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Sample records for sclerosis functional magnetic

  1. Integration of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Filippini, Nicola; Knight, Steven; Talbot, Kevin; Turner, Martin R

    2011-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as a system failure is a concept supported by the finding of consistent extramotor as well as motor cerebral pathology. The functional correlates of the structural changes detected using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry have not been extensively studied. A group of 25 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was compared to healthy control subjects using a multi-modal neuroimaging approach comprising T(1)-weighted, diffusion-weighted and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Using probabilistic tractography, a grey matter connection network was defined based upon the prominent corticospinal tract and corpus callosum involvement demonstrated by white matter tract-based spatial statistics. This 'amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-specific' network included motor, premotor and supplementary motor cortices, pars opercularis and motor-related thalamic nuclei. A novel analysis protocol, using this disease-specific grey matter network as an input for a dual-regression analysis, was then used to assess changes in functional connectivity directly associated with this network. A spatial pattern of increased functional connectivity spanning sensorimotor, premotor, prefrontal and thalamic regions was found. A composite of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging measures also allowed the qualitative discrimination of patients from controls. An integrated structural and functional connectivity approach therefore identified apparently dichotomous processes characterizing the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cerebral network failure, in which there was increased functional connectivity within regions of decreased structural connectivity. Patients with slower rates of disease progression showed connectivity measures with values closer to healthy controls, raising the possibility that functional connectivity increases might not simply represent a

  2. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Concurrent Urodynamic Testing Identifies Brain Structures Involved in Micturition Cycle in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavari, Rose; Karmonik, Christof; Shy, Michael; Fletcher, Sophie; Boone, Timothy

    2017-02-01

    Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, which is common in patients with multiple sclerosis, has a significant impact on quality of life. In this study we sought to determine brain activity processes during the micturition cycle in female patients with multiple sclerosis and neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. We report brain activity on functional magnetic resonance imaging and simultaneous urodynamic testing in 23 ambulatory female patients with multiple sclerosis. Individual functional magnetic resonance imaging activation maps at strong desire to void and at initiation of voiding were calculated and averaged at Montreal Neuroimaging Institute. Areas of significant activation were identified in these average maps. Subgroup analysis was performed in patients with elicitable neurogenic detrusor overactivity or detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Group analysis of all patients at strong desire to void yielded areas of activation in regions associated with executive function (frontal gyrus), emotional regulation (cingulate gyrus) and motor control (putamen, cerebellum and precuneus). Comparison of the average change in activation between previously reported healthy controls and patients with multiple sclerosis showed predominantly stronger, more focal activation in the former and lower, more diffused activation in the latter. Patients with multiple sclerosis who had demonstrable neurogenic detrusor overactivity and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia showed a trend toward distinct brain activation at full urge and at initiation of voiding respectively. We successfully studied brain activation during the entire micturition cycle in female patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and multiple sclerosis using a concurrent functional magnetic resonance imaging/urodynamic testing platform. Understanding the central neural processes involved in specific parts of micturition in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction may identify areas

  3. Examination of cognitive fatigue in multiple sclerosis using functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Helen M; Rajagopalan, Venkateswaran; Deluca, John; Das, Abhijit; Binder, Allison; Arjunan, Aparna; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; Wylie, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the neural correlates of cognitive fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), looking specifically at the relationship between self-reported fatigue and objective measures of cognitive fatigue. In Experiment 1, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine where in the brain BOLD activity covaried with "state" fatigue, assessed during performance of a task designed to induce cognitive fatigue while in the scanner. In Experiment 2, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to examine where in the brain white matter damage correlated with increased "trait" fatigue in individuals with MS, assessed by the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) completed outside the scanning session. During the cognitively fatiguing task, the MS group had increased brain activity associated with fatigue in the caudate as compared with HCs. DTI findings revealed that reduced fractional anisotropy in the anterior internal capsule was associated with increased self-reported fatigue on the FSS. Results are discussed in terms of identifying a "fatigue-network" in MS.

  4. Examination of cognitive fatigue in multiple sclerosis using functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M Genova

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the neural correlates of cognitive fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis (MS, looking specifically at the relationship between self-reported fatigue and objective measures of cognitive fatigue. In Experiment 1, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used to examine where in the brain BOLD activity covaried with "state" fatigue, assessed during performance of a task designed to induce cognitive fatigue while in the scanner. In Experiment 2, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI was used to examine where in the brain white matter damage correlated with increased "trait" fatigue in individuals with MS, assessed by the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS completed outside the scanning session. During the cognitively fatiguing task, the MS group had increased brain activity associated with fatigue in the caudate as compared with HCs. DTI findings revealed that reduced fractional anisotropy in the anterior internal capsule was associated with increased self-reported fatigue on the FSS. Results are discussed in terms of identifying a "fatigue-network" in MS.

  5. Monitoring the Effect of Facilitation Physiotherapy in Multiple Sclerosis using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, M.; Řasová, K.; Tintěra, J.; Martinková, Patrícia; Procházka, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 7 (2014), s. 1003-1004 ISSN 1352-4585. [RIMS 2014. Annual Conference on Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis /19./. 06.06.2014-07.06.2014, Brighton] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  6. Magnetic resonance in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotti, G.; Caputo, D.; Cazzullo, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. (orig.)

  7. Brain magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Reem H A; Nassef, Amr A

    2010-02-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a multisystem disease where functional and structural abnormalities of small blood vessels prevail. Recently, transient ischemic attacks, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhages have been reported as primary consequence of vascular central nervous system affection in systemic sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered to be the most sensitive diagnostic technique for detecting symptomatic and asymptomatic lesions in the brain in cases of multifocal diseases. Evaluate brain changes in patients with systemic sclerosis using MRI. Thirty female patients with systemic sclerosis aged 27-61 years, with disease duration of 1-9 years and with no history of other systemic disease or cerebrovascular accidents, were enrolled. An age-matched female control group of 30 clinically normal subjects, underwent brain MR examination. Central nervous system involvement in the form of white matter hyperintense foci of variable sizes were found in significantly abundant forms in systemic sclerosis patients on MR evaluation than in the age-related control group, signifying a form of central nervous system vasculopathy. Such foci showed no definite correlation with disease duration, yet they showed significant correlation to severity of peripheral vascular disease, headaches, fainting attacks and depression in the group under study. Asymptomatic as well as symptomatic central nervous system ischemic vasculopathy is not uncommon in systemic sclerosis patients and MRI is considered a sensitive noninvasive screening tool for early detection of CNS involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis.

  8. Multiple sclerosis in magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M.; Walecki, J.; Stelmasiak, Z.

    1994-01-01

    The authors analyzed MR examination of 277 patients with multiple sclerosis. White matter hyperintesities in brain were found in 270 of them, in spinal cord in 32. The most frequently they were found in periventricular white matter, in subcortical localization and in the corpus callosum. MR examination allows the estimate the activity of the disease on the basis of the presence of edema around the plaques and their contrast enhancement with Gd-DTPA. About one third of all cases were accompanied by cortical brain atrophy (the most often seen in the frontal lobes), subcortical brain atrophy was less frequent. In about two third of all cases the corpus callosum atrophy was found. MR examination is a highly sensitive method of multiple sclerosis diagnosis, of the assessment of its activity and progression. (author)

  9. Increasing Benefit of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyhtinen, J.; Karttunen, A.; Tikkakoski, T. [Radiologian Klinikka, Oulu (Finland)

    2006-11-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as an essential tool of multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and has opened up completely new prospects in MS research and treatment trials. It is a sensitive method that gives direct evidence of tissue pathology and has greatly increased our knowledge of MS. In clinical work, MRI is used to confirm and exclude the diagnosis of MS. The international recommendation is that every suspected MS patient should undergo at least one brain MRI. T2-weighted images are the standard tool in clinical work, and functional imaging methods are mainly used in MS research. The subtypes and the course of the disease cause variation in MRI findings. Here, we present a general overview of MR findings in MS. Brain, magnetic resonance imaging, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord.

  10. Increasing Benefit of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyhtinen, J.; Karttunen, A.; Tikkakoski, T.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as an essential tool of multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and has opened up completely new prospects in MS research and treatment trials. It is a sensitive method that gives direct evidence of tissue pathology and has greatly increased our knowledge of MS. In clinical work, MRI is used to confirm and exclude the diagnosis of MS. The international recommendation is that every suspected MS patient should undergo at least one brain MRI. T2-weighted images are the standard tool in clinical work, and functional imaging methods are mainly used in MS research. The subtypes and the course of the disease cause variation in MRI findings. Here, we present a general overview of MR findings in MS. Brain, magnetic resonance imaging, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord

  11. Intellectual Enrichment Is Linked to Cerebral Efficiency in Multiple Sclerosis: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evidence for Cognitive Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumowski, James F.; Wylie, Glenn R.; DeLuca, John; Chiaravalloti, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    The cognitive reserve hypothesis helps to explain the incomplete relationship between brain disease and cognitive status in people with neurologic diseases, including Alzheimer's; disease and multiple sclerosis. Lifetime intellectual enrichment (estimated with education or vocabulary knowledge) lessens the negative impact of brain disease on…

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnostics of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, J.P.; Tjoerstad, K.; Kaass, B.; Oedegaard, H.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an important and frequent neurological disease and the diagnosis might be difficult. The clinical criteria of multiple sclerosis and the role of laboratory examinations in the diagnosis of the disease are discussed. In particular the help offered by the magnetic resonance imaging method is the subject of this paper. Three patients are reported and discussed

  13. Magnetic resonance tomography in confirmed multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlenbrock, D.; Dickmann, E.; Beyer, H.K.; Gehlen, W.; Josef-Hospital, Bochum; Knappschafts-Krankenhaus Bochum

    1985-01-01

    The authors report on 21 cases of confirmed multiple sclerosis examined by both CT and magnetic resonance tomography. To safeguard the results, strict criteria were applied in accordance with the suggestions made by neurological work teams. Pathological lesons were seen in 20 patients; the MR image did not reveal anything abnormal in one case. On the average, 10.3 lesions were seen in the MR tomogram, whereas CT images showed on the average only 2.1 foci. The size and number of lesions in the MR tomogram were independent of the duration of the disease, the presented clinical symptoms, or the type of treatment at the time of examination. Evidently the sensitivity of MR tomography is very high in MS patients, but it has not yet been clarified to what extent this applies also to the specificity. Further research is mandatory. First experiences made by us show that lesions of a similar kind can also occur in diseases such as malignant lymphoma involving the brain, in vitamin B 12 deficiency syndrome, or encephalitis, and can become manifest in the MR tomogram. (orig.) [de

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Barker, G J; MacKay, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The theory of relaxation processes and their measurements are described. An overview is presented of the literature on relaxation time measurements in the normal and the developing brain, in experimental diseases in animals, and in patients with multiple sclerosis. RESULTS...... AND CONCLUSION: Relaxation time measurements provide insight into development of multiple sclerosis plaques, especially the occurrence of oedema, demyelination, and gliosis. There is also evidence that normal appearing white matter in patients with multiple sclerosis is affected. What is now needed are fast...

  15. [Multiple sclerosis, loss of functionality and gender].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-González, Félix; Álvarez-Roldán, Arturo

    2017-12-01

    To identify the type of support and assistance that patients with multiple sclerosis need in order to cope with the loss of functionality, and to show how gender affects the perception of these needs. Interpretative-phenomenological qualitative study. Granada (Spain). Year: 2014. Intentional sample: 30 patients and 20 family caregivers. Data were gathered from 26 interviews and 4 focus groups. The data were coded and analysed with the NVivo programme. The multiple sclerosis patients and family caregivers had different perceptions of the loss of capacity to undertake activities of daily living. Being able to self care was considered the last vestige of autonomy. The women with multiple sclerosis tried to take on the responsibility of housework, but the male caregivers became gradually involved in these tasks. Gender roles were redefined with respect to housekeeping. The multiple sclerosis patients showed a need for emotional support. Some of the men had abandoned the stereotype of the strong male as a result of the decline in their health. Adaptations in the home took place without planning them in advance. The use of mobility devices started on an occasional basis. A fear of stigma was an obstacle for regular use of assistive technology. Health care for people with multiple sclerosis should include family caregivers. Gender influences the perception that caregivers and patients have of the assistance they require to maximise their quality of life. This flags up several intervention areas for the follow-up and long-term care of these patients by the healthcare system. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was performed in a total of 45 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), comprising 27 with brain symptoms and 18 without it. The results were compared with X-ray computed tomography (CT). Some of the 45 MS patients were also examined by neurophysiological studies for comparison. MRI showed demyelinating plaques of the brain in a total of 31 patients (69%) - 20 symptomatic and 11 asymptomatic patients. For symptomatic patients, MRI was capable of detecting brain lesions in 6 (86%) of 7 acute stage patients and 14 (70%) of 20 non-acute stage patients. It was also capable of detecting brain lesions in 21 (70%) of 30 clinically definite MR patients and 10 (67%) of 15 clinically probable MS patients. Concurrently available X-ray CT revealed brain lesions in 9 symptomatic patients (33%) and one asymptomatic patient (6%). Visual evoked potentials examined in 31 patients showed abnormality in one (11%) of 9 patients without symptoms of optic neuritis and all (100%) of the other 22 patients with symptoms. In 19 evaluable patients, auditory brainstem responses were abnormal in one (11%) of 9 patients without brainstem symptoms and 3 (30%) of 10 patients with symptoms. MRI of the brain was far superior to X-ray CT, visual evoked potentials and auditory brainstem responses in detecting clinically unsuspected lesions. We proposed new diagnostic criteria including MRI findings of the brain in the Japanese MS diagnostic criteria. MRI of the spinal cord was performed in 12 MS patients with spinal cord symptoms by sagittal and coronal images. It demonstrated demyelinating lesions within the cervical and superior thoracic cord in 8 MS acute stage patients. Spinal cord lesions were longitudinally continuous as long as many spinal segments, with swelling in 6 patients and atrophy in 2 patients. MRI of spinal cord was useful in deciding superior and inferior limits of cord lesions and in visualizing cord swelling or atrophy. (Namekawa, K)

  17. Balo's concentric sclerosis; value of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.; Kuruvilla, A.; Korah, I.P.; Alexander, M.

    1999-01-01

    We report two cases of Balo's concentric sclerosis that demonstrate the typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of concentric rings of demyelination involving the superficial and deep white matter and sparing the cortex. In both cases biopsy was not performed as MRI findings and multi-mode evoked potential studies were consistent with demyelinating illness. The theories regarding the pathogenesis of this peculiar appearance are briefly reviewed. Balo's concentric sclerosis is a very rare type of demyelinating disease characterized pathologically by large alternating lamellae of demyelinated and myelinated white matter arranged in a concentric pattern. This progressive disease is more often found in young male adults and is more common in the Philippines. Balo's concentric sclerosis is considered an unusual variant of multiple sclerosis (MS); however, some authors believe it to be a different entity. Although the pathogenesis of the concentric sclerosis is debated, the cause of demyelination is generally presumed to be the same as that of multiple sclerosis. There is striking resemblance between the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance and the histopathological features of MS. Not all cases may show a typical MR appearance. Prior to MR imaging, most of them were diagnosed at post-mortem. To our knowledge, few cases have been diagnosed by MR imaging in life. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Pulmonary function and dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, S C; Utell, M J; Rudick, R A; Herndon, R M

    1988-11-01

    Pulmonary function was studied in 25 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis with a range of motor impairment. Forced vital capacity (FVC), maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV), and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) were normal in the ambulatory patients (mean greater than or equal to 80% predicted) but reduced in bedridden patients (mean, 38.5%, 31.6%, and 36.3% predicted; FCV, MVV, and MEP, respectively) and wheelchair-bound patients with upper extremity involvement (mean, 69.4%, 50.4%, and 62.6% predicted; FVC, MVV, and MEP, respectively). Forced vital capacity, MVV, and MEP correlated with Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status scores (tau = -0.72, -0.70, and -0.65) and expiratory muscle weakness occurred most frequently. These findings demonstrate that marked expiratory weakness develops in severely paraparetic patients with multiple sclerosis and the weakness increases as the upper extremities become increasingly involved.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in clinically-definite multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, J.B.; Herkes, G.K.; Frith, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Forty-two patients with clinically-definite multiple sclerosis were examined by magnetic resonance imaging using a 1.5-T instrument. Magnetic resonance imaging detected an abnormality in 90% of patients. In four patients, no lesions were demonstrated. The number, size and site of the lesions by magnetic resonance imaging were compared with the patients' clinical status and other variables. The Kurtzke disability status scale score increased in patients with corpus callosum atrophy, brainstem and basal ganglia lesions, and correlated with the total number of lesions. No correlation was shown between the findings of magnetic resonance imaging and disease duration, age, sex or pattern-reversal visual-evoked potentials. The variety of magnetic resonance images that could be obtained in patients with clinically-definite multiple sclerosis is highlighted. 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  20. [Cognitive function in patients with systemic sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straszecka, J; Jonderko, G; Kucharz, E J; Brzezińska-Wcisło, L; Kotulska, A; Bogdanowski, T

    1997-09-01

    Central nervous system involvement is seldom reported in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Cognitive functions were determined in 21 patients with definite SSc and 42 healthy controls. Thyroid function was also measured in order to eliminate the effect of hypothyroidism on cognitive functioning. It was found that the SSc patients with normal thyroid function showed defective long-term and recent memory, learning ability, criticism, perception and visuo-perceptual skills, their simple reaction time was prolonged. Similar but less advanced cognitive defects were shown in the SSc patients with overt or latent hypothyroidism. The obtained results indicate that the central nervous system involvement is more common in patients with SSc than it has been reported earlier.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesselring, J.; Ormerod, I.E.C.; Miller, D.H.; Du Boulay, G.H.; McDonald, W.I.

    1989-01-01

    In 1983 the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Great Britain and Northern Ireland set up the Multiple Sclerosis NMR Research Group at the Institute of Neurology and the National Hospital, Queen Square. The first aim of the Group was to define the role of MRI in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, and this Atlas represents a summary of that work. Our strategy was to determine the pattern of MRI abnormalities in clinically definite MS and to compare it with those of isolated clinical syndromes of the kind seen in MS (e.g. optic neuritis) and of other disorders with which MS can be confused clinically or radiologically. We have also been involved in a major program of experimental work designed to elucidate the origin of the abnormal signals in MRI. To describe this in full detail would go beyond the scope of the Atlas, but we have incorporated such results as far as they illuminate our clinical problems. The imager used was a 0.5 Tesla Picker superconducting system. Technical advances have been rapid since we began. Nevertheless, the quality of the images obtained at our relatively low field has enabled us to establish the patterns of abnormality in the brain in MS and the diseases which must be distinguished from it. (orig./MG)

  2. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of normal appearing white matter in early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: correlations between disability and spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foronda Jesus

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background What currently appears to be irreversible axonal loss in normal appearing white matter, measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is of great interest in the study of Multiple Sclerosis. Our aim is to determine the axonal damage in normal appearing white matter measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and to correlate this with the functional disability measured by Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite scale, Neurological Rating Scale, Ambulation Index scale, and Expanded Disability Scale Score. Methods Thirty one patients (9 male and 22 female with relapsing remitting Multiple Sclerosis and a Kurtzke Expanded Disability Scale Score of 0–5.5 were recruited from four hospitals in Andalusia, Spain and included in the study. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy scans and neurological disability assessments were performed the same day. Results A statistically significant correlation was found (r = -0.38 p Conclusions There is correlation between disability (measured by Expanded Disability Scale Score and the NAA/Cr ratio in normal appearing white matter. The lack of correlation between the NAA/Cr ratio and the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite score indicates that the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite is not able to measure irreversible disability and would be more useful as a marker in stages where axonal damage is not a predominant factor.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in multiple sclerosis: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saharian, M. A.; Shakaouri Rad, A.; Motamedi, M.; Pakdaman, H.; Radue, E. W.

    2007-01-01

    :During the last two decades, magnetic resonance imaging has been widely used In the diagnosis and treatment monitoring of multiple sclerosis. MRI, both conventional and non conventional methods, has transformed all aspects of M S research and clinical practice in recent years. Although advanced imaging methods have added much more to our knowledge about pathogenesis and natural history of the disease but their cost, availability, complexity and lack of validation have limited their use in routine clinical practice. Conventional MR techniques including proton density, T1/T2-Weighted images and fluid- attenuated inversion recovery sequences are now accepted in standard protocols for diagnosis and treatment outcome measures in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis. This review will focus on the type, morphology and evolution of M S lesions regarding conventional MRI and their use for treatment monitoring in daily clinical practice

  4. Altered thalamic functional connectivity in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yaou; Liang, Peipeng; Duan, Yunyun; Huang, Jing; Ren, Zhuoqiong; Jia, Xiuqin [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Dong, Huiqing; Ye, Jing [Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Shi, Fu-Dong [Department of Neurology and Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Butzkueven, Helmut [Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Li, Kuncheng, E-mail: kunchengli55@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •We demonstrated decreased connectivity between thalamus and cortical regions in MS. •Increased intra- and inter-thalamic connectivity was also observed in MS. •The increased functional connectivity is attenuated by increasing disease duration. -- Abstract: Objective: To compare thalamic functional connectivity (FC) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls (HC), and correlate these connectivity measures with other MRI and clinical variables. Methods: We employed resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) to examine changes in thalamic connectivity by comparing thirty-five patients with MS and 35 age- and sex-matched HC. Thalamic FC was investigated by correlating low frequency fMRI signal fluctuations in thalamic voxels with voxels in all other brain regions. Additionally thalamic volume fraction (TF), T2 lesion volume (T2LV), EDSS and disease duration were recorded and correlated with the FC changes. Results: MS patients were found to have a significantly lower TF than HC in bilateral thalami. Compared to HC, the MS group showed significantly decreased FC between thalamus and several brain regions including right middle frontal and parahippocampal gyri, and the left inferior parietal lobule. Increased intra- and inter-thalamic FC was observed in the MS group compared to HC. These FC alterations were not correlated with T2LV, thalamic volume or lesions. In the MS group, however, there was a negative correlation between disease duration and inter-thalamic connectivity (r = −0.59, p < 0.001). Conclusion: We demonstrated decreased FC between thalamus and several cortical regions, while increased intra- and inter-thalamic connectivity in MS patients. These complex functional changes reflect impairments and/or adaptations that are independent of T2LV, thalamic volume or presence of thalamic lesions. The negative correlation between disease duration and inter-thalamic connectivity could indicate an adaptive role of thalamus that is

  5. Magnetic resonance findings in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using a spin echo magnetization transfer sequence: preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROCHA ANTÔNIO JOSÉ DA

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the magnetic resonance (MR findings of five patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS using a spin-echo sequence with an additional magnetization transfer (MT pulse on T1-weighted images (T1 SE/MT. These findings were absent in the control group and consisted of hyperintensity of the corticospinal tract. Moreover we discuss the principles and the use of this fast but simple MR technique in the diagnosis of ALS

  6. Clinical diagnostic criteria of multiple sclerosis: the role of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belair, M.; Girard, M.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this article is to summarize the diagnostic criteria recommended by the International Panel on the Diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis in 2001. The recommendations of another working group, the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers Consensus Meeting, which met in Vancouver in 2001, concerning the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with multiple sclerosis are also presented in an effort to standardize the protocols for magnetic resonance imaging of these patients. (author)

  7. Evaluating Functional Decline in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Sara; Weiss, Patrice L.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a disease with a wide-ranging impact on functional status. The aim of the study was to examine the added value of simultaneously evaluating fatigue, personal ADL and handwriting performance as indicators for functional decline among patients with MS. Participants were 50 outpatients with MS and 26 matched healthy…

  8. Volume measurement of multiple sclerosis lesions with magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, D.A.G.; Tofts, P.S.; Miller, D.H.; Du Boulay, G.H.; Feinstein, A.; Harvey, I.; Brenner, R.; McDonald, W.I.; Sacares, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    The ability to visualise multiple sclerosis lesions in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging suggests an important role in monitoring the course of the disease. In order to help the long-term assessment of prospective treatments, a semi-automated technique for measuring lesion volume has been developed to provide a quantitative index of disease progression. Results are presented from a preliminary study with a single patient and compared to measurements taken from lesion outlines traced by a neuroradiologist, two neurologists and a technician. The semi-automated technique achieved a precision of 6% compared to a range of 12-33% for the manual tracing method. It also reduced the human interaction time from at least 60 min to 15 min. (orig.)

  9. Gender-related differences in functional connectivity in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonheim, M.M.; Hulst, H.E.; Landi, D.; Ciccarelli, O.; Roosendaal, S.D.; Sanz-Arigita, E.J.; Vrenken, H.; Polman, C.H.; Stam, C.J.; Barkhof, F.; Geurts, J.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Gender effects are strong in multiple sclerosis (MS), with male patients showing a worse clinical outcome than female patients. Functional reorganization of neural activity may contribute to limit disability, and possible gender differences in this process may have important clinical

  10. Magnetic resonance techniques for investigation of multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Alex; Laule, Cornelia; Li, David K. B.; Meyers, Sandra M.; Russell-Schulz, Bretta; Vavasour, Irene M.

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common neurological disease which can cause loss of vision and balance, muscle weakness, impaired speech, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction and even paralysis. The key pathological processes in MS are inflammation, edema, myelin loss, axonal loss and gliosis. Unfortunately, the cause of MS is still not understood and there is currently no cure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important clinical and research tool for MS. 'Conventional' MRI images of MS brain reveal bright lesions, or plaques, which demark regions of severe tissue damage. Conventional MRI has been extremely valuable for the diagnosis and management of people who have MS and also for the assessment of therapies designed to reduce inflammation and promote repair. While conventional MRI is clearly valuable, it lack pathological specificity and, in some cases, sensitivity to non-lesional pathology. Advanced MR techniques have been developed to provide information that is more sensitive and specific than what is available with clinical scanning. Diffusion tensor imaging and magnetization transfer provide a general but non-specific measure of the pathological state of brain tissue. MR spectroscopy provides concentrations of brain metabolites which can be related to specific pathologies. Myelin water imaging was designed to assess brain myelination and has proved useful for measuring myelin loss in MS. To combat MS, it is crucial that the pharmaceutical industry finds therapies which can reverse the neurodegenerative processes which occur in the disease. The challenge for magnetic resonance researchers is to design imaging techniques which can provide detailed pathological information relating to the mechanisms of MS therapies. This paper briefly describes the pathologies of MS and demonstrates how MS-associated pathologies can be followed using both conventional and advanced MR imaging protocols.

  11. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  12. Multiple sclerosis and anterograde axonal degeneration study by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Pardo, P.; Capdevila Cirera, A.; Sanz Marin, P.M.; Gili Planas, J.

    1993-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system that affects specifically the myelin. Its diagnosis by imaging techniques is, since the development of magnetic resonance (MR), relatively simple, and its occasional association with anterograde axonal degeneration (WD) has been reported. In both disorders, there is a lengthening of the T1 and T2 relaxation times. In the present report, 76 patients with MS with less than 4 plaques in the typical periventricular position were studied retrospectively, resulting in a rate of association with anterograde axonal degeneration of 8%. We consider that in spite of their same behavior in MR,MS and WD, with moreover represent completely different pathologies, are perfectly differential by MR. The S-E images with longer repetition and echo times in the axial and coronal planes have proved to be those most sensitive for this differentiation. Given that MS is specific pathology of then myelin, the axonal damages in delayed until several plaques adjacent to an axon affect it. We consider that this, added to the restriction of our study group (less than 4 plaques), is the cause of the pow percentage of the MS-WD association in our study. (Author)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in optic nerve lesions with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo; Kakisu, Yonetsugu; Adachi, Emiko

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the optic nerve was performed in 10 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) using short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) pulse sequences, and the results were compared with the visual evoked potentials (VEP). The 10 patients had optic neuritis in the chronic or remitting phase together with additional symptoms or signs allowing a diagnosis of clinically definite or probable MS. Sixteen optic nerves were clinically affected and 4 were unaffected. MRI was performed using a 0.5 tesla supeconducting unit, and multiple continuous 5 mm coronal and axial STIR images were obtained. A lesion was judged to be present if a focal or diffuse area of increased signal intensity was detectd in the optic nerve. In VEP, a delay in peak latency or no P 100 component was judged to be abnormal. With regard to the clinically affected optic nerves, MRI revealed a region of increased signal intensity in 14/16 (88%) and the VEP was abnormal in 16/16 (100%). In the clinically unaffected optic nerves, MRI revealed an increased signal intensity in 2/4 (50%). One of these nerves had an abnormal VEP and the other had a VEP latency at the upper limit of normal. The VEP was abnormal in 1/4 (25%). In the clinically affected optic nerves, the degree of loss of visual acuity was not associated with the longitudinal extent of the lesions shown by MRI. The mean length was 17.5 mm in optic nerves with a slight disturbance of visual acuity and 15.0 mm in nerves with severe visual loss. MRI using STIR pulse sequences was found to be almost as sensitive as VEP in detecting both clinically affected and unaffected optic nerve lesions in patients with MS, and was useful in visualizing the location or size of the lesions. (author)

  14. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging in suspected multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J.; Bergers, E.; Castelijns, J.A.; Barkhof, F.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Polman, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the value of spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnostic work-up of multiple sclerosis (MS). Forty patients suspected of having MS were examined within 24 months after the start of symptoms. Disability was assessed, and symptoms were categorized as either brain or spinal cord. Work-up further included cerebrospinal fluid analysis and standard proton-density, T2-, and T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced brain and spinal cord MRI. Patients were categorized as either clinically definite MS (n = 13), laboratory-supported definite MS (n = 14), or clinically probable MS (n = 4); four patients had clinically probable MS, and in nine MS was suspected. Spinal cord abnormalities were found in 35 of 40 patients (87.5 %), consisting of focal lesions in 31, only diffuse abnormalities in two, and both in two. Asymptomatic spinal cord lesions occurred in six patients. All patients with diffuse spinal cord abnormality had clear spinal cord symptoms and a primary progressive disease course. In clinically definite MS, the inclusion of spinal imaging increased the sensitivity of MRI to 100 %. Seven patients without a definite diagnosis had clinically isolated syndromes involving the spinal cord. Brain MRI was inconclusive, while all had focal spinal cord lesions which explained symptoms and ruled out other causes. Two other patients had atypical brain abnormalities suggesting ischemic/vascular disease. No spinal cord abnormalities were found, and during follow-up MS was ruled out. Spinal cord abnormalities are common in suspected MS, and may occur asymptomatic. Although diagnostic classification is seldom changed, spinal cord imaging increases diagnostic sensitivity of MRI in patients with suspected MS. In addition, patients with primary progressive MS may possibly be earlier diagnosed. Finally, differentiation with atypical lesions may be improved. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Takase, Sadao; Ichikawa, Nobumichi; Yamada, Kenji; Matsuzawa, Taiju.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), 11 clinically definite and 6 probable MS, were studied using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and other diagnostic techniques including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, evoked potentials (EP) and CT. The MRI imager was operated at 0.14 tesla. The Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence was employed and multiple spin echoes were acquired. T 1 and T 2 relaxation times of the MS plaques were calculated. Incidence of MS plaque detection was 82 % in MRI (100 % in definite MS and 50 % in probable MS). Incidence of abnormality was 65 % in CSF analysis (IgG, oligoclonal bands and myelin basic protein), 63 % in EP (auditory evoked brainstem response and somatosensory evoked response), and 24 % in CT. Lesion detection by MRI was more frequent when the patient was diagnosed as clinically definite, when the duration of disease was longer or the exacerbation was more frequent. T 1 and T 2 of the MS plaques were 715 ± 140 msec and 184 ± 42 msec, respectively, and were significantly prolonged compared to normal values (T 1 ; 351 ± 35 msec, T 2 ; 102 ± 12 msec). The relaxation times of the plaques which were detected by CT (T 1 ; 834 ± 106 msec, T 2 ; 216 ± 37 msec) were significantly longer than those which were not detected (T 1 ; 673 ± 128 msec, T 2 ; 165 ± 32 msec). Serial observations of relaxation times showed that they become short as time passes after the onset of symptoms. As a result, MRI was most sensitive among the diagnostic modalities of MS, and the relaxation times can serve as indices of the activity and severity of the disease. (author)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Fukutake, Toshio; Hirayama, Keizo; Fukuda, Nobuo.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used in three patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) to demonstrate the longitudinal distribution of demyelinating plaques in the spinal cord and to measure their T1 relaxation time values in these disease processes. Neurological examination allowed the detection of the superior limit of the spinal cord lesions in the three patients, but did not permit detection of the inferior limit in two of the patients. With MRI, however, it was possible to demonstrate the longitudinal distribution of demyelinating plaques in all three patients from coronal or sagittal images using spin echo and inversion recovery pulse sequences. In two patients treated with prednisolone, serial T1 relaxation time values of MS spinal cord lesions were measured from T1 calculated images. In one patient with transverse myelopathy, the T1 relaxation time values of MS spinal cord lesions were significantly increased at a stage of acute exacerbation. This is apparently in contrast with the values at the stage of remission. In the patient with localized cervical myelopathy, the increase in T1 relaxation time values of MS spinal cord lesions at the acute stage was small and significantly different from the values at the remission stage. Several recent reports have indicated that MRI is extremely sensitive in the detection of MS plaques, but most efforts to use MRI in the diagnosis of MS have been concentrated on brain lesions in spite of their frequent associations with spinal cord involvements. It is concluded from our case studies that MRI coronal or sagittal image is useful in demonstrating the longitudinal distribution of MS spinal cord lesions. In addition, serial observations of T1 relaxation time values of MS plaques may be important in assessing the activity of MS plaques and evaluation of the steroid therapy in MS processes. (author)

  17. Balo`s concentric sclerosis; value of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.; Kuruvilla, A.; Korah, I.P. [Christian Medical College and Hospital, Vellore, Tamilnadu, (India). Department of Radiodiagnosis; Alexander, M. [Christian Medical College and Hospital, Vellore, Tamilnadu, (India). Department of Neurosciences

    1999-08-01

    We report two cases of Balo`s concentric sclerosis that demonstrate the typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of concentric rings of demyelination involving the superficial and deep white matter and sparing the cortex. In both cases biopsy was not performed as MRI findings and multi-mode evoked potential studies were consistent with demyelinating illness. The theories regarding the pathogenesis of this peculiar appearance are briefly reviewed. Balo`s concentric sclerosis is a very rare type of demyelinating disease characterized pathologically by large alternating lamellae of demyelinated and myelinated white matter arranged in a concentric pattern. This progressive disease is more often found in young male adults and is more common in the Philippines. Balo`s concentric sclerosis is considered an unusual variant of multiple sclerosis (MS); however, some authors believe it to be a different entity. Although the pathogenesis of the concentric sclerosis is debated, the cause of demyelination is generally presumed to be the same as that of multiple sclerosis. There is striking resemblance between the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance and the histopathological features of MS. Not all cases may show a typical MR appearance. Prior to MR imaging, most of them were diagnosed at post-mortem. To our knowledge, few cases have been diagnosed by MR imaging in life. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 15 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Predicting functional decline and survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Mei-Lyn; Tan, Pei Fang; Holbrook, Joanna D

    2017-01-01

    Better predictors of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease course could enable smaller and more targeted clinical trials. Partially to address this aim, the Prize for Life foundation collected de-identified records from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis sufferers who participated in clinical trials of investigational drugs and made them available to researchers in the PRO-ACT database. In this study, time series data from PRO-ACT subjects were fitted to exponential models. Binary classes for decline in the total score of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis functional rating scale revised (ALSFRS-R) (fast/slow progression) and survival (high/low death risk) were derived. Data was segregated into training and test sets via cross validation. Learning algorithms were applied to the demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters in the training set to predict ALSFRS-R decline and the derived fast/slow progression and high/low death risk categories. The performance of predictive models was assessed by cross-validation in the test set using Receiver Operator Curves and root mean squared errors. A model created using a boosting algorithm containing the decline in four parameters (weight, alkaline phosphatase, albumin and creatine kinase) post baseline, was able to predict functional decline class (fast or slow) with fair accuracy (AUC = 0.82). However similar approaches to build a predictive model for decline class by baseline subject characteristics were not successful. In contrast, baseline values of total bilirubin, gamma glutamyltransferase, urine specific gravity and ALSFRS-R item score-climbing stairs were sufficient to predict survival class. Using combinations of small numbers of variables it was possible to predict classes of functional decline and survival across the 1-2 year timeframe available in PRO-ACT. These findings may have utility for design of future ALS clinical trials.

  19. Assessment of patients with multiple sclerosis according to tests of the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anelise Ineu Figueiredo

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC is a scale that evaluates the functional and cognitive aspects of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Objective: To compare the performance of individuals with the relapsing-remitting form of MS (RRMS with a group of healthy subjects using the MSFC. Methods: Twenty subjects were investigated in this study, consisting of 10 patients with clinical diagnosis of RRMS and 10 controls with similar gender and age to the group with the disease. The three tests that comprise the MSFC were used for the evaluation of gait, upper limb motor function and cognition (memory and processing speed. Student's t-test was used to assess data with normal distribution and data with skewed distribution were evaluated using the Mann-Whitney test. Results: The results showed that the patients with RRMS took longer to perform the locomotion test (6.91 ± 2.35 compared to the control group (5.16 ± 1.28. The MS group (22.06 ± 5.44 also showed greater difficulty in performing a task with the dominant upper limb compared to the healthy subjects (17.79 ± 2.96. No statistically significant difference was found between the groups in the performance of cognitive tasks (p = .65. Conclusion: The use of the MSFC tests proved valuable for measuring possible motor and cognitive impairments in patients with RRMS. Thus, it is suggested that this scale is adopted in clinical practice, improving therapies for the treatment of MS patients and thereby providing them a better quality of life.

  20. Bimonthly assessment of magnetization transfer magnetic resonance imaging parameters in multiple sclerosis: a 14-month, multicentre, follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesaros, S.; Rocca, M.A.; Sormani, M.P.; Valsasina, P.; Markowitz, C.; De Stefano, N.; Montalban, X.; Barkhof, F.; Ranjeva, J.P.; Sailer, M.; Kappos, L.; Comi, G.; Filippi, M.

    2010-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the temporal evolution of damage within lesions and the normal-appearing white matter, measured using frequent magnetization transfer (MT) MRI, in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). The relationship of MT ratio (MTR) changes with measures of lesion

  1. Encephalic magnetic resonance imaging in spinal clinical forms of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubetzki, C.; Lyon-Caen, O.; Lhermitte, F.; Iba-Zizen, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in patients presenting with signs and symptoms of pure spinal cord involvement is always difficult. Previous studies have shown the usefulness of encephalic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in those cases. The aim was to evaluate the diagnosis value of brain MRI in medullar forms of MS. 3 refs

  2. Psychological functioning in primary progressive versus secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vleugels, L; Pfennings, L E; Pouwer, F

    1998-01-01

    Psychological functioning in two types of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is assessed: primary progressive (PP) and secondary progressive (SP) patients. On the basis of differences in clinical course and underlying pathology we hypothesized that primary progressive patients and secondary...... progressive patients might have different psychological functioning. Seventy patients treated in an MS centre were examined cross-sectionally. Forty had an SP course of MS and 30 a PP course. The 33 male and 37 female patients had a mean age of 48.4 years (SD 11.2) and mean age of onset of MS of 30.7 years...... (SD 11.1). Patients completed questionnaires measuring among others the following aspects of psychological functioning: depression (BDI, SCL-90), anxiety (STAI, SCL-90), agoraphobia (SCL-90), somatic complaints (SCL-90), hostility (SCL-90) and attitude towards handicap (GHAS). Patients with a PP...

  3. Functional Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, James

    Nanoparticle system research and characterization is the focal point of this research and dissertation. In the research presented here, magnetite, cobalt, and ferrite nanoparticle systems have been explored in regard to their magnetocaloric effect (MCE) properties, as well as for use in polymer composites. Both areas of study have potential applications across a wide variety of interdisciplinary fields. Magnetite nanoparticles have been successfully dispersed in a polymer. The surface chemistry of the magnetic nanoparticle proves critical to obtaining a homogenous and well separated high density dispersion in PMMA. Theoretical studies found in the literature have indicated that surface interface energy is a critical component in dispersion. Oleic acid is used to alter the surface of magnetite nanoparticles and successfully achieve good dispersion in a PMMA thin film. Polypyrrole is then coated onto the PMMA composite layer. The bilayer is characterized using cross-sectional TEM, cross-sectional SEM, magnetic characterization, and low frequency conductivity. The results show that the superparmagnetic properties of the as synthesized particles are maintained in the composite. With further study of the properties of these nanoparticles for real and functional uses, MCE is studied on a variety of magnetic nanoparticle systems. Magnetite, manganese zinc ferrite, and cobalt ferrite systems show significant broadening of the MCE and the ability to tune the peak temperature of MCE by varying the size of the nanoparticles. Four distinct systems are studied including cobalt, cobalt core silver shell nanoparticles, nickel ferrite, and ball milled zinc ferrite. The results demonstrate the importance of surface characteristics on MCE. Surface spin disorder appears to have a large influence on the low temperature magnetic and magnetocalorie characteristics of these nanoparticle systems.

  4. Cross-diagnostic validity of the SF-36 physical functioning scale in patients with stroke, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a study using Rasch analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallmeijer, Annet J.; de Groot, Vincent; Roorda, Leo D.; Schepers, Vera P. M.; Lindeman, Eline; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Beelen, Anita; Dekker, Joost

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate unidimensionality and differential item functioning of the SF-36 physical functioning scale (PF10) in patients with various neurological disorders. Patients: Patients post-stroke (n = 198), with multiple sclerosis (n = 151) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

  5. Comparison of sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging and evoked potentials in the detection of brainstem involvement in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comi, G.; Martinelli, V.; Medaglini, S.; Locatelli, T.; Magnani, G.; Poggi, A.; Triulzi, F.

    1988-01-01

    A comparison was made of the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging and the combined use of Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential and Median Somatosensory Evoked Potential in the detection of brainstem dysfunction in 54 multiple sclerosis patients. 10 refs.; 2 tabs

  6. Finger and foot tapping as alternative outcomes of upper and lower extremity function in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Makoto; Stein, Jason; Park, John; Kosa, Peter; Cortese, Irene; Bielekova, Bibiana

    2017-01-01

    While magnetic resonance imaging contrast-enhancing lesions represent an excellent screening tool for disease-modifying treatments in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), this biomarker is insensitive for testing therapies against compartmentalized inflammation in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Therefore, alternative sensitive outcomes are needed. Using machine learning, clinician-acquired disability scales can be combined with timed measures of neurological functions such as walking speed (e.g. 25-foot walk; 25FW) or fine finger movements (e.g. 9-hole peg test; 9HPT) into sensitive composite clinical scales, such as the recently developed combinatorial, weight-adjusted disability scale (CombiWISE). Ideally, these complementary simplified measurements of certain neurological functions could be performed regularly at patients' homes using smartphones. We asked whether tests amenable to adaptation to smartphone technology, such as finger and foot tapping have comparable sensitivity and specificity to current non-clinician-acquired disability measures. We observed that finger and foot tapping can differentiate RRMS and progressive MS in a cross-sectional study and can also measure yearly and two-year disease progression in the latter, with better power (based on z-scores) in comparison to currently utilized 9HPT and 25FW. Replacing the 9HPT and 25FW with simplified tests broadly adaptable to smartphone technology may enhance the power of composite scales for progressive MS.

  7. Physical and cognitive functioning after 3 years can be predicted using information from the diagnostic process in recently diagnosed multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Vincent; Beckerman, Heleen; Uitdehaag, Bernard M.; Hintzen, Rogier Q.; Minneboo, Arjan; Heymans, Martijn W.; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J.; Polman, Chris H.; Bouter, Lex M.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2009-01-01

    Objective To predict functioning after 3 years in patients with recently diagnosed multiple sclerosis (MS). Design Inception cohort with 3 years of follow-up. At baseline, predictors were obtained from medical history taking, neurologic examination, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Setting

  8. Magnetism: a supramolecular function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decurtins, S.; Pellaux, R.; Schmalle, H.W.

    1996-01-01

    The field of molecule-based magnetism has developed tremendously in the last few years. Two different extended molecular - hence supramolecular -systems are presented. The Prussian-blue analogues show some of the highest magnetic ordering temperature of any class of molecular magnets, T c = 315 K, whereas the class of transition-metal oxalate-bridged compounds exhibits a diversity of magnetic phenomena. Especially for the latter compounds, the elastic neutron scattering technique has successfully been proven to trace the magnetic structure of these supramolecular and chiral compounds. (author) 18 figs., 25 refs

  9. Magnetism: a supramolecular function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decurtins, S; Pellaux, R; Schmalle, H W [Zurich Univ., Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    The field of molecule-based magnetism has developed tremendously in the last few years. Two different extended molecular - hence supramolecular -systems are presented. The Prussian-blue analogues show some of the highest magnetic ordering temperature of any class of molecular magnets, T{sub c} = 315 K, whereas the class of transition-metal oxalate-bridged compounds exhibits a diversity of magnetic phenomena. Especially for the latter compounds, the elastic neutron scattering technique has successfully been proven to trace the magnetic structure of these supramolecular and chiral compounds. (author) 18 figs., 25 refs.

  10. Multitasking in multiple sclerosis: can it inform vocational functioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Chelsea L; Schultheis, Maria T; McKeever, Joshua D; Leist, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    To examine associations between multitasking ability defined by performance on a complex task integrating multiple cognitive domains and vocational functioning in multiple sclerosis (MS). Survey data collection. Laboratory with referrals from an outpatient clinic. Community-dwelling individuals with MS (N=30) referred between October 2011 and June 2012. Not applicable. The modified Six Elements Test (SET) to measure multitasking ability, Fatigue Severity Scale to measure fatigue, several neuropsychological measures of executive functioning, and vocational status. Among the sample, 60% of individuals have reduced their work hours because of MS symptoms (cutback employment group) and 40% had maintained their work hours. Among both groups, SET performance was significantly associated with performance on several measures of neuropsychological functioning. Individuals in the cutback employment group demonstrated significantly worse overall performance on the SET (P=.041). Logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between SET performance and vocational status, while accounting for neuropsychological performance and fatigue. The overall model was significant (χ(2)3=8.65, P=.032), with fatigue [Exp(B)=.83, P=.01] and multitasking ability [Exp(B)=.60, P=.043] retained as significant predictors. Multitasking ability may play an important role in performance at work for individuals with MS. Given that multitasking was associated with vocational functioning, future efforts should assess the usefulness of incorporating multitasking ability into rehabilitation planning. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. HLA typing in acute optic neuritis. Relation to multiple sclerosis and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, J.L.; Madsen, H.O.; Ryder, L.P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and HLA findings to clarify the relationship between monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) and ON as part of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). DESIGN: Population-based cohort of patients with ON refe......OBJECTIVE: To study the association of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and HLA findings to clarify the relationship between monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) and ON as part of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). DESIGN: Population-based cohort of patients......: The frequency of HLA-DR15 was significantly increased in patients with ON + CDMS (52%) and ON (47%) compared with control subjects (31%). The frequency of HLA-DR17 was almost equal in the ON + CDMS (18%), ON (23%), and control (23%) groups. The frequencies of HLA-DQA-1B (55% in ON + CDMS, 58% in ON) and HLA...

  12. Frontotemporal Dysfunction in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Discriminant Function Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidos, Andreas; Kasselimis, Dimitrios S; Simos, Panagiotis G; Rentzos, Michael; Alexakis, Theodoros; Zalonis, Ioannis; Zouvelou, Vassiliki; Potagas, Constantin; Evdokimidis, Ioannis; Woolley, Susan C

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence for extramotor dysfunction (EMd) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), with a reported prevalence of up to 52%. In the present study, we explore the clinical utility of a brief neuropsychological battery for the investigation of cognitive, behavioral, and language deficits in patients with ALS. Thirty-four consecutive ALS patients aged 44-89 years were tested with a brief neuropsychological battery, including executive, behavioral, and language measures. Patients were initially classified as EMd or non-EMd based on their scores on the frontal assessment battery (FAB). Between-group comparisons revealed significant differences in all measures (p < 0.01). Discriminant analysis resulted in a single canonical function, with all tests serving as significant predictors. This function agreed with the FAB in 13 of 17 patients screened as EMd and identified extramotor deficits in 2 additional patients. Overall sensitivity and specificity estimates against FAB were 88.2%. We stress the importance of discriminant function analysis in clinical neuropsychological assessment and argue that the proposed neuropsychological battery may be of clinical value, especially when the option of extensive and comprehensive neuropsychological testing is limited. The psychometric validity of an ALS-frontotemporal dementia diagnosis using neuropsychological tests is also discussed. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Applicability of McDonald 2010 and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis (MAGNIMS) 2016 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Criteria for the Diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Sujani Madhurika Kodagoda; Wijeweera, Indunil; Wijesinghe, Priyangi; Adikari, Sanjaya Bandara; Fink, Katharina; Sominanda, Herath Mudiyanselage Ajith

    2018-05-31

    The magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis (MAGNIMS) group recently proposed guidelines to replace the existing dissemination-in-space criteria in McDonald 2010 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria for diagnosing multiple sclerosis. There has been insufficient research regarding their applicability in Asians. Objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of McDonald 2010 and MAGNIMS 2016 MRI criteria with the aim of verifying their applicability in Sri Lankan patients. Patients with clinically isolated syndrome diagnosed by consultant neurologists were recruited from five major neurology centers. Baseline and follow-up MRI scans were performed within 3 months from the initial presentation and at one year after baseline MRI, respectively. McDonald 2010 and MAGNIMS 2016 MRI criteria were applied to all MRI scans. Patients were followed-up for 2 years to assess the conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV, and NPV for predicting the conversion to CDMS were calculated. Forty-two of 66 patients converted to CDMS. Thirty-seven fulfilled the McDonald 2010 MRI criteria, and 33 converted to CDMS. MAGNIMS 2016 MRI criteria were fulfilled by 29, with 28 converting to CDMS. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV, and NPV were 78%, 83%, 64%, 89%, and 69%, respectively, for the McDonald 2010 criteria, and 67%, 96%, 77%, 96%, and 62% for the MAGNIMS 2016 MRI criteria. MAGNIMS 2016 MRI criteria were superior to McDonald 2010 MRI criteria in specificity, accuracy, and PPV, but inferior in sensitivity and NPV. Copyright © 2018 Korean Neurological Association.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in monitoring of treatment of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M.; Walecki, J.; Stelmasiak, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish the value of MR in monitoring of treatment of multiple sclerosis with new drug 2-CDA and placebo. 83 patients (51 women, 32 men) were examined - 81 of them twice, 66 - three times: before and after 6 and 12 courses of treatment. Toshiba MRT50A machine was used. After the first 6 courses of treatment the number of new plaques was twice as big in placebo group than in 2-CDA group. After 12 courses it turned out that a certain inhibitory influence of 2-CDA on new plaques' appearance was more evident after 15 than 3 months after the end of its administration. This may indicate the delayed action of 2-CDA but requires further investigation. (author)

  15. Correlation between memory, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and interictal epileptiform discharges in temporal lobe epilepsy related to mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantoan, Marcele Araújo Silva; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; de Figueiredo Ferreira Guilhoto, Laura Maria; Lin, Katia; da Silva Noffs, Maria Helena; de Souza Silva Tudesco, Ivanda; Belzunces, Erich; Carrete, Henrique; Bussoletti, Renato Tavares; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2009-11-01

    The aim of the study described here was to examine the relationship between memory function, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) abnormalities, and interictal epileptiform discharge (IED) lateralization in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) related to unilateral mesial temporal sclerosis. We assessed performance on tests of memory function and intelligence quotient (IQ) in 29 right-handed outpatients and 24 controls. IEDs were assessed on 30-minute-awake and 30-minute-sleep EEG samples. Patients had (1)H-MRS at 1.5 T. There was a negative correlation between IQ (P=0.031) and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test results (P=0.022) and epilepsy duration; between(1)H-MRS findings and epilepsy duration (P=0.027); and between N-acetylaspartate (NAA) levels and IEDs (P=0.006) in contralateral mesial temporal structures in the left MTS group. (1)H-MRS findings, IEDs, and verbal function were correlated. These findings suggest that IEDs and NAA/(Cho+Cr) ratios reflecting neural metabolism are closely related to verbal memory function in mesial temporal sclerosis. Higher interictal activity on the EEG was associated with a decline in total NAA in contralateral mesial temporal structures.

  16. Respiratory insufficiency with preserved diaphragmatic function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Rika; Imai, Tomihiro; Tsuda, Emiko; Hozuki, Takayoshi; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Shimohama, Shun

    2014-01-01

    We performed a longitudinal study to elucidate the correlation between respiratory insufficiency and respiratory biomarkers, including diaphragmatic compound muscle action potential (DCMAP), at the initiation of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The patients were assessed at least every six months. Additional assessments were performed at the start of respiratory therapy when the patients met the criteria for the initiation of NIV. Each assessment consisted of a full neurological examination, a phrenic nerve conduction study, respiratory function tests, and nocturnal pulsed oximetry. We enrolled 43 patients with either definite or probable ALS as defined by the revised El Escorial criteria. The patients were divided into two groups according to the timing of the initiation of respiratory therapy. Seventeen patients (group A) met the criteria for NIV initiation when their DCMAP remained normal. Twenty-six patients (group B) met the criteria when their DCMAP decreased below normal limits. Although respiratory function parameters were significantly worse in group B compared with group A at NIV initiation, more than 80% of the patients in both groups developed nocturnal desaturation during sleep. DCMAP is not always a reliable indicator for determining the optimal timing for NIV initiation during the progression of respiratory insufficiency in ALS. Physicians should be aware of the risk of respiratory insufficiency during sleep in patients with ALS.

  17. Progressive multiple sclerosis, cognitive function, and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højsgaard Chow, Helene; Schreiber, Karen; Magyari, Melinda; Ammitzbøll, Cecilie; Börnsen, Lars; Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Ratzer, Rikke; Soelberg Sørensen, Per; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2018-02-01

    Patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) often have cognitive impairment in addition to physical impairment. The burden of cognitive and physical impairment progresses over time, and may be major determinants of quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess to which degree quality of life correlates with physical and cognitive function in progressive MS. This is a retrospective study of 52 patients with primary progressive ( N  = 18) and secondary progressive MS ( N  = 34). Physical disability was assessed using the Expanded Disability Status Scale, Timed 25 Foot Walk (T25FW) test and 9-Hole Peg Test (9HPT). Cognitive function was assessed using Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT), Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test, and Trail Making Test B (TRAIL-B). In addition, quality of life was assessed by the Short Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire. Only measures of cognitive function correlated with the overall SF-36 quality of life score and the Mental Component Summary score from the SF-36. The only physical measure that correlated with a measure of quality of life was T25FW test, which correlated with the Physical Component Summary from the SF-36. We found no other significant correlations between the measures of cognitive function and the overall physical measures but interestingly, we found a possible relationship between the 9HPT score for the nondominant hand and the SDMT and TRAIL-B. Our findings support inclusion of measures of cognitive function in the assessment of patients with progressive MS as these correlated closer with quality of life than measures of physical impairment.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging and {sup 1}H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarchielli, P.; Gallai, V. [Neurological Clinic, Policlinico Monte Luce, Perugia (Italy); Pelliccioli, G.P.; Chiarini, P. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Azienda Ospedaliera, Perugia (Italy); Tarducci, R.; Presciutti, O.; Gobbi, G. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliera, Perugia (Italy)

    2001-03-01

    We aimed to increase confidence in the combined use of MRI and proton MR spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS) in diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We investigated 12 patients with ALS, seven definite and five probable, taking into account clinical measures of motor neuron function. On T2-weighted images we found high signal in the corticospinal tract in six and low signal in the primary motor cortex in seven of the 12 patients. Atrophy of the precentral gyrus was apparent in all the patients apart from one with probable ALS. Absolute quantification of cerebral metabolites using {sup 1}H-MRS demonstrated a significantly lower mean concentration of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in the precentral gyrus of patients with probable and definite ALS (8.5 {+-} 0.62) than in control subjects (10.4 {+-} 0.71; P < 0.001). NAA concentration in primary motor cortex correlated with Norris scale scores (r = 0.30; P < 0.0001) but not with the ALS Functional Rating Scale score or disease duration. Significantly lower levels of NAA were detected in patients with low signal in the motor cortex than in those without (P < 0.01). Mean choline (Cho) and creatine (Cr) values did not differ between patients with ALS and controls. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging and 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarchielli, P.; Gallai, V.; Pelliccioli, G.P.; Chiarini, P.; Tarducci, R.; Presciutti, O.; Gobbi, G.

    2001-01-01

    We aimed to increase confidence in the combined use of MRI and proton MR spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) in diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We investigated 12 patients with ALS, seven definite and five probable, taking into account clinical measures of motor neuron function. On T2-weighted images we found high signal in the corticospinal tract in six and low signal in the primary motor cortex in seven of the 12 patients. Atrophy of the precentral gyrus was apparent in all the patients apart from one with probable ALS. Absolute quantification of cerebral metabolites using 1 H-MRS demonstrated a significantly lower mean concentration of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in the precentral gyrus of patients with probable and definite ALS (8.5 ± 0.62) than in control subjects (10.4 ± 0.71; P < 0.001). NAA concentration in primary motor cortex correlated with Norris scale scores (r = 0.30; P < 0.0001) but not with the ALS Functional Rating Scale score or disease duration. Significantly lower levels of NAA were detected in patients with low signal in the motor cortex than in those without (P < 0.01). Mean choline (Cho) and creatine (Cr) values did not differ between patients with ALS and controls. (orig.)

  20. Spinal cord multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging for survival prediction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querin, G; El Mendili, M M; Lenglet, T; Delphine, S; Marchand-Pauvert, V; Benali, H; Pradat, P-F

    2017-08-01

    Assessing survival is a critical issue in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Neuroimaging seems to be promising in the assessment of disease severity and several studies also suggest a strong relationship between spinal cord (SC) atrophy described by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and disease progression. The aim of the study was to determine the predictive added value of multimodal SC MRI on survival. Forty-nine ALS patients were recruited and clinical data were collected. Patients were scored on the Revised ALS Functional Rating Scale and manual muscle testing. They were followed longitudinally to assess survival. The cervical SC was imaged using the 3 T MRI system. Cord volume and cross-sectional area (CSA) at each vertebral level were computed. Diffusion tensor imaging metrics were measured. Imaging metrics and clinical variables were used as inputs for a multivariate Cox regression survival model. On building a multivariate Cox regression model with clinical and MRI parameters, fractional anisotropy, magnetization transfer ratio and CSA at C2-C3, C4-C5, C5-C6 and C6-C7 vertebral levels were significant. Moreover, the hazard ratio calculated for CSA at the C3-C4 and C5-C6 levels indicated an increased risk for patients with SC atrophy (respectively 0.66 and 0.68). In our cohort, MRI parameters seem to be more predictive than clinical variables, which had a hazard ratio very close to 1. It is suggested that multimodal SC MRI could be a useful tool in survival prediction especially if used at the beginning of the disease and when combined with clinical variables. To validate it as a biomarker, confirmation of the results in bigger independent cohorts of patients is warranted. © 2017 EAN.

  1. Remodeling Functional Connectivity in Multiple Sclerosis: A Challenging Therapeutic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampanoni Bassi, Mario; Gilio, Luana; Buttari, Fabio; Maffei, Pierpaolo; Marfia, Girolama A; Restivo, Domenico A; Centonze, Diego; Iezzi, Ennio

    2017-01-01

    Neurons in the central nervous system are organized in functional units interconnected to form complex networks. Acute and chronic brain damage disrupts brain connectivity producing neurological signs and/or symptoms. In several neurological diseases, particularly in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), structural imaging studies cannot always demonstrate a clear association between lesion site and clinical disability, originating the "clinico-radiological paradox." The discrepancy between structural damage and disability can be explained by a complex network perspective. Both brain networks architecture and synaptic plasticity may play important roles in modulating brain networks efficiency after brain damage. In particular, long-term potentiation (LTP) may occur in surviving neurons to compensate network disconnection. In MS, inflammatory cytokines dramatically interfere with synaptic transmission and plasticity. Importantly, in addition to acute and chronic structural damage, inflammation could contribute to reduce brain networks efficiency in MS leading to worse clinical recovery after a relapse and worse disease progression. These evidence suggest that removing inflammation should represent the main therapeutic target in MS; moreover, as synaptic plasticity is particularly altered by inflammation, specific strategies aimed at promoting LTP mechanisms could be effective for enhancing clinical recovery. Modulation of plasticity with different non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques has been used to promote recovery of MS symptoms. Better knowledge of features inducing brain disconnection in MS is crucial to design specific strategies to promote recovery and use NIBS with an increasingly tailored approach.

  2. Remodeling Functional Connectivity in Multiple Sclerosis: A Challenging Therapeutic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Stampanoni Bassi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the central nervous system are organized in functional units interconnected to form complex networks. Acute and chronic brain damage disrupts brain connectivity producing neurological signs and/or symptoms. In several neurological diseases, particularly in Multiple Sclerosis (MS, structural imaging studies cannot always demonstrate a clear association between lesion site and clinical disability, originating the “clinico-radiological paradox.” The discrepancy between structural damage and disability can be explained by a complex network perspective. Both brain networks architecture and synaptic plasticity may play important roles in modulating brain networks efficiency after brain damage. In particular, long-term potentiation (LTP may occur in surviving neurons to compensate network disconnection. In MS, inflammatory cytokines dramatically interfere with synaptic transmission and plasticity. Importantly, in addition to acute and chronic structural damage, inflammation could contribute to reduce brain networks efficiency in MS leading to worse clinical recovery after a relapse and worse disease progression. These evidence suggest that removing inflammation should represent the main therapeutic target in MS; moreover, as synaptic plasticity is particularly altered by inflammation, specific strategies aimed at promoting LTP mechanisms could be effective for enhancing clinical recovery. Modulation of plasticity with different non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS techniques has been used to promote recovery of MS symptoms. Better knowledge of features inducing brain disconnection in MS is crucial to design specific strategies to promote recovery and use NIBS with an increasingly tailored approach.

  3. Aerobic capacity explains physical functioning and participation in patients with multiple sclerosis-related fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Emma Rosalie Driehuis; Lizanne Eva van den Akker; Vincent de Groot; Heleen Beckerman

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether aerobic capacity explains the level of self-reported physical activity, physical functioning, and participation and autonomy in daily living in persons with multiple sclerosis-related fatigue. Design: A cross-sectional study. Patients: Sixty-two participants with multiple sclerosis-related fatigue. Methods: Aerobic capacity was measured with a leg ergometer and was expressed as maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, in ...

  4. Multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunwald, I.Q.; Kuehn, A.L.; Backens, M.; Papanagiotou, P.; Shariat, K.; Kostopoulos, P.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common chronic inflammatory disease of myelin with interspersed lesions in the white matter of the central nervous system. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the diagnosis and monitoring of white matter diseases. This article focuses on key findings in multiple sclerosis as detected by MRI. (orig.) [de

  5. Functional and Structural Brain Plasticity Enhanced by Motor and Cognitive Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Prosperini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation is recognized to be important in ameliorating motor and cognitive functions, reducing disease burden, and improving quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. In this systematic review, we summarize the existing evidences that motor and cognitive rehabilitation may enhance functional and structural brain plasticity in patients with MS, as assessed by means of the most advanced neuroimaging techniques, including diffusion tensor imaging and task-related and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. In most cases, the rehabilitation program was based on computer-assisted/video game exercises performed in either an outpatient or home setting. Despite their heterogeneity, all the included studies describe changes in white matter microarchitecture, in task-related activation, and/or in functional connectivity following both task-oriented and selective training. When explored, relevant correlation between improved function and MRI-detected brain changes was often found, supporting the hypothesis that training-induced brain plasticity is specifically linked to the trained domain. Small sample sizes, lack of randomization and/or an active control group, as well as missed relationship between MRI-detected changes and clinical performance, are the major drawbacks of the selected studies. Knowledge gaps in this field of research are also discussed to provide a framework for future investigations.

  6. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients with early stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivak, Stefan [Comenius University, Clinic of Neurology, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Martin (Slovakia); Jessenius Medical Faculty, Clinic of Neurology, Martin (Slovakia); Bittsansky, Michal; Dobrota, Dusan [Comenius University, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Martin (Slovakia); Kurca, Egon; Turcanova-Koprusakova, Monika; Grofik, Milan; Nosal, Vladimir [Comenius University, Clinic of Neurology, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Martin (Slovakia); Polacek, Hubert [Comenius University, Clinic of Radiodiagnostics, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Martin (Slovakia)

    2010-12-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder primarily affecting upper and lower motor neurons. Due to relative fast progression of the disease, early diagnosis is essential. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS) is used for objectivization of upper motor neuron (UMN) lesions. The aim of this study was to assess the use of {sup 1}H-MRS in the early stages of ALS. Eleven patients with clinically definite (n = 2), probable (n = 7), and probable laboratory-supported (n = 2) diagnosis of ALS with disease duration of less than 14 months were studied. Control group consists of 11 sex- and age-matched healthy subjects. All subjects underwent assessment of functional disability using revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) and single-voxel {sup 1}H-MRS examination of both precentral gyri, pons, medulla oblongata, and occipital lobe. Spectra were evaluated with LCModel software. The mean disease duration was 6.5 {+-} 3.5 months. The median ALSFRS-R was 42. Significant decrease between patient and control groups was found in the NAA/Cre ratio in the left and right precentral gyri (p = 0.008, p = 0.040). Other metabolite ratios in other areas did not show significant differences. Total ALSFRS-R score weakly positively correlated with NAA/Cre ratio in the left precentral gyrus (p = 0.047). {sup 1}H-MRS is sensitive to detect metabolic changes caused by neurodegeneration processes during ALS and can be used for detection of UMN dysfunction. These MRS changes in the early stages of ALS are most prominent in motor cortex. (orig.)

  7. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients with early stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivak, Stefan; Bittsansky, Michal; Dobrota, Dusan; Kurca, Egon; Turcanova-Koprusakova, Monika; Grofik, Milan; Nosal, Vladimir; Polacek, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder primarily affecting upper and lower motor neurons. Due to relative fast progression of the disease, early diagnosis is essential. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) is used for objectivization of upper motor neuron (UMN) lesions. The aim of this study was to assess the use of 1 H-MRS in the early stages of ALS. Eleven patients with clinically definite (n = 2), probable (n = 7), and probable laboratory-supported (n = 2) diagnosis of ALS with disease duration of less than 14 months were studied. Control group consists of 11 sex- and age-matched healthy subjects. All subjects underwent assessment of functional disability using revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) and single-voxel 1 H-MRS examination of both precentral gyri, pons, medulla oblongata, and occipital lobe. Spectra were evaluated with LCModel software. The mean disease duration was 6.5 ± 3.5 months. The median ALSFRS-R was 42. Significant decrease between patient and control groups was found in the NAA/Cre ratio in the left and right precentral gyri (p = 0.008, p = 0.040). Other metabolite ratios in other areas did not show significant differences. Total ALSFRS-R score weakly positively correlated with NAA/Cre ratio in the left precentral gyrus (p = 0.047). 1 H-MRS is sensitive to detect metabolic changes caused by neurodegeneration processes during ALS and can be used for detection of UMN dysfunction. These MRS changes in the early stages of ALS are most prominent in motor cortex. (orig.)

  8. Changes of deep gray matter magnetic susceptibility over 2years in multiple sclerosis and healthy control brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Hagemeier

    Full Text Available In multiple sclerosis, pathological changes of both tissue iron and myelin occur, yet these factors have not been characterized in a longitudinal fashion using the novel iron- and myelin-sensitive quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM MRI technique. We investigated disease-relevant tissue changes associated with myelin loss and iron accumulation in multiple sclerosis deep gray matter (DGM over two years. One-hundred twenty (120 multiple sclerosis patients and 40 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included in this prospective study. Written informed consent and local IRB approval were obtained from all participants. Clinical testing and QSM were performed both at baseline and at follow-up. Brain magnetic susceptibility was measured in major DGM structures. Temporal (baseline vs. follow-up and cross-sectional (multiple sclerosis vs. controls differences were studied using mixed factorial ANOVA analysis and appropriate t-tests. At either time-point, multiple sclerosis patients had significantly higher susceptibility in the caudate and globus pallidus and lower susceptibility in the thalamus. Over two years, susceptibility increased significantly in the caudate of both controls and multiple sclerosis patients. Inverse thalamic findings among MS patients suggest a multi-phase pathology explained by simultaneous myelin loss and/or iron accumulation followed by iron depletion and/or calcium deposition at later stages. Keywords: Quantitative susceptibility mapping, QSM, Iron, Multiple sclerosis, Longitudinal study

  9. Transcranial magnetic stimulation primes the effects of exercise therapy in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Francesco; Ljoka, Concetta; Magni, Elisabetta; Codecà, Claudia; Kusayanagi, Hajime; Monteleone, Fabrizia; Sancesario, Andrea; Bernardi, Giorgio; Koch, Giacomo; Foti, Calogero; Centonze, Diego

    2011-07-01

    Exercise therapy (ET) can be beneficial in disabled multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Intermittent transcranial magnetic theta burst stimulation (iTBS) induces long-term excitability changes of the cerebral cortex and may ameliorate spasticity in MS. We investigated whether the combination of iTBS and a program of ET can improve motor disability in MS patients. In a double-blind, sham-controlled trial, 30 participants were randomized to three different interventions: iTBS plus ET, sham stimulation plus ET, and iTBS alone. Before and after 2 weeks of treatment, measures of spasticity through the modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and the 88 items Multiple Sclerosis Spasticity Score questionnaire (MSSS-88), fatigue through the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), daily living activities (ADL) through the Barthel index and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) through the 54 items Multiple Sclerosis Quality of life inventory (MSQoL-54) were collected. iTBS plus ET reduced MAS, MSSS-88, FSS scores, while in the Barthel index and MSQoL-54, physical composite scores were increased. iTBS alone caused a reduction of the MAS score, while none of the measured scales showed significant changes after sham iTBS plus ET. iTBS associated with ET is a promising tool for motor rehabilitation of MS patients.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of treatment in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappos, L.; Staedt, D.; Schneiderbanger-Grygier, S.; Heitzer, T.; Ratzka, M.; Nadjmi, M.; Poser, S.; Keil, W.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance scans of 74 patients with multiple sclerosis participating in a controlled trial were compared 6 months before and at the end of a 24-32 months-treatment period with either Cyclosporin A (n=31) or Azathioprine (n=43). Both qualitative rating and computation of lesion volume showed deterioration in more than 40% of the patients, while by clinical criteria only 10-30% were worse. No significant difference was noted when the two treatment groups were compared. If careful repositioning and standardized image parameters are used, MRI is an indispensable tool for the objective determination of disease progression in MS although it cannot replace clinical examination. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of treatment in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappos, L.; Staedt, D.; Schneiderbanger-Grygier, S.; Heitzer, T.; Ratzka, M.; Nadjmi, M.; Poser, S.; Keil, W.

    1988-08-01

    Magnetic resonance scans of 74 patients with multiple sclerosis participating in a controlled trial were compared 6 months before and at the end of a 24-32 months-treatment period with either Cyclosporin A (n=31) or Azathioprine (n=43). Both qualitative rating and computation of lesion volume showed deterioration in more than 40% of the patients, while by clinical criteria only 10-30% were worse. No significant difference was noted when the two treatment groups were compared. If careful repositioning and standardized image parameters are used, MRI is an indispensable tool for the objective determination of disease progression in MS although it cannot replace clinical examination.

  12. Evaluation of sclerosis in Modic changes of the spine using susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Böker, Sarah M., E-mail: Sarah-maria.boeker@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Bender, Yvonne Y., E-mail: Yi-na.bender@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Adams, Lisa C., E-mail: Lisa.adams@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Fallenberg, Eva M., E-mail: Eva.fallenberg@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Wagner, Moritz, E-mail: Moritz.wagner@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd, E-mail: Bernd.hamm@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Makowski, Marcus R., E-mail: Marcus.makowski@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • SWMR allows a reliable detection of sclerosis in Modic changes. • SWI has a better accuracy for detection of sclerosis in Modic changes than T1/T2w MR. • By applying SWMR the use of additional CT/radiography can be minimized. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (SWMR) for the differentiation of sclerotic and non-sclerotic Modic changes (MC) of the spine compared to computed tomography (CT) and radiographs. Materials and methods: The Institutional Ethics-Review-Board approved this prospective study in advance. Written consent was obtained from all subjects. SWMR and standard T1/T2 MR of the cervical (n = 21) and/or lumbar spine (n = 34) were performed in 54 patients. 21 patients served as control. 18 patients were evaluated with CT; in all other patients radiographs were available. 67 Modic changes were identified on T1/T2 MR. On SWMR changes were classified as sclerotic and non-sclerotic based on signal intensity measurements. The sensitivity and specificity of SWMR and T1/T2 MR for differentiating between sclerotic and non-sclerotic Modic changes were determined with CT and radiographs as reference standard. Results: On SWMR, signal measurements between sclerotic and non-sclerotic Modic changes differed significantly (p < 0.01). On T1- and T2-weighted MR no significant difference (p > 0.05) was measured. On SWMR, a reliable differentiation between sclerotic and non-sclerotic Modic changes could be achieved, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 95%. In contrast, the combination of T1-/T2-weighted MR yielded a significantly lower sensitivity to detect sclerosis (20%). Conclusion: SWMR allows a reliable detection of sclerosis in Modic changes with a higher accuracy compared to standard spine MR sequences, using radiographs and CT as reference standard.

  13. Altered cortical activation during action observation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a parametric functional MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Haiqing; Li, Yuxin; Yin, Bo; Tang, Weijun; Yu, Xiangrong; Geng, Daoying; Chen, Yan; Huang, Weiyuan; Zhang, Biyun

    2015-01-01

    To investigate functional cerebral abnormalities in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during action observation. Thirty patients with ALS and 30 matched healthy controls underwent fMRI with an experimental paradigm while observing a video of repetitive flexion-extension of the fingers at three frequency levels or three complexity levels, alternated with periods of a static hand. A parametric analysis was applied to determine the effects of each of the two factors. Action observation activated similar neural networks as the research on execution of action in the ALS patients and healthy subjects in several brain regions related to the mirror-neuron system (MNS). In the ALS patients, in particular, the dorsal lateral premotor cortex (dPMC), inferior parietal gyrus (IPG), and SMA, were more activated compared with the activation in the controls. Increased activation within the primary motor cortex (M1), dPMC, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and superior parietal gyrus (SPG) mainly correlated with hand movement frequency/complexity in the videos in the patients compared with controls. The findings indicated an ongoing compensatory process occurring within the higher order motor-processing system of ALS patients, likely to overcome the loss of function. (orig.)

  14. Altered cortical activation during action observation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a parametric functional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Haiqing; Li, Yuxin; Yin, Bo; Tang, Weijun; Yu, Xiangrong; Geng, Daoying [Huashan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Yan [Fudan University, Department of Neurology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Huang, Weiyuan [People' s Hospital of Hainan Province, Department of Radiology, Haikou, Hainan Province (China); Zhang, Biyun [Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Department of radiotherapy, Affiliated Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China)

    2015-09-15

    To investigate functional cerebral abnormalities in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during action observation. Thirty patients with ALS and 30 matched healthy controls underwent fMRI with an experimental paradigm while observing a video of repetitive flexion-extension of the fingers at three frequency levels or three complexity levels, alternated with periods of a static hand. A parametric analysis was applied to determine the effects of each of the two factors. Action observation activated similar neural networks as the research on execution of action in the ALS patients and healthy subjects in several brain regions related to the mirror-neuron system (MNS). In the ALS patients, in particular, the dorsal lateral premotor cortex (dPMC), inferior parietal gyrus (IPG), and SMA, were more activated compared with the activation in the controls. Increased activation within the primary motor cortex (M1), dPMC, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and superior parietal gyrus (SPG) mainly correlated with hand movement frequency/complexity in the videos in the patients compared with controls. The findings indicated an ongoing compensatory process occurring within the higher order motor-processing system of ALS patients, likely to overcome the loss of function. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, A.

    2001-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of multiple sclearosi (MS) continues to be based on clinical findings, magnetic resonance (MR) is currently considered an indispensable technique for showing the spatial and temporal profiles of the demyelinating lesions that characterize the disease. The diagnostic yield of MR is based on its high sensitivity in the detection of demyelinating lesions in both brain and medulla and on its capacity to detect temporal changes in them. This high sensitivity must be accompanied by a high specificity, which is achieved with the proper knowledge of the signal, morphologic, topographic and temporal features of demyelinating lesions, as described in the diagnostic criteria recently proposed by McDonald et al. (Author) 77 refs

  16. Seven-Tesla Magnetization Transfer Imaging to Detect Multiple Sclerosis White Matter Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I-Jun; Lim, Su-Yin; Tanasescu, Radu; Al-Radaideh, Ali; Mougin, Olivier E; Tench, Christopher R; Whitehouse, William P; Gowland, Penny A; Constantinescu, Cris S

    2018-03-01

    Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging at 3 Tesla (T) field strength is the most sensitive modality for detecting white matter lesions in multiple sclerosis. While 7T FLAIR is effective in detecting cortical lesions, it has not been fully optimized for visualization of white matter lesions and thus has not been used for delineating lesions in quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the normal appearing white matter in multiple sclerosis. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the sensitivity of 7T magnetization-transfer-weighted (MT w ) images in the detection of white matter lesions compared with 3T-FLAIR. Fifteen patients with clinically isolated syndrome, 6 with multiple sclerosis, and 10 healthy participants were scanned with 7T 3-dimensional (D) MT w and 3T-2D-FLAIR sequences on the same day. White matter lesions visible on either sequence were delineated. Of 662 lesions identified on 3T-2D-FLAIR images, 652 were detected on 7T-3D-MT w images (sensitivity, 98%; 95% confidence interval, 97% to 99%). The Spearman correlation coefficient between lesion loads estimated by the two sequences was .910. The intrarater and interrater reliability for 7T-3D-MT w images was good with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 98.4% and 81.8%, which is similar to that for 3T-2D-FLAIR images (ICC 96.1% and 96.7%). Seven-Tesla MT w sequences detected most of the white matter lesions identified by FLAIR at 3T. This suggests that 7T-MT w imaging is a robust alternative for detecting demyelinating lesions in addition to 3T-FLAIR. Future studies need to compare the roles of optimized 7T-FLAIR and of 7T-MT w imaging. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Neuroimaging published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society of Neuroimaging.

  17. In vivo magnetic resonance diffusion measurement in the brain of patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C; Frederiksen, J

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of water self-diffusion in the brain in 25 patients with multiple sclerosis was performed by magnetic resonance imaging. Quantitative diffusion measurements were obtained using single spin-echo pulse sequences with pulsed magnetic field gradients of different magnitude. Twenty......-two of these patients also underwent measurement of the transverse relaxation time (T2). Only one plaque was evaluated in each patient. Based on prior knowledge, 12 plaques were classified as being 3 mo or less in age, and 7 plaques were classified as being more than 3 mo old. In all 25 plaques, water self......-diffusion was found to be higher than in apparently normal white matter. Furthermore, water self-diffusion was found to be higher in acute plaques compared with chronic plaques. Finally, a slight tendency toward a relationship between the diffusion capability and T2 was found. We believe that an increased diffusion...

  18. Statistical Methods for Magnetic Resonance Image Analysis with Applications to Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomann, Gina-Maria

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated neurological disease that causes disability and morbidity. In patients with MS, the accumulation of lesions in the white matter of the brain is associated with disease progression and worse clinical outcomes. In the first part of the dissertation, we present methodology to study to compare the brain anatomy between patients with MS and controls. A nonparametric testing procedure is proposed for testing the null hypothesis that two samples of curves observed at discrete grids and with noise have the same underlying distribution. We propose to decompose the curves using functional principal component analysis of an appropriate mixture process, which we refer to as marginal functional principal component analysis. This approach reduces the dimension of the testing problem in a way that enables the use of traditional nonparametric univariate testing procedures. The procedure is computationally efficient and accommodates different sampling designs. Numerical studies are presented to validate the size and power properties of the test in many realistic scenarios. In these cases, the proposed test is more powerful than its primary competitor. The proposed methodology is illustrated on a state-of-the art diffusion tensor imaging study, where the objective is to compare white matter tract profiles in healthy individuals and MS patients. In the second part of the thesis, we present methods to study the behavior of MS in the white matter of the brain. Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier in newer lesions is indicative of more active disease-related processes and is a primary outcome considered in clinical trials of treatments for MS. Such abnormalities in active MS lesions are evaluated in vivo using contrast-enhanced structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), during which patients receive an intravenous infusion of a costly magnetic contrast agent. In some instances, the contrast agents can have toxic effects. Recently, local

  19. Multiple Sclerosis and Employment: A Research Review Based on the International Classification of Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frain, Michael P.; Bishop, Malachy; Rumrill, Phillip D., Jr.; Chan, Fong; Tansey, Timothy N.; Strauser, David; Chiu, Chung-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an unpredictable, sometimes progressive chronic illness affecting people in the prime of their working lives. This article reviews the effects of MS on employment based on the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health model. Correlations between employment and…

  20. The predictive value of respiratory function tests for non-invasive ventilation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tilanus, T.B.M.; Groothuis, J.T.; Broek-Pastoor, J.M.C. ten; Feuth, T.; Heijdra, Y.F.; Slenders, J.P.L.; Doorduin, J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Kampelmacher, M.J.; Raaphorst, J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) improves survival and quality of life in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. The timing of referral to a home ventilation service (HVS), which is in part based on respiratory function tests, has shown room for improvement. It is currently unknown

  1. The predictive value of respiratory function tests for non-invasive ventilation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tilanus, T. B. M.; Groothuis, J. T.; TenBroek-Pastoor, J. M. C.; Feuth, T. B.; Heijdra, Y. F.; Slenders, J. P. L.; Doorduin, J.; van Engelen, B. G.; Kampelmacher, M. J.; Raaphorst, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) improves survival and quality of life in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. The timing of referral to a home ventilation service (HVS), which is in part based on respiratory function tests, has shown room for improvement. It is currently unknown

  2. Disruption of Structural and Functional Networks in Long-Standing Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tewarie, P.; Steenwijk, M.D.; Tijms, B.M.; Daams, M.; Balk, L.J.; Stam, C.J.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Polman, C.H.; Geurts, J.J.G.; Barkhof, F.; Pouwels, P.J.W.; Vrenken, H.; Hillebrand, A.

    2014-01-01

    Both gray matter atrophy and disruption of functional networks are important predictors for physical disability and cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS), yet their relationship is poorly understood. Graph theory provides a modality invariant framework to analyze patterns of gray matter

  3. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study mapping the episodic memory encoding network in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Meneka K.; Stretton, Jason; Winston, Gavin P.; Bonelli, Silvia; Centeno, Maria; Vollmar, Christian; Symms, Mark; Thompson, Pamela J.; Koepp, Matthias J.

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated reorganization of memory encoding networks within the temporal lobe in temporal lobe epilepsy, but little is known of the extra-temporal networks in these patients. We investigated the temporal and extra-temporal reorganization of memory encoding networks in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and the neural correlates of successful subsequent memory formation. We studied 44 patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis (24 left) and 26 healthy control subjects. All participants performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging memory encoding paradigm of faces and words with subsequent out-of-scanner recognition assessments. A blocked analysis was used to investigate activations during encoding and neural correlates of subsequent memory were investigated using an event-related analysis. Event-related activations were then correlated with out-of-scanner verbal and visual memory scores. During word encoding, control subjects activated the left prefrontal cortex and left hippocampus whereas patients with left hippocampal sclerosis showed significant additional right temporal and extra-temporal activations. Control subjects displayed subsequent verbal memory effects within left parahippocampal gyrus, left orbitofrontal cortex and fusiform gyrus whereas patients with left hippocampal sclerosis activated only right posterior hippocampus, parahippocampus and fusiform gyrus. Correlational analysis showed that patients with left hippocampal sclerosis with better verbal memory additionally activated left orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and left posterior hippocampus. During face encoding, control subjects showed right lateralized prefrontal cortex and bilateral hippocampal activations. Patients with right hippocampal sclerosis showed increased temporal activations within the superior temporal gyri bilaterally and no increased extra-temporal areas of activation compared with

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in a case of facial myokymia with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kita, Kohei; Hirayama, Keizo; Ikehira, Hiroo; Fukuda, Nobuo; Tateno, Yukio.

    1985-01-01

    A 59-year-old female of facial myokymia with multiple sclerosis was reported. In this case, facial myokymia appeared at the same time as the first attack of multiple sclerosis, in association with paroxysmal pain and desesthesia of the neck, painful tonic seizures of the right upper and lower extremities and cervical transverse myelopathy. The facial myokymia consisted of grossly visible, continuous, fine and worm-like movement, which often began in the area of the left orbicularis oculi and spread to the other facial muscles on one side. Electromyographic studies revealed grouping of motor units and continuous spontaneous rhythmic discharges in the left orbicularis oris suggesting facial myokymia, but there were no abnormalities on voluntary contraction. Sometimes doublet or multiplet patterns occurred while at other times the bursts were of single motor potential. The respective frequencies were 3-4/sec and 40-50/sec. There was no evidence of fibrillation. The facial myokymia disappeared after 4-8 weeks of administration of prednisolone and did not recur. In the remission stage after disappearance of the facial myokymia, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging by the inversion recovery method demonstrated low intensity demyelinated plaque in the left lateral tegmentum of the inferior pons, which was responsible for the facial myokymia, but X-ray computed tomography revealed no pathological findings. The demyelinated plaque demonstrated by NMR imaging seemed to be located in the infranuclear area of the facial nerve nucleus and to involve the intramedurally root. (J.P.N.)

  5. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, Z.; Obenberger, J.; Vitak, T.

    1996-01-01

    The potential of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) was confirmed on 52 patients. In 25 patients, MS was diagnosed as highly probable, in additional 8 patients this diagnosis was suspected. MR imaging supported the diagnosis in 21 (95%) patients where this disease had been diagnosed as highly probable, and in 3 (38%) suspect patients. Lesions were found most frequently paraventricularly in the white matter of the brain, but also in the deep structures of the white matter of the temporal lobe and below the tentorium (in the cerebellum, pons and mesencephalon). No lesions were found in the optic nerve despite the frequent diagnosis of retrobulbar neuritis. Computerized tomography (CT) was performed in 14 patients; this technique only supported the diagnosis of MS in 3 patients, in all of whom this diagnosis had also been suggested by MR imaging. It is concluded that MR imaging can fully supersede CT as a tool for diagnosing multiple sclerosis. 3 figs., 10 refs

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in a case of facial myokymia with multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kita, Kohei; Hirayama, Keizo; Ikehira, Hiroo; Fukuda, Nobuo; Tateno, Yukio

    1985-06-01

    A 59-year-old female of facial myokymia with multiple sclerosis was reported. In this case, facial myokymia appeared at the same time as the first attack of multiple sclerosis, in association with paroxysmal pain and desesthesia of the neck, painful tonic seizures of the right upper and lower extremities and cervical transverse myelopathy. The facial myokymia consisted of grossly visible, continuous, fine and worm-like movement, which often began in the area of the left orbicularis oculi and spread to the other facial muscles on one side. Electromyographic studies revealed grouping of motor units and continuous spontaneous rhythmic discharges in the left orbicularis oris suggesting facial myokymia, but there were no abnormalities on voluntary contraction. Sometimes doublet or multiplet patterns occurred while at other times the bursts were of single motor potential. The respective frequencies were 3-4/sec and 40-50/sec. There was no evidence of fibrillation. The facial myokymia disappeared after 4-8 weeks of administration of prednisolone and did not recur. In the remission stage after disappearance of the facial myokymia, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging by the inversion recovery method demonstrated low intensity demyelinated plaque in the left lateral segmentum of the inferior pons, which was responsible for the facial myokymia, but X-ray computed tomography revealed no pathological findings. The demyelinated plaque demonstrated by NMR imaging seemed to be located in the infranuclear area of the facial nerve nucleus and to involve the intramedurally root.

  7. Magnetic susceptibility in the deep layers of the primary motor cortex in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Costagli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a progressive neurological disorder that entails degeneration of both upper and lower motor neurons. The primary motor cortex (M1 in patients with upper motor neuron (UMN impairment is pronouncedly hypointense in Magnetic Resonance (MR T2* contrast. In the present study, 3D gradient-recalled multi-echo sequences were used on a 7 Tesla MR system to acquire T2*-weighted images targeting M1 at high spatial resolution. MR raw data were used for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM. Measures of magnetic susceptibility correlated with the expected concentration of non-heme iron in different regions of the cerebral cortex in healthy subjects. In ALS patients, significant increases in magnetic susceptibility co-localized with the T2* hypointensity observed in the middle and deep layers of M1. The magnetic susceptibility, hence iron concentration, of the deep cortical layers of patients' M1 subregions corresponding to Penfield's areas of the hand and foot in both hemispheres significantly correlated with the clinical scores of UMN impairment of the corresponding limbs. QSM therefore reflects the presence of iron deposits related to neuroinflammatory reaction and cortical microgliosis, and might prove useful in estimating M1 iron concentration, as a possible radiological sign of severe UMN burden in ALS patients.

  8. The predictive value of respiratory function tests for non-invasive ventilation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tilanus, T. B. M.; Groothuis, J. T.; TenBroek-Pastoor, J. M. C.; Feuth, T. B.; Heijdra, Y. F.; Slenders, J. P. L.; Doorduin, J.; Van Engelen, B. G.; Kampelmacher, M. J.; Raaphorst, J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) improves survival and quality of life in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. The timing of referral to a home ventilation service (HVS), which is in part based on respiratory function tests, has shown room for improvement. It is currently unknown which respiratory function test predicts an appropriate timing of the initiation of NIV. METHODS: We analysed, retrospectively, serial data of five respiratory function tests: forced vital capacity...

  9. Serial gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with multiple sclerosis treated with mitoxantrone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krapf, H.; Mauch, E.; Fetzer, U.; Laufen, H.; Kornhuber, H.H.

    1995-01-01

    Serial gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to monitor the effect of mitoxantrone in ten patients with rapidly deteriorating multiple sclerosis (MS). MRI was performed as a baseline and thereafter at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 24 months. The total number of Gd-enhancing lesions diminished from 169 at baseline to 10 after 1 year and to 5 after 2 years. This reduction and the percentage of follow-up MRI studies showing no Gd enhancement were more pronounced than in other MRI studies of the natural course of MS. Measured with quantitative neurological scales, only one patient showed deterioration after 2 years; nevertheless, the changes in MRI were much more marked than those observed clinically. Serial Gd-MRI therefore, seems necessary for documenting efficacy in future therapeutic trails. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in relation to EEG epileptic foci in tuberous sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Kyoko; Okuno, Takehiko; Ito, Masatoshi; Asato, Reinin; Konishi, Junji; Mikawa, Haruki

    1990-01-01

    In 20 patients with tuberous sclerosis (TS), who were sequentially treated for epilepsy at our clinic, the high signal lesions in the cerebral cortex and subcortex detected on T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compared with the interictal EEG findings. In four cases who showed a unilateral distribution of the MRI lesions, there was a good correlation between the laterality of the affected lobes and the localization of the EEG epileptic foci. Thirteen cases with more than four affected lobes in both hemispheres also showed bilateral epileptic foci on EEG. The MRI lesions in the occipital lobes showed the best correlation with the EEG epileptic foci, while the worst correlation was seen in the frontal lobes. In addition, the cases with four or more affected lobes without laterality on MRI are more likely to show bilateral synchronization on EEG. The prognosis of epilepsy in these cases was found to be rather poor. (author)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging compared with trimodal evoked potentials in possible multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roullet, E.; Leger-Ravet, M.B.; Amarenco, P.; Marteau, R.; Lavallard-Rousseau, M.-C.; Dupuch, K.; Iba-Zizen, M.T.; Tamraz, J.; Cabanis, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain and Evoked Potentials (EP) can both demonstrate the presence of clinically unsuspected demyelinating lesions and have proven to be sensitive (but not specific) in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). MRI and EP are positive in 90 to 100% of patients with a definite diagnosis of MS. However, few studies have been conducted in patients with a lesser diagnostic certainty. In possible or suspected MS they gave conflicting results, possibly because of technical discrepancies and different clinical inclusion criteria. Since a number of putative new treatments can be evaluated in patients who have a definite diagnosis of MS, but nevertheless a short duration of disease and a low disability, it was decided to compare the sensitivity of MRI and EP as diagnostic tools in possible MS patients. MRI is shown to be more sensitive, shows more multiple lesions and gives a clearer appreciation of their size and exact location than EP. 10 refs.; 3 tabs

  12. Cerebral metabolism, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cognitive dysfunction in early multiple sclerosis: an exploratory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blinkenberg, Morten; Mathiesen, Henrik K; Tscherning, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    and neurological disability. METHODS: We studied 20 recently diagnosed, clinically definite, relapsing-remitting MS patients. Global and cortical CMRglc was estimated using PET with 18-F-deoxyglucose and NAA/Cr ratio was measured using multislice echo-planar spectroscopic imaging. All subjects were neuro-psychologically......OBJECTIVES: Positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown that cortical cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) is reduced in multiple sclerosis (MS). Quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measures of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) normalized to creatine (NAA/Cr) assess neuronal...... deterioration, and several studies have shown reductions in MS. Furthermore, both PET and MRS reductions correlate with cognitive dysfunction in MS. Our aim was to determine if changes in cortical CMRglc in early MS correlate with NAA/Cr measurements of neuronal deterioration, as well as cognitive dysfunction...

  13. Novel functional magnetic materials fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book presents current research on advanced magnetic materials and multifunctional composites. Recent advances in technology and engineering have resulted from the development of advanced magnetic materials with improved functional magnetic and magneto-transport properties. Certain industrial sectors, such as magnetic sensors, microelectronics, and security, demand cost-effective materials with reduced dimensionality and desirable magnetic properties such as enhanced magnetic softness, giant magnetic field sensitivity, and large magnetocaloric effect.  Expert chapters present the most up-to-date information on the fabrication process, processing, tailoring of properties, and applications of different families of modern functional materials for advanced smart applications. Topics covered include novel magnetic materials and applications; amorphous and nanocrystalline magnetic materials and applications; hard magnetic materials; magnetic shape memory alloys; and magnetic oxides. The book's highly interdis...

  14. Serial contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance and magnetization transfer in the study of patients with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, A.; Alonso, J.; Cucurella, G.; Nos, C.; Tintore, M.; Pedraza, S.; Rio, J.; Montalban, X.

    1997-01-01

    To demonstrate the changes in the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) of different demyelinating plaques, correlating them with the baseline values in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) sequences in order to relate them more closely to the underlying disease. The study was based on 33 demyelinating plaques obtained from six patients clinically diagnosed as having remitting-recurring multiple sclerosis (MS). All the patients underwent two MR studies at a 3 to 5-month interval, including contrast-enhanced T1 and T2- weighted sequences and magnetization transfer images. The latter were used to calculate the MTR for each of the demyelinating plaques included in the study. The statistical analysis of the results obtained revealed statistically significant between initial MTR values and those of subsequent T1-weighted sequences. The MTR demonstrate significant differences between plaques according to contrast-enhanced T1-weigh tes sequences, probably indicating variable degrees of edema, demyelination and tissue destruction. These differences should be taken into account to enable the use of T1-weighted sequences to quantify the lesion load in MS patients. (Author) 35 refs

  15. Examination of the role of magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis: A problem-orientated approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McFarland Henry

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI has brought in several benefits to the study of Multiple Sclerosis (MS. It provides accurate measurement of disease activity, facilitates precise diagnosis, and aid in the assessment of newer therapies. The imaging guidelines for MS are broadly divided in to approaches for imaging patients with suspected MS or clinically isolated syndromes (CIS or for monitoring patients with established MS. In this review, the technical aspects of MR imaging for MS are briefly discussed. The imaging process need to capture the twin aspects of acute MS viz. the autoimmune acute inflammatory process and the neurodegenerative process. Gadolinium enhanced MRI can identify acute inflammatory lesions precisely. The commonly applied MRI marker of disease progression is brain atrophy. Whole brain magnetization Transfer Ratio (MTR and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS are two other techniques use to monitor disease progression. A variety of imaging techniques such as Double Inversion Recovery (DIR, Spoiled Gradient Recalled (SPGR acquisition, and Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR have been utilized to study the cortical changes in MS. MRI is now extensively used in the Phase I, II and III clinical trials of new therapies. As the technical aspects of MRI advance rapidly, and higher field strengths become available, it is hoped that the impact of MRI on our understanding of MS will be even more profound in the next decade.

  16. Magnetic susceptibility of functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, T.; Ferraro, M.B.; Contreras, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    Proceeding with a series of works where new criteria are applied to the the calculation of the contribution of molecular fragments to certain properties, results are presented for a group of 1-X-benzenes and 1-X-naphtalenes for the magnetic susceptibility constant. Both the diamagnetic and paramagnetic parts are taken into account. To reduce the problems associated with the Gauge dependence originated in the approximations made, Gauge independent atomic orbitals (GIAO) orbitals are used in the atomic orbital basis. Results are discussed in terms of functional groups. (Author). 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  17. Monometric and scintiscanning evaluation of esophageal function after endoscopic sclerosis of esophageal varices. Controlled prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, J.L.A.

    1990-01-01

    Esophageal function was studied in twenty-one patients with esophageal varices of different etiology submitted to endoscopic sclerosis for the detection of possible alterations in the functional pattern of the organ after this treatment. The endoscopic injection sclerosis (EIS) was performed electively in 14 patients (Group I) and in the presence of bleeding in 07 (Group II). The sclerotizing agent used was a solution of equal parts of ethanolamine oleate (Ethamolin R ) and 50% glucose. The injections were preferentially performed by the perivascular technique at weekly intervals. Esophageal function was studied by manometry, and esophageal transit time by scintillography. Group I patients were evaluated before and two to three months and five to nine months after EIS, and Group II patients were only evaluated six to nine months after EIS. The manometry and scintillography procedures were performed in sequence on the same day. The scintillographic examinations were performed with the patient in the supine and sitting positions. (author)

  18. Resistance training improves muscle strength and functional capacity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, U; Stenager, E; Jakobsen, J

    2009-01-01

    strength and functional capacity in patients with multiple sclerosis, the effects persisting after 12 weeks of self-guided physical activity. Level of evidence: The present study provides level III evidence supporting the hypothesis that lower extremity progressive resistance training can improve muscle......OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that lower extremity progressive resistance training (PRT) can improve muscle strength and functional capacity in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and to evaluate whether the improvements are maintained after the trial. METHODS: The present study was a 2-arm...... and was afterward encouraged to continue training. After the trial, the control group completed the PRT intervention. Both groups were tested before and after 12 weeks of the trial and at 24 weeks (follow-up), where isometric muscle strength of the knee extensors (KE MVC) and functional capacity (FS; combined score...

  19. Neurogenic function in rats with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis that experienced early-life status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunleavy, Mark; Schindler, Clara K; Shinoda, Sachiko; Crilly, Shane; Henshall, David C

    2014-01-01

    Status epilepticus in the adult brain invariably causes an increase in hippocampal neurogenesis and the appearance of ectopic cells and this has been implicated as a causal factor in epileptogenesis. The effect of status epilepticus on neurogenesis in the developing brain is less well characterized and models of early-life seizures typically do not reproduce the hippocampal damage common to human mesial temporal sclerosis. We recently reported that evoking status epilepticus by intra-amygdala microinjection of kainic acid in post-natal (P) day 10 rats caused substantial acute neuronal death within the ipsilateral hippocampus and rats later developed unilateral hippocampal sclerosis and spontaneous recurrent seizures. Here, we examined the expression of a selection of genes associated with neurogenesis and assessed neurogenic function in this model. Protein levels of several markers of neurogenesis including polysialic acid neural cell adhesion molecule, neuroD and doublecortin were reduced in the hippocampus three days after status epilepticus in P10 rats. In contrast, protein levels of neurogenesis markers were similar to control in rats at P55. Pulse-chase experiments using thymidine analogues suggested there was a reduction in new neurons at 72 h after status epilepticus in P10 rats, whereas numbers of new neurons labelled in epileptic rats at P55 with hippocampal sclerosis were similar to controls. The present study suggests that status epilepticus in the immature brain suppresses neurogenesis but the neurogenic potential is retained in animals that later develop hippocampal sclerosis. PMID:25755841

  20. The assessment of problems in functioning and the subjective perception of these problems in people with Multiple Sclerosis : the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Profile (MSIP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wynia, Klaske; Roodbol, Petrie F.; Middel, Berry

    People with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) perceive consequences of this chronic condition that are not limited to impairments in physical functioning but also have their impact on limitations in activities and restrictions in participation in life situations. There is a growing awareness among healthcare

  1. IMPROVING FUNCTIONAL INDEPENDENCE OF PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS BY PHYSICAL THERAPY AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Ticărat

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients with multiple sclerosis can have a normal life despite of their real or possible disability and of the progressive nature of it. Scope. Patients who follow physical therapy and occupational therapy will have an increased quality of life and a greater functional independence.Methods. The randomized study was made on 7 patients with multiple sclerosis, from Oradea Day Centre, 3 times/week, ages between 35 – 55 years, functional level between mild and sever. Assessment and rehabilitation methods: inspection, BARTHEL Index. Frenkel method, brething exercises, weights exercises, gait exercises, writind exercises and games were used in the rehabilitation process. Group therapies: sociotherapy, arttherapy, music therapy. Results analysis consisted of the comparison of baseline and final means.Results. By analizing baseline and final means for Barthel Index for each functon separately, it was shown a mild improvement of functional independence for almost assessed functions, with at least 1-1,5 points.Conclusions. Persons with multiple sclerosis who follow physical therapy and occupational therapy presents a better functional independence after the treatment.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging perfusion is associated with disease severity and activity in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowa, Piotr [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Owren Nygaard, Gro [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Oslo (Norway); Bjoernerud, Atle [Intervention Center, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Oslo (Norway); Gulowsen Celius, Elisabeth [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Flinstad Harbo, Hanne [University of Oslo, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Oslo University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Oslo (Norway); Kristiansen Beyer, Mona [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Department of Life Sciences and Health, Oslo (Norway)

    2017-07-15

    The utility of perfusion-weighted imaging in multiple sclerosis (MS) is not well investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare baseline normalized perfusion measures in subgroups of newly diagnosed MS patients. We wanted to test the hypothesis that this method can differentiate between groups defined according to disease severity and disease activity at 1 year follow-up. Baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including a dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion sequence was performed on a 1.5-T scanner in 66 patients newly diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS. From the baseline MRI, cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT) maps were generated. Normalized (n) perfusion values were calculated by dividing each perfusion parameter obtained in white matter lesions by the same parameter obtained in normal-appearing white matter. Neurological examination was performed at baseline and at follow-up approximately 1 year later to establish the multiple sclerosis severity score (MSSS) and evidence of disease activity (EDA). Baseline normalized mean transit time (nMTT) was lower in patients with MSSS >3.79 (p = 0.016), in patients with EDA (p = 0.041), and in patients with both MSSS >3.79 and EDA (p = 0.032) at 1-year follow-up. Baseline normalized cerebral blood flow and normalized cerebral blood volume did not differ between these groups. Lower baseline nMTT was associated with higher disease severity and with presence of disease activity 1 year later in newly diagnosed MS patients. Further longitudinal studies are needed to confirm whether baseline-normalized perfusion measures can differentiate between disease severity and disease activity subgroups over time. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging perfusion is associated with disease severity and activity in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, Piotr; Owren Nygaard, Gro; Bjoernerud, Atle; Gulowsen Celius, Elisabeth; Flinstad Harbo, Hanne; Kristiansen Beyer, Mona

    2017-01-01

    The utility of perfusion-weighted imaging in multiple sclerosis (MS) is not well investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare baseline normalized perfusion measures in subgroups of newly diagnosed MS patients. We wanted to test the hypothesis that this method can differentiate between groups defined according to disease severity and disease activity at 1 year follow-up. Baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including a dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion sequence was performed on a 1.5-T scanner in 66 patients newly diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS. From the baseline MRI, cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT) maps were generated. Normalized (n) perfusion values were calculated by dividing each perfusion parameter obtained in white matter lesions by the same parameter obtained in normal-appearing white matter. Neurological examination was performed at baseline and at follow-up approximately 1 year later to establish the multiple sclerosis severity score (MSSS) and evidence of disease activity (EDA). Baseline normalized mean transit time (nMTT) was lower in patients with MSSS >3.79 (p = 0.016), in patients with EDA (p = 0.041), and in patients with both MSSS >3.79 and EDA (p = 0.032) at 1-year follow-up. Baseline normalized cerebral blood flow and normalized cerebral blood volume did not differ between these groups. Lower baseline nMTT was associated with higher disease severity and with presence of disease activity 1 year later in newly diagnosed MS patients. Further longitudinal studies are needed to confirm whether baseline-normalized perfusion measures can differentiate between disease severity and disease activity subgroups over time. (orig.)

  4. Understanding disease processes in multiple sclerosis through magnetic resonance imaging studies in animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeela Nathoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are exciting new advances in multiple sclerosis (MS resulting in a growing understanding of both the complexity of the disorder and the relative involvement of grey matter, white matter and inflammation. Increasing need for preclinical imaging is anticipated, as animal models provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disease. Magnetic resonance (MR is the key imaging tool used to diagnose and to monitor disease progression in MS, and thus will be a cornerstone for future research. Although gadolinium-enhancing and T2 lesions on MRI have been useful for detecting MS pathology, they are not correlative of disability. Therefore, new MRI methods are needed. Such methods require validation in animal models. The increasing necessity for MRI of animal models makes it critical and timely to understand what research has been conducted in this area and what potential there is for use of MRI in preclinical models of MS. Here, we provide a review of MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS studies that have been carried out in animal models of MS that focus on pathology. We compare the MRI phenotypes of animals and patients and provide advice on how best to use animal MR studies to increase our understanding of the linkages between MR and pathology in patients. This review describes how MRI studies of animal models have been, and will continue to be, used in the ongoing effort to understand MS.

  5. Characterizing functional connectivity during rest in multiple sclerosis patients versus healthy volunteers using independent component analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacio Garcia, L.; Andrzejak, R.; Prchkovska, V.; Rodrigues, P.

    2016-07-01

    It is commonly thought that our brain is not active when it does not receive any external input. However, during rest, there are still certain distant regions of the brain that are functionally correlated between them: the so-called resting-state networks. This functional connectivity of the brain is disrupted in many neurological diseases. In particular, it has been shown that one of the most studied resting-state networks (the default-mode network) is affected in multiple sclerosis, which is the most common disabling neurological condition affecting the central nervous system of young adults. In this work, I focus on the study of the differences in the resting-state networks between multiple sclerosis patients and healthy volunteers. In order to study the effects of multiple sclerosis on the functional connectivity of the brain, a numerical method known as independent component analysis (ICA) is applied. This technique divides the resting-state fMRI data into independent components. Nonetheless, noise, which could be due to head motion or physiological artifacts, may corrupt the data by indicating a false activation. Therefore, I create a web user interface that allows the user to manually classify all the independent components for a given subject. Eventually, the components classified as noise should be removed from the functional data in order to prevent them from taking part in any further analysis. (Author)

  6. Presurgical functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an important and novel neuroimaging modality for patients with brain tumors. By non-invasive measurement, localization and lateralization of brain activiation, most importantly of motor and speech function, fMRI facilitates the selection of the most appropriate and sparing treatment and function-preserving surgery. Prerequisites for the diagnostic use of fMRI are the application of dedicated clinical imaging protocols and standardization of the respective imaging procedures. The combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) also enables tracking and visualization of important fiber bundles such as the pyramidal tract and the arcuate fascicle. These multimodal MR data can be implemented in computer systems for functional neuronavigation or radiation treatment. The practicability, accuracy and reliability of presurgical fMRI have been validated by large numbers of published data. However, fMRI cannot be considered as a fully established modality of diagnostic neuroimaging due to the lack of guidelines of the responsible medical associations as well as the lack of medical certification of important hardware and software components. This article reviews the current research in the field and provides practical information relevant for presurgical fMRI. (orig.) [de

  7. Validation of the fatigue scale for motor and cognitive functions in a danish multiple sclerosis cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oervik, M. S.; Sejbaek, T.; Penner, I. K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Our objective was to validate the Danish translation of the Fatigue Scale for Motor and Cognitive Functions (FSMC) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Materials and methods A Danish MS cohort (n = 84) was matched and compared to the original German validation cohort (n = 309) and a he......Background Our objective was to validate the Danish translation of the Fatigue Scale for Motor and Cognitive Functions (FSMC) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Materials and methods A Danish MS cohort (n = 84) was matched and compared to the original German validation cohort (n = 309...... positive correlations between the two fatigue scales implied high convergent validity (total scores: r = 0.851, p gender). Correcting for depression did not result in any significant adjustments of the correlations...

  8. Validating archetypes for the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Michael; Brandt, Alexander Ulrich; Schulz, Stefan; Boeker, Martin

    2014-08-03

    Numerous information models for electronic health records, such as openEHR archetypes are available. The quality of such clinical models is important to guarantee standardised semantics and to facilitate their interoperability. However, validation aspects are not regarded sufficiently yet. The objective of this report is to investigate the feasibility of archetype development and its community-based validation process, presuming that this review process is a practical way to ensure high-quality information models amending the formal reference model definitions. A standard archetype development approach was applied on a case set of three clinical tests for multiple sclerosis assessment: After an analysis of the tests, the obtained data elements were organised and structured. The appropriate archetype class was selected and the data elements were implemented in an iterative refinement process. Clinical and information modelling experts validated the models in a structured review process. Four new archetypes were developed and publicly deployed in the openEHR Clinical Knowledge Manager, an online platform provided by the openEHR Foundation. Afterwards, these four archetypes were validated by domain experts in a team review. The review was a formalised process, organised in the Clinical Knowledge Manager. Both, development and review process turned out to be time-consuming tasks, mostly due to difficult selection processes between alternative modelling approaches. The archetype review was a straightforward team process with the goal to validate archetypes pragmatically. The quality of medical information models is crucial to guarantee standardised semantic representation in order to improve interoperability. The validation process is a practical way to better harmonise models that diverge due to necessary flexibility left open by the underlying formal reference model definitions.This case study provides evidence that both community- and tool-enabled review processes

  9. Pittsburgh compound-B PET white matter imaging and cognitive function in late multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeydan, Burcu; Lowe, Val J; Schwarz, Christopher G; Przybelski, Scott A; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Zuk, Samantha M; Senjem, Matthew L; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Roberts, Rosebud O; Mielke, Michelle M; Benarroch, Eduardo E; Rodriguez, Moses; Machulda, Mary M; Lesnick, Timothy G; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Jack, Clifford R; Kantarci, Kejal; Kantarci, Orhun H

    2018-05-01

    There is growing interest in white matter (WM) imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). We studied the association of cognitive function in late multiple sclerosis (MS) with cortical and WM Pittsburgh compound-B PET (PiB-PET) binding. In the population-based Mayo Clinic Study of Aging, 24 of 4869 participants had MS (12 underwent PiB-PET). Controls were age and sex matched (5:1). We used automated or semi-automated processing for quantitative image analyses and conditional logistic regression for group differences. MS patients had lower memory ( p = 0.03) and language ( p = 0.02) performance; smaller thalamic volumes ( p = 0.003); and thinner temporal ( p = 0.001) and frontal ( p = 0.045) cortices on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) than controls. There was no difference in global cortical PiB standardized uptake value ratios between MS and controls ( p = 0.35). PiB uptake was lower in areas of WM hyperintensities compared to normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in MS ( p = 0.0002). Reduced PiB uptake in both the areas of WM hyperintensities ( r = 0.65; p = 0.02) and NAWM ( r = 0.69; p = 0.01) was associated with decreased visuospatial performance in MS. PiB uptake in the cortex in late MS is not different from normal age-matched controls. PiB uptake in the WM in late MS may be a marker of the large network structures' integrity such as those involved in visuospatial performance.

  10. Structural and functional evaluation of cortical motor areas in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosottini, Mirco; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Piazza, Selina; Diciotti, Stefano; Cecchi, Paolo; Fabbri, Serena; Carlesi, Cecilia; Mascalchi, Mario; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2012-03-01

    The structural and functional data gathered with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques about the brain cortical motor damage in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are controversial. In fact some structural MRI studies showed foci of gray matter (GM) atrophy in the precentral gyrus, even in the early stage, while others did not. Most functional MRI (fMRI) studies in ALS reported hyperactivation of extra-primary motor cortices, while contradictory results were obtained on the activation of the primary motor cortex. We aimed to investigate the cortical motor circuitries in ALS patients by a combined structural and functional approach. Twenty patients with definite ALS and 16 healthy subjects underwent a structural examination with acquisition of a 3D T1-weighted sequence and fMRI examination during a maximal force handgrip task executed with the right-hand, the left-hand and with both hands simultaneously. The T1-weighted images were analyzed with Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) that showed several clusters of reduced cortical GM in ALS patients compared to controls including the pre and postcentral gyri, the superior, middle and inferior frontal gyri, the supplementary motor area, the superior and inferior parietal cortices and the temporal lobe, bilaterally but more extensive on the right side. In ALS patients a significant hypoactivation of the primary sensory motor cortex and frontal dorsal premotor areas as compared to controls was observed. The hypoactivated areas matched with foci of cortical atrophy demonstrated by VBM. The fMRI analysis also showed an enhanced activation in the ventral premotor frontal areas and in the parietal cortex pertaining to the fronto-parietal motor circuit which paralleled with disease progression rate and matched with cortical regions of atrophy. The hyperactivation of the fronto-parietal circuit was asymmetric and prevalent in the left hemisphere. VBM and fMRI identified structural and functional markers of an extended

  11. Current evidence on the potential therapeutic applications of transcranial magnetic stimulation in multiple sclerosis: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León Ruiz, M; Sospedra, M; Arce Arce, S; Tejeiro-Martínez, J; Benito-León, J

    2018-06-10

    A growing number of studies have evaluated the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for the symptomatic treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). We performed a PubMed search for articles, recent books, and recommendations from the most relevant clinical practice guidelines and scientific societies regarding the use of TMS as symptomatic treatment in MS. Excitatory electromagnetic pulses applied to the affected cerebral hemisphere allow us to optimise functional brain activity, including the transmission of nerve impulses through the demyelinated corticospinal pathway. Various studies into TMS have shown statistically significant improvements in spasticity, fatigue, lower urinary tract dysfunction, manual dexterity, gait, and cognitive deficits related to working memory in patients with MS; however, the exact level of evidence has not been defined as the results have not been replicated in a sufficient number of controlled studies. Further well-designed, randomised, controlled clinical trials involving a greater number of patients are warranted to attain a higher level of evidence in order to recommend the appropriate use of TMS in MS patients across the board. TMS acts as an adjuvant with other symptomatic and immunomodulatory treatments. Additional studies should specifically investigate the effect of conventional repetitive TMS on fatigue in these patients, something that has yet to see the light of day. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Transcranial magnetic stimulation: language function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, C M

    1998-07-01

    Studies of language using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have focused both on identification of language areas and on elucidation of function. TMS may result in either inhibition or facilitation of language processes and may operate directly at a presumptive site of language cortex or indirectly through intracortical networks. TMS has been used to create reversible "temporary lesions," similar to those produced by Wada tests and direct cortical electrical stimulation, in cerebral cortical areas subserving language function. Rapid-rate TMS over the left inferior frontal region blocks speech output in most subjects. However, the results are not those predicted from classic models of language organization. Speech arrest is obtained most easily over facial motor cortex, and true aphasia is rare, whereas right hemisphere or bilateral lateralization is unexpectedly prominent. A clinical role for these techniques is not yet fully established. Interfering with language comprehension and verbal memory is currently more difficult than blocking speech output, but numerous TMS studies have demonstrated facilitation of language-related tasks, including oral word association, story recall, digit span, and picture naming. Conversely, speech output also facilitates motor responses to TMS in the dominant hemisphere. Such new and often-unexpected findings may provide important insights into the organization of language.

  13. Horizontal nystagmus and multiple sclerosis using 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, P M; Fagan, A J; Meaney, J F; Colgan, N C; Meredith, S D; Driscoll, D O; Curran, K M; Bradley, D; Redmond, J

    2016-11-01

    Nystagmus in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is generally attributed to brainstem disease. Lesions in other regions may result in nystagmus. The identification of these other sites is enhanced by using 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3TMRI) due to increased signal-to-noise ratio. We sought to evaluate the distribution of structural lesions and disruption of tracts in patients with horizontal nystagmus secondary to MS using 3TMRI. Twenty-four patients (20 women, 4 men; age range 26-55 years) with horizontal nystagmus secondary to MS underwent 3TMRI brain scans; and 18 patients had diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for tractography. Nystagmus was bidirectional in 11, right-sided in 6 and left-sided in 7. We identified 194 lesions in 20 regions within the neural integrator circuit in 24 patients; 140 were within the cortex and 54 were within the brainstem. Only two patients had no lesions in the cortex, and 9 had no lesions in the brainstem. There was no relationship between side of lesion and direction of nystagmus. Thirteen of 18 (72 %) had tract disruption with fractional anisotropy (FA) values below 0.2. FA was significantly lower in bidirectional compared to unidirectional nystagmus (p = 0.006). In MS patients with horizontal nystagmus, lesions in all cortical eye fields and their descending connections were evident. Technical improvements in tractography may help identify the specific site(s) resulting in nystagmus in MS.

  14. Brain tissue segmentation using q-entropy in multiple sclerosis magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diniz, P.R.B.; Brum, D.G. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurociencias e Ciencias do Comportamento; Santos, A. C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Clinica Medica; Murta-Junior, L.O.; Araujo, D.B. de, E-mail: murta@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica

    2010-01-15

    The loss of brain volume has been used as a marker of tissue destruction and can be used as an index of the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. In the present study, we tested a new method for tissue segmentation based on pixel intensity threshold using generalized Tsallis entropy to determine a statistical segmentation parameter for each single class of brain tissue. We compared the performance of this method using a range of different q parameters and found a different optimal q parameter for white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. Our results support the conclusion that the differences in structural correlations and scale invariant similarities present in each tissue class can be accessed by generalized Tsallis entropy, obtaining the intensity limits for these tissue class separations. In order to test this method, we used it for analysis of brain magnetic resonance images of 43 patients and 10 healthy controls matched for gender and age. The values found for the entropic q index were 0.2 for cerebrospinal fluid, 0.1 for white matter and 1.5 for gray matter. With this algorithm, we could detect an annual loss of 0.98% for the patients, in agreement with literature data. Thus, we can conclude that the entropy of Tsallis adds advantages to the process of automatic target segmentation of tissue classes, which had not been demonstrated previously. (author)

  15. Veins in plaques of multiple sclerosis patients - a longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study at 7 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal-Bianco, Assunta; Auff, Eduard; Leutmezer, Fritz; Vass, Karl [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurology, Wien (Austria); Hametner, Simon [Medical University of Vienna, Center for Brain Research, Wien (Austria); Grabner, Guenther; Schernthaner, Melanie; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Wien (Austria); Reitner, Andreas; Vass, Clemens; Kircher, Karl [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Ophthalmology, Wien (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    To monitor the venous volumes in plaques of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) compared to an age-matched control group over a period of 3.5 years. Ten MS patients underwent an annual neurological examination and MRI. Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) combined with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) or FLAIR-like contrast at 7 Tesla (7 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used for manual segmentation of veins in plaques, in the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and in location-matched white matter of 9 age-matched controls. Venous volume to tissue volume ratio was assessed for each time point in order to describe the dynamics of venous volumes in MS plaques over time. MS plaques, which were newly detected during the study period, showed significantly higher venous volumes compared to the preplaque area 1 year before plaque detection and the corresponding NAWM regions. Venous volumes in established MS plaques, which were present already in the first scans, were significantly higher compared to the NAWM and controls. Our data underpin a relation of veins and plaque development in MS and reflect increased apparent venous calibers due to increased venous diameters or increased oxygen consumption in early MS plaques. (orig.)

  16. Brain tissue segmentation using q-entropy in multiple sclerosis magnetic resonance images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.R.B. Diniz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of brain volume has been used as a marker of tissue destruction and can be used as an index of the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. In the present study, we tested a new method for tissue segmentation based on pixel intensity threshold using generalized Tsallis entropy to determine a statistical segmentation parameter for each single class of brain tissue. We compared the performance of this method using a range of different q parameters and found a different optimal q parameter for white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. Our results support the conclusion that the differences in structural correlations and scale invariant similarities present in each tissue class can be accessed by generalized Tsallis entropy, obtaining the intensity limits for these tissue class separations. In order to test this method, we used it for analysis of brain magnetic resonance images of 43 patients and 10 healthy controls matched for gender and age. The values found for the entropic q index were 0.2 for cerebrospinal fluid, 0.1 for white matter and 1.5 for gray matter. With this algorithm, we could detect an annual loss of 0.98% for the patients, in agreement with literature data. Thus, we can conclude that the entropy of Tsallis adds advantages to the process of automatic target segmentation of tissue classes, which had not been demonstrated previously.

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis and Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manogaran, Praveena; Hanson, James V M; Olbert, Elisabeth D; Egger, Christine; Wicki, Carla; Gerth-Kahlert, Christina; Landau, Klara; Schippling, Sven

    2016-11-15

    Irreversible disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is largely attributed to neuronal and axonal degeneration, which, along with inflammation, is one of the major pathological hallmarks of these diseases. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging tool that has been used in MS, NMOSD, and other diseases to quantify damage to the retina, including the ganglion cells and their axons. The fact that these are the only unmyelinated axons within the central nervous system (CNS) renders the afferent visual pathway an ideal model for studying axonal and neuronal degeneration in neurodegenerative diseases. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to obtain anatomical information about the CNS and to quantify evolving pathology in MS and NMOSD, both globally and in specific regions of the visual pathway including the optic nerve, optic radiations and visual cortex. Therefore, correlations between brain or optic nerve abnormalities on MRI, and retinal pathology using OCT, may shed light on how damage to one part of the CNS can affect others. In addition, these imaging techniques can help identify important differences between MS and NMOSD such as disease-specific damage to the visual pathway, trans-synaptic degeneration, or pathological changes independent of the underlying disease process. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the role of the visual pathway using OCT and MRI in patients with MS and NMOSD. Emphasis is placed on studies that employ both MRI and OCT to investigate damage to the visual system in these diseases.

  18. Classification of multiple sclerosis patients by latent class analysis of magnetic resonance imaging characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwemmer, J N P; Berkhof, J; Castelijns, J A; Barkhof, F; Polman, C H; Uitdehaag, B M J

    2006-10-01

    Disease heterogeneity is a major issue in multiple sclerosis (MS). Classification of MS patients is usually based on clinical characteristics. More recently, a pathological classification has been presented. While clinical subtypes differ by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signature on a group level, a classification of individual MS patients based purely on MRI characteristics has not been presented so far. To investigate whether a restricted classification of MS patients can be made based on a combination of quantitative and qualitative MRI characteristics and to test whether the resulting subgroups are associated with clinical and laboratory characteristics. MRI examinations of the brain and spinal cord of 50 patients were scored for 21 quantitative and qualitative characteristics. Using latent class analysis, subgroups were identified, for whom disease characteristics and laboratory measures were compared. Latent class analysis revealed two subgroups that mainly differed in the extent of lesion confluency and MRI correlates of neuronal loss in the brain. Demographics and disease characteristics were comparable except for cognitive deficits. No correlations with laboratory measures were found. Latent class analysis offers a feasible approach for classifying subgroups of MS patients based on the presence of MRI characteristics. The reproducibility, longitudinal evolution and further clinical or prognostic relevance of the observed classification will have to be explored in a larger and independent sample of patients.

  19. Brain tissue segmentation using q-entropy in multiple sclerosis magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diniz, P.R.B.; Brum, D.G.; Santos, A. C.; Murta-Junior, L.O.; Araujo, D.B. de

    2010-01-01

    The loss of brain volume has been used as a marker of tissue destruction and can be used as an index of the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. In the present study, we tested a new method for tissue segmentation based on pixel intensity threshold using generalized Tsallis entropy to determine a statistical segmentation parameter for each single class of brain tissue. We compared the performance of this method using a range of different q parameters and found a different optimal q parameter for white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. Our results support the conclusion that the differences in structural correlations and scale invariant similarities present in each tissue class can be accessed by generalized Tsallis entropy, obtaining the intensity limits for these tissue class separations. In order to test this method, we used it for analysis of brain magnetic resonance images of 43 patients and 10 healthy controls matched for gender and age. The values found for the entropic q index were 0.2 for cerebrospinal fluid, 0.1 for white matter and 1.5 for gray matter. With this algorithm, we could detect an annual loss of 0.98% for the patients, in agreement with literature data. Thus, we can conclude that the entropy of Tsallis adds advantages to the process of automatic target segmentation of tissue classes, which had not been demonstrated previously. (author)

  20. Veins in plaques of multiple sclerosis patients - a longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study at 7 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dal-Bianco, Assunta; Auff, Eduard; Leutmezer, Fritz; Vass, Karl; Hametner, Simon; Grabner, Guenther; Schernthaner, Melanie; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Trattnig, Siegfried; Reitner, Andreas; Vass, Clemens; Kircher, Karl

    2015-01-01

    To monitor the venous volumes in plaques of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) compared to an age-matched control group over a period of 3.5 years. Ten MS patients underwent an annual neurological examination and MRI. Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) combined with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) or FLAIR-like contrast at 7 Tesla (7 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used for manual segmentation of veins in plaques, in the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and in location-matched white matter of 9 age-matched controls. Venous volume to tissue volume ratio was assessed for each time point in order to describe the dynamics of venous volumes in MS plaques over time. MS plaques, which were newly detected during the study period, showed significantly higher venous volumes compared to the preplaque area 1 year before plaque detection and the corresponding NAWM regions. Venous volumes in established MS plaques, which were present already in the first scans, were significantly higher compared to the NAWM and controls. Our data underpin a relation of veins and plaque development in MS and reflect increased apparent venous calibers due to increased venous diameters or increased oxygen consumption in early MS plaques. (orig.)

  1. Delineation of cortical pathology in multiple sclerosis using multi-surface magnetization transfer ratio imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Rudko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to evaluate the utility of measurements of cortical surface magnetization transfer ratio (csMTR on the inner, mid and outer cortical boundaries as clinically accessible biomarkers of cortical gray matter pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS. Twenty-five MS patients and 12 matched controls were recruited from the MS Clinic of the Montreal Neurological Institute. Anatomical and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR images were acquired using 3 Tesla MRI at baseline and two-year time-points. MTR maps were smoothed along meshes representing the inner, mid and outer neocortical boundaries. To evaluate csMTR reductions suggestive of sub-pial demyelination in MS patients, a mixed model analysis was carried out at both the individual vertex level and in anatomically parcellated brain regions. Our results demonstrate that focal areas of csMTR reduction are most prevalent along the outer cortical surface in the superior temporal and posterior cingulate cortices, as well as in the cuneus and precentral gyrus. Additionally, age regression analysis identified that reductions of csMTR in MS patients increase with age but appear to hit a plateau in the outer caudal anterior cingulate, as well as in the precentral and postcentral cortex. After correction for the naturally occurring gradient in cortical MTR, the difference in csMTR between the inner and outer cortex in focal areas in the brains of MS patients correlated with clinical disability. Overall, our findings support multi-surface analysis of csMTR as a sensitive marker of cortical sub-pial abnormality indicative of demyelination in MS patients.

  2. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Brainstem Volumes, Plaques, and Surface Area in the Occipital Regions of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alper, F.; Kantarci, M.; Altunkaynak, E.; Varoglu, A. O.; Karaman, A.; Oral, E.; Okur, A. [Ataturk Univ., Erzurum (Turkey). Depts. of Radiology, Histology, Neurology and Embryology, Psychiatry

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To determine brainstem volumes, number of plaques, and surface areas in the occipital lobes of patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), and to investigate whether there is any correlation between brainstem volume and the number/surface areas of plaque in the occipital lobes. Material and Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained on 14 relapsing-remitting (RR) and 13 secondary progressive (SP) MS patients and 26 female control subjects. The Cavalieri method was used by modern design stereology to measure brainstem volume. The point-counting grid was used to evaluate sclerotic plaque surface areas in the occipital lobe. The number of plaques in the imaging section was calculated. Results: Brainstem volumes for RR and SP with multiple sclerosis and control subjects were 3647 mm{sup 3} , 3515 mm{sup 3} , and 4517 mm{sup 3} , respectively. Mean number of plaques in the right-left occipital lobe was found to be 2.7-3.4 in RR-MS and 5.2-2.8 in SP-MS. Mean plaque surface area in the right-left occipital lobe was determined to be 58.52-88.24 mm{sup 2} in RR MS and 124.3-64.82 mm{sup 2} in SP MS. Brainstem volumes were significantly reduced in both groups of patients with MS compared to controls ( P <0.01). Conclusion: Magnetic-resonance-estimated volume and surface area values in multiple sclerosis may facilitate our understanding of the clinical situation of patients and provide a simple index for evaluating therapeutic efficiency.

  3. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Brainstem Volumes, Plaques, and Surface Area in the Occipital Regions of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alper, F.; Kantarci, M.; Altunkaynak, E.; Varoglu, A. O.; Karaman, A.; Oral, E.; Okur, A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine brainstem volumes, number of plaques, and surface areas in the occipital lobes of patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), and to investigate whether there is any correlation between brainstem volume and the number/surface areas of plaque in the occipital lobes. Material and Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained on 14 relapsing-remitting (RR) and 13 secondary progressive (SP) MS patients and 26 female control subjects. The Cavalieri method was used by modern design stereology to measure brainstem volume. The point-counting grid was used to evaluate sclerotic plaque surface areas in the occipital lobe. The number of plaques in the imaging section was calculated. Results: Brainstem volumes for RR and SP with multiple sclerosis and control subjects were 3647 mm 3 , 3515 mm 3 , and 4517 mm 3 , respectively. Mean number of plaques in the right-left occipital lobe was found to be 2.7-3.4 in RR-MS and 5.2-2.8 in SP-MS. Mean plaque surface area in the right-left occipital lobe was determined to be 58.52-88.24 mm 2 in RR MS and 124.3-64.82 mm 2 in SP MS. Brainstem volumes were significantly reduced in both groups of patients with MS compared to controls ( P <0.01). Conclusion: Magnetic-resonance-estimated volume and surface area values in multiple sclerosis may facilitate our understanding of the clinical situation of patients and provide a simple index for evaluating therapeutic efficiency

  4. Multiple sclerosis impairs regional functional connectivity in the cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Kasper Winther; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2013-01-01

    in the cerebellum in MS. This might be caused by a functional disruption of cortico-ponto-cerebellar and spino-cerebellar inputs, since patients with higher lesion load in the left cerebellar peduncles showed a stronger reduction in cerebellar homogeneity. In patients, two clusters in the left posterior cerebellum...

  5. [The application of high-frequency and iTBS transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of spasticity in the patients presenting with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzhova, J E; Chervyakov, A V; Poydasheva, A G; Kochergin, I A; Peresedova, A V; Zakharova, M N; Suponeva, N A; Chernikova, L A; Piradov, M A

    Spasticity is considered to be a common manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Muscle relaxants are not sufficiently effective; more than that, some of them often cause a variety of adverse reactions. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be a promising new tool for the treatment of spasticity. The objective of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of the two TMS protocols: rhythmic (high-frequency) TMS (rTMS) and stimulation with the theta bursts (iTBS) in terms of their ability to reduce spasticity in the patients presenting with multiple sclerosis. Twenty two patients with secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis were pseudo-randomized into two groups: those in the first (high-frequency) group received the treatment with the use of rTMS therapy at a frequency of 10 Hz; the patients of the second group, underwent stimulation with the theta bursts (iTBS). All the patients received 10 sessions of either stimulation applied to the primary motor area (M1) of both legs. The effectiveness of TMS protocols was evaluated before therapy and after 10 sessions of stimulation based on the Modified Ashworth scale (MAS), the expanded disability status scale (EDSS), and the Kurtzke functional scale (Kfs). In addition, the patients were interviewed before treatment, after 10 rTMS sessions, immediately after and within 2 and 12 weeks after the completion of the treatment using questionnaires for the evaluation of spasticity (SESS) , fatigue, and dysfunction of the pelvic organs (severity of defecation and urination disorders), fatigue. The study has demonstrated a significant reduction in spasticity in the patients of both groups at the end of the TMS protocol based on the MAS scale. There was no significant difference between the outcomes of the two protocols. Both had positive effect on the concomitant «non-motor» symptoms (fatigue, dysfunction of the pelvic organs). High-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation (10 sessions of rTMS therapy at a frequency

  6. Functional magnetic resonance imaging by visual stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yukiko; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori; Hashida, Masahiro

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated functional magnetic resonance images obtained in 8 healthy subjects in response to visual stimulation using a conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging system with multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging. Activation in the visual cortex was clearly demonstrated by the multi-slice experiment with a task-related change in signal intensity. In addition to the primary visual cortex, other areas were also activated by a complicated visual task. Multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging offers high temporal resolution and allows the three-dimensional analysis of brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides a useful noninvasive method of mapping brain function. (author)

  7. Magnetism and Structure in Functional Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Planes, Antoni; Saxena, Avadh

    2005-01-01

    Magnetism and Structure in Functional Materials addresses three distinct but related topics: (i) magnetoelastic materials such as magnetic martensites and magnetic shape memory alloys, (ii) the magnetocaloric effect related to magnetostructural transitions, and (iii) colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) and related magnanites. The goal is to identify common underlying principles in these classes of materials that are relevant for optimizing various functionalities. The emergence of apparently different magnetic/structural phenomena in disparate classes of materials clearly points to a need for common concepts in order to achieve a broader understanding of the interplay between magnetism and structure in this general class of new functional materials exhibiting ever more complex microstructure and function. The topic is interdisciplinary in nature and the contributors correspondingly include physicists, materials scientists and engineers. Likewise the book will appeal to scientists from all these areas.

  8. Impaired proteasome function in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashi, Edor; Agar, Jeffrey N; Strong, Michael J; Durham, Heather D

    2012-06-01

    Abstract The ubiquitin-proteasome system, important for maintaining protein quality control, is compromised in experimental models of familial ALS. The objective of this study was to determine if proteasome function is impaired in sporadic ALS. Proteasomal activities and subunit composition were evaluated in homogenates of spinal cord samples obtained at autopsy from sporadic ALS and non-neurological control cases, compared to cerebellum as a clinically spared tissue. The level of 20S α structural proteasome subunits was assessed in motor neurons by immunohistochemistry. Catalysis of peptide substrates of the three major proteasomal activities was substantially reduced in ALS thoracic spinal cord, but not in cerebellum, accompanied by alterations in the constitutive proteasome machinery. Chymotrypsin-like activity was decreased to 60% and 65% of control in ventral and dorsal spinal cord, respectively, concomitant with reduction in the β5 subunit with this catalytic activity. Caspase- and trypsin-like activities were reduced to a similar extent (46% - 68% of control). Proteasome levels, although generally maintained, appeared reduced specifically in motor neurons by immunolabelling. In conclusion, there are commonalities of findings in sporadic ALS patients and presymptomatic SOD1-G93A transgenic mice and these implicate inadequate proteasome function in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic ALS.

  9. Relationship between muscle strength parameters and functional capacity in persons with mild to moderate degree multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølhede, Tue; Vissing, Kristian; Langeskov-Christensen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maximal muscle strength has been shown to be an important predictor of functional capacity for persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Another muscle strength parameter known to be important for functional capacity in other patient groups is rate of force development (RFD) in knee...... is the better predictor of walking performance in persons with mild to moderate multiple sclerosis. RFD, although also important for functional capacity, is a less strong predictor. Maximal strength of the knee extensors, rather than the knee flexors, predicted performance in the stairclimb and 5STS tests....

  10. Sexual function in multiple sclerosis. A 5-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Stenager, E N; Jensen, K

    1996-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is known to occur in multiple sclerosis (MS). The purpose of the study is to describe the change in sexual function and symptoms in a longitudinal study. Forty-nine patients (27 females, 22 males) with definite MS were interviewed and examined with 5 years interval. The number...... of patients with sexual dysfunction increased significantly (p = 0.009) and involved females and males equally. Males usually had 1 or two symptoms of sexual dysfunction, while females frequently had 2 or more symptoms. It is concluded that the risk of sexual dysfunction increases over time. Further studies...

  11. Serial changes of magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimura, Kimiya; Sekimoto, Yoichi; Koike, Yasuo; Takahashi, Akira

    1987-01-01

    Serial changes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS) were demonstrated. Two inpatients of MS were followed-up for 8 and 5 months respectively. The first case was a 38-year-old housewife with lesions in upper cervical cord, medulla oblongata and visual nerve. The second case was a 45-year-old man with middle thracic spinal cord and brain stem lesions. Both cases were successfully induced into the remission by peroral prednisolone therapy. In the first case, in early stage of the disease, low signal (in IR method) and high signal (in T 2 -weighted SE method) intensities with enlarged lower dorsal medulla were demonstrated. The second MRI in this case specially in horizontal sections revealed round high intensity lesions (in T 2 -weighted SE) with clear margins, which appeared to push away the normal spinal cord tissue. In the third MRI, T 2 weighted SE revealed localized narrowing in C 2 and C 3 cervical cord, and even no signal lesions in IR method were shown in the central of the spinal cord. The forth and fifth MRI, however, showed almost normally recovered spinal cord and medulla oblongata. In the second case, the first MRI revealed high intensity lesions in the middle thracic spinal cord in T 2 weight SE, and moreover, the spinal cord looked very enlarged. In IR method, localized patchy low intensity lesions were seen in the enlarged spinal cord, but in this case, the MRI demonstrated that localized patchy high intensity lesions without cord swelling in SE remained long after the clinically complete recovery of the disease. (author)

  12. T2 relaxation time analysis in patients with multiple sclerosis: correlation with magnetization transfer ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, Nickolas; Papadaki, Eufrosini; Karampekios, Spyros; Maris, Thomas; Prassopoulos, Panos; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas; Spilioti, Martha

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to perform T2 relaxation time measurements in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and correlate them with magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) measurements, in order to investigate in more detail the various histopathological changes that occur in lesions and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM). A total number of 291 measurements of MTR and T2 relaxation times were performed in 13 MS patients and 10 age-matched healthy volunteers. Measurements concerned MS plaques (105), NAWM (80), and ''dirty'' white matter (DWM; 30), evenly divided between the MS patients, and normal white matter (NWM; 76) in the healthy volunteers. Biexponential T2 relaxation-time analysis was performed, and also possible linearity between MTR and mean T2 relaxation times was evaluated using linear regression analysis in all subgroups. Biexponential relaxation was more pronounced in ''black-hole'' lesions (16.6%) and homogeneous enhancing plaques (10%), whereas DWM, NAWM, and mildly hypointense lesions presented biexponential behavior with a lower frequency(6.6, 5, and 3.1%, respectively). Non-enhancing isointense lesions and normal white matter did not reveal any biexponentional behavior. Linear regression analysis between monoexponential T2 relaxation time and MTR measurements demonstrated excellent correlation for DWM(r=-0.78, p<0.0001), very good correlation for black-hole lesions(r=-0.71, p=0.002), good correlation for isointense lesions(r=-0.60, p=0.005), moderate correlation for mildly hypointense lesions(r=-0.34, p=0.007), and non-significant correlation for homogeneous enhancing plaques, NAWM, and NWM. Biexponential T2 relaxation-time behavior is seen in only very few lesions (mainly on plaques with high degree of demyelination and axonal loss). A strong correlation between MTR and monoexponential T2 values was found in regions where either inflammation or demyelination predominates; however, when both pathological conditions coexist, this linear

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging features of the spinal cord in pediatric multiple sclerosis: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhey, Leonard H. [Hospital for Sick Children, Neuroscience and Mental Health, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Branson, Helen M.; Shroff, Manohar [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Neuroradiology), Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Makhija, Monica [Hospital for Sick Children, Neuroscience and Mental Health, Toronto, ON (Canada); Banwell, Brenda [Hospital for Sick Children, Neuroscience and Mental Health, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Pediatrics (Neurology), Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    Spinal cord lesions in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) are thought to contribute to disability. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance and clinical correlates of spinal cord lesions in children with MS have not been reported. T1-weighted pre- and post-gadolinium and T2-weighted TSE/FSE spine MR images of 36 children (age, 14.3 {+-} 3.3) with relapsing-remitting MS (annualized relapse rate, 0.7; disease duration, 7.5 {+-} 3.3 years) were analyzed for total lesion count, lesion location and length, intramedullary extent, and gadolinium enhancement. Clinical, demographic, laboratory, and MRI data were correlated. Lesions preferentially involved the cervical region, were predominantly focal, and involved only a portion of the transverse cord diameter. However, ten of 36 patients demonstrated longitudinally extensive lesions. Children with the highest clinical relapse rate also tended to have more spinal cord lesions and were more likely to accrue new lesions on serial spinal scans. These preliminary data suggest that MS lesions of the spinal cord in children are radiographically similar to that of adult-onset MS - supporting a common biology of pediatric- and adult-onset disease. However, children with relapsing-remitting MS can also develop longitudinally extensive lesions, suggesting that such lesions may be less specific for diseases such as neuromyelitis optica in pediatric patients. All patients recovered well from spinal cord attacks, and the presence of spinal cord lesions in the first few years of disease did not correlate with physical disability. Measures of spinal cord atrophy and longer periods of observation are required to determine the impact of spinal cord involvement in pediatric-onset MS. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging features of the spinal cord in pediatric multiple sclerosis: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhey, Leonard H.; Branson, Helen M.; Shroff, Manohar; Makhija, Monica; Banwell, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord lesions in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) are thought to contribute to disability. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance and clinical correlates of spinal cord lesions in children with MS have not been reported. T1-weighted pre- and post-gadolinium and T2-weighted TSE/FSE spine MR images of 36 children (age, 14.3 ± 3.3) with relapsing-remitting MS (annualized relapse rate, 0.7; disease duration, 7.5 ± 3.3 years) were analyzed for total lesion count, lesion location and length, intramedullary extent, and gadolinium enhancement. Clinical, demographic, laboratory, and MRI data were correlated. Lesions preferentially involved the cervical region, were predominantly focal, and involved only a portion of the transverse cord diameter. However, ten of 36 patients demonstrated longitudinally extensive lesions. Children with the highest clinical relapse rate also tended to have more spinal cord lesions and were more likely to accrue new lesions on serial spinal scans. These preliminary data suggest that MS lesions of the spinal cord in children are radiographically similar to that of adult-onset MS - supporting a common biology of pediatric- and adult-onset disease. However, children with relapsing-remitting MS can also develop longitudinally extensive lesions, suggesting that such lesions may be less specific for diseases such as neuromyelitis optica in pediatric patients. All patients recovered well from spinal cord attacks, and the presence of spinal cord lesions in the first few years of disease did not correlate with physical disability. Measures of spinal cord atrophy and longer periods of observation are required to determine the impact of spinal cord involvement in pediatric-onset MS. (orig.)

  15. Fetal and Postnatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Unilateral Cystic Renal Dysplasia in a Neonate with Tuberous Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Tyagi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis (TS is an autosomal dominant condition associated with mutations in the TSC1 and/or TSC2 genes. Clinical manifestations are multisystemic, and they often include lesions in the brain, skin, heart, kidneys, and bones. TSC2 gene mutations can be seen concomitantly with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene mutations. We present a case of a fetus with prenatal diagnosis of TS that had unique asymmetrical distribution of renal cystic disease. We describe the extensive work up with both fetal and neonatal magnetic resonance imaging with correlating images of the unilateral polycystic renal disease in addition to typical TS brain findings.

  16. A tumefactive multiple sclerosis lesion in the brain: An uncommon site with atypical magnetic resonance image findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Kim, Hyun Sook; Kim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Eun Kyung; Choi, Yun Sun [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Tumefactive multiple sclerosis (MS) is a rare type of demyelinating disease. Typical magnetic resonance (MR) image findings show incomplete ring enhancement with a mild mass effect. This lesion is otherwise indistinguishable from other mass-like lesions in the brain. Knowledge of the MR imaging findings for tumefactive MS is thus helpful for correct diagnosis and appropriate therapy. In this report we describe the MR image findings for pathology-confirmed tumefactive MS in an uncommon location, alongside a discussion of its aggressive features.

  17. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with extension of the central canal of the spinal cord according to magnetic resonance imaging data

    OpenAIRE

    E. G. Mendelevich; G. R. Mukhamedzhanova; E. I. Bogdanov

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes an atypical case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) concurrent with extension of the central canal – hydromyelia.Diagnostic difficulty is due to the presence of symptoms which are atypical for ALS, such as early age of onset, slow progression with long-term involvement of one leg, as well as extension of the central canal of the spinal cord at the level of TIII-IX bodies, as evidenced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The paper presents a clinical case, a review of ...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord lesions in 22 multiple sclerosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroshi; Funakawa, Itaru; Hara, Kenji; Yasuda, Takeshi; Terao, Akira

    1994-01-01

    We reviewed MRI findings in 22 patients (37 cases) with clinically diagnosed multiple sclerosis (MS) with spinal cord lesions. The spinal cord lesions were detected in 17 (46%) of these 37 cases on MRI. The cervical cord lesions were more detectable than other spinal cord lesions. At the thoracic level, the upper lesions were more detectable than the lower ones. In this study, no correlation was found between the disease duration, the rate of functional disturbance and the detectable rate of spinal cord lesions. The characteristic findings of the lesions were swelling and the enhancement effect of Gd-DTPA in the patient group with a disease duration of less than three years, and atrophic change in the patient group with a disease duration of greater than seven years. The period of the enhancement effect of Gd-DTPA varied in each case, and it may reflect the clinical course. Syrinx-like lesions were found in four cases. In one of them, atrophic change was found in the same region six months after the follow up study. Although the precise reason for the syrinx-like lesion was unclear, a relationship between syrinx-like lesion and atrophy of the spinal cord was suggested. The MRI findings of the spinal cord lesions in MS varied in each case and in each stage of the disease. (author)

  19. Functional and structural balances of homologous sensorimotor regions in multiple sclerosis fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cogliati Dezza, I; Zito, G; Tomasevic, L

    2015-01-01

    regions-known to be crucial for sensorimotor networks effectiveness-decrease with MS fatigue increase. Functional connectivity measures at rest and during a simple motor task (weak handgrip of either the right or left hand) were derived from primary sensorimotor areas electroencephalographic recordings......Fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS) is a highly disabling symptom. Among the central mechanisms behind it, an involvement of sensorimotor networks is clearly evident from structural and functional studies. We aimed at assessing whether functional/structural balances of homologous sensorimotor...... in 27 mildly disabled MS patients. Structural MRI-derived inter-hemispheric asymmetries included the cortical thickness of Rolandic regions and the volume of thalami. Fatigue symptoms increased together with the functional inter-hemispheric imbalance of sensorimotor homologous areas activities at rest...

  20. Magnetic resonance in the diagnostic imaging study of mesial temporal sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, E.; Sanchez, J. C.; Rodriguez, I.; Altuzarra, A.; Machado, F.; Aguilar, D.

    2001-01-01

    Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) consists of hippocampal atrophy and gliosis and is the most common cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. The objective of the authors was to establish a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for its diagnosis. A prospective study was carried out in 72 patients with drug resistant complex partial seizures (42 women and 30 men ranging in age from 6 to 66 year: mean: 30 years). Using a 1.5-Tesla magnet, paracoronal sections were made in hippocampi for T1-weighted inversion-recovery images and volume measurements, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) and T2 relaxometry. A control group of 30 health volunteers was included in the study. MTS was considered to be indicated by the presence of atrophy and hyperintensity in hippocampi on T2-weighted images. There were no differences among the hippocampi of the healthy individuals. The confidence intervals (mean± 1.96 SD) were 4169 mm''3-5911 mm''3 for volume of right side, 4097 mm''3-5940 mm''3 for volume of left side and 98-113 ms for T2 relaxation time. MTS was detected in 40 patients (55.5%): 23 cases involving the left side, 13 involving the right and 4 cases of bilateral asymmetric involvement. The 95% confidence intervals for the diagnostic validity of the results (sensitivity/specificity) were (88.8%-97.2%)/(87.6%-96.4%) for T1 volumetry, (88.8%-97.2%)(95.7%-100.3%) for FLAIR and (85.4%-96.6%)/(85.4%-96.6%) for T2 relaxometry. In 5 cases of MTS, astrophy of other extra hippocampal structures was also observed, and MTS was associated with an extra hippocampal lesion (dual pathology), especially neurona migration disorders, in 8 patients. Seventeen patients (23.5%) presented lesions without MTS (tumors, cortical dysplasias and heterotopias) and there was no MRI evidence of anomalies in 15 (21%). Twenty-five patients underwent surgical treatment: 20 with MTS (19 diagnosed according to MRI and one in whom there had been no abnormal findings), 4 with tumors and 1 with a ballooned cell

  1. Magnetic fields and density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salsbury Jr., Freddie [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-02-01

    A major focus of this dissertation is the development of functionals for the magnetic susceptibility and the chemical shielding within the context of magnetic field density functional theory (BDFT). These functionals depend on the electron density in the absence of the field, which is unlike any other treatment of these responses. There have been several advances made within this theory. The first of which is the development of local density functionals for chemical shieldings and magnetic susceptibilities. There are the first such functionals ever proposed. These parameters have been studied by constructing functionals for the current density and then using the Biot-Savart equations to obtain the responses. In order to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the local functionals, they were tested numerically on some small molecules.

  2. Magnetic fields and density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salsbury, Freddie Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A major focus of this dissertation is the development of functionals for the magnetic susceptibility and the chemical shielding within the context of magnetic field density functional theory (BDFT). These functionals depend on the electron density in the absence of the field, which is unlike any other treatment of these responses. There have been several advances made within this theory. The first of which is the development of local density functionals for chemical shieldings and magnetic susceptibilities. There are the first such functionals ever proposed. These parameters have been studied by constructing functionals for the current density and then using the Biot-Savart equations to obtain the responses. In order to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the local functionals, they were tested numerically on some small molecules

  3. Comparing methods to combine functional loss and mortality in clinical trials for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Eijk RPA

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ruben PA van Eijk,1 Marinus JC Eijkemans,2 Dimitris Rizopoulos,3 Leonard H van den Berg,4,* Stavros Nikolakopoulos5,* 1Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 2Department of Biostatistics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 3Department of Biostatistics, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 4Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 5Department of Biostatistics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS clinical trials based on single end points only partially capture the full treatment effect when both function and mortality are affected, and may falsely dismiss efficacious drugs as futile. We aimed to investigate the statistical properties of several strategies for the simultaneous analysis of function and mortality in ALS clinical trials. Methods: Based on the Pooled Resource Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials (PRO-ACT database, we simulated longitudinal patterns of functional decline, defined by the revised amyotrophic lateral sclerosis functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R and conditional survival time. Different treatment scenarios with varying effect sizes were simulated with follow-up ranging from 12 to 18 months. We considered the following analytical strategies: 1 Cox model; 2 linear mixed effects (LME model; 3 omnibus test based on Cox and LME models; 4 composite time-to-6-point decrease or death; 5 combined assessment of function and survival (CAFS; and 6 test based on joint modeling framework. For each analytical strategy, we calculated the empirical power and sample size. Results: Both Cox and LME models have increased false-negative rates when treatment exclusively affects either function or survival. The joint model has superior power compared to other strategies. The composite end point

  4. Physiologic abnormalities of cardiac function in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follansbee, W.P.; Curtiss, E.I.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.; Steen, V.D.; Uretsky, B.F.; Owens, G.R.; Rodnan, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    To investigate cardiopulmonary function in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma, we studied 26 patients with maximal exercise and redistribution thallium scans, rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography, pulmonary-function testing, and chest roentgenography. Although only 6 patients had clinical evidence of cardiac involvement, 20 had abnormal thallium scans, including 10 with reversible exercise-induced defects and 18 with fixed defects (8 had both). Seven of the 10 patients who had exercise-induced defects and underwent cardiac catheterization had normal coronary angiograms. Mean resting left ventricular ejection fraction and mean resting right ventricular ejection fraction were lower in patients with post-exercise left ventricular thallium defect scores above the median (59 +/- 13 per cent vs. 69 +/- 6 per cent, and 36 +/- 12 per cent vs. 47 +/- 7 per cent, respectively). The authors conclude that in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of myocardial perfusion are common and appear to be due to a disturbance of the myocardial microcirculation. Both right and left ventricular dysfunction appear to be related to this circulatory disturbance, suggesting ischemically mediated injury

  5. The Effects of Massage Therapy on Multiple Sclerosis Patients’ Quality of Life and Leg Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Schroeder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Massage therapy is a noninvasive treatment that many individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS use to supplement their conventional treatment. Objective. We hypothesize that massage therapy will improve the leg function and overall quality of life (QoL of MS patients. Design. A two-period (rest, massage crossover design was used. Twenty-four individuals with MS ranging from 3.0 to 7.0 on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS received Swedish massage treatments for four weeks. Exercise capacity and leg function as well as QoL were assessed using the Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT and the Hamburg Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis (HAQUAMS instrument, respectively. Assessments were measured before and after a massage period and a rest period where no massages were employed. Results. The results displayed no significant changes in 6MWT distances or HAQUAMS scores. However, the participants perceived improvement in overall health as expressed in written comments. Conclusions. Massage is a safe, noninvasive treatment that may assist MS patients in managing the stress of their symptoms. Future studies with larger sample size and cortisol measures are warranted.

  6. Sclerotic bone lesions at abdominal magnetic resonance imaging in children with tuberous sclerosis complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boronat, Susana; Barber, Ignasi; Pargaonkar, Vivek; Chang, Joshua; Thiele, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Sclerotic bone lesions are often seen on chest CT in adults with tuberous sclerosis complex. To characterize bone lesions at abdominal MRI in children with tuberous sclerosis complex. This retrospective review included 70 children with tuberous sclerosis complex who had undergone abdominal MRI for renal imaging. An additional longitudinal study was performed in 50 children who had had two or more MRI scans. Abdominal CT (eight children) and radiographs (three children) were reviewed and compared with MRI. A total of 173 sclerotic bone lesions were detected in 51/70 children (73%; 95% confidence interval: 0.61-0.82) chiefly affecting vertebral pedicles. New lesions appeared in 20 children and growth of previous sclerotic bone lesions was documented in 14 children. Sclerotic bone lesions were more frequent in girls and in children with more extensive renal involvement. Sclerotic bone lesions are commonly detected by abdominal MRI in children with tuberous sclerosis complex. They usually affect posterior vertebral elements and their number and size increase with age. As current recommendations for tuberous sclerosis complex surveillance include renal MR performed in childhood, recognition of these lesions is useful. (orig.)

  7. Sclerotic bone lesions at abdominal magnetic resonance imaging in children with tuberous sclerosis complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boronat, Susana [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Boston, MA (United States); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Vall d' Hebron Hospital, Barcelona (Spain); Barber, Ignasi [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Vall d' Hebron Hospital, Barcelona (Spain); Pargaonkar, Vivek [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Chang, Joshua; Thiele, Elizabeth A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Sclerotic bone lesions are often seen on chest CT in adults with tuberous sclerosis complex. To characterize bone lesions at abdominal MRI in children with tuberous sclerosis complex. This retrospective review included 70 children with tuberous sclerosis complex who had undergone abdominal MRI for renal imaging. An additional longitudinal study was performed in 50 children who had had two or more MRI scans. Abdominal CT (eight children) and radiographs (three children) were reviewed and compared with MRI. A total of 173 sclerotic bone lesions were detected in 51/70 children (73%; 95% confidence interval: 0.61-0.82) chiefly affecting vertebral pedicles. New lesions appeared in 20 children and growth of previous sclerotic bone lesions was documented in 14 children. Sclerotic bone lesions were more frequent in girls and in children with more extensive renal involvement. Sclerotic bone lesions are commonly detected by abdominal MRI in children with tuberous sclerosis complex. They usually affect posterior vertebral elements and their number and size increase with age. As current recommendations for tuberous sclerosis complex surveillance include renal MR performed in childhood, recognition of these lesions is useful. (orig.)

  8. Lung structure and function relation in systemic sclerosis: Application of lung densitometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninaber, Maarten K., E-mail: m.k.ninaber@lumc.nl [Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Stolk, Jan; Smit, Jasper; Le Roy, Ernest J. [Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Kroft, Lucia J.M. [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Els Bakker, M. [Division of Image Processing, Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Vries Bouwstra, Jeska K. de; Schouffoer, Anne A. [Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Staring, Marius; Stoel, Berend C. [Division of Image Processing, Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A quantitative CT parameter of lung parenchyma in systemic sclerosis is presented. • We examine the optimal percentage threshold for the percentile density. • The 85th percentile density threshold correlated significantly with lung function. • A lung structure–function relation is confirmed. • We report applicability of Perc85 in progression mapping of interstitial lung disease. - Abstract: Introduction: Interstitial lung disease occurs frequently in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Quantitative computed tomography (CT) densitometry using the percentile density method may provide a sensitive assessment of lung structure for monitoring parenchymal damage. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the optimal percentile density score in SSc by quantitative CT densitometry, against pulmonary function. Material and methods: We investigated 41 SSc patients by chest CT scan, spirometry and gas transfer tests. Lung volumes and the nth percentile density (between 1 and 99%) of the entire lungs were calculated from CT histograms. The nth percentile density is defined as the threshold value of densities expressed in Hounsfield units. A prerequisite for an optimal percentage was its correlation with baseline DLCO %predicted. Two patients showed distinct changes in lung function 2 years after baseline. We obtained CT scans from these patients and performed progression analysis. Results: Regression analysis for the relation between DLCO %predicted and the nth percentile density was optimal at 85% (Perc85). There was significant agreement between Perc85 and DLCO %predicted (R = −0.49, P = 0.001) and FVC %predicted (R = −0.64, P < 0.001). Two patients showed a marked change in Perc85 over a 2 year period, but the localization of change differed clearly. Conclusions: We identified Perc85 as optimal lung density parameter, which correlated significantly with DLCO and FVC, confirming a lung parenchymal structure–function relation in SSc. This provides

  9. Lung structure and function relation in systemic sclerosis: Application of lung densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninaber, Maarten K.; Stolk, Jan; Smit, Jasper; Le Roy, Ernest J.; Kroft, Lucia J.M.; Els Bakker, M.; Vries Bouwstra, Jeska K. de; Schouffoer, Anne A.; Staring, Marius; Stoel, Berend C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A quantitative CT parameter of lung parenchyma in systemic sclerosis is presented. • We examine the optimal percentage threshold for the percentile density. • The 85th percentile density threshold correlated significantly with lung function. • A lung structure–function relation is confirmed. • We report applicability of Perc85 in progression mapping of interstitial lung disease. - Abstract: Introduction: Interstitial lung disease occurs frequently in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Quantitative computed tomography (CT) densitometry using the percentile density method may provide a sensitive assessment of lung structure for monitoring parenchymal damage. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the optimal percentile density score in SSc by quantitative CT densitometry, against pulmonary function. Material and methods: We investigated 41 SSc patients by chest CT scan, spirometry and gas transfer tests. Lung volumes and the nth percentile density (between 1 and 99%) of the entire lungs were calculated from CT histograms. The nth percentile density is defined as the threshold value of densities expressed in Hounsfield units. A prerequisite for an optimal percentage was its correlation with baseline DLCO %predicted. Two patients showed distinct changes in lung function 2 years after baseline. We obtained CT scans from these patients and performed progression analysis. Results: Regression analysis for the relation between DLCO %predicted and the nth percentile density was optimal at 85% (Perc85). There was significant agreement between Perc85 and DLCO %predicted (R = −0.49, P = 0.001) and FVC %predicted (R = −0.64, P < 0.001). Two patients showed a marked change in Perc85 over a 2 year period, but the localization of change differed clearly. Conclusions: We identified Perc85 as optimal lung density parameter, which correlated significantly with DLCO and FVC, confirming a lung parenchymal structure–function relation in SSc. This provides

  10. Aerobic capacity explains physical functioning and participation in patients with multiple sclerosis-related fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosalie Driehuis, Emma; van den Akker, Lizanne Eva; de Groot, Vincent; Beckerman, Heleen

    2018-02-13

    To investigate whether aerobic capacity explains the level of self-reported physical activity, physical functioning, and participation and autonomy in daily living in persons with multiple sclerosis-related fatigue. A cross-sectional study. Sixty-two participants with multiple sclerosis-related fatigue. Aerobic capacity was measured with a leg ergometer and was expressed as maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, in ml/kg/min). Physical activity was measured with the Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities (PASIPD), physical functioning with the Short Form 36 - physical functioning (SF36-pf), and participation and autonomy in daily living with the Impact on Participation and Autonomy questionnaire (IPA). Multiple regression analyses were performed, adjusted for potential confounders (gender, age, body mass index, educational level, and employment status). Mean maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was 23.9 ml/kg/min (standard deviation (SD) 6.3 ml/kg/min). There was no significant relationship between VO2max and physical activity (PASIPD): β = 0.320, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = -0.109 to 0.749, R2 = 10.8%. Higher VO2max correlated with better physical functioning (SF36-pf): β = 1.527, 95% CI = 0.820-2.234, R2 = 25.9%, and was significantly related to IPA domains "autonomy indoors" (β = -0.043, 95% CI = -0.067 to -0.020, R2 = 20.6%), "autonomy outdoors" (β = -0.037, 95% CI = -0.062 to -0.012, R2 = 18.2%) and "social life and relationships" (β=-0.033, 95% CI = -0.060 to -0.007, R2 = 21.3%). Maximum aerobic capacity was severely reduced in persons with multiple sclerosis-related fatigue. This partly explains the limited physical functioning and restrictions in participation and autonomy indoors, outdoors and in social life and relationships in these persons.

  11. Aerobic capacity explains physical functioning and participation in patients with multiple sclerosis-related fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Rosalie Driehuis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate whether aerobic capacity explains the level of self-reported physical activity, physical functioning, and participation and autonomy in daily living in persons with multiple sclerosis-related fatigue. Design: A cross-sectional study. Patients: Sixty-two participants with multiple sclerosis-related fatigue. Methods: Aerobic capacity was measured with a leg ergometer and was expressed as maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, in ml/kg/min. Physical activity was measured with the Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities (PASIPD, physical functioning with the Short Form 36 – physical functioning (SF36-pf, and participation and autonomy in daily living with the Impact on Participation and Autonomy questionnaire (IPA. Multiple regression analyses were performed, adjusted for potential confounders (gender, age, body mass index, educational level, and employment status. Results: Mean maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max was 23.9 ml/kg/min (standard deviation (SD 6.3 ml/kg/min. There was no significant relationship between VO2max and physical activity (PASIPD: β = 0.320, 95% confidence interval (95% CI = –0.109 to 0.749, R2 = 10.8%. Higher VO2max correlated with better physical functioning (SF36-pf: β = 1.527, 95% CI = 0.820–2.234, R2 = 25.9%, and was significantly related to IPA domains “autonomy indoors” (β = –0.043, 95% CI = –0.067 to –0.020, R2 = 20.6%, “autonomy outdoors” (β = –0.037, 95% CI = –0.062 to –0.012, R2 = 18.2% and “social life and relationships” (β=–0.033, 95% CI = –0.060 to –0.007, R2 = 21.3%. Conclusion: Maximum aerobic capacity was severely reduced in persons with multiple sclerosis-related fatigue. This partly explains the limited physical functioning and restrictions in participation and autonomy indoors, outdoors and in social life and relationships in these persons.

  12. HLA-DRB*1501 associations with magnetic resonance imaging measures of grey matter pathology in multiple sclerosis.

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    Yaldizli, Özgür; Sethi, Varun; Pardini, Matteo; Tur, Carmen; Mok, Kin Y; Muhlert, Nils; Liu, Zheng; Samson, Rebecca S; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Yousry, Tarek A; Houlden, Henry; Hardy, John; Miller, David H; Chard, Declan T

    2016-05-01

    The HLA-DRB*1501 haplotype influences the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), but it is not known how it affects grey matter pathology. To assess HLA-DRB(*)1501 effects on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cortical grey matter pathology. Whole and lesional cortical grey matter volumes, lesional and normal-appearing grey matter magnetization transfer ratio were measured in 85 people with MS and 36 healthy control subjects. HLA-DRB(*)1501 haplotype was determined by genotyping (rs3135388). No significant differences were observed in MRI measures between the HLA-DRB(*)1501 subgroups. The HLA-DRB(*)1501 haplotype is not strongly associated with MRI-visible grey matter pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Pulmonary function tests as outcomes for systemic sclerosis interstitial lung disease.

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    Caron, Melissa; Hoa, Sabrina; Hudson, Marie; Schwartzman, Kevin; Steele, Russell

    2018-06-30

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in systemic sclerosis (SSc). We performed a systematic review to characterise the use and validation of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) as surrogate markers for systemic sclerosis-associated interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD) progression.Five electronic databases were searched to identify all relevant studies. Included studies either used at least one PFT measure as a longitudinal outcome for SSc-ILD progression ( i.e. outcome studies) and/or reported at least one classical measure of validity for the PFTs in SSc-ILD ( i.e. validation studies).This systematic review included 169 outcome studies and 50 validation studies. Diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide ( D LCO ) was cumulatively the most commonly used outcome until 2010 when it was surpassed by forced vital capacity (FVC). FVC (% predicted) was the primary endpoint in 70.4% of studies, compared to 11.3% for % predicted D LCO Only five studies specifically aimed to validate the PFTs: two concluded that D LCO was the best measure of SSc-ILD extent, while the others did not favour any PFT. These studies also showed respectable validity measures for total lung capacity (TLC).Despite the current preference for FVC, available evidence suggests that D LCO and TLC should not yet be discounted as potential surrogate markers for SSc-ILD progression. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  14. Inefficient skeletal muscle oxidative function flanks impaired motor neuron recruitment in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranconi, F; Ferri, A; Corna, G; Bonazzi, R; Lunetta, C; Silani, V; Riva, N; Rigamonti, A; Maggiani, A; Ferrarese, C; Tremolizzo, L

    2017-06-07

    This study aimed to evaluate muscle oxidative function during exercise in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients (pALS) with non-invasive methods in order to assess if determinants of reduced exercise tolerance might match ALS clinical heterogeneity. 17 pALS, who were followed for 4 months, were compared with 13 healthy controls (CTRL). Exercise tolerance was assessed by an incremental exercise test on cycle ergometer measuring peak O 2 uptake ([Formula: see text]O 2peak ), vastus lateralis oxidative function by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and breathing pattern ([Formula: see text]E peak ). pALS displayed: (1) 44% lower [Formula: see text]O 2peak vs. CTRL (p motor units recruitment, is a major determinant of pALS clinical heterogeneity and working capacity exercise tolerance. CPET and NIRS are useful tools for detecting early stages of oxidative deficiency in skeletal muscles, disclosing individual impairments in the O 2 transport and utilization chain.

  15. [Correlation between demyelinating lesions and executive function decline in a sample of Mexican patients with multiple sclerosis].

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    Aldrete Cortez, V R; Duriez-Sotelo, E; Carrillo-Mora, P; Pérez-Zuno, J A

    2013-09-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is characterised by several neurological symptoms including cognitive impairment, which has recently been the subject of considerable study. At present, evidence pointing to a correlation between lesion characteristics and specific cognitive impairment is not conclusive. To investigate the presence of a correlation between the characteristics of demyelinating lesions and performance of basic executive functions in a sample of MS patients. We included 21 adult patients with scores of 0 to 5 on the Kurtzke scale and no exacerbations of the disease in at least 3 months prior to the evaluation date. They completed the Stroop test and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). The location of the lesions was determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed by a blinded expert in neuroimaging. Demyelinating lesions were more frequently located in the frontal and occipital lobes. The Stroop test showed that as cognitive demand increased on each of the sections in the test, reaction time and number of errors increased. On the WCST, 33.33% of patients registered as having moderate cognitive impairment. No correlation could be found between demyelinating lesion characteristics (location, size, and number) and patients' scores on the tests. Explanations of the causes of cognitive impairment in MS should examine a variety of biological, psychological, and social factors instead of focusing solely on demyelinating lesions. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. System xC- is a mediator of microglial function and its deletion slows symptoms in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesci, Pinar; Zaïdi, Sakina; Lobsiger, Christian S; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Escartin, Carole; Seilhean, Danielle; Sato, Hideyo; Mallat, Michel; Boillée, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease and evidence from mice expressing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-causing SOD1 mutations suggest that neurodegeneration is a non-cell autonomous process where microglial cells influence disease progression. However, microglial-derived neurotoxic factors still remain largely unidentified in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. With excitotoxicity being a major mechanism proposed to cause motor neuron death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, our hypothesis was that excessive glutamate release by activated microglia through their system [Formula: see text] (a cystine/glutamate antiporter with the specific subunit xCT/Slc7a11) could contribute to neurodegeneration. Here we show that xCT expression is enriched in microglia compared to total mouse spinal cord and absent from motor neurons. Activated microglia induced xCT expression and during disease, xCT levels were increased in both spinal cord and isolated microglia from mutant SOD1 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mice. Expression of xCT was also detectable in spinal cord post-mortem tissues of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and correlated with increased inflammation. Genetic deletion of xCT in mice demonstrated that activated microglia released glutamate mainly through system [Formula: see text]. Interestingly, xCT deletion also led to decreased production of specific microglial pro-inflammatory/neurotoxic factors including nitric oxide, TNFa and IL6, whereas expression of anti-inflammatory/neuroprotective markers such as Ym1/Chil3 were increased, indicating that xCT regulates microglial functions. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mice, xCT deletion surprisingly led to earlier symptom onset but, importantly, this was followed by a significantly slowed progressive disease phase, which resulted in more surviving motor neurons. These results are consistent with a deleterious contribution of microglial-derived glutamate during symptomatic

  17. "THE RELATION OF HYPERHOMOCYSTEINEMIA TO COGNITIVE FUNCTION AND BRAIN ATROPHY IN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghaffarpour

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment may be a common even at the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS. In this case-control study, we tried to find out the probable relationship between homocysteine levels and cerebral atrophy or cognitive impairment in patients with multiple sclerosis. One hundred fifty six patients who had MS according to McDonald diagnostic criteria were included in this study. Patients’ age, gender, and educational level, MS duration and clinical type, disability, cognitive function state based on minimental state examination (MMSE, presence of hyperhomocysteinemia, and brain atrophy were evaluated. There was no statistically significant relationship between hyperhomocysteinemia and cognitive status. Total homocysteine levels had a significant correlation with MMSE score only in those patients with elementary level of education. Also total homocysteine levels and overall cerebral atrophy did not indicate significant relationship according to those independent variables mentioned above except in the patients with EDSS less than 6. When intercaudate ratio > 0.10 was applied as a criterion for cerebral atrophy, we found that hyperhomocysteinemia related significantly to intercaudate ratio > 0.10 in females, aged between 21 and 30 years, MS duration ≤ 5 years, primary progressive MS and relapsing-remitting MS clinical types, EDSS ≤ 3 and elementary level of education. We suggest applying MMSE only for the first step of cognitive function survey. In the next steps, much more exact test must be used (e.g. MSNQ. Also we can not suggest measuring plasma homocysteine level as criterion for monitoring the cognitive function in patients with MS.

  18. Abnormal functional connectivity and cortical integrity influence dominant hand motor disability in multiple sclerosis: a multimodal analysis.

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    Zhong, Jidan; Nantes, Julia C; Holmes, Scott A; Gallant, Serge; Narayanan, Sridar; Koski, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    Functional reorganization and structural damage occur in the brains of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) throughout the disease course. However, the relationship between resting-state functional connectivity (FC) reorganization in the sensorimotor network and motor disability in MS is not well understood. This study used resting-state fMRI, T1-weighted and T2-weighted, and magnetization transfer (MT) imaging to investigate the relationship between abnormal FC in the sensorimotor network and upper limb motor disability in people with MS, as well as the impact of disease-related structural abnormalities within this network. Specifically, the differences in FC of the left hemisphere hand motor region between MS participants with preserved (n = 17) and impaired (n = 26) right hand function, compared with healthy controls (n = 20) was investigated. Differences in brain atrophy and MT ratio measured at the global and regional levels were also investigated between the three groups. Motor preserved MS participants had stronger FC in structurally intact visual information processing regions relative to motor impaired MS participants. Motor impaired MS participants showed weaker FC in the sensorimotor and somatosensory association cortices and more severe structural damage throughout the brain compared with the other groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that regional MTR predicted motor disability beyond the impact of global atrophy whereas regional grey matter volume did not. More importantly, as the first multimodal analysis combining resting-state fMRI, T1-weighted, T2-weighted and MTR images in MS, we demonstrate how a combination of structural and functional changes may contribute to motor impairment or preservation in MS. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4262-4275, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Altered cortical hubs in functional brain networks in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Ma, Xujing; Zhang, Jiuquan; Zhang, Youxue; Chen, Heng; Li, Rong; Wang, Jian; Chen, Huafu

    2015-11-01

    Cortical hubs are highly connected nodes in functional brain networks that play vital roles in the efficient transfer of information across brain regions. Although altered functional connectivity has been found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the changing pattern in functional network hubs in ALS remains unknown. In this study, we applied a voxel-wise method to investigate the changing pattern of cortical hubs in ALS. Through resting-state fMRI, we constructed whole-brain voxel-wise functional networks by measuring the temporal correlations of each pair of brain voxels and identified hubs using the graph theory method. Specifically, a functional connectivity strength (FCS) map was derived from the data on 20 patients with ALS and 20 healthy controls. The brain regions with high FCS values were regarded as functional network hubs. Functional hubs were found mainly in the bilateral precuneus, parietal cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, and in several visual regions and temporal areas in both groups. Within the hub regions, the ALS patients exhibited higher FCS in the prefrontal cortex compared with the healthy controls. The FCS value in the significantly abnormal hub regions was correlated with clinical variables. Results indicated the presence of altered cortical hubs in the ALS patients and could therefore shed light on the pathophysiology mechanisms underlying ALS.

  20. Mnesic performance and executive functions in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Introzzi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The Episodic Memory (EM and the Executive Functions (EF are cognitive areas that are affected in patients with diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis (MS. Nowadays there exists scarce works destined to explore the infl uence of the EF on measures of mnesic performance in MS. For this reason, we analyze the effect of the EF on the performance in a set of memory measures. We worked with a clinical group (n=36 and with a control group (n=36 compared by age and educational level. The results show that the clinical group obtained significantly low average values in all the mnesic indexes (with exception of recognition and in all the executive measures. All the executive indexes showed significant associations with some of the indexes of mnesic performance. These findings suggest that the problems in the episodic memory in EM patients could be analyzed as the manifestation of a global disorder that could be similar to the one that involves the EF.

  1. Functional Connectivity Changes in Resting-State EEG as Potential Biomarker for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Parameswaran Mahadeva; Egan, Catriona; Pinto-Grau, Marta; Burke, Tom; Elamin, Marwa; Nasseroleslami, Bahman; Pender, Niall; Lalor, Edmund C; Hardiman, Orla

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is heterogeneous and overlaps with frontotemporal dementia. Spectral EEG can predict damage in structural and functional networks in frontotemporal dementia but has never been applied to ALS. 18 incident ALS patients with normal cognition and 17 age matched controls underwent 128 channel EEG and neuropsychology assessment. The EEG data was analyzed using FieldTrip software in MATLAB to calculate simple connectivity measures and scalp network measures. sLORETA was used in nodal analysis for source localization and same methods were applied as above to calculate nodal network measures. Graph theory measures were used to assess network integrity. Cross spectral density in alpha band was higher in patients. In ALS patients, increased degree values of the network nodes was noted in the central and frontal regions in the theta band across seven of the different connectivity maps (pEEG has potential utility as a biomarker in ALS.

  2. The impact of subjective cognitive fatigue and depression on cognitive function in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Daniel; Doniger, Glen M; Wissemann, Karl; Zarif, Myassar; Bumstead, Barbara; Buhse, Marijean; Fafard, Lori; Lavi, Idit; Wilken, Jeffrey; Gudesblatt, Mark

    2018-02-01

    The association between subjective cognitive fatigue and objective cognitive dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) has been studied, with conflicting results. To explore the impact of fatigue on cognitive function, while controlling for the influence of depression, disability, comorbidities, and psychotropic medications. PwMS completed a computerized cognitive testing battery with age- and education-adjusted cognitive domain scores. Disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS)), cognitive fatigue, and depression were concurrently evaluated. In all, 699 PwMS were included. Both cognitive fatigue and depression were significantly and negatively correlated with the same cognitive domains: information processing speed, executive function, attention, motor function, and memory (-0.15 ⩽ r ⩽ -0.14 for cognitive fatigue; -0.24 ⩽ r ⩽ -0.19 for depression). Multivariate analysis revealed significant but small independent correlations only between depression and neuropsychological test results, while cognitive fatigue had no independent correlation with objective cognitive function except for a trend toward impaired motor function in highly fatigued PwMS. Depression and cognitive fatigue accounted for no more than 6% of the variance in objective cognitive domain scores. Cognitive fatigue is not independently related to objective cognitive impairment. Depression may influence cognitive function of PwMS primarily when it is severe. Cognitive impairment in PwMS should not be ascribed to fatigue or mild depression.

  3. Association of Cortical Lesion Burden on 7-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Cognition and Disability in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Daniel M; Roy, Snehashis; Oh, Jiwon; Izbudak, Izlem; Pham, Dzung; Courtney, Susan; Caffo, Brian; Jones, Craig K; van Zijl, Peter; Calabresi, Peter A

    2015-09-01

    Cortical lesions (CLs) contribute to physical and cognitive disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). Accurate methods for visualization of CLs are necessary for future clinical studies and therapeutic trials in MS. To evaluate the clinical relevance of measures of CL burden derived from high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in MS. An observational clinical imaging study was conducted at an academic MS center. Participants included 36 individuals with MS (30 relapsing-remitting, 6 secondary or primary progressive) and 15 healthy individuals serving as controls. The study was conducted from March 10, 2010, to November 23, 2012, and analysis was performed from June 1, 2011, to September 30, 2014. Seven-Tesla MRI of the brain was performed with 0.5-mm isotropic resolution magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo (MPRAGE) and whole-brain, 3-dimensional, 1.0-mm isotropic resolution magnetization-prepared, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (MPFLAIR). Cortical lesions, seen as hypointensities on MPRAGE, were manually segmented. Lesions were classified as leukocortical, intracortical, or subpial. Images were segmented using the Lesion-TOADS (Topology-Preserving Anatomical Segmentation) algorithm, and brain structure volumes and white matter (WM) lesion volume were reported. Volumes were normalized to intracranial volume. Physical disability was measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Cognitive disability was measured with the Minimal Assessment of Cognitive Function in MS battery. Cortical lesions were noted in 35 of 36 participants (97%), with a median of 16 lesions per participant (range, 0-99). Leukocortical lesion volume correlated with WM lesion volume (ρ = 0.50; P = .003) but not with cortical volume; subpial lesion volume inversely correlated with cortical volume (ρ = -0.36; P = .04) but not with WM lesion volume. Total CL count and volume, measured as median (range), were significantly increased in participants

  4. Functional cortical changes in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis at amplitude configuration: a resting-state fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu H

    2016-11-01

    showed high degrees of sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing patients with RRMS from HCs. The EDSS score showed a significant negative Pearson correlation with the beta value of the caudate head (r=-0.474, P=0.047. Conclusion: RRMS is associated with disturbances in spontaneous regional brain activity in specific areas, and these specific abnormalities may provide important information about the neural mechanisms underlying behavioral impairment in RRMS. Keywords: multiple sclerosis, amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation, receiver operating characteristic, functional magnetic resonance imaging, blood oxygen level dependent, resting state

  5. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with extension of the central canal of the spinal cord according to magnetic resonance imaging data

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    E. G. Mendelevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an atypical case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS concurrent with extension of the central canal – hydromyelia.Diagnostic difficulty is due to the presence of symptoms which are atypical for ALS, such as early age of onset, slow progression with long-term involvement of one leg, as well as extension of the central canal of the spinal cord at the level of TIII-IX bodies, as evidenced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The paper presents a clinical case, a review of current literature on the clinical and MRI signs of ALS and on the differential diagnosis of motor neuron disease.

  6. Association between nailfold capillaroscopy findings and pulmonary function tests in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellví, Ivan; Simeón-Aznar, Carmen Pilar; Sarmiento, Mónica; Fortuna, Ana; Mayos, Mercedes; Geli, Carme; Diaz-Torné, César; Moya, Patricia; De Llobet, Josep Maria; Casademont, Jordi

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether there is an association between different capillaroscopic findings and pulmonary function tests in systemic sclerosis (SSc). We did a retrospective observational study in a cohort of patients with SSc and early SSc. Patients with at least 1 nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) magnified 120× were included. Pathological findings were giant capillaries, angiogenesis, and density loss. Findings were compared with lung function values: percent expected value of forced vital capacity (FVC), DLCO, and FVC/DLCO ratio. Other variables collected were sex and SSc type, and the presence of digital ulcers (DU), interstitial lung disease (ILD), scleroderma renal crisis, and/or pulmonary hypertension (PH). Of 136 patients with SSc, 85 had undergone an NVC. The frequency of ILD, DU, and PH was 24.1%, 28.7%, and 17.2%, respectively. Data analysis showed that patients with density loss had worse FVC% (86.91 ± 19.42 vs 101.13 ± 16.06, p < 0.01) and DLCO% (71.43 ± 21.19 vs 85.9 ± 19.81, p < 0.01) compared to those without. Patients with loss of density present worse FVC and DLCO values. Prospective studies are warranted to determine whether NVC is useful for studying pulmonary function in SSc.

  7. Perceived functioning has ethnic-specific associations in systemic sclerosis: another dimension of personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNearney, Terry A; Hunnicutt, Sonya E; Fischbach, Michael; Friedman, Alan W; Aguilar, Martha; Ahn, Chul W; Reveille, John D; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Baethge, Bruce A; Goel, Niti; Mayes, Maureen D

    2009-12-01

    To measure self-reported physical and mental functioning and associated clinical features at study entry in 3 ethnic groups with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Sixty Hispanic, 39 African American, and 104 Caucasian patients with recent-onset SSc ( fatigue scores > IBQ > clinical variables (hypertension, skin score, and percentage predicted DLCO). Scleroderma-HAQ scores had ethnic-specific associations with IBQ > AHI scores > most clinical and laboratory variables. Decreased mental component summary (MCS) scores associated with AHI > ISEL. Ethnic-specific immunogenetic variables HLA-DQB1*0202 (Caucasian) and HLA-DRB 1*11 (African American), and HLA-DQA1*0501 (Hispanic) also associated with MCS. Antinuclear autoantibodies, anti-topoisomerase I, and RNA polymerases I and III also demonstrated associations with functioning in African American and Hispanic groups. Clinical, psychosocial, and immunogenetic variables had ethnic-specific associations with perceived physical and mental functioning. Consideration of ethnic-specific psychological and behavioral support in designing more personalized, relevant therapeutic interventions for the patient may improve therapeutic efficacy in SSc.

  8. Feasibility study for remote assessment of cognitive function in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michaela F; Holingue, Calliope B; Briggs, Farren B S; Shao, Xiaorong; Bellesis, Kalliope H; Whitmer, Rachel A; Schaefer, Catherine; Benedict, Ralph Hb; Barcellos, Lisa F

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), and affects employment and quality of life. Large studies are needed to identify risk factors for cognitive decline. Currently, a MS-validated remote assessment for cognitive function does not exist. Studies to determine feasibility of large remote cognitive function investigations in MS have not been published. To determine whether MS patients would participate in remote cognitive studies. We utilized the Modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS-M), a previously validated phone assessment for cognitive function in healthy elderly populations to detect mild cognitive impairment. We identified factors that influenced participation rates. We investigated the relationship between MS risk factors and TICS-M score in cases, and score differences between cases and control individuals. The TICS-M was administered to MS cases and controls. Linear and logistic regression models were utilized. 11.5% of eligible study participants did not participate in cognitive testing. MS cases, females and individuals with lower educational status were more likely to refuse (pTICS-M score among cases (pTICS-M score was significantly lower in cases compared to controls (p=0.007). Our results demonstrate convincingly that a remotely administered cognitive assessment is quite feasible for conducting large epidemiologic studies in MS, and lay the much needed foundation for future work that will utilize MS-validated cognitive measures.

  9. Increased cerebrospinal fluid albumin and immunoglobulin A fractions forecast cortical atrophy and longitudinal functional deterioration in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroth, Julia; Ciolac, Dumitru; Fleischer, Vinzenz; Koirala, Nabin; Krämer, Julia; Muthuraman, Muthuraman; Luessi, Felix; Bittner, Stefan; Gonzalez-Escamilla, Gabriel; Zipp, Frauke; Meuth, Sven G; Groppa, Sergiu

    2017-12-01

    Currently, no unequivocal predictors of disease evolution exist in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Cortical atrophy measurements are, however, closely associated with cumulative disability. Here, we aim to forecast longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-driven cortical atrophy and clinical disability from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers. We analyzed CSF fractions of albumin and immunoglobulins (Ig) A, G, and M and their CSF to serum quotients. Widespread atrophy was highly associated with increased baseline CSF concentrations and quotients of albumin and IgA. Patients with increased CSF IgA and CSF IgM showed higher functional disability at follow-up. CSF markers of blood-brain barrier integrity and specific immune response forecast emerging gray matter pathology and disease progression in MS.

  10. Investigating the contribution of VAPB/ALS8 loss of function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashi, Edor; El Oussini, Hajer; Bercier, Valérie; Gros-Louis, François; Valdmanis, Paul N; McDearmid, Jonathan; Mejier, Inge A; Dion, Patrick A; Dupre, Nicolas; Hollinger, David; Sinniger, Jérome; Dirrig-Grosch, Sylvie; Camu, William; Meininger, Vincent; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; René, Frédérique; Drapeau, Pierre; Rouleau, Guy A; Dupuis, Luc

    2013-06-15

    The mutations P56S and T46I in the gene encoding vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B/C (VAPB) cause ALS8, a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Overexpression of mutant forms of VAPB leads to cytosolic aggregates, suggesting a gain of function of the mutant protein. However, recent work suggested that the loss of VAPB function could be the major mechanism leading to ALS8. Here, we used multiple genetic and experimental approaches to study whether VAPB loss of function might be sufficient to trigger motor neuron degeneration. In order to identify additional ALS-associated VAPB mutations, we screened the entire VAPB gene in a cohort of ALS patients and detected two mutations (A145V and S160Δ). To directly address the contribution of VAPB loss of function in ALS, we generated zebrafish and mouse models with either a decreased or a complete loss of Vapb expression. Vapb knockdown in zebrafish led to swimming deficits. Mice knocked-out for Vapb showed mild motor deficits after 18 months of age yet had innervated neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Importantly, overexpression of VAPB mutations were unable to rescue the motor deficit caused by Vapb knockdown in zebrafish and failed to cause a toxic gain-of-function defect on their own. Thus, Vapb loss of function weakens the motor system of vertebrate animal models but is on its own unable to lead to a complete ALS phenotype. Our findings are consistent with the notion that VAPB mutations constitute a risk factor for motor neuron disease through a loss of VAPB function.

  11. Correlates of sexual function in male and female patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew-Starowicz, Michal; Rola, Rafal

    2014-09-01

    Many factors have been suggested to contribute to sexual dysfunction (SD) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, but the research on their impact on sexual functioning (SF) and sexual quality of life (SQoL) remains scant. The aim of this study was to investigate correlates of SF and SQoL in MS patients, as well as possible gender differences. 204 MS patients were interviewed, completed the questionnaires, and underwent neurological assessment. Primary outcome measures included the International Index of Erectile Function, the Female Sexual Function Questionnaire, the Sexual Quality of Life Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Expanded Disability Status Scale. The course and duration of the disease did not predict patients' SF. Negative correlations were found for brainstem symptoms with orgasmic function and overall satisfaction in men and between cognitive functioning and the partner domain in women. Interestingly, brainstem symptoms correlated positively with the arousal domain in women. More than half (52.1%) of patients fulfilled Beck Depression Inventory criteria for depression, and these patients showed more SD than nondepressive individuals. The strongest negative correlations with depressive symptoms were found for desire, erectile function, and overall satisfaction with sexual life in men and for orgasm and sexual enjoyment in women. Deterioration in particular domains of SF was clearly related with diminished SQoL. The main gender difference was a strong influence of decreased desire on SQoL in women and no such correlation in men. Negative assessment of the relationship with partner significantly affected all domains of SF and SQoL in MS women and the desire domain in MS men. Several correlates of SF in MS patients were found. The role of brainstem symptoms needs further investigation. Clinicians should pay close attention to depressive symptoms and relationship factors in MS patients who suffer from SD. © 2014 International Society for

  12. A Multimodal, Nonpharmacologic Intervention Improves Mood and Cognitive Function in People with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer E; Bisht, Babita; Hall, Michael J; Rubenstein, Linda M; Louison, Rebecca; Klein, Danielle T; Wahls, Terry L

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether participation in a 12-month multimodal intervention would improve mood and cognitive function in adults with progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). In this one-arm, open-label feasibility trial, participants were prescribed a home-based multimodal intervention, including (1) a modified Paleolithic diet; (2) an exercise program (stretching and strengthening of the trunk and lower limb muscles); (3) neuromuscular electrical stimulation (EStim) of trunk and lower limb muscles; and (4) stress management (meditation and self-massage). Individuals completed measures of mood (Beck Anxiety and Depression Inventories) and cognitive (Cognitive Stability Index, Cognitive Screening Test, Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System) and executive function (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale) at baseline and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the start of the intervention. Dosage of the multimodal intervention was assessed at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The more individuals participated in the intervention activities, the greater improvements they had from baseline to 12 months on self-report measures of anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory [BAI]; ps = 0.001 to 0.02), depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]; ps = Mood and cognitive improvements were more closely related to a higher intake of the modified Paleolithic diet than to exercise and stress management dosage. Anxiety and depression changes were evident after just a few months, whereas changes in cognitive function were generally not observed until later in the intervention period. Mood and cognitive function changes from baseline to 12 months were significantly associated with fatigue improvements (ps = exercise, EStim, and stress management intervention like this one has the potential to improve the mood and cognitive symptoms that can lead to considerable suffering in people with MS, potentially improving quality of life and function for people with progressive MS.

  13. Mental Health in Multiple Sclerosis Patients without Limitation of Physical Function: The Role of Physical Activity

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    Alexander Tallner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS patients, in general, show reduced physical function, physical activity, and quality of life. Positive associations between physical activity and quality of life have been reported. In particular, we were interested in the relation between physical activity and mental health in MS patients without limitation of physical function, since limitations of physical function may influence both physical activity and quality of life. Assessment comprised the Baecke questionnaire on physical activity, the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36, and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. We ranked our sample according to physical activity into four groups and performed an ANOVA to analyze the relationship between levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Then we performed a subgroup analysis and included patients with unlimited walking distance and a score of less than 18 in the BDI. Most active vs. inactive patients were compared for the mental subscales of the SF-36 and depression scores. From 632 patients, 265 met inclusion criteria and hence quartiles were filled with 67 patients each. Active and inactive patients did not differ considerably in physical function. In contrast, mental subscales of the SF-36 were higher in active patients. Remarkable and significant differences were found regarding vitality, general health perception, social functioning and mental health, all in favor of physically active patients. Our study showed that higher physical activity is still associated with higher mental health scores even if limitations of physical function are accounted for. Therefore, we believe that physical activity and exercise have considerable health benefits for MS patients.

  14. Multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadashima, Hiromichi; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Imai, Terukuni; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Matsumoto, Sadayuki; Yamamoto, Toru; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Maya, Kiyomi

    1986-01-01

    Eleven patients with a definite diagnosis of multiple sclerosis were examined in terms of correlations between the clinical features and the results of cranial computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: In 5 of the 11 patients, both CT and MRI demonstrated lesions consistent with a finding of multiple sclerosis. In 3 patients, only MRI demonstrated lesions. In the remaining 3 patients, neither CT nor MRI revealed any lesion in the brain. All 5 patients who showed abnormal findings on both CT and MRI had clinical signs either of cerebral or brainstem - cerebellar lesions. On the other hand, two of the 3 patients with normal CT and MRI findings had optic-nerve and spinal-cord signs. Therefore, our results suggested relatively good correlations between the clinical features, CT, and MRI. MRI revealed cerebral lesions in two of the four patients with clinical signs of only optic-nerve and spinal-cord lesions. MRI demonstrated sclerotic lesions in 3 of the 6 patients whose plaques were not detected by CT. In conclusion, MRI proved to be more helpful in the demonstration of lesions attributable to chronic multiple sclerosis. (author)

  15. Magnetic spectroscopy and microscopy of functional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Catherine Ann [Univ. of Mainz (Germany)

    2011-05-01

    Heusler intermetallics Mn2Y Ga and X2MnGa (X; Y =Fe, Co, Ni) undergo tetragonal magnetostructural transitions that can result in half metallicity, magnetic shape memory, or the magnetocaloric effect. Understanding the magnetism and magnetic behavior in functional materials is often the most direct route to being able to optimize current materials for todays applications and to design novel ones for tomorrow. Synchrotron soft x-ray magnetic spectromicroscopy techniques are well suited to explore the the competing effects from the magnetization and the lattice parameters in these materials as they provide detailed element-, valence-, and site-specifc information on the coupling of crystallographic ordering and electronic structure as well as external parameters like temperature and pressure on the bonding and exchange. Fundamental work preparing the model systems of spintronic, multiferroic, and energy-related compositions is presented for context. The methodology of synchrotron spectroscopy is presented and applied to not only magnetic characterization but also of developing a systematic screening method for future examples of materials exhibiting any of the above effects. The chapter progression is as follows: an introduction to the concepts and materials under consideration (Chapter 1); an overview of sample preparation techniques and results, and the kinds of characterization methods employed (Chapter 2); spectro- and microscopic explorations of X2MnGa/Ge (Chapter 3); spectroscopic investigations of the composition series Mn2Y Ga to the logical Mn3Ga endpoint (Chapter 4); and a summary and overview of upcoming work (Chapter 5). Appendices include the results of a Think Tank for the Graduate School of Excellence MAINZ (Appendix A) and details of an imaging project now in progress on magnetic reversal and domain wall observation in the classical Heusler material Co2FeSi (Appendix B).

  16. [The influence of high-tone power therapy on the functional status of patients with multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubsik, Anna; Klimkiewicz, Paulina; Klimkiewicz, Robert; Jankowska, Katarzyna; Jankowska, Agnieszka; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2014-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, which is characterized by diverse symptomatology. Most often affects people at a young age gradually leading to their disability. Looking for new therapies to alleviate neurological deficits caused by the disease. One of the alternative methods of therapy is high - tone power therapy. The article is a comparison of high-tone power therapy and kinesis in improving patients with multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of high-tone power therapy and exercises in kinesis on the functional status of patients with multiple sclerosis. The study involved 20 patients with multiple sclerosis, both sexes, treated at the Department of Rehabilitation and Physical Medicine in Lodz. Patients were randomly divided into two groups studied. In group high-tone power therapy applied for 60 minutes, while in group II were used exercises for kinesis. Treatment time for both groups of patients was 15 days. To assess the functional status scale was used: Expanded Disability Status Scale of Kurtzke (EDSS), as well as by Barthel ADL Index. Assessment of quality of life were made using MSQOL Questionnaire-54. For the evaluation of gait and balance using Tinetti scale, and pain VAS rated, and Laitinen. Changes in muscle tone was assessed on the basis of the Ashworth scale. Both group I and II improved on scales conducted before and after therapy. In group I, in which the applied high-tone power therapy, reported statistically significant results in 9 out of 10 tested parameters, while in group II, which was used in the exercises in kinesis an improvement in 6 out of 10 tested parameters. Correlating the results of both the test groups in relation to each other did not show statistically significant differences. High-Tone Power Therapy beneficial effect on the functional status of patients with multiple sclerosis. Obtaining results in terms of number of tested

  17. Stroop performance in multiple sclerosis: information processing, selective attention, or executive functioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macniven, J A B; Davis, C; Ho, M-Y; Bradshaw, C M; Szabadi, E; Constantinescu, C S

    2008-09-01

    Cognitive impairments in information processing speed, attention and executive functioning are widely reported in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Several studies have identified impaired performance on the Stroop test in people with MS, yet uncertainty remains over the cause of this phenomenon. In this study, 25 patients with MS were assessed with a neuropsychological test battery including a computerized Stroop test and a computerized test of information processing speed, the Graded Conditional Discrimination Tasks (GCDT). The patient group was compared with an individually age, sex and estimated premorbid IQ-matched healthy control group. The patients' reaction times (RTs) were significantly longer than those of the controls on all Stroop test trials and there was a significantly enhanced absolute (RT(incongruent)-RT(neutral)) and relative (100 x [RT(incongruent)-RT(neutral)]/RT(neutral)) Stroop interference effect for the MS group. The linear function relating RT to stimulus complexity in the GCDT was significantly steeper in the patient group, indicating slowed information processing. The results are discussed with reference to the difference engine model, a theory of diversity in speeded cognition. It is concluded that, in the assessment of people with MS, great caution must be used in the interpretation of performance on neuropsychological tests which rely on RT as the primary measure.

  18. Prospective memory in multiple sclerosis: The impact of cue distinctiveness and executive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagenais, Emmanuelle; Rouleau, Isabelle; Tremblay, Alexandra; Demers, Mélanie; Roger, Élaine; Jobin, Céline; Duquette, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    Prospective memory (PM), the ability to remember to do something at the appropriate time in the future, is crucial in everyday life. One way to improve PM performance is to increase the salience of a cue announcing that it is time to act. Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients often report PM failures and there is growing evidence of PM deficits among this population. However, such deficits are poorly characterized and their relation to cognitive status remains unclear. To better understand PM deficits in MS patients, this study investigated the impact of cue salience on PM, and its relation to retrospective memory (RM) and executive deficits. Thirty-nine (39) MS patients were compared to 18 healthy controls on a PM task modulating cue salience during an ongoing general knowledge test. MS patients performed worse than controls on the PM task, regardless of cue salience. MS patients' executive functions contributed significantly to the variance in PM performance, whereas age, education and RM did not. Interestingly, low- and high-executive patients' performance differed when the cue was not salient, but not when it was, suggesting that low-executive MS patients benefited more from cue salience. These findings add to the growing evidence of PM deficits in MS and highlight the contribution of executive functions to certain aspects of PM. In low-executive MS patients, high cue salience improves PM performance by reducing the detection threshold and need for environmental monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ventilation distribution and small airway function in patients with systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.R.A. Silva

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the importance of traditional pulmonary function tests (PFTs in managing systemic sclerosis (SSc, many patients with pulmonary disease diagnosed by computed tomography (CT present with normal PFTs. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of the nitrogen single-breath washout (N2SBW test in diagnosing SSc and to correlate N2SBW parameters with the PFT indexes used in the follow-up of these patients, clinical data, and CT findings. Methods: Cross-sectional study in which 52 consecutive SSc patients were subjected to spirometry, body plethysmography, analysis of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO, analysis of respiratory muscle strength, N2SBW testing, and CT analysis. Results: Twenty-eight patients had a forced vital capacity (FVC that was 120% of the predicted value, while 15 patients had a closing volume/vital capacity (CV/VC that was >120% of the predicted value. A significant difference in Phase III slopeN2SBW was observed when the patients with predominant traction bronchiectasis and honeycombing were compared to the patients with other CT patterns (p < 0.0001. The Phase III slopeN2SBW was correlated with FVC (rs = −0.845, p < 0.0001 and DLCO (rs = −0.600, p < 0.0001, and the CV/VC was correlated with FVC (rs = −0.460, p = 0.0006 and residual volume/total lung capacity (rs = 0.328, p = 0.017. Conclusion: Ventilation heterogeneity is a frequent finding in SSc patients that is associated with restrictive damage, changes in pulmonary diffusion, and CT patterns. In addition, approximately one-third of the patients presented with findings that were compatible with small airway disease. Keywords: Systemic sclerosis, Respiratory function tests, Nitrogen single-breath washout test

  20. Functional Components of Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis: A Cross-Sectional Investigation

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    Jordi A. Matias-Guiu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCognitive impairment is frequent and disabling in multiple sclerosis (MS. Changes in information processing speed constitute the most important cognitive deficit in MS. However, given the clinical and topographical variability of the disease, cognitive impairment may vary greatly and appear in other forms in addition to slower information processing speed. Our aim was to determine the frequency of cognitive impairment, the principal cognitive domains, and components involved in MS and to identify factors associated with presence of cognitive impairment in these patients in a large series of patients.MethodsCross-sectional study of 311 patients with MS [236 with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS, 52 with secondary progressive MS (SPMS, and 23 with primary progressive MS (PPMS]. Patients’ cognitive function was assessed with a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment protocol. Patients displaying deficits in 2 or more cognitive domains were considered to have cognitive impairment associated with MS. We conducted a principal component analysis to detect different cognitive patterns by identifying clusters of tests highly correlated to one another.ResultsCognitive impairment was detected in 41.5% of the sample, and it was more frequent in patients with SPMS and PPMS (P = 0.002. Expanded Disability Status Scale scores and education were independent predictors of cognitive impairment. Principal component analysis identified seven clusters: attention and basic executive function (including information processing speed, planning and high-level executive function, verbal memory and language, executive and visuospatial performance time, fatigue-depression, visuospatial function, and basic attention and verbal/visual working memory. Mean scoring of components 2 (high-order executive functioning and 3 (verbal memory-language was higher in patients with RRMS than in those with PPMS (component 2 and SPMS (component 3.ConclusionMS is linked to

  1. Disrupted Module Efficiency of Structural and Functional Brain Connectomes in Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaou Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated disrupted topological organization of brain connectome in multiple sclerosis (MS. However, whether the communication efficiency between different functional systems is affected in the early stage of MS remained largely unknown. In this study, we constructed the structural connectivity (SC and functional connectivity (FC networks in 41 patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS, 32 MS patients and 35 healthy controls (HC based on diffusion and resting-state functional MRI. To quantify the communication efficiency within and between different functional systems, we proposed two measures called intra- and inter-module efficiency. Based on the module parcellation of functional backbone network, the intra- and inter-module efficiency of SC and FC networks was calculated for each participant. For the SC network, CIS showed decreased inter-module efficiency between the sensory-motor network (SMN, the visual network (VN, the default-mode network (DMN and the fronto-parietal network (FPN compared with HC, while MS showed more widespread decreased module efficiency both within and between modules relative to HC and CIS. For the FC network, no differences were found between CIS and HC, and a decreased inter-module efficiency between SMN and FPN and between VN and FPN was identified in MS, compared with HC and CIS. Moreover, both intra- and inter-module efficiency of SC network were correlated with the disability and cognitive scores in MS. Therefore, our results demonstrated early SC changes between modules in CIS, and more widespread SC alterations and inter-module FC changes were observed in MS, which were further associated with cognitive impairment and physical disability.

  2. Early functional deficit and microglial disturbances in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Nicolas Gerber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective motoneurons degeneration. There is today no clear-cut pathogenesis sequence nor any treatment. However growing evidences are in favor of the involvement, besides neurons, of several partners such as glia and muscles. To better characterize the time course of pathological events in an animal model that recapitulates human ALS symptoms, we investigated functional and cellular characteristics of hSOD1(G93A mice. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We have evaluated locomotor function of hSOD1(G93A mice through dynamic walking patterns and spontaneous motor activity analysis. We detected early functional deficits that redefine symptoms onset at 60 days of age, i.e. 20 days earlier than previously described. Moreover, sequential combination of these approaches allows monitoring of motor activity up to disease end stage. To tentatively correlate early functional deficit with cellular alterations we have used flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry approaches to characterize neuromuscular junctions, astrocytes and microglia. We show that (1 decrease in neuromuscular junction's number correlates with motor impairment, (2 astrocytes number is not altered at pre- and early-symptomatic ages but intraspinal repartition is modified at symptoms onset, and (3 microglia modifications precede disease onset. At pre-symptomatic age, we show a decrease in microglia number whereas at onset of the disease two distinct microglia sub-populations emerge. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, precise motor analysis updates the onset of the disease in hSOD1(G93A mice and allows locomotor monitoring until the end stage of the disease. Early functional deficits coincide with alterations of neuromuscular junctions. Importantly, we identify different sets of changes in microglia before disease onset as well as at early-symptomatic stage. This finding not only brings a new sequence of cellular

  3. Improved pulmonary function following pirfenidone treatment in a patient with progressive interstitial lung disease associated with systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarir F Udwadia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pirfenidone is an anti-fibrotic drug which has been approved for the management of patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF. However, its role in interstitial lung disease (ILD due to other causes such as systemic sclerosis (SSc is not clear. We present a case of a patient with SSc associated ILD who showed a subjective as well as objective improvement in lung function with pirfenidone.

  4. Identification of multiple sclerosis patients at highest risk of cognitive impairment using an integrated brain magnetic resonance imaging assessment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, T; Vaneckova, M; Sormani, M P; Krasensky, J; Sobisek, L; Dusankova, J Blahova; Seidl, Z; Havrdova, E; Kalincik, T; Benedict, R H B; Horakova, D

    2017-02-01

    While impaired cognitive performance is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), it has been largely underdiagnosed. Here a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening algorithm is proposed to identify patients at highest risk of cognitive impairment. The objective was to examine whether assessment of lesion burden together with whole brain atrophy on MRI improves our ability to identify cognitively impaired MS patients. Of the 1253 patients enrolled in the study, 1052 patients with all cognitive, volumetric MRI and clinical data available were included in the analysis. Brain MRI and neuropsychological assessment with the Brief International Cognitive Assessment for Multiple Sclerosis were performed. Multivariable logistic regression and individual prediction analysis were used to investigate the associations between MRI markers and cognitive impairment. The results of the primary analysis were validated at two subsequent time points (months 12 and 24). The prevalence of cognitive impairment was greater in patients with low brain parenchymal fraction (BPF) (3.5 ml) than in patients with high BPF (>0.85) and low T2-LV (patients predicted cognitive impairment with 83% specificity, 82% negative predictive value, 51% sensitivity and 75% overall accuracy. The risk of confirmed cognitive decline over the follow-up was greater in patients with high T2-LV (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.1-3.8) and low BPF (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.4-4.7). The integrated MRI assessment of lesion burden and brain atrophy may improve the stratification of MS patients who may benefit from cognitive assessment. © 2016 EAN.

  5. Oral motor functions, speech and communication before a definitive diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkonen, Tanja; Korpijaakko-Huuhka, Anna-Maija; Ruottinen, Hanna; Puhto, Riitta; Hollo, Kirsi; Ylinen, Aarne; Palmio, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the cranial nerve symptoms, speech disorders and communicative effectiveness of Finnish patients with diagnosed or possible amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) at their first assessment by a speech-language pathologist. The group studied consisted of 30 participants who had clinical signs of bulbar deterioration at the beginning of the study. They underwent a thorough clinical speech and communication examination. The cranial nerve symptoms and ability to communicate were compared in 14 participants with probable or definitive ALS and in 16 participants with suspected or possible ALS. The initial type of ALS was also assessed. More deterioration in soft palate function was found in participants with possible ALS than with diagnosed ALS. Likewise, a slower speech rate combined with more severe dysarthria was observed in possible ALS. In both groups, there was some deterioration in communicative effectiveness. In the possible ALS group the diagnostic delay was longer and speech therapy intervention actualized later. The participants with ALS showed multidimensional decline in communication at their first visit to the speech-language pathologist, but impairments and activity limitations were more severe in suspected or possible ALS. The majority of persons with bulbar-onset ALS in this study were in the latter diagnostic group. This suggests that they are more susceptible to delayed diagnosis and delayed speech therapy assessment. It is important to start speech therapy intervention during the diagnostic processes particularly if the person already shows bulbar symptoms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. The effect of executive function on stress, depression, anxiety, and quality of life in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, Lisa B; Kiropoulos, Litza A; Kirby, Katherine M; Butler, Ernest; Paine, Mark; Hester, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The experience of cognitive deficits and emotional dysfunction are prevalent in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), although research examining their interaction has provided inconsistent findings. The current study examined the ability of executive function to predict psychosocial adjustment in PwMS. One hundred and seven PwMS underwent cognitive assessment and completed measures of stress, depression, anxiety, and quality of life (QoL). There was limited support for a relationship. There was no relationship between objective cognitive tasks and state or trait anxiety, mental health QoL, overall QoL, or stress frequency. The only relationship with depression was found when the Beck Depression Inventory Fast-Screen was used, with a task of planning when the timing element was removed. A measure of error rates on a task of cognitive flexibility predicted physical health QoL, and severity, but not frequency, of stress was predicted by a task of working memory. The results of this study highlight the need for further research into the relationship between cognitive deficits and psychosocial adjustment because of the conflicting findings between studies and call for a common measurement framework for future investigation.

  7. Simple index of functional connectivity at rest in Multiple Sclerosis fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukturkoglu, Korhan; Porcaro, Camillo; Cottone, Carlo; Cancelli, Andrea; Inglese, Matilde; Tecchio, Franca

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the EEG-derived functional connectivity at rest (FCR) patterns of fatigued Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients in order to find good parameters for a future EEG-Neurofeedback intervention to reduce their fatigue symptoms. We evaluated FCR between hemispheric homologous areas, via spectral coherence between pairs of corresponding left and right bipolar derivations, in the Theta, Alpha and Beta bands. We estimated FCR in 18MS patients with different levels of fatigue and minimal clinical severity and in 11 age and gender matched healthy controls. We used correlation analysis to assess the relationship between the fatigue scores and the FCR values differing between fatigued MS patients and controls. Among FCR values differing between fatigued MS patients and controls, fatigue symptoms increased with higher Beta temporo-parietal FCR (p=0.00004). Also, positive correlations were found between the fatigue levels and the fronto-frontal FCR in Beta and Theta bands (p=0.0002 and p=0.001 respectively). We propose that a future EEG-Neurofeedback system against MS fatigue would train patients to decrease voluntarily the beta coherence between the homologous temporo-parietal areas. We extracted a feature for building an EEG-Neurofeedback system against fatigue in MS. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of functional magnetic nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, J.; Sanders, J.; Srinath, S.; Srikanth, H.

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes have been excellent functional materials that could be dispersed in polymer matrices for various applications. However, uniform dispersion of particles in polymers without agglomeration is quite challenging. We have fabricated PMMA/polypyrrole bilayer structures embedded with Fe3O4 magnetite nanoparticles synthesized using wet chemical synthesis. Agglomeration-free dispersion of nanoparticles was achieved by coating the particles with surfactants and by dissolving both the particles and PMMA in chlorobenzene. Structural characterization was done using XRD and TEM. Magnetic properties of the bilayer structures indicated superparamagnetic behavior that is desirable for RF applications as the magnetic losses are reduced. Our polymer nanocomposite bilayer films with conducting polymer coatings are potential candidates for tunable RF applications with integrated EMI suppression. We will also report on our studies of pumped ferrofluids flowing past carbon nanotubes that are arranged in microchannel arrays. Magnetization under various flow conditions is investigated and correlated with the hydrodynamic properties. This scheme provides a novel method of energy conversion and storage using nanocomposite materials.

  9. Ultrasound assessment of diaphragmatic function in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Riccardo; Mandrioli, Jessica; Zona, Stefano; Antenora, Federico; Iattoni, Andrea; Monelli, Marco; Fini, Nicola; Tonelli, Roberto; Clini, Enrico; Marchioni, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    Evaluation of diaphragm function in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is critical in determining when to commence non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV). Currently, forced vital capacity (FVC) and sniff nasal inspiratory pressure (SNIP) are volitional measures for this evaluation, but require collaboration and are poorly specific. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether diaphragmatic thickness measured by ultrasound (US) correlates with lung function impairment in ALS patients. The secondary aim was then to compare US diaphragm thickness index (ΔTdi) with a new parameter (ΔTmax index). 41 patients with ALS and 30 healthy subjects were enrolled in the study. All subjects underwent spirometry, SNIP and diaphragm US evaluation, while arterial blood gases were measured in some patients only. US assessed diaphragm thickness (Tdi) at tidal volume (Vt) or total lung capacity (TLC), and their ratio (ΔTmax) were recorded. Changes (Δ) in Tdi indices during tidal volume (ΔTdiVt) and maximal inspiration (ΔTdiTLC) were also assessed. ΔTdiTLC (p <0.001) and ΔTmax (p = 0.007), but not ΔTdiVt, differed between patients and controls. Significant correlation (p < 0.05) was found between ΔTdiTLC, ΔTmax and FVC. The ROC curve analysis for comparison of individual testing showed better accuracy with Δtmax than with ΔtdiTLC for FVC (AUC 0.76 and 0.27) and SNIP (AUC 0.71 and 0.25). Diaphragm thickness assessed by ultrasound significantly correlates with global respiratory alterations in patients with ALS. ΔTmax represents a new US index of early diaphragmatic dysfunction, better related with the routinely performed lung function tests. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  10. Staging of cortical and deep grey matter functional connectivity changes in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Kim A; Eijlers, Anand J C; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Schoonheim, Menno M

    2018-02-01

    Functional connectivity is known to increase as well as decrease throughout the brain in multiple sclerosis (MS), which could represent different stages of the disease. In addition, functional connectivity changes could follow the atrophy pattern observed with disease progression, that is, moving from the deep grey matter towards the cortex. This study investigated when and where connectivity changes develop and explored their clinical and cognitive relevance across different MS stages. A cohort of 121 patients with early relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), 122 with late RRMS and 53 with secondary progressive MS (SPMS) as well as 96 healthy controls underwent MRI and neuropsychological testing. Functional connectivity changes were investigated for (1) within deep grey matter connectivity, (2) connectivity between the deep grey matter and cortex and (3) within-cortex connectivity. A post hoc regional analysis was performed to identify which regions were driving the connectivity changes. Patients with late RRMS and SPMS showed increased connectivity of the deep grey matter, especially of the putamen and palladium, with other deep grey matter structures and with the cortex. Within-cortex connectivity was decreased, especially for temporal, occipital and frontal regions, but only in SPMS relative to early RRMS. Deep grey matter connectivity alterations were related to cognition and disability, whereas within-cortex connectivity was only related to disability. Increased connectivity of the deep grey matter became apparent in late RRMS and further increased in SPMS. The additive effect of cortical network degeneration, which was only seen in SPMS, may explain the sudden clinical deterioration characteristic to this phase of the disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. The statistic-thermodynamically calculations of magnetic thermodynamically functions for nuclear magnetic moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhenghe; Luo Deli; Feng Kaiming

    2013-01-01

    The present work is to calculate the magnetic thermodynamically functions, i.e. energy, the intensity of magnetization, enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs function for nuclear magnetic moments of T, D and neutron n at 2 T and 1, 50, 100 and 150 K from partition functions. It is shown that magnetic saturation of thermonuclear plasma does not easily occur for nuclear magneton is only of 10 -3 of Bohr magneton. The work done by magnetic field is considerable. (authors)

  12. The predictive value of respiratory function tests for non-invasive ventilation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilanus, T B M; Groothuis, J T; TenBroek-Pastoor, J M C; Feuth, T B; Heijdra, Y F; Slenders, J P L; Doorduin, J; Van Engelen, B G; Kampelmacher, M J; Raaphorst, J

    2017-07-25

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) improves survival and quality of life in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. The timing of referral to a home ventilation service (HVS), which is in part based on respiratory function tests, has shown room for improvement. It is currently unknown which respiratory function test predicts an appropriate timing of the initiation of NIV. We analysed, retrospectively, serial data of five respiratory function tests: forced vital capacity (FVC), peak cough flow (PCF), maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressure (MIP and MEP) and sniff nasal inspiratory pressure (SNIP) in patients with ALS. Patients who had had at least one assessment of respiratory function and one visit at the HVS, were included. Our aim was to detect the test with the highest predictive value for the need for elective NIV in the following 3 months. We analysed time curves, currently used cut-off values for referral, and respiratory function test results between 'NIV indication' and 'no-NIV indication' patients. One hundred ten patients with ALS were included of whom 87 received an NIV indication; 11.5% had one assessment before receiving an NIV indication, 88.5% had two or more assessments. The NIV indication was based on complaints of hypoventilation and/or proven (nocturnal) hypercapnia. The five respiratory function tests showed a descending trend during disease progression, where SNIP showed the greatest decline within the latest 3 months before NIV indication (mean = -22%). PCF at the time of referral to the HVS significantly discriminated between the groups 'NIV-indication' and 'no NIV-indication yet' patients at the first HVS visit: 259 (±92) vs. 348 (±137) L/min, p = 0.019. PCF and SNIP showed the best predictive characteristics in terms of sensitivity. SNIP showed the greatest decline prior to NIV indication and PCF significantly differentiated 'NIV-indication' from 'no NIV-indication yet' patients with ALS. Currently used cut-off values might be

  13. Cognitive function in multiple sclerosis improves with telerehabilitation: Results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh E Charvet

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment affects more than half of all individuals living with multiple sclerosis (MS. We hypothesized that training at home with an adaptive online cognitive training program would have greater cognitive benefit than ordinary computer games in cognitively-impaired adults with MS. This was a double-blind, randomized, active-placebo-controlled trial. Participants with MS were recruited through Stony Brook Medicine and randomly assigned to either the adaptive cognitive remediation (ACR program or active control of ordinary computer games for 60 hours over 12 weeks. Training was remotely-supervised and delivered through a study-provided laptop computer. A computer generated, blocked stratification table prepared by statistician provided the randomization schedule and condition was assigned by a study technician. The primary outcome, administered by study psychometrician, was measured by change in a neuropsychological composite measure from baseline to study end. An intent-to-treat analysis was employed and missing primary outcome values were imputed via Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. Participants in the ACR (n = 74 vs. active control (n = 61 training program had significantly greater improvement in the primary outcome of cognitive functioning (mean change in composite z score±SD: 0·25±0·45 vs. 0·09±0·37, p = 0·03, estimated difference = 0·16 with 95% CI: 0·02-0·30, despite greater training time in the active control condition (mean±SD:56·9 ± 34·6 vs. 37·7 ±23 ·8 hours played, p = 0·006. This study provides Class I evidence that adaptive, computer-based cognitive remediation accessed from home can improve cognitive functioning in MS. This telerehabilitation approach allowed for rapid recruitment and high compliance, and can be readily applied to other neurological conditions associated with cognitive dysfunction.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02141386.

  14. Functional substrate for memory function differences between patients with left and right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Seung-Hyun; Chung, Chun Kee

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about the functional substrate for memory function differences in patients with left or right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) associated with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) from an electrophysiological perspective. To characterize these differences, we hypothesized that hippocampal theta connectivity in the resting-state might be different between patients with left and right mTLE with HS and be correlated with memory performance. Resting-state hippocampal theta connectivity, identified via whole-brain magnetoencephalography, was evaluated. Connectivity and memory function in 41 patients with mTLE with HS (left mTLE=22; right mTLE=19) were compared with those in 46 age-matched healthy controls and 28 patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) but without HS. Connectivity between the right hippocampus and the left middle frontal gyrus was significantly stronger in patients with right mTLE than in patients with left mTLE. Moreover, this connectivity was positively correlated with delayed verbal recall and recognition scores in patients with mTLE. Patients with left mTLE had greater delayed recall impairment than patients with right mTLE and FCD. Similarly, delayed recognition performance was worse in patients with left mTLE than in patients with right mTLE and FCD. No significant differences in memory function between patients with right mTLE and FCD were detected. Patients with right mTLE showed significantly stronger hippocampal theta connectivity between the right hippocampus and left middle frontal gyrus than patients with FCD and left mTLE. Our results suggest that right hippocampal-left middle frontal theta connectivity could be a functional substrate that can account for differences in memory function between patients with left and right mTLE. This functional substrate might be related to different compensatory mechanisms against the structural hippocampal lesions in left and right mTLE groups. Given the positive correlation between

  15. Lack of magnetic resonance imaging lesion activity as a treatment target in multiple sclerosis: An evaluation using electronically collected outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Devon S; Thompson, Nicolas R; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2016-09-01

    The appropriate treatment target in multiple sclerosis (MS) is unclear. Lack of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesion activity, a component of the no evidence of disease activity concept, has been proposed as a treatment target in MS. We used our MS database to investigate whether aggressively pursuing MRI stability by changing disease modifying therapy (DMT) when MRI activity is observed leads to better clinical and imaging outcomes. The Knowledge Program (KP) is a database linked to our electronic medical record allowing capture of patient and clinician reported outcomes. Through KP query and chart review, we identified all relapsing-remitting MS patients visiting between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2014 with active MRIs despite DMT. Propensity modeling based on demographic and disease characteristics was used to match DMT switchers to non-switchers. KP and MRI outcomes were compared 18 months after the active MRI using mixed-effects linear regression models. We identified 417 patients who met criteria for our analysis. After propensity matching, 78 switchers and 91 non-switchers were analyzed. There was no difference in clinical or radiologic outcomes between these groups at 18 months. We did not find a short-term benefit of changing DMT to pursue MRI stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modulation of the Left Prefrontal Cortex with High Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Facilitates Gait in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer M. Burhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic central nervous system (CNS demyelinating disease. Gait abnormalities are common and disabling in patients with MS with limited treatment options available. Emerging evidence suggests a role of prefrontal attention networks in modulating gait. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is known to enhance cortical excitability in stimulated cortex and its correlates. We investigated the effect of high-frequency left prefrontal rTMS on gait parameters in a 51-year-old Caucasian male with chronic relapsing/remitting MS with residual disabling attention and gait symptoms. Patient received 6 Hz, rTMS at 90% motor threshold using figure of eight coil centered on F3 location (using 10-20 electroencephalography (EEG lead localization system. GAITRite gait analysis system was used to collect objective gait measures before and after one session and in another occasion three consecutive daily sessions of rTMS. Two-tailed within subject repeated measure t-test showed significant enhancement in ambulation time, gait velocity, and cadence after three consecutive daily sessions of rTMS. Modulating left prefrontal cortex excitability using rTMS resulted in significant change in gait parameters after three sessions. To our knowledge, this is the first report that demonstrates the effect of rTMS applied to the prefrontal cortex on gait in MS patients.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis brain lesions: A semeiologic study by multiple spin-echo sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caires, M.C.; Scheiber, C.; Rumbach, L.; Gounot, D.; Dumitresco, B.; Warter, J.M.; Collard, M.; Chambron, J.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) if the brain is now known as a very sensitive tool for clearly revealing lesions in white matter, and has thus become important in the study of multiple sclerosis (MS). Since 1981, others have shown the best of MRI: we can see 6 x more lesions than CT. MRI contrast bases mainly on the spatial heterogeneity of the relaxation time of different tissues. The sensitivity depends on the longer T1 and/or T2 of the pathological tissues compared to those of normal tissues. In our series, the authors use mainly T2 weighted MR images and they evaluate their interest for the diagnosis of MS. They study the frequency of the abnormalities and their semeiology in a small number of transversal sections imaged at the level of the lateral ventricles. The authors' aim is to describe the NMR-derived morphological signs of MS and to prospect its interest in the physiopathological studies of this disease

  18. Correlation of cumulative corticosteroid treatment with magnetic resonance imaging assessment of avascular femoral head necrosis in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilufer Kale

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Increased risk of osteoporosis, fractures, and avascular necrosis (AVN has been suggested in multiple sclerosis (MS. Patients with MS are often exposed to corticosteroid treatment (CST during the disease course and conflicting reports exist regarding complications of CST. Our study aims to investigate the association between cumulative doses of CST and radiographic evaluation of AVN of the femoral head in MS. Twenty-six MS patients (mean age, 38.4±10 yr were enrolled and prospectively evaluated for AVN by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The mean disease duration was 11.5±8.5 years and mean expanded disability status scale (EDSS score was 3±2. The cumulative dosage of CST varied between 20 g and 60 g; patients were grouped into two categories: 1 CST between 20-40 g, 17 (65% patients; 2 CST ≥40 g; 9 (35% patients. The relationship between cumulative CST dosage and MRI diagnosis of AVN was stat­istically insignificant (P>0.9. Clarification of the cumulative effect of CST in the development of AVN is of great importance for future long-term steroid treatment strategies.

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid metabolic profiles in multiple sclerosis and degenerative dementias obtained by high resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vion-Dury, J.; Confort-Gouny, S.; Maillet, S.; Cozzone, P.J.; Nicoli, F.; Gastaut, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    We have analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 19 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), 12 patients with degenerative dementia and 17 control patients using in vitro high resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 400 MHz. The CSF metabolic profile is slightly modified in MS patients (increased lactate and fructose concentrations, decreased creatinine and phenylalanine concentrations) and is not correlated with the intensity of the intrathecal inflammation. Proton MRS of CSF does not differentiate relapsing-remitting MS and primary progressive MS. We have not detected any specific abnormal resonance in native or lyophilized CSF. The CSF metabolic profile of demented patients is much more altered (increased concentration of lactate, pyruvate, alanine, lysine, valine, leucine-isoleucine, tyrosine, glutamine) and is in agreement with a brain oxidative metabolism impairment as already described in Alzheimer's disease. Unassigned abnormal but non specific or constant resonances have been detected on MR spectra of demented patients. CSF inositol concentration is also increased in the CSF of patients with Alzheimer's disease. In vitro high resolution proton MRS of the CSF constitutes a new and original way to explore CSF for the differential and/or early diagnosis of dementias, as a complement to in vivo proton cerebral MRS. (authors). 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid metabolic profiles in multiple sclerosis and degenerative dementias obtained by high resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vion-Dury, J.; Confort-Gouny, S.; Maillet, S.; Cozzone, P.J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France); Nicoli, F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France)]|[Hopital Sainte-Marguerite, 13 - Marseille (France); Gastaut, J.L. [Hopital Sainte-Marguerite, 13 - Marseille (France)

    1996-07-01

    We have analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 19 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), 12 patients with degenerative dementia and 17 control patients using in vitro high resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 400 MHz. The CSF metabolic profile is slightly modified in MS patients (increased lactate and fructose concentrations, decreased creatinine and phenylalanine concentrations) and is not correlated with the intensity of the intrathecal inflammation. Proton MRS of CSF does not differentiate relapsing-remitting MS and primary progressive MS. We have not detected any specific abnormal resonance in native or lyophilized CSF. The CSF metabolic profile of demented patients is much more altered (increased concentration of lactate, pyruvate, alanine, lysine, valine, leucine-isoleucine, tyrosine, glutamine) and is in agreement with a brain oxidative metabolism impairment as already described in Alzheimer`s disease. Unassigned abnormal but non specific or constant resonances have been detected on MR spectra of demented patients. CSF inositol concentration is also increased in the CSF of patients with Alzheimer`s disease. In vitro high resolution proton MRS of the CSF constitutes a new and original way to explore CSF for the differential and/or early diagnosis of dementias, as a complement to in vivo proton cerebral MRS. (authors). 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Association between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and magnetic resonance imaging findings and intelligence in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtari, Fereshteh; Emami, Parisa; Akbari, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disease in which demyelination and axonal loss leads to progressive disability. Cognition impairment is among the most common complication. Studying axonal loss in the retina is a new marker for MS. The main goal of our study is to search for correlations between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness at the macula and head of the optic nerve and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) Scores that assess multiple domains of intelligence, and to explore the relationship between changes in the RNFL thickness with intellectual and cognitive dysfunction. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted at the University Hospital of Kashani, Isfahan, Iran, from September to December 2013. All patients were assessed with a full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ) on the WAIS-R. An optical coherence tomography study and brain MRI were performed in the same week for all the patients. Statistical analysis was conducted by using a bivariate correlation, by utilizing SPSS 20.0. A P value ≤ 0.05 was the threshold of statistical significance. Examination of a 100 patients showed a significant correlation between the average RNFL thickness of the macula and the verbal IQ (P value = 0.01) and full IQ (P value = 0.01). There was a significant correlation between brain atrophy and verbal IQ. The RNFL loss was correlated with verbal IQ and full IQ.

  2. One-Dimensional-Ratio Measures of Atrophy Progression in Multiple Sclerosis as Evaluated by Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martola, J.; Wiberg Kristoffersen, M.; Aspelin, P.; Stawiarz, L.; Fredrikson, S.; Hillert, J.; Bergstroem, J.; Flodmark, O.

    2009-01-01

    Background: For decades, normalized one-dimensional (1D) measures have been used in the evaluation of brain atrophy. In multiple sclerosis (MS), the use of normalized linear measures over longitudinal follow-up remains insufficiently documented. Purpose: To evaluate the association between different regional atrophy measures and disability in MS patients over four decades in a longitudinal cross-sectional study. Material and Methods: 37 consecutively selected MS patients were included. At baseline, patients had a range of disease duration (1-33 years) and age (24-65 years). Each patient was followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for a mean of 9.25 years (range 7.3-10 years). Four 1D measures were applied at three time points on axial 5-mm T1-weighted images. Three clinical MS subgroups were represented: relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), secondary progressive MS (SPMS), and primary progressive MS (PPMS). Results: There were significant changes in all 1D ratios during follow-up. The Evans ratio (ER) and the bifrontal ratio (BFR) were associated with the development of disability. Changes of ER and BFR reflected more aggressive disease progression, as expressed by MS severity score (MSSS). Conclusion: All four normalized ratios showed uniform atrophy progression, suggesting a consistent rate of atrophy over long-term disease duration independent of MS course. Disability status correlated with 1D measures, suggesting that serial evaluation of Evans and bifrontal ratios might contribute to the radiological evaluation of MS patients

  3. Diffusion tensor imaging applications in multiple sclerosis patients using 3T magnetic resonance: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testaverde, Lorenzo; Caporali, Laura [University ' ' Sapienza' ' of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Venditti, Eugenio; Grillea, Giovanni [U.O.C. Neuroradiologia, I.R.C.C.S. ' ' Neuromed' ' , Pozzilli (Italy); Colonnese, Claudio [University ' ' Sapienza' ' of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); U.O.C. Neuroradiologia, I.R.C.C.S. ' ' Neuromed' ' , Pozzilli (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    This study evaluated patients with multiple sclerosis using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to obtain fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values. We investigated the possible statistically significant variation of MD and FA in different MS patients, compared simultaneously, putting in comparison their normal appearing white matter (NAWM) and white matter affected by disease (plaques), both during activity and in remission, with normal white matter (NWM) of control subjects. Statistical analysis using Levene's test for comparison of variances revealed significant (P < 0.05) differences between FA values of the NWM of the controls and those of NAWM and active or inactive lesions, of the patients in the study. However, the differences between MD values of the NWM of the controls and those of NAWM and active or inactive lesions of the patients in the study were judged not significant (P > 0.05). Imaging of MS using MRI techniques is constantly searching for reproducible quantitative parameter. This study shows how these parameters can be identified in the MD and FA values, and thus suggests the implementation of MRI routine protocols for diagnosing MS with the DTI analysis, since it can provide valuable information otherwise unobtainable. (orig.)

  4. Structural networks involved in attention and executive functions in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Llufriu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Attention and executive deficits are disabling symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS that have been related to disconnection mechanisms. We aimed to investigate changes in structural connectivity in MS and their association with attention and executive performance applying an improved framework that combines high order probabilistic tractography and anatomical exclusion criteria postprocessing. We compared graph theory metrics of structural networks and fractional anisotropy (FA of white matter (WM connections or edges between 72 MS subjects and 38 healthy volunteers (HV and assessed their correlation with cognition. Patients displayed decreased network transitivity, global efficiency and increased path length compared with HV (p < 0.05, corrected. Also, nodal strength was decreased in 26 of 84 gray matter regions. The distribution of nodes with stronger connections or hubs of the network was similar among groups except for the right pallidum and left insula, which became hubs in patients. MS subjects presented reduced edge FA widespread in the network, while FA was increased in 24 connections (p < 0.05, corrected. Decreased integrity of frontoparietal networks, deep gray nuclei and insula correlated with worse attention and executive performance (r between 0.38 and 0.55, p < 0.05, corrected. Contrarily, higher strength in the right transverse temporal cortex and increased FA of several connections (mainly from cingulate, frontal and occipital cortices were associated with worse functioning (r between −0.40 and −0.47, p < 0.05 corrected. In conclusion, structural brain connectivity is disturbed in MS due to widespread impairment of WM connections and gray matter structures. The increased edge connectivity suggests the presence of reorganization mechanisms at the structural level. Importantly, attention and executive performance relates to frontoparietal networks, deep gray nuclei and insula. These results support the relevance of

  5. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwatban, Adnan Z.W.

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the author except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a transtympanic electrode implanted onto the surface of the cochlea. This approach would however, result in electromotive forces (EMFs) being induced by the time varying magnetic field, which would lead to current flow and heating, as well as deflection of the metallic electrode within the static magnetic field, and image distortion due to the magnetic susceptibility difference. A gold-plated tungsten electrode with a zero magnetic susceptibility was developed to avoid image distortion. Used with carbon leads and a carbon reference pad, it enabled safe, distortion-free fMRI studies of deaf subjects. The study revealed activation of the primary auditory cortex. This fMRI procedure can be used to demonstrate whether the auditory pathway is fully intact, and may provide a useful method for pre-operative assessment of candidates for cochlear implantation. Glucose is the energy source on which the function of the human brain is entirely dependent. Failure to

  6. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwatban, Adnan Z W

    2002-07-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the author except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a transtympanic electrode implanted onto the surface of the cochlea. This approach would however, result in electromotive forces (EMFs) being induced by the time varying magnetic field, which would lead to current flow and heating, as well as deflection of the metallic electrode within the static magnetic field, and image distortion due to the magnetic susceptibility difference. A gold-plated tungsten electrode with a zero magnetic susceptibility was developed to avoid image distortion. Used with carbon leads and a carbon reference pad, it enabled safe, distortion-free fMRI studies of deaf subjects. The study revealed activation of the primary auditory cortex. This fMRI procedure can be used to demonstrate whether the auditory pathway is fully intact, and may provide a useful method for pre-operative assessment of candidates for cochlear implantation. Glucose is the energy source on which the function of the human brain is entirely dependent. Failure to

  7. Skeletal Muscle Remodelling as a Function of Disease Progression in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L; Jørgensen, L H; Bech, R D

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness is considered the pivotal sign of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Knowledge about the skeletal muscle degeneration/regeneration process and the myogenic potential is limited in ALS patients. Therefore, we investigate these processes in a time course perspective by analysing s...

  8. Exploring brain function with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Salle, F.; Formisano, E.; Linden, D.E.J.; Goebel, R.; Bonavita, S.; Pepino, A.; Smaltino, F.; Tedeschi, G.

    1999-01-01

    Since its invention in the early 1990s, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has rapidly assumed a leading role among the techniques used to localize brain activity. The spatial and temporal resolution provided by state-of-the-art MR technology and its non-invasive character, which allows multiple studies of the same subject, are some of the main advantages of fMRI over the other functional neuroimaging modalities that are based on changes in blood flow and cortical metabolism. This paper describes the basic principles and methodology of fMRI and some aspects of its application to functional activation studies. Attention is focused on the physiology of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast mechanism and on the acquisition of functional time-series with echo planar imaging (EPI). We also provide an introduction to the current strategies for the correction of signal artefacts and other image processing techniques. In order to convey an idea of the numerous applications of fMRI, we will review some of the recent results in the fields of cognitive and sensorimotor psychology and physiology

  9. Exploring brain function with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Salle, F.; Formisano, E.; Linden, D.E.J.; Goebel, R.; Bonavita, S.; Pepino, A.; Smaltino, F.; Tedeschi, G

    1999-05-01

    Since its invention in the early 1990s, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has rapidly assumed a leading role among the techniques used to localize brain activity. The spatial and temporal resolution provided by state-of-the-art MR technology and its non-invasive character, which allows multiple studies of the same subject, are some of the main advantages of fMRI over the other functional neuroimaging modalities that are based on changes in blood flow and cortical metabolism. This paper describes the basic principles and methodology of fMRI and some aspects of its application to functional activation studies. Attention is focused on the physiology of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast mechanism and on the acquisition of functional time-series with echo planar imaging (EPI). We also provide an introduction to the current strategies for the correction of signal artefacts and other image processing techniques. In order to convey an idea of the numerous applications of fMRI, we will review some of the recent results in the fields of cognitive and sensorimotor psychology and physiology.

  10. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Consumer Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Martin; Schilke, Oliver; Weber, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    of prior fMRI research related to consumer behavior and highlights the features that make fMRI an attractive method for consumer and marketing research. The authors discuss advantages and limitations and illustrate the proposed procedures with an applied study, which investigates loss aversion when buying......Although the field of psychology is undergoing an immense shift toward the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the application of this methodology to consumer research is relatively new. To assist consumer researchers in understanding fMRI, this paper elaborates on the findings...... and selling a common product. Results reveal a significantly stronger activation in the amygdala while consumers estimate selling prices versus buying prices, suggesting that loss aversion is associated with the processing of negative emotion. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  11. Multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indwelling catheter Osteoporosis or thinning of the bones Pressure sores Side effects of medicines used to treat the ... Daily bowel care program Multiple sclerosis - discharge Preventing pressure ulcers Swallowing problems Images Multiple sclerosis MRI of the ...

  12. Using Functional Electrical Stimulation Mediated by Iterative Learning Control and Robotics to Improve Arm Movement for People With Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Patrica; Freeman, Chris; Coote, Susan; Demain, Sara; Feys, Peter; Meadmore, Katie; Hughes, Ann-Marie

    2016-02-01

    Few interventions address multiple sclerosis (MS) arm dysfunction but robotics and functional electrical stimulation (FES) appear promising. This paper investigates the feasibility of combining FES with passive robotic support during virtual reality (VR) training tasks to improve upper limb function in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). The system assists patients in following a specified trajectory path, employing an advanced model-based paradigm termed iterative learning control (ILC) to adjust the FES to improve accuracy and maximise voluntary effort. Reaching tasks were repeated six times with ILC learning the optimum control action from previous attempts. A convenience sample of five pwMS was recruited from local MS societies, and the intervention comprised 18 one-hour training sessions over 10 weeks. The accuracy of tracking performance without FES and the amount of FES delivered during training were analyzed using regression analysis. Clinical functioning of the arm was documented before and after treatment with standard tests. Statistically significant results following training included: improved accuracy of tracking performance both when assisted and unassisted by FES; reduction in maximum amount of FES needed to assist tracking; and less impairment in the proximal arm that was trained. The system was well tolerated by all participants with no increase in muscle fatigue reported. This study confirms the feasibility of FES combined with passive robot assistance as a potentially effective intervention to improve arm movement and control in pwMS and provides the basis for a follow-up study.

  13. Predictive value of different conventional and non-conventional MRI-parameters for specific domains of cognitive function in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Daniela; Khalil, Michael; Pichler, Alexander; Langkammer, Christian; Ropele, Stefan; Marschik, Peter B; Fuchs, Siegrid; Fazekas, Franz; Enzinger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    While many studies correlated cognitive function with changes in brain morphology in multiple sclerosis (MS), few of them used a multi-parametric approach in a single dataset so far. We thus here assessed the predictive value of different conventional and quantitative MRI-parameters both for overall and domain-specific cognitive performance in MS patients from a single center. 69 patients (17 clinically isolated syndrome, 47 relapsing-remitting MS, 5 secondary-progressive MS) underwent the "Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Tests" assessing overall cognition, cognitive efficiency and memory function as well as MRI at 3 Tesla to obtain T2-lesion load (T2-LL), normalized brain volume (global brain volume loss), normalized cortical volume (NCV), normalized thalamic volume (NTV), normalized hippocampal volume (NHV), normalized caudate nuclei volume (NCNV), basal ganglia R2* values (iron deposition) and magnetization transfer ratios (MTRs) for cortex and normal appearing brain tissue (NABT). Regression models including clinical, demographic variables and MRI-parameters explained 22-27% of variance of overall cognition, 17-26% of cognitive efficiency and 22-23% of memory. NCV, T2-LL and MTR of NABT were the strongest predictors of overall cognitive function. Cognitive efficiency was best predicted by NCV, T2-LL and iron deposition in the basal ganglia. NTV was the strongest predictor for memory function and NHV was particularly related to memory function. The predictive value of distinct MRI-parameters differs for specific domains of cognitive function, with a greater impact of cortical volume, focal and diffuse white matter abnormalities on overall cognitive function, an additional role of basal ganglia iron deposition on cognitive efficiency, and thalamic and hippocampal volume on memory function. This suggests the usefulness of using multiparametric MRI to assess (micro)structural correlates of different cognitive constructs.

  14. Current concepts in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiethoelter, Horst; Dichgans, Johannes

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains 9 articles dealing with the use of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and positron emitted tomography in the diagnosis and staging of multiple sclerosis. (H.W.). refs.; figs.; tabs

  15. Defining active progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, Finn; Börnsen, Lars; Ammitzbøll, Cecilie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether disease activity according to consensus criteria (magnetic resonance imaging activity or clinical relapses) associate with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) changes in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVE: To compare CSF biomarkers in active and inactive...

  16. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human primary visual cortex during visual stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Atsushi; Abe, Haruki; Nakajima, Takashi; Fujita, Motoi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Kuwabara, Takeo; Naruse, Shoji; Takagi, Mineo.

    1995-01-01

    Signal changes in the human primary visual cortex during visual stimulation were evaluated using non-invasive functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The experiments were performed on 10 normal human volunteers and 2 patients with homonymous hemianopsia, including one who was recovering from the exacerbation of multiple sclerosis. The visual stimuli were provided by a pattern generator using the checkerboard pattern for determining the visual evoked potential of full-field and hemifield stimulation. In normal volunteers, a signal increase was observed on the bilateral primary visual cortex during the full-field stimulation and on the contra-lateral cortex during hemifield stimulation. In the patient with homonymous hemianopsia after cerebral infarction, the signal change was clearly decreased on the affected side. In the other patient, the one recovering from multiple sclerosis with an almost normal visual field, the fMRI was within normal limits. These results suggest that it is possible to visualize the activation of the visual cortex during visual stimulation, and that there is a possibility of using this test as an objective method of visual field examination. (author)

  17. Tuberous sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan S

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Although tuberous sclerosis has been described with a diagnostic triad, it is not present consistently in all cases. Variety of skin manifestations were reported in tuberous sclerosis. This studay was undertaken to assess the frequency of various skin changes in tuberous sclerosis. Ten consecutive cases of tuberous sclerosis were studied. Angiofibroma was the commonest cutaneous manifestation. Atypical fibroxanthoma, dermatofibroma and neurofibroma were also noticed as interesting associations.

  18. MR in the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, Alex; Leon, Adelaida

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, persistent inflammatory-demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that typically presents as an acute clinically isolated syndrome attributable to a monofocal or multifocal demyelinating lesion, which usually affects the optic nerve, spinal cord, or brainstem and cerebellum. Although the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is still based on clinical findings, magnetic resonance imaging is now integrated in the overall diagnostic scheme of the disease because of its unique sensitivity to demonstrate the spatial and temporal dissemination of demyelinating plaques in the brain and spinal cord. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging techniques, such as T2-weighted and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted sequences are highly sensitive in detecting multiple sclerosis plaques and provide a quantitative assessment of inflammatory activity and lesion load. However, there is a persisting mismatch between clinical and magnetic resonance imaging efficacy of approved treatments, which underlies the fact that this technique does not suffice to explain the entire spectrum of the disease process. In recent years, great effort has been dedicated to overcoming these limitations by using non-conventional magnetic resonance-derived metrics that can selectively measure the more destructive aspects of multiple sclerosis pathology and monitor the reparative mechanisms. These metrics, which include unenhanced T1-weighted imaging, measures of central nervous system atrophy, magnetization transfer imaging, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion-weighted imaging, and functional magnetic resonance imaging, provide a better approximation of the pathological substrate of the multiple sclerosis plaques, have increased our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, and have proven useful for studying the natural history of multiple sclerosis and monitoring the effects of new treatments. Therefore, magnetic resonance imaging not only plays an

  19. MR in the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira, Alex [Magnetic Resonance Unit (I.D.I.), Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: alex.rovira@idi-cat.org; Leon, Adelaida [Magnetic Resonance Unit (I.D.I.), Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-09-15

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, persistent inflammatory-demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that typically presents as an acute clinically isolated syndrome attributable to a monofocal or multifocal demyelinating lesion, which usually affects the optic nerve, spinal cord, or brainstem and cerebellum. Although the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is still based on clinical findings, magnetic resonance imaging is now integrated in the overall diagnostic scheme of the disease because of its unique sensitivity to demonstrate the spatial and temporal dissemination of demyelinating plaques in the brain and spinal cord. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging techniques, such as T2-weighted and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted sequences are highly sensitive in detecting multiple sclerosis plaques and provide a quantitative assessment of inflammatory activity and lesion load. However, there is a persisting mismatch between clinical and magnetic resonance imaging efficacy of approved treatments, which underlies the fact that this technique does not suffice to explain the entire spectrum of the disease process. In recent years, great effort has been dedicated to overcoming these limitations by using non-conventional magnetic resonance-derived metrics that can selectively measure the more destructive aspects of multiple sclerosis pathology and monitor the reparative mechanisms. These metrics, which include unenhanced T1-weighted imaging, measures of central nervous system atrophy, magnetization transfer imaging, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion-weighted imaging, and functional magnetic resonance imaging, provide a better approximation of the pathological substrate of the multiple sclerosis plaques, have increased our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, and have proven useful for studying the natural history of multiple sclerosis and monitoring the effects of new treatments. Therefore, magnetic resonance imaging not only plays an

  20. The Optimization of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pulse Sequences in Order to Better Detection of Multiple Sclerosis Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshidfar, Z; Faeghi, F; Haghighatkhah, H R; Abdolmohammadi, J

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most sensitive technique to detect multiple sclerosis (MS) plaques in central nervous system. In some cases, the patients who were suspected to MS, Whereas MRI images are normal, but whether patients don't have MS plaques or MRI images are not enough optimized enough in order to show MS plaques? The aim of the current study is evaluating the efficiency of different MRI sequences in order to better detection of MS plaques. In this cross-sectional study which was performed at Shohada-E Tajrish in Tehran - Iran hospital between October, 2011 to April, 2012, included 20 patients who suspected to MS disease were selected by the method of random sampling and underwent routine brain Pulse sequences (Axial T2w, Axial T1w, Coronal T2w, Sagittal T1w, Axial FLAIR) by Siemens, Avanto, 1.5 Tesla system. If any lesion which is suspected to the MS disease was observed, additional sequences such as: Sagittal FLAIR Fat Sat, Sagittal PDw-fat Sat, Sagittal PDw-water sat was also performed. This study was performed in about 52 lesions and the results in more than 19 lesions showed that, for the Subcortical and Infratentorial areas, PDWw sequence with fat suppression is the best choice, And in nearly 33 plaques located in Periventricular area, FLAIR Fat Sat was the most effective sequence than both PDw fat and water suppression pulse sequences. Although large plaques may visible in all images, but important problem in patients with suspected MS is screening the tiny MS plaques. This study showed that for revealing the MS plaques located in the Subcortical and Infratentorial areas, PDw-fat sat is the most effective sequence, and for MS plaques in the periventricular area, FLAIR fat Sat is the best choice.

  1. Exercise training effects on memory and hippocampal viscoelasticity in multiple sclerosis: a novel application of magnetic resonance elastography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandroff, Brian M. [Kessler Foundation, Neuropsychology and Neuroscience Laboratory, East Hanover, NJ (United States); Johnson, Curtis L. [University of Delaware, Deparment of Biomedical Engineering, Newark, DE (United States); Motl, Robert W. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Cognitive impairment is common and debilitating among persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) and might be managed with exercise training. However, the effects of exercise training on viscoelastic brain properties in this population are unknown. The present pilot study adopted a single-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) design and is the first to examine the effect of an aerobic exercise training intervention on learning and memory and hippocampal viscoelasticity using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in persons with MS. Eight fully ambulatory females with MS were randomly assigned into exercise training intervention or waitlist control conditions. The intervention condition involved 12 weeks of supervised, progressive treadmill walking exercise training. All participants underwent measures of learning and memory (i.e., California Verbal Learning Test-II; CVLT-II) and further underwent MRE scans for measurement of shear stiffness (μ) and damping ratio (ξ) of the hippocampus before and after the 12-week period. Overall, there were small-to-moderate intervention effects on CVLT-II performance (d = 0.34) and large intervention effects on hippocampal μ (d = 0.94) and hippocampal ξ (d = -1.20). Change in CVLT-II scores was strongly associated with change in μ (r = 0.93, p < 0.01) and ξ (r = -.96, p < 0.01) of the hippocampus. This small pilot RCT provides exciting proof-of-concept data supporting progressive treadmill walking exercise training for potentially improving learning and memory and underlying hippocampal viscoelastic properties in persons with MS. This is important given the high prevalence and burden of MS-related memory impairment. (orig.)

  2. Exercise training effects on memory and hippocampal viscoelasticity in multiple sclerosis: a novel application of magnetic resonance elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandroff, Brian M.; Johnson, Curtis L.; Motl, Robert W.

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is common and debilitating among persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) and might be managed with exercise training. However, the effects of exercise training on viscoelastic brain properties in this population are unknown. The present pilot study adopted a single-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) design and is the first to examine the effect of an aerobic exercise training intervention on learning and memory and hippocampal viscoelasticity using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in persons with MS. Eight fully ambulatory females with MS were randomly assigned into exercise training intervention or waitlist control conditions. The intervention condition involved 12 weeks of supervised, progressive treadmill walking exercise training. All participants underwent measures of learning and memory (i.e., California Verbal Learning Test-II; CVLT-II) and further underwent MRE scans for measurement of shear stiffness (μ) and damping ratio (ξ) of the hippocampus before and after the 12-week period. Overall, there were small-to-moderate intervention effects on CVLT-II performance (d = 0.34) and large intervention effects on hippocampal μ (d = 0.94) and hippocampal ξ (d = -1.20). Change in CVLT-II scores was strongly associated with change in μ (r = 0.93, p < 0.01) and ξ (r = -.96, p < 0.01) of the hippocampus. This small pilot RCT provides exciting proof-of-concept data supporting progressive treadmill walking exercise training for potentially improving learning and memory and underlying hippocampal viscoelastic properties in persons with MS. This is important given the high prevalence and burden of MS-related memory impairment. (orig.)

  3. Increase in stability of cellulase immobilized on functionalized magnetic nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenjuan [Department of Machine Intelligence and Systems Engineering, Faculty of Systems Engineering, Akita Prefectural University, Akita 015-0055 (Japan); Qiu, Jianhui, E-mail: qiu@akita-pu.ac.jp [Department of Machine Intelligence and Systems Engineering, Faculty of Systems Engineering, Akita Prefectural University, Akita 015-0055 (Japan); Feng, Huixia [College of Petrochemical Engineering, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Zang, Limin; Sakai, Eiichi [Department of Machine Intelligence and Systems Engineering, Faculty of Systems Engineering, Akita Prefectural University, Akita 015-0055 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    Functionalized magnetic nanospheres were prepared by co-condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate with three different amino-silanes: 3-(2-aminoethylamino propyl)-triethoxysilane (AEAPTES), 3-(2-aminoethylamino propyl)-trimethoxysilane (AEAPTMES) and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Then three functionalized magnetic nanospheres were used as supports for immobilization of cellulase. The three functionalized magnetic nanospheres with core–shell morphologies exhibited higher capacity for cellulase immobilization than unfunctionalized magnetic nanospheres. The increasing of surface charge of functionalized magnetic nanospheres leads to an enhancement of the capacity of cellulase immobilization. Particularly, AEAPTMES with methoxy groups was favored to be hydrolyzed and grafted on unfunctionalized magnetic nanospheres than the others. AEAPTMES functionalized magnetic nanospheres with the highest zeta potential (29 mV) exhibited 87% activity recovery and the maximum amount of immobilized cellulase was 112 mg/g support at concentration of initial cellulase of 8 mg/mL. Immobilized cellulase on AEAPTMES functionalized magnetic nanospheres had higher temperature stability and broader pH stability than other immobilized cellulases and free cellulase. In particular, it can be used in about 40 °C, demonstrating the potential of biofuel production using this immobilized cellulase. - Highlights: • Three Amino-silane modified magnetic nanospheres were prepared. • Cellulase immobilized AEAPTMES functionalized magnetic nanospheres had higher temperature stability and broader pH stability than free cellulase. • The potential of biofuel production using this immobilized cellulase.

  4. Increase in stability of cellulase immobilized on functionalized magnetic nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Qiu, Jianhui; Feng, Huixia; Zang, Limin; Sakai, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized magnetic nanospheres were prepared by co-condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate with three different amino-silanes: 3-(2-aminoethylamino propyl)-triethoxysilane (AEAPTES), 3-(2-aminoethylamino propyl)-trimethoxysilane (AEAPTMES) and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Then three functionalized magnetic nanospheres were used as supports for immobilization of cellulase. The three functionalized magnetic nanospheres with core–shell morphologies exhibited higher capacity for cellulase immobilization than unfunctionalized magnetic nanospheres. The increasing of surface charge of functionalized magnetic nanospheres leads to an enhancement of the capacity of cellulase immobilization. Particularly, AEAPTMES with methoxy groups was favored to be hydrolyzed and grafted on unfunctionalized magnetic nanospheres than the others. AEAPTMES functionalized magnetic nanospheres with the highest zeta potential (29 mV) exhibited 87% activity recovery and the maximum amount of immobilized cellulase was 112 mg/g support at concentration of initial cellulase of 8 mg/mL. Immobilized cellulase on AEAPTMES functionalized magnetic nanospheres had higher temperature stability and broader pH stability than other immobilized cellulases and free cellulase. In particular, it can be used in about 40 °C, demonstrating the potential of biofuel production using this immobilized cellulase. - Highlights: • Three Amino-silane modified magnetic nanospheres were prepared. • Cellulase immobilized AEAPTMES functionalized magnetic nanospheres had higher temperature stability and broader pH stability than free cellulase. • The potential of biofuel production using this immobilized cellulase

  5. The patient had a normal magnetic resonance imaging and temporal lobe epilepsy secondary to a porencephalic cyst but showed structural lesions (hippocampal sclerosis)☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Teppei; Ayuzawa, Satoshi; Aoki, Tsukasa; Fujiomto, Ayataka; Osuka, Satoru; Matsumura, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Patients with a porencephalic cyst frequently develop intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We report a surgically-treated male patient with intractable mesial TLE (mTLE) secondary to a porencephalic cyst. Although magnetic resonance imaging showed no hippocampal abnormalities, long-term video-electrocorticography revealed seizure onset discharges in the hippocampus. Temporal lobectomy brought an end to the patient's seizures. Hippocampal sclerosis was histopathologically confirmed (dual pathology). Careful evaluation of hippocampal epileptogenicity is required, and temporal lobectomy, which is less invasive than hemispherectomy, can be a treatment of choice for patients with mTLE secondary to a porencephalic cyst. PMID:25667851

  6. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abbreviations used: BOLD, Blood oxygenation level dependent; CBF, cerebral blood flow; fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging; EPI, eco-planar imaging; FOV, field of view; MRI, Magnetic resonance imaging; MRS, magnetic resonance spectroscopy;. PET, position emission tomography; rCBF, regional cerebral ...

  7. Neuroimaging of multimodal sensory stimulation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

    OpenAIRE

    Lulé , Dorothée; Diekmann , Volker; Müller , Hans-Peter; Kassubek , Jan; Ludolph , Albert C; Birbaumer , Niels

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Structural and functional imaging techniques were combined to investigate sensory system function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate cortical activity during visual, auditory, and somato-sensory stimulation in fourteen ALS patients and eighteen control subjects. Changes in amplitude, latency and duration of the BOLD response were modelled. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging was ...

  8. Use of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to describe patient-reported disability in multiple sclerosis and identification of relevant environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fary; Pallant, Julie F

    2007-01-01

    To use the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to describe patient-reported disability in multiple sclerosis and identify relevant environmental factors. Cross-sectional survey of 101 participants in the community. Their multiple sclerosis-related problems were linked with ICF categories (second level) using a checklist, consensus between health professionals and the "linking rules". The impact of multiple sclerosis on health areas corresponding to 48 ICF categories was also assessed. A total of 170 ICF categories were identified (mean age 49 years, 72 were female). Average number of problems reported was 18. The categories include 48 (42%) for body function, 16 (34%) body structure, 68 (58%) activities and participation and 38 (51%) for environmental factors. Extreme impact in health areas corresponding to ICF categories for activities and participation were reported for mobility, work, everyday home activities, community and social activities. While those for the environmental factors (barriers) included products for mobility, attitudes of extended family, restriction accessing social security and health resources. This study is a first step in the use of the ICF in persons with multiple sclerosis and towards development of the ICF Core set for multiple sclerosis from a broader international perspective.

  9. Quantification of brain metabolites in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, O; Rosenbaum, S; Topp, S

    1997-01-01

    We performed proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in patients with motor neuron disease (MND) to determine the absolute in vivo concentrations in the brain of the metabolites N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr/PCr). We examined the spectra acquired from a 20 x 20 x...... subjects. We estimated the concentrations of the metabolites using the water signal as an internal standard. The concentrations of Cho and Cr/PCr in both brain regions, as well as the concentration of NAA in the cerebellum, were unaltered in the MND patients compared with the controls. Only MND patients...... with both upper and lower motor neuron signs had a significantly decreased concentration of NAA (9.13 +/- 0.28 mM, mean +/- SEM) in the primary motor cortex when compared with healthy controls (10.03 +/- 0.22 mM). In conclusion, the slightly decreased concentration of NAA in the primary motor cortex from...

  10. STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL CHANGES EVALUATED BY ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY IN PATIENTS WITH SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. O. Saad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate heart rate variability (HRV in patients with systemic sclerosis (SS and to investigate their relationship to echocardiographic structural and functional changes in the heart.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 125 patients with SS and 50 gender- and age-matched apparently healthy individuals who made up a control group. In addition to clinical examinations, 73 patients underwent HRV assessment from 24-hour Holter electrocardiogram (ECG monitoring results and 121 patients had echocardiography (EchoCG. 24-hour Holter ECG monitoring was carried out in all control individuals.Results and discussion. Examination of the main parameters of time-domain HRV in patients with SS revealed a significant decline in all temporal and spectral indices, except for the mean R–R interval duration (meanNN, as compared with the control group. EchoCG detected a variety of changes, primarily the induration and calcification of aortic and mitral valves in most patients. Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction was encountered in almost half of the patients with SS. Eight patients had a lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, which was <55%. Studying the association of HRV values with separate EchoCG parameters revealed significant inverse correlations of the mean standard deviation of R–R intervals in 5-minute recording segments during 24 hours with the thickness of the interventricular septum (r = -0.18; p < 0.05 and with the induration of the aortic valve (r = -0.18; p < 0.05; the square root mean squared of successive differences (RMSSD, ms for R–R intervals and the percentage of adjacent R–R intervals that varied by more than 50 ms (pNN50 correlated with the induration of the aortic valve (r = -0.23; p<0.05 and r = -0.25; p < 0.05, respectively, with the presence of pericarditis (r = -0.24; p < 0.05 and r = -0,27; p < 0.05, respectively, and with the level of pulmonary artery systolic pressure (r = -0

  11. Early Magnetic Resonance Detection of Natalizumab-Related Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy in a Patient with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmo Manenti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is usually based on the clinical presentation, on the demonstration of the brain lesions at the magnetic resonance imaging examination, and on the detection of the JC virus DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid with high sensitive polymerase chain reaction. The role of magnetic resonance imaging specifically in natalizumab-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is strengthening, and it is gaining importance not only as an irreplaceable diagnostic tool but also as a surveillance and risk stratifying tool in treated patients. While other imaging techniques such as computed tomography lack sensitivity and specificity, magnetic resonance performed with morphological and functional sequences offers clinicians the possibility to early identify the stage of the disease and the emergence of an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after natalizumab blood removal plasmapheresis.

  12. Vision research with functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakadomari, Satoshi

    1999-01-01

    Present state of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which is based on changes of MR signals produced by blood circulation changes due to the nerve activity, in vision research was reviewed. In this field, there are international associations of Human Brain Mapping and for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) and reports presented in ARVO in 1998 and 1999 were firstly described. Next, the comparison between two conditions was defined as the experimental paradigm of fMRI and analyses with the event related fMRI and with classification into visual central regions were explained. Major findings obtained by stimulation of visual central regions were discussed on the lateral corpus geniculatum, areas of V1, V2, V3 (VP), V3A, V4A (V8), V5 and LO (lateral occipital complex), and others. In practice of actual fMRI, the noise is often attributable to the examinee factor and notification for speculating the result is important. The value of fMRI in the clinical ophthalmological diagnosis was discussed and thought to be further investigated. (K.H.)

  13. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balcer, Laura J; Miller, David H; Reingold, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple...... sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique...... of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes...

  14. The corticospinal tract lesion of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, Shin-ichi; Sobue, Gen; Mitsuma, Terunori; Yasuda, Takeshi; Kachi, Teruhiko.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging by gradient echo method demonstrated lesions of the lateral corticospinal tract at cervical cord levels in three ALS patients. Patient 1 was a 43-year-old woman with common from of ALS. She developed right-side predominant pyramidal signs, and right-side predominant prolongation of central motor conduction time. MRI showed hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsal region of the lateral column at the 4th and 5th cervical segments with right-side predominacy. Patient 2 was a 65-year-old man with pseudopolyneuritic from of ALS, who showed lower motor neuron signs without a pyramidal sign. MRI of the 3rd and 4th cervical cord segments demonstrated bilateral hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsal part of the lateral column. Patient 3 was a 62-year-old man with common form of ALS, who showed marked bilateral pyramidal signs with Babinski's sign. MRI of the 5th cervical spinal cord segment demonstrated bilateral hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsolateral column. MR images of the spinal cord thus obtained corresponded well to the postmortem confirmed degeneration of the spinal corticospinal tract. MRI of the spinal cord performed by gradient echo method would provide additional information on the upper motor neuron involvement in ALS. (author)

  15. The corticospinal tract lesion of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terao, Shin-ichi; Sobue, Gen; Mitsuma, Terunori (Aichi Medical Univ., Nagakute (Japan)); Yasuda, Takeshi; Kachi, Teruhiko

    1994-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging by gradient echo method demonstrated lesions of the lateral corticospinal tract at cervical cord levels in three ALS patients. Patient 1 was a 43-year-old woman with common from of ALS. She developed right-side predominant pyramidal signs, and right-side predominant prolongation of central motor conduction time. MRI showed hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsal region of the lateral column at the 4th and 5th cervical segments with right-side predominacy. Patient 2 was a 65-year-old man with pseudopolyneuritic from of ALS, who showed lower motor neuron signs without a pyramidal sign. MRI of the 3rd and 4th cervical cord segments demonstrated bilateral hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsal part of the lateral column. Patient 3 was a 62-year-old man with common form of ALS, who showed marked bilateral pyramidal signs with Babinski's sign. MRI of the 5th cervical spinal cord segment demonstrated bilateral hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsolateral column. MR images of the spinal cord thus obtained corresponded well to the postmortem confirmed degeneration of the spinal corticospinal tract. MRI of the spinal cord performed by gradient echo method would provide additional information on the upper motor neuron involvement in ALS. (author).

  16. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging predicts response to methylprednisolone in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Jensen, C.V.; Larsson, H.B.W.

    2003-01-01

    underwent lumbar puncture before treatment. The odds ratio (OR) of improvement after methylprednisolone treatment (a one point change in the visual function system score of the Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) in ON or in the EDSS score in attacks of MS) was higher in patients with enhancing...

  17. Functional magnetic nanoparticles for medical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiyanagi, Yuko [Graduate School of Engineering, Department of Physics, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: yuko@ynu.ac.jp; Moritake, Shinji [Graduate School of Engineering, Department of Physics, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Taira, Shu [Mitsubishi Kagaku Institute of Life Sciences, Molecular Gerontology Research Group, Tokyo 194-8511 (Japan); Setou, Mitsutoshi [Mitsubishi Kagaku Institute of Life Sciences, Molecular Gerontology Research Group, Tokyo 194-8511 (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    We prepared an amino-substituted nanoparticle by means of the amino-silane coupling procedure. The original magnetic particles were {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which ranged in size from 1.3 to 34 nm, surrounded by amorphous SiO{sub 2}. The modification of the magnetic particle by the addition of an amino group was confirmed using a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FT-IR). The X-ray diffraction patterns showed a spinel structure both before and after modification of the amino group. The magnetization curve indicated paramagnetic behavior for the 3 nm particles, superparamagnetic behavior for the 7 nm particles, and ferromagnetic behavior for 9 nm particles at room temperature. A fluorescent reagent was applied to the particle, and the particle was introduced into a cell. The magnetic particles in the cell were localized using an external magnetic field.

  18. Functional magnetic nanoparticles for medical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiyanagi, Yuko; Moritake, Shinji; Taira, Shu; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2007-01-01

    We prepared an amino-substituted nanoparticle by means of the amino-silane coupling procedure. The original magnetic particles were γ-Fe 2 O 3 , which ranged in size from 1.3 to 34 nm, surrounded by amorphous SiO 2 . The modification of the magnetic particle by the addition of an amino group was confirmed using a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FT-IR). The X-ray diffraction patterns showed a spinel structure both before and after modification of the amino group. The magnetization curve indicated paramagnetic behavior for the 3 nm particles, superparamagnetic behavior for the 7 nm particles, and ferromagnetic behavior for 9 nm particles at room temperature. A fluorescent reagent was applied to the particle, and the particle was introduced into a cell. The magnetic particles in the cell were localized using an external magnetic field

  19. Rehabilitation and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    In a chronic and disabling disease like multiple sclerosis, rehabilitation becomes of major importance in the preservation of physical, psychological and social functioning. Approximately 80% of patients have multiple sclerosis for more than 35 years and most will develop disability at some point......, a paradigm shift is taking place and it is now increasingly acknowledged that exercise therapy is both safe and beneficial. Robot-assisted training is also attracting attention in multiple sclerosis rehabilitation. Several sophisticated commercial robots exist, but so far the number of scientific studies...... promising. This drug has been shown to improve walking ability in some patients with multiple sclerosis, associated with a reduction of patients' self-reported ambulatory disability. Rehabilitation strategies involving these different approaches, or combinations of them, may be of great use in improving...

  20. Increase in stability of cellulase immobilized on functionalized magnetic nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Qiu, Jianhui; Feng, Huixia; Zang, Limin; Sakai, Eiichi

    2015-02-01

    Functionalized magnetic nanospheres were prepared by co-condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate with three different amino-silanes: 3-(2-aminoethylamino propyl)-triethoxysilane (AEAPTES), 3-(2-aminoethylamino propyl)-trimethoxysilane (AEAPTMES) and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Then three functionalized magnetic nanospheres were used as supports for immobilization of cellulase. The three functionalized magnetic nanospheres with core-shell morphologies exhibited higher capacity for cellulase immobilization than unfunctionalized magnetic nanospheres. The increasing of surface charge of functionalized magnetic nanospheres leads to an enhancement of the capacity of cellulase immobilization. Particularly, AEAPTMES with methoxy groups was favored to be hydrolyzed and grafted on unfunctionalized magnetic nanospheres than the others. AEAPTMES functionalized magnetic nanospheres with the highest zeta potential (29 mV) exhibited 87% activity recovery and the maximum amount of immobilized cellulase was 112 mg/g support at concentration of initial cellulase of 8 mg/mL. Immobilized cellulase on AEAPTMES functionalized magnetic nanospheres had higher temperature stability and broader pH stability than other immobilized cellulases and free cellulase. In particular, it can be used in about 40 °C, demonstrating the potential of biofuel production using this immobilized cellulase.

  1. Treatment of Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pierson, Susan H.; Griffith, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis is an increasingly recognized entity. This article reviews the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis, its prevalence, its relationship to different types of multiple sclerosis, and its contribution to long-term functional prognosis. The discussion also focuses on the key elements of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis which distinguish it from other forms of cognitive impairment. Therapeutic interventions potentially effective for the co...

  2. No association of abnormal cranial venous drainage with multiple sclerosis: a magnetic resonance venography and flow-quantification study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattjes, M.P.; van Oosten, B.W.; de Graaf, W.L.; Seewann, A.M.; Bot, J.C.J.; van den Berg, R.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Polman, C.H.; Barkhof, F.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recent studies using colour-coded Doppler sonography showed that chronic impaired venous drainage from the central nervous system is almost exclusively found in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. This study aimed to investigate the intracranial and extracranial venous anatomy and the

  3. No association of abnormal cranial venous drainage with multiple sclerosis: a magnetic resonance venography and flow-quantification study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattjes, Mike P.; van Oosten, Bob W.; de Graaf, Wolter L.; Seewann, Alexandra; Bot, Joseph C. J.; van den Berg, René; Uitdehaag, Bernard M. J.; Polman, Chris H.; Barkhof, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies using colour-coded Doppler sonography showed that chronic impaired venous drainage from the central nervous system is almost exclusively found in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. This study aimed to investigate the intracranial and extracranial venous anatomy and the intracerebral

  4. Hybride magnetic nanostructure based on amino acids functionalized polypyrrole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Alexandrina, E-mail: alexandrina.nan@itim-cj.ro; Bunge, Alexander; Turcu, Rodica [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    Conducting polypyrrole is especially promising for many commercial applications because of its unique optical, electric, thermal and mechanical properties. We report the synthesis and characterization of novel pyrrole functionalized monomers and core-shell hybrid nanostructures, consisting of a conjugated polymer layer (amino acids functionalized pyrrole copolymers) and a magnetic nanoparticle core. For functionalization of the pyrrole monomer we used several amino acids: tryptophan, leucine, phenylalanine, serine and tyrosine. These amino acids were linked via different types of hydrophobic linkers to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole monomer. The magnetic core-shell hybrid nanostructures are characterized by various methods such as FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements.

  5. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcer, Laura J.; Miller, David H.; Reingold, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique to the afferent visual pathway. Abnormal eye movements also are common in multiple sclerosis, but quantitative assessment methods that can be applied in practice and clinical trials are not readily available. We summarize here a comprehensive literature search and the discussion at a recent international meeting of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes assessment in clinical practice and therapeutic trials in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25433914

  6. Measuring Neuromuscular Junction Functionality in the SOD1(G93A) Animal Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzuto, Emanuele; Pisu, Simona; Musarò, Antonio; Del Prete, Zaccaria

    2015-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that leads to motor neuron degeneration, alteration in neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), muscle atrophy, and paralysis. To investigate the NMJ functionality in ALS we tested, in vitro, two innervated muscle types excised from SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice at the end-stage of the disease: the Soleus, a postural muscle almost completely paralyzed at that stage, and the diaphragm, which, on the contrary, is functional until death. To this aim we employed an experimental protocol that combined two types of electrical stimulation: the direct stimulation and the stimulation through the nerve. The technique we applied allowed us to determine the relevance of NMJ functionality separately from muscle contractile properties in SOD1(G93A) animal model. Functional measurements revealed that the muscle contractility of transgenic diaphragms is almost unaltered in comparison to control muscles, while transgenic Soleus muscles were severely compromised. In contrast, when stimulated via the nerve, both transgenic muscle types showed a strong decrease of the contraction force, a slowing down of the kinetic parameters, as well as alterations in the neurotransmission failure parameter. All together, these results confirm a severely impaired functionality in the SOD1(G93A) neuromuscular junctions.

  7. A magnetic window into bodily functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, C.

    1986-01-01

    The paper concerns the uses of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in Medical Science. The physics of NMR and the chemical shift are both explained. The use of NMR in studying metabolism and deep tissue is described; these studies include brain metabolites in babies, muscle disorders, and monitoring malfunctions in the human body. (UK)

  8. Functionalization of magnetic nanowires by charged biopolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnin, D.; Callegari, V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    We report on a facile method for the preparation of biocompatible and bioactive magnetic nanowires. The method consists of the direct deposition of polysaccharides by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly onto a brush of metallic nanowires; obtained by electrodeposition of the metal within the nanopores ...

  9. Brain MRI screening showing evidences of early central nervous system involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Reem Hamdy A; Sabry, Yousriah Y; Nasef, Amr A

    2011-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a multisystem autoimmune collagen disease where structural and functional abnormalities of small blood vessels prevail. Transient ischemic attacks, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhage have been reported as primary consequence of vascular central nervous system affection in systemic sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered to be the most sensitive diagnostic technique for detecting symptomatic and asymptomatic lesions in the brain in cases of multifocal diseases. The objective of this study is to detect subclinical as well as clinically manifest cerebral vasculopathy in patients with systemic sclerosis using magnetic resonance imaging. As much as 30 female patients with systemic sclerosis aged 27-61 years old, with disease duration of 1-9 years and with no history of other systemic disease or cerebrovascular accidents, were enrolled. Age-matched female control group of 30 clinically normal subjects, underwent brain magnetic resonance examination. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in the form of white matter hyperintense foci of variable sizes were found in significantly abundant forms in systemic sclerosis patients on magnetic resonance evaluation than in age-related control group, signifying a form of CNS vasculopathy. Such foci showed significant correlation to clinical features of organic CNS lesion including headaches, fainting attacks and organic depression as well as to the severity of peripheral vascular disease with insignificant correlation with disease duration. In conclusion, subclinical as well as clinically manifest CNS ischemic vasculopathy is not uncommon in systemic sclerosis patients and magnetic resonance imaging is considered a sensitive noninvasive screening tool for early detection of CNS involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis.

  10. Computer-aided cognitive rehabilitation improves cognitive performances and induces brain functional connectivity changes in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis patients: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavita, S; Sacco, R; Della Corte, M; Esposito, S; Sparaco, M; d'Ambrosio, A; Docimo, R; Bisecco, A; Lavorgna, L; Corbo, D; Cirillo, S; Gallo, A; Esposito, F; Tedeschi, G

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the effects of short-term computer-based cognitive rehabilitation (cCR) on cognitive performances and default mode network (DMN) intrinsic functional connectivity (FC) in cognitively impaired relapsing remitting (RR) multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Eighteen cognitively impaired RRMS patients underwent neuropsychological evaluation by the Rao's brief repeatable battery and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate FC of the DMN before and after a short-term (8 weeks, twice a week) cCR. A control group of 14 cognitively impaired RRMS patients was assigned to an aspecific cognitive training (aCT), and underwent the same study protocol. Correlations between DMN and cognitive performances were also tested. After cCR, there was a significant improvement of the following tests: SDMT (p Color-Word Interference Test and FC in the PCC emerged. After aCT, the control group did not show any significant effect either on FC or neuropsychological tests. No significant differences were found in brain volumes and lesion load in both groups when comparing data acquired at baseline and after cCR or aCT. In cognitively impaired RRMS patients, cCR improves cognitive performances (i.e., processing speed and visual and verbal sustained memory), and increases FC in the PCC and IPC of the DMN. This exploratory study suggests that cCR may induce adaptive cortical reorganization favoring better cognitive performances, thus strengthening the value of cognitive exercise in the general perspective of building either cognitive or brain reserve.

  11. Initial observations using a novel "cine" magnetic resonance imaging technique to detect changes in abdominal motion caused by encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Benjamin; Summers, Angela; Fenner, John; Gillott, Richard; Hutchinson, Charles E; Spencer, Paul A; Wilkie, Martin; Hurst, Helen; Herrick, Sarah; Brenchley, Paul; Augustine, Titus; Bardhan, Karna D

    2011-01-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is an uncommon complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD), with high mortality and morbidity. The peritoneum thickens, dysfunctions, and forms a cocoon that progressively "strangulates" the small intestine, causing malnutrition, ischemia, and infarction. There is as yet no reliable noninvasive means of diagnosis, but recent developments in image analysis of cine magnetic resonance imaging for the recognition of adhesions offers a way forward. We used this protocol before surgery in 3 patients with suspected EPS. Image analysis revealed patterns of abdominal movement that were markedly different from the patterns in healthy volunteers. The volunteers showed marked movement throughout the abdomen; in contrast, movement in EPS patients was restricted to just below the diaphragm. This clear difference provides early "proof of principle" of the approach that we have developed.

  12. Exploring resting-state EEG brain oscillatory activity in relation to cognitive functioning in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keune, Philipp M; Hansen, Sascha; Weber, Emily; Zapf, Franziska; Habich, Juliane; Muenssinger, Jana; Wolf, Sebastian; Schönenberg, Michael; Oschmann, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Neurophysiologic monitoring parameters related to cognition in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are sparse. Previous work reported an association between magnetoencephalographic (MEG) alpha-1 activity and information processing speed. While this remains to be replicated by more available electroencephalographic (EEG) methods, also other established EEG markers, e.g. the slow-wave/fast-wave ratio (theta/beta ratio), remain to be explored in this context. Performance on standard tests addressing information processing speed and attention (Symbol-Digit Modalities Test, SDMT; Test of Attention Performance, TAP) was examined in relation to resting-state EEG alpha-1 and alpha-2 activity and the theta/beta ratio in 25MS patients. Increased global alpha-1 and alpha-2 activity and an increased frontal theta/beta ratio (pronounced slow-wave relative to fast-wave activity) were associated with lower SDMT processing speed. In an exploratory analysis, clinically impaired attention was associated with a significantly increased frontal theta/beta ratio whereas alpha power did not show sensitivity to clinical impairment. EEG global alpha power and the frontal theta/beta ratio were both associated with attention. The theta/beta ratio involved potential clinical sensitivity. Resting-state EEG recordings can be obtained during the routine clinical process. The examined resting-state measures may represent feasible monitoring parameters in MS. This notion should be explored in future intervention studies. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Vitamin D levels are associated with gross motor function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganoni, Sabrina; Macklin, Eric A; Karam, Chafic; Yu, Hong; Gonterman, Fernando; Fetterman, K Ashley; Cudkowicz, Merit; Berry, James; Wills, Anne-Marie

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether serum vitamin D [25(OH)D] levels are associated with disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). 25(OH)D was measured in subjects enrolled in a multicenter study for validation of ALS biomarkers. Baseline 25(OH)D levels were correlated with baseline ALSFRS-R scores. Average 25(OH)D levels from baseline and month 6 visits (seasonally asynchronous) were used to predict subsequent rate of change in ALSFRS-R from month 6 to month 18. Most subjects had either insufficient or deficient 25(OH)D levels. Lower 25(OH)D was associated with lower ALSFRS-R gross motor scores, but not lower ALSFRS-R total scores at baseline. Levels of 25(OH)D were not predictive of disease progression over the next 12 months. 25(OH)D was associated with baseline gross motor ALSFRS-R scores but did not predict the rate of disease progression. Vitamin D levels may reflect poor mobility in patients with ALS. Muscle Nerve, 2017 Muscle Nerve 56: 726-731, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Evaluation of pulsing magnetic field effects on paresthesia in multiple sclerosis patients, a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Daryoush; Moradian, Nasrin; Khalili, Majid; Razazian, Nazanin; Bostani, Arash; Hoseini, Jamal; Moradian, Mohamad; Ghiasian, Masoud

    2016-10-01

    Evidence is mounting that magnet therapy could alleviate the symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS). This study was performed to test the effects of the pulsing magnetic fields on the paresthesia in MS patients. This study has been conducted as a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group clinical trial during the April 2012 to October 2013. The subjects were selected among patients referred to MS clinic of Imam Reza Hospital; affiliated to Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Sixty three patients with MS were included in the study and randomly were divided into two groups, 35 patients were exposed to a magnetic pulsing field of 4mT intensity and 15-Hz frequency sinusoidal wave for 20min per session 2 times per week over a period of 2 months involving 16 sessions and 28 patients was exposed to a magnetically inactive field (placebo) for 20min per session 2 times per week over a period of 2 months involving 16 sessions. The severity of paresthesia was measured by the numerical rating scale (NRS) at 30, 60days. The study primary end point was NRS change between baseline and 60days. The secondary outcome was NRS change between baseline and 30days. Patients exposing to magnetic field showed significant paresthesia improvement compared with the group of patients exposing to placebo. According to our results pulsed magnetic therapy could alleviate paresthesia in MS patients .But trials with more patients and longer duration are mandatory to describe long-term effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Wigner functions for fermions in strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xin-li; Rischke, Dirk H.; Vasak, David; Wang, Qun

    2018-02-01

    We compute the covariant Wigner function for spin-(1/2) fermions in an arbitrarily strong magnetic field by exactly solving the Dirac equation at non-zero fermion-number and chiral-charge densities. The Landau energy levels as well as a set of orthonormal eigenfunctions are found as solutions of the Dirac equation. With these orthonormal eigenfunctions we construct the fermion field operators and the corresponding Wigner-function operator. The Wigner function is obtained by taking the ensemble average of the Wigner-function operator in global thermodynamical equilibrium, i.e., at constant temperature T and non-zero fermion-number and chiral-charge chemical potentials μ and μ_5, respectively. Extracting the vector and axial-vector components of the Wigner function, we reproduce the currents of the chiral magnetic and separation effect in an arbitrarily strong magnetic field.

  16. Treatment of Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Susan H.; Griffith, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis is an increasingly recognized entity. This article reviews the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis, its prevalence, its relationship to different types of multiple sclerosis, and its contribution to long-term functional prognosis. The discussion also focuses on the key elements of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis which distinguish it from other forms of cognitive impairment. Therapeutic interventions potentially effective for the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis are reviewed including the effects of disease modifying therapies and the use of physical and cognitive interventions. PMID:16720960

  17. Multiple sclerosis and other white matter diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) by computerized tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance are shown, including the examination of cerebral spinal fluid. Lymphocytic, foamy histiocytic perivascular cuffing, degenerated oligodendrocytes, and microglia proliferation with relative axonal sparing are presented. In the latter stage of the chronic MS plaque there is sclerosis with microcystic formation with complete demyelination and organization. (author)

  18. Magnetic and optical bistability in tetrairon(III) single molecule magnets functionalized with azobenzene groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Thazhe Kootteri; Poneti, Giordano; Sorace, Lorenzo; Rodriguez-Douton, Maria Jesus; Barra, Anne-Laure; Neugebauer, Petr; Costantino, Luca; Sessoli, Roberta; Cornia, Andrea

    2012-07-21

    Tetrairon(III) complexes known as "ferric stars" have been functionalized with azobenzene groups to investigate the effect of light-induced trans-cis isomerization on single-molecule magnet (SMM) behaviour. According to DC magnetic data and EPR spectroscopy, clusters dispersed in polystyrene (4% w/w) exhibit the same spin (S = 5) and magnetic anisotropy as bulk samples. Ligand photoisomerization, achieved by irradiation at 365 nm, has no detectable influence on static magnetic properties. However, it induces a small but significant acceleration of magnetic relaxation as probed by AC susceptometry. The pristine behaviour can be almost quantitatively recovered by irradiation with white light. Our studies demonstrate that magnetic and optical bistability can be made to coexist in SMM materials, which are of current interest in molecular spintronics.

  19. Brain MR post-gadolinium contrast in multiple sclerosis: the role of magnetization transfer and image subtraction in detecting more enhancing lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavra, M.M.; Gouliamos, A.D.; Vlahos, L.J. [Department of Radiology, ' ' Aretaieion' ' Hospital,University of Athens Medical School, Athens (Greece); Voumvourakis, C.; Sfagos, C. [Department of Neurology, ' ' Eginiteion' ' Hospital, University of Athens Medical School, Athens (Greece)

    2004-03-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the role of magnetization transfer and image subtraction in detecting more enhancing lesions in brain MR imaging of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Thirty-one MS patients underwent MR imaging of the brain with T1-weighted spin echo sequences without and with magnetization transfer (MT) using a 1.5 T imager. Both sequences were acquired before and after intravenous injection of a paramagnetic contrast agent. Subtraction images in T1-weighted sequences were obtained by subtracting the pre-contrast images from the post-contrast ones. A significant difference was found between the numbers of enhanced areas in post-gadolinium T1-weighted images without and with MT (p=0.020). The post-gadolinium T1-weighted images with MT allowed the detection of an increased (13) number of enhancing lesions compared with post-gadolinium T1-weighted images without MT. A significant difference was also found between the numbers of enhanced areas in post-gadolinium T1-weighted images without MT and subtraction images without MT (p=0.020). The subtraction images without MT allowed the detection of an increased (10) number of enhancing lesions compared with post-gadolinium T1-weighted images without MT. Magnetization transfer contrast and subtraction techniques appear to be the simplest and least time-consuming applications to improve the conspicuity and detection of contrast-enhancing lesions in patients with MS. (orig.)

  20. Brain MR post-gadolinium contrast in multiple sclerosis: the role of magnetization transfer and image subtraction in detecting more enhancing lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavra, M.M.; Gouliamos, A.D.; Vlahos, L.J.; Voumvourakis, C.; Sfagos, C.

    2004-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the role of magnetization transfer and image subtraction in detecting more enhancing lesions in brain MR imaging of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Thirty-one MS patients underwent MR imaging of the brain with T1-weighted spin echo sequences without and with magnetization transfer (MT) using a 1.5 T imager. Both sequences were acquired before and after intravenous injection of a paramagnetic contrast agent. Subtraction images in T1-weighted sequences were obtained by subtracting the pre-contrast images from the post-contrast ones. A significant difference was found between the numbers of enhanced areas in post-gadolinium T1-weighted images without and with MT (p=0.020). The post-gadolinium T1-weighted images with MT allowed the detection of an increased (13) number of enhancing lesions compared with post-gadolinium T1-weighted images without MT. A significant difference was also found between the numbers of enhanced areas in post-gadolinium T1-weighted images without MT and subtraction images without MT (p=0.020). The subtraction images without MT allowed the detection of an increased (10) number of enhancing lesions compared with post-gadolinium T1-weighted images without MT. Magnetization transfer contrast and subtraction techniques appear to be the simplest and least time-consuming applications to improve the conspicuity and detection of contrast-enhancing lesions in patients with MS. (orig.)

  1. Detection of reduced interhemispheric cortical communication during task execution in multiple sclerosis patients using functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Jon J.; Yang, Runze; Nathoo, Nabeela; Varshney, Vishal P.; Golestani, Ali-Mohammad; Goodyear, Bradley G.; Metz, Luanne M.; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2014-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) impairs brain activity through demyelination and loss of axons. Increased brain activity is accompanied by increases in microvascular hemoglobin oxygen saturation (oxygenation) and total hemoglobin, which can be measured using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Due to the potentially reduced size and integrity of the white matter tracts within the corpus callosum, it may be expected that MS patients have reduced functional communication between the left and right sides of the brain; this could potentially be an indicator of disease progression. To assess interhemispheric communication in MS, we used fNIRS during a unilateral motor task and the resting state. The magnitude of the change in hemoglobin parameters in the motor cortex was significantly reduced in MS patients during the motor task relative to healthy control subjects. There was also a significant decrease in interhemispheric communication between the motor cortices (expressed as coherence) in MS patients compared to controls during the motor task, but not during the resting state. fNIRS assessment of interhemispheric coherence during task execution may be a useful marker in disorders with white matter damage or axonal loss, including MS.

  2. Factors related to respiration influencing survival and respiratory function in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardis, L; Dolenc Grošelj, L; Vidmar, G

    2012-12-01

    Various breathing abnormalities (Neurology 2009; 73: 1218) have been proposed as indicators for the introduction of non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation (NIV) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We were interested in the usefulness of symptoms of respiratory insufficiency and abnormal results of daytime arterial gas analyses (AGA) as predictors of survival and the effect of NIV on respiratory volumes and pressures. Reported symptoms, respiratory subscore of the ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-r), Norris scale (Norris-r), and AGA were retrospectively analyzed in 189 ALS patients. Longitudinal follow-up of forced vital capacity (FVC), maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure (MIP, MEP), and sniff nasal pressure (SNP) were analyzed with regard to the introduction of NIV. Respiratory symptoms were a bad prognostic sign (P = 0.007). Abnormalities in Norris-r, ALSFRS-r, pO(2), pCO(2), and oxygen saturation tended to be associated with a shorter survival, although they were not statistically significant. NIV prolonged survival and reduced the decline in FVC (P = 0.007), MIP, MEP, and SNP (the last three were not statistically significant). Symptoms, abnormal FVC, and AGA do not always coincide, and they can appear in a different sequence. Any respiratory abnormality should prompt the clinician to start discussing NIV with the patient. NIV prolongs survival and improves respiratory function. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  3. Epidemiological characteristics and functional disability of multiple sclerosis patients in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeqiraj, Kamber; Kruja, Jera; Kabashi, Serbeze; Muçaj, Sefedin

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic recurrent neurological disease that affects the Central Nervous System. This study aims to determine epidemiological factors that affect the appearance of MS, such as: incidence, prevalence, mortality, case appearance in accordance with the disease phase RRMS, SPMS, PPMS, gender, age, age group, and EDSS. Deals with analyzing diagnosed and treated patients in the Clinic of Neurology in Prishtina during the period of 2003-2012. The research was conducted through a questionnaire applied in the diagnosed cases of MS. Information on patients was gathered from: history of illness, discharge reports and other relevant documents on MS illness. Clinical and epidemiological-descriptive study methods were used. The acquired results are shown through tables, graphics. Statistical processing was conducted with Microsoft Office Excel. From the total number of doubtful hospitalized cases of demyelinization (644) in the Clinic of Neurology in Prishtina, 412 cases (64%) were diagnosed with MS. For the period of 2003-2012 the prevalence of MS has been 19.6 of patients in 100,000 inhabitants. MS incidence rate was 0.95 of patients in 100,000 inhabitants. MS mortality rate was 0.14 of deceased in 100,000 inhabitants. The ratio female--male is 2.3:1. A larger number of patients fall within the age group of 30-39 years-old. Clinical form trends: RRSM 72.3%, SPSM 22.6%, PPSM 5.1%. The rate of EDSS 78.3% (0-3.5), 14.9% (4-6.5), 6.8% (7-9).

  4. Fine Mapping and Functional Analysis of the Multiple Sclerosis Risk Gene CD6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Bhairavi; Cuapio, Angélica; Alloza, Iraide; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Alcina, Antonio; García-Barcina, Maria; Fedetz, Maria; Fernández, Óscar; Lucas, Miguel; Órpez, Teresa; Pinto-Medel, Mª Jesus; Otaegui, David; Olascoaga, Javier; Urcelay, Elena; Ortiz, Miguel A.; Arroyo, Rafael; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Tolosa, Eva; Vandenbroeck, Koen

    2013-01-01

    CD6 has recently been identified and validated as risk gene for multiple sclerosis (MS), based on the association of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs17824933, located in intron 1. CD6 is a cell surface scavenger receptor involved in T-cell activation and proliferation, as well as in thymocyte differentiation. In this study, we performed a haptag SNP screen of the CD6 gene locus using a total of thirteen tagging SNPs, of which three were non-synonymous SNPs, and replicated the recently reported GWAS SNP rs650258 in a Spanish-Basque collection of 814 controls and 823 cases. Validation of the six most strongly associated SNPs was performed in an independent collection of 2265 MS patients and 2600 healthy controls. We identified association of haplotypes composed of two non-synonymous SNPs [rs11230563 (R225W) and rs2074225 (A257V)] in the 2nd SRCR domain with susceptibility to MS (P max(T) permutation = 1×10−4). The effect of these haplotypes on CD6 surface expression and cytokine secretion was also tested. The analysis showed significantly different CD6 expression patterns in the distinct cell subsets, i.e. – CD4+ naïve cells, P = 0.0001; CD8+ naïve cells, P<0.0001; CD4+ and CD8+ central memory cells, P = 0.01 and 0.05, respectively; and natural killer T (NKT) cells, P = 0.02; with the protective haplotype (RA) showing higher expression of CD6. However, no significant changes were observed in natural killer (NK) cells, effector memory and terminally differentiated effector memory T cells. Our findings reveal that this new MS-associated CD6 risk haplotype significantly modifies expression of CD6 on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. PMID:23638056

  5. Novel functional polymorphism in IGF-1 gene associated with multiple sclerosis: A new insight to MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Majid; Abdolmohammadi, Reza; Ebadi, Hamid; Farazmandfar, Touraj

    2017-04-01

    Interactions between several genes and environment may play a role in susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS). The IGF-1 plays a key role in proliferation, maintenance and survival of nerve cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that IGF-1 may be a target for prediction and control MS. We aimed to analysis IGF-1 gene promoter sequence, to investigate the effect of the single nucleotide variants on IGF-1 expression and its association with MS. We enrolled 339 MS patients and 431 healthy controls. A specific region in IGF-1 gene promoter was investigated by SSCP analysis. All samples were genotyped by SSP-PCR. In-vitro and in-vivo IGF-1 production was measured by ELISA assay. IGF-1 expression in PBMCs was measured using real-time PCR. We identified a T to C single nucleotide substitution at position -1089 and a C to T at position -383 from transcription start site in the IGF-1 gene promoter. There was a significant association between MS and genotypes IGF-1(-383) C/T (p=0.001) and IGF-1(-383) C/C (pMS (p=0.001). In-vitro and in-vivo IGF-1 level showed that IGF-1 production in samples with genotype IGF-1(-383) C/C significantly was less than T/T (p=0.004) but not T/C (p=0.220). According to IGF-1 roles in CNS and our results, this study suggests that low IGF-1 level may be associated with susceptibility to MS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pediatric applications of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, Nolan R. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Bernal, Byron [Miami Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Neuroradiology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Pediatric functional MRI has been used for the last 2 decades but is now gaining wide acceptance in the preoperative workup of children with brain tumors and medically refractory epilepsy. This review covers pediatrics-specific difficulties such as sedation and task paradigm selection according to the child's age and cognitive level. We also illustrate the increasing uses of functional MRI in the depiction of cognitive function, neuropsychiatric disorders and response to pharmacological agents. Finally, we review the uses of resting-state fMRI in the evaluation of children and in the detection of epileptogenic regions. (orig.)

  7. Pediatric applications of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, Nolan R.; Bernal, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric functional MRI has been used for the last 2 decades but is now gaining wide acceptance in the preoperative workup of children with brain tumors and medically refractory epilepsy. This review covers pediatrics-specific difficulties such as sedation and task paradigm selection according to the child's age and cognitive level. We also illustrate the increasing uses of functional MRI in the depiction of cognitive function, neuropsychiatric disorders and response to pharmacological agents. Finally, we review the uses of resting-state fMRI in the evaluation of children and in the detection of epileptogenic regions. (orig.)

  8. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MADU

    systems and ultra fast imaging techniques, such as echo planar imaging (EPI ) ... is used to understand brain organization, assessing of neurological status, and ..... J C 1998 Functional MRI studies of motor recovery after stroke;. NeuroImage 7 ...

  9. Novel axolotl cardiac function analysis method using magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanches, Pedro Gomes; Op 't Veld, Roel C.; de Graaf, Wolter; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Grüll, Holger

    2017-01-01

    The salamander axolotl is capable of complete regeneration of amputated heart tissue. However, non-invasive imaging tools for assessing its cardiac function were so far not employed. In this study, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is introduced as a non-invasive technique to image heart function

  10. Novel axolotl cardiac function analysis method using magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanches, P.G.; Op ‘t Veld, R.C.; de Graaf, W.; Strijkers, G.J.; Grüll, H.

    2017-01-01

    The salamander axolotl is capable of complete regeneration of amputated heart tissue. However, non-invasive imaging tools for assessing its cardiac function were so far not employed. In this study, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is introduced as a noninvasive technique to image heart function of

  11. Low field-low cost: Can low-field magnetic resonance systems replace high-field magnetic resonance systems in the diagnostic assessment of multiple sclerosis patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reith, W.; Sartor, K.

    2001-01-01

    As low-field MR imaging is becoming a widely used imaging technique, we aimed at a prospective assessment of differences in imaging quality between low- and high-field MR imaging in multiple sclerosis patients possibly interfering with diagnostic or therapeutic decision making. Twenty patients with clinically proven multiple sclerosis were examined with optimized imaging protocols in a 1.5- and a 0.23-T MR scanner within 48 h. Images were assessed independently by two neuroradiologists. No statistically significant interrater discrepancies were observed. A significantly lower number of white matter lesions could be identified in low-field MR imaging both on T1- and on T2-weighted images (T2: high field 700, low field 481; T1: high field 253, low field 177). A total of 114 enhancing lesions were discerned in the high-field MR imaging as opposed to 45 enhancing lesions in low-field MR imaging. Blood-brain barrier disruption was identified in 11 of 20 patients in the high-field MR imaging, but only in 4 of 20 patients in low-field MR imaging. Since a significantly lower lesion load is identified in low-field MR imaging than in high-field MR imaging, and blood-brain barrier disruption is frequently missed, caution must be exercised in interpreting a normal low-field MR imaging scan in a patient with clinical signs of multiple sclerosis and in interpreting a scan without enhancing lesions in a patient with known multiple sclerosis and clinical signs of exacerbation. (orig.)

  12. Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the myelin sheath, the material that surrounds and protects your nerve cells. This damage slows down ...

  13. Tuberous Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Esclerosis tuberosa Order NINDS Publications Patient Organizations Child Neurology ... National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Esclerosis tuberosa Order NINDS Publications Definition Tuberous sclerosis (TSC) ...

  14. Survival and Functionality of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Oligodendrocytes in a Nonhuman Primate Model for Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiruvalluvan, Arun; Czepiel, Marcin; Kap, Yolanda A.; Mantingh-Otter, Ietje; Vainchtein, Ilia; Kuipers, Jeroen; Bijlard, Marjolein; Baron, Wia; Giepmans, Ben; Brueck, Wolfgang; 'T Hart, Bert A.; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2016-01-01

    : Fast remyelination by endogenous oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) is essential to prevent axonal and subsequent retrograde neuronal degeneration in demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS). In chronic lesions, however, the remyelination capacity of OPCs becomes insufficient. Cell

  15. Rationalisation of distribution functions for models of nanoparticle magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hilo, M.; Chantrell, R.W.

    2012-01-01

    A formalism is presented which reconciles the use of different distribution functions of particle diameter in analytical models of the magnetic properties of nanoparticle systems. For the lognormal distribution a transformation is derived which shows that a distribution of volume fraction transforms into a lognormal distribution of particle number albeit with a modified median diameter. This transformation resolves an apparent discrepancy reported in Tournus and Tamion [Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 323 (2011) 1118]. - Highlights: ► We resolve a problem resulting from the misunderstanding of the nature. ► The nature of dispersion functions in models of nanoparticle magnetism. ► The derived transformation between distributions will be of benefit in comparing models and experimental results.

  16. Loss of function of C9orf72 causes motor deficits in a zebrafish model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciura, Sorana; Lattante, Serena; Le Ber, Isabelle; Latouche, Morwena; Tostivint, Hervé; Brice, Alexis; Kabashi, Edor

    2013-08-01

    To define the role that repeat expansions of a GGGGCC hexanucleotide sequence of the C9orf72 gene play in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). A genetic model for ALS was developed to determine whether loss of function of the zebrafish orthologue of C9orf72 (zC9orf72) leads to abnormalities in neuronal development. C9orf72 mRNA levels were quantified in brain and lymphoblasts derived from FTLD and ALS/FTLD patients and in zebrafish. Knockdown of the zC9orf72 was performed using 2 specific antisense morpholino oligonucleotides to block transcription. Quantifications of spontaneous swimming and tactile escape response, as well as measurements of axonal projections from the spinal cord, were performed. Significantly decreased expression of C9orf72 transcripts in brain and lymphoblasts was found in sporadic FTLD and ALS/FTLD patients with normal-size or expanded hexanucleotide repeats. The zC9orf72 is selectively expressed in the developing nervous system at developmental stages. Loss of function of the zC9orf72 transcripts causes both behavioral and cellular deficits related to locomotion without major morphological abnormalities. These deficits were rescued upon overexpression of human C9orf72 mRNA transcripts. Our results indicate C9orf72 haploinsufficiency could be a contributing factor in the spectrum of ALS/FTLD neurodegenerative disorders. Loss of function of the zebrafish orthologue of zC9orf72 expression in zebrafish is associated with axonal degeneration of motor neurons that can be rescued by expressing human C9orf72 mRNA, highlighting the specificity of the induced phenotype. These results reveal a pathogenic consequence of decreased C9orf72 levels, supporting a loss of function mechanism of disease. © 2013 American Neurological Association.

  17. The Armeo Spring as training tool to improve upper limb functionality in multiple sclerosis: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerkhofs Lore

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few research in multiple sclerosis (MS has focused on physical rehabilitation of upper limb dysfunction, though the latter strongly influences independent performance of activities of daily living. Upper limb rehabilitation technology could hold promise for complementing traditional MS therapy. Consequently, this pilot study aimed to examine the feasibility of an 8-week mechanical-assisted training program for improving upper limb muscle strength and functional capacity in MS patients with evident paresis. Methods A case series was applied, with provision of a training program (3×/week, 30 minutes/session, supplementary on the customary maintaining care, by employing a gravity-supporting exoskeleton apparatus (Armeo Spring. Ten high-level disability MS patients (Expanded Disability Status Scale 7.0-8.5 actively performed task-oriented movements in a virtual real-life-like learning environment with the affected upper limb. Tests were administered before and after training, and at 2-month follow-up. Muscle strength was determined through the Motricity Index and Jamar hand-held dynamometer. Functional capacity was assessed using the TEMPA, Action Research Arm Test (ARAT and 9-Hole Peg Test (9HPT. Results Muscle strength did not change significantly. Significant gains were particularly found in functional capacity tests. After training completion, TEMPA scores improved (p = 0.02, while a trend towards significance was found for the 9HPT (p = 0.05. At follow-up, the TEMPA as well as ARAT showed greater improvement relative to baseline than after the 8-week intervention period (p = 0.01, p = 0.02 respectively. Conclusions The results of present pilot study suggest that upper limb functionality of high-level disability MS patients can be positively influenced by means of a technology-enhanced physical rehabilitation program.

  18. Role of executive functions in prospective memory in multiple sclerosis: Impact of the strength of cue-action association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagenais, Emmanuelle; Rouleau, Isabelle; Tremblay, Alexandra; Demers, Mélanie; Roger, Élaine; Jobin, Céline; Duquette, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) often report prospective memory (PM) deficits. Although PM is important for daily functioning, it is not formally assessed in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to examine the role of executive functions in MS patients' PM revealed by the effect of strength of cue-action association on PM performance. Thirty-nine MS patients were compared to 18 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and education on a PM task modulating the strength of association between the cue and the intended action. Deficits in MS patients affecting both prospective and retrospective components of PM were confirmed using 2 × 2 × 2 mixed analyses of variance (ANOVAs). Among patients, multiple regression analyses revealed that the impairment was modulated by the efficiency of executive functions, whereas retrospective memory seemed to have little impact on PM performance, contrary to expectation. More specifically, results of 2 × 2 × 2 mixed-model analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs) showed that low-executive patients had more difficulty detecting and, especially, retrieving the appropriate action when the cue and the action were unrelated, whereas high-executive patients' performance seemed to be virtually unaffected by the cue-action association. Using an objective measure, these findings confirm the presence of PM deficits in MS. They also suggest that such deficits depend on executive functioning and can be reduced when automatic PM processes are engaged through semantic cue-action association. They underscore the importance of assessing PM in clinical settings through a cognitive evaluation and offer an interesting avenue for rehabilitation.

  19. Features of the magnetic field of a rectangular combined function bending magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, C.S.; National Chiao Tung Univ., Hsinchu; Chang, C.H.; Hwang, G.J.; Uen, T.M.; Tseng, P.K.; National Taiwan Univ., Taipei

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic field features of the combined function bending magnet with dipole and quadrupole field components are essential for the successful operation of the electron beam trajectory. These fields also dominate the photon beam quality. The vertical magnetic field B y (x,y) calculation is performed by a computer code MAGNET at the magnet center (s = 0). Those results are compared with the 2-D field measurement by the Hall probe mapping system. Also detailed survey has been made of the harmonic field strength and the main features of the fundamental integrated strength, effective length, magnetic symmetry, tilt of the pole face, offset of the field center and the fringe field. The end shims that compensate for the strong end negative sextupole field to increase the good field region for the entire integrated strength are discussed. An important physical feature of this combined function bending magnet is the constant ratio of dipole and quadrupole strength ∫Bds/∫Gds which is expressed as a function of excitation current in the energy range 0.6 to 1.5 GeV

  20. Afferent thermosensory function in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis following exercise-induced increases in body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filingeri, Davide; Chaseling, Georgia; Hoang, Phu; Barnett, Michael; Davis, Scott L; Jay, Ollie

    2017-08-01

    What is the central question of this study? Between 60 and 80% of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients experience transient worsening of symptoms with increased body temperature (heat sensitivity). As sensory abnormalities are common in MS, we asked whether afferent thermosensory function is altered in MS following exercise-induced increases in body temperature. What is the main finding and its importance? Increases in body temperature of as little as ∼0.4°C were sufficient to decrease cold, but not warm, skin thermosensitivity (∼10%) in MS, across a wider temperature range than in age-matched healthy individuals. These findings provide new evidence on the impact of heat sensitivity on afferent function in MS, which could be useful for clinical evaluation of this neurological disease. In multiple sclerosis (MS), increases in body temperature result in transient worsening of clinical symptoms (heat sensitivity or Uhthoff's phenomenon). Although the impact of heat sensitivity on efferent physiological function has been investigated, the effects of heat stress on afferent sensory function in MS are unknown. Hence, we quantified afferent thermosensory function in MS following exercise-induced increases in body temperature with a new quantitative sensory test. Eight relapsing-remitting MS patients (three men and five women; 51.4 ± 9.1 years of age; Expanded Disability Status Scale score 2.8 ± 1.1) and eight age-matched control (CTR) subjects (five men and three women; 47.4 ± 9.1 years of age) rated the perceived magnitude of two cold (26 and 22°C) and two warm stimuli (34 and 38°C) applied to the dorsum of the hand before and after 30 min cycling in the heat (30°C air; 30% relative humidity). Exercise produced similar increases in mean body temperature in MS [+0.39°C (95% CI: +0.21, +0.53) P = 0.001] and CTR subjects [+0.41°C (95% CI: +0.25, +0.58) P = 0.001]. These changes were sufficient to decrease thermosensitivity significantly to all cold [26

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and brain functional exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bihan, D.; CEA, 91 - Orsay

    1997-01-01

    The utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging for functional analysis of the brain is presented: the oxygenated and deoxygenated blood flowing in the brain do not have the same effect on NMR images; the oxygenated blood, related to brain activity, may be detected and the corresponding activity zone in the brain, identified; functional NMR imaging could be used to gain a better understanding of functional troubles linked to neurological or psychiatric diseases

  2. Functional magnetic resonance imaging and dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesel, F.L.; Hempel, A.; Schoenknecht, P.; Schroeder, J.; Wuestenberg, T.; Weber, M.A.; Essig, M.

    2003-01-01

    Currently, different cerebral neuroimaging methods are being applied to varying questions in the diagnosis of dementia. In patients with manifest Alzheimer's disease a reduction of cortical perfusion and metabolism in temporal and temporoparietal regions has been demonstrated when compared to healthy controls on a diversity of memory tasks. Since differing levels of performance and varying degrees of cortical atrophy may influence functional results considerably, an understanding of the processes associated with normal ageing is perceived as prerequisite for studies applying functional neuroimaging. The integration of knowledge concerning neuropsychological and neurobiological alterations associated with healthy ageing allows hypotheses for the differentiation of pathological ageing processes to be phrased. In this connection non-invasive methods such as fMRI and ASL are of increasing importance. (orig.) [de

  3. Pronounced Structural and Functional Damage in Early Adult Pediatric-Onset Multiple Sclerosis with No or Minimal Clinical Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Giorgio

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (POMS may represent a model of vulnerability to damage occurring during a period of active maturation of the human brain. Whereas adaptive mechanisms seem to take place in the POMS brain in the short-medium term, natural history studies have shown that these patients reach irreversible disability, despite slower progression, at a significantly younger age than adult-onset MS (AOMS patients. We tested for the first time whether significant brain alterations already occurred in POMS patients in their early adulthood and with no or minimal disability (n = 15 in comparison with age- and disability-matched AOMS patients (n = 14 and to normal controls (NC, n = 20. We used a multimodal MRI approach by modeling, using FSL, voxelwise measures of microstructural integrity of white matter tracts and gray matter volumes with those of intra- and internetwork functional connectivity (FC (analysis of variance, p ≤ 0.01, corrected for multiple comparisons across space. POMS patients showed, when compared with both NC and AOMS patients, altered measures of diffusion tensor imaging (reduced fractional anisotropy and/or increased diffusivities and higher probability of lesion occurrence in a clinically eloquent region for physical disability such as the posterior corona radiata. In addition, POMS patients showed, compared with the other two groups, reduced long-range FC, assessed from resting functional MRI, between default mode network and secondary visual network, whose interaction subserves important cognitive functions such as spatial attention and visual learning. Overall, this pattern of structural damage and brain connectivity disruption in early adult POMS patients with no or minimal clinical disability might explain their unfavorable clinical outcome in the long term.

  4. An Objective Functional Characterisation of Head Movement Impairment in Individuals with Neck Muscle Weakness Due to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pancani

    Full Text Available Neck muscle weakness and head drop are well recognised in patients with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, but an objective characterisation of the consequent head movement impairment is lacking. The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterise head movements in ALS compared to aged matched controls.We evaluated two groups, one of thirteen patients with ALS and one of thirteen age-matched controls, during the execution of a series of controlled head movements, performed while wearing two inertial sensors attached on the forehead and sternum, respectively. We quantified the differences between the two groups from the sensor data using indices of velocity, smoothness and movement coupling (intended as a measure of undesired out of plane movements.Results confirmed a general limitation in the ability of the ALS patients to perform and control head movements. High inter-patient variability was observed due to a wide range of observed functional impairment levels. The ability to extend the head backward and flex it laterally were the most compromised, with significantly lower angular velocity (P 0.8, reduced smoothness and greater presence of coupled movements with respect to the controls. A significant reduction of angular velocity (P 0.8 in extension, axial rotation and lateral flexion was observed when patients were asked to perform the movements as fast as possible.This pilot study is the first study providing a functional objective quantification of head movements in ALS. Further work involving different body areas and correlation with existing methods of evaluating neuromuscular function, such as dynamometry and EMG, is needed to explore the use of this approach as a marker of disease progression in ALS.

  5. Recent advances in multiple sclerosis therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonsette, R.E.; Delmotte, P.

    1989-01-01

    Seven papers in this volume are in INIS scope, one dealing with autoradiographic detection of multiple sclerosis plaques with radiologands, and the others with magnetic resonance imaging of MS lesions. (H.W.). refs.; figs.; tabs

  6. Functional magnetic resonance imaging with ultra-high fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windischberger, C.; Schoepf, V.; Sladky, R.; Moser, E.; Fischmeister, F.P.S.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is currently the primary method for non-invasive functional localization in the brain. With the emergence of MR systems with field strengths of 4 Tesla and above, neuronal activation may be studied with unprecedented accuracy. In this article we present different approaches to use the improved sensitivity and specificity for expanding current fMRT resolution limits in space and time based on several 7 Tesla studies. In addition to the challenges that arise with ultra-high magnetic fields possible solutions will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  7. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of higher brain activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui He; Wang Yunjiu; Chen Runsheng; Tang Xiaowei.

    1996-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance images (fMRIs) exhibit small differences in the magnetic resonance signal intensity in positions corresponding to focal areas of brain activation. These signal are caused by variation in the oxygenation state of the venous vasculature. Using this non-invasive and dynamic method, it is possible to localize functional brain activation, in vivo, in normal individuals, with an accuracy of millimeters and a temporal resolution of seconds. Though a series of technical difficulties remain, fMRI is increasingly becoming a key method for visualizing the working brain, and uncovering the topographical organization of the human brain, and understanding the relationship between brain and the mind

  8. Practical Introduction to Cerebral Functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, Jorge Andres; Rascovsky Simon; Sanz, Alexander; Castrillon, Juan Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR ) imaging holds a privileged position within neuroimaging techniques owing to its high anatomic detail and its capacity to study many physiological processes. The appearance of functional magnetic resonance (fMR I) brings more relevance to MR , turning it into a powerful tool with the ability to group, in a single exam, high-resolution anatomy and cerebral function. In this article we describe the principles and some advantages of fMRI compared to other neuro functional imaging modalities. In addition, we present the site wide and analysis requisites for the performance and post-processing of the most common neuro functional experiments in clinical practice. We also include neuro functional images obtained at Instituto de Alta Tecnologia Medica of Antioquia (IATM ) on a healthy volunteer group and two pathological cases. Lastly, we mention some of the practical indications of this technique which is still in an intense development, research and validation phase.

  9. Exercise therapy in multiple sclerosis and its effects on function and the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    to clinically relevant improvements in physical function, but should be considered an adjunct to specific task-based training. Exercise has also shown positive effects on the brain, including improvements in brain volume and cognition. In summary, exercise therapy is a safe and potent nonpharmacological...... intervention in MS, with beneficial effects on both functional capacity and the brain....

  10. Assessing the criterion validity of four highly abbreviated measures from the Minimal Assessment of Cognitive Function in Multiple Sclerosis (MACFIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromisch, Elizabeth S; Zemon, Vance; Holtzer, Roee; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D; DeLuca, John; Beier, Meghan; Farrell, Eileen; Snyder, Stacey; Schairer, Laura C; Glukhovsky, Lisa; Botvinick, Jason; Sloan, Jessica; Picone, Mary Ann; Kim, Sonya; Foley, Frederick W

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is prevalent in multiple sclerosis. As self-reported cognitive functioning is unreliable, brief objective screening measures are needed. Utilizing widely used full-length neuropsychological tests, this study aimed to establish the criterion validity of highly abbreviated versions of the Brief Visuospatial Memory Test - Revised (BVMT-R), Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT), Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS) Sorting Test, and Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT) in order to begin developing an MS-specific screening battery. Participants from Holy Name Medical Center and the Kessler Foundation were administered one or more of these four measures. Using test-specific criterion to identify impairment at both -1.5 and -2.0 SD, receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analyses of BVMT-R Trial 1, Trial 2, and Trial 1 + 2 raw data (N = 286) were run to calculate the classification accuracy of the abbreviated version, as well as the sensitivity and specificity. The same methods were used for SDMT 30-s and 60-s (N = 321), D-KEFS Sorting Free Card Sort 1 (N = 120), and COWAT letters F and A (N = 298). Using these definitions of impairment, each analysis yielded high classification accuracy (89.3 to 94.3%). BVMT-R Trial 1, SDMT 30-s, D-KEFS Free Card Sort 1, and COWAT F possess good criterion validity in detecting impairment on their respective overall measure, capturing much of the same information as the full version. Along with the first two trials of the California Verbal Learning Test - Second Edition (CVLT-II), these five highly abbreviated measures may be used to develop a brief screening battery.

  11. A novel anti-EMMPRIN function-blocking antibody reduces T cell proliferation and neurotoxicity: relevance to multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Smriti M; Silva, Claudia; Wang, Janet; Tong, Jade Pui-Wai; Yong, V Wee

    2012-04-05

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN; CD147, basigin) is an inducer of the expression of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We reported previously that blocking EMMPRIN activity reduced neuroinflammation and severity of disease in an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). To improve upon EMMPRIN blockade, and to help unravel the biological functions of EMMPRIN in inflammatory disorders, we have developed several anti-EMMPRIN monoclonal antibodies. Of these monoclonal antibodies, a particular one, clone 10, was efficient in binding mouse and human cells using several methods of detection. The specificity of clone 10 was demonstrated by its lack of staining of EMMPRIN-null embryos compared to heterozygous and wild-type mouse samples. Functionally, human T cells activated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 elevated their expression of EMMPRIN and the treatment of these T cells with clone 10 resulted in decreased proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase- 9 (MMP-9) production. Activated human T cells were toxic to human neurons in culture and clone 10 pretreatment reduced T cell cytotoxicity correspondent with decrease of granzyme B levels within T cells. In vivo, EAE mice treated with clone 10 had a markedly reduced disease score compared to mice treated with IgM isotype control. We have produced a novel anti-EMMPRIN monoclonal antibody that blocks several aspects of T cell activity, thus highlighting the multiple roles of EMMPRIN in T cell biology. Moreover, clone 10 reduces EAE scores in mice compared to controls, and has activity on human cells, potentially allowing for the testing of anti-EMMPRIN treatment not only in EAE, but conceivably also in MS.

  12. A novel anti-EMMPRIN function-blocking antibody reduces T cell proliferation and neurotoxicity: relevance to multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Smriti M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN; CD147, basigin is an inducer of the expression of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. We reported previously that blocking EMMPRIN activity reduced neuroinflammation and severity of disease in an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Methods To improve upon EMMPRIN blockade, and to help unravel the biological functions of EMMPRIN in inflammatory disorders, we have developed several anti-EMMPRIN monoclonal antibodies. Results Of these monoclonal antibodies, a particular one, clone 10, was efficient in binding mouse and human cells using several methods of detection. The specificity of clone 10 was demonstrated by its lack of staining of EMMPRIN-null embryos compared to heterozygous and wild-type mouse samples. Functionally, human T cells activated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 elevated their expression of EMMPRIN and the treatment of these T cells with clone 10 resulted in decreased proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase- 9 (MMP-9 production. Activated human T cells were toxic to human neurons in culture and clone 10 pretreatment reduced T cell cytotoxicity correspondent with decrease of granzyme B levels within T cells. In vivo, EAE mice treated with clone 10 had a markedly reduced disease score compared to mice treated with IgM isotype control. Conclusions We have produced a novel anti-EMMPRIN monoclonal antibody that blocks several aspects of T cell activity, thus highlighting the multiple roles of EMMPRIN in T cell biology. Moreover, clone 10 reduces EAE scores in mice compared to controls, and has activity on human cells, potentially allowing for the testing of anti-EMMPRIN treatment not only in EAE, but conceivably also in MS.

  13. Action processing and mirror neuron function in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: an fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Jelsone-Swain

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a highly debilitating and rapidly fatal neurodegenerative disease. It has been suggested that social cognition may be affected, such as impairment in theory of mind (ToM ability. Despite these findings, research in this area is scarce and the investigation of neural mechanisms behind such impairment is absent. Nineteen patients with ALS and eighteen healthy controls participated in this study. Because the mirror neuron system (MNS is thought to be involved in theory of mind, we first implemented a straightforward action-execution and observation task to assess basic MNS function. Second, we examined the social-cognitive ability to understand actions of others, which is a component of ToM. We used fMRI to assess BOLD activity differences between groups during both experiments. Theory of mind was also measured behaviorally using the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test (RME. ALS patients displayed greater BOLD activity during the action-execution and observation task, especially throughout right anterior cortical regions. These areas included the right inferior operculum, premotor and primary motor regions, and left inferior parietal lobe. A conjunction analysis showed significantly more co-activated voxels during both the observation and action-execution conditions in the patient group throughout MNS regions. These results support a compensatory response in the MNS during action processing. In the action understanding experiment, healthy controls performed better behaviorally and subsequently recruited greater regions of activity throughout the prefrontal cortex and middle temporal gyrus. Lastly, action understanding performance was able to cluster patients with ALS into high and lower performing groups, which then differentiated RME performance. Collectively, these data suggest that social cognition, particularly theory of mind, may be affected in a subset of patients with ALS. This impairment may be related to

  14. Magnetic elements in otoliths of lagena and their function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    The mystery of pigeons' homing abilities has been the subject of much interest, and it is widely believed that information from the earth's magnetic field may be involved. However, no specific magnetic sensory organ has yet been identified. The recent finding of magnetic materials in the lagenal otolith of fishes and birds raises the possibility that these structures might be key elements in the elusive magnetic sensor system. For the elemental analysis inside materials, x-ray fluorescence method (Synchrotron radiation) is one of the most powerful techniques. BL4A beam line of Photo factory of KEK at Tsukuba was used for analysis of the otolith. Comparing the compositions of the three different kinds of otolith among several species of sea fishes and birds, we found that the saccular and utricular otolith rarely contain detectable levels of Fe (iron), but that Fe is present in significant quantities in the lagenal otolith of the birds. The lagenal otolith is tiny crystal that contains magnetic elements and is sensitively displaced by imposed magnetic fields, providing the animal with geomagnetic sensory input, from which the brain would infer navigational information. Behavioral experiments of the homing abilities of the pigeons involving sectioning the lagenal nerves and the magnetic interfere to their lagena were done using 30 controlled birds and 21 treated birds from the same loft of the racing pigeons. The result of homing test of the control and treated pigeons clearly indicates the magnetic influence and lagenal function to pigeon's navigation ability, and the treated pigeons were either lost or significantly delayed, while the controls returned within 30 minutes after the release. Thus the birds' lagena is unique organ, and it may be concluded that the lagena is a key element to magnetic sensory system for birds. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in monitoring of treatment of multiple sclerosis; Zastosowanie metody rezonansu magnetycznego w monitorowaniu leczenia stwardnienia rozsianego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M.; Walecki, J.; Stelmasiak, Z. [Zaklad Diagnostyki Obrazowej, Centralny Szpital Kolejowy i Centrum Medyczne Ksztalcenia Podyplomowego, Miedzylesie (Poland)]|[Centrum Naukowo-Kliniczne and Zespol Naukowo Badawczy Chorob Demielinizacyjnych, Akademia Medyczna, Lublin (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of the study was to establish the value of MR in monitoring of treatment of multiple sclerosis with new drug 2-CDA and placebo. 83 patients (51 women, 32 men) were examined - 81 of them twice, 66 - three times: before and after 6 and 12 courses of treatment. Toshiba MRT50A machine was used. After the first 6 courses of treatment the number of new plaques was twice as big in placebo group than in 2-CDA group. After 12 courses it turned out that a certain inhibitory influence of 2-CDA on new plaques` appearance was more evident after 15 than 3 months after the end of its administration. This may indicate the delayed action of 2-CDA but requires further investigation. (author) 8 refs, 2 figs, 7 tabs

  16. The clinical impact of cerebellar grey matter pathology in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Damasceno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cerebellum is an important site for cortical demyelination in multiple sclerosis, but the functional significance of this finding is not fully understood. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical and cognitive impact of cerebellar grey-matter pathology in multiple sclerosis patients. METHODS: Forty-two relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and 30 controls underwent clinical assessment including the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS and cerebellar functional system (FS score, and cognitive evaluation, including the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT and the Symbol-Digit Modalities Test (SDMT. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed with a 3T scanner and variables of interest were: brain white-matter and cortical lesion load, cerebellar intracortical and leukocortical lesion volumes, and brain cortical and cerebellar white-matter and grey-matter volumes. RESULTS: After multivariate analysis high burden of cerebellar intracortical lesions was the only predictor for the EDSS (p<0.001, cerebellar FS (p = 0.002, arm function (p = 0.049, and for leg function (p<0.001. Patients with high burden of cerebellar leukocortical lesions had lower PASAT scores (p = 0.013, while patients with greater volumes of cerebellar intracortical lesions had worse SDMT scores (p = 0.015. CONCLUSIONS: Cerebellar grey-matter pathology is widely present and contributes to clinical dysfunction in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, independently of brain grey-matter damage.

  17. Surface functionalized biocompatible magnetic nanospheres for cancer hyperthermia.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X.; Novosad, V.; Rozhkova, E. A.; Chen, H.; Yefremenko, V.; Pearson, J.; Torno, M.; Bader, S. D.; Rosengart, A. J.; Univ. Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine

    2007-06-01

    We report a simplified single emulsion (oil-in-water) solvent evaporation protocol to synthesize surface functionalized biocompatible magnetic nanospheres by using highly concentrated hydrophobic magnetite (gel) and a mixture of poly(D,L lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and poly(lactic acid-block-polyethylene glycol-maleimide) (PLA-PEG-maleimide) (10:1 by mass) polymers. The as-synthesized particles are approximately spherical with an average diameter of 360-370 nm with polydispersity index of 0.12-0.18, are surface-functionalized with maleimide groups, and have saturation magnetization values of 25-40 emu/g. The efficiency of the heating induced by 400-kHz oscillating magnetic fields is compared for two samples with different magnetite loadings. Results show that these nanospheres have the potential to provide an efficient cancer-targeted hyperthermia.

  18. Magnetic behavior study of samarium nitride using density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Narayan N.; Mankad, Venu H.; Dabhi, Shweta D.; Patel, Anjali; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, the state-of-art density functional theory is employed to study the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of samarium nitride (SmN). We have performed calculation for both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states in rock-salt phase. The calculated results of optimized lattice parameter and magnetic moment agree well with the available experimental and theoretical values. From energy band diagram and electronic density of states, we observe a half-metallic behaviour in FM phase of rock salt SmN in while metallicity in AFM I and AFM III phases. We present and discuss our current understanding of the possible half-metallicity together with the magnetic ordering in SmN. The calculated phonon dispersion curves shows dynamical stability of the considered structures. The phonon density of states and Eliashberg functional have also been analysed to understand the superconductivity in SmN.

  19. Density-functional theory for internal magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellgren, Erik I.

    2018-01-01

    A density-functional theory is developed based on the Maxwell-Schrödinger equation with an internal magnetic field in addition to the external electromagnetic potentials. The basic variables of this theory are the electron density and the total magnetic field, which can equivalently be represented as a physical current density. Hence, the theory can be regarded as a physical current density-functional theory and an alternative to the paramagnetic current density-functional theory due to Vignale and Rasolt. The energy functional has strong enough convexity properties to allow a formulation that generalizes Lieb's convex analysis formulation of standard density-functional theory. Several variational principles as well as a Hohenberg-Kohn-like mapping between potentials and ground-state densities follow from the underlying convex structure. Moreover, the energy functional can be regarded as the result of a standard approximation technique (Moreau-Yosida regularization) applied to the conventional Schrödinger ground-state energy, which imposes limits on the maximum curvature of the energy (with respect to the magnetic field) and enables construction of a (Fréchet) differentiable universal density functional.

  20. Static Posturography and Falls According to Pyramidal, Sensory and Cerebellar Functional Systems in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalron, Alon; Givon, Uri; Frid, Lior; Dolev, Mark; Achiron, Anat

    2016-01-01

    Balance impairment is common in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and frequently impacts quality of life by decreasing mobility and increasing the risk of falling. However, there are only scarce data examining the contribution of specific neurological functional systems on balance measures in MS. Therefore, the primary aim of our study was to examine the differences in posturography parameters and fall incidence according to the pyramidal, cerebellar and sensory systems functional systems in PwMS. The study included 342 PwMS, 211 women and mean disease duration of 8.2 (S.D = 8.3) years. The study sample was divided into six groups according to the pyramidal, cerebellar and sensory functional system scores, derived from the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) data. Static postural control parameters were obtained from the Zebris FDM-T Treadmill (zebris® Medical GmbH, Germany). Participants were defined as "fallers" and "non-fallers" based on their fall history. Our findings revealed a trend that PwMS affected solely in the pyramidal system, have reduced stability compared to patients with cerebellar and sensory dysfunctions. Moreover, the addition of sensory impairments to pyramidal dysfunction does not exacerbate postural control. The patients in the pure sensory group demonstrated increased stability compared to each of the three combined groups; pyramidal-cerebellar, pyramidal-sensory and pyramidal-cerebellar-sensory groups. As for fall status, the percentage of fallers in the pure pyramidal, cerebellar and sensory groups were 44.3%, 33.3% and 19.5%, respectively. As for the combined functional system groups, the percentage of fallers in the pyramidal-cerebellar, pyramidal-sensory and pyramidal-cerebellar-sensory groups were 59.7%, 40.7% and 65%, respectively. This study confirms that disorders in neurological functional systems generate different effects on postural control and incidence of falls in the MS population. From a clinical standpoint, the

  1. Static Posturography and Falls According to Pyramidal, Sensory and Cerebellar Functional Systems in People with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalron, Alon; Givon, Uri; Frid, Lior; Dolev, Mark; Achiron, Anat

    2016-01-01

    Balance impairment is common in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and frequently impacts quality of life by decreasing mobility and increasing the risk of falling. However, there are only scarce data examining the contribution of specific neurological functional systems on balance measures in MS. Therefore, the primary aim of our study was to examine the differences in posturography parameters and fall incidence according to the pyramidal, cerebellar and sensory systems functional systems in PwMS. The study included 342 PwMS, 211 women and mean disease duration of 8.2 (S.D = 8.3) years. The study sample was divided into six groups according to the pyramidal, cerebellar and sensory functional system scores, derived from the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) data. Static postural control parameters were obtained from the Zebris FDM-T Treadmill (zebris® Medical GmbH, Germany). Participants were defined as "fallers" and "non-fallers" based on their fall history. Our findings revealed a trend that PwMS affected solely in the pyramidal system, have reduced stability compared to patients with cerebellar and sensory dysfunctions. Moreover, the addition of sensory impairments to pyramidal dysfunction does not exacerbate postural control. The patients in the pure sensory group demonstrated increased stability compared to each of the three combined groups; pyramidal-cerebellar, pyramidal-sensory and pyramidal-cerebellar-sensory groups. As for fall status, the percentage of fallers in the pure pyramidal, cerebellar and sensory groups were 44.3%, 33.3% and 19.5%, respectively. As for the combined functional system groups, the percentage of fallers in the pyramidal-cerebellar, pyramidal-sensory and pyramidal-cerebellar-sensory groups were 59.7%, 40.7% and 65%, respectively. This study confirms that disorders in neurological functional systems generate different effects on postural control and incidence of falls in the MS population. From a clinical standpoint, the

  2. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been performed on 20 right handed volunteers at 1.5 Tesla using echo planar imaging (EPI) protocol. Index finger tapping invoked localized activation in the primary motor area. Consistent and highly reproducible activation in the primary motor area was observed ...

  3. Functional Magnetic Resonance in the Evaluation of Oesophageal Motility Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Covotta, Francesco; Piretta, Luca; Badiali, Danilo; Laghi, Andrea; Biondi, Tommaso; Corazziari, Enrico S.; Panebianco, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been recently proposed for the evaluation of the esophagus. Our aim is to assess the role of fMRI as a technique to assess morphological and functional parameters of the esophagus in patients with esophageal motor disorders and in healthy controls. Subsequently, we assessed the diagnostic efficiency of fMRI in comparison to videofluoroscopic and manometric findings in the investigation of patients with esophageal motor disorders. Considering...

  4. Motor programme activating therapy influences adaptive brain functions in multiple sclerosis: clinical and MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasova, Kamila; Prochazkova, Marie; Tintera, Jaroslav; Ibrahim, Ibrahim; Zimova, Denisa; Stetkarova, Ivana

    2015-03-01

    There is still little scientific evidence for the efficacy of neurofacilitation approaches and their possible influence on brain plasticity and adaptability. In this study, the outcome of a new kind of neurofacilitation approach, motor programme activating therapy (MPAT), was evaluated on the basis of a set of clinical functions and with MRI. Eighteen patients were examined four times with standardized clinical tests and diffusion tensor imaging to monitor changes without therapy, immediately after therapy and 1 month after therapy. Moreover, the strength of effective connectivity was analysed before and after therapy. Patients underwent a 1-h session of MPAT twice a week for 2 months. The data were analysed by nonparametric tests of association and were subsequently statistically evaluated. The therapy led to significant improvement in clinical functions, significant increment of fractional anisotropy and significant decrement of mean diffusivity, and decrement of effective connectivity at supplementary motor areas was observed immediately after the therapy. Changes in clinical functions and diffusion tensor images persisted 1 month after completing the programme. No statistically significant changes in clinical functions and no differences in MRI-diffusion tensor images were observed without physiotherapy. Positive immediate and long-term effects of MPAT on clinical and brain functions, as well as brain microstructure, were confirmed.

  5. Amine-functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles for DNA separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Wei; Wei, Wei; Li, Junjian; Qi, Xiaoliang; Zuo, Gancheng; Chen, Qi; Pan, Xihao; Dong, Wei, E-mail: weidong@njust.edu.cn

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}@EDPS with uniform size and good dispersity is prepared. • We fabricated MMSN@EDPS with distinct core-shell–shell triple-layer composition. • DNA adsorption capacity of MMSN@EDPS is considerable. - Abstract: We report a modified approach for the functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSN) using polymer microspheres incorporated with magnetic nanoparticles in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and the core-shell magnetic silica nanoparticles (MSN). These particles were functionalized with amino groups via the addition of aminosilane directly to the particle sol. We then evaluate their DNA separation abilities and find the capacity of DNA binding significantly increased (210.22 μg/mg) compared with normal magnetic silica spheres (138.44 μg/mg) by using an ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer (UV). The morphologies, magnetic properties, particle size, pore size, core-shell structure and Zeta potential are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). This work demonstrates that our MMSN own an excellent potential application in bioseparation and drug delivery.

  6. Myocardial function and perfusion in the CREST syndrome variant of progressive systemic sclerosis. Exercise radionuclide evaluation and comparison with diffuse scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follansbee, W.P.; Curtiss, E.I.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.; Owens, G.R.; Steen, V.D.; Rodnan, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    Myocardial function and perfusion were evaluated in 22 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis with the CREST syndrome using exercise and radionuclide techniques, pulmonary function testing, and chest roentgenography. The results were compared with a similar study of 26 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma. The prevalence of thallium perfusion abnormalities was similar in the groups with CREST syndrome and diffuse scleroderma, (64 percent versus 77 percent), but the defects were significantly smaller in the CREST syndrome (p less than 0.01). Reperfusion thallium defects in the absence of extramural coronary artery disease were seen in 38 percent of patients with diffuse scleroderma. This finding was not seen in any of the patients with the CREST syndrome. In diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of both right and left ventricular function were related to larger thallium perfusion defects. In the CREST syndrome, abnormalities of left ventricular function were minor, were seen only during exercise, and were unrelated to thallium perfusion defects. Abnormal resting right ventricular function was seen in 36 percent of the patients with the CREST syndrome and was associated with an isolated decrease in diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide. It is concluded that the cardiac manifestations of the CREST syndrome are distinct from those found in diffuse scleroderma. Unlike diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of left ventricular function in the CREST syndrome are minor and are unrelated to abnormalities of coronary perfusion. Right ventricular dysfunction in the CREST syndrome appears to be primarily related to pulmonary vascular disease

  7. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, Egon; Stenager, E N; Knudsen, Lone

    1994-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 117 randomly selected patients (52 men, 65 women) with definite multiple sclerosis, it was found that 76 percent were married or cohabitant, 8 percent divorced. Social contacts remained unchanged for 70 percent, but outgoing social contacts were reduced for 45 percent......, need for structural changes in home and need for pension became greater with increasing physical handicap. No significant differences between gender were found. It is concluded that patients and relatives are under increased social strain, when multiple sclerosis progresses to a moderate handicap...

  8. Laboratory diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.; Stovner, L.J.; Rinck, P.A.; Nilsen, G.; Romslo, I.

    1991-01-01

    In 26 patients with multiple sclerosis 100% responded abnormally to magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Lesions in the posterior fossa were observed in 18 patients. The auditory brain stem response was abnormal in 15 patients, and 22 had abnormal immunoglobulins in the cerebrospinal fluid. The correlation between abnormalities of the auditory brain stem response and the magnetic resonance images was greatest in a subgroup where the two investigations were performed within a ten day interval. Results from magnetic resonance imaging, evoked potentials and cerebrospinal fluid investigations were used to reclassify 13 of 15 patients with clinically ''possible'' or ''probable''multiple sclerosis to a higher level using Poser's criteria. Evoked potentials (the auditory brain stem response in particular) correlated best with clinical multiple sclerosis category. The authors recommend that the magnetic resonance imaging is established as a first-hand investigation in evaluation of multiple sclerosis. Evoked potentials and cerebrospinal fluid investigations may prove to be more specific, however, and these investigations should also be performed as a routine. 23 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Zebrafish model of tuberous sclerosis complex reveals cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous functions of mutant tuberin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Hyung Kim

    2011-03-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in either the TSC1 (encodes hamartin or TSC2 (encodes tuberin genes. Patients with TSC have hamartomas in various organs throughout the whole body, most notably in the brain, skin, eye, heart, kidney and lung. To study the development of hamartomas, we generated a zebrafish model of TSC featuring a nonsense mutation (vu242 in the tsc2 gene. This tsc2vu242 allele encodes a truncated Tuberin protein lacking the GAP domain, which is required for inhibition of Rheb and of the TOR kinase within TORC1. We show that tsc2vu242 is a recessive larval-lethal mutation that causes increased cell size in the brain and liver. Greatly elevated TORC1 signaling is observed in tsc2vu242/vu242 homozygous zebrafish, and is moderately increased in tsc2vu242/+ heterozygotes. Forebrain neurons are poorly organized in tsc2vu242/vu242 homozygous mutants, which have extensive gray and white matter disorganization and ectopically positioned cells. Genetic mosaic analyses demonstrate that tsc2 limits TORC1 signaling in a cell-autonomous manner. However, in chimeric animals, tsc2vu242/vu242 mutant cells also mislocalize wild-type host cells in the forebrain in a non-cell-autonomous manner. These results demonstrate a highly conserved role of tsc2 in zebrafish and establish a new animal model for studies of TSC. The finding of a non-cell-autonomous function of mutant cells might help explain the formation of brain hamartomas and cortical malformations in human TSC.

  10. Serial contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance and magnetization transfer in the study of patients with multiple sclerosis; Resonancia magnetica con contraste y transferencia de magnetizacion en el estudio seriado de pacientes con esclerosis multiple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira, A; Alonso, J; Cucurella, G; Nos, C; Tintore, M; Pedraza, S; Rio, J; Montalban, X [Hospital General i Universitari Vall d` Hebron. Barcelona (Spain)

    1998-12-31

    To demonstrate the changes in the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) of different demyelinating plaques, correlating them with the baseline values in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) sequences in order to relate them more closely to the underlying disease. The study was based on 33 demyelinating plaques obtained from six patients clinically diagnosed as having remitting-recurring multiple sclerosis (MS). All the patients underwent two MR studies at a 3 to 5-month interval, including contrast-enhanced T1 and T2- weighted sequences and magnetization transfer images. The latter were used to calculate the MTR for each of the demyelinating plaques included in the study. The statistical analysis of the results obtained revealed statistically significant between initial MTR values and those of subsequent T1-weighted sequences. The MTR demonstrate significant differences between plaques according to contrast-enhanced T1-weigh tes sequences, probably indicating variable degrees of edema, demyelination and tissue destruction. These differences should be taken into account to enable the use of T1-weighted sequences to quantify the lesion load in MS patients. (Author) 35 refs.

  11. Progress in functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles for applications in biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, Catherine C

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) ranging from the nanometre and micrometre scale have been widely applied in recent years in the area of biomedicine. They contain unique magnetic properties and due to their size can function at a cellular level, making them attractive candidates for cell labelling, imaging, tracking and as carriers. A recent surge of interest in nanotechnology has boosted the breadth and depth of the nanoparticle research field. This review aims to supplement a previously published review in 2003 and address more recent advances in the uses and bioapplications of mNPs and future interesting perspectives. (topical review)

  12. Uniform magnetic fields in density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellgren, Erik I.; Laestadius, Andre; Helgaker, Trygve; Kvaal, Simen; Teale, Andrew M.

    2018-01-01

    We construct a density-functional formalism adapted to uniform external magnetic fields that is intermediate between conventional density functional theory and Current-Density Functional Theory (CDFT). In the intermediate theory, which we term linear vector potential-DFT (LDFT), the basic variables are the density, the canonical momentum, and the paramagnetic contribution to the magnetic moment. Both a constrained-search formulation and a convex formulation in terms of Legendre-Fenchel transformations are constructed. Many theoretical issues in CDFT find simplified analogs in LDFT. We prove results concerning N-representability, Hohenberg-Kohn-like mappings, existence of minimizers in the constrained-search expression, and a restricted analog to gauge invariance. The issue of additivity of the energy over non-interacting subsystems, which is qualitatively different in LDFT and CDFT, is also discussed.

  13. Reversible cold-induced abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and function in systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, E.L.; Firestein, G.S.; Weiss, J.L.; Heuser, R.R.; Leitl, G.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Brinker, J.A.; Ciuffo, A.A.; Becker, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of peripheral cold exposure on myocardial perfusion and function were studied in 13 patients with scleroderma without clinically evident myocardial disease. Ten patients had at least one transient, cold-induced, myocardial perfusion defect visualized by thallium-201 scintigraphy, and 12 had reversible, cold-induced, segmental left ventricular hypokinesis by two-dimensional echocardiography. The 10 patients with transient perfusion defects all had anatomically corresponding ventricular wall motion abnormalities. No one in either of two control groups (9 normal volunteers and 7 patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms) had cold-induced abnormalities. This study is the first to show the simultaneous occurrence of cold-induced abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and function in patients with scleroderma. The results suggest that cold exposure in such patients may elicit transient reflex coronary vasoconstriction resulting in reversible myocardial ischemia and dysfunction. Chronic recurrent episodes of coronary spasm may lead to focal myocardial fibrosis

  14. Detection of Brain Reorganization in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Using Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    including the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV) for verbal and non-verbal intelligence; the Boston Naming Test , which evaluates a...demonstrated congruency between fMRI mappings and patient performance; 2) testing of the fMRI methods we developed for use in POMS patients was carried out...adaptive functional reorganization as a way to explain how some early-stage MS patients are able to perform well in clinical cognitive testing

  15. Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, G.; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    Neurosurgical resection of brain lesions aims to maximize excision while minimizing the risk of permanent injury to the surrounding intact brain tissue and resulting neurological deficits. While direct electrical cortical stimulation at the time of surgery allows the precise identification...... of essential cortex, it cannot provide information preoperatively for surgical planning.Brain imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetoencephalography (MEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are increasingly being used to localize functionally critical cortical......, if the stimulated cortex makes a critical contribution to the brain functions subserving the task. While the relationship between task and functional activation as revealed by fMRI is correlative in nature, the neurodisruptive effect of TMS reflects a causal effect on brain activity.The use of preoperative f...

  16. Blood oxygenation level dependent functional MRI study on the changes of motor cortex in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jing; Ma Lin; Lou Xin; Yu Shengyuan; Li Dejun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of motor cortex in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) while executing sequential finger tapping movement by using blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional MRI. Methods: Fifteen patients with definite or probable ALS and 15 age and gender matched normal controls were enrolled in the BOLD study, and all the subjects were right-handed with no other diseases or any recent medication history. A 3.0 T MR scanner' was employed and gradient echo EPI (GRE-EPI)sequence was used to acquire the functional images. Subjects executed sequential finger tapping movement at a frequency of 1-2 Hz during a block design task. fMRI data were analyzed by using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) 2. Volume of activated brain areas was compared with the use of a Student's t-test. Results: Bilateral primary sensorimotor cortex (PSM), bilateral posterior aspect of premotor area (PA), bilateral supplementary motor area (SMA), contralateral inferior lateral premotor area (ILPA), bilateral parietal region (PAR), and ipsilateral cerebellum showed activation in both ALS patients and normal controls when executing the same motor task. The activation areas in bilateral PSM and bilateral posterior aspect of PA ( right hand ipsilateral activation: ALS (924.5±141.1) mm 3 , control (829.9± 98.4) mm 3 , P=0.05; right hand contralateral activation: ALS (9143.8±702.8) mm 3 , control (8638.8±506.4) mm 3 P 3 , control (902.5±3 184.2)mm , P 3 , control (5934.6±616.4) mm 3 , P 3 , control (4710.7±416.3) mm 3 , P 3 , control (3688.9±672.3) mm 3 , P 3 , control (254.3±84.4) mm 3 , P 3 , control (1689.0±719.6) mm 3 , P<0.05) were significantly larger in ALS patients than in normal controls. Extra activation areas including ipsilateral ILPA, contralateral cerebellum and bilateral posterior limb of internal capsule were only detected in ALS patients. Conclusions: Similar activation areas were seen in both groups while executing the same motor

  17. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1988-01-01

    Forty-two (12%) of a total of 366 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) had psychiatric admissions. Of these, 34 (81%) had their first psychiatric admission in conjunction with or after the onset of MS. Classification by psychiatric diagnosis showed that there was a significant positive correlation...

  18. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Knudsen, L; Jensen, K

    1991-01-01

    In a cross-sectional investigation of 116 patients with multiple sclerosis, the social and sparetime activities of the patient were assessed by both patient and his/her family. The assessments were correlated to physical disability which showed that particularly those who were moderately disabled...

  19. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1990-01-01

    An investigation on the correlation between ability to read TV subtitles and the duration of visual evoked potential (VEP) latency in 14 patients with definite multiple sclerosis (MS), indicated that VEP latency in patients unable to read the TV subtitles was significantly delayed in comparison...

  20. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Knudsen, L; Jensen, K

    1994-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 94 patients (42 males, 52 females) with definite multiple sclerosis (MS) in the age range 25-55 years, the correlation of neuropsychological tests with the ability to read TV-subtitles and with the use of sedatives is examined. A logistic regression analysis reveals...

  1. Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on multiple sclerosis is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  2. Influence of clinical features, serum antinuclear antibodies, and lung function on survival of patients with systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Ullman, S; Shen, G Q

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the independent contribution of several clinical and laboratory variables to the mortality of a cohort of Danish patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). METHODS: A cohort of 174 patients with incident SSc was retrospectively identified using clinical charts and study record...

  3. Multiple sclerosis and anterograde axonal degeneration study by magnetic resonance. Asociacion de esclerosis multiple y degeneracion Walleriana estudio por resonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez Pardo, P; Capdevila Cirera, A; Sanz Marin, P M; Gili Planas, J [Centro de Resonancia Magnetica de Barcelona (Spain)

    1993-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system that affects specifically the myelin. Its diagnosis by imaging techniques is, since the development of magnetic resonance (MR), relatively simple, and its occasional association with anterograde axonal degeneration (WD) has been reported. In both disorders, there is a lengthening of the T1 and T2 relaxation times. In the present report, 76 patients with MS with less than 4 plaques in the typical periventricular position were studied retrospectively, resulting in a rate of association with anterograde axonal degeneration of 8%. We consider that in spite of their same behavior in MR,MS and WD, with moreover represent completely different pathologies, are perfectly differential by MR. The S-E images with longer repetition and echo times in the axial and coronal planes have proved to be those most sensitive for this differentiation. Given that MS is specific pathology of then myelin, the axonal damages in delayed until several plaques adjacent to an axon affect it. We consider that this, added to the restriction of our study group (less than 4 plaques), is the cause of the pow percentage of the MS-WD association in our study. (Author).

  4. Zero-field magnetic response functions in Landau levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Niu, Qian

    2017-07-01

    We present a fresh perspective on the Landau level quantization rule; that is, by successively including zero-field magnetic response functions at zero temperature, such as zero-field magnetization and susceptibility, the Onsager’s rule can be corrected order by order. Such a perspective is further reinterpreted as a quantization of the semiclassical electron density in solids. Our theory not only reproduces Onsager’s rule at zeroth order and the Berry phase and magnetic moment correction at first order but also explains the nature of higher-order corrections in a universal way. In applications, those higher-order corrections are expected to curve the linear relation between the level index and the inverse of the magnetic field, as already observed in experiments. Our theory then provides a way to extract the correct value of Berry phase as well as the magnetic susceptibility at zero temperature from Landau level fan diagrams in experiments. Moreover, it can be used theoretically to calculate Landau levels up to second-order accuracy for realistic models.

  5. Neuromuscular adaptations to long-term progressive resistance training translates to improved functional capacity for people with multiple sclerosis and is maintained at follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjolhede, T.; Vissing, K.; de Place, L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progressive resistance training (PRT) is acknowledged to effectively improve muscle strength for people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), but diverging results exist regarding whether such improvements translates to improved functional capacity, possibly relating to insufficient duration......: This study was a randomised controlled trial, with a training group and a waitlist group undergoing supervised PRT for 24 weeks initially or after 24 weeks of habitual lifestyle, respectively. Functional capacity, isometric muscle strength of knee extensors and flexors, neural drive and thigh muscle cross......-sectional area was measured at baseline, after 24 and 48 weeks. RESULTS: The training group significantly improved neuromuscular function of the knee extensors and flexors, which translated to improvements in functional capacity. Furthermore, the improved functional capacity was maintained after 24 weeks of self...

  6. Green's function of compressible Petschek-type magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penz, Thomas; Semenov, V.S.; Ivanova, V.V.; Heyn, M.F.; Ivanov, I.B.; Biernat, H.K.

    2006-01-01

    We present a method to analyze the wave and shock structures arising from Petschek-type magnetic reconnection. Based on a time-dependent analytical approach developed by Heyn and Semenov [Phys. Plasmas 3, 2725 (1996)] and Semenov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 11, 62 (2004)], we calculate the perturbations caused by a delta function-shaped reconnection electric field, which allows us to achieve a representation of the plasma variables in the form of Green's functions. Different configurations for the initial conditions are considered. In the case of symmetric, antiparallel magnetic fields and symmetric plasma density, the well-known structure of an Alfven discontinuity, a fast body wave, a slow shock, a slow wave, and a tube wave occurs. In the case of asymmetric, antiparallel magnetic fields, additionally surface waves are found. We also discuss the case of symmetric, antiparallel magnetic fields and asymmetric densities, which leads to a faster propagation in the lower half plane, causing side waves forming a Mach cone in the upper half plane. Complex effects like anisotropic propagation characteristics, intrinsic wave coupling, and the generation of different nonlinear and linear wave modes in a finite β plasma are retained. The temporal evolution of these wave and shock structures is shown

  7. Frequency-Specific Abnormalities of Intrinsic Functional Connectivity Strength among Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Fangjun; Zhou, Fuqing; Huang, Muhua; Gong, Honghan; Xu, Renshi

    2017-01-01

    The classical concept that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative disorder characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons is agreed. However, more and more studies have suggested the involvement of some extra-motor regions. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency-related alteration pattern of intrinsic functional connectivity strength (FCS) at the voxel-wise level in the relatively early-stage of ALS on a whole brain scale. In this study, 21 patients w...

  8. Rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubsik-Gidlewska, Anna M; Klimkiewicz, Paulina; Klimkiewicz, Robert; Janczewska, Katarzyna; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the study is to present a strategy of rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis on the basis of the latest developments in the field of physiotherapy. The publications on the problem discuss a wide range of methods of physiotherapy that can be used in order to reduce the degree of disability and alleviate the symptoms associated with the disease. The complexity of the disease, the difficulty in determining the appropriate treatment and a wide range of symptoms require a comprehensive approach to the patient, which would include both pharmacology and neurorehabilitation. Rehabilitation, which includes psychotherapy and symptomatic therapy, is regarded nowadays as the best form of treatment for multiple sclerosis. An indepth diagnostic assessment of functional status and prognosis should be carried out before the start of the rehabilitation process. The prognosis should take into account the mental state, the neurological status and the awareness of the patient. The kinesiotherapy program in multiple sclerosis is based on a gradation of physiotherapy which assumes a gradual transition from basic movements to more complex ones till global functions are obtained. The most appropriate form of treatment is functional rehabilitation combined with physical procedures. Recent reports indicate the need for aerobic training to be included in the rehabilitation program. The introduction of physical activities, regardless of the severity of the disease, will reduce the negative effects of akinesia, and thus increase the functional capabilities of all body systems.

  9. Arbitrary function generator for APS injector synchrotron correction magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despe, O.D.

    1991-01-01

    The APS injector synchrotron has eighty correction magnets around its circumference to provide the vernier field changes required for beam orbit correction during acceleration. The arbitrary function generator (AFG) design is based on scanning out encoded data from a semi-conductor memory, a first-in-first-out (FIFO) device. The data input consists of a maximum of 20 correction values specified within the acceleration window. Additional points between these values are then linearly interpolated to create a uniformly spaced 1000 data-point function stored in the FIFO. Each point, encoded as a 3-bit value is scanned out in synchronism with the injection pulse and used to clock the up/down counter driving the DAC. The DAC produces the analog reference voltage used to control the magnet current. 1 ref., 4 figs

  10. Chronic antiepileptic drug use and functional network efficiency : a functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veenendaal, T.M.; IJff, D.M.; Aldenkamp, A.P.; Lazeron, R.H.C.; Hofman, P.A.M.; de Louw, A.J.A.; Backes, W.H.; Jansen, J.F.A.

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To increase our insight in the neuronal mechanisms underlying cognitive side-effects of antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment. METHODS: The relation between functional magnetic resonance-acquired brain network measures, AED use, and cognitive function was investigated. Three groups of patients

  11. 3-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging-guided tumor resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, W.A. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Depts. of Neurosurgery; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology; University of Minnesota Medical Center (MMC), Minneapolis, MN (United States); Truwit, C.L. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Neurology; Hennepin Country Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-12-15

    Objective: We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of using 3-tesla (T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to guide brain tumor resection. Material and methods: From February 2004 to March 2006, fMRI was performed on 13 patients before surgical resection. Functional imaging was used to identify eloquent cortices for motor (8), speech (3), and motor and speech (2) activation using two different 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. Surgical resection was accomplished using a 1.5-T intraoperative MR system. Appropriate MR scan sequences were performed intraoperatively to determine and maximize the extent of the surgical resection. Results: Tumors included six oligodendrogliomas, three meningiomas, two astrocytomas and two glioblastomas multiforme. The fMRI data was accurate in all cases. After surgery, two patients had hemiparesis, two had worsening of their speech, and one had worsening of speech and motor function. Neurological function returned to normal in all patients within 1 month. Complete resections were possible in 10 patients (77%). Two patients had incomplete resections because of the proximity of their tumors to functional areas. Biopsy was performed in another patient with an astrocytoma in the motor strip. Conclusion: 3-T fMRI was accurate for locating neurologic function before tumor resection near eloquent cortex. (orig.)

  12. 3-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging-guided tumor resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, W.A.; Truwit, C.L.; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN; Hennepin Country Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of using 3-tesla (T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to guide brain tumor resection. Material and methods: From February 2004 to March 2006, fMRI was performed on 13 patients before surgical resection. Functional imaging was used to identify eloquent cortices for motor (8), speech (3), and motor and speech (2) activation using two different 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. Surgical resection was accomplished using a 1.5-T intraoperative MR system. Appropriate MR scan sequences were performed intraoperatively to determine and maximize the extent of the surgical resection. Results: Tumors included six oligodendrogliomas, three meningiomas, two astrocytomas and two glioblastomas multiforme. The fMRI data was accurate in all cases. After surgery, two patients had hemiparesis, two had worsening of their speech, and one had worsening of speech and motor function. Neurological function returned to normal in all patients within 1 month. Complete resections were possible in 10 patients (77%). Two patients had incomplete resections because of the proximity of their tumors to functional areas. Biopsy was performed in another patient with an astrocytoma in the motor strip. Conclusion: 3-T fMRI was accurate for locating neurologic function before tumor resection near eloquent cortex. (orig.)

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of epithelial metabolism and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaban, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a noninvasive technique for studying cellular metabolism and function. In this review the general applications and advantages of NMR will be discussed with specific reference to epithelial tissues. Phosphorus NMR investigations have been performed on epithelial tissues in vivo and in vitro; however, other detectable nuclei have not been utilized to date. Several new applications of phosphorus NMR to epithelial tissues are also discussed, including studies on isolated renal tubules and sheet epithelia

  14. Impact of cognitive function and dysarthria on spoken language and perceived speech severity in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feenaughty, Lynda

    Purpose: The current study sought to investigate the separate effects of dysarthria and cognitive status on global speech timing, speech hesitation, and linguistic complexity characteristics and how these speech behaviors impose on listener impressions for three connected speech tasks presumed to differ in cognitive-linguistic demand for four carefully defined speaker groups; 1) MS with cognitive deficits (MSCI), 2) MS with clinically diagnosed dysarthria and intact cognition (MSDYS), 3) MS without dysarthria or cognitive deficits (MS), and 4) healthy talkers (CON). The relationship between neuropsychological test scores and speech-language production and perceptual variables for speakers with cognitive deficits was also explored. Methods: 48 speakers, including 36 individuals reporting a neurological diagnosis of MS and 12 healthy talkers participated. The three MS groups and control group each contained 12 speakers (8 women and 4 men). Cognitive function was quantified using standard clinical tests of memory, information processing speed, and executive function. A standard z-score of ≤ -1.50 indicated deficits in a given cognitive domain. Three certified speech-language pathologists determined the clinical diagnosis of dysarthria for speakers with MS. Experimental speech tasks of interest included audio-recordings of an oral reading of the Grandfather passage and two spontaneous speech samples in the form of Familiar and Unfamiliar descriptive discourse. Various measures of spoken language were of interest. Suprasegmental acoustic measures included speech and articulatory rate. Linguistic speech hesitation measures included pause frequency (i.e., silent and filled pauses), mean silent pause duration, grammatical appropriateness of pauses, and interjection frequency. For the two discourse samples, three standard measures of language complexity were obtained including subordination index, inter-sentence cohesion adequacy, and lexical diversity. Ten listeners

  15. Dispersion functions for weakly relativistic magnetized plasmas in inhomogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaelzer, R.; Schneider, R.S.; Ziebell, L.F.

    1995-01-01

    The study of wave propagation and absorption inhomogeneous plasmas can be made by using a formulation in which the dielectric properties of the plasma are described by an effective dielectric tensor which incorporates inhomogeneity effects, inserted into a dispersion relation which is formally the same as that of an homogeneous plasma. We have recently utilized this formalism in the study of electron cyclotron absorption in inhomogeneous media, both in the case of homogeneous magnetic field and in the case of inhomogeneous magnetic field. In the present paper we resume the study of the case with inhomogeneous magnetic field, in order to introduce a generalized dispersion function useful for the case of a Maxwellian plasma, and discuss some of its properties. (author). 10 refs

  16. Pathological changes of the chemosensory function in multiple sclerosis. An MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, F.A.; Harms, L.; Fleiner, F.; Dahlslett, B.; Goektas, Oe.; Bohner, G.; Erb, K.; Luedemann, L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To examine possible causes for olfactory and gustatory dysfunction in MS patients in a prospective study with MRI. Materials and Methods: 30 MS patients (21 women, 11 men, 22 - 65 years, diameter 42 years) were examined by MRI. The olfactory bulb (OB) and olfactory brain volume was correlated with the number and volume of MS lesions in the olfactory brain and the non-olfactory brain. Olfactory testing was performed using the Threshold-Discrimination-Identification Test (TDI), and gustatory function was tested using the Taste-Strips-Test (TST). Results: 33 % of the MS patients displayed olfactory dysfunction (8 % of the control group), and 17 % displayed gustatory dysfunction (5 % of the control group). There was a correlation between the olfactory brain volume and the number (r = -0.38, p < 0.05) and volume (r = -0.38, p < 0.05) of MS lesions in the olfactory brain. The olfactory brain volume correlated with the number of MS lesions in the non-olfactory brain (r = -0.48, p < 0.05). The volume of the left OB correlated with the volume of MS lesions in the olfactory brain (r = -0.42, p < 0.05), the number (r = 0.37, p < 0.05) and volume (r = 0.4, p < 0.05) of lesions in the left part of the olfactory brain and with the TST score (r = -0.45, p < 0.05). The TST score correlated with the volume of lesions in the left (r = -0.45, p < 0.05) and right part (r = -0.53, p < 0.05) of the olfactory brain. The TST score correlated with the number of lesions in the non-olfactory brain (r = -0.48, p < 0.05). Conclusion: The correlation between a higher number and volume of MS lesions in the olfactory brain with a decreased OB and olfactory brain volume could help to explain olfactory and gustatory dysfunction in MS patients. Just the left OB correlated with the number and volume of lesions in the olfactory brain. Manual segmentation was a suitable method for measuring OB and olfactory brain volume. (orig.)

  17. Elucidating the Function of Penetratin and a Static Magnetic Field in Cellular Uptake of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Stirling

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs have become important tools in molecular diagnostics, in vivo imaging and improved treatment of disease, with the ultimate aim of producing a more theranostic approach. Due to their small sizes, the nanoparticles can cross most of the biological barriers such as the blood vessels and the blood brain barrier, thus providing ubiquitous access to most tissues. In all biomedical applications maximum nanoparticle uptake into cells is required. Two promising methods employed to this end include functionalization of mNPs with cell-penetrating peptides to promote efficient translocation of cargo into the cell and the use of external magnetic fields for enhanced delivery. This study aimed to compare the effect of both penetratin and a static magnetic field with regards to the cellular uptake of 200 nm magnetic NPs and determine the route of uptake by both methods. Results demonstrated that both techniques increased particle uptake, with penetratin proving more cell specific. Clathrin- medicated endocytosis appeared to be responsible for uptake as shown via PCR and western blot, with Pitstop 2 (known to selectively block clathrin formation blocking particle uptake. Interestingly, it was further shown that a magnetic field was able to reverse or overcome the blocking, suggesting an alternative route of uptake.

  18. Alignment of SWNTs by protein-ligand interaction of functionalized magnetic particles under low magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae Jung; Park, Jong Pil; Lee, Seok Jae; Jung, Dae-Hwan; Ko, Young Koan; Jung, Hee-Tae; Lee, Sang Yup

    2011-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted considerable attention for applications using their superior mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. A simple method to controllably align single-walled CNTs (SWNTs) by using magnetic particles embedded with superparamagnetic iron oxide as an accelerator under the magnetic field was developed. The functionalization of SWNTs using biotin, interacted with streptavidin-coupled magnetic particles (micro-to-nano in diameter), and layer-by-layer assembly were performed for the alignment of a particular direction onto the clean silicon and the gold substrate at very low magnetic forces (0.02-0.89 T) at room temperature. The successful alignment of the SWNTs with multi-layer film was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By changing the orientation and location of the substrates, crossed-networks of SWNTs-magnetic particle complex could easily be fabricated. We suggest that this approach, which consists of a combination of biological interaction among streptavidin-biotin and magnetite particles, should be useful for lateral orientation of individual SWNTs with controllable direction.

  19. Advanced Morphological and Functional Magnetic Resonance Techniques in Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Mastropasqua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a multifactorial disease that is the leading cause of irreversible blindness. Recent data documented that glaucoma is not limited to the retinal ganglion cells but that it also extends to the posterior visual pathway. The diagnosis is based on the presence of signs of glaucomatous optic neuropathy and consistent functional visual field alterations. Unfortunately these functional alterations often become evident when a significant amount of the nerve fibers that compose the optic nerve has been irreversibly lost. Advanced morphological and functional magnetic resonance (MR techniques (morphometry, diffusion tensor imaging, arterial spin labeling, and functional connectivity may provide a means for observing modifications induced by this fiber loss, within the optic nerve and the visual cortex, in an earlier stage. The aim of this systematic review was to determine if the use of these advanced MR techniques could offer the possibility of diagnosing glaucoma at an earlier stage than that currently possible.

  20. Avian magnetic compass: Its functional properties and physical basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roswitha WILTSCHKO, Wolfgang WILTSCHKO

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The avian magnetic compass was analyzed in bird species of three different orders – Passeriforms, Columbiforms and Galliforms – and in three different behavioral contexts, namely migratory orientation, homing and directional conditioning. The respective findings indicate similar functional properties: it is an inclination compass that works only within a functional window around the ambient magnetic field intensity; it tends to be lateralized in favor of the right eye, and it is wavelength-dependent, requiring light from the short-wavelength range of the spectrum. The underlying physical mechanisms have been identified as radical pair processes, spin-chemical reactions in specialized photopigments. The iron-based receptors in the upper beak do not seem to be involved. The existence of the same type of magnetic compass in only very distantly related bird species suggests that it may have been present already in the common ancestors of all modern birds, where it evolved as an all-purpose compass mechanism for orientation within the home range [Current Zoology 56 (3: 265–276, 2010].

  1. Coupled particle–fluid transport and magnetic separation in microfluidic systems with passive magnetic functionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khashan, Saud A; Furlani, Edward P

    2013-01-01

    A study is presented of coupled particle–fluid transport and field-directed particle capture in microfluidic systems with passive magnetic functionality. These systems consist of a microfluidic flow cell on a substrate that contains embedded magnetic elements. Two systems are considered that utilize soft- and hard-magnetic elements, respectively. In the former, an external field is applied to magnetize the elements, and in the latter, they are permanently magnetized. The field produced by the magnetized elements permeates into the flow cell giving rise to an attractive force on magnetic particles that flow through it. The systems are studied using a novel numerical/closed-form modelling approach that combines numerical transport analysis with closed-form field analysis. Particle–fluid transport is computed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), while the magnetic force that governs particle capture is obtained in closed form. The CFD analysis takes into account dominant particle forces and two-way momentum transfer between the particles and the fluid. The two-way particle–fluid coupling capability is an important feature of the model that distinguishes it from more commonly used and simplified one-way coupling analysis. The model is used to quantify the impact of two-way particle–fluid coupling on both the capture efficiency and the flow pattern in the systems considered. Many effects such as particle-induced flow-enhanced capture efficiency and flow circulation are studied that cannot be predicted using one-way coupling analysis. In addition, dilute particle dispersions are shown to exhibit significant localized particle–fluid coupling near the capture regions, which contradicts the commonly held view that two-way coupling can be ignored when analysing high-gradient magnetic separation involving such particle systems. Overall, the model demonstrates that two-way coupling needs to be taken into account for rigorous predictions of capture efficiency

  2. Oxygen transport enhancement by functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (FMP) in bioprocesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataide, Filipe Andre Prata

    The enhancement of fluid properties, namely thermal conductivity and mass diffusivity for a wide range of applications, through the use of nanosized particles' suspensions has been gathering increasing interest in the scientific community. In previous studies, Olle et al. (2006) showed an enhancement in oxygen absorption to aqueous solutions of up to 6-fold through the use of functionalized nanosized magnetic particles with oleic acid coating. Krishnamurthy et al. (2006) showed a remarkable 26-fold enhancement in dye diffusion in water. These two publications are landmarks in mass transfer enhancement in chemical systems through the use of nanoparticles. The central goal of this Ph.D. thesis was to develop functionalized magnetic nanoparticles to enhance oxygen transport in bioprocesses. The experimental protocol for magnetic nanoparticles synthesis and purification adopted in this thesis is a modification of that reported by Olle et al. (2006). This is facilitated by employing twice the quantity of ammonia, added at a slower rate, and by filtering the final nanoparticle solution in a cross-flow filtration modulus against 55 volumes of distilled water. This modification in the protocol resulted in improved magnetic nanoparticles with measurably higher mass transfer enhancement. Magnetic nanoparticles with oleic acid and Hitenol-BC coating were screened for oxygen transfer enhancement, since these particles are relatively inexpensive and easy to synthesize. A glass 0.5-liter reactor was custom manufactured specifically for oxygen transport studies in magnetic nanoparticles suspensions. The reactor geometry, baffles and Rushton impeller are of standard dimensions. Mass transfer tests were conducted through the use of the sulphite oxidation method, applying iodometric back-titration. A 3-factor central composite circumscribed design (CCD) was adopted for design of experiments in order to generate sufficiently informative data to model the effect of magnetic

  3. Characterization and Functionality of Immidazolium Ionic Liquids Modified Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 1,3-Dialkylimidazolium-based ionic liquids were chemically synthesized and bonded on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs with easy one-step reaction. The obtained six kinds of ionic liquid modified MNPs were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, magnetization, and FTIR, which owned the high adsorption capacity due to the nanometer size and high-density modification with ionic liquids. Functionality of MNPs with ionic liquids greatly influenced the solubility of the MNPs with organic solvents depending on the alkyl chain length and the anions of the ionic liquids. Moreover, the obtained MNPs showed the specific extraction efficiency to organic pollutant, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, while superparamagnetic property of the MNPs facilitated the convenient separation of MNPs from the bulks water samples.

  4. Amine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for removal of oil droplets from produced water and accelerated magnetic separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Saebom, E-mail: saebomko@austin.utexas.edu [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Kim, Eun Song [University of Texas, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Park, Siman [University of Texas, Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering (United States); Daigle, Hugh [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Milner, Thomas E. [University of Texas, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Huh, Chun [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Bennetzen, Martin V. [Maersk Oil Corporate (Denmark); Geremia, Giuliano A. [Maersk Oil Research and Technology Centre (Qatar)

    2017-04-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with surface coatings designed for water treatment, in particular for targeted removal of contaminants from produced water in oil fields, have drawn considerable attention due to their environmental merit. The goal of this study was to develop an efficient method of removing very stable, micron-scale oil droplets dispersed in oilfield produced water. We synthesized MNPs in the laboratory with a prescribed surface coating. The MNPs were superparamagnetic magnetite, and the hydrodynamic size of amine functionalized MNPs ranges from 21 to 255 nm with an average size of 66 nm. The initial oil content of 0.25 wt.% was reduced by as much as 99.9% in separated water. The electrostatic attraction between negatively charged oil-in-water emulsions and positively charged MNPs controls, the attachment of MNPs to the droplet surface, and the subsequent aggregation of the electrically neutral oil droplets with attached MNPs (MNPs-oils) play a critical role in accelerated and efficient magnetic separation. The total magnetic separation time was dramatically reduced to as short as 1 s after MNPs, and oil droplets were mixed, in contrast with the case of free, individual MNPs with which separation took about 36∼72 h, depending on the MNP concentrations. Model calculations of magnetic separation velocity, accounting for the MNP magnetization and viscous drag, show that the total magnetic separation time will be approximately 5 min or less, when the size of the MNPs-oils is greater than 360 nm, which can be used as an optimum operating condition.

  5. Optimal arrangement of magnetic coils for functional magnetic stimulation of the inspiratory muscles in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Vernon Weh-Hau; Zhu, Ercheng; Sasse, Scott A; Sassoon, Catherine; Hsiao, Ian N

    2005-12-01

    In an attempt to maximize inspiratory pressure and volume, the optimal position of a single or of dual magnetic coils during functional magnetic stimulation (FMS) of the inspiratory muscles was evaluated in twenty-three dogs. Unilateral phrenic magnetic stimulation (UPMS) or bilateral phrenic magnetic stimulation (BPMS), posterior cervical magnetic stimulation (PCMS), anterior cervical magnetic stimulation (ACMS) as well as a combination of PCMS and ACMS were performed. Trans-diaphragmatic pressure (Pdi), flow, and lung volume changes with an open airway were measured. Transdiaphragmatic pressure was also measured with an occluded airway. Changes in inspiratory parameters during FMS were compared with 1) electrical stimulation of surgically exposed bilateral phrenic nerves (BPES) and 2) ventral root electrical stimulation at C5-C7 (VRES C5-C7). Relative to the Pdi generated by BPES of 36.3 +/- 4.5 cm H2O (Mean +/- SEM), occluded Pdi(s) produced by UPMS, BPMS, PCMS, ACMS, and a combined PCMS + ACMS were 51.7%, 61.5%, 22.4%, 100.3%, and 104.5% of the maximal Pdi, respectively. Pdi(s) produced by UPMS, BPMS, PCMS, ACMS, and combined ACMS + PCMS were 38.0%, 45.2%, 16.5%, 73.8%, and 76.8%, respectively, of the Pdi induced by VRES (C5-C7) (48.0 +/- 3.9 cm H2O). The maximal Pdi(s) generated during ACMS and combined PCMS + ACMS were higher than the maximal Pdi(s) generated during UPMS, BPMS, or PCMS (p BPMS or PCMS. ACMS can be used to generate sufficient inspiratory pressure, flow, and volume for activation of the inspiratory muscles.

  6. Magnetic Resonance and Brain Function. Approaches from Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maraviglia, B.

    1999-01-01

    In the last decade of this millennium, while, on the one hand, the international scientific community has focused with increasing endeavour on the research about the great unknown of the mechanism and the pathologies of the human brain, on the other hand, the NMR community has achieved some important results, which should widely affect, in the future, the possibility of understanding the function and disfunction of the human brain. In the early 1980's, the beginning of the application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to the morphological study of the brain in vivo, has played an extraordinary role, which, since then, placed MRI in a leading position among the methodologies used for investigation and diagnostics of the Central Nervous System. In the 1990s, the objective of finding new means, based on MRI, capable of giving functional and metabolic information, with the highest possible space resolution, drove the scientists towards different approaches. Among these, the first one to generate a breakthrough in the localization of specific cerebral functions was the Blood Oxygen Level Development (BOLD) MRI. A very wide range of applications followed the discovery of BOLD imaging. Still, this method gives an indirect information of the localization of functions, via the variation of oxygen release and deoxyhemoglobin formation. Of course, a high-resolution spatial distribution of the metabolites, crucial to brain function, would give a deeper insight into the occurring processes. This finality is aimed at by the Double Magnetic Resonance methods, which are developing new procedures able to detect some metabolites with increasing sensitivity and resolution. A third new promising approach to functional MRI should derive from the use of hyperpolarized, opens a series of potential applications to the study of brain function

  7. Height, shape and anterior-posterior diameter of pituitary gland on magnetic resonance imaging among patients with multiple sclerosis compared to normal individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Mohammad; Ebrahimi, Hossein Ali; Ahmadi-Pour, Habibeh; Khodadoust, Mohammad

    2017-10-07

    Background: Several studies indicate contribution of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in multiple sclerosis (MS) disease. This study was designed to determine whether there is an effective difference in pituitary height, shape, and anterior-posterior diameter (APD) between patients with MS and the control group. Methods: In this study, sagittal pituitary height and APD of 134 men and women (64 patients with MS and 70 healthy subjects as control group) were measured by T1 sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All the subjects were free of sellar or parasellar pathology without a history of surgical intervention or prolactin affecting drugs like bromocriptine and cabergoline or corticosteroid consumption. Results: Mean height of pituitary gland was 6.62 ± 1.43 and 5.78 ± 1.15 mm for patients and the control group, respectively, and the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.001). Mean APD was 10.40 ± 1.29 mm for the group of patients and 10.25 ± 1.41 mm for the control group, respectively, without significant differences. 46.9%, 37.5%, and 15.6% of patients had flat, convex, and concave hypophyseal surfaces, respectively. This rate was 50%, 30%, and 20% among the control group, respectively. There was no significant difference between our measurements among patients on whom imaging study was performed at time of disease onset with others. Conclusion: Mean height of pituitary gland among patients with MS was significantly greater than the control group (P = 0.001). So can we consider the same etiology for pituitary hypertrophy among patients with MS as a hypothesis?

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging of normal-appearing white matter in children and young adults with tuberous sclerosis complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arulrajah, Sahayini; Ertan, Gulhan; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.; Jordan, Lori; Khaykin, Elizabeth; Izbudak, Izlem

    2009-01-01

    Patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) frequently present with neurocognitive deficits which may be related to impaired white matter maturation. The purposes of our study were (a) to evaluate the white matter maturation in children and young adults with TSC by comparing the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) with age-matched healthy controls and (b) to determine the association of NAWM-ADC values with the severity of neurological symptoms in TSC patients. Twenty-three TSC patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion-weighted imaging between January 2000 and January 2009 were studied. ADC values of NAWM were measured in the frontal, parietal, occipital lobes, and in the pons. ADC data were compared with age-matched normative data derived from healthy controls. Patients were neurologically scored by a pediatric neurologist. Two-sample t tests and linear regression were conducted using STATA software. ADC values of NAWM were higher in TSC patients compared with healthy controls; the increase, however, only reached statistical significance in the frontal white matter and pons in the age group between 96 and 144 months and in the right parietal and occipital white matter in the age group above 144 months. There was no significant change in neurological severity score per unit increase in ADC measurement. ADC values of NAWM appear increased in TSC patients. The abnormal ADC values suggest that myelination may be delayed/impaired in TSC patients, which could explain global neurocognitive deficits. Larger prospective studies, including diffusion tensor imaging, are necessary to validate our results. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging of normal-appearing white matter in children and young adults with tuberous sclerosis complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arulrajah, Sahayini; Ertan, Gulhan; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Jordan, Lori [Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Khaykin, Elizabeth [Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Department of Mental Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Izbudak, Izlem [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) frequently present with neurocognitive deficits which may be related to impaired white matter maturation. The purposes of our study were (a) to evaluate the white matter maturation in children and young adults with TSC by comparing the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) with age-matched healthy controls and (b) to determine the association of NAWM-ADC values with the severity of neurological symptoms in TSC patients. Twenty-three TSC patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion-weighted imaging between January 2000 and January 2009 were studied. ADC values of NAWM were measured in the frontal, parietal, occipital lobes, and in the pons. ADC data were compared with age-matched normative data derived from healthy controls. Patients were neurologically scored by a pediatric neurologist. Two-sample t tests and linear regression were conducted using STATA software. ADC values of NAWM were higher in TSC patients compared with healthy controls; the increase, however, only reached statistical significance in the frontal white matter and pons in the age group between 96 and 144 months and in the right parietal and occipital white matter in the age group above 144 months. There was no significant change in neurological severity score per unit increase in ADC measurement. ADC values of NAWM appear increased in TSC patients. The abnormal ADC values suggest that myelination may be delayed/impaired in TSC patients, which could explain global neurocognitive deficits. Larger prospective studies, including diffusion tensor imaging, are necessary to validate our results. (orig.)

  10. Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and soluble adhesion molecules in relation to magnetic resonance imaging results and clinical activity in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millers, A.; Metra, M.; Mastina, M.; Platkajis, A.; Kukaine, R.

    2001-01-01

    One direction of research in pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been to identify immunological markers associated with disease activity that are capable of predicting subsequent course of disease and are sensitive to intervention by immunomodulatory therapies. Adhesion molecules and tumor necrosis factor-α of the cytokine superfamily are associated with inflammation-mediated blood-brain barrier dysfunction and demyelination in the central nervous system (CNS). This study investigates the relationship between the serum level of soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (alCAM), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) activity in 18 patients with relapsing-remitting (RR) MS with different clinical activity. Patients with active gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced lesions on MRI showed a higher serum level of TNF-α, sVCA-1, slCAM-1 than RR MS patients without Gd-enhanced lesions. Control individuals (n=10) without MRI abnormalities had significantly lower serum levels of the above immunological parameters. These results suggest that serum levels of TNF-α and adhesion molecules slCAM-1 in RR MS patients are correlated with Gd-enhanced MRI and disease clinical activity and that they can be used as biological markers of disease activity. The soluble form of VCAM levels in peripheral blood did not correlate with disease activity and Gd-enhanced lesions of MRI. sVCAM as an early indicator of blood-brain barrier dysfunction may also serve as marker of beneficial activity in the relapsing phase of MS course. (authors)

  11. Functional magnetic resonance in the conditions of a clinical department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenberger, J.; Seidl, Z.; Krasensky, J.; Vitak, T.; Haberzettel, V.

    1997-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance is a novel technique enabling non-invasive monitoring of the brain function and metabolism at a time resolution and spatial resolution unmatched by any other imaging technique. The principle of the method is outlined, and it is demonstrated that such demanding examinations can be performed using state-of-the-art MR instrumentation combined with conventional equipment and GE sequences available at normal clinical departments. The functional MR examination, which does not take a much longer time than routine examination, can be improved by fixing the patient's head. As a prerequisite for correlation, the MR instrument has to be interfaced to a computer, and suitable tools for mutual data correlation have to be created. (P.A.)

  12. Functional and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging at 3 tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klarhoefer, M.

    2001-03-01

    This thesis deals with the development and optimization of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods for non-invasive functional studies of the human brain and perfusion imaging on a 3 Tesla (T) whole body NMR system. The functional MRI (fMRI) experiments performed showed that single-shot multi-echo EPI and spiral imaging techniques provide fast tools to obtain information about T2* distributions during functional activation in the human brain. Both sequences were found to be useful in the separation of different sources contributing to the functional MR signal like inflow or susceptibility effects in the various vascular environments. An fMRI study dealing with the involvement of prefrontal brain regions in movement preparation lead to inconsistent results. It could not be clarified if these were caused by problems during a spatial normalization process of the individual brains or if the functional paradigm, using very short inter-stimulus intervals, was not suited for the problem investigated. Blood flow velocity measurements in the human finger showed that the use of a strong, small-bore gradient system permits short echo times that reduce flow artefacts and allows high spatial resolution in order to keep systematic errors due to partial volume effects small. With regard to the perfusion investigations an inversion recovery snapshot-FLASH sequence was implemented, which allowed the acquisition of T1 parameter maps of the human brain within a few seconds. The accuracy of this method was demonstrated in test objects. The perfusion investigations with FAIR showed good qualitative results, whereas the quantitative analysis did not yield reproducible findings. A reason for the poor results could be the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the FAIR images or an incomplete global inversion of the magnetization due to the transmission characteristics of the radio-frequency coil. The BASE sequence that did not require a global inversion yielded quantitative perfusion

  13. Whiplash Injuries Can be Visible by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengt H Johansson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Whiplash trauma can result in injuries that are difficult to diagnose. Diagnosis is particularly difficult in injuries to the upper segments of the cervical spine (craniocervical joint [CCJ] complex. Studies indicate that injuries in that region may be responsible for the cervicoencephalic syndrome, as evidenced by headache, balance problems, vertigo, dizziness, eye problems, tinnitus, poor concentration, sensitivity to light and pronounced fatigue. Consequently, diagnosis of lesions in the CCJ region is important. Functional magnetic resonance imaging is a radiological technique that can visualize injuries of the ligaments and the joint capsules, and accompanying pathological movement patterns.

  14. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism has opposite effects on memory circuits of multiple sclerosis patients and controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Fera

    Full Text Available Episodic memory deficits are frequent symptoms in Multiple Sclerosis and have been associated with dysfunctions of the hippocampus, a key region for learning. However, it is unclear whether genetic factors that influence neural plasticity modulate episodic memory in MS. We thus studied how the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Val(66Met genotype, a common polymorphism influencing the hippocampal function in healthy controls, impacted on brain networks underlying episodic memory in patients with Multiple Sclerosis. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess how the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Val(66Met polymorphism modulated brain regional activity and functional connectivity in 26 cognitively unimpaired Multiple Sclerosis patients and 25 age- and education-matched healthy controls while performing an episodic memory task that included encoding and retrieving visual scenes. We found a highly significant group by genotype interaction in the left posterior hippocampus, bilateral parahippocampus, and left posterior cingulate cortex. In particular, Multiple Sclerosis patients homozygous for the Val(66 allele, relative to Met(66 carriers, showed greater brain responses during both encoding and retrieval while the opposite was true for healthy controls. Furthermore, a robust group by genotype by task interaction was detected for the functional connectivity between the left posterior hippocampus and the ipsilateral posterior cingulate cortex. Here, greater hippocampus-posterior cingulate cortex connectivity was observed in Multiple Sclerosis Met(66 carriers relative to Val(66 homozygous during retrieval (but not encoding while, again, the reverse was true for healthy controls. The Val(66Met polymorphism has opposite effects on hippocampal circuitry underlying episodic memory in Multiple Sclerosis patients and healthy controls. Enhancing the knowledge of how genetic factors influence cognitive functions may improve the clinical

  15. Peptide-functionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle for gold mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Wei-Zheng; Cetinel, Sibel; Sharma, Kumakshi; Borujeny, Elham Rafie; Montemagno, Carlo, E-mail: montemag@ualberta.ca [Ingenuity Lab, 1-070C (Canada)

    2017-02-15

    Here, we present our work on preparing a novel nanomaterial composed of inorganic binding peptides and magnetic nanoparticles for inorganic mining. Two previously selected and well-characterized gold-binding peptides from cell surface display, AuBP1 and AuBP2, were exploited. This nanomaterial (AuBP-MNP) was designed to fulfill the following two significant functions: the surface conjugated gold-binding peptide will recognize and selectively bind to gold, while the magnetic nano-sized core will respond and migrate according to the applied external magnetic field. This will allow the smart nanomaterial to mine an individual material (gold) from a pool of mixture, without excessive solvent extraction, filtration, and concentration steps. The working efficiency of AuBP-MNP was determined by showing a dramatic reduction of gold nanoparticle colloid concentration, monitored by spectroscopy. The binding kinetics of AuBP-MNP onto the gold surface was determined using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, which exhibits around 100 times higher binding kinetics than peptides alone. The binding capacity of AuBP-MNP was demonstrated by a bench-top mining test with gold microparticles.

  16. Item response theory analysis of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale-Revised in the Pooled Resource Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, Elizabeth D; Staniewska, Dorota; Coyne, Karin S; Boyer, Stacey; White, Leigh Ann; Zach, Neta; Cedarbaum, Jesse M

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to examine dimensionality and item-level performance of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) across time using classical and modern test theory approaches. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Item Response Theory (IRT) analyses were conducted using data from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) Pooled Resources Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials (PRO-ACT) database with complete ALSFRS-R data (n = 888) at three time-points (Time 0, Time 1 (6-months), Time 2 (1-year)). Results demonstrated that in this population of 888 patients, mean age was 54.6 years, 64.4% were male, and 93.7% were Caucasian. The CFA supported a 4* individual-domain structure (bulbar, gross motor, fine motor, and respiratory domains). IRT analysis within each domain revealed misfitting items and overlapping item response category thresholds at all time-points, particularly in the gross motor and respiratory domain items. Results indicate that many of the items of the ALSFRS-R may sub-optimally distinguish among varying levels of disability assessed by each domain, particularly in patients with less severe disability. Measure performance improved across time as patient disability severity increased. In conclusion, modifications to select ALSFRS-R items may improve the instrument's specificity to disability level and sensitivity to treatment effects.

  17. Magnetic resonance in the diagnostic imaging study of mesial temporal sclerosis; Diagnostico por imagen con resonancia magnetica de la esclerosis temporal mesial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastor, E; Sanchez, J C; Rodriguez, I; Altuzarra, A; Machado, F [Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves. Granada (Spain); Aguilar, D [Hospital Clinico Universitario San Cecilio. Granada (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) consists of hippocampal atrophy and gliosis and is the most common cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. The objective of the authors was to establish a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for its diagnosis. A prospective study was carried out in 72 patients with drug resistant complex partial seizures (42 women and 30 men ranging in age from 6 to 66 year: mean: 30 years). Using a 1.5-Tesla magnet, paracoronal sections were made in hippocampi for T1-weighted inversion-recovery images and volume measurements, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) and T2 relaxometry. A control group of 30 health volunteers was included in the study. MTS was considered to be indicated by the presence of atrophy and hyperintensity in hippocampi on T2-weighted images. There were no differences among the hippocampi of the healthy individuals. The confidence intervals (mean{+-} 1.96 SD) were 4169 mm''3-5911 mm''3 for volume of right side, 4097 mm''3-5940 mm''3 for volume of left side and 98-113 ms for T2 relaxation time. MTS was detected in 40 patients (55.5%): 23 cases involving the left side, 13 involving the right and 4 cases of bilateral asymmetric involvement. The 95% confidence intervals for the diagnostic validity of the results (sensitivity/specificity) were (88.8%-97.2%)/(87.6%-96.4%) for T1 volumetry, (88.8%-97.2%)(95.7%-100.3%) for FLAIR and (85.4%-96.6%)/(85.4%-96.6%) for T2 relaxometry. In 5 cases of MTS, astrophy of other extra hippocampal structures was also observed, and MTS was associated with an extra hippocampal lesion (dual pathology), especially neurona migration disorders, in 8 patients. Seventeen patients (23.5%) presented lesions without MTS (tumors, cortical dysplasias and heterotopias) and there was no MRI evidence of anomalies in 15 (21%). Twenty-five patients underwent surgical treatment: 20 with MTS (19 diagnosed according to MRI and one in whom there had been no abnormal findings), 4 with tumors and 1 with a ballooned

  18. Magnetic resonance in the diagnostic imaging study of mesial temporal sclerosis; Diagnostico por imagen con resonancia magnetica de la esclerosis temporal mesial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastor, E.; Sanchez, J. C.; Rodriguez, I.; Altuzarra, A.; Machado, F. [Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves. Granada (Spain); Aguilar, D. [Hospital Clinico Universitario San Cecilio. Granada (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) consists of hippocampal atrophy and gliosis and is the most common cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. The objective of the authors was to establish a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for its diagnosis. A prospective study was carried out in 72 patients with drug resistant complex partial seizures (42 women and 30 men ranging in age from 6 to 66 year: mean: 30 years). Using a 1.5-Tesla magnet, paracoronal sections were made in hippocampi for T1-weighted inversion-recovery images and volume measurements, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) and T2 relaxometry. A control group of 30 health volunteers was included in the study. MTS was considered to be indicated by the presence of atrophy and hyperintensity in hippocampi on T2-weighted images. There were no differences among the hippocampi of the healthy individuals. The confidence intervals (mean{+-} 1.96 SD) were 4169 mm''3-5911 mm''3 for volume of right side, 4097 mm''3-5940 mm''3 for volume of left side and 98-113 ms for T2 relaxation time. MTS was detected in 40 patients (55.5%): 23 cases involving the left side, 13 involving the right and 4 cases of bilateral asymmetric involvement. The 95% confidence intervals for the diagnostic validity of the results (sensitivity/specificity) were (88.8%-97.2%)/(87.6%-96.4%) for T1 volumetry, (88.8%-97.2%)(95.7%-100.3%) for FLAIR and (85.4%-96.6%)/(85.4%-96.6%) for T2 relaxometry. In 5 cases of MTS, astrophy of other extra hippocampal structures was also observed, and MTS was associated with an extra hippocampal lesion (dual pathology), especially neurona migration disorders, in 8 patients. Seventeen patients (23.5%) presented lesions without MTS (tumors, cortical dysplasias and heterotopias) and there was no MRI evidence of anomalies in 15 (21%). Twenty-five patients underwent surgical treatment: 20 with MTS (19 diagnosed according to MRI and one in whom there had been no abnormal findings

  19. Deterioration of lung function is associated with presence of IgM rheumatoid factor and smoking in patients with systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, B.; Ullman, S.; Halberg, P.

    2008-01-01

    of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) the influence of smoking and IgM RF on the lung function was calculated. One hundred fifty-five persons with SSc had vital capacity (VC) and diffusing capacity (DLco) measured at least twice with at least 1-year interval as percents of predicted values according......Smoking is a known risk factor for the development of several lung diseases, autoimmune diseases, and IgM rheumatoid factor (RF) in nonrheumatic persons. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis and IgM RF the diffusion capacity is decreased in smokers but not in nonsmokers. In the present study......M RF was found only in smokers or previous smokers, P = 0.007 and P = 0.01, respectively. These findings were confirmed by means of multiple regression analyses. The presence of IgM RF in smoking SSc patients is associated with deteriorating lung function. Whether this is a causal association...

  20. Measuring the impact of multiple sclerosis on psychosocial functioning: the development of a new self-efficacy scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airlie, J; Baker, G A; Smith, S J; Young, C A

    2001-06-01

    To develop a scale to measure self-efficacy in neurologically impaired patients with multiple sclerosis and to assess the scale's psychometric properties. Cross-sectional questionnaire study in a clinical setting, the retest questionnaire returned by mail after completion at home. Regional multiple sclerosis (MS) outpatient clinic or the Clinical Trials Unit (CTU) at a large neuroscience centre in the UK. One hundred persons with MS attending the Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery and Clatterbridge Hospital, Wirral, as outpatients. Cognitively impaired patients were excluded at an initial clinic assessment. Patients were asked to provide demographic data and complete the self-efficacy scale along with the following validated scales: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Impact, Stigma and Mastery and Rankin Scales. The Rankin Scale and Barthel Index were also assessed by the physician. A new 11-item self-efficacy scale was constructed consisting of two domains of control and personal agency. The validity of the scale was confirmed using Cronbach's alpha analysis of internal consistency (alpha = 0.81). The test-retest reliability of the scale over two weeks was acceptable with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.79. Construct validity was investigated using Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient resulting in significant correlations with depression (r= -0.52) anxiety (r =-0.50) and mastery (r= 0.73). Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that these factors accounted for 70% of the variance of scores on the self-efficacy scale, with scores on mastery, anxiety and perceived disability being independently significant. Assessment of the psychometric properties of this new self-efficacy scale suggest that it possesses good validity and reliability in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  1. [Functional magnetic resonance imaging in psychiatry and psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derntl, B; Habel, U; Schneider, F

    2010-01-01

    technical improvements, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become the most popular and versatile imaging method in psychiatric research. The scope of this manuscript is to briefly introduce the basics of MR physics, the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast as well as the principles of MR study design and functional data analysis. The presentation of exemplary studies on emotion recognition and empathy in schizophrenia patients will highlight the importance of MR methods in psychiatry. Finally, we will demonstrate insights into new developments that will further boost MR techniques in clinical research and will help to gain more insight into dysfunctional neural networks underlying cognitive and emotional deficits in psychiatric patients. Moreover, some techniques such as neurofeedback seem promising for evaluation of therapy effects on a behavioral and neural level.

  2. Functional magnetic resonance imaging for neurosurgical planning in neurooncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlieger, Erik-Jan; Majoie, Charles B.; Heeten, Gerard J. den; Leenstra, Sieger

    2004-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique that is widely available and can be used to determine the spatial relationships between tumor tissue and eloquent brain areas. Within certain limits, this functional information can be applied in the field of neurosurgery as a pre-operative mapping tool to minimize damage to eloquent brain areas. In this article, we review the literature on the use of fMRI for neurosurgical planning. The issues addressed are: (1) stimulation paradigms, (2) the influence of tumors on the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal, (3) post-processing the fMRI time course, (4) integration of fMRI results into neuronavigation systems, (5) the accuracy of fMRI and (6) fMRI compared to intra-operative mapping (IOM). (orig.)

  3. A compatible electrocutaneous display for functional magnetic resonance imaging application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, V; Cappelli, C; Vanello, N; Ricciardi, E; Scilingo, E P; Giovannetti, G; Santarelli, M F; Positano, V; Pietrini, P; Landini, L; Bicchi, A

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we propose an MR (magnetic resonance) compatible electrocutaneous stimulator able to inject an electric current, variable in amplitude and frequency, into the fingertips in order to elicit tactile skin receptors (mechanoreceptors). The desired goal is to evoke specific tactile sensations selectively stimulating skin receptors by means of an electric current in place of mechanical stimuli. The field of application ranges from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) tactile studies to augmented reality technology. The device here proposed is designed using safety criteria in order to comply with the threshold of voltage and current permitted by regulations. Moreover, MR safety and compatibility criteria were considered in order to perform experiments inside the MR scanner during an fMRI acquisition for functional brain activation analysis. Psychophysical laboratory tests are performed in order to define the different evoked tactile sensation. After verifying the device MR safety and compatibility on a phantom, a test on a human subject during fMRI acquisition is performed to visualize the brain areas activated by the simulated tactile sensation.

  4. Is it Possible to Actively and Purposely make use of Plasticity and Adaptibility in the Neurorehabilitation Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis Patients? A Pilot Project

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řasová, K.; Krásenský, J.; Havrdová, E.; Obenberger, J.; Seidel, Z.; Doležal, O.; Rexová, Patrícia; Zálišová, M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 19, - (2005), s. 170-181 ISSN 0269-2155 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504; CEZ:MSM 111100001 Keywords : neurorehabilitation * multiple sclerosis * functional magnetic resonance * CNS plasticity and adaptability * motor learning Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.447, year: 2005

  5. Use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to describe patient-reported disability: a comparison of Guillain Barré syndrome with multiple sclerosis in a community cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fary; Amatya, Bhasker; Ng, Louisa

    2010-09-01

    To use the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to describe and compare patient-reported disability in Guillain-Barré syndrome survivors and persons with multiple sclerosis, and to identify relevant environmental factors. Cross-sectional survey of 77 survivors of Guillain-Barré syndrome in the community. Their Guillain-Barré syndrome-related problems were linked with ICF categories (second level) using an open-ended questionnaire, consensus between health professionals and the "linking rules", and compared with similar data collected previously for 101 persons with multiple sclerosis. Guillain-Barré syndrome survivors were male (59%) and older than persons with multiple sclerosis (mean age 55 vs 49 years). Of 170 ICF categories, 113 were relevant for Guillain-Barré syndrome survivors (mean number 30 vs 18 for persons with multiple sclerosis). The linked categories for Guillain-Barré syndrome included: body function 27 (56%) compared with 48 (42%) for persons with multiple sclerosis; body structure 11 (68%) vs 16 (34%); activities and participation 48 (70%) and 68 (58%); and for environmental factors 27 (71%) compared with 38 (51%) for persons with multiple sclerosis. The main areas linked in the activities and participation domain were mobility, major life areas and interpersonal relationships; and environmental factors included support and relationships, attitudes and products and technology. This is the first study to use ICF in Guillain-Barré syndrome survivors and towards development of the ICF Core Set for Guillain-Barré syndrome from a broader international perspective.

  6. Can resistance training impact MRI outcomes in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølhede, Tue; Siemonsen, Susanne; Wenzel, Damian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterised by accelerated brain atrophy, which relates to disease progression. Previous research shows that progressive resistance training (PRT) can counteract brain atrophy in other populations. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of PRT by magnetic...... lifestyle followed by PRT). Assessments included disability measures and MRI (lesion load, global brain volume, percentage brain volume change (PBVC) and cortical thickness). RESULTS: While the MS Functional Composite score improved, Expanded Disability Status Scale, lesion load and global brain volumes did...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of respiratory movement and lung function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetzlaff, R.; Eichinger, M.

    2009-01-01

    Lung function measurements are the domain of spirometry or plethysmography. These methods have proven their value in clinical practice, nevertheless, being global measurements the functional indices only describe the sum of all functional units of the lung. Impairment of only a single component of the respiratory pump or of a small part of lung parenchyma can be compensated by unaffected lung tissue. Dynamic imaging can help to detect such local changes and lead to earlier adapted therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) seems to be perfect for this application as it is not hampered by image distortion as is projection radiography and it does not expose the patient to potentially harmful radiation like computed tomography. Unfortunately, lung parenchyma is not easy to image using MRI due to its low signal intensity. For this reason first applications of MRI in lung function measurements concentrated on the movement of the thoracic wall and the diaphragm. Recent technical advances in MRI however might allow measurements of regional dynamics of the lungs. (orig.) [de

  8. Modulating functional and dysfunctional mentalizing by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias eSchuwerk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mentalizing, the ability to attribute mental states to others and oneself, is a cognitive function with high relevance for social interactions. Recent neuroscientific research has increasingly contributed to attempts to decompose this complex social cognitive function into constituting neurocognitive building blocks. Additionally, clinical research that focuses on social cognition to find links between impaired social functioning and neurophysiological deviations has accumulated evidence that mentalizing is affected in most psychiatric disorders. Recently, both lines of research have started to employ transcranial magnetic stimulation: the first to modulate mentalizing in order to specify its neurocognitive components, the latter to treat impaired mentalizing in clinical conditions. This review integrates findings of these two different approaches to draw a more detailed picture of the neurocognitive basis of mentalizing and its deviations in psychiatric disorders. Moreover, we evaluate the effectiveness of hitherto employed stimulation techniques and protocols, paradigms and outcome measures. Based on this overview we highlight new directions for future research on the neurocognitive basis of functional and dysfunctional social cognition.

  9. Novel axolotl cardiac function analysis method using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Gomes Sanches

    Full Text Available The salamander axolotl is capable of complete regeneration of amputated heart tissue. However, non-invasive imaging tools for assessing its cardiac function were so far not employed. In this study, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is introduced as a non-invasive technique to image heart function of axolotls. Three axolotls were imaged with magnetic resonance imaging using a retrospectively gated Fast Low Angle Shot cine sequence. Within one scanning session the axolotl heart was imaged three times in all planes, consecutively. Heart rate, ejection fraction, stroke volume and cardiac output were calculated using three techniques: (1 combined long-axis, (2 short-axis series, and (3 ultrasound (control for heart rate only. All values are presented as mean ± standard deviation. Heart rate (beats per minute among different animals was 32.2±6.0 (long axis, 30.4±5.5 (short axis and 32.7±4.9 (ultrasound and statistically similar regardless of the imaging method (p > 0.05. Ejection fraction (% was 59.6±10.8 (long axis and 48.1±11.3 (short axis and it differed significantly (p = 0.019. Stroke volume (μl/beat was 133.7±33.7 (long axis and 93.2±31.2 (short axis, also differed significantly (p = 0.015. Calculations were consistent among the animals and over three repeated measurements. The heart rate varied depending on depth of anaesthesia. We described a new method for defining and imaging the anatomical planes of the axolotl heart and propose one of our techniques (long axis analysis may prove useful in defining cardiac function in regenerating axolotl hearts.

  10. Respiratory muscle training for multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietberg, Marc B.; Veerbeek, Janne M.; Gosselink, Rik; Kwakkel, Gert; van Wegen, Erwin E.H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system, affecting approximately 2.5 million people worldwide. People with MS may experience limitations in muscular strength and endurance - including the respiratory muscles, affecting functional performance and

  11. Visual Evoked Potential and Magnetic Resonance Imaging are More Effective Markers of Multiple Sclerosis Progression than Laser Polarimetry with Variable Corneal Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantorová, Ema; Ziak, Peter; Kurča, Egon; Koyšová, Mária; Hladká, Mária; Zeleňák, Kamil; Michalik, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the role of laser polarimetry and visual evoked potentials (VEP) as potential biomarkers of disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). A total of 41 patients with MS (82 eyes) and 22 age-related healthy volunteers (44 eyes) completed the study. MS patients were divided into two groups, one (ON) with a history of optic neuritis (17 patients, 34 eyes) and another group (NON) without it (24 patients, 48 eyes). The MS patients and controls underwent laser polarimetry (GDx) examination of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). In the MS group, we also examined: Kurtzke "expanded disability status scale" (EDSS), the duration of the disorder, VEP - latency and amplitude, and conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA, Mann-Whitney, and Spearman correlation analyses. In the MS group, brain atrophy and new T2 brain lesions in MRI correlated with both VEP latencies and amplitudes. Separate comparisons revealed VEP latency testing to be less sensitive in ON than in NON-patients. In ON patients, VEP amplitudes correlated mildly with brain atrophy (r = -0.15) and strongly with brain new MRI lesions (r = -0.8). In NON-patients, highly significant correlation of new MRI brain lesions with VEP latencies (r = 0.63, r = 0.6) and amplitudes (r = -0.3, r = -4.2) was found. EDSS also correlated with brain atrophy in this group (r = 0.5). Our study did not find a correlation of GDx measures with MRI tests. The GDx method was not able to detect whole brain demyelinization and the degeneration process, but was only able to reveal the involvement of optic nerves in ON and NON-patients. In our study, we found that both methods (VEP and GDx) can be used for the detection of optic nerve damage, but VEP was found to be superior in evaluating whole brain demyelinization and axonal degeneration. Both VEP and MRI, but not GDx, have an important role in monitoring

  12. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in the activation of working memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitzer, M.; Kammer, T.; Bellemann, M.E.; Gueckel, F.; Georgi, M.; Gass, A.; Brix, G.

    1996-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used in conjunction with a letter detection task for the study of working memory in 16 normal subjects. Because of movement artifacts, data from only 9 subjects were analysed. In the activation taks, subjects responded by pressing a button whenever any presented letter was the same as the second last in the sequence. In the control condition, the subjects had to respond to a fixed letter. Hence, the activation condition and the control condition differend only subjectively, i.e., regarding the task demand, whereas the stimuli and the type and frequency of response were identical. The activation condition produced significant activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's areas 10, 46, and 9). In contrast to experimental tasks previsouly used rather extensively to study the prefrontal cortex, the present paradigm is characterized by its simplicity, interpretability, and its ties to known neurophysiology of the frontal cortex. (orig.) [de

  13. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichter, Gabriel S.

    2012-01-01

    This review presents an overview of functional magnetic resonance imaging findings in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), Although there is considerable heterogeneity with respect to results across studies, common themes have emerged, including: (i) hypoactivation in nodes of the “social brain” during social processing tasks, including regions within the prefrontal cortex, the posterior superior temporal sulcus, the amygdala, and the fusiform gyrus; (ii) aberrant frontostriatal activation during cognitive control tasks relevant to restricted and repetitive behaviors and interests, including regions within the dorsal prefrontal cortex and the basal ganglia; (iii) differential lateralization and activation of language processing and production regions during communication tasks; (iv) anomalous mesolimbic responses to social and nonsocial rewards; (v) task-based long-range functional hypoconnectivity and short-range hyper-connectivity; and (vi) decreased anterior-posterior functional connectivity during resting states. These findings provide mechanistic accounts of ASD pathophysiology and suggest directions for future research aimed at elucidating etiologic models and developing rationally derived and targeted treatments. PMID:23226956

  14. The application of functional magnetic resonance imaging to neuropharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Yasmene B; Marsden, Charles A

    2004-10-01

    The technique of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has the capacity to acquire data with spatial and temporal resolution that far exceeds other currently available methods of non-invasive investigation of brain function. This coupled with its ability for serial studies makes it an attractive prospect for investigating the effects of pharmacological agents in the brain. Recent advances in fMRI have been made in the areas of reward and dependence, brain trauma and injury, psychotropic drugs and pain using small animals. Although the use of fMRI in pharmacological studies is becoming popular, there are various associated complications, such as the possible interference of drugs with the mechanisms that give rise to the pharmacological fMRI signal, and local or global cardiovascular changes that might produce functional responses unrelated to neural activity. Consideration of these concerns, coupled with careful attention to experimental detail and verification procedures, promises to make pharmacological fMRI use a valuable tool for understanding the actions of drugs in the brain.

  15. Relativistic Adiabatic Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Using Hybrid Functionals and Noncollinear Spin Magnetization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bast, Radovan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Saue, Trond

    2009-01-01

    into reduction of algebra from quaternion to complex or real. For hybrid GGAs with noncollinear spin magnetization we derive a new computationally advantageous equation for the full second variational derivatives of such exchange-correlation functionals. We apply our implementation to calculations on the ns2...... → ns1np1 excitation energies in the Zn, Cd, and Hg atoms (n = 4-6) and (vertical) excitation energies of UO2+ 2 ; and we test the performance of various functionals by comparison with experimental data (group 12 atoms) or higher-level computational results (UO2+2 ). The results indicate...

  16. Fatigue and Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society Sign In In Your Area Donate Donate ... of MS What Causes MS? Who Gets MS? Multiple Sclerosis FAQs Types of MS Related Conditions Symptoms & Diagnosis ...

  17. Grey matter damage in multiple sclerosis A pathology perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, R.; de Vries, H.E.; Schenk, G.J.; Geurts, J.J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, immunohistochemical studies have provided compelling evidence that gray matter (GM) pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) is extensive. Until recently, this GM pathology was difficult to visualize using standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI ) techniques. However, with newly

  18. Detection of carcinoembryonic antigen using functional magnetic and fluorescent nanoparticles in magnetic separators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H. Y., E-mail: annetsai@csmu.edu.tw [Chung Shan Medical University, Department of Applied Chemistry (China); Chang, C. Y.; Li, Y. C.; Chu, W. C.; Viswanathan, K.; Bor Fuh, C., E-mail: cbfuh@ncnu.edu.tw [National Chi Nan University, Department of Applied Chemistry (China)

    2011-06-15

    We combined a sandwich immunoassay, anti-CEA/CEA/anti-CEA, with functional magnetic ({approx}80 nm) and fluorescent ({approx}180 nm) nanoparticles in magnetic separators to demonstrate a detection method for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Determination of CEA in serum can be used in clinical diagnosis and monitoring of tumor-related diseases. The CEA concentrations in samples were deduced and determined based on the reference plot using the measured fluorescent intensity of sandwich nanoparticles from the sample. The linear range of CEA detection was from 18 ng/mL to 1.8 pg/mL. The detection limit of CEA was 1.8 pg/mL. In comparison with most other detection methods, this method had advantages of lower detection limit and wider linear range. The recovery was higher than 94%. The CEA concentrations of two serum samples were determined to be 9.0 and 55 ng/mL, which differed by 6.7% (9.6 ng/mL) and 9.1% (50 ng/mL) from the measurements of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. The analysis time can be reduced to one third of ELISA. This method has good potential for other biomarker detections and biochemical applications.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Evaluation of diastolic function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, F.; Reiser, M.F.; Theisen, D.; Schwab, F.; Beckmann, B.M.; Schuessler, F.; Kaeaeb, S.; Zinsser, D.; Goelz, T.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has a prevalence of approximately 0.2% and is clinically asymptomatic in many patients or presents with unspecific symptoms. This explains the importance of imaging for the diagnosis of HCM as well as for the assessment of the clinical course. The definitive finding in HCM is myocardial hypertrophy with thickening of the ventricular wall ≥ 15 mm. While echocardiography is an excellent screening tool magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows a comprehensive analysis of the heart in HCM. This includes a detailed analysis of the distribution and extent of myocardial hypertrophy, a thorough evaluation of systolic and diastolic cardiac function, the assessment of the presence and extent of dynamic outflow tract obstruction as well as the description of the systolic anterior motion (SAM) phenomenon of the mitral valve with secondary mitral insufficiency. When contrast material is administered, additional information about myocardial perfusion as well as the presence and extent of myocardial fibrosis can be obtained. This study compared systolic functional parameters as well as end systolic and end diastolic wall thickness of patients with and without diastolic dysfunction. (orig.) [de

  20. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) and expert testimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulich, Ronald; Maciewicz, Raymond; Scrivani, Steven J

    2009-03-01

    Medical experts frequently use imaging studies to illustrate points in their court testimony. This article reviews how these studies impact the credibility of expert testimony with judges and juries. The apparent "objective" evidence provided by such imaging studies can lend strong credence to a judge's or jury's appraisal of medical expert's testimony. However, as the court usually has no specialized scientific expertise, the use of complex images as part of courtroom testimony also has the potential to mislead or at least inappropriately bias the weight given to expert evidence. Recent advances in brain imaging may profoundly impact forensic expert testimony. Functional magnetic resonance imaging and other physiologic imaging techniques currently allow visualization of the activation pattern of brain regions associated with a wide variety of cognitive and behavioral tasks, and more recently, pain. While functional imaging technology has a valuable role in brain research and clinical investigation, it is important to emphasize that the use of imaging studies in forensic matters requires a careful scientific foundation and a rigorous legal assessment.

  1. Rapid Evaluation of Platelet Function With T2 Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuker, Adam; Husseinzadeh, Holleh; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Marturano, Joseph E.; Massefski, Walter; Lowery, Thomas J.; Lambert, Michele P.; Abrams, Charles S.; Weisel, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The clinical diagnosis of qualitative platelet disorders (QPDs) based on light transmission aggregometry (LTA) requires significant blood volume, time, and expertise, all of which can be barriers to utilization in some populations and settings. Our objective was to develop a more rapid assay of platelet function by measuring platelet-mediated clot contraction in small volumes (35 µL) of whole blood using T2 magnetic resonance (T2MR). Methods: We established normal ranges for platelet-mediated clot contraction using T2MR, used these ranges to study patients with known platelet dysfunction, and then evaluated agreement between T2MR and LTA with arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate, epinephrine, and thrombin receptor activator peptide. Results: Blood from 21 healthy donors was studied. T2MR showed 100% agreement with LTA with each of the four agonists and their cognate inhibitors tested. T2MR successfully detected abnormalities in each of seven patients with known QPDs, with the exception of one patient with a novel mutation leading to Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. T2MR appeared to detect platelet function at similar or lower platelet counts than LTA. Conclusions: T2MR may provide a clinically useful approach to diagnose QPDs using small volumes of whole blood, while also providing new insight into platelet biology not evident using plasma-based platelet aggregation tests. PMID:28028118

  2. GABA and glutamate levels correlate with MTR and clinical disability: Insights from multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantes, Julia C; Proulx, Sébastien; Zhong, Jidan; Holmes, Scott A; Narayanan, Sridar; Brown, Robert A; Hoge, Richard D; Koski, Lisa

    2017-08-15

    Converging areas of research have implicated glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as key players in neuronal signalling and other central functions. Further research is needed, however, to identify microstructural and behavioral links to regional variability in levels of these neurometabolites, particularly in the presence of demyelinating disease. Thus, we sought to investigate the extent to which regional glutamate and GABA levels are related to a neuroimaging marker of microstructural damage and to motor and cognitive performance. Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 47 people with multiple sclerosis (all right-handed) participated in this study. Motor and cognitive abilities were assessed with standard tests used in the study of multiple sclerosis. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy data were acquired from sensorimotor and parietal regions of the brains' left cerebral hemisphere using a MEGA-PRESS sequence. Our analysis protocol for the spectroscopy data was designed to account for confounding factors that could contaminate the measurement of neurometabolite levels due to disease, such as the macromolecule signal, partial volume effects, and relaxation effects. Glutamate levels in both regions of interest were lower in people with multiple sclerosis. In the sensorimotor (though not the parietal) region, GABA concentration was higher in the multiple sclerosis group compared to controls. Lower magnetization transfer ratio within grey and white matter regions from which spectroscopy data were acquired was linked to neurometabolite levels. When adjusting for age, normalized brain volume, MTR, total N-acetylaspartate level, and glutamate level, significant relationships were found between lower sensorimotor GABA level and worse performance on several tests, including one of upper limb motor function. This work highlights important methodological considerations relevant to analysis of spectroscopy data, particularly in the afflicted human brain. These findings

  3. Chronic antiepileptic drug use and functional network efficiency: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veenendaal, Tamar M; IJff, Dominique M; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Lazeron, Richard H C; Hofman, Paul A M; de Louw, Anton J A; Backes, Walter H; Jansen, Jacobus F A

    2017-06-28

    To increase our insight in the neuronal mechanisms underlying cognitive side-effects of antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment. The relation between functional magnetic resonance-acquired brain network measures, AED use, and cognitive function was investigated. Three groups of patients with epilepsy with a different risk profile for developing cognitive side effects were included: A "low risk" category (lamotrigine or levetiracetam, n = 16), an "intermediate risk" category (carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, or valproate, n = 34) and a "high risk" category (topiramate, n = 5). Brain connectivity was assessed using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and graph theoretical network analysis. The Computerized Visual Searching Task was used to measure central information processing speed, a common cognitive side effect of AED treatment. Central information processing speed was lower in patients taking AEDs from the intermediate and high risk categories, compared with patients from the low risk category. The effect of risk category on global efficiency was significant ( P effect on the clustering coefficient (ANCOVA, P > 0.2). Also no significant associations between information processing speed and global efficiency or the clustering coefficient (linear regression analysis, P > 0.15) were observed. Only the four patients taking topiramate show aberrant network measures, suggesting that alterations in functional brain network organization may be only subtle and measureable in patients with more severe cognitive side effects.

  4. Resonancia magnética funcional Functional magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Sell

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available La resonancia magnética funcional (RMNf es un estudio no invasivo de mapeo funcional cerebral, cuya señal obtenida en secuencias T2* es dependiente del nivel de oxigenación sanguínea (BOLD. Este estudio se agrega actualmente a otros muchos empleados en el abordaje de pacientes candidatos a cirugía de epilepsia, para localizar lenguaje y función motriz previa a planear la cirugía. Tiene una concordancia con el test de WADA de cerca del 90%. El uso concomitante de registro encefalográfico y RMNf es técnicamente difícil, pero una vez filtrados los artefactos presenta un patrón de activación significativamente discordante con el foco de actividad interictal. Este hallazgo podría obedecer a redes complejas de actividad epiléptica, y promete ser un útil instrumento en la investigación de la fisiopatología del tejido epileptogénico.Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fmri is a non-invasive functional brain mapping technique ased on blood oxygenated level dependent signal (BOLD. It is obtained during T2* weighted imaging MRI studies. fmri aids in the localization of language and motor function for patients candidates for epilepsy surgery, and has up to a 90% concordance with WADA test. Even though synchronous recording of fmri and EEG is technically challenging, it shows a discordant pattern of activation when compared with EEG or electrocorticography. This finding could be due to complex epileptic networks, and overall this study technique has the potential to contribute to further research into epileptic network and epilepsy physiopathology.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging research progress on brain functional reorganization after peripheral nerve injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weiwei; Liu Hanqiu

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of functional magnetic resonance imaging technology the brain plasticity and functional reorganization are hot topics in the central nervous system imaging studies. Brain functional reorganization and rehabilitation after peripheral nerve injury may have certain regularity. In this paper, the progress of brain functional magnetic resonance imaging technology and its applications in the world wide clinical and experimental researches of the brain functional reorganization after peripheral nerve injury is are reviewed. (authors)

  6. A Miniature Magnetic-Force-Based Three-Axis AC Magnetic Sensor with Piezoelectric/Vibrational Energy-Harvesting Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiao-Fang Hung

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate a miniature magnetic-force-based, three-axis, AC magnetic sensor with piezoelectric/vibrational energy-harvesting functions. For magnetic sensing, the sensor employs a magnetic–mechanical–piezoelectric configuration (which uses magnetic force and torque, a compact, single, mechanical mechanism, and the piezoelectric effect to convert x-axis and y-axis in-plane and z-axis magnetic fields into piezoelectric voltage outputs. Under the x-axis magnetic field (sine-wave, 100 Hz, 0.2–3.2 gauss and the z-axis magnetic field (sine-wave, 142 Hz, 0.2–3.2 gauss, the voltage output with the sensitivity of the sensor are 1.13–26.15 mV with 8.79 mV/gauss and 1.31–8.92 mV with 2.63 mV/gauss, respectively. In addition, through this configuration, the sensor can harness ambient vibrational energy, i.e., possessing piezoelectric/vibrational energy-harvesting functions. Under x-axis vibration (sine-wave, 100 Hz, 3.5 g and z-axis vibration (sine-wave, 142 Hz, 3.8 g, the root-mean-square voltage output with power output of the sensor is 439 mV with 0.333 μW and 138 mV with 0.051 μW, respectively. These results show that the sensor, using this configuration, successfully achieves three-axis magnetic field sensing and three-axis vibration energy-harvesting. Due to these features, the three-axis AC magnetic sensor could be an important design reference in order to develop future three-axis AC magnetic sensors, which possess energy-harvesting functions, for practical industrial applications, such as intelligent vehicle/traffic monitoring, processes monitoring, security systems, and so on.

  7. Cognitive deficits in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, H; Jønsson, A; Andresen, Jesper Graubæk

    2012-01-01

    of the cognitive impairment seen in MS and constitute a supplement to traditional measurement of T2 lesion volume. Materials and Methods - Fifty patients with clinically definite MS were included (38 women, 12 men). Patients were MR scanned, neuropsychologically tested, and evaluated clinically with the Kurtzke......Objectives - Although disease load in multiple sclerosis (MS) often is based on T2 lesion volumes, the changes in T2 of normal appearing brain tissue (NABT) are rarely considered. By means of magnetic resonance, (MR) we retrospectively investigated whether T2 changes in NABT explain part...... Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the Multiple Sclerosis Impairment Scale (MSIS). Voxel-wise T2 estimates and total T2 lesion volume were tested for correlations with eight cognitive domains, a general cognitive dysfunction factor (CDF), and the two clinical scales. Results - We found distinct...

  8. Examining the benefits of combining two learning strategies on recall of functional information in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverover, Yael; Basso, Michael; Wood, Hali; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; DeLuca, John

    2011-12-01

    Forgetfulness occurs commonly in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), but few treatments alleviate this problem. This study examined the combined effect of two cognitive rehabilitation strategies to improve learning and memory in MS: self-generation and spaced learning. The hypothesis was that the combination of spaced learning and self-generation would yield better learning and memory recall performance than spaced learning alone. Using a within groups design, 20 participants with MS and 18 healthy controls (HC) were presented with three tasks (learning names, appointment, and object location), each in three learning conditions (Massed, Spaced Learning, and combination of spaced and generated information). Participants were required to recall the information they learned in each of these conditions immediately and 30 min following the initial presentation. The combination of spaced learning and self-generation yielded better recall than did spaced learning alone. In turn, spaced learning resulted in better recall than the massed rehearsal condition. These findings reveal that the combination of these two learning strategies may possess utility as a cognitive rehabilitation strategy.

  9. Intellectual function and radiological images in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Special reference to single photon emission computed tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Hiroo; Kanda, Mikio; Fukui, Toshiya; Sugita, Koujiro [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1994-10-01

    To clarify cognitive decline in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we compared cognitive and motor signs with neuroradiological features, with special reference to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), in 23 patients with ALS. Of these 23 patients, five demented patients (ALS-D) showed a decrease in voluntary speech output, abnormal behavior or character change. SPECT images in these patients were specifically characterized by marked uptake reduction in the frontal lobes. ALS patients with normal mentality (ALS-N) showed either a normal pattern or non-specific patchy uptake reduction on SPECT, but never showed the diffuse frontal uptake reduction that was observed in ALS-D patients. None of the ALS-N patients showed cognitive decline or frontal uptake reduction during the follow-up period of up to 29 months. There was no relation in either ALS-D or ALS-N patients between the degree of tracer uptake reduction and clinical features of ALS including severity and duration of illness. Clinical and neuroradiological features in ALS-D patients were compatible with those of `frontal lobe dementia`. ALS-D patients may compose a distinct group because cognitive decline is unlikely to occur in ALS-N patients with a long clinical course. ALS-D patients may be differentiated from other non-demented ALS patients in the early clinical course by the characteristic diffuse frontal uptake reduction on SPECT. (author).

  10. Intellectual function and radiological images in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Special reference to single photon emission computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Hiroo; Kanda, Mikio; Fukui, Toshiya; Sugita, Koujiro

    1994-01-01

    To clarify cognitive decline in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we compared cognitive and motor signs with neuroradiological features, with special reference to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), in 23 patients with ALS. Of these 23 patients, five demented patients (ALS-D) showed a decrease in voluntary speech output, abnormal behavior or character change. SPECT images in these patients were specifically characterized by marked uptake reduction in the frontal lobes. ALS patients with normal mentality (ALS-N) showed either a normal pattern or non-specific patchy uptake reduction on SPECT, but never showed the diffuse frontal uptake reduction that was observed in ALS-D patients. None of the ALS-N patients showed cognitive decline or frontal uptake reduction during the follow-up period of up to 29 months. There was no relation in either ALS-D or ALS-N patients between the degree of tracer uptake reduction and clinical features of ALS including severity and duration of illness. Clinical and neuroradiological features in ALS-D patients were compatible with those of 'frontal lobe dementia'. ALS-D patients may compose a distinct group because cognitive decline is unlikely to occur in ALS-N patients with a long clinical course. ALS-D patients may be differentiated from other non-demented ALS patients in the early clinical course by the characteristic diffuse frontal uptake reduction on SPECT. (author)

  11. Dihydrotestosterone ameliorates degeneration in muscle, axons and motoneurons and improves motor function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis model mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Eun Yoo

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a lethal disease characterized by a progressive loss of motoneurons. The clinical symptoms include skeletal muscle weakness and atrophy, which impairs motor performance and eventually leads to respiratory failure. We tested whether dihydrotestosterone (DHT, which has both anabolic effects on muscle and neuroprotective effects on axons and motoneurons, can ameliorate clinical symptoms in ALS. A silastic tube containing DHT crystals was implanted subcutaneously in SOD1-G93A mice at early symptomatic age when decreases in body weight and grip-strength were observed as compared to wild-type mice. DHT-treated SOD1-G93A mice demonstrated ameliorated muscle atrophy and increased body weight, which was associated with stronger grip-strength. DHT treatment increased the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 in muscle, which can exert myotrophic as well as neurotrophic effects through retrograde transport. DHT treatment attenuated neuromuscular junction denervation, and axonal and motoneuron loss. DHT-treated SOD1-G93A mice demonstrated improvement in motor behavior as assessed by rota-rod and gait analyses, and an increased lifespan. Application of DHT is a relatively simple and non-invasive procedure, which may be translated into therapy to improve the quality of life for ALS patients.

  12. Multi-function magnetic jack control drive mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, L.R.; Crawford, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    A multi-function magnetic jack control drive mechanism is described for controlling a nuclear reactor comprising: an elongate pressure housing; closely-spaced drive rods located in the pressure housing, the drive rod being connected to a reactor rod which is insertable in a reactor core; electrochemical stationary latch means which are selectively actuatable for holding a respective one of the drive rods stationary with respect to the pressure housing, the plurality of stationary latch means including at least one coil located about the pressure housing; longitudinally spaced electromechanical movable latch means, individually associated with one of the drive rods and each including a base for the drive rod associated therewith, for, when actuated, holding the associated drive rod stationary with respect to the base associated therewith, the movable latch means including an associated coil located about the pressure housing; and longitudinally spaced electromechanical lift means, individually associated with the base, for, when actuated, moving an associated base longitudinally along the pressure housing from a first position to a second position to thereby enable movement of one or more of the other drive rods longitudinally independently of the other drive rods in response to sequential and repeated operation of the electromechanical means, the lift means including an associated coil located about the pressure housing

  13. Task-related signal decrease on functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Yoshie; Nakamura, Mitsugu; Tamaki, Norihiko; Tamura, Shogo; Kitamura, Junji

    2001-01-01

    An atypical pattern of signal change was identified on functional magnetic resonance (fMR) imaging in pathologic patients. Three normal volunteers and 34 patients with pathologic lesions near the primary motor cortex underwent fMR imaging with echo-planar imaging while performing a hand motor task. Signal intensities were evaluated with the z-score method, and the time course and changes of the signal intensity were calculated. Nine of the 34 patients with pathologic lesions displayed a significant task-related signal reduction in motor-related areas. They also presented a conventional task-related signal increase in other motor-related areas. The time courses of the increase and decrease were the inverse of each other. There was no significant difference between rates of signal increase and decrease. Our findings suggest that this atypical signal decrease is clinically significant, and that impaired vascular reactivity and altered oxygen metabolism could contribute to the task-related signal reduction. Brain areas showing such task-related signal decrease should be preserved at surgery. (author)

  14. [Functional magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic neuroanatomy of addictive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nikov, M E; Shtark, M B

    2014-01-01

    Research into the cerebral patterns that govern the formation and development of addictive behavior is one of the most interesting goals of neurophysiology. Authors of contemporary papers on the matter define a number of symptoms that are all part of substance or non-substance dependence, each one of them leading to abnormalities in the corresponding system of the brain. During the last twenty years the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMR1) technology has been instrumental in locating such abnormalities, identifying specific parts of the brain that, when dysfunctional, may enhance addiction and cause its positive or negative symptoms. This article reviews fMRI studies aimed toward locating areas in the brain that are responsible for cognitive, emotional, and motivational dysfunction. Cerebral correlatives of impulsiveness, behavior control, and drug cravings are reviewed separately. The article also contains an overview of possibilities to further investigate the Selves of those dependent on substances, identify previously unknown diagnostic markers of substance dependence, and evaluate the effectiveness of therapy. The research under review in this article provides data that points to a special role of the nucleus caudatus as well as the nucleus accumbens, the thalamus, the insular cortex (IC), the anterior cingulate, prefrontal and orbitofrontal areas in psychological disorders that are part of substance dependence. General findings of the article are in accordance with contemporary models of addictive pattern.

  15. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of internet addiction in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepede, Gianna; Tavino, Margherita; Santacroce, Rita; Fiori, Federica; Salerno, Rosa Maria; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2016-02-28

    To report the results of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies pertaining internet addiction disorder (IAD) in young adults. We conducted a systematic review on PubMed, focusing our attention on fMRI studies involving adult IAD patients, free from any comorbid psychiatric condition. The following search words were used, both alone and in combination: fMRI, internet addiction, internet dependence, functional neuroimaging. The search was conducted on April 20(th), 2015 and yielded 58 records. Inclusion criteria were the following: Articles written in English, patients' age ≥ 18 years, patients affected by IAD, studies providing fMRI results during resting state or cognitive/emotional paradigms. Structural MRI studies, functional imaging techniques other than fMRI, studies involving adolescents, patients with comorbid psychiatric, neurological or medical conditions were excluded. By reading titles and abstracts, we excluded 30 records. By reading the full texts of the 28 remaining articles, we identified 18 papers meeting our inclusion criteria and therefore included in the qualitative synthesis. We found 18 studies fulfilling our inclusion criteria, 17 of them conducted in Asia, and including a total number of 666 tested subjects. The included studies reported data acquired during resting state or different paradigms, such as cue-reactivity, guessing or cognitive control tasks. The enrolled patients were usually males (95.4%) and very young (21-25 years). The most represented IAD subtype, reported in more than 85% of patients, was the internet gaming disorder, or videogame addiction. In the resting state studies, the more relevant abnormalities were localized in the superior temporal gyrus, limbic, medial frontal and parietal regions. When analyzing the task related fmri studies, we found that less than half of the papers reported behavioral differences between patients and normal controls, but all of them found significant differences in cortical

  16. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of internet addiction in young adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gianna Sepede; Margherita Tavino; Rita Santacroce; Federica Fiori; Rosa Maria Salerno; Massimo Di Giannantonio

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report the results of functional magnetic resonance imaging(f MRI) studies pertaining internet addiction disorder(IAD) in young adults.METHODS: We conducted a systematic review on Pub Med, focusing our attention on f MRI studies involving adult IAD patients, free from any comorbid psychiatric condition. The following search words were used, both alone and in combination: f MRI, internet addiction, internet dependence, functional neuroimaging. The search was conducted on April 20th, 2015 and yielded 58 records. Inclusion criteria were the following: Articles written in English, patients’ age ≥ 18 years, patients affected by IAD, studies providing f MRI results during resting state or cognitive/emotional paradigms. Structural MRI studies, functional imaging techniques other than f MRI, studies involving adolescents, patients with comorbid psychiatric, neurological or medical conditions were excluded. By reading titles and abstracts, we excluded 30 records. By reading the full texts of the 28 remaining articles, we identified 18 papers meeting our inclusion criteria and therefore included in the qualitative synthesis.RESULTS: We found 18 studies fulfilling our inclusion criteria, 17 of them conducted in Asia, and including a total number of 666 tested subjects. The included studies reported data acquired during resting state or different paradigms, such as cue-reactivity, guessing or cognitive control tasks. The enrolled patients were usually males(95.4%) and very young(21-25 years). The most represented IAD subtype, reported in more than 85% of patients, was the internet gaming disorder, or videogame addiction. In the resting state studies, the more relevant abnormalities were localized in the superior temporal gyrus, limbic, medial frontal and parietal regions. When analyzing the task related fmri studies, we found that less than half of the papers reported behavioral differences between patients and normal controls, but all of them found

  17. Hearing disorders in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, Miriam; Levine, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that is both a focal inflammatory and a chronic neurodegenerative disease. The focal inflammatory component is characterized by destruction of central nervous system myelin, including the spinal cord; as such it can impair any central neural system, including the auditory system. While on the one hand auditory complaints in MS patients are rare compared to other senses, such as vision and proprioception, on the other hand auditory tests of precise neural timing are never "silent." Whenever focal MS lesions are detected involving the pontine auditory pathway, auditory tests requiring precise neural timing are always abnormal, while auditory functions not requiring such precise timing are often normal. Azimuth sound localization is accomplished by comparing the timing and loudness of the sound at the two ears. Hence tests of azimuth sound localization must obligatorily involve the central nervous system and particularly the brainstem. Whenever a focal lesion was localized to the pontine auditory pathway, timing tests were always abnormal, but loudness tests were not. Moreover, a timing test that included only high-frequency sounds was very often abnormal, even when there was no detectable focal MS lesion involving the pontine auditory pathway. This test may be a marker for the chronic neurodegenerative aspect of MS, and, as such could be used to complement the magnetic resonance imaging scan in monitoring the neurodegenerative aspect of MS. Studies of MS brainstem lesion location and auditory function have led to advances in understanding how the human brain processes sound. The brain processes binaural sounds independently for time and level in a two-stage process. The first stage is at the level of the superior olivary complex (SOC) and the second at a level rostral to the SOC. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Green's functions for a graphene sheet and quantum dot in a normal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horing, Norman J Morgenstern; Liu, S Y

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the derivation of the retarded Green's function for a two-dimensional graphene layer in a perpendicular magnetic field in two explicit, analytic forms, which we employ in obtaining a closed-form solution for the Green's function of a tightly confined magnetized graphene quantum dot. The dot is represented by a δ (2) (r)-potential well and the system is subject to Landau quantization in the normal magnetic field

  19. One-step ligand exchange reaction as an efficient way for functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrówczyński, Radosław; Rednic, Lidia; Turcu, Rodica; Liebscher, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Novel magnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (NPs) covered by one layer of functionalized fatty acids, bearing entities (Hayashi catalyst, biotin, quinine, proline, and galactose) of high interest for practical application in nanomedicine or organocatalysis, were synthesized. The functionalized fatty acids were obtained by Cu(I)-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) of azido fatty acids with alkynes. All the magnetic NPs show superparamagnetic behavior with high values of magnetization and high colloidal stability in DCM solution.

  20. Functional assessment of the visual pathway with multifocal visual evoked potentials, and their relationship with disability in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Román; Pérez-Rico, Consuelo; Puertas-Muñoz, Inmaculada; Ayuso-Peralta, Lucía; Boquete, Luciano; Arévalo-Serrano, Juan

    2014-02-01

    To objectively evaluate the visual function, and the relationship between disability and optic nerve dysfunction, in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and optic neuritis (ON), using multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP). This observational, cross-sectional study assessed 28 consecutive patients with clinically definite MS, according to the McDonald criteria, and 19 age-matched healthy subjects. Disability was recorded using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score. The patients' mfVEP were compared to their clinical, psychophysical (Humphrey perimetry) and structural (optic coherence tomography (OCT)) diagnostic test data. We observed a significant agreement between mfVEP amplitude and Humphrey perimetry/OCT in MS-ON eyes, and between mfVEP amplitude and OCT in MS but non-ON eyes. We found significant differences in EDSS score between patients with abnormal and normal mfVEP amplitudes. Abnormal mfVEP amplitude defects (from interocular and monocular probability analysis) were found in 67.9% and 73.7% of the MS-ON and MS-non-ON group eyes, respectively. Delayed mfVEP latencies (interocular and monocular probability analysis) were seen in 70.3% and 73.7% of the MS-ON and MS-non-ON groups, respectively. We found a significant relationship between mfVEP amplitude and disease severity, as measured by EDSS score, that suggested there is a role for mfVEP amplitude as a functional biomarker of axonal loss in MS.

  1. Randomized Controlled Trial to Examine the Impact of Aquatic Exercise Training on Functional Capacity, Balance, and Perceptions of Fatigue in Female Patients With Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargarfard, Mehdi; Shariat, Ardalan; Ingle, Lee; Cleland, Joshua A; Kargarfard, Mina

    2018-02-01

    To assess the effects of an 8-week aquatic exercise training program on functional capacity, balance, and perceptions of fatigue in women with multiple sclerosis (MS). Randomized controlled design. Referral center of an MS society. Women (N=32; mean age ± SD, 36.4±8.2y) with diagnosed relapsing-remitting MS. After undergoing baseline testing by a neurologist, participants were allocated to either an intervention (aquatic training program, n=17) or a control group (n=15). The intervention consisted of an 8-week aquatic training program (3 supervised training sessions per week; session duration, 45-60min; 50%-75% estimated maximum heart rate). Six-minute walk test (6-MWT), balance (Berg Balance Scale [BBS]), and perceptions of fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale; [MFIS]) at baseline and after the 8-week intervention. Differences over time between the experimental and control groups were assessed by a 2×2 (group by time) repeated-measures analysis of variance. Thirty-two women completed the 8-week aquatic training intervention (experimental group, n=17; control group, n=15). All outcome measures improved in the experimental group: 6-MWT performance (pretest mean ± SD, 451±58m; posttest mean ± SD, 503±57m; Ptraining improved functional capacity, balance, and perceptions of fatigue in women with MS. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A systematic review of the effect of moderate intensity exercise on function and disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Andrew J; Byl, Nancy N

    2009-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an idiopathic disease of adults affecting upper and lower motor neurons. In one to four years, progressive weakness, spasticity, and respiratory insufficiency compromise independence and survival. Current medical treatment is limited to medication and supportive care. The benefit and harm of moderate physical exercise are controversial. This review examined current research related to moderate exercise for maintaining independence without accelerating disease progression in persons with ALS. An evidence-based search was conducted using keywords alone and in combination (ALS, exercise, Lou Gehrig's disease, physical therapy) to search PubMed, PEDro, Hooked on Evidence, Ovid, and Cochrane databases. Human and animal models were included and graded on level of evidence and strength of recommendations for developing guidelines to practice. A secondary reviewer evaluated all selected studies, and statistics were calculated. The search yielded the following nine studies: four small clinical studies, one clinical systematic review, and four randomized, controlled trials based on animal models. In human studies, there were small to moderate effect sizes supporting the benefit of moderate exercise in persons with early-stage ALS, with no adverse affects on disease progression or survival time. In transgenic mice with superoxide dismutase-1 ALS, moderate exercise most often had a moderate effect size for increasing life span. Large randomized clinical trials are needed to develop specific exercise guidelines. However, evidence suggests that moderate exercise is not associated with adverse outcomes in persons with early-stage ALS. Moderate exercise programs can be safely adapted to abilities, interests, specific response to exercise, accessibility, and family support.

  3. Quick screening of cognitive function in Indian multiple sclerosis patients using Montreal cognitive assessment test-short version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshpreet Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive impairments in multiple sclerosis (MS are now well recognized worldwide, but unfortunately this domain has been less explored in India due to many undermining factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate cognitive impairments in Indian MS patients with visual or upper limb motor problems with the help of short version of Montreal cognitive assessment test (MoCA. Subjects and Methods: Thirty MS patients and 50 matched controls were recruited for the 12 points MoCA task. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC analysis was performed to determine optimal sensitivity and specificity of the 12 points MoCA in differentiating cognitively impaired patients and controls. Results: The mean 12 points MoCA scores of the controls and MS patients were 11.56 ± 0.67 and 8.06 ± 1.99, respectively. In our study, the optimal cut-off value for 12 points MoCA to be able to differentiate patients with cognitive impairments from controls is 10/12. Accordingly, 73.3% patients fell below the cut off value. Both the groups did not have significant statistical differences with regard to age and educational years. Conclusion: The 12 points, short version of MoCA, is a useful brief screening tool for quick and early detection of mild cognitive impairments in subjects with MS. It can be administered to patients having visual and motor problems. It is of potential use by primary care physicians, nurses, and other allied health professionals who need a quick screening test. No formal training for administration is required. Financial and time constraints should not limit the use of the proposed instrument.

  4. ALFF Value in Right Parahippocampal Gyrus Acts as a Potential Marker Monitoring Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Progression: a Neuropsychological, Voxel-Based Morphometry, and Resting-State Functional MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenjia; Fu, Xiaoling; Cui, Fang; Yang, Fei; Ren, Yuting; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Xiaolan; Chen, Zhaohui; Ling, Li; Huang, Xusheng

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze cognitive impairment in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Forty-four participants matched for age, sex, and educational background were enrolled as the sporadic ALS group (n = 22) and the control group (n = 22). All participants completed comprehensive neuropsychological tests, including the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), the Stroop Color-Word Interference Test (SCWT), the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), and the Frontal Assessment Battery. The participants underwent a series of 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Resting-state functional MRI (Rs-fMRI) using the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) was performed. Three-dimensional T1-weighted anatomical images obtained by voxel-based morphometry (VBM) were used to conduct correlation analyses and group comparisons with the demographic and neuropsychological characteristics. The results indicated that the decreased gray matter (GM) volume in the bilateral precentral gyri and increased ALFF values in the right parahippocampal gyrus, left inferior temporal gyrus, left anterior cingulate gyrus, right superior frontal gyrus, and left middle occipital gyrus were identified in the sporadic ALS group. The increased ALFF value in the right parahippocampal gyrus was positively correlated with ALS progression rate. The ALS patients exhibited poor performances on cognitive and executive tests, which were significantly or marginally significantly correlated with the ALFF values in the anterior cingulate gyrus and the frontal, temporal, and parahippocampal cortices. In conclusion, these findings provide evidence of an extramotor involvement and suggest that the ALFF value in the right parahippocampal gyrus could represent a potential marker to monitor disease progression.

  5. Theory of multichannel magnetic stimulation: toward functional neuromuscular rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruohonen, J; Ravazzani, P; Grandori, F; Ilmoniemi, R J

    1999-06-01

    Human excitable cells can be stimulated noninvasively with externally applied time-varying electromagnetic fields. The stimulation can be achieved either by directly driving current into the tissue (electrical stimulation) or by means of electro-magnetic induction (magnetic stimulation). While the electrical stimulation of the peripheral neuromuscular system has many beneficial applications, peripheral magnetic stimulation has so far only a few. This paper analyzes theoretically the use of multiple magnetic stimulation coils to better control the excitation and also to eventually mimic electrical stimulation. Multiple coils allow electronic spatial adjustment of the shape and location of the stimulus without moving the coils. The new properties may enable unforeseen uses for peripheral magnetic stimulation, e.g., in rehabilitation of patients with neuromuscular impairment.

  6. Functional valve assessment: the emerging role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dipan J

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of valvular heart disease is increasing along with the life span of the population. In assessing individuals with valve disease, echocardiography is the primary imaging modality used by clinicians both for initial assessment and for longitudinal evaluation. Information regarding valve morphology and function, cardiac chamber size, wall thickness, ventricular function, and estimates of pulmonary artery pressures can be readily obtained and integrated to formulate an assessment of valve disease severity. In some instances, body habitus or the presence of coexisting lung disease may result in suboptimal acoustic windows on echocardiography, which may lead to technically difficult studies. Additionally, in some patients, information from clinical history and physical examination or other diagnostic tests may be discordant with echocardiographic findings. In these instances, there is a significant clinical role for cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The diagnostic capabilities of CMR have increased substantially over the past 20 years due to hardware and software advances. Today, CMR has a number of unique advantages over other imaging modalities - primarily, it provides a view of the entire heart without limitations from inadequate imaging windows or body habitus. Furthermore, CMR can obtain imaging data in any imaging plane prescribed by the scan operator, which makes it ideal for accurate investigation of all cardiac valves - aortic, mitral, pulmonic, and tricuspid. In addition, CMR for valve assessment is noninvasive, free of ionizing radiation, and in most instances does not require contrast administration. Since a comprehensive review of the role of CMR in all valve lesions is beyond the scope of this article, we will focus on the most common valvular indication for performance of clinical CMR techniques and an overview of selected validation and reproducibility studies. The objectives of a comprehensive CMR study for evaluating mitral

  7. Functional magnetic resonance maps obtained by personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, F. j.; Manjon, J. V.; Robles, M.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Dosda, R.; Molla, E.

    2001-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance (fMR) is of special relevance in the analysis of certain types of brain activation. The present report describes the development of a simple software program for use with personal computers (PCs) that analyzes these images and provides functional activation maps. Activation maps are based on the temporal differences in oxyhemoglobin in tomographic images. To detect these differences, intensities registered repeatedly during brain control and activation are compared. The experiments were performed with a 1.5-Tesla MR unit. To verify the reliability of the program fMR studies were carried out in 4 healthy individuals (12 contiguous slices, 80 images per slice every 3.1 seconds for a total of 960 images). All the images were transferred to a PC and were processed pixel by pixel within each sequence to obtain an intensity/time curve. The statistical study of the results (Student's test and cross correlation analysis) made it possible to establish the activation of each pixel. The images were prepared using spatial filtering, temporal filtering, baseline correction, normalization and segmentation of the parenchyma. The postprocessing of the results involved the elimination of single pixels, superposition of an anatomical image of greater spatial resolution and anti-aliasing. The application (Xfun 1.0, Valencia, Spain) was developed in Microsoft Visual C++5.0 Developer Studio for Windows NT Workstation. As a representative example, the program took 8.2 seconds to calculate and present the results of the entire study (12 functional maps). In the motor and visual activation experiments, the activation corresponding to regions proximal to the central sulcus of the hemisphere contralateral to the hand that moved and in the occipital cortex were observed. While programs that calculate activation maps are available, the development of software for PCs running Microsoft Windows ensures several key features for its use on a daily basis: it is easy

  8. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation on functional status in chronic multiple sclerosis: importance of lymphopenia early after treatment--the pros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devereux, C.; Troiano, R.; Zito, G.

    1988-01-01

    To determine whether immunosuppression by total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) slowed deterioration of chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), functional impairment score and blood lymphocyte counts were compared at 6-month intervals through 4 years following treatment of MS patients by either TLI (n = 27) or sham irradiation (n = 21). At each interval, 20 to 30% fewer TLI-treated patients had deteriorated (p less than 0.05 at 6, 12, and 18 months), and the difference in mean functional impairment score between groups became progressively greater (p less than 0.01 at 42 and 48 months). Benefit accrued principally to the 17 TLI-treated patients with absolute blood lymphocyte counts less than 900/mm3 3 months after treatment, whose mean functional impairment score remained within 0.6 units of baseline (p = NS), whereas the ten TLI patients with higher post-treatment lymphocyte counts had progressive deterioration (p less than 0.05 to p less than 0.001 versus TLI-treated patients with lower lymphocyte counts at all intervals except 30 months) and had deteriorated by more than 5 functional scale units by 42 and 48 months. Side effects were minor and complications rare in TLI-treated patients, but one TLI-treated patient developed staphylococcal sepsis. Thus, TLI slows deterioration of chronic progressive MS, with what appears to be enduring benefit through 4 years compartmented to patients with greater induced lymphopenia. Modification of lymphoid irradiation regimens to increase the proportion of MS patients who achieve a favorable degree of lymphopenia and to avert functional hyposplenism may further improve the benefit/risk ratio

  9. Effects of aerobic exercise therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy on functioning and quality of life in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: protocol of the FACTS-2-ALS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Groenestijn, Annerieke C.; van de Port, Ingrid G. L.; Schröder, Carin D.; Post, Marcel W. M.; Grupstra, Hepke F.; Kruitwagen, Esther T.; van der Linde, Harmen; van Vliet, Reinout O.; van de Weerd, Margreet G. H.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Lindeman, Eline

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor neurons in the spinal cord, brainstem and motor cortex, leading to muscle weakness. Muscle weakness may result in the avoidance of physical activity, which exacerbates disuse weakness and

  10. Neuropsychological assessment of language functions during functional magnetic resonance imaging: development of new tasks. Preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fersten, Ewa; Jakuciński, Maciej; Kuliński, Radosław; Koziara, Henryk; Mroziak, Barbara; Nauman, Paweł

    2011-01-01

    Due to the complex and extended cerebral organization of language functions, the brain regions crucial for speech and language, i.e. eloquent areas, have to be affected by neurooncological surgery. One of the techniques that may be helpful in pre-operative planning of the extent of tumour removal and estimating possible complications seems to be functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The aim of the study was to develop valid procedures for neuropsychological assessment of various language functions visualisable by fMRI in healthy individuals. In this fMRI study, 10 healthy (with no CNS pathology), right-handed volunteers aged 25-35 were examined using four tasks designed to measure different language functions, and one for short-term memory assessment. A 1.5-T MRI scanner performing ultrafast functional (EPI) sequences with 4-mm slice thickness and 1-mm interslice gap was used to detect the BOLD response to stimuli present-ed in a block design (30-second alternating blocks of activity and rest). The analyses used the SPM software running in a MATLAB environment, and the obtained data were interpreted by means of colour-coded maps superimposed on structural brain scans. For each of the tasks developed for particular language functions, a different area of increased neuronal activity was found. The differential localization of function-related neuronal activity seems interesting and the research worth continuing, since verbal communication failure may result from impairment of any of various language functions, and studies reported in the literature seem to focus on verbal expression only.

  11. Wave functions for a relativistic electron in superstrong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrescu, Gh.

    2003-01-01

    In the past decade few authors attempted to search interesting features of the radiation of a specific neutron star, the magnetar. In this paper we investigate some features of the motion of an electron in a strong magnetic field as it occurs in a magnetar atmosphere. We have applied the conditions of the super relativistic electrons in super-strong magnetic fields proposed by Gonthier et al. to express two specific spin operators and their eigenfunctions. We have done this in order to investigate into a further paper an estimation of the cross section in Compton process in strong and superstrong magnetic fields in relativistic regime. (author)

  12. Improving physical functional and quality of life in older adults with multiple sclerosis via a DVD-delivered exercise intervention: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcicki, Thomas R; Roberts, Sarah A; Learmonth, Yvonne C; Hubbard, Elizabeth A; Kinnett-Hopkins, Dominque; Motl, Robert W; McAuley, Edward

    2014-12-01

    There is a need to identify innovative, low-cost and broad-reaching strategies for promoting exercise and improving physical function in older adults with multiple sclerosis (MS). This randomised controlled pilot trial will test the efficacy of a 6-month, DVD-delivered exercise intervention to improve functional performance and quality of life in older adults with MS. Participants will be randomised either into a DVD-delivered exercise condition or an attentional control condition. This novel approach to programme delivery provides participants with detailed exercise instructions which are presented in a progressive manner and includes a variety of modifications to better meet varying levels of physical abilities. The targeted exercises focus on three critical elements of functional fitness: flexibility, strength and balance. It is hypothesised that participants who are randomised to the exercise DVD condition will demonstrate improvements in physical function compared with participants assigned to the attentional control condition. Data analysis will include a 2 (condition)×2 (time) mixed factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) that follows intent-to-treat principles, as well as an examination of effect sizes. Participants will take part in qualitative interviews about perspectives on physical activity and programme participation. The study protocol was approved by a university institutional review board and registered with a federal database. Participants will be asked to read and sign a detailed informed consent document and will be required to provide a physician's approval to participate in the study. The exercise DVDs include an overview of safety-related concerns and recommendations relative to exercise participation, as well as detailed instructions highlighting the proper execution of each exercise presented on screen. Following completion of this trial, data will be immediately analysed and results will be presented at scientific meetings and published in

  13. Lectin-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for reproductive improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Semen ejaculates contain heterogeneous sperm populations that can jeopardize male fertility. Recent development of nanotechnology in physiological systems may have applications in reproductive biology. Here, we used magnetic nanoparticles as a novel strategy for sperm purification to imp...

  14. Dual-function magnetic structure for toroidal plasma devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to a support system wherein the iron core and yoke of the plasma current system of a tokamak plasma containment device is redesigned to support the forces of the magnet coils. The containment rings, which occupy very valuable space around the magnet coils, are utilized to serve as yokes for the core such that the conventional yoke is eliminated. The overall result is an improved aspect ratio, reduction in structure, smaller overall size, and improved access to the plasma ring

  15. Pleiotropic functions of magnetic nanoparticles for ex vivo gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kami, Daisuke; Kitani, Tomoya; Kishida, Tsunao; Mazda, Osam; Toyoda, Masashi; Tomitaka, Asahi; Ota, Satoshi; Ishii, Ryuga; Takemura, Yasushi; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Gojo, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    Gene transfer technique has various applications, ranging from cellular biology to medical treatments for diseases. Although nonviral vectors, such as episomal vectors, have been developed, it is necessary to improve their gene transfer efficacy. Therefore, we attempted to develop a highly efficient gene delivery system combining an episomal vector with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). In comparison with the conventional method using transfection reagents, polyethylenimine-coated MNPs introduced episomal vectors more efficiently under a magnetic field and could express the gene in mammalian cells with higher efficiency and for longer periods. This novel in vitro separation method of gene-introduced cells utilizing the magnetic property of MNPs significantly facilitated the separation of cells of interest. Transplanted cells in vivo were detected using magnetic resonance. These results suggest that MNPs play multifunctional roles in ex vivo gene transfer, such as improvement of gene transfer efficacy, separation of cells, and detection of transplanted cells. This study convincingly demonstrates enhanced efficiency of gene transfer via magnetic nanoparticles. The method also enables magnetic sorting of cells positive for the transferred gene, and in vivo monitoring of the process with MRI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bacterial Nanocellulose Magnetically Functionalized for Neuro-Endovascular Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverry-Rendon, Mónica; Reece, Lisa M; Pastrana, Fernando; Arias, Sandra L; Shetty, Akshath R; Pavón, Juan Jose; Allain, Jean Paul

    2017-06-01

    Current treatments for brain aneurysms are invasive, traumatic, and not suitable in most patients with increased risks. A new alternative method is using scaffold stents to create a local and focal attraction force of cells for an in situ reconstruction of the tunica media. For this purpose, a nanostructured bioactive coating is designed to render an asymmetric region of the stent scaffold magnetic and biomimetic, which utilizes bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) as a platform for both magnetic and cell attraction as well as proliferation. The magnetization of the BNC is realized through the reaction of Fe III and II, precipitating superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION). Subsequently, magnetic bacterial nanocellulose (MBNC) is coated with polyethylene glycol to improve its biocompatibility. Cytotoxicity and biocompatibility are evaluated using porcine aortic smooth muscle cells. Preliminary cellular migration assays demonstrate the behavior between MBNC and cells labeled with SPION. In this work, (1) synthesis of BNC impregnated with magnetic nanoparticles is successfully demonstrated; (2) a viable, resilient, and biocompatible hydrogel membrane is tested for neuroendovascular application using a stent scaffold; (3) cell viability and minimal cytotoxicity is achieved; (4) cell migration tests and examination of cellular magnetic attraction confirm the viability of MBNC as a multifunctional coating. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Engineering magnetism at functional oxides interfaces: manganites and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Di; Lu, Nianpeng; Chen, Xuegang; Shen, Shengchun; Yu, Pu

    2017-11-08

    The family of transition metal oxides (TMOs) is a large class of magnetic materials that has been intensively studied due to the rich physics involved as well as the promising potential applications in next generation electronic devices. In TMOs, the spin, charge, orbital and lattice are strongly coupled, and significant advances have been achieved to engineer the magnetism by different routes that manipulate these degrees of freedom. The family of manganites is a model system of strongly correlated magnetic TMOs. In this review, using manganites thin films and the heterostructures in conjunction with other TMOs as model systems, we review the recent progress of engineering magnetism in TMOs. We first discuss the role of the lattice that includes the epitaxial strain and the interface structural coupling. Then we look into the role of charge, focusing on the interface charge modulation. Having demonstrated the static effects, we continue to review the research on dynamical control of magnetism by electric field. Next, we review recent advances in heterostructures comprised of high T c cuprate superconductors and manganites. Following that, we discuss the emergent magnetic phenomena at interfaces between 3d TMOs and 5d TMOs with strong spin-orbit coupling. Finally, we provide our outlook for prospective future directions.

  18. The Efficacy of Functional Electrical Stimulation of the Abdominal Muscles in the Treatment of Chronic Constipation in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Singleton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic constipation in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS is common and the current methods of treatment are ineffective in some patients. Anecdotal observations suggest that functional electrical stimulation (FES of the abdominal muscles may be effective in the management of constipation in these patients. Patients and Methods. In this exploratory investigation we studied the effects of FES on the whole gut transit time (WGTT and the colonic transit time (CTT. In addition, we evaluated the treatment effect on the patients’ constipation-related quality of life and on the use of laxatives and the use of manual bowel evacuation. FES was given for 30 minutes twice a day for a period of six weeks. Four female patients were studied. Results. The WGTT and CTT and constipation-related quality of life improved in all patients. The patients’ use of laxatives was reduced. No adverse effects of FES treatment were reported. Conclusion. The findings of this pilot study suggest that FES applied to the abdominal muscles may be an effective treatment modality for severe chronic constipation in patients with MS.

  19. The Italian validation of the minimal assessment of cognitive function in multiple sclerosis (MACFIMS) and the application of the Cognitive Impairment Index scoring procedure in MS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argento, Ornella; Incerti, Chiara C; Quartuccio, Maria E; Magistrale, Giuseppe; Francia, Ada; Caltagirone, Carlo; Pisani, Valerio; Nocentini, Ugo

    2018-04-27

    Cognitive dysfunction occurs in almost 50-60% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) even in early stages of the disease and affects different aspects of patient's life. Aims of the present study were (1) to introduce and validate an Italian version of the minimal assessment of cognitive functions in MS (MACFIMS) battery and (2) to propose the use of the Cognitive Impairment Index (CII) as a scoring procedure to define the degree of impairment in relapsing-remitting (RRMS) and secondary-progressive (SPMS) patients. A total of 240 HC and 123 MS patients performed the Italian version of the MACFIMS composed by the same tests as the original except for the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test. The CII was derived for each score of the 11 scales for participants of both groups. The results of the study show that cognitive impairment affects around 50% of our sample of MS patients. In RRMS group, only the 15.7% of patients reported a severe impairment, while in the group of SPMS, the 51.4% of patients felt in the "severely impaired" group. Results are in line with previously reported percentages of impairment in MS patients, showing that the calculation of the CII applied to the Italian version of the MACFIMS is sensitive and reliable in detecting different degrees of impairment in MS patients.

  20. Magnetic field effects on the quantum wire energy spectrum and Green's function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern Horing, Norman J.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the energy spectrum and propagation of electrons in a quantum wire on a 2D host medium in a normal magnetic field, representing the wire by a 1D Dirac delta function potential which would support just a single subband state in the absence of the magnetic field. The associated Schroedinger Green's function for the quantum wire is derived in closed form in terms of known functions and the Landau quantized subband energy spectrum is examined.

  1. Current-current correlation function in presence of chemical potential and external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apresyan, E.A.

    2017-01-01

    The (2+1)-dimensional electron system was observed, where relation between the Green functions and conductivity was used. The current-current correlation function Π_μ_ν(B) for the fermion system was calculated in presence of non-quantizing magnetic field B, chemical potential η and gap m. From this function it is possible to obtain the equation for polarization operator calculated without the magnetic field. The result is also applicable for graphene

  2. Longitudinal study of visual function in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis with and without a history of optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Gómez, A; García-Ben, A; Soler García, A; García-Basterra, I; Padilla Parrado, F; García-Campos, J M

    2017-03-15

    The contrast sensitivity test determines the quality of visual function in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The purpose of this study is to analyse changes in visual function in patients with relapsing-remitting MS with and without a history of optic neuritis (ON). We conducted a longitudinal study including 61 patients classified into 3 groups as follows: a) disease-free patients (control group); b) patients with MS and no history of ON; and c) patients with MS and a history of unilateral ON. All patients underwent baseline and 6-year follow-up ophthalmologic examinations, which included visual acuity and monocular and binocular Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity tests. Monocular contrast sensitivity was significantly lower in MS patients with and without a history of ON than in controls both at baseline (P=.00 and P=.01, respectively) and at 6 years (P=.01 and P=.02). Patients with MS and no history of ON remained stable throughout follow-up whereas those with a history of ON displayed a significant loss of contrast sensitivity (P=.01). Visual acuity and binocular contrast sensitivity at baseline and at 6 years was significantly lower in the group of patients with a history of ON than in the control group (P=.003 and P=.002 vs P=.006 and P=.005) and the group with no history of ON (P=.04 and P=.038 vs P=.008 and P=.01). However, no significant differences were found in follow-up results (P=.1 and P=.5). Monocular Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity test may be used to detect changes in visual function in patients with ON. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Trigeminal root entry zone involvement in neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Atsuhiko; Mori, Masahiro; Masuda, Hiroki; Uchida, Tomohiko; Muto, Mayumi; Uzawa, Akiyuki; Ito, Shoichi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-08-15

    Trigeminal root entry zone abnormality on brain magnetic resonance imaging has been frequently reported in multiple sclerosis patients, but it has not been investigated in neuromyelitis optica patients. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of 128 consecutive multiple sclerosis patients and 46 neuromyelitis optica patients was evaluated. Trigeminal root entry zone abnormality was present in 11 (8.6%) of the multiple sclerosis patients and two (4.3%) of the neuromyelitis optica patients. The pontine trigeminal root entry zone may be involved in both multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitation of blood-brain barrier defect by magnetic resonance imaging and gadolinium-DTPA in patients with multiple sclerosis and brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Stubgaard, M; Frederiksen, J L

    1990-01-01

    In this study quantitation of the degree of deficiency of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in patients with multiple sclerosis or brain tumors, by using MRI, is shown to be possible. As a measure of permeability of the BBB to Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) the flux per unit of distribution volume per unit...... of brain mass was used. This quantity was found by introducing the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1) as a measure of concentration of Gd-DTPA in the brain tissue in the mathematical model for the transcapillary transport over the BBB. High accordance between the observed data points and the model was found...

  5. Health technology assessment on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and clinically isolated syndromes (CIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achten, Eric [Department of Radiology, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: rik.achten@ugent.be; Deblaere, Karel [Department of Radiology, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: karel.deblaere@ugent.be

    2008-02-15

    This work is the result of a health technology assessment for the Flemish regional government, Belgium, performed in 2006. A search of the available literature in the databases Medline and EMBASE was performed to find evidence for a rational choice between CT and MRI techniques in the work-up of patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) with a suspicion for multiple sclerosis (MS), and in follow-up exams performed in such patients. From the presented evidence, in patients referred for CIS or MS, MR is superior to CT for detection and characterization of brain and spine lesions.

  6. Interpolation of magnetic surface functions for an axi-symmetric plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Taiki; Maeyama, Mitsuaki

    2000-01-01

    Informations of the magnetic surface functions of magnetically confined plasma are indispensable for equilibrium, stability and transport analyses. In this paper, in order to identify a realistic surface functions and compare those with ones which are introduced from Taylor's relaxation theory, we propose a code to interpolate these surface functions for an axi-symmetric plasma from experimentally measured data. To confirm our code, we used the date which were analyzed from known functions given as a measured data. As a result, we have developed a code which can derive surface functions I and P. Effects of measurement error on those functions are also examined. (author)

  7. Green’s function theory of ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic superlattices with damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, R.K.; Guo, F.F.; Zhang, Z.D.

    2016-01-01

    We explore a quantum Green’s-function method to study the resonance absorption of magnetic materials. The relationship between the resonance magnon (spin wave) density and the resonance frequency of a superlattice consisting of two magnetic layers with damping and antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling is studied. The effects of temperature, interlayer coupling, anisotropy, external magnetic field and damping on the the resonance frequency and resonance magnon density are investigated. The resonance excitation probability for a magnon is proportional to the resonance magnon density. In the classic methods, the imaginary part of magnetic permeability represents the resonance absorption in magnetic materials. In the quantum approach, the resonance magnon density can be used to estimate the strength of the resonance absorption. In the present work, a quantum approach is developed to study resonance absorption of magnetic materials and the results show the method to obtain a magnetic multilayered materials with both high resonance frequency and high resonance absorption.

  8. Green’s function theory of ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic superlattices with damping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, R.K., E-mail: rkqiu@163.com [Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110870 (China); Guo, F.F. [Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110870 (China); Zhang, Z.D. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2016-02-01

    We explore a quantum Green’s-function method to study the resonance absorption of magnetic materials. The relationship between the resonance magnon (spin wave) density and the resonance frequency of a superlattice consisting of two magnetic layers with damping and antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling is studied. The effects of temperature, interlayer coupling, anisotropy, external magnetic field and damping on the the resonance frequency and resonance magnon density are investigated. The resonance excitation probability for a magnon is proportional to the resonance magnon density. In the classic methods, the imaginary part of magnetic permeability represents the resonance absorption in magnetic materials. In the quantum approach, the resonance magnon density can be used to estimate the strength of the resonance absorption. In the present work, a quantum approach is developed to study resonance absorption of magnetic materials and the results show the method to obtain a magnetic multilayered materials with both high resonance frequency and high resonance absorption.

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  10. How does MRI work? An introduction into physics and functionality of magnetic resonance imaging. 6. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weishaupt, Dominik; Marincek, Borut

    2009-01-01

    The book provides the basic physics and describes the functionality of magnetic resonance tomography in a very illustrative way. The following topics are covered: Spins and the magnetic resonance phenomenon, image contrast, three-dimensional structure, signal-to-noise ratio, description of a magnetic resonance tomography, basic pulse sequences, fast pulse sequences, methods for fat suppression, parallel imaging, cardiovascular imaging, MR contrast media, MR image artifacts, high-field MRI, imaging beyond morphology and structure, safety and risks [de

  11. Imaging Findings Associated with Cognitive Performance in Primary Lateral Sclerosis and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avner Meoded

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Executive dysfunction occurs in many patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, but it has not been well studied in primary lateral sclerosis (PLS. The aims of this study were to (1 compare cognitive function in PLS to that in ALS patients, (2 explore the relationship between performance on specific cognitive tests and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI metrics of white matter tracts and gray matter volumes, and (3 compare DTI metrics in patients with and without cognitive and behavioral changes. Methods: The Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS, the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (DRS-2, and other behavior and mood scales were administered to 25 ALS patients and 25 PLS patients. Seventeen of the PLS patients, 13 of the ALS patients, and 17 healthy controls underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and DTI. Atlas-based analysis using MRI Studio software was used to measure fractional anisotropy, and axial and radial diffusivity of selected white matter tracts. Voxel-based morphometry was used to assess gray matter volumes. The relationship between diffusion properties of selected association and commissural white matter and performance on executive function and memory tests was explored using a linear regression model. Results: More ALS than PLS patients had abnormal scores on the DRS-2. DRS-2 and D-KEFS scores were related to DTI metrics in several long association tracts and the callosum. Reduced gray matter volumes in motor and perirolandic areas were not associated with cognitive scores. Conclusion: The changes in diffusion metrics of white matter long association tracts suggest that the loss of integrity of the networks connecting fronto-temporal areas to parietal and occipital areas contributes to cognitive impairment.

  12. Multiple sclerosis - etiology and diagnostic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, Joanna; Koper, Olga M; Piechal, Kinga; Kemona, Halina

    2017-06-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of autoimmune originate. The main agents responsible for the MS development include exogenous, environmental, and genetic factors. MS is characterized by multifocal and temporally scattered central nervous system (CNS) damage which lead to the axonal damage. Among clinical courses of MS it can be distinguish relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPSM), primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), and progressive-relapsing multiple sclerosis (RPMS). Depending on the severity of signs and symptoms MS can be described as benign MS or malignant MS. MS diagnosis is based on McDonald's diagnostic criteria, which link clinical manifestation with characteristic lesions demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, and visual evoked potentials. Among CSF laboratory tests used to the MS diagnosis are applied: Tibbling & Link IgG index, reinbegrams, and CSF isoelectrofocusing for oligoclonal bands detection. It should be emphasized, that despite huge progress regarding MS as well as the availability of different diagnostics methods this disease is still a diagnostic challenge. It may result from fact that MS has diverse clinical course and there is a lack of single test, which would be of appropriate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for quick and accurate diagnosis.

  13. Multiple sclerosis - etiology and diagnostic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kamińska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of autoimmune originate. The main agents responsible for the MS development include exogenous, environmental, and genetic factors. MS is characterized by multifocal and temporally scattered central nervous system (CNS damage which lead to the axonal damage. Among clinical courses of MS it can be distinguish relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPSM, primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS, and progressive-relapsing multiple sclerosis (RPMS. Depending on the severity of signs and symptoms MS can be described as benign MS or malignant MS. MS diagnosis is based on McDonald’s diagnostic criteria, which link clinical manifestation with characteristic lesions demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis, and visual evoked potentials. Among CSF laboratory tests used to the MS diagnosis are applied: Tibbling & Link IgG index, reinbegrams, and CSF isoelectrofocusing for oligoclonal bands detection. It should be emphasized, that despite huge progress regarding MS as well as the availability of differentdiagnostics methods this disease is still a diagnostic challenge. It may result from fact that MS has diverse clinical course and there is a lack of single test, which would be of appropriate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for quick and accurate diagnosis.

  14. Modeling drug release from functionalized magnetic nanoparticles actuated by non-heating low frequency magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovin, Y., E-mail: nano@tsutmb.ru [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, School of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Golovin, D. [G.R. Derzhavin Tambov State University (Russian Federation); Klyachko, N.; Majouga, A.; Kabanov, A. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, School of Chemistry (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Various plausible acceleration mechanisms of drug release from nanocarriers composed of a single-domain magnetic nanoparticle core with attached long macromolecule chains activated by low frequency non-heating alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed. The most important system characteristics affecting the AMF exposure impact are determined. Impact of several reasonable mechanisms is estimated analytically or obtained using numerical modeling. Some conditions providing manifold release acceleration as a result from exposure in AMF are found.

  15. Modeling drug release from functionalized magnetic nanoparticles actuated by non-heating low frequency magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovin, Y.; Golovin, D.; Klyachko, N.; Majouga, A.; Kabanov, A.

    2017-01-01

    Various plausible acceleration mechanisms of drug release from nanocarriers composed of a single-domain magnetic nanoparticle core with attached long macromolecule chains activated by low frequency non-heating alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed. The most important system characteristics affecting the AMF exposure impact are determined. Impact of several reasonable mechanisms is estimated analytically or obtained using numerical modeling. Some conditions providing manifold release acceleration as a result from exposure in AMF are found.

  16. Use of Green functions in line shape problems in nuclear Magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M.; Moreno, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A method based on the two times Green function formalism is presented. It permits the straightforward determination of the line shape in Magnetic Resonance experiments together with its temperature behavior. Model calculations are made on a two-spin system attached to a one-dimensional rotor obtaining the temperature dependence of its Magnetic Resonance line shape and second moment

  17. Static high-gradient magnetic fields affect the functionality of monocytic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syrovets, T.; Schmidt, Z.; Buechele, B.; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Dempsey, N.; Simmet, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2014), s. 1-2 ISSN 0892-6638 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : static high-gradient * magnet ic fields * affect the functionality * monocytic cells Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnet ism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.)

  18. Design, Development & Functional Validation of Magnets system in support of 42 GHz Gyrotron in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradhan S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A multi institutional initiative is underway towards the development of 42 GHz, 200 kW gyrotron system in India under the frame work of Department of Science and Technology, Government of India. Indigenous realization comprising of design, fabrication, prototypes and functional validations of an appropriate Magnet System is one of the primary technological objective of these initiatives. The 42 GHz gyrotron magnet system comprises of a warm gun magnet, a NbTi/Cu based high homogenous superconducting cavity magnet and three warm collector magnets. The superconducting cavity magnet has been housed inside a low loss cryostat. The magnet system has been designed in accordance with gyrotron physics and engineering considerations respecting highly homogenous spatial field profile as well as maintaining steep gradient as per the compression and velocity ratios between the emission and resonator regions. The designed magnet system further ensures the co-linearity of the magnetic axis with that of the beam axis with custom winding techniques apart from a smooth collection of beam with the collector magnet profiles. The designed magnets have been wound after several R & D validations. The superconducting magnet has been housed inside a low loss designed cryostat with in-built radial and axial alignment flexibilities to certain extent. The cryostat further houses liquid helium port, liquid nitrogen ports, current communication ports, ports for monitoring helium level and other instrumentations apart from over-pressure safety intensive burst disks etc. The entire magnet system comprising of warm and superconducting magnets has been installed and integrated in the Gyrotron test set-up. The magnet system has been aligned in both warm and when the superconducting cavity magnet is cold. The integrated geometric axes have been experimentally ensured as well as the field profiles have been measured with the magnets being charged. Under experimental conditions

  19. Density functional theory study of structure, electronic and magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABHIJIT DUTTA

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... magnetic properties of non-metal (Group 13) doped stable. Rhn(n = 2−8) ... Deformed electron density was found to be higher in the case of Rh5B, Rh4Al, Rh7Al and ...... systems: Modeling of surface alloys and alloy surfaces.

  20. Executive deficits, not processing speed relates to abnormalities in distinct prefrontal tracts in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Lewis D; Bastin, Mark E; Smith, Colin; Bak, Thomas H; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Abrahams, Sharon

    2013-11-01

    Cognitive impairment in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is characterized by deficits on tests of executive function; however, the contribution of abnormal processing speed is unknown. Methods are confounded by tasks that depend on motor speed in patients with physical disability. Structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have revealed multi-system cerebral involvement, with evidence of reduced white matter volume and integrity in predominant frontotemporal regions. The current study has two aims. First, to investigate whether cognitive impairments in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are due to executive dysfunction or slowed processing speed using methodology that accommodates motor disability. This is achieved using a dual-task paradigm and tasks that manipulate stimulus presentation times and do not rely on response motor speed. Second, to identify relationships between specific cognitive impairments and the integrity of distinct white matter tracts. Thirty patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 30 age- and education-matched control subjects were administered an experimental dual-task procedure that combined a visual inspection time task and digit recall. In addition, measures of executive function (including letter fluency) and processing speed (visual inspection time and rapid serial letter identification) were administered. Integrity of white matter tracts was determined using region of interest analyses of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging data. Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis did not show impairments on tests of processing speed, but executive deficits were revealed once visual inspection time was combined with digit recall (dual-task) and in letter fluency. In addition to the corticospinal tracts, significant differences in fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity were found between groups in a number of prefrontal and temporal white matter tracts including the anterior cingulate, anterior thalamic radiation

  1. Functional magnetic resonance imaging phase synchronization as a measure of dynamic functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glerean, Enrico; Salmi, Juha; Lahnakoski, Juha M; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Sams, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    Functional brain activity and connectivity have been studied by calculating intersubject and seed-based correlations of hemodynamic data acquired with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To inspect temporal dynamics, these correlation measures have been calculated over sliding time windows with necessary restrictions on the length of the temporal window that compromises the temporal resolution. Here, we show that it is possible to increase temporal resolution by using instantaneous phase synchronization (PS) as a measure of dynamic (time-varying) functional connectivity. We applied PS on an fMRI dataset obtained while 12 healthy volunteers watched a feature film. Narrow frequency band (0.04-0.07 Hz) was used in the PS analysis to avoid artifactual results. We defined three metrics for computing time-varying functional connectivity and time-varying intersubject reliability based on estimation of instantaneous PS across the subjects: (1) seed-based PS, (2) intersubject PS, and (3) intersubject seed-based PS. Our findings show that these PS-based metrics yield results consistent with both seed-based correlation and intersubject correlation methods when inspected over the whole time series, but provide an important advantage of maximal single-TR temporal resolution. These metrics can be applied both in studies with complex naturalistic stimuli (e.g., watching a movie or listening to music in the MRI scanner) and more controlled (e.g., event-related or blocked design) paradigms. A MATLAB toolbox FUNPSY ( http://becs.aalto.fi/bml/software.html ) is openly available for using these metrics in fMRI data analysis.

  2. Sclerosis: Implications for Interhemispheric Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lunardelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 47-year-old woman with 35-year history of multiple sclerosis, who showed alien hand signs, a rare behavioural disorder that involves unilateral goal-directed movements that are contrary to the individual's intention. Alien hand syndrome has been described in multiple sclerosis (MS only occasionally and is generally suggestive of callosal disconnection. The patient presented also with bilateral limb apraxia and left hand agraphia, raising the possibility of cortical dysfunction or disconnection, in addition to corpus callosum and white matter involvement. Her specific pattern of symptoms supports the role of the corpus callosum in interhemispheric communication for complex as well as fine motor activities and may indicate that it can serve as both an inhibitory and excitatory function depending on task demands.

  3. Effects of aerobic exercise therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy on functioning and quality of life in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: protocol of the FACTS-2-ALS trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Weerd Margreet GH

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor neurons in the spinal cord, brainstem and motor cortex, leading to muscle weakness. Muscle weakness may result in the avoidance of physical activity, which exacerbates disuse weakness and cardiovascular deconditioning. The impact of the grave prognosis may result in depressive symptoms and hopelessness. Since there is no cure for ALS, optimal treatment is based on symptom management and preservation of quality of life (QoL, provided in a multidisciplinary setting. Two distinctly different therapeutic interventions may be effective to improve or preserve daily functioning and QoL at the highest achievable level: aerobic exercise therapy (AET to maintain or enhance functional capacity and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT to improve coping style and cognitions in patients with ALS. However, evidence to support either approach is still insufficient, and the underlying mechanisms of the approaches remain poorly understood. The primary aim of the FACTS-2-ALS trial is to study the effects of AET and CBT, in addition to usual care, compared to usual care alone, on functioning and QoL in patients with ALS. Methods / Design A multicentre, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial with a postponed information model will be conducted. A sample of 120 patients with ALS (1 month post diagnosis will be recruited from 3 university hospitals and 1 rehabilitation centre. Patients will be randomized to one of three groups i.e. (1 AET + usual care, (2 CBT + usual care, (3 Usual care. AET consists of a 16-week aerobic exercise programme, on 3 days a week. CBT consists of individual psychological support of patients in 5 to 10 sessions over a 16-week period. QoL, functioning and secondary outcome measures will be assessed at baseline, immediately post intervention and at 3- and 6-months follow-up. Discussion The FACTS-2-ALS study is the first

  4. Effects of aerobic exercise therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy on functioning and quality of life in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: protocol of the FACTS-2-ALS trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Groenestijn, Annerieke C; van de Port, Ingrid G L; Schröder, Carin D; Post, Marcel W M; Grupstra, Hepke F; Kruitwagen, Esther T; van der Linde, Harmen; van Vliet, Reinout O; van de Weerd, Margreet G H; van den Berg, Leonard H; Lindeman, Eline

    2011-06-14

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor neurons in the spinal cord, brainstem and motor cortex, leading to muscle weakness. Muscle weakness may result in the avoidance of physical activity, which exacerbates disuse weakness and cardiovascular deconditioning. The impact of the grave prognosis may result in depressive symptoms and hopelessness. Since there is no cure for ALS, optimal treatment is based on symptom management and preservation of quality of life (QoL), provided in a multidisciplinary setting. Two distinctly different therapeutic interventions may be effective to improve or preserve daily functioning and QoL at the highest achievable level: aerobic exercise therapy (AET) to maintain or enhance functional capacity and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to improve coping style and cognitions in patients with ALS. However, evidence to support either approach is still insufficient, and the underlying mechanisms of the approaches remain poorly understood. The primary aim of the FACTS-2-ALS trial is to study the effects of AET and CBT, in addition to usual care, compared to usual care alone, on functioning and QoL in patients with ALS. A multicentre, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial with a postponed information model will be conducted. A sample of 120 patients with ALS (1 month post diagnosis) will be recruited from 3 university hospitals and 1 rehabilitation centre. Patients will be randomized to one of three groups i.e. (1) AET + usual care, (2) CBT + usual care, (3) Usual care. AET consists of a 16-week aerobic exercise programme, on 3 days a week. CBT consists of individual psychological support of patients in 5 to 10 sessions over a 16-week period. QoL, functioning and secondary outcome measures will be assessed at baseline, immediately post intervention and at 3- and 6-months follow-up. The FACTS-2-ALS study is the first theory-based randomized controlled trial to evaluate the

  5. Sulphamic acid-functionalized magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    as recyclable catalyst for synthesis of imidazoles under microwave irradiation ... functionalized magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (SA–MNPs) as a novel solid acid catalyst under solvent-free classical heating ..... green chemistry approach.

  6. Stress and brain functional changes in patients with Crohn's disease: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, A; Ballotta, D; Righi, S; Moretti, M; Bertani, A; Scarcelli, A; Sartini, A; Ercolani, M; Nichelli, P; Campieri, M; Benuzzi, F

    2017-10-01

    In Crohn's disease (CD) patients, stress is believed to influence symptoms generation. Stress may act via central nervous system pathways to affect visceral sensitivity and motility thus exacerbating gastrointestinal symptoms. The neural substrate underpinning these mechanisms needs to be investigated in CD. We conducted an explorative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in order to investigate potential differences in the brain stress response in CD patients compared to controls. 17 CD patients and 17 healthy controls underwent a fMRI scan while performing a stressful task consisting in a Stroop color-word interference task designed to induce mental stress in the fMRI environment. Compared to controls, in CD patients the stress task elicited greater blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals in the midcingulate cortex (MCC). The MCC integrate "high" emotional processes with afferent sensory information ascending from the gut. In light of these integrative functions, the stress-evoked MCC hyperactivity in CD patients might represent a plausible neural substrate for the association between stress and symptomatic disease. The MCC dysfunction might be involved in mechanisms of central disinhibition of nociceptive inputs leading to amplify the visceral sensitivity. Finally, the stress-evoked MCC hyperactivity might affect the regulation of intestinal motility resulting in exacerbation of disease symptoms and the autonomic and neuroendocrine regulation of inflammation resulting in enhanced inflammatory activity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Irregular wave functions of a hydrogen atom in a uniform magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintgen, D.; Hoenig, A.

    1989-01-01

    The highly excited irregular wave functions of a hydrogen atom in a uniform magnetic field are investigated analytically, with wave function scarring by periodic orbits considered quantitatively. The results obtained confirm that the contributions of closed classical orbits to the spatial wave functions vanish in the semiclassical limit. Their disappearance, however, is slow. This discussion is illustrated by numerical examples.

  8. Effects of an individual 12-week community-located "start-to-run" program on physical capacity, walking, fatigue, cognitive function, brain volumes, and structures in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feys, Peter; Moumdjian, Lousin; Van Halewyck, Florian; Wens, Inez; Eijnde, Bert O; Van Wijmeersch, Bart; Popescu, Veronica; Van Asch, Paul

    2017-11-01

    Exercise therapy studies in persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) primarily focused on motor outcomes in mid disease stage, while cognitive function and neural correlates were only limitedly addressed. This pragmatic randomized controlled study investigated the effects of a remotely supervised community-located "start-to-run" program on physical and cognitive function, fatigue, quality of life, brain volume, and connectivity. In all, 42 pwMS were randomized to either experimental (EXP) or waiting list control (WLC) group. The EXP group received individualized training instructions during 12 weeks (3×/week), to be performed in their community aiming to participate in a running event. Measures were physical (VO 2max , sit-to-stand test, Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12)) and cognitive function (Rao's Brief Repeatable Battery (BRB), Paced Auditory Serial Attention Test (PASAT)), fatigue (Fatigue Scale for Motor and Cognitive Function (FSMC)), quality of life (Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale-29 (MSIS-29)), and imaging. Brain volumes and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were quantified using FSL-SIENA/FIRST and FSL-TBSS. In all, 35 pwMS completed the trial. Interaction effects in favor of the EXP group were found for VO 2max , sit-to-stand test, MSWS-12, Spatial Recall Test, FSMC, MSIS-29, and pallidum volume. VO 2max improved by 1.5 mL/kg/min, MSWS-12 by 4, FSMC by 11, and MSIS-29 by 14 points. The Spatial Recall Test improved by more than 10%. Community-located run training improved aerobic capacity, functional mobility, visuospatial memory, fatigue, and quality of life and pallidum volume in pwMS.

  9. Single step synthesis, characterization and applications of curcumin functionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhandari, Rohit; Gupta, Prachi; Dziubla, Thomas; Hilt, J. Zach, E-mail: zach.hilt@uky.edu

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been well known for their applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia, targeted drug delivery, etc. The surface modification of these magnetic nanoparticles has been explored extensively to achieve functionalized materials with potential application in biomedical, environmental and catalysis field. Herein, we report a novel and versatile single step methodology for developing curcumin functionalized magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles without any additional linkers, using a simple coprecipitation technique. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The developed MNPs were employed in a cellular application for protection against an inflammatory agent, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) molecule. - Graphical abstract: Novel single step curcumin coated magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles without any additional linkers for medical, environmental, and other applications. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A novel and versatile single step methodology for developing curcumin functionalized magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles is reported. • The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were characterized using TEM, XRD, FTIR and TGA. • The developed MNPs were employed in a cellular application for protection against an inflammatory agent, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB).

  10. High pressure cells for magnetic measurements - destruction and functional tests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamarád, Jiří; Machátová, Zuzana; Arnold, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 11 (2004), s. 5022-5025 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0739; GA AV ČR IAA1010315 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : pressure cells * pressure transmitting media * CuBe * MP35N Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.226, year: 2004

  11. Copper nanoparticles functionalized PE: Preparation, characterization and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reznickova, A.; Orendac, M.; Kolska, Z.; Cizmar, E.; Dendisova, M.; Svorcik, V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Polyethylene (PE) surface was activated by argon plasma discharge. • Copper nanoparticles were coated on polyethylene via dithiol interlayer. • Prepared samples exhibit excellent structural and magnetic properties. • Studied properties may be utilized in design and fabrication of electronic devices. - Abstract: We report grafting of copper nanoparticles (CuNP) on plasma activated high density polyethylene (HDPE) via dithiol interlayer pointing out to the structural and magnetic properties of those composites. The as-synthesized Cu nanoparticles have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM/TEM) and UV–vis spectroscopy. Properties of pristine PE and their plasma treated counterparts were studied by different experimental techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), zeta potential, electron spin resonance (ESR) and SQUID magnetometry. From TEM and HRTEM analyses, it is found that the size of high purity Cu nanoparticles is (12.2 ± 5.2) nm. It was determined that in the CuNPs, the copper atoms are arranged mostly in the (111) and (200) planes. Absorption in UV–vis region by these nanoparticles is ranging from 570 to 670 nm. EDS revealed that after 1 h of grafting are Cu nanoparticles homogeneously distributed over the whole surface and after 24 h of grafting Cu nanoparticles tend to aggregate slightly. The combined investigation of magnetic properties using ESR spectrometry and SQUID magnetometry confirmed the presence of copper nanoparticles anchored on PE substrate and indicated ferromagnetic interactions.

  12. Copper nanoparticles functionalized PE: Preparation, characterization and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reznickova, A., E-mail: alena.reznickova@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Orendac, M., E-mail: martin.orendac@upjs.sk [Faculty of Science, P.J. Safarik University, Park Angelinum 9, 04013 Kosice (Slovakia); Kolska, Z., E-mail: zdenka.kolska@seznam.cz [Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkyne University, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Cizmar, E., E-mail: erik.cizmar@upjs.sk [Faculty of Science, P.J. Safarik University, Park Angelinum 9, 04013 Kosice (Slovakia); Dendisova, M., E-mail: vyskovsm@vscht.cz [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Svorcik, V., E-mail: vaclav.svorcik@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Polyethylene (PE) surface was activated by argon plasma discharge. • Copper nanoparticles were coated on polyethylene via dithiol interlayer. • Prepared samples exhibit excellent structural and magnetic properties. • Studied properties may be utilized in design and fabrication of electronic devices. - Abstract: We report grafting of copper nanoparticles (CuNP) on plasma activated high density polyethylene (HDPE) via dithiol interlayer pointing out to the structural and magnetic properties of those composites. The as-synthesized Cu nanoparticles have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM/TEM) and UV–vis spectroscopy. Properties of pristine PE and their plasma treated counterparts were studied by different experimental techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), zeta potential, electron spin resonance (ESR) and SQUID magnetometry. From TEM and HRTEM analyses, it is found that the size of high purity Cu nanoparticles is (12.2 ± 5.2) nm. It was determined that in the CuNPs, the copper atoms are arranged mostly in the (111) and (200) planes. Absorption in UV–vis region by these nanoparticles is ranging from 570 to 670 nm. EDS revealed that after 1 h of grafting are Cu nanoparticles homogeneously distributed over the whole surface and after 24 h of grafting Cu nanoparticles tend to aggregate slightly. The combined investigation of magnetic properties using ESR spectrometry and SQUID magnetometry confirmed the presence of copper nanoparticles anchored on PE substrate and indicated ferromagnetic interactions.

  13. Age-related normal structural and functional ventricular values in cardiac function assessed by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiechter, Michael; Gaemperli, Oliver; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Fuchs, Tobias A; Gebhard, Catherine; Stehli, Julia; Klaeser, Bernd; Stähli, Barbara E; Manka, Robert; Manes, Costantina; Tanner, Felix C

    2013-01-01

    The heart is subject to structural and functional changes with advancing age. However, the magnitude of cardiac age-dependent transformation has not been conclusively elucidated. This retrospective cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) study included 183 subjects with normal structural and functional ventricular values. End systolic volume (ESV), end diastolic volume (EDV), and ejection fraction (EF) were obtained from the left and the right ventricle in breath-hold cine CMR. Patients were classified into four age groups (20–29, 30–49, 50–69, and ≥70 years) and cardiac measurements were compared using Pearson’s rank correlation over the four different groups. With advanced age a slight but significant decrease in ESV (r=−0.41 for both ventricles, P<0.001) and EDV (r=−0.39 for left ventricle, r=−0.35 for right ventricle, P<0.001) were observed associated with a significant increase in left (r=0.28, P<0.001) and right (r=0.27, P<0.01) ventricular EF reaching a maximal increase in EF of +8.4% (P<0.001) for the left and +6.1% (P<0.01) for the right ventricle in the oldest compared to the youngest patient group. Left ventricular myocardial mass significantly decreased over the four different age groups (P<0.05). The aging process is associated with significant changes in left and right ventricular EF, ESV and EDV in subjects with no cardiac functional and structural abnormalities. These findings underline the importance of using age adapted values as standard of reference when evaluating CMR studies

  14. One-step ligand exchange reaction as an efficient way for functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrowczynski, Radoslaw [Humboldt-University Berlin, Department of Chemistry (Germany); Rednic, Lidia; Turcu, Rodica [National Institute of Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technologies (Romania); Liebscher, Juergen, E-mail: liebscher@chemie.hu-berlin.de [Humboldt-University Berlin, Department of Chemistry (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Novel magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) covered by one layer of functionalized fatty acids, bearing entities (Hayashi catalyst, biotin, quinine, proline, and galactose) of high interest for practical application in nanomedicine or organocatalysis, were synthesized. The functionalized fatty acids were obtained by Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) of azido fatty acids with alkynes. All the magnetic NPs show superparamagnetic behavior with high values of magnetization and high colloidal stability in DCM solution.

  15. Whole-lung volume and density in spirometrically-gated inspiratory and expiratory CT in systemic sclerosis: correlation with static volumes at pulmonary function tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camiciottoli, G; Diciotti, S; Bartolucci, M; Orlandi, I; Bigazzi, F; Matucci-Cerinic, M; Pistolesi, M; Mascalchi, M

    2013-03-01

    Spiral low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) permits to measure whole-lung volume and density in a single breath-hold. To evaluate the agreement between static lung volumes measured with LDCT and pulmonary function test (PFT) and the correlation between the LDCT volumes and lung density in restrictive lung disease. Patients with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) with (n = 24) and without (n = 16) pulmonary involvement on sequential thin-section CT and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)(n = 29) underwent spirometrically-gated LDCT at 90% and 10% of vital capacity to measure inspiratory and expiratory lung volumes and mean lung attenuation (MLA). Total lung capacity and residual volume were measured the same day of CT. Inspiratory [95% limits of agreement (95% LoA)--43.8% and 39.2%] and expiratory (95% LoA -45.8% and 37.1%) lung volumes measured on LDCT and PFT showed poor agreement in SSc patients with pulmonary involvement, whereas they were in substantial agreement (inspiratory 95% LoA -14.1% and 16.1%; expiratory 95% LoA -13.5% and 23%) in SSc patients without pulmonary involvement and in inspiratory scans only (95% LoA -23.1% and 20.9%) of COPD patients. Inspiratory and expiratory LDCT volumes, MLA and their deltas differentiated both SSc patients with or without pulmonary involvement from COPD patients. LDCT lung volumes and density were not correlated in SSc patients with pulmonary involvement, whereas they did correlate in SSc without pulmonary involvement and in COPD patients. In restrictive lung disease due to SSc there is poor agreement between static lung volumes measured using LDCT and PFT and the relationship between volume and density values on CT is altered.

  16. Frequency-Specific Abnormalities of Intrinsic Functional Connectivity Strength among Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Resting-State fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangjun; Zhou, Fuqing; Huang, Muhua; Gong, Honghan; Xu, Renshi

    2017-01-01

    The classical concept that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative disorder characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons is agreed. However, more and more studies have suggested the involvement of some extra-motor regions. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency-related alteration pattern of intrinsic functional connectivity strength (FCS) at the voxel-wise level in the relatively early-stage of ALS on a whole brain scale. In this study, 21 patients with ALS and 21 well-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled to examine the intrinsic FCS in the different frequencies (slow-4: 0.027-0.073 Hz; slow-5: 0.01-0.027 Hz, and typical band: 0.01-0.1 Hz). Compared with the control subjects, the ALS patients showed a significantly decreased FCS in the left prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the bilateral superior frontal gyrus. In the slow-5 band, the patients with ALS showed decreased FCS in the left lingual gyrus, as well as increased FCS in the left postcentral gyrus/paracentral lobule (PoCG/PARC). In the slow-4 band, the ALS patients presented decreased FCS in the left and right ventrolateral PFC. Moreover, the increased FCS in the left PoCG/PARC in the slow-5 band was positively correlated with the ALSFRS-r score ( P = 0.015). Our results demonstrated that the FCS changes in ALS were wide spread and frequency dependent. These findings may provide some evidences that ALS patients have the consistent impairment in some extra-motor regions at a relatively early-stage.

  17. Frequency-Specific Abnormalities of Intrinsic Functional Connectivity Strength among Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangjun Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The classical concept that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a degenerative disorder characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons is agreed. However, more and more studies have suggested the involvement of some extra-motor regions. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency-related alteration pattern of intrinsic functional connectivity strength (FCS at the voxel-wise level in the relatively early-stage of ALS on a whole brain scale. In this study, 21 patients with ALS and 21 well-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled to examine the intrinsic FCS in the different frequencies (slow-4: 0.027–0.073 Hz; slow-5: 0.01–0.027 Hz, and typical band: 0.01–0.1 Hz. Compared with the control subjects, the ALS patients showed a significantly decreased FCS in the left prefrontal cortex (PFC and the bilateral superior frontal gyrus. In the slow-5 band, the patients with ALS showed decreased FCS in the left lingual gyrus, as well as increased FCS in the left postcentral gyrus/paracentral lobule (PoCG/PARC. In the slow-4 band, the ALS patients presented decreased FCS in the left and right ventrolateral PFC. Moreover, the increased FCS in the left PoCG/PARC in the slow-5 band was positively correlated with the ALSFRS-r score (P = 0.015. Our results demonstrated that the FCS changes in ALS were wide spread and frequency dependent. These findings may provide some evidences that ALS patients have the consistent impairment in some extra-motor regions at a relatively early-stage.

  18. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging may show abnormalities in the normal-appearing cervical spinal cord from patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Miraldi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study aims to evaluate “in vivo” the integrity of the normal-appearing spinal cord (NASC in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS compared to controls, using diffusion tensor MR imaging. Methods We studied 32 patients with MS and 17 without any neurologic disorder. Fractional anisotropy (FA, axial diffusivity (AD, radial diffusivity (RD and mean diffusivity (MD were calculated within regions of interest at C2 and C7 levels in the four columns of the spinal cord. Results At C2, FA value was decreased in MS patients. Besides, RD value was higher in MS than in controls. At C7, MD values were increased in MS. Conclusion The NASC in the right column of the cervical spinal cord showed abnormal FA, RD and MD values, which is possibly related to demyelination, since the FA abnormality was related to the RD and not to the AD.

  19. Exercise, Diet, and Stress Management as Mediators between Functional Disability and Health-Related Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Connie; Chiu, Chung-Yi; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Bezyak, Jill; Chan, Fong; Muller, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the mediational and moderational effect of exercise, diet, and stress management on the relationship between functional disability and health-related quality of life. Quantitative descriptive research design using multiple regression and correlation techniques was used. Participants were 215…

  20. Growing Region Segmentation Software (GRES) for quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis: intra- and inter-observer agreement variability: a comparison with manual contouring method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parodi, Roberto C.; Sardanelli, Francesco; Renzetti, Paolo; Rosso, Elisabetta; Losacco, Caterina; Ferrari, Alessandra; Levrero, Fabrizio; Pilot, Alberto; Inglese, Matilde; Mancardi, Giovanni L.

    2002-01-01

    Lesion area measurement in multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the key points in evaluating the natural history and in monitoring the efficacy of treatments. This study was performed to check the intra- and inter-observer agreement variability of a locally developed Growing Region Segmentation Software (GRES), comparing them to those obtained using manual contouring (MC). From routine 1.5-T MRI study of clinically definite multiple sclerosis patients, 36 lesions seen on proton-density-weighted images (PDWI) and 36 enhancing lesion on Gd-DTPA-BMA-enhanced T1-weighted images (Gd-T1WI) were randomly chosen and were evaluated by three observers. The mean range of lesion size was 9.9-536.0 mm 2 on PDWI and 3.6-57.2 mm 2 on Gd-T1WI. The median intra- and inter-observer agreement were, respectively, 97.1 and 90.0% using GRES on PDWI, 81.0 and 70.0% using MC on PDWI, 88.8 and 80.0% using GRES on Gd-T1WI, and 85.8 and 70.0% using MC on Gd-T1WI. The intra- and inter-observer agreements were significantly greater for GRES compared with MC (P<0.0001 and P=0.0023, respectively) for PDWI, while no difference was found between GRES an MC for Gd-T1WI. The intra-observer variability for GRES was significantly lower on both PDWI (P=0.0001) and Gd-T1WI (P=0.0067), whereas for MC the same result was found only for PDWI (P=0.0147). These data indicate that GRES reduces both the intra- and the inter-observer variability in assessing the area of MS lesions on PDWI and may prove useful in multicentre studies. (orig.)

  1. Magnetism of Ba4Ru3O10 revealed by density functional calculations: Structural trimers behaving as coupled magnetic dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, Andres; Radtke, Guillaume; Klein, Yannick; Rousse, Gwenaelle

    2013-03-01

    From a simple ionic picture, the only magnetically active ions in this compound are the three Ru4+ atoms which form trimers of faced shared RuO6 octahedral. The Ru atom in the middle of the trimer (named Ru(1)) is cristallographically inequivalent to the ones at the corners (named Ru(2)). A naïve analysis of the magnetic properties of this compound compatible with the expected low spin magnetic configuration of the Ru ions would predict a complicate magnetic order at low temperature involving the Ru(1) and Ru(2) ions and a high temperature susceptibility corresponding to three S=1 ions per unit cell. In spite of that, we demonstrate in this work, from density functional calculations, that under the influence of Ru-Ru covalent bonding, the structural trimers behave in an extended range of temperature from 0 to 600K, as strong (S = 1) antiferromagnetic dimers. Our calculations of the effective exchange interactions show a strong intra-dimer interaction and a weaker inter-dimer one which explains the antiferromagnetic order observed below TN = 105 K and the magnetic susceptibility in the intermediate and high temperature range (from TN=105K up to 612 K).

  2. Self-assembly with orthogonal-imposed stimuli to impart structure and confer magnetic function to electrodeposited hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Yi; Gao, Tieren; Zhang, Boce; Song, Yingying; Terrell, Jessica L; Barber, Nathan; Bentley, William E; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Payne, Gregory F; Wang, Qin

    2015-05-20

    A magnetic nanocomposite film with the capability of reversibly collecting functionalized magnetic particles was fabricated by simultaneously imposing two orthogonal stimuli (electrical and magnetic). We demonstrate that cathodic codeposition of chitosan and Fe3O4 nanoparticles while simultaneously applying a magnetic field during codeposition can (i) organize structure, (ii) confer magnetic properties, and (iii) yield magnetic films that can perform reversible collection/assembly functions. The magnetic field triggered the self-assembly of Fe3O4 nanoparticles into hierarchical "chains" and "fibers" in the chitosan film. For controlled magnetic properties, the Fe3O4-chitosan film was electrodeposited in the presence of various strength magnetic fields and different deposition times. The magnetic properties of the resulting films should enable broad applications in complex devices. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the reversible capture and release of green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-conjugated magnetic microparticles by the magnetic chitosan film. Moreover, antibody-functionalized magnetic microparticles were applied to capture cells from a sample, and these cells were collected, analyzed, and released by the magnetic chitosan film, paving the way for applications such as reusable biosensor interfaces (e.g., for pathogen detection). To our knowledge, this is the first report to apply a magnetic field during the electrodeposition of a hydrogel to generate magnetic soft matter. Importantly, the simple, rapid, and reagentless fabrication methodologies demonstrated here are valuable features for creating a magnetic device interface.

  3. Safety, pharmacokinetic, and functional effects of the nogo-a monoclonal antibody in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a randomized, first-in-human clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Meininger

    Full Text Available The neurite outgrowth inhibitor, Nogo-A, has been shown to be overexpressed in skeletal muscle in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; it is both a potential biomarker and therapeutic target. We performed a double-blind, two-part, dose-escalation study, in subjects with ALS, assessing safety, pharmacokinetics (PK and functional effects of ozanezumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against Nogo-A. In Part 1, 40 subjects were randomized (3∶1 to receive single dose intravenous ozanezumab (0.01, 0.1, 1, 5, or 15 mg/kg or placebo. In Part 2, 36 subjects were randomized (3∶1 to receive two repeat doses of intravenous ozanezumab (0.5, 2.5, or 15 mg/kg or placebo, approximately 4 weeks apart. The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability (adverse events [AEs], vital signs, electrocardiogram (ECG, and clinical laboratory tests. Secondary endpoints included PK, immunogenicity, functional endpoints (clinical and electrophysiological, and biomarker parameters. Overall, ozanezumab treatment (0.01-15 mg/kg was well tolerated. The overall incidence of AEs in the repeat dose 2.5 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg ozanezumab groups was higher than in the repeat dose placebo group and repeat dose 0.5 mg/kg ozanezumab group. The majority were considered not related to study drug by the investigators. Six serious AEs were reported in three subjects receiving ozanezumab; none were considered related to study drug. No study drug-related patterns were identified for ECG, laboratory, or vital signs parameters. One subject (repeat dose 15 mg/kg ozanezumab showed a weak, positive anti-ozanezumab-antibody result. PK results were generally consistent with monoclonal antibody treatments. No apparent treatment effects were observed for functional endpoints or muscle biomarkers. Immunohistochemical staining showed dose-dependent co-localization of ozanezumab with Nogo-A in skeletal muscle. In conclusion, single and repeat dose ozanezumab treatment was well tolerated and demonstrated

  4. Longitudinal wave function control in single quantum dots with an applied magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuo; Tang, Jing; Gao, Yunan; Sun, Yue; Qiu, Kangsheng; Zhao, Yanhui; He, Min; Shi, Jin-An; Gu, Lin; Williams, David A.; Sheng, Weidong; Jin, Kuijuan; Xu, Xiulai

    2015-01-01

    Controlling single-particle wave functions in single semiconductor quantum dots is in demand to implement solid-state quantum information processing and spintronics. Normally, particle wave functions can be tuned transversely by an perpendicular magnetic field. We report a longitudinal wave function control in single quantum dots with a magnetic field. For a pure InAs quantum dot with a shape of pyramid or truncated pyramid, the hole wave function always occupies the base because of the less confinement at base, which induces a permanent dipole oriented from base to apex. With applying magnetic field along the base-apex direction, the hole wave function shrinks in the base plane. Because of the linear changing of the confinement for hole wave function from base to apex, the center of effective mass moves up during shrinking process. Due to the uniform confine potential for electrons, the center of effective mass of electrons does not move much, which results in a permanent dipole moment change and an inverted electron-hole alignment along the magnetic field direction. Manipulating the wave function longitudinally not only provides an alternative way to control the charge distribution with magnetic field but also a new method to tune electron-hole interaction in single quantum dots. PMID:25624018

  5. Longitudinal wave function control in single quantum dots with an applied magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuo; Tang, Jing; Gao, Yunan; Sun, Yue; Qiu, Kangsheng; Zhao, Yanhui; He, Min; Shi, Jin-An; Gu, Lin; Williams, David A; Sheng, Weidong; Jin, Kuijuan; Xu, Xiulai

    2015-01-27

    Controlling single-particle wave functions in single semiconductor quantum dots is in demand to implement solid-state quantum information processing and spintronics. Normally, particle wave functions can be tuned transversely by an perpendicular magnetic field. We report a longitudinal wave function control in single quantum dots with a magnetic field. For a pure InAs quantum dot with a shape of pyramid or truncated pyramid, the hole wave function always occupies the base because of the less confinement at base, which induces a permanent dipole oriented from base to apex. With applying magnetic field along the base-apex direction, the hole wave function shrinks in the base plane. Because of the linear changing of the confinement for hole wave function from base to apex, the center of effective mass moves up during shrinking process. Due to the uniform confine potential for electrons, the center of effective mass of electrons does not move much, which results in a permanent dipole moment change and an inverted electron-hole alignment along the magnetic field direction. Manipulating the wave function longitudinally not only provides an alternative way to control the charge distribution with magnetic field but also a new method to tune electron-hole interaction in single quantum dots.

  6. Toward a functional neuroanatomy of dysthymia: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Arun V; Smith, Andra; Cameron, Colin; Bhatla, Raj; Cameron, Ian; Georgescu, Tania M; Hogan, Matthew J

    2009-12-01

    Dysthymia is a common mood disorder. Recent studies have confirmed the neurobiological and treatment response overlap of dysthymia with major depression. There are no previous published studies of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in dysthymia. fMRI was used to compare neural processing of 17 unmedicated dysthymic patients with 17 age, sex, and education-matched control subjects in a mood induction paradigm using the International Affective Pictures System (IAPS). Using a random effects analysis to compare the groups, the results revealed that the dysthymic patients had significantly reduced activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex compared to controls. The dysthymic patients exhibited increased activation in the amygdala, anterior cingulate and insula compared to controls and these differences were more evident when processing negative than positive images. This study included both early and late subtypes of dysthymia, and participants were only imaged at one time point, which may limit the generalizability of the results. The findings suggest the involvement of the prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, amygdala, and insula in the neural circuitry underlying dysthymia. It is suggested that altered activation in some of these neural regions may be a common substrate for depressive disorders in general while others may relate specifically to symptom characteristics and the chronic course of dysthymia. These findings are particularly striking given the history of this deceptively mild disorder which is still confused by some with character pathology.

  7. The Effect of the Facilitation Physiotherapy on the Clinical Functions and Brain's Microstructure in Multiple Sclerosis: Comparison of Two Ways of the Somatosensory Stimuli Application

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řasová, K.; Jan, V.; Jandová, D.; Ibrahim, I.; Tintěra, J.; Martinková, Patrícia; Zvára Jr., Karel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 5 (2012), s. 61-61 ISSN 1352-4585. [RIMS 2012. Annual Conference on Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis /17./. 31.05.2012-02.06.2012, Hamburg] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  8. The Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction on Psychological Distress and Cognitive Functioning in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: a Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankespoor, R.J.; Schellekens, M.P.J.; Vos, S.H.; Speckens, A.E.M.; Jong, B.A. de

    2017-01-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) often suffer from psychological distress and cognitive dysfunctioning. These factors negatively impact the health-related quality of life. Only recently behavioral therapeutic approaches are being used to treat psychological distress in MS. The aim of the

  9. Functionalization and magnetization of carbon nanotubes using Co-60 gamma-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.Y.; Fu, M.J.; Tsai, C.Y. [Division of Isotope Application, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, P.O. BOX 3-27 Longtan, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan (R.O.C.) (China); Lin, F.H. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (R.O.C.) (China); Chen, K.Y., E-mail: chenky@iner.gov.tw [Division of Isotope Application, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, P.O. BOX 3-27 Longtan, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan (R.O.C.) (China)

    2014-10-01

    Functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be used in the biological and biomedical fields as biosensors, drug delivery systems, etc., which makes research into processes for manufacturing modified CNTs quite important. In this paper, Co-60 gamma irradiation is shown to be an effective tool for fabricating functionalized and magnetized CNTs. After the Co-60 gamma irradiation, the presence of carboxylic functional groups on the CNT walls was confirmed by their Fourier transform infrared spectra, and the presence of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was verified by the X-ray diffraction patterns. The functionalized and magnetized CNTs produced using Co-60 gamma irradiation have excellent dispersion properties. The techniques for functionalizing and magnetizing CNTs are introduced in this paper, and applications of the modified CNTs will be reported after more data are gathered. - Highlights: Dispersion ability of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was improved by functionalization. CNTs were easily manipulated by precipitation of magnetic nanoparticles. Our product can be used as versatile biosensor substrate for biomarker screening.

  10. Influence of the Training Methods in the Diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis Using Radial Basis Functions Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Gutiérrez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The data available in the average clinical study of a disease is very often small. This is one of the main obstacles in the application of neural networks to the classification of biological signals used for diagnosing diseases. A rule of thumb states that the number of parameters (weights that can be used for training a neural network should be around 15% of the available data, to avoid overlearning. This condition puts a limit on the dimension of the input space. Different authors have used different approaches to solve this problem, like eliminating redundancy in the data, preprocessing the data to find centers for the radial basis functions, or extracting a small number of features that were used as inputs. It is clear that the classification would be better the more features we could feed into the network. The approach utilized in this paper is incrementing the number of training elements with randomly expanding training sets. This way the number of original signals does not constraint the dimension of the input set in the radial basis network. Then we train the network using the method that minimizes the error function using the gradient descent algorithm and the method that uses the particle swarm optimization technique. A comparison between the two methods showed that for the same number of iterations on both methods, the particle swarm optimization was faster, it was learning to recognize only the sick people. On the other hand, the gradient method was not as good in general better at identifying those people.

  11. Amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as robust support for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    their surface properties via introduction of functional groups holds great prospect in the field of ... Biomaterials; enzyme activity; enzyme biocatalysis; nanoparticles; surface properties. 1. .... lyzer (Pyris Diamond TG-DTA) with a heating rate. 8.

  12. Magnetic resonance in the assessment of renal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knesplova, L.; Krestin, G.P. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    1998-03-01

    The kidneys are the most important organs to maintain homeostasis. In the assessment of renal functional disorders laboratory tests offer only indirect hints on location of the disease; radionuclide nephrography is hampered by low spatial resolution and radiologic methods provide only limited quantitative information. The MRI technique with fast pulse sequences and renally eliminated contrast agent has the capability of combining both anatomic and functional information. This article gives an overview on functional MRI of the kidneys with its possibilities and limitations. The clinical application of functional MRI allows a better understanding of some pathologic conditions such as urinary tract obstruction, renal insufficiency, effects of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, different states of hydration, effects of drugs, vascular disorders, and effects of transplantation. (orig.) With 9 figs., 62 refs.

  13. Magnetic resonance in the assessment of renal function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knesplova, L.; Krestin, G.P.

    1998-01-01

    The kidneys are the most important organs to maintain homeostasis. In the assessment of renal functional disorders laboratory tests offer only indirect hints on location of the disease; radionuclide nephrography is hampered by low spatial resolution and radiologic methods provide only limited quantitative information. The MRI technique with fast pulse sequences and renally eliminated contrast agent has the capability of combining both anatomic and functional information. This article gives an overview on functional MRI of the kidneys with its possibilities and limitations. The clinical application of functional MRI allows a better understanding of some pathologic conditions such as urinary tract obstruction, renal insufficiency, effects of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, different states of hydration, effects of drugs, vascular disorders, and effects of transplantation. (orig.)

  14. Field theoretic perspectives of the Wigner function formulation of the chiral magnetic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Hou, De-fu; Ren, Hai-cang

    2017-11-01

    We assess the applicability of the Wigner function formulation in its present form to the chiral magnetic effect and note some issues regarding the conservation and the consistency of the electric current in the presence of an inhomogeneous and time-dependent axial chemical potential. The problems are rooted in the ultraviolet divergence of the underlying field theory associated with the axial anomaly and can be fixed with the Pauli-Villars regularization of the Wigner function. The chiral magnetic current with a nonconstant axial chemical potential is calculated with the regularized Wigner function and the phenomenological implications are discussed.

  15. 50-60 Hz electric and magnetic field effects on cognitive function in humans: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasson, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the effect of 50-60 Hz weak electric, magnetic and combined electric and magnetic field exposure on cognitive functions such as memory, attention, information processing and time perception, as determined by electroencephalographic methods and performance measures. Overall, laboratory studies, which have investigated the acute effects of power frequency fields on cognitive functioning in humans are heterogeneous, in terms of both electric and magnetic field (EMF) exposure and the experimental design and measures used. Results are inconsistent and difficult to interpret with regard to functional relevance for possible health risks. Statistically significant differences between field and control exposure, when they are found, are small, subtle, transitory, without any clear dose-response relationship and difficult to reproduce. The human performance or event related potentials (ERPs) measures that might specifically be affected by EMF exposure, as well as a possible cerebral structure or function that could be more sensitive to EMF, cannot be better determined. (author)

  16. Green's function for a neutral particle of spin 1/2 in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Rafael de Lima; Vaidya, Arvind Narayan

    2001-12-01

    Using the spectral theorema in context of Green's function in momentum space of neutrons in the magnetic field of a linear conductor with current the bound state energy spectrum and eigenfunctions are deduced. It's also pointed out that this problem present a new scenary of Green's function in non-relativistic quantum mechanics. (author)

  17. Group Theory of Wannier Functions Providing the Basis for a Deeper Understanding of Magnetism and Superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekkehard Krüger

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the group theory of optimally-localized and symmetry-adapted Wannier functions in a crystal of any given space group G or magnetic group M. Provided that the calculated band structure of the considered material is given and that the symmetry of the Bloch functions at all of the points of symmetry in the Brillouin zone is known, the paper details whether or not the Bloch functions of particular energy bands can be unitarily transformed into optimally-localized Wannier functions symmetry-adapted to the space group G, to the magnetic group M or to a subgroup of G or M. In this context, the paper considers usual, as well as spin-dependent Wannier functions, the latter representing the most general definition of Wannier functions. The presented group theory is a review of the theory published by one of the authors (Ekkehard Krüger in several former papers and is independent of any physical model of magnetism or superconductivity. However, it is suggested to interpret the special symmetry of the optimally-localized Wannier functions in the framework of a nonadiabatic extension of the Heisenberg model, the nonadiabatic Heisenberg model. On the basis of the symmetry of the Wannier functions, this model of strongly-correlated localized electrons makes clear predictions of whether or not the system can possess superconducting or magnetic eigenstates.

  18. Developing a Valuation Function for the Preference-Based Multiple Sclerosis Index: Comparison of Standard Gamble and Rating Scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Kuspinar

    Full Text Available The standard gamble (SG and rating scale (RS are two approaches that can be employed to elicit health state preferences from patients in order to inform decision making. The objectives of this study were: (i to contribute evidence towards the similarities and differences in the SG and the RS to reflect patient preferences, and (ii to develop a multi-attribute utility function (MAUF (i.e., scoring algorithm for the PBMSI.Two samples were recruited for the study. The first sample provided cross-sectional data to generate the preference weights which were then used to develop (D the MAUFD. The distribution of SG and RS were compared across levels of perceived difficulty. The second sample provided additional data to validate (V the MAUF, termed MAUFV.The mean RS values ranged from 0.39 to 0.65, whereas the mean SG values were much higher ranging from 0.80 to 0.91. Correlations between the two methods were very low ranging from -0.29 to 0.15. Bland-Altman plots revealed the extent of differences in values produced by the two methods.In contemplating trade-offs in the selection of a preference-based elicitation approach for a MAUF that could guide clinical decision making, results suggest the RS is preferable in terms of feasibility and validity for MS patients. The PBMSI with patient preferences shows promise as a measure of health-related quality of life for MS.

  19. Porous silicon platform for optical detection of functionalized magnetic particles biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Pil Ju; Ishikawa, Ryousuke; Sohn, Honglae; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2013-04-01

    The physical properties of porous materials are being exploited for a wide range of applications including optical biosensors, waveguides, gas sensors, micro capacitors, and solar cells. Here, we review the fast, easy and inexpensive electrochemical anodization based fabrication porous silicon (PSi) for optical biosensing using functionalized magnetic particles. Combining magnetically labeled biomolecules with PSi offers a rapid and one-step immunoassay and real-time detection by magnetic manipulation of superparamagnetic beads (SPBs) functionalized with target molecules onto corresponding probe molecules immobilized inside nano-pores of PSi. We first give an introduction to electrochemical and chemical etching procedures used to fabricate a wide range of PSi structures. Next, we describe the basic properties of PSi and underlying optical scattering mechanisms that govern their unique optical properties. Finally, we give examples of our experiments that demonstrate the potential of combining PSi and magnetic beads for real-time point of care diagnostics.

  20. Clustering Multiple Sclerosis Subgroups with Multifractal Methods and Self-Organizing Map Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Yeliz; Cattani, Carlo

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most sensitive method to detect chronic nervous system diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). In this paper, Brownian motion Hölder regularity functions (polynomial, periodic (sine), exponential) for 2D image, such as multifractal methods were applied to MR brain images, aiming to easily identify distressed regions, in MS patients. With these regions, we have proposed an MS classification based on the multifractal method by using the Self-Organizing Map (SOM) algorithm. Thus, we obtained a cluster analysis by identifying pixels from distressed regions in MR images through multifractal methods and by diagnosing subgroups of MS patients through artificial neural networks.