18 patients. The auditory brain stem response was abnormal in 15 patients, and 22 had abnormal immunoglobulins in the cerebrospinal fluid. The correlation between abnormalities of the auditory brain stem response and the magnetic resonance images was greatest in a subgroup where the two investigations were performed within a ten day interval. Results from magnetic resonance imaging, evoked potentials and cerebrospinal fluid investigations were used to reclassify 13 of 15 patients with clinically ''possible'' or ''probable''multiple sclerosis to a higher level using Poser's criteria. Evoked potentials (the auditory brain stem response in particular) correlated best with clinical multiple sclerosis category. The authors recommend that the magnetic resonance imaging is established as a first-hand investigation in evaluation of multiple sclerosis. Evoked potentials and cerebrospinal fluid investigations may prove to be more specific, however, and these investigations should also be performed as a routine. 23 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Imaging in tuberous sclerosis complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaensen, M.E.A.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1995, the University Medical Center Utrecht is a nationwide referral center for patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Aim of this thesis was to make a start with the systematic evaluation of imaging in patients with TSC followed at our institution focusing on the heart, the lungs and

  20. Tuberous Sclerosis in Identical Twins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh C Govil

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis was, observed in six year old identical twin brothers born with single placenta and a single amnion. Both had adenoma sebaceum shagreen patches, ash leaf spots and progressive mental deterioration. One of them had a verrucous pigmented nevus on the, left temple and recurrent localized motor seizures.

  1. Oral treatment for multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Killestein, J.; Rudick, R.A.; Polman, C.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The armamentarium for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) is increasing rapidly. Several oral treatments have shown benefit and will generate much interest because of the convenience of such administration. However, availability of convenient oral drugs will

  2. The danish multiple sclerosis registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Stenager, Egon

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The Danish Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Registry was established in 1956. Content: The register comprises data on all Danes who had MS in 1949 or who have been diagnosed since. Data on new cases and updated information on persons with an MS diagnosis already notified are continuously...

  3. The immunogenetics of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejgaard, A.

    2008-01-01

    with complex genetic backgrounds. HLA controls immune response genes and HLA associations indicate the involvement of autoimmunity. Multiple sclerosis (MS) was one of the first conditions proven to be HLA associated involving primarily HLA class II factors. We review how HLA studies give fundamental...

  4. Tuberous sclerosis Anaesthetic considerations | Bosenberg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 2 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Tuberous sclerosis Anaesthetic ...

  5. Hippocampal Sclerosis: Causes and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Matthew Charles

    2015-06-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is the commonest cause of drug-resistant epilepsy in adults, and is associated with alterations to structures and networks beyond the hippocampus.In addition to being a cause of epilepsy, the hippocampus is vulnerable to damage from seizure activity. In particular, prolonged seizures (status epilepticus) can result in hippocampal sclerosis. The hippocampus is also vulnerable to other insults including traumatic brain injury, and inflammation. Hippocampal sclerosis can occur in association with other brain lesions; the prevailing view is that it is probably a secondary consequence. In such instances, successful surgical treatment usually involves the resection of both the lesion and the involved hippocampus. Experimental data have pointed to numerous neuroprotective strategies to prevent hippocampal sclerosis. Initial neuroprotective strategies aimed at glutamate receptors may be effective, but later, metabolic pathways, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, and inflammation are involved, perhaps necessitating the use of interventions aimed at multiple targets. Some of the therapies that we use to treat status epilepticus may neuroprotect. However, prevention of neuronal death does not necessarily prevent the later development of epilepsy or cognitive deficits. Perhaps, the most important intervention is the early, aggressive treatment of seizure activity, and the prevention of prolonged seizures. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. The Influence of Major Life Events on Economic Attitudes in a World of Gene-Environment Interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatemi, Peter K

    2013-10-01

    The role of "genes" on political attitudes has gained attention across disciplines. However, person-specific experiences have yet to be incorporated into models that consider genetic influences. Relying on a gene-environment interplay approach, this study explicates how life-events, such as losing one's job or suffering a financial loss, influence economic policy attitudes. The results indicate genetic and environmental variance on support for unions, immigration, capitalism, socialism and property tax is moderated by financial risks. Changes in the magnitude of genetic influences, however, are temporary. After two years, the phenotypic effects of the life events remain on most attitudes, but changes in the sources of individual differences do not. Univariate twin models that estimate the independent contributions of genes and environment on the variation of attitudes appear to provide robust baseline indicators of sources of individual differences. These estimates, however, are not event or day specific. In this way, genetic influences add stability, while environment cues change, and this process is continually updated.

  7. Sex-specific predictors of hearing-aid use in older persons: The age, gene/environment susceptibility - Reykjavik study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Diana E.; Li, Chuan-Ming; Hoffman, Howard J.; Chiu, May S.; Themann, Christa L.; Petersen, Hannes; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Jonsson, Helgi; Jonasson, Fridbert; Sverrisdottir, Johanna Eyrun; Launer, Lenore J.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cotch, Mary Frances

    2015-01-01

    Objective We estimate the prevalence of hearing-aid use in Iceland and identify sex-specific factors associated with use. Design Population-based cohort study. Study sample A total of 5172 age, gene/environment susceptibility - Reykjavik study (AGES-RS) participants, aged 67 to 96 years (mean age 76.5 years), who completed air-conduction and pure-tone audiometry. Results Hearing-aid use was reported by 23.0% of men and 15.9% of women in the cohort, although among participants with at least moderate hearing loss in the better ear (pure-tone average [PTA] of thresholds at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz ≥ 35 dB hearing level [HL]) it was 49.9% and did not differ by sex. Self-reported hearing loss was the strongest predictor of hearing-aid use in men [OR: 2.68 (95% CI: 1.77, 4.08)] and women [OR: 3.07 (95% CI: 1.94, 4.86)], followed by hearing loss severity based on audiometry. Having diabetes or osteoarthritis were significant positive predictors of use in men, whereas greater physical activity and unimpaired cognitive status were important in women. Conclusions Hearing-aid use was comparable in Icelandic men and women with moderate or greater hearing loss. Self-recognition of hearing loss was the factor most predictive of hearing-aid use; other influential factors differed for men and women. PMID:25816699

  8. Affiliation with substance-using peers: Examining gene-environment correlations among parent monitoring, polygenic risk, and children's impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Kit K; Chassin, Laurie; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Pandika, Danielle; Wang, Frances L; Bountress, Kaitlin; Dick, Danielle; Agrawal, Arpana

    2017-07-01

    Parental monitoring can buffer the effect of deviant peers on adolescents' substance use by reducing affiliation with substance-using peers. However, children's genetic predispositions may evoke poorer monitoring, contributing to negative child outcomes. We examined evocative genotype-environment correlations underlying children's genetic predisposition for behavioral undercontrol and parental monitoring in early adolescence via children's impulsivity in middle childhood, and the influence of parental monitoring on affiliation with substance-using peers a year and a half later (n = 359). Genetic predisposition for behavioral undercontrol was captured using a polygenic risk score, and a portion of passive rGE was controlled by including parents' polygenic risk scores. Children's polygenic risk predicted poorer parental monitoring via greater children's impulsivity, indicating evocative rGE, controlling for a portion of passive rGE. Poorer parental monitoring predicted greater children's affiliation with substance-using peers a year and a half later. Results are discussed with respect to gene-environment correlations within developmental cascades. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Sex-specific predictors of hearing-aid use in older persons: The age, gene/environment susceptibility - Reykjavik study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Diana E; Li, Chuan-Ming; Hoffman, Howard J; Chiu, May S; Themann, Christa L; Petersen, Hannes; Jonsson, Palmi V; Jonsson, Helgi; Jonasson, Fridbert; Sverrisdottir, Johanna Eyrun; Launer, Lenore J; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cotch, Mary Frances

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the prevalence of hearing-aid use in Iceland and identify sex-specific factors associated with use. Population-based cohort study. A total of 5172 age, gene/environment susceptibility - Reykjavik study (AGES-RS) participants, aged 67 to 96 years (mean age 76.5 years), who completed air-conduction and pure-tone audiometry. Hearing-aid use was reported by 23.0% of men and 15.9% of women in the cohort, although among participants with at least moderate hearing loss in the better ear (pure-tone average [PTA] of thresholds at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz ≥ 35 dB hearing level [HL]) it was 49.9% and did not differ by sex. Self-reported hearing loss was the strongest predictor of hearing-aid use in men [OR: 2.68 (95% CI: 1.77, 4.08)] and women [OR: 3.07 (95% CI: 1.94, 4.86)], followed by hearing loss severity based on audiometry. Having diabetes or osteoarthritis were significant positive predictors of use in men, whereas greater physical activity and unimpaired cognitive status were important in women. Hearing-aid use was comparable in Icelandic men and women with moderate or greater hearing loss. Self-recognition of hearing loss was the factor most predictive of hearing-aid use; other influential factors differed for men and women.

  10. 'Normal' and 'failing' mothers: Women's constructions of maternal subjectivity while living with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Chloe; Katz, Terri; Ussher, Jane M

    2017-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis causes physical and cognitive impairment that can impact women's experiences of motherhood. This study examined how women construct their maternal subjectivities, or sense of self as a mother, drawing on a framework of biographical disruption. A total of 20 mothers with a multiple sclerosis diagnosis took part in semi-structured interviews. Transcripts were analysed using thematic decomposition to identify subject positions that women adopted in relation to cultural discourses of gender, motherhood and illness. Three main subject positions were identified: 'The Failing Mother', 'Fear of Judgement and Burdening Others' and 'The Normal Mother'. Women's sense of self as the 'Failing Mother' was attributed to the impact of multiple sclerosis, contributing to biographical disruption and reinforced through 'Fear of Judgement and Burdening Others' within social interactions. In accounts of the 'Normal Mother', maternal subjectivity was renegotiated by adopting strategies to manage the limitations of multiple sclerosis on mothering practice. This allowed women to self-position as 'good' mothers. Health professionals can assist women by acknowledging the embodied impact of multiple sclerosis on maternal subjectivities, coping strategies that women employ to address potential biographical disruption, and the cultural context of mothering, which contributes to women's experience of subjectivity and well-being when living with multiple sclerosis.

  11. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh P Nigel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disease characterised by progressive muscular paralysis reflecting degeneration of motor neurones in the primary motor cortex, corticospinal tracts, brainstem and spinal cord. Incidence (average 1.89 per 100,000/year and prevalence (average 5.2 per100,000 are relatively uniform in Western countries, although foci of higher frequency occur in the Western Pacific. The mean age of onset for sporadic ALS is about 60 years. Overall, there is a slight male prevalence (M:F ratio~1.5:1. Approximately two thirds of patients with typical ALS have a spinal form of the disease (limb onset and present with symptoms related to focal muscle weakness and wasting, where the symptoms may start either distally or proximally in the upper and lower limbs. Gradually, spasticity may develop in the weakened atrophic limbs, affecting manual dexterity and gait. Patients with bulbar onset ALS usually present with dysarthria and dysphagia for solid or liquids, and limbs symptoms can develop almost simultaneously with bulbar symptoms, and in the vast majority of cases will occur within 1–2 years. Paralysis is progressive and leads to death due to respiratory failure within 2–3 years for bulbar onset cases and 3–5 years for limb onset ALS cases. Most ALS cases are sporadic but 5–10% of cases are familial, and of these 20% have a mutation of the SOD1 gene and about 2–5% have mutations of the TARDBP (TDP-43 gene. Two percent of apparently sporadic patients have SOD1 mutations, and TARDBP mutations also occur in sporadic cases. The diagnosis is based on clinical history, examination, electromyography, and exclusion of 'ALS-mimics' (e.g. cervical spondylotic myelopathies, multifocal motor neuropathy, Kennedy's disease by appropriate investigations. The pathological hallmarks comprise loss of motor neurones with intraneuronal ubiquitin-immunoreactive inclusions in upper motor neurones and TDP-43

  12. Does vagotomy protect against multiple sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundbøll, Jens; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Adelborg, Kasper; Svensson, Elisabeth

    2017-07-01

    To examine the association between vagotomy and multiple sclerosis. We conducted a matched cohort study of all patients who underwent truncal or super-selective vagotomy and a comparison cohort, by linking Danish population-based medical registries (1977-1995). Hazard ratios (HRs) for multiple sclerosis, adjusting for potential confounders were computed by means of Cox regression analysis. Median age of multiple sclerosis onset corresponded to late onset multiple sclerosis. No association with multiple sclerosis was observed for truncal vagotomy (0-37 year adjusted HR=0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.48-1.74) or super-selective vagotomy (0-37 year adjusted HR=1.28, 95% CI: 0.79-2.09) compared with the general population. We found no association between vagotomy and later risk of late onset multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Multiple Sclerosis Overlap: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Trojsi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The concurrence of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and multiple sclerosis (MS is extremely rare. We reported the case of a 33-year-old woman with a past history of paresthesias at the right hand, who developed progressive quadriparesis with muscular atrophy of limbs and, finally, bulbar signs and dyspnea. Clinical and neurophysiologic investigations revealed upper and lower motor neuron signs in the bulbar region and extremities, suggesting the diagnosis of ALS. Moreover, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis demonstrated 3 periventricular and juxtacortical lesions, hyperintense in T2 and FLAIR sequences, and 3 liquoral immunoglobulin G (IgG oligoclonal bands, consistent with diagnosis of primary progressive MS (PPMS. This unusual overlap of ALS and MS leads to the discussion of a hypothetical common pathological process of immunological dysfunction in these two disorders, although the role of immune response in ALS remains ambivalent and unclear.

  14. Understanding the Etiology of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    of life as infantile spasms that are unresponsive to conventional anti-epileptic drug therapies (Curatolo et al., 2001; Holmes and Stafstrom, 2007... Infantile spasms in tuberous sclerosis complex. Brain Dev 23:502-507. DiMario FJ, Jr. (2004) Brain abnormalities in tuberous sclerosis complex. J...on chromosome 16. Cell, 75, 1305–1315. 3. Curatolo, P., Seri, S., Verdecchia, M. and Bombardieri, R. (2001) Infantile spasms in tuberous sclerosis

  15. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile primary lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Manual Consumer Version: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Other Motor Neuron Diseases Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 links) Motor Neurone Disease Association (UK) Muscular Dystrophy Association National ...

  16. [SCLEROSIS: LOCAL AND GENERAL PATTERNS OF DEVELOPMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kats, Ya A; Parkhonyuk, E V

    2015-01-01

    Sclerosis is a final substrate and outcome of structural lesions of different organs and tissues in various pathological conditions, such as hypertensive disease, coronaty heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic scleroderma, etc. Not infrequently it as a determinant of severity and unfavourable outcome of the disease. Elucidation of general patterns of the development of sclerosis requires an integrated approach to the systemic analysis of clinical, genetic, biochemical, and morphological characteristics whereas a local analysis reveals peculiarities of formation of sclerosis in individual patients. Such combination permits to use methods of predictive-preventive personified medicine for planning the treatment of sclerosis.

  17. Diabetes, markers of brain pathology and cognitive function: the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chengxuan; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Zhang, Qian; Jonsdottir, Maria K; Kjartansson, Olafur; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Garcia, Melissa E; Harris, Tamara B; van Buchem, Mark A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether, and the extent to which, vascular and degenerative lesions in the brain mediate the association of diabetes with poor cognitive performance. This cross-sectional study included 4,206 participants (age > 65 years; 57.8% women) of the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study. Data were collected through interview, clinical examination, psychological testing, and laboratory tests. The composite scores on memory, information-processing speed, and executive function were derived from a cognitive test battery. Markers of cerebral macrovascular (cortical infarcts), microvascular (subcortical infarcts, cerebral microbleeds, and higher white matter lesion volume), and neurodegenerative (lower gray matter, normal white matter, and total brain tissue volumes) processes were assessed on magnetic resonance images. Mediation models were employed to test the mediating effect of brain lesions on the association of diabetes with cognitive performance controlling for potential confounders. There were 462 (11.0%) persons with diabetes. Diabetes was significantly associated with lower scores on processing speed and executive function, but not with memory function. Diabetes was significantly associated with all markers of brain pathology. All of these markers were significantly associated with lower scores on memory, processing speed, and executive function. Formal mediation tests suggested that markers of cerebrovascular and degenerative pathology significantly mediated the associations of diabetes with processing speed and executive function. Diabetes is associated with poor performance on cognitive tests of information-processing speed and executive function. The association is largely mediated by markers of both neurodegeneration and cerebrovascular disease. Older people with diabetes should be monitored for cognitive problems and brain lesions. © 2013 American Neurological Association.

  18. Allergies, antibiotics use, and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jinma; Ni, Huijuan; Kim, Minchul; Cooley, Kimberly L; Valenzuela, Reuben M; Asche, Carl V

    2017-08-01

    The associations between allergies, antibiotics use, and multiple sclerosis (MS) remain controversial and their mediating or moderating effects have not yet been examined. We aimed to assess the direct and indirect influences of allergies and antibiotics use on MS development, and their interactions. A 1:3 matched case-control study was performed using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey database from 2006 to 2013 in the USA. Multiple sclerosis was identified based on the ICD-9 code (340.0) in any position. Cases were matched to their controls based on survey year, age, gender, race, payer type, region, and tobacco use. Allergy diseases and antibiotics prescriptions were extracted by ICD-9 code and drug classification code, respectively. Both generalized structural equation model and MacArthur approach were used to examine their intrinsic relationships. The weighted prevalence of MS was 133.7 per 100,000 visits. A total of 829 MS patients and 2441 controls were matched. Both respiratory tract allergies (OR = 0.29, 95% CI: 0.18, 0.49) and other allergies (OR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.19, 0.77) were associated with a reduction of the risk of MS. Patients with respiratory tract allergies were more likely to use penicillin (OR = 8.73, 95% CI: 4.12, 18.53) and other antibiotics (OR = 3.77, 95% CI: 2.72, 5.21), and those with other allergies had a higher likelihood of penicillin use (OR = 4.15, 95% CI: 1.27, 13.54); however, the link between antibiotics use and MS was not confirmed although penicillin use might mediate the relationship between allergies and MS. The findings supported allergy as a protective factor for MS development. We also suggest antibiotics use might not be a suitable indicator of bacterial infection to investigate the cause of MS.

  19. [Current description of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Río, Jordi; Montalbán, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a multifocal demyelinating disease leading to progressive neurodegeneration caused by an autoimmune response in genetically predisposed individuals. In the last few years, the knowledge and management of this disease has been revolutionized by a series of findings. The present article reviews pathological features of the disease, in which cortical involvement is increasingly implicated, and aspects related to novel pathogenic mechanisms, such as the role of the microbiota in the genesis of multiple sclerosis, as well as recent contributions from the fields of epidemiology and genetics. Also reviewed are the latest diagnostic criteria, which currently allow a much earlier diagnosis, with clear therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Tolerogenic vaccines for Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannie, Mark D.; Curtis, II, Alan D.

    2013-01-01

    Tolerogenic vaccines represent a new class of vaccine designed to re-establish immunological tolerance, restore immune homeostasis, and thereby reverse autoimmune disease. Tolerogenic vaccines induce long-term, antigen-specific, inhibitory memory that blocks pathogenic T cell responses via loss of effector T cells and gain of regulatory T cell function. Substantial advances have been realized in the generation of tolerogenic vaccines that inhibit experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in a preclinical setting, and these vaccines may be a prequel of the tolerogenic vaccines that may have therapeutic benefit in Multiple Sclerosis. The purpose here is to provide a snapshot of the current concepts and future prospects of tolerogenic vaccination for Multiple Sclerosis, along with the central challenges to clinical application. PMID:23357858

  1. Fructose Malabsorption in Systemic Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Marie, Isabelle; Leroi, Anne-Marie; Gourcerol, Guillaume; Levesque, Herv?; M?nard, Jean-Fran?ois; Ducrotte, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The deleterious effect of fructose, which is increasingly incorporated in many beverages, dairy products, and processed foods, has been described; fructose malabsorption has thus been reported in up to 2.4% of healthy subjects, leading to digestive clinical symptoms (eg, pain, distension, diarrhea). Because digestive involvement is frequent in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), we hypothesized that fructose malabsorption could be responsible for intestinal manifestations in thes...

  2. The role of immune cells, glia and neurons in white and gray matter pathology in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallucci, Giulia; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Bernstock, Joshua D; Pluchino, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis is one of the most common causes of chronic neurological disability beginning in early to middle adult life. Multiple sclerosis is idiopathic in nature, yet increasing correlative evidence supports a strong association between one's genetic predisposition, the environment and the immune system. Symptoms of multiple sclerosis have primarily been shown to result from a disruption in the integrity of myelinated tracts within the white matter of the central nervous system. However, recent research has also highlighted the hitherto underappreciated involvement of gray matter in multiple sclerosis disease pathophysiology, which may be especially relevant when considering the accumulation of irreversible damage and progressive disability. This review aims at providing a comprehensive overview of the interplay between inflammation, glial/neuronal damage and regeneration throughout the course of multiple sclerosis via the analysis of both white and gray matter lesional pathology. Further, we describe the common pathological mechanisms underlying both relapsing and progressive forms of multiple sclerosis, and analyze how current (as well as future) treatments may interact and/or interfere with its pathology. Understanding the putative mechanisms that drive disease pathogenesis will be key in helping to develop effective therapeutic strategies to prevent, mitigate, and treat the diverse morbidities associated with multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of immune cells, glia and neurons in white and gray matter pathology in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstock, Joshua D.; Pluchino, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is one of the most common causes of chronic neurological disability beginning in early to middle adult life. Multiple sclerosis is idiopathic in nature, yet increasing correlative evidence supports a strong association between one’s genetic predisposition, the environment and the immune system. Symptoms of multiple sclerosis have primarily been shown to result from a disruption in the integrity of myelinated tracts within the white matter of the central nervous system. However, recent research has also highlighted the hitherto underappreciated involvement of gray matter in multiple sclerosis disease pathophysiology, which may be especially relevant when considering the accumulation of irreversible damage and progressive disability. This review aims at providing a comprehensive overview of the interplay between inflammation, glial/neuronal damage and regeneration throughout the course of multiple sclerosis via the analysis of both white and gray matter lesional pathology. Further, we describe the common pathological mechanisms underlying both relapsing and progressive forms of multiple sclerosis, and analyze how current (as well as future) treatments may interact and/or interfere with its pathology. Understanding the putative mechanisms that drive disease pathogenesis will be key in helping to develop effective therapeutic strategies to prevent, mitigate, and treat the diverse morbidities associated with multiple sclerosis. PMID:25802011

  4. Living with uncertainty and hope: A qualitative study exploring parents' experiences of living with childhood multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Denise; Kirk, Susan

    2017-06-01

    Background There is growing recognition that multiple sclerosis is a possible, albeit uncommon, diagnosis in childhood. However, very little is known about the experiences of families living with childhood multiple sclerosis and this is the first study to explore this in depth. Objective Our objective was to explore the experiences of parents of children with multiple sclerosis. Methods Qualitative in-depth interviews with 31 parents using a grounded theory approach were conducted. Parents were sampled and recruited via health service and voluntary sector organisations in the United Kingdom. Results Parents' accounts of life with childhood multiple sclerosis were dominated by feelings of uncertainty associated with four sources; diagnostic uncertainty, daily uncertainty, interaction uncertainty and future uncertainty. Parents attempted to manage these uncertainties using specific strategies, which could in turn create further uncertainties about their child's illness. However, over time, ongoing uncertainty appeared to give parents hope for their child's future with multiple sclerosis. Conclusion Illness-related uncertainties appear to play a role in generating hope among parents of a child with multiple sclerosis. However, this may lead parents to avoid sources of information and support that threatens their fragile optimism. Professionals need to be sensitive to the role hope plays in supporting parental coping with childhood multiple sclerosis.

  5. Lactose malabsorption in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, I; Leroi, A-M; Gourcerol, G; Levesque, H; Menard, J-F; Ducrotte, P

    2016-11-01

    There are no studies on systemic sclerosis (SSc) assessing the relationship between food intake, especially lactose, and gastrointestinal dysfunction. To determine the prevalence of lactose malabsorption, using lactose breath test, in patients with SSc. To evaluate the correlation between lactose malabsorption and gastrointestinal involvement. To predict which SSc patients exhibit lactose malabsorption. Seventy-seven consecutive Caucasian patients with SSc and 20 control subjects underwent lactose breath test. All patients also completed a questionnaire on digestive symptoms, and a global symptom score (GSS) was calculated. The prevalence of lactose malabsorption was higher in SSc patients than in controls (44.3% vs. 10%; P = 0.004). We observed a marked correlation between the presence of lactose malabsorption and: higher values of GSS (P lactose malabsorption, the median value of GSS of digestive symptoms was lower after initiation of lactose-free diet (P lactose malabsorption often occurs in patients with systemic sclerosis. Furthermore, our findings highlight the fact that lactose breath test is a helpful, noninvasive method, by identifying the group of patients with systemic sclerosis with symptomatic lactose malabsorption that may benefit from a reduction in lactose intake. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Gene-environment correlations in the cross-generational transmission of parenting: Grandparenting moderates the effect of child 5-HTTLPR genotype on mothers' parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopala-Sibley, Daniel C; Hayden, Elizabeth P; Singh, Shiva M; Sheikh, Haroon I; Kryski, Katie R; Klein, Daniel N

    2017-11-01

    Evidence suggests that parenting is associated cross-generationally and that children's genes may elicit specific parenting styles (evocative gene-environment correlation). This study examined whether the effect of children's genotype, specifically 5-HTTLPR, on mothers' parenting behaviors was moderated by her own parenting experiences from her mother. Two independent samples of three-year-olds (N = 476 and 405) were genotyped for the serotonin transporter gene, and observational measures of parenting were collected. Mothers completed measures of the parenting they received as children. The child having a short allele on 5-HTTLPR was associated with more maternal hostility (sample 1 and 2) and with less maternal support (sample 1), but only if the mother reported lower quality grandmothers' parenting (abuse and indifference in Sample 1 and lower levels of grandmother care in Sample 2). Results support the possibility of a moderated evocative gene-environment correlation.

  7. Gene-environment correlations in the cross-generational transmission of parenting: Grandparenting moderates the effect of child 5-HTTLPR genotype on mothers’ parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopala-Sibley, Daniel C.; Hayden, Elizabeth P.; Singh, Shiva M.; Sheikh, Haroon I.; Kryski, Katie R.; Klein, Daniel N.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that parenting is associated cross-generationally and that children’s genes may elicit specific parenting styles (evocative gene-environment correlation). This study examined whether the effect of children’s genotype, specifically 5-HTTLPR, on mothers’ parenting behaviors was moderated by her own parenting experiences from her mother. Two independent samples of three-year-olds (N = 476 and 405) were genotyped for the serotonin transporter gene, and observational measures of parenting were collected. Mothers completed measures of the parenting they received as children. The child having a short allele on 5-HTTLPR was associated with more maternal hostility (sample 1 and 2) and with less maternal support (sample 1), but only if the mother reported lower quality grandmothers’ parenting (abuse and indifference in Sample 1 and lower levels of grandmother care in Sample 2). Results support the possibility of a moderated evocative gene-environment correlation. PMID:29628626

  8. Reproduction and the risk of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils Iørgen; Pfleger, Claudia Christina

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark has doubled in women since 1970, whereas it has been almost unchanged in men.......The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark has doubled in women since 1970, whereas it has been almost unchanged in men....

  9. New management algorithms in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Per Soelberg

    2014-01-01

    complex. The purpose of the review has been to work out new management algorithms for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis including new oral therapies and therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent large placebo-controlled trials in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis...

  10. Demyelination of subcortical nuclei in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutenkova, E.; Aitmagambetova, G.; Khodanovich, M.; Bowen, J.; Gangadharan, B.; Henson, L.; Mayadev, A.; Repovic, P.; Qian, P.; Yarnykh, V.

    2016-02-01

    Myelin containing in basal ganglia in multiple sclerosis patients was evaluated using new noninvasive quantitative MRI method fast whole brain macromolecular proton fraction mapping. Myelin level in globus pallidus and putamen significantly decreased in multiple sclerosis patients as compared with healthy control subjects but not in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus.

  11. Tuberous sclerosis complex presenting as pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) manifests predominantly as a neurocutaneous disorder. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare pulmonary manifestation of TSC. Imaging evaluation plays an important role in the assessment of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. In newly diagnosed patients, it helps not only to ...

  12. The Audio Recorded Cognitive Screen (ARCS) in patients with multiple sclerosis: a practical tool for multiple sclerosis clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner-Scott, J; Kerr, T; Spencer, B; Agland, S; Lydon, A; Schofield, P W

    2010-09-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common complication of multiple sclerosis, even in early stage disease, with significant impacts on life quality and social interaction. However, its detection is highly test-dependent. To validate a recently described screening tool, the ARCS, for detecting cognitive impairment in a multiple sclerosis population. The ARCS administers tests of executive function, memory, visual spatial construction and language via an audio device to unsupervised patients who write their responses for later scoring. Some 127 patients with a wide variety of disease course and severity were assessed by ARCS, of whom 87 also completed the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) and 45 underwent formal ('gold standard') neuropsychological testing. Compared with PASAT, we found that the ARCS showed better sensitivity (86% versus 68%) at equivalent specificity (71%) for detection of impairment in any cognitive domain, and superiority in the detection of memory and executive impairments. Acceptance and completion rates for the ARCS were as good or better than for the PASAT. ARCS is sensitive, well-tolerated, easy to administer and facilitates comprehensive cognitive assessment in less than 5 min of clinician time. It has several advantages over the PASAT for detecting cognitive impairment in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  13. Reduced brain functional reserve and altered functional connectivity in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cader, Sarah; Cifelli, Alberto; Abu-Omar, Yasir; Palace, Jacqueline; Matthews, Paul M

    2006-02-01

    Cognitive dysfunction (affecting particularly attention and working memory) occurs early in patients with multiple sclerosis. Previous studies have focused on identifying potentially adaptive functional reorganization through recruitment of new brain regions that could limit expression of these deficits. However, lesion studies remind us that functional specializations in the brain make certain brain regions necessary for a given task. We therefore have asked whether altered functional interactions between regions normally recruited provide an alternative adaptive mechanism with multiple sclerosis pathology. We used a version of the n-back task to probe working memory in patients with early multiple sclerosis. We applied a functional connectivity analysis to test whether relationships between relative activations in different brain regions change in potentially adaptive ways with multiple sclerosis. We studied 21 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 16 age- and sex-matched healthy controls with 3T functional MRI. The two groups performed equally well on the task. Task-related activations were found in similar regions for patients and controls. However, patients showed relatively reduced activation in the superior frontal and anterior cingulate gyri (P > 0.01). Patients also showed a variable, but generally substantially smaller increase in activation than healthy controls with greater task complexity, depending on the specific brain region assessed (P memory. Functional connectivity analysis suggests that altered inter-hemispheric interactions between dorsal and lateral prefrontal regions may provide an adaptive mechanism that could limit clinical expression of the disease distinct from recruitment of novel processing regions. Together, these results suggest that therapeutic enhancement of the coherence of interactions between brain regions normally recruited (functional enhancement), as well as recruitment of alternative areas or use of

  14. Tissue Transglutaminase in Marmoset Experimental Multiple Sclerosis: Discrepancy between White and Grey Matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espitia Pinzón, N.; Stroo, E.; 't Hart, B.A.; Bol, J.G.J.M.; Drukarch, B.; Bauer, J.; van Dam, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Infiltration of leukocytes is a major pathological event in white matter lesion formation in the brain of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. In grey matter lesions, less infiltration of these cells occur, but microglial activation is present. Thus far, the interaction of β-integrins with

  15. Serotonin: A mediator of the gut-brain axis in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malinova, Tsveta S.; Dijkstra, Christine D.; de Vries, Helga E.

    2017-01-01

    The significance of the gut microbiome for the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been established, although the underlying signaling mechanisms of this interaction have not been sufficiently explored. We address this point and use serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT))-a

  16. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in patients with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milenkova, Maria; Milanov, Ivan; Kmetska, Ksenia; Deleva, Sofia; Popova, Ljubomira; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Groudeva, Violeta; Hadjidekova, Savina; Domínguez, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied radiosensitivity to in vitro γ-irradiated lymphocytes from MS patients. • Immunotherapy in RRMS patients reduced the yield of radiation induced MN. • The group of treated RRMS accounts for the low radiosensitivity in MS patients. • Spontaneous yield of MN was similar in treated and untreated RRMS patients. - Abstract: Multiple sclerosis is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease leading to severe neurological disability. Although during the last years many disease-modifying agents as treatment options for multiple sclerosis have been made available, their mechanisms of action are still not fully determined. In the present study radiosensitivity in lymphocytes of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and healthy controls was investigated. Whole blood cultures from multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls were used to analyze the spontaneous and radiation-induced micronuclei in binucleated lymphocytes. A subgroup of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis was treated with immunomodulatory agents, interferon β or glatiramer acetate. The secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients group was not receiving any treatment. Our results reveal that the basal DNA damage was not different between relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls. No differences between gamma-irradiation induced micronuclei frequencies in binucleated cells from relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls were found either. Nevertheless, when we compared the radiation induced DNA damage in binucleated cells from healthy individuals with the whole group of patients, a reduction in the frequency of micronuclei was obtained in the patients group. Induced micronuclei yield was significantly lower in the irradiated samples from treated relapsing–remitting multiple

  17. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milenkova, Maria; Milanov, Ivan; Kmetska, Ksenia [III Neurological Clinic, University Hospital Saint Naum, Sofia (Bulgaria); Deleva, Sofia; Popova, Ljubomira; Hadjidekova, Valeria [Laboratory of Radiation Genetics, NCRRP, Sofia (Bulgaria); Groudeva, Violeta [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University Hospital St. Ekaterina, Sofia (Bulgaria); Hadjidekova, Savina [Department of Medical Genetics, Medical University, Sofia (Bulgaria); Domínguez, Inmaculada, E-mail: idomin@us.es [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Biology, University of Seville, Avda. Reina Mercedes 6, 41012 (Spain)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We studied radiosensitivity to in vitro γ-irradiated lymphocytes from MS patients. • Immunotherapy in RRMS patients reduced the yield of radiation induced MN. • The group of treated RRMS accounts for the low radiosensitivity in MS patients. • Spontaneous yield of MN was similar in treated and untreated RRMS patients. - Abstract: Multiple sclerosis is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease leading to severe neurological disability. Although during the last years many disease-modifying agents as treatment options for multiple sclerosis have been made available, their mechanisms of action are still not fully determined. In the present study radiosensitivity in lymphocytes of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and healthy controls was investigated. Whole blood cultures from multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls were used to analyze the spontaneous and radiation-induced micronuclei in binucleated lymphocytes. A subgroup of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis was treated with immunomodulatory agents, interferon β or glatiramer acetate. The secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients group was not receiving any treatment. Our results reveal that the basal DNA damage was not different between relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls. No differences between gamma-irradiation induced micronuclei frequencies in binucleated cells from relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls were found either. Nevertheless, when we compared the radiation induced DNA damage in binucleated cells from healthy individuals with the whole group of patients, a reduction in the frequency of micronuclei was obtained in the patients group. Induced micronuclei yield was significantly lower in the irradiated samples from treated relapsing–remitting multiple

  18. [Special cases of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendibe Bilbao, Mar

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic disease that usually occurs in young people and affects them for the rest of their lives. Patients and their families usually have a series of doubts and questions on everyday matters and all types of situations that occur during the distinct stages of life and which can influence the course of the disease. The aim of this review is to provide specific answers to these questions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Systematic imaging review: Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Katdare

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic, inflammatory disease of the central nervous system characterised by immune-mediated demyelination, and is a leading cause of neurological disability worldwide. It has a wide spectrum of clinical presentations which overlap with other neurological conditions many times. Further, the radiological array of findings in MS can also be confused for multiple other conditions, leading to the need to look for the more typical findings, and interpret these in close conjunction with the clinical picture including temporal evolution. This review aims to revisit the MRI findings in MS, including recent innovations in imaging, and to help distinguish MS from its mimics.

  20. Clinical neurogenetics: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Matthew B; Baloh, Robert H

    2013-11-01

    Our understanding of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease, is expanding rapidly as its genetic causes are uncovered. The pace of new gene discovery over the last 5 years has accelerated, providing new insights into the pathogenesis of disease and highlighting biological pathways as targets for therapeutic development. This article reviews our current understanding of the heritability of ALS and provides an overview of each of the major ALS genes, highlighting their phenotypic characteristics and frequencies as a guide for clinicians evaluating patients with ALS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Symptomatic management in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushkar Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the commonest cause of disability in young adults. While there is increasing choice and better treatments available for delaying disease progression, there are still, very few, effective symptomatic treatments. For many patients such as those with primary progressive MS (PPMS and those that inevitably become secondary progressive, symptom management is the only treatment available. MS related symptoms are complex, interrelated, and can be interdependent. It requires good understanding of the condition, a holistic multidisciplinary approach, and above all, patient education and empowerment.

  2. Cognitive deficits in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, H; Jønsson, A; Andresen, Jesper Graubæk

    2012-01-01

    Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the Multiple Sclerosis Impairment Scale (MSIS). Voxel-wise T2 estimates and total T2 lesion volume were tested for correlations with eight cognitive domains, a general cognitive dysfunction factor (CDF), and the two clinical scales. Results - We found distinct...... = -0.34, P = 0.03), visual problem solving (r = -0.40, P = 0.01), and complex motor speed (r = -0.39, P = 0.01). No significant correlation was detected between total lesion load and the clinical measures EDSS and MSIS. Conclusion - Our results suggest that even in the NABT MR detects changes likely...

  3. Longitudinal personality change associated with cognitive decline in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shumita; Drake, Allison; Fuchs, Tom; Dwyer, Michael G; Zivadinov, Robert; Chapman, Benjamin P; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Benedict, Ralph Hb

    2018-01-01

    We previously reported that personality and cognition were stable over 3 years in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This study examined whether a longer duration would reveal evidence of emerging personality dysfunction. The NEO Five-Factor Inventory and Brief International Cognitive Assessment for MS was used to assess personality and cognition, respectively. Patients were classified as "Cog Stable" or "Cog Decline" based on cognitive deterioration over 5 years. Extraversion and Conscientiousness declined across pooled groups. Follow-up of a group by time interaction found that decline in these traits was more evident in the Cog Decline group, demonstrating a link between personality and cognitive change.

  4. Endocannabinoids in Multiple Sclerosis and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryce, Gareth; Baker, David

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous reports that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) have for many years been self-medicating with illegal street cannabis or more recently medicinal cannabis to alleviate the symptoms associated with MS and also amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These anecdotal reports have been confirmed by data from animal models and more recently clinical trials on the ability of cannabinoids to alleviate limb spasticity, a common feature of progressive MS (and also ALS) and neurodegeneration. Experimental studies into the biology of the endocannabinoid system have revealed that cannabinoids have efficacy, not only in symptom relief but also as neuroprotective agents which may slow disease progression and thus delay the onset of symptoms. This review discusses what we now know about the endocannabinoid system as it relates to MS and ALS and also the therapeutic potential of cannabinoid therapeutics as disease-modifying or symptom control agents, as well as future therapeutic strategies including the potential for slowing disease progression in MS and ALS.

  5. Gene-based interaction analysis shows GABAergic genes interacting with parenting in adolescent depressive symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Assche, Evelien; Moons, Tim; Cinar, Ozan; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Verschueren, Karine; Colpin, Hilde; Lambrechts, Diether; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Goossens, Luc; Claes, Stephan; van Winkel, Ruud

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most gene-environment interaction studies (G × E) have focused on single candidate genes. This approach is criticized for its expectations of large effect sizes and occurrence of spurious results. We describe an approach that accounts for the polygenic nature of most psychiatric

  6. Molecular and Metabolic Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccia, Marcello; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2017-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a multifactorial disease with heterogeneous pathogenetic mechanisms, which deserve to be studied to evaluate new possible targets for treatments and improve patient management. MR spectroscopy and PET allow assessing in vivo the molecular and metabolic mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. This article focuses on the relationship between these imaging techniques and the biologic and chemical pathways leading to multiple sclerosis pathology and its clinical features. Future directions of research are also presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment of Raynaud phenomenon in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnathurai, P; Schrieber, L

    2013-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a connective tissue disease characterised by microvascular injury and excessive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Most patients with this condition experience Raynaud phenomenon, usually as the earliest manifestation of disease. In addition to pain and functional impairment, Raynaud phenomenon can produce tissue ischaemia resulting in digital ulceration and gangrene. Current treatments have been only moderately successful in reducing the frequency and severity of Raynaud phenomenon in patients with systemic sclerosis. This review will address treatments available for Raynaud phenomenon in systemic sclerosis. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  8. Erasmus Syndrome: Silicosis and Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shubhra; Joshi, Vinod; Rathore, Yogendra S; Khippal, Narendra

    2017-01-01

    Several occupational hazards, especially exposure to silica, have been implicated as causal factors for the development of scleroderma-like disorders. Compared to other connective tissue disorders, silica-associated systemic sclerosis (SA-SS) is relatively rare. Silica-induced scleroderma is indistinguishable from idiopathic systemic sclerosis. However, the former expresses a high predisposition of pulmonary involvement and anti-Scl-70 antibody. We report the case of a 42-year-old male, stone cutter by occupation, who was diagnosed as simple chronic silicosis and developed systemic sclerosis.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Barker, G J; MacKay, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The theory of relaxation processes and their measurements are described. An overview is presented of the literature on relaxation time measurements in the normal and the developing brain, in experimental diseases in animals, and in patients with multiple sclerosis. RESULTS...... AND CONCLUSION: Relaxation time measurements provide insight into development of multiple sclerosis plaques, especially the occurrence of oedema, demyelination, and gliosis. There is also evidence that normal appearing white matter in patients with multiple sclerosis is affected. What is now needed are fast...

  10. Registers of multiple sclerosis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch-Henriksen, N; Magyari, M; Laursen, B

    2015-01-01

    There are two nationwide population-based registers for multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark. The oldest register is The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry (DMSR), which is an epidemiological register for estimation of prevalence and incidence of MS and survival, and for identifying exposures earlier...... between a number of different environmental exposures in the past and the subsequent risk of MS. Some of these studies have been able to exonerate suspected risk factors. The other register, the nationwide Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register, is a follow-up register for all patients who have...

  11. Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, B.B. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Elsas, L.J. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics; Wyly, J.B. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Pasquali, M. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics

    1994-03-01

    Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis (OS-CS) is a specific bone dysplasia manifested by hypertelorism, flat nasal bridge, frontal bossing, large head, hypoplastic maxilla, palate anomalies, chronic otitis media, hearing deficits, nasal obstruction, and neurological changes of deafness, facial palsy, ophthalmoplegia, and mental retardation. We will review the clinical and radiologic findings in a new patient from birth to 20 years; this is believed to be the thirty-fifth patient reported. OS-CS is 2.5 times more common in females and occurs as an autosomal dominant condition or a sporadic dominant mutation with patients presenting for evaluation from the newborn period to the fifth decade. Skeletal abnormalities are distinctive including sclerosis of the skull base and calvarium, linear striated densities in the long bones and pelvis, and poor development of the mastoid and sinus air cells. Radionuclide bone scans with SPECT indicated in our patient increased bone turnover which was supported by biochemical findings of increased pyridinoline excretion. The major complications are due to constriction of essential foramina at the skull base. The condition is not life-threatening but can produce disability. (orig.)

  12. The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, E.A.C.M.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis describes recently developed research methods for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. In Chapter X the use of the CT-scan in the detection of hemispheral or cerebellar lesions is discussed. In chapter XIII the results of the application of all methods to a group of 89 patients with definite, probable or possible multiple sclerosis and to a group of 25 purely optic neuritis patients are presented. With the aid of the CT-scan, hypo- or hyperdense areas in the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres were found in 52% of the 114 patients. Most reports ascribe these lesions to demyelinating cerebral plaques. The CT-scan showed no cerebellar or brainstem lesions. The CT-scan is independent of the duration of, and degree of incapacitation due to, the disease and can be helpful in giving a definite diagnosis in an early stage of the disease. The CT-scan will always play an important role for the differential diagnosis. (Auth.)

  13. Multiple sclerosis-a quiet revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransohoff, Richard M; Hafler, David A; Lucchinetti, Claudia F

    2015-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has been thought to be a complex and indecipherable disease, and poorly understood with regards to aetiology. Here, we suggest an emphatically positive view of progress over several decades in the understanding and treatment of MS, particularly focusing on advances made within the past 20 years. As with virtually all complex disorders, MS is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. In recent years, formidable biochemical, bioinformatic, epidemiological and neuroimaging tools have been brought to bear on research into the causes of MS. While susceptibility to the disease is now relatively well accounted for, disease course is not and remains a salient challenge. In the therapeutic realm, numerous agents have become available, reflecting the fact that the disease can be attacked successfully at many levels and using varied strategies. Tailoring therapies to individuals, risk mitigation and selection of first-line as compared with second-line medications remain to be completed. In our view, the MS landscape has been comprehensively and irreversibly transformed by this progress. Here we focus on MS therapeutics-the most meaningful outcome of research efforts.

  14. Comorbidity of Bipolar Disorder and Multiple Sclerosis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Keskin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is a chronic demyelinating disease of a central nervous system. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in multiple sclerosis and bipolar disorder is one of the most common psychiatric disorders that coexist with multiple sclerosis. Manic episodes may be the first presenting symptom of multiple sclerosis as comorbid pathology or as an adverse effect of pharmacotherapies used in multiple sclerosis. The comorbidity of bipolar disorder and multiple sclerosis is well-proven but its etiology is not known and investigated accurately. Recent studies support a common genetic susceptibility. Management of bipolar disorder in multiple sclerosis is based on evidence provided by case reports and treatment should be individualized. In this report, the association between bipolar disorder and multiple sclerosis, epidemiology, ethiology and treatment is discussed through a case had diagnosed as multiple sclerosis and had a manic episode with psychotic features. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 832-836

  15. Genetics Home Reference: tuberous sclerosis complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sclerosis, type 2 Genetics Education Materials for School Success (GEMSS) Massachusetts General Hospital Merck Manual Consumer Version ... for Links Data Files & API Site Map Subscribe Customer Support USA.gov Copyright Privacy Accessibility FOIA Viewers & ...

  16. Localized Scleroderma, Systemic Sclerosis and Cardiovascular Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselvig, Jeanette Halskou; Kofoed, Kristian; Wu, Jashin J

    2018-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that patients with systemic sclerosis have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. To determine whether patients with systemic sclerosis or localized scleroderma are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, a cohort study of the entire Danish population aged ≥ 18...... and ≤ 100 years was conducted, followed from 1997 to 2011 by individual-level linkage of nationwide registries. Multivariable adjusted Cox regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) for a composite cardiovascular disease endpoint. A total of 697 patients with localized scleroderma and 1......,962 patients with systemic sclerosis were identified and compared with 5,428,380 people in the reference population. In systemic sclerosis, the adjusted HR was 2.22 (95% confidence interval 1.99-2.48). No association was seen between patients with localized scleroderma and cardiovascular disease. In conclusion...

  17. Plasma homocysteine levels in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramsaransing, G S M; Fokkema, M R; Teelken, A; Arutjunyan, A V; Koch, M; De Keyser, J

    Background: There is evidence that homocysteine contributes to various neurodegenerative disorders, and elevated plasma homocysteine levels have been observed in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective: To investigate if and why plasma homocysteine levels are increased in MS, and whether

  18. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis and tuberous sclerosis with pulmonary involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrosa, I.; Saiz, A.; Bustos, A.; Hernando, F.

    2000-01-01

    We present two cases of pulmonary lumphangioleiomyomatosis and one case of tuberous sclerosis with pulmonary involvement describing the most characteristic features according to plain chest X-ray and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). (Author) 14 refs

  19. Respiratory muscle training for multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietberg, Marc B.; Veerbeek, Janne M.; Gosselink, Rik; Kwakkel, Gert; van Wegen, Erwin E.H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system, affecting approximately 2.5 million people worldwide. People with MS may experience limitations in muscular strength and endurance - including the respiratory muscles, affecting functional performance and

  20. Suicide among Danes with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, H; Stenager, E; Nylev Stenager, E

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the suicide risk among Danish citizens with multiple sclerosis with that of the general population, and to evaluate changes over 45 years. METHODS: The study was based on linkage of the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry to the Cause of Death Registry. It comprised all 10...... taken their own lives, whereas the expected number of suicides was 54.2 (29.1 men, 25.1 women). Thus the suicide risk among persons with multiple sclerosis was more than twice that of the general population (SMR = 2.12). The increased risk was particularly high during the first year after diagnosis (SMR...... = 3.15). CONCLUSIONS: The risk of suicide in multiple sclerosis was almost twice as high as expected more than 20 years after diagnosis. The excess suicide risk has not declined since 1953....

  1. Anti-Integrin Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Eiji Kawamoto; Susumu Nakahashi; Takayuki Okamoto; Hiroshi Imai; Motomu Shimaoka

    2012-01-01

    Integrins are the foremost family of cell adhesion molecules that regulate immune cell trafficking in health and diseases. Integrin alpha4 mediates organ-specific migration of immune cells to the inflamed brain, thereby playing the critical role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Anti-alpha4 integrin therapy aiming to block infiltration of autoreactive lymphocytes to the inflamed brain has been validated in several clinical trials for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. This paper pr...

  2. Disease Modifying Agents for Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hilas, Olga; Patel, Priti N; Lam, Sum

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To summarize major clinical trials which evaluate the efficacy and safety data of approved disease modifying agents for the treatment of various types of multiple sclerosis. Data Sources: A MEDLINE (1966 to August 2008) search of clinical trials using the terms multiple sclerosis, interferon, glatiramer, mitoxantrone and natalizumab was performed. A manual bibliographic search was also conducted. English-language articles identified from the searches were evaluated. New agents unde...

  3. Cavernous angioma associated with ipsilateral hippocampal sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okujava, M.; Ebner, A.; Schmitt, J.; Woermann, F.G.

    2002-01-01

    We report two cases with extratemporal cavernous angioma (CA) and coexisting ipsilateral hippocampal sclerosis. Classically dual pathology is defined as the association of hippocampal sclerosis with an extrahippocampal lesion. Subtle changes in hippocampus might be overlooked in the presence of an unequivocal extrahippocampal abnormality. Seizure outcome after epilepsy surgery in cases with dual pathology is less favourable if only one of the lesions is removed. Dual pathology must always be considered in diagnostic imaging of patients with intractable epilepsy and CA. (orig.)

  4. Gait Characteristics in Adolescents With Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalron, Alon; Frid, Lior; Menascu, Shay

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a progressive autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. A presentation of multiple sclerosis before age18 years has traditionally been thought to be rare. However, during the past decade, more cases have been reported. We examined gait characteristics in 24 adolescents with multiple sclerosis (12 girls, 12 boys). Mean disease duration was 20.4 (S.D. = 24.9) months and mean age was 15.5 (S.D. = 1.1) years. The mean expanded disability status scale score was 1.7 (S.D. = 0.7) indicating minimal disability. Outcomes were compared with gait and the gait variability index value of healthy age-matched adolescents. Adolescents with multiple sclerosis walked slower with a wider base of support compared with age-matched healthy control subjects. Moreover, the gait variability index was lower in the multiple sclerosis group compared with the values in the healthy adolescents: 85.4 (S.D. = 8.1) versus 96.5 (S.D. = 7.4). We present gait parameters of adolescents with multiple sclerosis. From a clinical standpoint, our data could improve management of walking dysfunction in this relatively young population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Determining Effects of Genes, Environment, and Gene X Environment Interaction That Are Common to Breast and Ovarian Cancers Via Bivariate Logistic Regression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan

    2003-01-01

    .... A generalized estimation equations (GEE) logistic regression model was used for the modeling. A shared trait is defined for two discrete traits based upon explicit patterns of trait concordance and discordance within twin pairs...

  6. Nutrigenomics, the microbiome, and gene environment interactions: new directions in cardiovascular disease research, prevention, and treatment. A scientific statement From the American Heart Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiometabolic diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide and are strongly linked to both genetic and nutritional factors. The field of nutrigenomics encompasses multiple approaches aimed at understanding the effects of diet on health or disease development, including nutrigenetic studies in...

  7. Gene-environment interaction in the onset of eczema in infancy: filaggrin loss-of-function mutations enhanced by neonatal cat exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Bisgaard, H; Simpson, A; Palmer, CN; B?nnelykke, K; McLean, I; Mukhopadhyay, S; Pipper, CB; Halkjaer, LB; Lipworth, B; Hankinson, J; Woodcock, A; Custovic, A

    2008-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Eczema is a skin condition characterized by dry, red, and itchy patches on the skin. Eczema is associated with asthma and allergy, though allergy rarely plays a role in development or severity of eczema. Eczema usually begins during infancy, typically on the face, scalp, neck, extensor sides of the forearms, and legs. Up to one in five infants develops eczema, but in more than half of them, the condition improves or disappears completely before they are 15 years o...

  8. A variable-number-of-tandem-repeats polymorphism in the dopamine D4 receptor gene affects social adaptation of alcohol use: investigation of a gene-environment interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, H.; van der Zwaluw, C.S.; Overbeek, G.; Granic, I.; Franke, B.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that people adapt their own drinking behavior to that of other people. According to a genetic-differences approach, some individuals may be more inclined than others to adapt their alcohol consumption level to that of other people. Using a 3 (drinking condition) × 2 (genotype)

  9. Nutrigenomics, the Microbiome, and Gene-Environment Interactions: New Directions in Cardiovascular Disease Research, Prevention, and Treatment: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jane F; Allayee, Hooman; Gerszten, Robert E; Ideraabdullah, Folami; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Ordovás, José M; Rimm, Eric B; Wang, Thomas J; Bennett, Brian J

    2016-06-01

    Cardiometabolic diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide and are strongly linked to both genetic and nutritional factors. The field of nutrigenomics encompasses multiple approaches aimed at understanding the effects of diet on health or disease development, including nutrigenetic studies investigating the relationship between genetic variants and diet in modulating cardiometabolic risk, as well as the effects of dietary components on multiple "omic" measures, including transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, lipidomics, epigenetic modifications, and the microbiome. Here, we describe the current state of the field of nutrigenomics with respect to cardiometabolic disease research and outline a direction for the integration of multiple omics techniques in future nutrigenomic studies aimed at understanding mechanisms and developing new therapeutic options for cardiometabolic disease treatment and prevention. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. A variable-number-of-tandem-repeats polymorphism in the dopamine D4 receptor gene affects social adaptation of alcohol use: investigation of a gene-environment interaction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, H.; Zwaluw, C.S. van der; Overbeek, G.; Granic, I.; Franke, B.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that people adapt their own drinking behavior to that of other people. According to a genetic-differences approach, some individuals may be more inclined than others to adapt their alcohol consumption level to that of other people. Using a 3 (drinking condition) x 2 (genotype)

  11. A Variable-Number-of-Tandem-Repeats Polymorphism in the Dopamine D4 Receptor Gene Affects Social Adaptation of Alcohol Use. Investigation of a Gene-Environment Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, H.; Zwaluw, C.S. van der; Overbeek, G.J.; Granic, I.; Franke, B.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that people adapt their own drinking behavior to that of other people. According to a genetic-differences approach, some individuals may be more inclined than others to adapt their alcohol consumption level to that of other people. Using a 3 (drinking condition) × 2 (genotype)

  12. Impact of variation in the BDNF gene on social stress sensitivity and the buffering impact of positive emotions : Replication and extension of a gene-environment interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winkel, Mark; Peeters, Frenk; van Winkel, Ruud; Kenis, Gunter; Collip, Dina; Geschwind, Nicole; Jacobs, Nele; Derom, Catherine; Thiery, Evert; van Os, Jim; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Wichers, Marieke

    A previous study reported that social stress sensitivity is moderated by the brain-derived-neurotrophic-factor(Va166Met) (BDNF rs6265) genotype. Additionally, positive emotions partially neutralize this moderating effect. The current study aimed to: (i) replicate in a new independent sample of

  13. Computerized tomography in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delouvrier, J.J.; Tritschler, J.L.; Desbleds, M.T.; Cambier, J.; Nahum, H.

    1980-01-01

    The double scan CT method was applied to a homogeneous population of 50 multiple sclerosis patients and the following features were studied: well defined low-density areas, localized contrast enhancements, cerebral atrophy and white matter homogeneity. The analyses of the variance of the white matter (centrum ovale) can disclose those lesions which individually do not surpass the visibility threshold. The lesions that are localized in the white matter are mainly periventricular, most often multiple, and they do not displace the neighbouring structures. By revealing a large number of clinically silent cerebral lesions, the cerebral CT becomes a highly important diagnostic tool. The value of the CT examinations seems to be of major importance each time that the clinical diagnosis is hesitant, particularly when faced with medullary signs or an initial neurological episode. (C.F.)

  14. Suicide attempts in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, Elsebeth Nylev; Jensen, Børge; Stenager, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of the study were (1) to estimate the risk of suicide attempts in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in Denmark and compare the risk to the background population in the County of Funen, Denmark; (2) to estimate the risk of suicide attempts in MS patients receiving immunomodulating...... therapy compared with untreated patients. The Danish MS Registry, the Danish MS Treatment Registry and the Suicide Attempt Registry are linked and merged together using a person identification number given to all persons residing in Denmark. Among 404 MS patients, 15 patients had attempted suicide......, although no increased risk for suicide attempts was found in MS patients. No difference in number of suicide attempts in treated and untreated patients was found....

  15. Statin treatment in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl-Jensen, Gorm; Tsakiri, Anna; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that leads to progressive disability. Statins [hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors] are widely prescribed drugs in hypercholesterolemia. They exert immunomodulatory and neurotrophic effects and are attractive...... of relapse activity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) activity, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) progression, and adverse events using a fixed-effects model due to low heterogeneity between studies. RESULTS: Eight trials were included in the review [five of statin add-on to interferon (IFN......, proportion of patients with relapse, and whole brain atrophy but not for EDSS progression. In SPMS, statin monotherapy showed significant reduction in brain atrophy and disability progression but no effect on relapse rate. In CIS, a phase II trial showed no difference in relapse activity, MRI activity...

  16. Implicit Memory in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Latchford

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of neuropsychological studies have revealed that memory problems are relatively common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. It may be useful to compare MS with conditions such as Huntington's disease (HD, which have been referred to as subcortical dementia. A characteristic of these conditions may be an impairment in implicit (unconscious memory, but not in explicit (conscious memory. The present study examined the functioning of explicit and implicit memory in MS. Results showed that implicit memory was not significantly impaired in the MS subjects, and that they were impaired on recall but not recognition. A correlation was found between implicit memory performance and disability status in MS patients. Findings also suggest the possibility of long-term priming of implicit memory in the control subjects. The implications of these results are discussed.

  17. Connected health and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M

    2018-04-18

    There is as yet no consensual definition of "connected health". In general, the term refers to the growing use of technology and, in particular, mobile technology in medicine. Over the past 10 years, there have been an increasing number of published reports on the wide-ranging and heterogeneous fields involving the application of technology in medicine, ranging from telemedicine to tools to improve patients' evaluation and monitoring by physicians, as well as a multitude of patient-centered applications. They also represent promising tools in the field of clinical research. This report is a review of the importance of using this technology in the management of multiple sclerosis patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Recurrent myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis: a case report of a child with Schilder's variant of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, M.J.; Coleman, L.T.

    2000-01-01

    Myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis (MDS, Schilder's disease) is a rare CNS demyelinating disorder affecting mainly children and usually presenting as an intracranial mass lesion. We report the first case of recurrent intracranial MDS where the third episode of demyelination involved the cervical spinal cord. This may represent a subset of the disease, which should be considered as Schilder's variant (childhood form) of multiple sclerosis. (orig.)

  19. Motor neuron disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) arising from longstanding primary lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, R. P.; Koelman, J. H.; Troost, D.; de Jong, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Three men were initially diagnosed as having primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), but eventually developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) after 7.5, 9, and at least 27 years. Non-familial ALS and PLS might be different manifestations of a single disease or constitute completely distinct entities.

  20. Temporal lobe sclerosis associated with hippocampal sclerosis in temporal lobe epilepsy: neuropathological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Maria; Eriksson, Sofia; Martinian, Lillian; Caboclo, Luis O; McEvoy, Andrew W; Duncan, John S; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2009-08-01

    Widespread changes involving neocortical and mesial temporal lobe structures can be present in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis. The incidence, pathology, and clinical significance of neocortical temporal lobe sclerosis (TLS) are not well characterized. We identified TLS in 30 of 272 surgically treated cases of hippocampal sclerosis. Temporal lobe sclerosis was defined by variable reduction of neurons from cortical layers II/III and laminar gliosis; it was typically accompanied by additional architectural abnormalities of layer II, that is, abnormal neuronal orientation and aggregation. Quantitative analysis including tessellation methods for the distribution of layer II neurons supported these observations. In 40% of cases, there was a gradient of TLS with more severe involvement toward the temporal pole, possibly signifying involvement of hippocampal projection pathways. There was a history of a febrile seizure as an initial precipitating injury in 73% of patients with TLS compared with 36% without TLS; no other clinical differences between TLS and non-TLS cases were identified. Temporal lobe sclerosis was not evident preoperatively by neuroimaging. No obvious effect of TLS on seizure outcome was noted after temporal lobe resection; 73% became seizure-free at 2-year follow-up. In conclusion, approximately 11% of surgically treated hippocampal sclerosis is accompanied by TLS. Temporal lobe sclerosis is likely an acquired process with accompanying reorganizational dysplasia and an extension of mesial temporal sclerosis rather than a separate pathological entity.

  1. Limb apraxia in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapaić Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. There are almost no studies on apraxia in people with multiple sclerosis. Although the white matter is damaged in MS, it is not the only location in which the pathological changes are present. Demyelinated lesions in the cortex have recently been recognized as important components of multiple sclerosis pathology. The aim of this study was to determine whether apraxia is present among people with MS, and the importance of demographic characteristics and impairment of functional systems at conceptualization and execution of movements. Methods. The experimental group consisted of 30 patients, mean age 51.34 ± 7.70 years. The patients in the experimental group were diagnosed with MS according to the McDonald criteria. The control group consisted of 30 healthy subjects, mean age 50.30 ± 10.47 years. For research purposes, we used the following instruments: Questionnaire for Collecting Demographic Data, Kurtzke Functional Systems Scores, Waterloo-Sunnybrook Apraxia Battery (WatAB. Execution of motion tasks that are a part of the Watwere incorporated in the System for the Observation and Analysis of Motor Behavior. Results. Our study showed that limb apraxia was common in people with MS. Apraxia was present during pantomime in 26.70% of the patients, and during the imitation of movements in 44.80% of the patients. Gender, age, education level, duration of disease and a form of MS did not determine the quality of conceptualization and execution of movements. The time elapsed from the last exacerbation was a determinant of quality of executed movements. Impairments of functional systems predicted impairments of movement execution. The expanded disability scale score correlated with the severity of apraxia. Conclusion. Our study confirm the presence of apraxia in MS. It is necessary to carry out further studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging, as well as the conduct longitudinal studies to determine the precise structure of

  2. Child-evoked maternal negativity from 9 to 27 months: Evidence of gene-environment correlation and its moderation by marital distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearon, R M Pasco; Reiss, David; Leve, Leslie D; Shaw, Daniel S; Scaramella, Laura V; Ganiban, Jody M; Neiderhiser, Jenae M

    2015-11-01

    Past research has documented pervasive genetic influences on emotional and behavioral disturbance across the life span and on liability to adult psychiatric disorder. Increasingly, interest is turning to mechanisms of gene-environment interplay in attempting to understand the earliest manifestations of genetic risk. We report findings from a prospective adoption study, which aimed to test the role of evocative gene-environment correlation in early development. Included in the study were 561 infants adopted at birth and studied between 9 and 27 months, along with their adoptive parents and birth mothers. Birth mother psychiatric diagnoses and symptoms scales were used as indicators of genetic influence, and multiple self-report measures were used to index adoptive mother parental negativity. We hypothesized that birth mother psychopathology would be associated with greater adoptive parent negativity and that such evocative effects would be amplified under conditions of high adoptive family adversity. The findings suggested that genetic factors associated with birth mother externalizing psychopathology may evoke negative reactions in adoptive mothers in the first year of life, but only when the adoptive family environment is characterized by marital problems. Maternal negativity mediated the effects of genetic risk on child adjustment at 27 months. The results underscore the importance of genetically influenced evocative processes in early development.

  3. Diagnostic challenges in combined multiple sclerosis and centronuclear myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, D.B.; Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Schmalbruch, H

    2000-01-01

    The first case of combined centronuclear myopathy and multiple sclerosis is reported. The difficulties of diagnosing multiple sclerosis in patients with muscular disorders associated with the central nervous system involvement are discussed...

  4. The risk of fracture in incident multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bazelier, Marloes T; Bentzen, Joan; Vestergaard, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be at increased risk of fractures owing to osteoporosis and falling.......Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be at increased risk of fractures owing to osteoporosis and falling....

  5. Randomized trial of oral teriflunomide for relapsing multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, Paul; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Confavreux, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Teriflunomide is a new oral disease-modifying therapy for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis.......Teriflunomide is a new oral disease-modifying therapy for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis....

  6. Multiple Sclerosis, Personal Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Multiple Sclerosis Personal Stories: Nicole Lemelle, Iris Young, Michael Anthony, ... something quite different for a person living with multiple sclerosis, such as his girlfriend's brother, Chuy. The more ...

  7. An Empirical Comparison of Joint and Stratified Frameworks for Studying G × E Interactions: Systolic Blood Pressure and Smoking in the CHARGE Gene-Lifestyle Interactions Working Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sung, Y.J. (Yun Ju); T.W. Winkler (Thomas W.); A.K. Manning (Alisa); H. Aschard (Hugues); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); T.B. Harris (Tamara); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); M.R. Brown; A.C. Morrison (Alanna); M. Fornage (Myriam); L.-A. Lin (Li-An); Richard, M. (Melissa); T.M. Bartz (Traci M.); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); C. Hayward (Caroline); O. Polasek (Ozren); J. Marten (Jonathan); I. Rudan (Igor); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); A. Kraja (Aldi); M.A. Province (Mike); Deng, X. (Xuan); Fisher, V.A. (Virginia A.); Y. Zhou (Yanhua); L.F. Bielak (Lawrence F.); J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); B.H. Smith (Blair); Ding, J. (Jingzhong); Y. Liu (YongMei); Lohman, K. (Kurt); C. Bouchard (Claude); T. Rankinen (Tuomo); Rice, T.K. (Treva K.); D.K. Arnett (Donna); K. Schwander; X. Guo (Xiuqing); W. Palmas (Walter); Rotter, J.I. (Jerome I.); Alfred, T. (Tamuno); E.P. Bottinger (Erwin); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); N. Amin (Najaf); O.H. Franco (Oscar); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); D. Vojinovic (Dina); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); P.M. Ridker (Paul); L.M. Rose (Lynda); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); X. Zhu (Xiaofeng); K.M. Rice (Kenneth); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); D.C. Rao (Dabeeru C.); Gauderman, W.J. (W. James); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractStudying gene-environment (G × E) interactions is important, as they extend our knowledge of the genetic architecture of complex traits and may help to identify novel variants not detected via analysis of main effects alone. The main statistical framework for studying G × E interactions

  8. Gene-air pollution interaction and cardiovascular disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanobetti, Antonella; Baccarelli, Andrea; Schwartz, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility is likely to play a role in response to air pollution. Hence, gene-environment interaction studies can be a tool for exploring the mechanisms and the importance of the pathway in the association between air pollution and a cardiovascular outcome. In this article, we present a systematic review of the studies that have examined gene-environment interactions in relation to the cardiovascular health effects of air pollutants. We identified 16 articles meeting our search criteria. Of these studies, most have focused on individual functional polymorphisms or individual candidate genes. Moreover, they were all based on 3 study populations that have been extensively investigated in relation to air pollution effects: the Normative Aging Study, Air Pollution and Inflammatory Response in Myocardial Infarction Survivors: Gene-Environment Interaction in a High Risk Group, and Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. In conclusions, the studies differed substantially in both the cardiovascular outcomes examined and the polymorphisms examined, so there is little confirmation of results across cohorts. Gene-environment interaction studies can help explore the mechanisms and the potential pathway in the association between air pollution and a cardiovascular outcome; replication of findings and studies involving multiple cohorts would be needed to draw stronger conclusions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Multiple sclerosis - etiology and diagnostic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kamińska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of autoimmune originate. The main agents responsible for the MS development include exogenous, environmental, and genetic factors. MS is characterized by multifocal and temporally scattered central nervous system (CNS damage which lead to the axonal damage. Among clinical courses of MS it can be distinguish relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPSM, primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS, and progressive-relapsing multiple sclerosis (RPMS. Depending on the severity of signs and symptoms MS can be described as benign MS or malignant MS. MS diagnosis is based on McDonald’s diagnostic criteria, which link clinical manifestation with characteristic lesions demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis, and visual evoked potentials. Among CSF laboratory tests used to the MS diagnosis are applied: Tibbling & Link IgG index, reinbegrams, and CSF isoelectrofocusing for oligoclonal bands detection. It should be emphasized, that despite huge progress regarding MS as well as the availability of differentdiagnostics methods this disease is still a diagnostic challenge. It may result from fact that MS has diverse clinical course and there is a lack of single test, which would be of appropriate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for quick and accurate diagnosis.

  10. Allopregnanolone and Neuroinflammation: a Focus on Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid eNoorbakhsh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The progesterone derivative, allopregnanolone (ALLO, is one of the most widely studied compounds among neurosteroids. Through interactions with GABA-A receptors expressed by neurons and glial cells, ALLO has been shown to affect diverse aspects of neural cell physiology, including cell proliferation and survival, migration and gene expression. Recent data point to important roles for ALLO in different neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS. Dysregulation in ALLO biosynthesis pathways has been reported in brain tissue from MS patients as well as in the central nervous system (CNS tissue derived from MS animal models. Administration of ALLO has been shown to ameliorate neurobehavioral deficits together with neuropathology and inflammation in the CNS of animals with autoimmune demyelination. These findings are in line with previous reports indicating growth- and differentiation-promoting actions of ALLO on neurons and glial cells as well as its neuroprotective effects in the context of other CNS diseases. Nonetheless, these findings have also raised the possibility that ALLO might influence leukocyte biology and associated neuroinflammatory mechanisms independent of its neuroregenerative properties. Herein, we review the current knowledge regarding the role of ALLO in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, and discuss the potential cell and molecular pathways that might be influenced by ALLO in the context of disease.

  11. Activation of endogenous retrovirus reverse transcriptase in multiple sclerosis patient lymphocytes by inactivated HSV-1, HHV-6 and VZV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Lühdorf, Pernille; Christensen, Tove

    2007-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) and herpesviruses have been associated with the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). These virus groups interact with each other and have been shown to induce synergistic immune responses. Here, we focus on the possible role of herpesviruses as contributin...

  12. Differential Vocational Rehabilitation Service Patterns Related to the Job Retention and Job-Seeking Needs of Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, Timothy N.; Strauser, David; Frain, Michael P.; Bishop, Malachy; Chiu, Chung-Yi; Kaya, Cahit; Chan, Fong

    2015-01-01

    The experience of living with multiple sclerosis (MS) can have a profound effect on employment. The impact of MS is a complex interaction of personal, medical, functional, financial, and psychosocial variables that ultimately results in up to 80% of persons with MS leaving their jobs within 10 years of their diagnosis. The aim of this study was to…

  13. Rehabilitation challenges in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burks Jack

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available While current immunomodulating drugs aim to reduce multiple sclerosis (MS exacerbations and slow disease progression, rehabilitation aims to improve and maintain the functional abilities of patients in the face of disease progression. An increasing number of journal articles are describing the value of the many rehabilitation interventions that can be used throughout the course of the disease, from the initial symptoms to the advanced stages. An integrated team of healthcare professionals is necessary to address a myriad of problems to reduce impairments, disabilities, and handicaps. The problems may be related to fatigue, weakness, spasticity, mobility, balance, pain, cognition, mood, relationships, bowel, bladder, sexual function, swallowing, speech, transportation, employment, recreation, and activities of daily living (ADL such as dressing, eating, bathing, and household chores. The team can help prevent complications and secondary disabilities, while increasing patient safety. Improving neurologically related function, maintaining good relationships, and feeling productive and creative adds enormously to the quality of life of people with MS and their families. Rehabilitation is more than an ′extra′ service that is given after medical therapies; it is an integral part of the management of the diverse set of problems encountered throughout the course of the disease. An interdisciplinary team may have many members, including physicians, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, psychotherapists, social workers, recreational therapists, vocational rehabilitation therapists, patients, families, and other caregivers.

  14. Cognitive rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissart, H; Leroy, M; Morele, E; Baumann, C; Spitz, E; Debouverie, M

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairments are frequent in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, most studies about efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation interventions have been criticized in terms of methods and/or design. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation in MS patients with a cognitive intervention (ProCogSEP* program), compared to a control intervention (discussion program). Twenty MS patients have completed this simple blind study: 10 patients followed 13 sessions (2 hours) of the ProCog-SEP(1) program. Ten other patients followed 13 sessions (2 hours) of a discussion program (Control Group). All patients underwent neuropsychological assessment, before and after their program, in order to evaluate cognitive functions. Two neuropsychologists respectively assessed the patients and conducted the group sessions. Compared to its own baseline, ProCog-SEP Group show improvements in verbal memory [free recall (p = .02), learning (p = .002)], in visual memory [free (p = .05) and delayed recall (p = .007)], in working-memory (p = .03), in verbal fluency (p = .05) and in language (p = .01). Inter group analysis show a benefit of cognitive program mainly in verbal and visual memory, and in verbal fluencies. These results support the interest of a cognitive therapeutic management of MS patients.

  15. Vascular involvement in tuberous sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Ann E; Marsenic, Olivera; Meyers, Kevin E C; Kaplan, Bernard S; Hellinger, Jeffrey C

    2010-08-01

    Vascular involvement in tuberous sclerosis (TS) is rare. Central and peripheral aneurysms and large and medium size arterial stenotic-occlusive disease have been reported in patients with TS. We present here three pediatric patients with TS and severe vascular abnormalities, followed by a review of the literature. The three cases include a 14-month-old girl with polycystic kidneys and cerebral tubers who had a large asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm, a 2-year-old boy with multiple features of TS who had hypertension and was found to have mid-aortic syndrome with bilateral renal artery stenosis, and an 18-year-old girl with abdominal pain and TS features who had greater than 70% celiac artery stenosis. In all cases, noninvasive vascular imaging modalities were utilized for either initial diagnosis, surveillance, or both. These cases highlight the collaborative roles of the pediatric nephrologist and cardiovascular imager in the diagnosis and management of the vascular complications in TS patients. Appropriate care can only be made through a high index of suspicion.

  16. Defining active progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellebjerg, Finn; Börnsen, Lars; Ammitzbøll, Cecilie; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; von Essen, Marina; Ratzer, Rikke Lenhard; Soelberg Sørensen, Per; Romme Christensen, Jeppe

    2017-11-01

    It is unknown whether disease activity according to consensus criteria (magnetic resonance imaging activity or clinical relapses) associate with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) changes in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). To compare CSF biomarkers in active and inactive progressive MS according to consensus criteria. Neurofilament light chain (NFL), myelin basic protein (MBP), IgG-index, chitinase-3-like-1 (CHI3L1), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), chemokine CXCL13, terminal complement complex, leukocyte counts and nitric oxide metabolites were measured in primary ( n = 26) and secondary progressive MS ( n = 26) and healthy controls ( n = 24). Progressive MS patients had higher CSF cell counts, IgG-index, CHI3L1, MMP-9, CXCL13, NFL and MBP concentrations. Active patients were younger and had higher NFL, CXCL13 and MMP-9 concentrations than inactive patients. Patients with active disease according to consensus criteria or detectable CXCL13 or MMP-9 in CSF were defined as having combined active progressive MS. These patients had increased CSF cell counts, IgG-index and MBP, NFL and CHI3L1 concentrations. Combined inactive patients only had increased IgG-index and MBP concentrations. Patients with combined active progressive MS show evidence of inflammation, demyelination and neuronal/axonal damage, whereas the remaining patients mainly show evidence of active demyelination. This challenges the idea that neurodegeneration independent of inflammation is crucial in disease progression.

  17. Islamic fasting and multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Month-long daytime Ramadan fasting pose s major challenges to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in Muslim countries. Physicians should have practical knowledge on the implications of fasting on MS. We present a summary of database searches (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PubMed) and a mini-symposium on Ramadan fasting and MS. In this symposium, we aimed to review the effect of fasting on MS and suggest practical guidelines on management. Discussion In general, fasting is possible for most stable patients. Appropriate amendment of drug regimens, careful monitoring of symptoms, as well as providing patients with available evidence on fasting and MS are important parts of management. Evidence from experimental studies suggests that calorie restriction before disease induction reduces inflammation and subsequent demyelination and attenuates disease severity. Fasting does not appear to have unfavorable effects on disease course in patients with mild disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score ≤3). Most experts believed that during fasting (especially in summer), some MS symptoms (fatigue, fatigue perception, dizziness, spasticity, cognitive problems, weakness, vision, balance, gait) might worsen but return to normal levels during feasting. There was a general consensus that fasting is not safe for patients: on high doses of anti-convulsants, anti-spastics, and corticosteroids; with coagulopathy or active disease; during attacks; with EDSS score ≥7. Summary These data suggest that MS patients should have tailored care. Fasting in MS patients is a challenge that is directly associated with the spiritual belief of the patient. PMID:24655543

  18. [Oral treatments in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meca-Lallana, José Eustasio; Hernández-Clares, Rocío; Carreón-Guarnizo, Ester

    2014-12-01

    The development of new disease-modifying drugs (DMD) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), which share the common denominator of oral administration, considerably improves patient expectations in terms of effectiveness, tolerability and treatment adherence compared with currently available drugs. However, the common route of administration of these drugs does not mean that they are equivalent, since the heading of "oral route" encompasses drugs with distinct indications and mechanisms of action, as well as heterogeneous results in terms of efficacy and safety, allowing treatment to be personalized according to the each patient' s characteristics. Currently, four oral DMD are available or in an advanced stage of clinical development: fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate and laquinimod. In pivotal trials versus placebo, these molecules reduced the annualized rate of exacerbations versus placebo by 54%, 31%, 53% and 23%, respectively, the risk of progression of disability by 31%, 30%, 38% and 36%, and the number of active lesions showing contrast uptake on magnetic resonance imaging by 82%, 80%, 90% and 37%, respectively. Based on the risk/benefit ratio, fingolimod is indicated in patients with suboptimal response to initial DMD or in severe rapidly progressing RRMS, while the remaining drugs can be used as first-line options. Clinical experience with these treatments will provide new data on safety and effectiveness, which will be determinant when establishing therapeutic algorithms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Pediatric multiple sclerosis in Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín A. Peña

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of Venezuelan pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. METHODS: Database records from the National Program for MS were searched for patients with an established diagnosis of MS whose first symptoms appeared before age 18. RESULTS: The national database held records of 1.710 patients; 3.8% had onset of the first symptoms before age 18. 46.7% were boys, yielding an F:M ratio of 1.13:1. Many children had a disease onset characterized by motor impairment (30.7%, brainstem/cerebellum and spinal cord affectation (27.6%, headache (26%. Less frequent symptoms were sensory symptoms (8% and optic neuritis (7%. DISCUSSION: Pediatric MS patients in Venezuela represent a significant proportion of all MS cases. The clinical pattern is characterized by motor symptoms at onset, and predominantly monosymptomatic presentation with a relapsing-remitting pattern. This is the first systematic attempt to estimate the prevalence of pediatric MS in Venezuela.

  20. Multiple sclerosis and Capgras' syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidoti, Vincenzo; Lorusso, Lorenzo

    2007-11-01

    Psychotic disorders in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), although reported in the literature, are quite rare. The maniac psychosis is increased in MS patients, especially after steroid use, but a pure paranoid (delusional) state is very uncommon. We report a case of a patient with MS complicated by Capgras' syndrome. This disorder, characterized by misidentification and also known as "illusion of double", was first described by the French psychiatrist Joseph Capgras in 1923. Our patient was a 36-year-old female, with a negative psychiatric history; the diagnosis of MS dated back to the age of 18. Subsequently, after a treatment with high dosage of steroids for optic neuritis, her psychiatric symptoms (delusion of references) began and she was then treated with clozapine. Thereafter she had repeated relapses. Immunomodulatory treatments with beta-interferon first and azathioprine then were stopped for intolerance. She came to our hospital for a new relapse with severe dynamic ataxia. After a treatment with corticosteroids the patient developed a paranoid disorder characterized by persecutory delusion (illusion of double) towards her husband. Treatment with glatiramer acetate and quetiapine improved her neuropsychiatric condition.

  1. Depression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATASSI, NAZEM; COOK, AMANDA; PINEDA, CRISTIANA M. E.; YERRAMILLI-RAO, PADMAJA; PULLEY, DARLENE; CUDKOWICZ, MERIT

    2011-01-01

    Depression is an under-recognized comorbidity associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The goals of this study were to prospectively estimate the prevalence of depression and other ALS related symptoms and to study the impact of depression on enrollment in research studies. One hundred and twenty-seven people with ALS completed the ALS Depression Inventory (ADI-12) and answered questions about ALS related symptoms and research study enrollment preferences. Demographics, ALS symptoms, medications, functional status, and research enrollment were compared between depressed and non-depressed patients. Results showed that the prevalence of mild and severe depression was 29% and 6%, respectively. More than one-third of our ALS patients were receiving anti-depressants to treat depression, sialorrhea, and pseudobulbar affect. Depression prevalence was not correlated with disease duration or progression. Except for anxiety, none of the ALS related symptoms predicted depression. The presence of depression did not have an effect on the decision to enroll in research studies. In conclusion, major depression is less common in our ALS cohort than in the general population. The diagnosis of depression can be masked by some ALS related symptoms and it has no impact on enrollment in ALS clinical trials. PMID:21091399

  2. Functional treatments in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Ardith M; Castro-Borrero, Wanda; Davis, Scott L; Frohman, Teresa C; Frohman, Elliot M

    2011-06-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding and management of symptoms and dysfunctions associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). A broad spectrum of dysfunctions associated with MS are under investigation. Research published in the past year and a half addresses gait dysfunction, exercise training, fatigue, bowel/bladder and sexual dysfunction, and sleep disruption. Functional electrical stimulation and strength training have been validated for improvement in gait and motor function. Exercise training has been shown to benefit mood and quality of life scores and to reduce circulating inflammatory cytokine levels. Fatigue remains a challenging problem with incremental improvements in understanding of underlying causes and effective drug therapies offered by recent work. Treatment of bowel, bladder and sexual dysfunction utilizing a variety of modalities has been investigated with some progress. In the absence of treatments to reverse neurologic injury due to MS, effective symptom management and functional improvement remain essential to mitigate disability and maintain quality of life. Basic research, as well as controlled clinical trials, in this realm offers promising insights and solutions.

  3. Natalizumab therapy of multiple sclerosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hutchinson, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the commonest disabling neurological disease of young and middle-aged adults affecting 1 million persons world wide. The illness begins with a relapsing-remitting MS course in 85%-90% of patients; the other 10%-15% have a primary progressive onset MS. Our current understanding is that MS is an autoimmune disorder with an inflammatory T-cell attack on myelin or some component of the oligodendrocyte--myelin structure. Relapses of disease activity result in plaques of demyelination with destruction of myelin and, to a lesser, extent axons. Lymphocytes within the central nervous system tissue recruit more cells leading to an inflammatory cascade that causes myelin damage, axonal disruption, and neuronal death. If the plaque occurs in a vocal area of the central nervous system then symptoms relating to that area result. However, magnetic resonance imaging shows that approximately 10 times more lesions occur in asymptomatic areas of the brain. Recovery from an initial relapse may appear relatively complete but persistent inflammation results in axonal injury and residual disability results. With time and accumulated lesion load, secondary degeneration of denuded axons results in the phase of secondary progressive MS usually 15-20 years after onset.

  4. Remyelination Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle E. Harlow

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an immune-mediated disorder of the central nervous system that results in destruction of the myelin sheath that surrounds axons and eventual neurodegeneration. Current treatments approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS target the aberrant immune response and successfully reduce the severity of attacks and frequency of relapses. Therapies are still needed that can repair damage particularly for the treatment of progressive forms of MS for which current therapies are relatively ineffective. Remyelination can restore neuronal function and prevent further neuronal loss and clinical disability. Recent advancements in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating myelination, as well as the development of high throughput screens to identify agents that enhance myelination, have lead to the identification of many potential remyelination therapies currently in pre-clinical and early clinical development. One problem that has plagued the development of treatments to promote remyelination is the difficulty in assessing remyelination in patients with current imaging techniques. Powerful new imaging technologies are making it easier to discern remyelination in patients, which is critical for the assessment of these new therapeutic strategies during clinical trials. This review will summarize what is currently known about remyelination failure in MS, strategies to overcome this failure, new therapeutic treatments in the pipeline for promoting remyelination in MS patients, and new imaging technologies for measuring remyelination in patients.

  5. HLA typing in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Faré

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between Systemic Sclerosis (SSc and HLA antigens, and to correlate these antigens with the clinical manifestations of the disease. Materials and methods: 55 patients were stratified according a to the cutaneous involvement b to the positivity of Scl- 70 and anticentromere antibody and c to the internal organ involvement, in particular we used HRCT to demonstrate lung fibrosis, echocardiography for the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension, blood creatinine, urinalysis and arterial hypertension to demonstrate renal failure, and esophagus double-countrast barium swallow for the diagnosis of esophagopathy. The control group consisting of 2000 healthy Caucasian subjects was recruited from the same population. Results: the frequency of the antigens A23 (p=0.003, RR=3.69, B18 (p<0.0001, RR=3.57, and DR11 (p<0.0001, RR=6.18 was statistically increased in the patients population compared with the healthy controls. Although there is no any significant correlation between HLA antigens and different clinical subsets of scleroderma, antigens B18 and DR11 could be associated with more severe clinical features. Conclusions: the presence of a significant association between SSc and specific HLA antigens (A23, B18, and DR11 could link the HLA system with SSc.

  6. Interest in Providing Multiple Sclerosis Care and Subspecializing in Multiple Sclerosis Among Neurology Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira-Poit, Stephanie; Kane, Heather L.; Frost, A. Corey; Keating, Michael; Olmsted, Murrey

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although detailed knowledge regarding treatment options for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is largely limited to neurologists, shortages in the neurologist workforce, including MS subspecialists, are predicted. Thus, MS patients may have difficulties in gaining access to appropriate care. No systematic evaluation has yet been performed of the number of neurology residents planning to pursue MS subspecialization. This study identifies factors affecting interest in providing MS patient care or MS subspecialization among current neurology residents. Methods: We randomly selected half of all Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education–certified neurology residency programs in the continental United States to receive the neurology resident survey. Completed surveys were received from 218 residents. Results: Residents were significantly more likely to have increased interest in MS care when they participated in MS research, were interested in teaching, and indicated that the “ability to improve patient outcomes and quality of life” was a positive factor influencing their desire to provide MS patient care. Residents who were interested in providing MS care, interested in teaching, and indicated that “research opportunities” was a positive factor for providing MS patient care were significantly more likely to express interest in MS subspecialization. Conclusions: Increasing opportunities to interact with MS patients, learn about MS care, and participate in MS research may increase interest in MS care and subspecialization among neurology residents. Opportunities to educate residents regarding MS patient care may affect residents’ attitudes. PMID:24688352

  7. Anti-integrin therapy for multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Eiji; Nakahashi, Susumu; Okamoto, Takayuki; Imai, Hiroshi; Shimaoka, Motomu

    2012-01-01

    Integrins are the foremost family of cell adhesion molecules that regulate immune cell trafficking in health and diseases. Integrin alpha4 mediates organ-specific migration of immune cells to the inflamed brain, thereby playing the critical role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Anti-alpha4 integrin therapy aiming to block infiltration of autoreactive lymphocytes to the inflamed brain has been validated in several clinical trials for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. This paper provides readers with an overview of the molecular and structural bases of integrin activation as well as rationale for using anti-alpha4 integrin therapy for multiple sclerosis and then chronicles the rise and fall of this treatment strategy using natalizumab, a humanized anti-alpha4 integrin.

  8. Anti-Integrin Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Kawamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrins are the foremost family of cell adhesion molecules that regulate immune cell trafficking in health and diseases. Integrin alpha4 mediates organ-specific migration of immune cells to the inflamed brain, thereby playing the critical role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Anti-alpha4 integrin therapy aiming to block infiltration of autoreactive lymphocytes to the inflamed brain has been validated in several clinical trials for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. This paper provides readers with an overview of the molecular and structural bases of integrin activation as well as rationale for using anti-alpha4 integrin therapy for multiple sclerosis and then chronicles the rise and fall of this treatment strategy using natalizumab, a humanized anti-alpha4 integrin.

  9. Selected methods of rehabilitation in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Gerkowicz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis is a chronic connective tissue disease characterized by microvascular abnormalities, immune disturbances and progressive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Skin involvement may result in contractures, leading to marked loss of hand mobility, adversely affecting the performance of daily activities and decreasing the quality of life. Face involvement not only causes functional loss, but also lowers the self-esteem of patients. Increasing attention has recently been focused on the need to rehabilitate patients with systemic sclerosis in order to prevent the development of joint contractures and loss of mobility. The study presents a review of the current literature on rehabilitation possibilities in patients with systemic sclerosis, with a special focus on physiotherapy methods.

  10. Mutations in the Matrin 3 gene cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Janel O; Pioro, Erik P; Boehringer, Ashley; Chia, Ruth; Feit, Howard; Renton, Alan E; Pliner, Hannah A; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Marangi, Giuseppe; Winborn, Brett J; Gibbs, J Raphael; Nalls, Michael A; Morgan, Sarah; Shoai, Maryam; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan; Orrell, Richard W; Malaspina, Andrea; Sidle, Katie C; Fratta, Pietro; Harms, Matthew B; Baloh, Robert H; Pestronk, Alan; Weihl, Conrad C; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Zinman, Lorne; Drory, Vivian E; Borghero, Giuseppe; Mora, Gabriele; Calvo, Andrea; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Drepper, Carsten; Sendtner, Michael; Singleton, Andrew B; Taylor, J Paul; Cookson, Mark R; Restagno, Gabriella; Sabatelli, Mario; Bowser, Robert; Chiò, Adriano; Traynor, Bryan J

    2014-05-01

    MATR3 is an RNA- and DNA-binding protein that interacts with TDP-43, a disease protein linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia. Using exome sequencing, we identified mutations in MATR3 in ALS kindreds. We also observed MATR3 pathology in ALS-affected spinal cords with and without MATR3 mutations. Our data provide more evidence supporting the role of aberrant RNA processing in motor neuron degeneration.

  11. Biomarkers in Multiple Sclerosis: Role of Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Berger

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The first international workshop on “Biomarkers in Multiple Sclerosis” was organized by B. Bielekova, R. Hohlfeld, R. Martin and U. Utz from April 14–16, 2004, in Washington, DC. The workshop intended to discuss the current status and potential applicability of biological markers for the understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapy of multiple sclerosis. The present review summarizes the presentation on the potential role of antibodies as biomarkers for diagnosis, disease activity, classification and prediction of clinical courses in multiple sclerosis.

  12. Respiratory treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benditt, Joshua O; Boitano, Louis

    2008-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with no known cure. The major cause of mortality and major morbidities is related to the effects of the disease on the muscles of the respiratory system (ie, the inspiratory, expiratory, and upper airway muscles). Dyspnea, swallowing difficulties, sialorrhea, and impaired cough are all symptoms that can be palliated through pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic means. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, in particular, is a technique that not only relieves dyspnea but may also extend the lives of patients who have this disease. It should be offered to all patients who have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with a forced vital capacity of less than 50 percent.

  13. Intravenous polyclonal human immunoglobulins in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2008-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established therapy for demyelinating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. IVIG exerts a number of effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). Four double-blind IVIG trials have been performed in relapsing-remitting MS. A meta-analysis ......Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established therapy for demyelinating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. IVIG exerts a number of effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). Four double-blind IVIG trials have been performed in relapsing-remitting MS. A meta...

  14. Genetic Interactions with Prenatal Social Environment: Effects on Academic and Behavioral Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Dalton; Rauscher, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies report gene-environment interactions, suggesting that specific alleles have different effects on social outcomes depending on environment. In all these studies, however, environmental conditions are potentially endogenous to unmeasured genetic characteristics. That is, it could be that the observed interaction effects actually…

  15. Neurologic disorders: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, multiple sclerosis, and poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkle, T J; Kimmelman, C P

    1982-01-01

    The patient who has multiple cranial neuropathies may pose a diagnostic dilemma. The neurologic disorders of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and poliomyelitis often cause bulbar dysfunctions such as diplopia, facial weakness, slurred or hypernasal speech, dysphagia, and hoarseness. In general, treatment is supportive and is directed toward restoring or aiding lost function (i.e., tracheostomy, esophagostomy, and cricopharyngeal myotomy). The relative infrequency of these disorders can lead to delays in diagnosis and rehabilitative therapy.

  16. Nutrition Facts in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Riccio

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness.

  17. Targeted Therapy in Systemic Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Baron

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapies use an understanding of the pathophysiology of a disease in an individual patient. Although targeted therapy for systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma has not yet reached the level of patient-specific treatments, recent developments in the understanding of the global pathophysiology of the disease have led to new treatments based on the cells and pathways that have been shown to be involved in the disease pathogenesis. The presence of a B cell signature in skin biopsies has led to the trial of rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, in SSc. The well-known properties of transforming growth factor (TGF-β in promoting collagen synthesis and secretion has led to a small trial of fresolimumab, a human IgG4 monoclonal antibody capable of neutralizing TGF-β. Evidence supporting important roles for interleukin-6 in the pathogenesis of SSc have led to a large trial of tocilizumab in SSc. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP upon binding of nitric oxide (NO to the sGC molecule. Processes such as cell growth and proliferation are regulated by cGMP. Evidence that sGC may play a role in SSc has led to a trial of riociguat, a molecule that sensitizes sGC to endogenous NO. Tyrosine kinases (TKs are involved in a wide variety of physiologic and pathological processes including vascular remodeling and fibrogenesis such as occurs in SSc. This has led to a trial of nintedanib, a next-generation tyrosine-kinase (TK inhibitor which targets multiple TKs, in SSc.

  18. Iron Chelation and Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey J. Weigel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Histochemical and MRI studies have demonstrated that MS (multiple sclerosis patients have abnormal deposition of iron in both gray and white matter structures. Data is emerging indicating that this iron could partake in pathogenesis by various mechanisms, e.g., promoting the production of reactive oxygen species and enhancing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Iron chelation therapy could be a viable strategy to block iron-related pathological events or it can confer cellular protection by stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor 1α, a transcription factor that normally responds to hypoxic conditions. Iron chelation has been shown to protect against disease progression and/or limit iron accumulation in some neurological disorders or their experimental models. Data from studies that administered a chelator to animals with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of MS, support the rationale for examining this treatment approach in MS. Preliminary clinical studies have been performed in MS patients using deferoxamine. Although some side effects were observed, the large majority of patients were able to tolerate the arduous administration regimen, i.e., 6–8 h of subcutaneous infusion, and all side effects resolved upon discontinuation of treatment. Importantly, these preliminary studies did not identify a disqualifying event for this experimental approach. More recently developed chelators, deferasirox and deferiprone, are more desirable for possible use in MS given their oral administration, and importantly, deferiprone can cross the blood–brain barrier. However, experiences from other conditions indicate that the potential for adverse events during chelation therapy necessitates close patient monitoring and a carefully considered administration regimen.

  19. Hearing disorders in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, Miriam; Levine, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that is both a focal inflammatory and a chronic neurodegenerative disease. The focal inflammatory component is characterized by destruction of central nervous system myelin, including the spinal cord; as such it can impair any central neural system, including the auditory system. While on the one hand auditory complaints in MS patients are rare compared to other senses, such as vision and proprioception, on the other hand auditory tests of precise neural timing are never "silent." Whenever focal MS lesions are detected involving the pontine auditory pathway, auditory tests requiring precise neural timing are always abnormal, while auditory functions not requiring such precise timing are often normal. Azimuth sound localization is accomplished by comparing the timing and loudness of the sound at the two ears. Hence tests of azimuth sound localization must obligatorily involve the central nervous system and particularly the brainstem. Whenever a focal lesion was localized to the pontine auditory pathway, timing tests were always abnormal, but loudness tests were not. Moreover, a timing test that included only high-frequency sounds was very often abnormal, even when there was no detectable focal MS lesion involving the pontine auditory pathway. This test may be a marker for the chronic neurodegenerative aspect of MS, and, as such could be used to complement the magnetic resonance imaging scan in monitoring the neurodegenerative aspect of MS. Studies of MS brainstem lesion location and auditory function have led to advances in understanding how the human brain processes sound. The brain processes binaural sounds independently for time and level in a two-stage process. The first stage is at the level of the superior olivary complex (SOC) and the second at a level rostral to the SOC. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Association between MAOA-u VNTR polymorphism and its interaction with stressful life events and major depressive disorder in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Yu, Shun-Ying; Liang, Shan; Ding, Jun; Feng, Zhe; Yang, Fan; Gao, Wei-Jia; Lin, Jia-Ni; Huang, Chun-Xiang; Liu, Xue-Jun; Su, Lin-Yan

    2013-07-01

    To investigate whether the genetic polymorphism, upstream variable number of tandem repeats (uVNTR), in the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene, is associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescents and to test whether there is gene-environment interaction between MAOA-uVNTR polymorphism and stressful life events (SLEs). A total of 394 Chinese Han subjects, including 187 adolescent patients with MDD and 207 normal students as a control group, were included in the study. Genotyping was performed by SNaP-shot assay. SLEs in the previous 12 months were evaluated. The groups were compared in terms of the frequency distributions of MAOA-uVNTR genotypes and alleles using statistical software. The binary logistic regression model of gene-environment interaction was established to analyze the association of the gene-environment interaction between MAOA-u VNTR genotypes and SLEs with adolescent MDD. The distribution profiles of MAOA-u VNTR genotypes and alleles were not related to the onset of MDD, severity of depression, comorbid anxiety and suicidal ideation/behavior/attempt in adolescents. The gene-environment interaction between MAOA-u VNTR genotypes and SLEs was not associated with MDD in male or female adolescents. It is not proven that MAOA-u VNTR polymorphism is associated with adolescent MDD. There is also no gene-environment interaction between MAOA-u VNTR polymorphism and SLEs that is associated with adolescent MDD.

  1. Fingolimod for the Treatment of Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Altunrende

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system and is characterized by inflammation, demyelination, and axonal loss. Fingolimod is the first oral drug for the treatment of MS approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, European Union countries, and various other countries. The compound exerts its effect via interaction with lysophospholipid receptors known as sphingosine-1 phosphate receptors. Although fingolimod has a very convenient daily oral dosing, it may cause development of bradycardia at the first dose, macular edema, infection, all of which require attention. Randomized double-blind clinical trials have shown that fingolimod significantly reduces relapse rates and is beneficial in brain magnetic resonance imaging measures when compared with both placebo and intramuscular interferon β-1a. This review describes the characteristics of fingolimod concerning its efficacy, safety, and tolerability in the clinical context of the management of MS

  2. Extracellular vesicles in multiple sclerosis: what are they telling us?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías eSáenz-Cuesta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are membrane-bound particles secreted by almost all cell types. They are classified depending on their biogenesis and size into exosomes and microvesicles or according to their cell origin. EVs play a role in cell-to-cell communication, including contact-free cell synapsis, carrying active membrane proteins, lipids, and genetic material both inside the particle and on their surface. They have been related to several physiological and pathological conditions. In particular, increasing concentrations of EVs have been found in many autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS. MS is a central nervous system demyelinating disease characterized by relapsing of symptoms followed by periods of remission. Close interaction between endothelial cells, leukocytes, monocytes and cells from central nervous system is crucial for the development of MS. This review summarizes the pathological role of EVs in MS and the relationship of EVs with clinical characteristics, therapy and biomarkers of the disease.

  3. Evolving concepts in the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comi, Giancarlo; Radaelli, Marta; Soelberg Sørensen, Per

    2017-01-01

    or MRI activity. The choice for therapy is increasingly complex and should be driven by an appropriate knowledge of the mechanisms of action of the different drugs and of their risk-benefit profile. Because the relapsing phase of the disease is characterised by inflammation, treatment should be started......In the past 20 years the treatment scenario of multiple sclerosis has radically changed. The increasing availability of effective disease-modifying therapies has shifted the aim of therapeutic interventions from a reduction in relapses and disability accrual, to the absence of any sign of clinical...... as early as possible and aim to re-establish the normal complex interactions in the immune system. Before starting a treatment, neurologists should carefully consider the state of the disease, its prognostic factors and comorbidities, the patient's response to previous treatments, and whether the patient...

  4. Autoimmunity to Neuronal Antigens in Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.G. Huizinga (Ruth)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractMultiple sclerosis (MS), first identified as a separate neurological disease by the French neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot (Charcot, 1868), is the most common disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in young adults. Affecting more than 2 million people worldwide, MS classically

  5. Towards gene therapy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisman, Liselijn Agatha Barendina

    2004-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a paralytic neurodegenerative disorder, characterised by a specific loss of motoneurons. Although the exact pathogenesis is largely enigmatic, it is known that glutamate excitotoxicity plays an important role in motoneuron cell death. Glutamate is one of the

  6. Blindness in tuberous sclerosis: A case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-24

    Jun 24, 2015 ... Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an inherited neuro- ... No personality change or excessive weight changes was noticed. She had an episode of generalized tonic convulsion that lasted about 20 minutes with no loss of sphincter control .... taneous disorder that is associated with tumours in vari-.

  7. Gender and autoimmune comorbidity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Pfleger, Claudia C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The female preponderance in incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) calls for investigations into sex differences in comorbidity with other autoimmune diseases (ADs). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether male and female patients with MS have a higher frequency of autoimmune comorbidity than...

  8. Retinal layer segmentation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petzold, Axel; Balcer, Laura J; Calabresi, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    eyes, MSNON eyes versus control eyes, and MSNON eyes versus MSON eyes. We excluded relevant sources of bias by funnel plots. FINDINGS: Of 25 497 records identified, 110 articles were eligible and 40 reported data (in total 5776 eyes from patients with multiple sclerosis [1667 MSON eyes and 4109 MSNON...

  9. Immune system alterations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovden, H; Frederiksen, J L; Pedersen, S W

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a disease of which the underlying cause and pathogenesis are unknown. Cumulatative data clearly indicates an active participation by the immune system in the disease. An increasingly recognized theory suggests a non-cell autonomous mechanism, meaning that multiple...

  10. Sleep and Fasciculations in Amyothropic Lateral Sclerosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šonka, K.; Fiksa, J.; Horváth, E.; Kemlink, D.; Süssová, J.; Böhm, J.; Šebesta, Václav; Volná, J.; Nevšímalová, S.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2004), s. 25-30 ISSN 1432-9123 R&D Projects: GA MZd NF5999 Keywords : amyothropic lateral sclerosis ALS * fasciculation * fragmentary myoclonus * periodic leg movements in sleep PLMS * polysomnography PSG * electromyography EMG * REM sleep Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

  11. Mapping and predicting mortality from systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elhai, Muriel; Meune, Christophe; Boubaya, Marouane

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the causes of death and risk factors in systemic sclerosis (SSc). METHODS: Between 2000 and 2011, we examined the death certificates of all French patients with SSc to determine causes of death. Then we examined causes of death and developed a score associated with all-ca...

  12. Assessment of fatigue in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sander, C.; Voelter, H.U.; Schlake, H.P.; Eling, P.A.T.M.; Hildebrandt, H.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most frequent symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS) is fatigue. It has a major impact on quality of life as well as on professional activity. Even nowadays it is still unclear what constitutes an adequate assessment of the perceived fatigue. The following overview will discuss different

  13. Antigen-specific therapies in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, J.M. van

    1998-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the major neurological disease of young adults in the western world, affecting about 1 per 1,000. It is characterised by chronic or recurrent lesions of inflammatory damage in the white matter of the central nervous system. Within such lesions, the protective myelin sheath is

  14. The risk of multiple sclerosis in nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, Egon; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Koch-Henriksen, Nils

    2003-01-01

    The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in nurses during the period 1980-1996 was calculated in a nationwide study. The cohort consisted of 69,428 nurses, 2185 men and 67,243 women. Sixty (two men and 58 women) with definite MS were observed, whereas 69.3 were expected. We found no significant...

  15. Concordance for multiple sclerosis in Danish twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T; Skytthe, Axel; Stenager, Egon

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in twins has not previously been studied in complete nationwide data sets. The existence of almost complete MS and twin registries in Denmark ensures that essentially unbiased samples of MS cases among twins can be obtained. In this population-based study...

  16. Hearing Disorders in Multiple Sclerosis (MS Patiants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Mohammadkhani

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a neurological disease that causes sudden deaf. In this research auditory disorders were studied in the patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Materials & Methods: This cross sectional descriptive-analytical study was performed on 107 patients with multiple sclerosis in the range of 20-45 yrs. There were not history of trauma and middle ear disease in all cases. Sampling was randomized. A complete auditory evaluation including pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry, imittance audiometry and brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential were performed on patients. Results: In pure tone audiometry 62.19% of cases had sensory neural high tone loss. In speech audiometry and imittance audiometry 18 and 31 cases were abnormal, respectively. 14.55% of cases had abnormality in BAEP. The most of abnormalities were prolonged latency of V, decrease of V/I amplitude ratio and poor reproducibility, respectively. With high rate of stimulation 57.77% of cases were abnormal. Statistical analysis showed significant difference between latency of V and stimulation rate. Conclusion: According to findings of this research it seems that hearing evaluation is very important for follow-up and early rehabilitation of auditory disorder in patients with MS. Also auditory tests battery especially brain-stem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP with high stimulation rate are useful in the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis.

  17. Grey matter pathology in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, J.J.G.; Barkhof, F.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has been classically regarded as a white matter disease. However, recent histopathological studies have convincingly shown that grey matter regions are also heavily affected. Grey matter damage starts early in the disease and substantially affects clinico-cognitive

  18. The socioeconomic consequences of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Wanscher, Benedikte; Frederiksen, Jette

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has serious negative effects on health-, social-, and work-related issues for the patients and their families, thus causing significant socioeconomic burden. The objective of the study was to determine healthcare costs and indirect illness costs in MS patient in a national...

  19. Unusual Cutaneous Manifestation of Tuberous Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Shah

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations are found in 60 to 70% cases of tuberous sclerosis and consist of adenoma sebaceum, periungual fibromatas, cafe au lait spots, shagreen patches and white macules. Our patient showed unusual skin manifestations like spotty pigmentation on the chest, back and abdomen and hyperkeratosis palmaris et plantaris.

  20. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: mutations, functions and phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Sancak (Ozgur)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractTuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by the development of hamartomas in multiple organs and tissues. TSC is caused by mutations in either the TSC1 or TSC2 gene. We searched for mutations in both genes in a cohort of 490 patients diagnosed

  1. Multiple sclerosis presenting with progressive visual failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Ormerod, I E; McDonald, W I

    1984-01-01

    Progressive visual failure as the presenting feature of multiple sclerosis is described in five patients. The clinical features did not permit a distinction from visual loss due to compression. The finding of oligoclonal bands in the CSF at presentation is a useful pointer to the diagnosis, but is not specific and full investigation to exclude treatable causes of visual loss is essential.

  2. Nutritional management of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saspen Case Study: Nutritional management of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis with intradialytic parenteral nutrition. 2014;27(1). S Afr J Clin Nutr. Kriel J, BSc(Dietetics); Clinical Dietitian; Esau N, MSc(Dietetics), Clinical Dietitian. Tygerberg Academic Hospital; Department of Health. Correspondence: Janine Kriel, e-mail: ...

  3. Clinical psychology and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pagnini

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis is a fatal and progressive disease, characterized by progressive muscles weakness, with consequent loss of physical capacities. Psychologists can play an important role in ALS care, by providing clinical activities in every step of the disease, including support and counseling activities directed to patients, their caregivers and to physicians.

  4. Onset symptoms in paediatric multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Magnus Spangsberg; Sellebjerg, Finn; Blinkenberg, Morten

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) carries a relatively higher mortality and morbidity than adult MS. Paediatric MS symptoms and paraclinical findings at the first demyelinating event have never before been characterised in a Danish setting. The aim of this study was to compare...

  5. MYO9B polymorphisms in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemppinen, A.; Suvela, M.; Tienari, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 3' region of myosin IXB (MYO9B) gene have recently been reported to associate with different inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. We monitored for the association of MYO9B variants to multiple sclerosis (MS) in four Northern European populations. First...

  6. Myeloproliferative neoplasms in five multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sigrun; Bjerrum, Ole Weis

    2013-01-01

    The concurrence of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) is unusual. We report five patients from a localized geographic area in Denmark with both MS and MPN; all the patients were diagnosed with MPNs in the years 2007-2012. We describe the patients' history and treatment...

  7. Cigarette smoking and progression in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus; van Harten, Annemarie; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; De Keyser, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of cigarette smoking on progression and disability accumulation in multiple sclerosis ( MS). Methods: Information on past and present smoking of 364 patients with MS was obtained through a structured questionnaire survey. We used Kaplan-Meier analyses and Cox

  8. The Danish multiple sclerosis treatment register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the database: The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register (DMSTR) serves as a clinical quality register, enabling the health authorities to monitor the quality of the diseasemodifying treatment, and it is an important data source for epidemiological research. Study population: The DMS...

  9. Quantitative muscle ultrasonography in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, I.M.P.; Rooij, F.G. van; Overeem, S.; Pillen, S.; Janssen, H.M.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether quantitative muscle ultrasonography can detect structural muscle changes in early-stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Bilateral transverse scans were made of five muscles or muscle groups (sternocleidomastoid, biceps brachii/brachialis, forearm flexor group,

  10. Monoclonal Antibodies for Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blinkenberg, Morten; Soelberg Sørensen, Per

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) has improved considerably over the last decade because of new insights into MS pathology and biotechnological advances. This has led to the development of new potent pharmaceutical compounds targeting different processes in the complex autoimmune pathology...... the context of different treatment strategies. Finally, we consider the most important future developments....

  11. Etiology and pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Ransohoff, R M

    1998-01-01

    The cause of multiple sclerosis (MS) remains unknown despite decades of intense research. The major research disciplines that have been brought to bear on this question include genetics, epidemiology, neuropathology, immunology, and virology. Recent advances in the understanding of the inflammato...

  12. Risks of multiple sclerosis in relatives of patients in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, H; Vlietinck, R; Debruyne, J; DeKeyser, J; DHooghe, MB; Loos, R; Medaer, R; Truyen, L; Yee, IML; Sadovnick, AD

    Objectives - To calculate age adjusted risks for multiple sclerosis in relatives of Flemish patients with multiple sclerosis. Methods - Lifetime risks were calculated using the maximum likelihood approach. Results - Vital information was obtained on 674 probands with multiple sclerosis in Flanders

  13. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum crosstalk in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Giovanni; Kawamata, Hibiki

    2016-06-01

    Physical and functional interactions between mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are crucial for cell life. These two organelles are intimately connected and collaborate to essential processes, such as calcium homeostasis and phospholipid biosynthesis. The connections between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum occur through structures named mitochondria associated membranes (MAMs), which contain lipid rafts and a large number of proteins, many of which serve multiple functions at different cellular sites. Growing evidence strongly suggests that alterations of ER-mitochondria interactions are involved in neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a devastating and rapidly fatal motor neuron disease. Mutations in proteins that participate in ER-mitochondria interactions and MAM functions are increasingly being associated with genetic forms of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. This evidence strongly suggests that, rather than considering the two organelles separately, a better understanding of the disease process can derive from studying the alterations in their crosstalk. In this review we discuss normal and pathological ER-mitochondria interactions and the evidence that link them to ALS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antiepileptic and Antidepressive Polypharmacy in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Anton Giæver Beiske

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS are often suffering from neuropathic pain. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs are commonly used and are susceptible to be involved in drug interactions. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the prevalence of use of antiepileptic and antidepressive drugs in MS patients and to discuss the theoretical potential for interactions. Methods. Review of the medical records from all patients treated at a dedicated MS rehabilitation centre in Norway between 2009 and 2012. Results. In total 1090 patients attended a rehabilitation stay during the study period. Of these, 342 (31%; 249 females with mean age of 53 (±10 years and EDSS 4.8 (±1.7 used at least one AED (gabapentin 12.7%, pregabalin 7.7%, clonazepam 7.8%, and carbamazepine 2.6% or amitriptyline (9.7%. Polypharmacy was widespread (mean 5.4 drugs with 60% using additional CNS-active drugs with a propensity to be involved in interactions. Age, gender, and EDSS scores did not differ significantly between those using and not using AED/amitriptyline. Conclusion. One-third of MS patients attending a rehabilitation stay receive AED/amitriptyline treatment. The high prevalence of polypharmacy and use of CNS-active drugs calls for awareness of especially pharmacodynamic interactions and possible excessive adverse effects.

  15. Factors affecting dignity of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Simin; Borhani, Fariba; Abbaszadeh, Abbas

    2016-12-01

    MS is one of the most common chronic diseases of the nervous system. Apart from disease progression, other complications such as unemployment, separation and divorce could potentially threat patients' dignity. Most of the previous studies have been done of maintaining patients' dignity in interaction with healthcare team, but studies on affecting factors of dignity in chronic patients in the society and in interaction with usual people are scarce. We aimed to investigate factors affecting dignity of Iranian patients with MS in daily living and in interaction of them with the society. In this qualitative study, 13 patients with multiple sclerosis were chosen by purposive sampling and semi-structured interviews were conducted until data saturation. The study was done in Tehran, the capital city of Iran. Factors affecting dignity were classified as 'personal factors' and 'social factors'. Personal factors consist of the following subcategories: patients' communication with self, patients' knowledge, patients' values and beliefs and patients' resources. Social factors include others' communication with patients, social knowledge, social values and beliefs and social resources. Multiple personal and social factors interfere in perceived patient dignity. In fact, interaction between personal and social factors can be influential in final perceived dignity. By focusing on whole aspects of the patients' lives, we can identify dignity-promoting or dignity-threatening factors and help patients maintain their dignity by taking appropriate measures for moderating threatening factors and improving dignity enhancing ones. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  16. [Multiple sclerosis, loss of functionality and gender].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-González, Félix; Álvarez-Roldán, Arturo

    2017-12-01

    To identify the type of support and assistance that patients with multiple sclerosis need in order to cope with the loss of functionality, and to show how gender affects the perception of these needs. Interpretative-phenomenological qualitative study. Granada (Spain). Year: 2014. Intentional sample: 30 patients and 20 family caregivers. Data were gathered from 26 interviews and 4 focus groups. The data were coded and analysed with the NVivo programme. The multiple sclerosis patients and family caregivers had different perceptions of the loss of capacity to undertake activities of daily living. Being able to self care was considered the last vestige of autonomy. The women with multiple sclerosis tried to take on the responsibility of housework, but the male caregivers became gradually involved in these tasks. Gender roles were redefined with respect to housekeeping. The multiple sclerosis patients showed a need for emotional support. Some of the men had abandoned the stereotype of the strong male as a result of the decline in their health. Adaptations in the home took place without planning them in advance. The use of mobility devices started on an occasional basis. A fear of stigma was an obstacle for regular use of assistive technology. Health care for people with multiple sclerosis should include family caregivers. Gender influences the perception that caregivers and patients have of the assistance they require to maximise their quality of life. This flags up several intervention areas for the follow-up and long-term care of these patients by the healthcare system. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Tuberous sclerosis complex Esclerose tuberosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Araujo Rodrigues

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, also known as Epiloia or Bourneville-Pringle disease is an autosomal dominant neurocutaneous syndrome with variable clinical expression. It is a multisystem disorder that may be associated with hamartomas in multiple organs in an unpredictable manner. The dermatologist plays an essential role in the history of the disease, since skin manifestations represent the most prevalent clinical features, enabling early diagnosis and intervention in its natural course. This article aims to inform the scientific community about advances made in the study of genetics and molecular biology. Recent findings regarding stimulation of tumor growth have been changing the history of this condition, making therapeutic trials with topical and systemic drugs possible. Knowledge of these topics enables better management of the patients affected, since tissue replacement by tumors can result in significant morbidity and mortality.A Esclerose Tuberosa, também conhecida como Epilóia ou Facomatose de Pringle-Bourneville, é uma síndrome neurocutânea de caráter autossômico dominante com expressões clínicas variadas. É uma doença multissistêmica que pode cursar com hamartomas em diversos órgãos, de forma imprevisível. O dermatologista tem papel essencial na história da doença, uma vez que as afecções cutâneas representam as mais prevalentes apresentações clínicas, possibilitando assim o diagnóstico precoce da síndrome e intervenção na sua evolução natural. O presente artigo tem o objetivo de atualizar a comunidade científica sobre avanços alcançados no estudo genético e biologia molecular. Recentes descobertas sobre o estímulo do crescimento tumoral vêm mudando a evolução desta patologia, possibilitando ensaios terapêuticos com drogas tópicas e sistêmicas. O conhecimento destes aspectos possibilita melhor condução dos pacientes acometidos, dado que a substituição tumoral dos diversos tecidos pode

  18. Fructose Malabsorption in Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Isabelle; Leroi, Anne-Marie; Gourcerol, Guillaume; Levesque, Hervé; Ménard, Jean-François; Ducrotte, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    The deleterious effect of fructose, which is increasingly incorporated in many beverages, dairy products, and processed foods, has been described; fructose malabsorption has thus been reported in up to 2.4% of healthy subjects, leading to digestive clinical symptoms (eg, pain, distension, diarrhea). Because digestive involvement is frequent in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), we hypothesized that fructose malabsorption could be responsible for intestinal manifestations in these patients. The aims of this prospective study were to: determine the prevalence of fructose malabsorption, in SSc; predict which SSc patients are at risk of developing fructose malabsorption; and assess the outcome of digestive symptoms in SSc patients after initiation of standardized low-fructose diet. Eighty consecutive patients with SSc underwent fructose breath test. All SSc patients also completed a questionnaire on digestive symptoms, and a global symptom score (GSS) was calculated. The prevalence of fructose malabsorption was as high as 40% in SSc patients. We also observed a marked correlation between the presence of fructose malabsorption and: higher values of GSS score of digestive symptoms (P = 0.000004); and absence of delayed gastric emptying (P = 0.007). Furthermore, in SSc patients with fructose malabsorption, the median value of GSS score of digestive symptoms was lower after initiation of standardized low-fructose diet (4 before vs. 1 after; P = 0.0009). Our study underscores that fructose malabsorption often occurs in SSc patients. Our findings are thus relevant for clinical practice, highlighting that fructose breath test is a helpful, noninvasive method by: demonstrating fructose intolerance in patients with SSc; and identifying the group of SSc patients with fructose intolerance who may benefit from low-fructose diet. Interestingly, because the present series also shows that low-fructose diet resulted in a marked decrease of gastrointestinal clinical manifestations

  19. Cranial Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Hayriye Sorgun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that cranial neuropathy findings could be seen in the neurologic examination of multiple sclerosis (MS patients, although brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may not reveal any lesion responsible for the cranial nerve involvement. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of brainstem and cranial nerve involvement, except for olfactory and optic nerves, during MS attacks, and to investigate the rate of an available explanation for the cranial neuropathy findings by lesion localization on brain MRI. METHODS: Ninety-five attacks of 86 MS patients were included in the study. The patients underwent a complete neurological examination, and cranial nerve palsies (CNP were determined during MS attacks. RESULTS: CNP were found as follows: 3rd CNP in 7 (7.4%, 4th CNP in 1 (1.1%, 5th CNP in 6 (6.3%, 6th CNP in 12 (12.6%, 7th CNP in 5 (5.3%, 8th CNP in 4 (4.2%, and 9th and 10th CNP in 2 (2.1% out of 95 attacks. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO was detected in 5 (5.4%, nystagmus in 37 (38.9%, vertigo in 9 (6.3%, and diplopia in 14 (14.7% out of 95 attacks. Pons, mesencephalon and bulbus lesions were detected in 58.7%, 41.5% and 21.1% of the patients, respectively, on the brain MRI. Cranial nerve palsy findings could not be explained by the localization of the lesions on brainstem MRI in 5 attacks; 2 of them were 3rd CNP (1 with INO, 2 were 6th CNP and 1 was a combination of 6th, 7th and 8th CNP. CONCLUSION: The most frequently affected cranial nerve and brainstem region in MS patients is the 6th cranial nerve and pons, respectively. A few of the MS patients have normal brainstem MRI, although they have cranial neuropathy findings in the neurologic examination.

  20. Cranial Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Hayriye Sorgun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that cranial neuropathy findings could be seen in the neurologic examination of multiple sclerosis (MS patients, although brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may not reveal any lesion responsible for the cranial nerve involvement. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of brainstem and cranial nerve involvement, except for olfactory and optic nerves, during MS attacks, and to investigate the rate of an available explanation for the cranial neuropathy findings by lesion localization on brain MRI. METHODS: Ninety-five attacks of 86 MS patients were included in the study. The patients underwent a complete neurological examination, and cranial nerve palsies (CNP were determined during MS attacks. RESULTS: CNP were found as follows: 3rd CNP in 7 (7.4%, 4th CNP in 1 (1.1%, 5th CNP in 6 (6.3%, 6th CNP in 12 (12.6%, 7th CNP in 5 (5.3%, 8th CNP in 4 (4.2%, and 9th and 10th CNP in 2 (2.1% out of 95 attacks. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO was detected in 5 (5.4%, nystagmus in 37 (38.9%, vertigo in 9 (6.3%, and diplopia in 14 (14.7% out of 95 attacks. Pons, mesencephalon and bulbus lesions were detected in 58.7%, 41.5% and 21.1% of the patients, respectively, on the brain MRI. Cranial nerve palsy findings could not be explained by the localization of the lesions on brainstem MRI in 5 attacks; 2 of them were 3rd CNP (1 with INO, 2 were 6th CNP and 1 was a combination of 6th, 7th and 8th CNP. CONCLUSION: The most frequently affected cranial nerve and brainstem region in MS patients is the 6th cranial nerve and pons, respectively. A few of the MS patients have normal brainstem MRI, although they have cranial neuropathy findings in the neurologic examination