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  1. Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis (PSC)

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  2. Impact of Microbes on the Pathogenesis of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis (PSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Mattner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC represent the major clinical entities of chronic cholestatic liver diseases. Both disorders are characterized by portal inflammation and slowly progress to obliterative fibrosis and eventually liver cirrhosis. Although immune-pathogenic mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PBC and PSC, neither disorder is considered to be a classical autoimmune disease, as PSC and PBC patients do not respond to immune-suppressants. Furthermore, the decreased bile flow resulting from the immune-mediated tissue assault and the subsequent accumulation of toxic bile products in PBC and PSC not only perpetuates biliary epithelial damage, but also alters the composition of the intestinal and biliary microbiota and its mutual interactions with the host. Consistent with the close association of PSC and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, the polyclonal hyper IgM response in PBC and (auto-antibodies which cross-react to microbial antigens in both diseases, an expansion of individual microbes leads to shifts in the composition of the intestinal or biliary microbiota and a subsequent altered integrity of epithelial layers, promoting microbial translocation. These changes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of both devastating disorders. Thus, we will discuss here these recent findings in the context of novel and alternative therapeutic options.

  3. Primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapman Roger

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is a chronic cholestatic liver disease of unknown aetiology characterised by inflammation and fibrosis of the biliary tree. The mean age at diagnosis is 40 years and men are affected twice as often as women. There is a reported annual incidence of PSC of 0.9–1.31/100,000 and point prevalence of 8.5–13.6/100,000. The onset of PSC is usually insidious and many patients are asymptomatic at diagnosis or have mild symptoms only such as fatigue, abdominal discomfort and pruritus In late stages, splenomegaly and jaundice may be a feature. In most, the disease progresses to cirrhosis and liver failure. Cholangiocarcinoma develops in 8–30% of patients. PSC is thought to be immune mediated and is often associated with inflammatory bowel disease, especially ulcerative colitis. The disease is diagnosed on typical cholangiographic and histological findings and after exclusion of secondary sclerosing cholangitis. Median survival has been estimated to be 12 years from diagnosis in symptomatic patients. Patients who are asymptomatic at diagnosis, the majority of whom will develop progressive disease, have a survival rate greater than 70% at 16 years after diagnosis. Liver transplantation remains the only effective therapeutic option for patients with end-stage liver disease from PSC, although high dose ursodeoxycholic acid may have a beneficial effect.

  4. Primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina G Silveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammation and fibrosis of the bile ducts, resulting in end-stage liver disease and reduced life expectancy. PSC primarily affects young and middle-aged men, often in association with underlying inflammatory bowel disease. The etiology of PSC includes immune-mediated components and elements of undefined nature. A cholestatic picture of liver biochemistries with elevations in serum alkaline phosphatase, nonspecific autoantibodies such as perinuclear antineutrophilic antibody, antinuclear antibodies and smooth muscle antibodies, and diffuse multifocal biliary strictures, resulting in a ‘beaded’ appearance on radiographic studies, are the hallmarks of the disease. No effective medical therapy is currently available, although clinical studies are in progress. Ursodeoxycholic acid at high doses (28 mg/kg/day to 30 mg/kg/day is the most promising agent but is unproven so far. Liver transplantation is currently the only life-extending therapy for patients with end-stage disease, although recurrent disease can be observed in the transplanted liver. The multiple complications of PSC include pruritus, fatigue, vitamin deficiencies, metabolic bone disease, peristomal varices, bacterial cholangitis, dominant biliary strictures, gallbladder stones and polyps, and malignancy, particularly cholangiocarcinoma, which is the most lethal complication of PSC.

  5. Development and validation of a primary sclerosing cholangitis-specific patient-reported outcomes instrument: The PSC PRO.

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    Younossi, Zobair M; Afendy, Arian; Stepanova, Maria; Racila, Andrei; Nader, Fatema; Gomel, Rachel; Safer, Ricky; Lenderking, William R; Skalicky, Anne; Kleinman, Leah; Myers, Robert P; Subramanian, G Mani; McHutchison, John G; Levy, Cynthia; Bowlus, Christopher L; Kowdley, Kris; Muir, Andrew J

    2017-11-20

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic liver disease associated with inflammation and biliary fibrosis that leads to cholangitis, cirrhosis, and impaired quality of life. Our objective was to develop and validate a PSC-specific patient-reported outcome (PRO) instrument. We developed a 42-item PSC PRO instrument that contains two modules (Symptoms and Impact of Symptoms) and conducted an external validation. Reliability and validity were evaluated using clinical data and a battery of other validated instruments. Test-retest reliability was assessed in a subgroup of patients who repeated the PSC PRO after the first administration. One hundred two PSC subjects (44 ± 13 years; 32% male, 74% employed, 39% with cirrhosis, 14% with a history of decompensated cirrhosis, 38% history of depression, and 68% with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]) completed PSC PRO and other PRO instruments (Short Form 36 V2 [SF-36], Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire [CLDQ], Primary Biliary Cholangitis - 40 [PBC-40], and five dimensions [5-D Itch]). PSC PRO demonstrated excellent internal consistency (Cronbach alphas, 0.84-0.94) and discriminant validity (41 of 42 items had the highest correlations with their own domains). There were good correlations between PSC PRO domains and relevant domains of SF-36, CLDQ, and PBC-40 (R = 0.69-0.90; all P 0.05). Test-retest reliability was assessed in 53 subjects who repeated PSC PRO within a median (interquartile range) of 37 (27-47) days. There was excellent reliability for most domains with intraclass correlations (0.71-0.88; all P < 0.001). PSC PRO is a self-administered disease-specific instrument developed according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines. This preliminary validation study suggests good psychometric properties. Further validation of the instrument in a larger and more diverse sample of PSC patients is needed. (Hepatology 2017). © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  6. Comparative clinical characteristics and natural history of three variants of sclerosing cholangitis: IgG4-related SC, PSC/AIH and PSC alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Min; Li, Bo; Xiao, Xiao; Yang, Yue; Jiang, Pan; Yan, Li; Sun, Chunyan; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Yiran; Li, Yanmei; Chen, Weihua; Jiang, Xiang; Miao, Qi; Chen, Xiaoyu; Qiu, Dekai; Sheng, Li; Hua, Jing; Tang, Ruqi; Wang, Qixia; Eric Gershwin, M; Ma, Xiong

    2017-08-01

    There is increased interest and recognition of the clinical variants of Sclerosing Cholangitis (SC) namely IgG4-SC, PSC/AIH overlap and PSC. For most Centers, the characteristic of IgG4-SC has not been thoroughly clinically compared with other sclerosing cholangitis variants. Further there are relatively few PSC/AIH overlap patients and the clinical outcome is not well characterized, especially for the PSC/AIH overlap syndrome. Our objective herein is to clarify the differences and similarities of the natural history of IgG4-SC, the PSC/AIH overlap and PSC alone. We also place in perspective the diagnostic value of serum IgG4 for IgG4-SC and investigate biomarkers for predicting the prognosis of sclerosing cholangitis. In this study, we took advantage of our large and well-defined patient cohort to perform a retrospective cohort study including 57 IgG4-SC, 36 PSC/AIH overlap patients, and 55 PSC patients. Firstly, as expected, we noted significant differences among immunoglobulin profiles and all patients exhibited similar cholestatic profiles at presentation. Cirrhotic events were found in 20 of total 57 IgG4-SC, 15 of 36 PSC/AIH overlap, and 18 of 55 PSC patients. Serum IgG4 was elevated in 92.65% of IgG4-SC patients with an 86% sensitivity and 98% specificity for diagnosis. IgG4-SC patients had a better treatment response at 6-month and 1-year than PSC/AIH patients, while the latter responded better with steroids than PSC patients. Importantly the adverse outcome-free survival of IgG4-SC patients was reduced, unlike earlier reports, and therefore similar to the PSC/AIH overlap syndrome. Serum IgG and total bilirubin were useful to predict long-term survival of IgG4-SC and PSC/AIH, respectively. In conclusion, serum IgG4≧1.25 ULN shows an excellent predictability to distinguish IgG4-SC among SC patients. IgG4-SC appears to be immune-mediated inflammatory process, while PSC/AIH overlap more tends to be cholestatic disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob Ørskov; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Andersson, Mikael

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be complicated by primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We aimed to assess the characteristics of Danish PSC-IBD patients and to compare their prognosis with IBD patients without PSC. METHODS: A retrospective nationwide population-based co......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be complicated by primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We aimed to assess the characteristics of Danish PSC-IBD patients and to compare their prognosis with IBD patients without PSC. METHODS: A retrospective nationwide population....... Among patients with PSC and Crohn's disease (CD) 91% had colonic involvement. The PSC-IBD patients had a significantly higher probability of receiving resective surgery (HR; 2.13, 95% CI: 1.50-3.03); of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) (HR; 21.4, 95% CI: 9.6-47.6), of cholangiocarcinoma (HR; 190, 95...

  8. Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Risk Estimate Tool (PREsTo) Predicts Outcomes in PSC: A Derivation & Validation Study Using Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, John E; Vesterhus, Mette; McCauley, Bryan M; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Schlicht, Erik M; Juran, Brian D; Gossard, Andrea A; LaRusso, Nicholas F; Gores, Gregory J; Karlsen, Tom H; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N

    2018-05-09

    Improved methods are needed to risk stratify and predict outcomes in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Therefore, we sought to derive and validate a new prediction model and compare its performance to existing surrogate markers. The model was derived using 509 subjects from a multicenter North American cohort and validated in an international multicenter cohort (n=278). Gradient boosting, a machine based learning technique, was used to create the model. The endpoint was hepatic decompensation (ascites, variceal hemorrhage or encephalopathy). Subjects with advanced PSC or cholangiocarcinoma at baseline were excluded. The PSC risk estimate tool (PREsTo) consists of 9 variables: bilirubin, albumin, serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP) times the upper limit of normal (ULN), platelets, AST, hemoglobin, sodium, patient age and the number of years since PSC was diagnosed. Validation in an independent cohort confirms PREsTo accurately predicts decompensation (C statistic 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.84-0.95) and performed well compared to MELD score (C statistic 0.72, 95% CI 0.57-0.84), Mayo PSC risk score (C statistic 0.85, 95% CI 0.77-0.92) and SAP statistic 0.65, 95% CI 0.55-0.73). PREsTo continued to be accurate among individuals with a bilirubin statistic 0.90, 95% CI 0.82-0.96) and when the score was re-applied at a later course in the disease (C statistic 0.82, 95% CI 0.64-0.95). PREsTo accurately predicts hepatic decompensation in PSC and exceeds the performance among other widely available, noninvasive prognostic scoring systems. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  9. Glucocorticosteroids for primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giljaca, Vanja; Poropat, Goran; Stimac, Davor

    2010-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic cholestatic disease of intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary ducts, characterised by chronic periductal inflammation and sclerosis of the ducts, which results in segmental stenoses of bile ducts, cholestasis, fibrosis, and ultimately, liver cirrhosis...... sclerosing cholangitis, like ursodeoxycholic acid, glucocorticosteroids, and immunomodulatory agents, but none has been successful in reversing the process of the disease. To date, liver transplantation is the only definite therapeutic solution for patients with advanced primary sclerosing cholangitis...

  10. Diagnosis, Differential Diagnosis, and Epidemiology of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.

    2015-01-01

    According to recent guidelines, primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is diagnosed when a patient has a cholestatic liver enzyme profile, characteristic bile duct changes on imaging, and when secondary causes of sclerosing cholangitis are excluded. In patients with a clinical suspicion but normal

  11. Chemotherapy-induced sclerosing cholangitis

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    Sandrasegaran, K.; Alazmi, W.M.; Tann, M.; Fogel, E.L.; McHenry, L.; Lehman, G.A

    2006-08-15

    Aim: To review the computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cholangiographic findings of chemotherapy-induced sclerosing cholangitis (CISC). Methods: Between January 1995 and December 2004, 11 patients in the endoscopic retrograde cholangiography database were identified with CISC. Twelve CT, four MRI, 69 endoscopic and nine antegrade cholangiographic studies in these patients were reviewed. Serial change in appearance and response to endoscopic treatment were recorded. Results: CISC showed segmental irregular biliary dilatation with strictures of proximal extrahepatic bile ducts. The distal 5 cm of common bile duct was not affected in any patient. CT and MRI findings included altered vascular perfusion of one or more liver segments, liver metastases or peritoneal carcinomatosis. Biliary strictures needed repeated stenting in 10 patients (mean: every 4.7 months). Cirrhosis (n = 1) or confluent fibrosis (n = 0) were uncommon findings. Conclusion: CISC shares similar cholangiographic appearances to primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Unlike PSC, biliary disease primarily involved ducts at the hepatic porta rather than intrahepatic ducts. Multiphasic contrast-enhanced CT or MRI may show evidence of perfusion abnormalities, cavitary liver lesions, or metastatic disease.

  12. Characteristics of primary sclerosing cholangitis in Japan.

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    Takikawa, Hajime

    2007-10-01

    At a workshop on primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) held during Digestive Disease Week - Japan 2003, 388 PSC cases in Japan were analyzed. Two peaks in the age distribution were also observed in this survey. Jaundice and itching, major symptoms in PSC patients included in the diagnostic criteria, were observed in only 28% and 16%, respectively. Alkaline phosphatase levels were less than twofold of the upper limit of the normal range in 35%. In this regard, the diagnostic criteria in 2003 from the Mayo Clinic, including cholestatic symptoms and two- to threefold increases in serum alkaline phosphatase, should be modified in Japan. Inflammatory bowel diseases were complicated in 37%, and autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) in 7.2%. PSC cases with inflammatory bowel diseases were younger than the average, creating the firstpeak in age distribution, and have similar characteristics compared to patients with PSC in foreign countries. In addition, even after the exclusion of cases of sclerosing cholangitis complicated with AIP, the second peak in the age distribution was clearly evident. Recently, a concept of immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing cholangitis has been postulated, which has a similar pathogenesis to AIP but without apparent pancreatic lesions. PSC patients without apparent involvement of the pancreas may be present in older patients and seem to be specific to Japan.

  13. Primary sclerosing cholangitis and disease distribution in inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, Aoibhlinn

    2012-04-01

    The relationship between site of intestinal inflammation and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) development in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been studied extensively, but may be important in understanding the pathogenesis of PSC. We aimed to determine patterns of disease distribution in IBD patients with and without PSC.

  14. Primary sclerosing cholangitis and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casper Q. Kammeijer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a progressive disease, and coincidentally in pregnancy it is rare. It is characterized by progressive inflammation and destruction of bile ducts finally resulting in liver failure. A rare case of primary sclerosing cholangitis in pregnancy is presented. The course of the pregnancy was marked by threatened preterm delivery and exacerbation of cholestasis. She was successfully treated with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA. Although, primary sclerosing cholangitis has both maternal and fetal effects on pregnancy, the overall outcome is favorable. Only few cases have been reported using high dose ursodeoxycholic acid for primary sclerosing cholangitis in pregnancy, it often improves pruritus but has no protection against stillbirth. Data on the safety to the fetus or neonate and long-term outcome are scarce.

  15. Primary sclerosing cholangitis: diagnostic and management challenges

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    Sirpal S

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sanjeev Sirpal,1 Natasha Chandok2 1Department of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, 2Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada Abstract: Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is a chronic immune-mediated disease affecting intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts, primarily the large biliary ducts. Clinical manifestations are broad, and the spectrum encompasses asymptomatic cholestasis, icteric cholangitis with pruritis, cirrhosis, and cholangiocarcinoma. Though rare, PSC has a propensity to affect young to middle-aged males and is strongly associated with inflammatory bowel disease. There is an unmet need for effective medical treatments for PSC, and to date, the only curative therapy is liver transplantation reserved for those with end-stage liver disease. This article addresses the diagnostic and management challenges of PSC, with a succinct analysis of existing therapies, their limitations, and a glimpse into the future of the management of this multifaceted pathologic entity. Keywords: primary sclerosing cholangitis, management, PSC

  16. Bile acids for primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Bile acids have been used for treating primary sclerosing cholangitis, but their beneficial and harmful effects remain unclear.......Bile acids have been used for treating primary sclerosing cholangitis, but their beneficial and harmful effects remain unclear....

  17. Sclerosing cholangitis with ulcerative colitis in a Nigerian woman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis (PSC) is a relatively rare cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. It presents as chronic cholestasis associated with jaundice and pruritus. We report a middle aged Nigerian woman who presented with cholestatic jaundice and diagnosed with PSC with concurrent ulcerative colitis based on ...

  18. Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis (PSC)

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  19. Radiation diagnosis of patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharipov, V.Sh.

    2001-01-01

    Results of combined examination of patients for the purpose of diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are presented. Combined examination consisted of the following techniques: ultrasonography, routine X-ray contrast study of upper section of digestive system, relaxation duodenography, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, computerized tomography, endoscopic retrograde pancreatocholangiography. Peculiarities in X-ray PSC semiotics were revealed. It is shown that the combined examination and X-ray semiotics of the disease is of great significance for PSC preoperational diagnosis [ru

  20. IgG4-Related Sclerosing Cholangitis.

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    Nakazawa, Takahiro; Shimizu, Shuya; Naitoh, Itaru

    2016-08-01

    More men than women develop immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC). Age at clinical onset is significantly older in patients with IgG4-SC. Patients with IgG4-SC appear similar to those with cholangiocarcinoma and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). The association between IgG4-SC and autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is useful for the diagnosis of IgG4-SC. However, some IgG4-SC cases are isolated from AIP and are difficult to diagnose. The authors focus on three distinct features of IgG4-SC. First, diffuse inflammation induces a longer stenosis on cholangiography in contrast to the short stenosis of patients with PSC. Second, fibroinflammatory involvement is observed mainly in the stroma of the bile duct wall, whereas the bile duct epithelium is intact. Third, steroid therapy results in remarkable improvement. Although the prognosis of patients with IgG4-SC is good, some cases have developed portal hypertension and liver cirrhosis during their clinical course. Further study is needed to elucidate the long-term outcomes and mechanism of IgG4-SC. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Bile acids for primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poropat, Goran; Giljaca, Vanja; Stimac, Davor

    2011-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a progressive chronic cholestatic liver disease that usually leads to the development of cirrhosis. Studies evaluating bile acids in the treatment of primary sclerosing cholangitis have shown a potential benefit of their use. However, no influence on patients...

  2. MMP-2 is a disease-modifying gene in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korkmaz, Kerem Sebib; de Rooij, Bert-Jan F.; van Hoek, Bart; Janse, Marcel; Coenraad, Minneke J.; van der Reijden, Johan J.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Porte, Robert J.; Voorneveld, Philip W.; Baranski, Andrzej G.; Verspaget, Hein W.

    BackgroundPrimary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the bile ducts, frequently necessitating orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), often accompanied by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are associated with fibrotic diseases caused by

  3. Diagnosis of IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis

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    Nakazawa, Takahiro; Naitoh, Itaru; Hayashi, Kazuki; Miyabe, Katsuyuki; Simizu, Shuya; Joh, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) is often associated with autoimmune pancreatitis. However, the diffuse cholangiographic abnormalities observed in IgG4-SC may resemble those observed in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), and the presence of segmental stenosis suggests cholangiocarcinoma (CC). IgG4-SC responds well to steroid therapy, whereas PSC is only effectively treated with liver transplantation and CC requires surgical intervention. Since IgG4-SC was first described, it has become a third distinct clinical entity of sclerosing cholangitis. The aim of this review was to introduce the diagnostic methods for IgG4-SC. IgG4-SC should be carefully diagnosed based on a combination of characteristic clinical, serological, morphological, and histopathological features after cholangiographic classification and targeting of a disease for differential diagnosis. When intrapancreatic stenosis is detected, pancreatic cancer or CC should be ruled out. If multiple intrahepatic stenoses are evident, PSC should be distinguished on the basis of cholangiographic findings and liver biopsy with IgG4 immunostaining. Associated inflammatory bowel disease is suggestive of PSC. If stenosis is demonstrated in the hepatic hilar region, CC should be discriminated by ultrasonography, intraductal ultrasonography, bile duct biopsy, and a higher cutoff serum IgG4 level of 182 mg/dL. PMID:24282356

  4. Celiac disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) in one patient: a family study Enfermedad celiaca (EC), colitis ulcerosa (CU) y colangitis esclerosante primaria (CEP) asociadas en el mismo paciente: estudio familiar

    OpenAIRE

    V. Cadahía; L. Rodrigo; D. Fuentes; S. Riestra; R. de Francisco; M. Fernández

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the case of a 17-year-old male who at the age of 7 was diagnosed with celiac disease (CD) together with ulcerative colitis (UC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). The patient was treated with gluten-free diet and immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine), and currently remains asymptomatic. The patient's younger, 12-year-old sister was diagnosed with CD when she was 1.5 years old, and at 7 years she developed type-I diabetes mellitus, which was difficult to control. A family st...

  5. Applicability and prognostic value of histologic scoring systems in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Elisabeth M. G.; Verheij, Joanne; Hubscher, Stefan G.; Leeflang, Mariska M. G.; Boonstra, Kirsten; Beuers, Ulrich; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.

    2015-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease. At present, there is no appropriate histologic scoring system available for PSC, evaluating both degree of necroinflammatory activity (grade) and fibrosis (stage). The aim of this study was to assess if three scoring

  6. Patient Age, Sex, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype Associate With Course of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weismueller, Tobias J.; Trivedi, Palak J; Bergquist, Annika; Imam, Mohamad; Lenzen, Henrike; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Holm, Kristian; Gotthardt, Daniel; Faerkkilae, Martti A.; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Thorburn, Douglas; Weersma, Rinse K.; Fevery, Johan; Mueller, Tobias; Chazouilleres, Olivier; Schulze, Kornelius; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Almer, Sven; Pereira, Stephen P.; Levy, Cynthia; Mason, Andrew L.; Naess, Sigrid; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Floreani, Annarosa; Halilbasic, Emina; Yimam, Kidist K.; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Beuers, Ulrich; Huynh, Dep K.; Pares, Albert; Manser, Christine N.; Dalekos, George N.; Eksteen, Bertus; Invernizzi, Pietro; Berg, Christoph P.; Kirchner, Gabi I.; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zimmer, Vincent; Fabris, Luca; Braun, Felix; Marzioni, Marco; Juran, Brian D.; Said, Karouk; Rupp, Christian; Jokelainen, Kalle; de Valle, Maria Benito; Saffioti, Francesca; Cheung, Angela; Trauner, Michael; Schramm, Christoph; Chapman, Roger W.; Karlsen, Tom H.; Schrumpf, Erik; Strassburg, Christian P.; Manns, Michael P.; Lindor, Keith D; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Boberg, Kirsten M.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is an orphan hepatobiliary disorder associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to estimate the risk of disease progression based on distinct clinical phenotypes in a large international cohort of patients with PSC. METHODS: We

  7. Patient Age, Sex, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype Associate With Course of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weismuller, Tobias J.; Trivedi, Palak J.; Bergquist, Annika; Imam, Mohamad; Lenzen, Henrike; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Holm, Kristian; Gotthardt, Daniel; Farkkila, Martti A.; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Thorburn, Douglas; Weersma, Rinse K.; Fevery, Johan; Mueller, Tobias; Chazouilleres, Olivier; Schulze, Kornelius; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Almer, Sven; Pereira, Stephen P.; Levy, Cynthia; Mason, Andrew; Naess, Sigrid; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Floreani, Annarosa; Halilbasic, Emina; Yimam, Kidist K.; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Beuers, Ulrich; Huynh, Dep K.; Pares, Albert; Manser, Christine N.; Dalekos, George N.; Eksteen, Bertus; Invernizzi, Pietro; Berg, Christoph P.; Kirchner, Gabi I.; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zimmer, Vincent; Fabris, Luca; Braun, Felix; Marzioni, Marco; Juran, Brian D.; Said, Karouk; Rupp, Christian; Jokelainen, Kalle; Benito de Valle, Maria; Saffioti, Francesca; Cheung, Angela; Trauner, Michael; Schramm, Christoph; Chapman, Roger W.; Karlsen, Tom H.; Schrumpf, Erik; Strassburg, Christian P.; Manns, Michael P.; Lindor, Keith D.; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Boberg, Kirsten M.

    2017-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is an orphan hepatobiliary disorder associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to estimate the risk of disease progression based on distinct clinical phenotypes in a large international cohort of patients with PSC. We performed a retrospective

  8. Sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis versus primary sclerosing cholangitis: comparison on endoscopic retrograde cholangiography, MR cholangiography, CT, and MRI

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    Kim; Jin Hee; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, So Yeon; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Moon-Gyu [Dept. of Radiology and Research Inst. of Radiology, Univ. of Ulsan Coll. of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: jhbyun@amc.seoul.kr; Kim, Myung-Hwan [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. of Ulsan Coll. of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    Background: It is essential to differentiate sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis (SC-AIP) from primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) as the treatment and prognosis of the two diseases are totally different. Purpose: To compare image findings of SC-AIP and PSC on endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed ERC, MRC, CT, and MRI in 28 SC-AIP and 23 PSC patients in consensus. Factors evaluated included the length, location, and multiplicity of bile duct stricture, the presence of characteristic cholangiographic features of PSC on ERC and MRC, and the presence, location, thickness, and pattern of bile duct wall thickening on CT and MRI. Results: On ERC, focal stricture, multifocal and intrahepatic bile duct stricture, and beaded, pruned-tree, and diverticulum-like appearance were more frequent in PSC than in SC-AIP patients (P = 0.006). On MRC, multifocal and intrahepatic bile duct stricture and pruned-tree appearance were more frequent in PSC than in SC-AIP patients (P = 0.044). On CT and MRI, the bile duct wall was thicker (5.1 mm vs. 3.1 mm; P = 0.033 and 4.3 mm vs. 3.0 mm; P = 0.01, respectively) in SC-AIP than in PSC patients. PSC was more frequently associated with intrahepatic bile duct wall thickening on both CT (93% vs. 50%; P = 0.024) and MRI (100% vs. 50%; P = 0.023) than SC-AIP. Conclusion: The combination of ERC or MRC with cross-sectional images, including CT and MRI, may be helpful in differentiating between SC-AIP and PSC.

  9. Sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis versus primary sclerosing cholangitis: comparison on endoscopic retrograde cholangiography, MR cholangiography, CT, and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim; Jin Hee; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, So Yeon; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Moon-Gyu; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is essential to differentiate sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis (SC-AIP) from primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) as the treatment and prognosis of the two diseases are totally different. Purpose: To compare image findings of SC-AIP and PSC on endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed ERC, MRC, CT, and MRI in 28 SC-AIP and 23 PSC patients in consensus. Factors evaluated included the length, location, and multiplicity of bile duct stricture, the presence of characteristic cholangiographic features of PSC on ERC and MRC, and the presence, location, thickness, and pattern of bile duct wall thickening on CT and MRI. Results: On ERC, focal stricture, multifocal and intrahepatic bile duct stricture, and beaded, pruned-tree, and diverticulum-like appearance were more frequent in PSC than in SC-AIP patients (P = 0.006). On MRC, multifocal and intrahepatic bile duct stricture and pruned-tree appearance were more frequent in PSC than in SC-AIP patients (P = 0.044). On CT and MRI, the bile duct wall was thicker (5.1 mm vs. 3.1 mm; P = 0.033 and 4.3 mm vs. 3.0 mm; P = 0.01, respectively) in SC-AIP than in PSC patients. PSC was more frequently associated with intrahepatic bile duct wall thickening on both CT (93% vs. 50%; P = 0.024) and MRI (100% vs. 50%; P = 0.023) than SC-AIP. Conclusion: The combination of ERC or MRC with cross-sectional images, including CT and MRI, may be helpful in differentiating between SC-AIP and PSC

  10. Variations in primary sclerosing cholangitis across the age spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, John E; McCauley, Bryan M; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Juran, Brian D; Schlicht, Erik M; de Andrade, Mariza; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N

    2017-10-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) typically develops in middle-age adults. Little is known about phenotypic differences when PSC is diagnosed at various ages. Therefore, we sought to compare the clinical characteristics of a large PSC cohort based on the age when PSC was diagnosed. We performed a multicenter retrospective review to compare the features of PSC among those diagnosed between 1-19 (n = 95), 20-59 (n = 662), and 60-79 years (n = 102). Those with an early diagnosis (ED) of PSC were more likely to have small-duct PSC (13%) than those with a middle-age diagnosis (MD) (5%) and late diagnosis (LD) groups (2%), P early in life are more likely to have small-duct PSC and less likely to have disease-related complications. Clinicians should be vigilant for underlying cholangiocarcinoma among those with PSC diagnosed late in life. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Development of a scoring system for differentiating IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis from primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Lee, Jong Kyun; Baek, Seunghee; Woo, Young Sik; Cho, Dong Hui; Oh, Dongwook; Song, Tae Jun; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong Wan; Lee, Sung Koo

    2017-04-01

    Recent research has shown that a substantial number of patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) can also have elevated serum/tissue IgG4. The aim of our study was to develop a simple scoring system for the discrimination of IgG4-related sclerosing cholangits (IgG4-SC) from PSC. Patients with IgG4-SC (n = 39) and PSC (n = 76) who had intrahepatic/hilar strictures were included. Candidate-differentiating variables included patient age, other organ involvement (OOI), inflammatory bowel disease, serum IgG4, and cholangiographic features. A scoring system was developed on the basis of these variables, and its performance was internally validated using a bootstrapping-based method. The scoring system in the final model included age (IgG4-SC. The discrimination between IgG4-SC and PSC using the scoring system was excellent (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.986). A reliable differentiation of IgG4-SC from PSC can be made using the scoring system presented here. We suggest the diagnosis of IgG4-SC at a cutoff of 7 points or higher and the indication of diagnostic steroid trial at 5 or 6 points. External validation of our scoring system is warranted.

  12. Papillary bile duct dysplasia in primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, J; Wahlstrom, H E; Batts, K P; Wiesner, R H

    1992-06-01

    A 62-year-old man with a 20-year history of chronic ulcerative colitis and a 9-year history of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) underwent orthotopic liver transplantation because of symptoms related to PSC and cholangiographic features compatible with a biliary neoplasm. Study of the excised liver revealed papillary mucosal lesions in the common hepatic duct and the right and left hepatic ducts as well as cholangiectases and other features typically associated with PSC. The papillary lesions consisted of abundant fibrovascular stroma covered by biliary epithelium with low-grade and high-grade dysplasia. Some periductal glands were also dysplastic. These features distinguished papillary dysplasia from classic biliary papillomatosis. Only one focus of microinvasion was found; there were no metastases. Among 60 cases of PSC in whom the entire liver could be studied after orthotopic liver transplantation, this was the only instance of unequivocal dysplasia. However, in one specimen, papillary hyperplasia was found. Detailed macroscopic and microscopic rereview of 23 livers from our patients with the longest history of PSC (range, 5-24 years) failed to reveal any additional cases with dysplasia. It is concluded that (a) papillary mucosal lesions in PSC may represent papillary dysplasia without invasion; (b) these lesions may evolve from papillary hyperplasia; (c) the process may be largely, if not entirely, in situ; and (d) the prevalence of dysplasia and carcinoma of bile ducts may be less than the 7%-9% reported in the literature for malignancies associated with PSC.

  13. Value of brush cytology for dominant strictures in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponsioen, C. Y.; Vrouenraets, S. M.; van Milligen de Wit, A. W.; Sturm, P.; Tascilar, M.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Prins, M.; Huibregtse, K.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1999-01-01

    Around 10% of patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) develop cholangiocarcinoma, which is cholangiographically often indistinguishable from a benign dominant stricture. The aim of the present study was to assess the value of brush cytology in discriminating between benign and malignant

  14. A survey of infectious agents as risk factors for primary sclerosing cholangitis: are Chlamydia species involved?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Defoer, Jacqueline; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Weverling, Gerrit J.; Tytgat, Guido N. J.; Pannekoek, Yvonne; Wertheim-Dillen, Pauline M. E.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives The aetiology of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is unknown, and the role of micro-organisms has been studied only to a limited extent. We tested the hypothesis that past or persisting infection with common viruses or atypical bacteria might play a role in genetically susceptible

  15. Genetic polymorphisms of matrix metalloproteinase 3 in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juran, Brian D.; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Schlicht, Erik M.; Larson, Joseph J.; Ellinghaus, David; Franke, Andre; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.

    2011-01-01

    Background The damaging cholestasis inherent to primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) results from bile duct stricturing because of progressive fibrosis. The matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) degrades a wide range of matrix components and is expressed by activated liver stellate cells, and so is a candidate for involvement with the fibrotic processes underlying PSC. Moreover, the MMP3 gene harbours polymorphisms associated with variation in its activity directly impacting clinical phenotypes. Aims We aimed to examine the influence of MMP3 polymorphisms on PSC risk and progression. Methods Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the common genetic variation of MMP3 were genotyped in 266 PSC patients and 407 controls. SNPs and inferred haplotypes were assessed for PSC association by logistic regression and score tests. The effect of SNPs on survival to liver transplant or death was analysed using Cox regression, and Kaplan–Meier curves were constructed. Results No association of PSC with individual SNPs or haplotypes of MMP3 was detected. However, progression to death or liver transplant was significantly associated with homozygosity for minor alleles of rs522616, rs650108 and rs683878, particularly among PSC patients with concurrent ulcerative colitis (UC) (strongest in redundant SNPs rs650108/rs683878, hazard ratio = 3.23, 95% confidence interval 1.45–7.25, P = 0.004). Conclusions Genetic variation in MMP3 influences PSC progression, possibly in the context of coexisting UC. While the functional variants and specific mechanisms remain unknown, this finding implicates the turnover of the extracellular matrix as an important and variable component of PSC pathogenesis. Efforts to understand this process could form the basis for developing effective treatments, which are currently lacking for PSC. PMID:21134112

  16. Dense genotyping of immune-related disease regions identifies nine new risk loci for primary sclerosing cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Jimmy Z.; Hov, Johannes Roksund; Folseraas, Trine; Ellinghaus, Eva; Rushbrook, Simon M.; Doncheva, Nadezhda T.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Weismüller, Tobias J.; Eksteen, Bertus; Invernizzi, Pietro; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Pares, Albert; Ellinghaus, David; Shah, Tejas; Juran, Brian D.; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Rust, Christian; Schramm, Christoph; Müller, Tobias; Srivastava, Brijesh; Dalekos, Georgios; Nöthen, Markus M.; Herms, Stefan; Winkelmann, Juliane; Mitrovic, Mitja; Braun, Felix; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Croucher, Peter J. P.; Sterneck, Martina; Teufel, Andreas; Mason, Andrew L.; Saarela, Janna; Leppa, Virpi; Dorfman, Ruslan; Alvaro, Domenico; Floreani, Annarosa; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Schork, Andrew J.; Næss, Sigrid; Thomsen, Ingo; Mayr, Gabriele; König, Inke R.; Hveem, Kristian; Cleynen, Isabelle; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; van Heel, David; Björnsson, Einar; Sandford, Richard N.; Durie, Peter R.; Melum, Espen; Vatn, Morten H.; Silverberg, Mark S.; Duerr, Richard H.; Padyukov, Leonid; Brand, Stephan; Sans, Miquel; Annese, Vito; Achkar, Jean-Paul; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Chazouillères, Olivier; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Schrumpf, Erik; Vermeire, Severine; Albrecht, Mario; Rioux, John D.; Alexander, Graeme; Bergquist, Annika; Cho, Judy; Schreiber, Stefan; Manns, Michael P.; Färkkilä, Martti; Dale, Anders M.; Chapman, Roger W.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Franke, Andre; Anderson, Carl A.; Karlsen, Tom H.

    2013-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a severe liver disease of unknown etiology leading to fibrotic destruction of the bile ducts and ultimately to the need for liver transplantation. We compared 3,789 PSC cases of European ancestry to 25,079 population controls across 130,422 SNPs genotyped

  17. Dense genotyping of immune-related disease regions identifies nine new risk loci for primary sclerosing cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Jimmy Z.; Hov, Johannes Roksund; Folseraas, Trine; Ellinghaus, Eva; Rushbrook, Simon M.; Doncheva, Nadezhda T.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Weismueller, Tobias J.; Eksteen, Bertus; Invernizzi, Pietro; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Pares, Albert; Ellinghaus, David; Shah, Tejas; Juran, Brian D.; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Rust, Christian; Schramm, Christoph; Mueller, Tobias; Srivastava, Brijesh; Dalekos, Georgios; Noethen, Markus M.; Herms, Stefan; Winkelmann, Juliane; Mitrovic, Mitja; Braun, Felix; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Croucher, Peter J. P.; Sterneck, Martina; Teufel, Andreas; Mason, Andrew L.; Saarela, Janna; Leppa, Virpi; Dorfman, Ruslan; Alvaro, Domenico; Floreani, Annarosa; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Schork, Andrew J.; Naess, Sigrid; Thomsen, Ingo; Mayr, Gabriele; Koenig, Inke R.; Hveem, Kristian; Cleynen, Isabelle; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Ricano-Ponce, Isis; van Heel, David; Bjoernsson, Einar; Sandford, Richard N.; Durie, Peter R.; Melum, Espen; Vatn, Morten H.; Silverberg, Mark S.; Duerr, Richard H.; Padyukov, Leonid; Brand, Stephan; Sans, Miquel; Annese, Vito; Achkar, Jean-Paul; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Chazouilleres, Olivier; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Schrumpf, Erik; Vermeire, Severine; Albrecht, Mario; Rioux, John D.; Alexander, Graeme; Bergquist, Annika; Cho, Judy; Schreiber, Stefan; Manns, Michael P.; Farkkila, Martti; Dale, Anders M.; Chapman, Roger W.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Franke, Andre; Anderson, Carl A.; Karlsen, Tom H.

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a severe liver disease of unknown etiology leading to fibrotic destruction of the bile ducts and ultimately to the need for liver transplantation(1-3). We compared 3,789 PSC cases of European ancestry to 25,079 population controls across 130,422 SNPs genotyped

  18. Radiological diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis: value of ERC and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollmann, F.D.; Maeurer, J.; Hintze, R.E.; Adler, A.; Veltzke, W.; Lohmann, R.; Felix, R.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the use of computed tomography (CT) in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) as compared to endoscopic-retrograde cholangiography (ERC), imaging studies of 24 patients were reviewed. 19 patients were studied by ERC, 19 by CT and 14 by both. In 17 cases, ERC confirmed PSC. One cholangiogram suggested a tumor. CT reflected PSC in only 11 cases, while three patients displayed a mass lesion. Thus, ERC remains the standard imaging technique for diagnosing PSC, whereas CT proves beneficial in excluding hepatic masses. (orig.) [de

  19. Three ulcerative colitis susceptibility loci are associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis and indicate a role for IL2, REL, and CARD9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, Marcel; Lamberts, Laetitia E.; Franke, Lude; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Ellinghaus, Eva; Muri Boberg, Kirsten; Melum, Espen; Folseraas, Trine; Schrumpf, Erik; Bergquist, Annika; Björnsson, Einar; Fu, Jingyuan; Jan Westra, Harm; Groen, Harry J. M.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Smolonska, Joanna; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Porte, Robert J.; Weismüller, Tobias J.; Wedemeyer, Jochen; Schramm, Christoph; Sterneck, Martina; Günther, Rainer; Braun, Felix; Vermeire, Severine; Henckaerts, Liesbet; Wijmenga, Cisca; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Schreiber, Stefan; Karlsen, Tom H.; Franke, Andre; Weersma, Rinse K.

    2011-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammation and fibrosis of the bile ducts. Both environmental and genetic factors contribute to its pathogenesis. To further clarify its genetic background, we investigated susceptibility loci recently

  20. Three Ulcerative Colitis Susceptibility Loci Are Associated with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis and Indicate a Role for IL2, REL, and CARD9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, Marcel; Lamberts, Laetitia E.; Franke, Lude; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Ellinghaus, Eva; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Melum, Espen; Folseraas, Trine; Schrumpf, Erik; Bergquist, Annika; Bjornsson, Einar; Fu, Jingyuan; Westra, Harm Jan; Groen, Harry J. M.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Smolonska, Joanna; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Porte, Robert J.; Weismueller, Tobias J.; Wedemeyer, Jochen; Schramm, Christoph; Sterneck, Martina; Guenther, Rainer; Braun, Felix; Vermeire, Severine; Henckaerts, Liesbet; Wijmenga, Cisca; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Schreiber, Stefan; Karlsen, Tom H.; Franke, Andre; Weersma, Rinse K.

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammation and fibrosis of the bile ducts. Both environmental and genetic factors contribute to its pathogenesis. To further clarify its genetic background, we investigated susceptibility loci recently

  1. A case of cutaneous scleroderma with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H P Nandeesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing cholangitis comprises of a spectrum of cholestatic conditions that are characterized by patchy fibrosis, inflammation and destruction of intra hepatic and extrahepatic ducts. We report a case of a 42 year old woman who presented with darkening of skin with yellowish discolouration of the eyes. Clinical examination revealed icterus, taut skin with hepatosplenomegaly. Liver function tests showed a cholestatic picture. Skin biopsy showed features of cutaneous scleroderma. MRCP and Liver biopsy was suggestive of sclerosing cholangitis.

  2. Sclerosing cholangitis: Clinicopathologic features, imaging spectrum, and systemic approach to differential diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ni Eun [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, So Yeon; Lee, Seung Soo; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Moon Gyu [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Sclerosing cholangitis is a spectrum of chronic progressive cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammation, fibrosis, and stricture of the bile ducts, which can be classified as primary and secondary sclerosing cholangitis. Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic progressive liver disease of unknown cause. On the other hand, secondary sclerosing cholangitis has identifiable causes that include immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease, recurrent pyogenic cholangitis, ischemic cholangitis, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related cholangitis, and eosinophilic cholangitis. In this review, we suggest a systemic approach to the differential diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis based on the clinical and laboratory findings, as well as the typical imaging features on computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with MR cholangiography. Familiarity with various etiologies of sclerosing cholangitis and awareness of their typical clinical and imaging findings are essential for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

  3. Sclerosing Cholangitis: Clinicopathologic Features, Imaging Spectrum, and Systemic Approach to Differential Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Nieun; Kim, So Yeon; Lee, Seung Soo; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing cholangitis is a spectrum of chronic progressive cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammation, fibrosis, and stricture of the bile ducts, which can be classified as primary and secondary sclerosing cholangitis. Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic progressive liver disease of unknown cause. On the other hand, secondary sclerosing cholangitis has identifiable causes that include immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease, recurrent pyogenic cholangitis, ischemic cholangitis, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related cholangitis, and eosinophilic cholangitis. In this review, we suggest a systemic approach to the differential diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis based on the clinical and laboratory findings, as well as the typical imaging features on computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with MR cholangiography. Familiarity with various etiologies of sclerosing cholangitis and awareness of their typical clinical and imaging findings are essential for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

  4. Celiac disease (CD, ulcerative colitis (UC, and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC in one patient: a family study Enfermedad celiaca (EC, colitis ulcerosa (CU y colangitis esclerosante primaria (CEP asociadas en el mismo paciente: estudio familiar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Cadahía

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the case of a 17-year-old male who at the age of 7 was diagnosed with celiac disease (CD together with ulcerative colitis (UC and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC. The patient was treated with gluten-free diet and immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, and currently remains asymptomatic. The patient's younger, 12-year-old sister was diagnosed with CD when she was 1.5 years old, and at 7 years she developed type-I diabetes mellitus, which was difficult to control. A family study was made, and both parents were found to be affected with silent CD. All were DQ2 (+. In relation to the case and family study, we provide a series of comments related to CD and its complications.Presentamos el caso de un varón de 17 años, que a la edad de 7 años fue diagnosticado de enfermedad celiaca (EC junto con una colitis ulcerosa (CU y una colangitis esclerosante primaria (CEP asociadas. Fue tratado con DSG e inmuno-supresores tipo azatioprina y se encuentra asintomático en la actualidad. Su hermana menor de 12 años, fue diagnosticada de EC cuando tenía 1,5 años y a los 7 años desarrolló una DM tipo 1 de difícil control. Se realizó un estudio familiar y ambos padres están afectos de una EC silente. Todos ellos son DQ2 (+. A propósito del caso y estudio familiar, se hacen una serie de consideraciones sobre la enfermedad celiaca y el desarrollo de complicaciones.

  5. Ursodeoxycholic acid for treatment of primary sclerosing cholangitis: a placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuers, U.; Spengler, U.; Kruis, W.; AYDEMIR, U.; WIEBECKE, B.; HELDWEIN, W.; WEINZIERL, M.; Pape, G. R.; Sauerbruch, T.; Paumgartner, G.

    1992-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of ursodeoxycholic acid for the treatment of primary sclerosing cholangitis were evaluated in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Fourteen patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis documented by cholestatic serum enzyme pattern, liver

  6. Primary sclerosing cholangitis associated with increased peripheral eosinophils and serum IgE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, I; Takase, Y; Matsumoto, S; Kuyama, J; Nakajima, T; Maeda, H; Sugase, T; Hata, A; Hanada, M; Okuno, M

    1996-10-01

    Symptoms of cholestasis, including epigastralgia, fever, and jaundice, with marked increases in peripheral eosinophils and serum IgE in a 20-year-old man are reported here. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) detected constrictions of the bile ducts, compatible with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). The symptoms and blood parameters of liver dysfunction were associated with the degree of eosinophilia and high serum IgE levels. During corticosteroid therapy, all of these parameters improved, and morphologic improvements of the bile ducts were also observed. The pathogenesis of PSC may be explained, in part, by the concept of hypereosinophilic syndrome or allergic reaction.

  7. Gene Expression by PBMC in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: Evidence for Dysregulation of Immune Mediated Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Aoki

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is a chronic disease of the bile ducts characterized by an inflammatory infiltrate and obliterative fibrosis. The precise role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of PSC remains unknown. We used RNA microarray analysis to identify immune-related genes and pathways that are differentially expressed in PSC. Messenger RNA (mRNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC was isolated from both patients with PSC and age and sex matched healthy controls. Samples from 5 PSC patients and 5 controls were analyzed by microarray and based upon rigorous statistical analysis of the data, relevant genes were chosen for confirmation by RT-PCR in 10 PSC patients and 10 controls. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, gene expression in PSC was statistically different from our control population. Interestingly, genes within the IL-2 receptor beta, IL-6 and MAP Kinase pathways were found to be differently expressed in patients with PSC compared to controls. Further, individual genes, TNF-α induced protein 6 (TNFaip6 and membrane-spanning 4-domains, subfamily A (ms4a were found to be upregulated in PSC while similar to Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 5 (SMAD 5 was downregulated. In conclusion, several immune-related pathways and genes were differentially expressed in PSC compared to control patients, giving further evidence that this disease is systemic and immune-mediated.

  8. De-novo cholangiocarcinoma in native common bile duct remnant following OLT for primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landaverde, Carmen; Ng, Vivian; Sato, Alisa; Tabibian, James; Durazo, Francisco; Busuttil, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory and obstructive disease of the intra- and extra-hepatic bile ducts of unknown etiology. Currently, orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the only definitive treatment for PSC-related end-stage liver disease. However, PSC has been known to recur in the grafted liver. Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy is more commonly performed than choledochocholedochostomy for PSC, although choledochocholedochostomy has been found to be safe and efficacious for PSC if the distal common bile duct is uninvolved at the time of OLT. Our case is unique in that it describes a patient who developed de-novo cholangiocarcinoma in the remnant portion of the native common bile duct six years after OLT with choledochocholedochostomy for PSC-associated end-stage liver disease without having PSC recurrence. In conclusion, our case report indicates that choledochocholedochostomy may not be desirable in PSC due to an increased risk of developing cholangiocarcinoma in the native common bile duct. This risk exists as well with a Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy in the remaining intra-duodenal and intra-pancreatic biliary epithelium, although in theory to a lesser extent. Therefore, the risk of developing cholangiocarcinoma in the recipient common bile duct can only be completely eliminated by performing a Whipple procedure at the time of OLT.

  9. Imaging and estimation of the prognostic features of primary sclerosing cholangitis by ultrasonography and MR cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikarinen, H.; Paeaekkoe, E.; Suramo, I.; Paeivaensalo, M.; Tervonen, O.; Lehtola, J.; Aukee, J.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the ability of US and MR cholangiography (MRC) to detect bile duct changes and prognostic signs of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) seen at endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). Material and Methods: In a prospective study, 9 patients with PSC underwent US, MRC, MR imaging and ERC of the bile ducts and the liver. Eight age- and sex-matched control patients were examined with MRC, MR imaging and ERC. A segmental comparison was performed to assess the ability of MRC-MR and US to reveal the accurate ductal involvement in different segments of the biliary tree and the specific criteria of poor prognostic outcome in PSC. The ability of MRC-MR to detect the presence of PSC in different patients was analysed blindly. Results: MRC-MR depicted changes of PSC correctly in 9 patients (radiologist 1) and in 8 patients with 1 false-positive finding (radiologist 2) in the blinded analysis. In the segmental comparison, MRC missed especially bile duct dilatation. MRC was too pessimistic in the evaluation of the outcome. US detected features suggestive of PSC in 8 patients (radiologist 3). US was unable to show the predictors of poor outcome. Conclusion: MRC and US seem to be useful in the detection of PSC. US is unable and MRC is too pessimistic to estimate the outcome of PSC

  10. Risk factors and outcome in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis with persistent biliary candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Christian; Bode, Konrad Alexander; Chahoud, Fadi; Wannhoff, Andreas; Friedrich, Kilian; Weiss, Karl-Heinz; Sauer, Peter; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils

    2014-10-23

    Candidiasis is commonly observed in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), but the clinical risk factors associated with its presence have not been fully investigated. In this study, we aimed to analyse the incidence, risk factors, and transplantation-free survival in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) patients with persistent biliary candidiasis. We retrospectively analysed patients diagnosed with PSC who were admitted to our department during 2002 to 2012. One-hundred fifty patients whose bile cultures were tested for fungal species were selected, and their clinical and laboratory parameters were investigated. The results of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) and bile cultures were analysed using chart reviews. The cases of biliary candidiasis were sub-classified as transient or persistent. Thirty out of 150 (20.0%) patients had biliary candidiasis. Although all patients demonstrated comparable baseline characteristics, those with biliary candidiasis showed significantly reduced transplantation-free survival (p candidiasis. A subgroup analysis showed reduced survival with a greater necessity for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) only in patients with persistence of Candida (p = 0.007). The survival in the patients with transient biliary candidiasis was comparable to that in candidiasis-free patients. In a multivariate regression analysis that included Mayo risk score (MRS), sex, age, dominant stenosis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome, and number of times ERC was performed, biliary candidiasis was an independent risk factor for reduced survival (p = 0.008). Risk factors associated with acquisition of biliary candidiasis were age at PSC diagnosis and number of ERCs. The persistence of biliary candidiasis is associated with markedly reduced transplantation-free survival in PSC patients. By contrast, actuarial survival in patients with transient biliary candidiasis approaches that for patients without any

  11. IgG4-Seronegative Autoimmune Pancreatitis and Sclerosing Cholangitis

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    Allon Kahn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available IgG4-related disease is a relatively novel clinical entity whose gastrointestinal manifestations include type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP and IgG4-associated sclerosing cholangitis. The presence of elevated serum IgG4 is suggestive but not essential for the diagnosis of type 1 AIP and is a pervasive feature of the proposed diagnostic criteria. The differential diagnosis of type 1 AIP includes malignant conditions, emphasizing the importance of a deliberate, comprehensive evaluation. Management of patients with a suggestive clinical presentation, but without serum IgG4 elevation, is difficult. Here we present three cases of IgG4-seronegative AIP and sclerosing cholangitis that responded to empiric steroid therapy and discuss approach considerations. These cases demonstrate the value of meticulous application of existing diagnostic algorithms to achieve a clinical diagnosis and avoid surgical intervention.

  12. Secondary sclerosing cholangitis in critically ill patients: current perspectives

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    Gudnason HO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hafsteinn O Gudnason,1 Einar S Björnsson1,2 1Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Landspitali, University Hospital of Iceland, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Abstract: Secondary sclerosing cholangitis (SSC is a term used for a group of chronic cholestatic disease affecting the intra- and/or extrahepatic biliary tree with inflammation and progressive stricture formation, which can lead to biliary cirrhosis. A newly recognized form of SSC is secondary sclerosing cholangitis in critically ill patients (SSC-CIP. Pathogenesis is believed to involve ischemic injury of intrahepatic bile ducts associated with prolonged hypotension, vasopressors administration, and/or mechanical ventilation in patients treated in the intensive care unit (ICU. Patients diagnosed with SSC-CIP have no prior history of liver disease and no known pathologic process or injury responsible for bile duct obstruction prior to ICU treatment. Reasons leading to ICU treatment are many including multitrauma, burn injury, cardiac surgery, severe pneumonia, other infections, or bleeding after abdominal surgery. Patients have in common prolonged ICU admission. SSC-CIP is associated with rapid progression to liver cirrhosis and poor survival with limited treatment options except a liver transplantation. Transplant-free survival is around 17–40 months, which is lower than in other SSC patients. During the initial stages of the disease, the clinical symptoms and biochemical profile are not specific and easily missed. Biliary casts formation may be considered pathognomonic for SSC-CIP since most patients have them in early stages of the disease. Increased awareness and early detection of the disease and its complications is considered to be crucial to improve the poor prognosis. Keywords: secondary sclerosing cholangitis, SSC-CIP, chronic cholestatic disease, sclerosing cholangitis

  13. No negative impact of serum IgG4 levels on clinical outcome in 435 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis from Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Tazuma, Susumu; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Inui, Kazuo; Takikawa, Hajime

    2017-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that elevated serum IgG4 levels are associated with poor outcomes of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), but the impact of serum IgG4 levels on PSC remains controversial. In this study, we aimed to determine prognostic factors of patients with PSC and to investigate the association between serum IgG4 levels and the clinical features and prognosis of PSC in a Japanese cohort. We retrospectively analyzed follow-up data for 435 patients with PSC (UMIN000018438). Patients with distinct etiologies of sclerosing cholangitis including IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) were excluded from this study. Serum IgG4 levels were tested at the time of diagnosis in 216 of 435 patients with PSC, and were elevated in 27 patients (>134 mg/dl, 12.5%). Clinical features at diagnosis were comparable between patients with normal and elevated serum IgG4 levels, with the exception of serum albumin. The overall and liver-transplantation free survival rate was comparable between the groups. Multivariate analysis indicated that age, albumin, and bilirubin, but not IgG4, at the time of diagnosis affected PSC prognosis. The current study showed that serum IgG4 levels at diagnosis do not affect PSC prognosis in a Japanese cohort that excluded patients with IgG4-SC. © 2017 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  14. Characterization of Intestinal Microbiota in Ulcerative Colitis Patients with and without Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevans, D; Tyler, A D; Holm, K; Jørgensen, K K; Vatn, M H; Karlsen, T H; Kaplan, G G; Eksteen, B; Gevers, D; Hov, J R; Silverberg, M S

    2016-03-01

    There is an unexplained association between ulcerative colitis [UC] and primary sclerosing cholangitis [PSC], with the intestinal microbiota implicated as an important factor. The study aim was to compare the structure of the intestinal microbiota of patients with UC with and without PSC. UC patients with PSC [PSC-UC] and without PSC [UC] were identified from biobanks at Oslo University Hospital, Foothills Hospital Calgary and Mount Sinai Hospital Toronto. Microbial DNA was extracted from colonic tissue and sequencing performed of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene on Illumina MiSeq. Sequences were assigned to operational taxonomic units [OTUs] using Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology [QIIME]. Microbial alpha diversity, beta diversity, and relative abundance were compared between PSC-UC and UC phenotypes. In all, 31 PSC-UC patients and 56 UC patients were included. Principal coordinate analysis [PCoA] demonstrated that city of sample collection was the strongest determinant of taxonomic profile. In the Oslo cohort, Chao 1 index was modestly decreased in PSC-UC compared with UC [p = 0.04] but did not differ significantly in the Calgary cohort. No clustering by PSC phenotype was observed using beta diversity measures. For multiple microbial genera there were nominally significant differences between UC and PSC-UC, but results were not robust to false-discovery rate correction. No strong PSC-specific microbial associations in UC patients consistent across different cohorts were identified. Recruitment centre had a strong effect on microbial composition. Future studies should include larger cohorts to increase power and the ability to control for confounding factors. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Microbiological analysis of bile and its impact in critically ill patients with secondary sclerosing cholangitis.

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    Voigtländer, Torsten; Leuchs, Ensieh; Vonberg, Ralf-Peter; Solbach, Philipp; Manns, Michael P; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Lankisch, Tim O

    2015-05-01

    Secondary sclerosing cholangitis in critically ill patients (SSC-CIP) is an emerging disease entity with unfavourable outcome. Our aim was to analyze the microbial spectrum in bile of patients with SSC-CIP and to evaluate the potential impact on the empiric antibiotic treatment in these patients. 169 patients (72 patients with SSC-CIP and 97 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC)) were included in a prospective observational study between 2010 and 2013. Bile was obtained during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) and microbiologically analyzed. Patients with SSC displayed a significantly different microbiological profile in bile. Enterococcus faecium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and non-albicans species of Candida were more frequent in SSC compared to patients with PSC (p bile (p = 0.001). The antimicrobial therapy was adjusted in 64% of patients due to resistance or presence of microorganisms not covered by the initial therapy regimen. Patients with SSC-CIP have a distinct microbial profile in bile. Difficult to treat organisms are frequent and an ERC with bile fluid collection for microbiological analysis should be considered in case of insufficient antimicrobial treatment. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Leukocytapheresis Therapy Improved Cholestasis in a Patient Suffering from Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis with Ulcerative Colitis

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    Minoru Itou

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is an autoimmune disease of the hepatobiliary system for which effective therapy has not been established. Leukocytapheresis (LCAP therapy is known to effective in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC. In addition, effects of LCAP therapy were reported on some autoimmune diseases such as Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Here we report the case of a 29-year-old man with PSC associated with UC who was treated with LCAP therapy. He had a 16-year history of UC and a 12-year history of PSC. Although he was under treatment with prednisolone and ursodeoxycholic acid, exacerbation of UC and PSC-associated cholestasis were seen. Since he showed side effects of prednisolone, he was treated with LCAP. Not only improvement of UC, but also decreased serum alkaline phosphatase, γ-guanosine triphosphate and total bile acids, suggesting improvement of PSC-associated cholestaisis, were seen after treatment with LCAP. Our experience with this case suggests that LCAP therapy could be a new effective therapeutic strategy for patients with PSC associated with UC.

  17. Reduced Coffee Consumption Among Individuals with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis but Not Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

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    Lammert, Craig; Juran, Brian D.; Schlicht, Erik; Xie, Xiao; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; de Andrade, Mariza; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Coffee consumption has been associated with decreased risk of liver disease and related outcomes. However, coffee drinking has not been investigated among patients with cholestatic autoimmune liver diseases, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We investigated the relationship between coffee consumption and risk of PBC and PSC in a large North American cohort. Methods Lifetime coffee drinking habits were determined from responses to questionnaires from 606 patients with PBC, 480 with PSC, and 564 healthy volunteers (controls). Patients (those with PBC or PSC) were compared to controls utilizing the Wilcoxon rank sum test for continuous variables and c2 method for discrete variables. Logistic regression was used to analyze the estimate the effects of different coffee parameters (time, frequency, and type of coffee consumption) after adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, and education level. Results Patients with PBC and controls did not differ in coffee parameters. However, 24% of patients with PSC had never drank coffee compared to 16% of controls (Pcoffee drinking coffee (46.6% vs 66.7% for controls, Pcoffee protected against proctocolectomy (hazard ratio=0.34, PCoffee consumption is lower among patients with PSC, but not PBC, compared to controls. PMID:24440215

  18. [Primary sclerosing cholangitis associated with Sjögren's syndrome, retroperitoneal fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis. Report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreda, F; Contardo, C; León, A; Navarrete, J; Figueroa, R; Attanasio, F

    1989-01-01

    Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis (PSC) is an unusual chronic, cholestatic disease of unknown etiology, more frequently seen in young adults in close relationship with Chronic Ulcerative Colitis. We report the case of a 30 year old woman, coming from the peruvian amazon with PSC associated with Sjögren Syndrome, Chronic Pancreatitis and Retroperitoneal Fibrosis, without colonic involvement. She was treated with external biliary drainage and controlled for 12 months. In this paper, clinical, biochemical, radiological, histological and therapeutic features are reviewed as well as its possible immunologie autoimmune origin.

  19. Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing cholangitis: assessment of clinical, CT, and pathological findings

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    Itoh, S., E-mail: shigekimiyo@luck.ocn.ne.j [Department of Technical Radiology, Nagoya University School of Health Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Nagasaka, T. [Department of Pathology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Suzuki, K.; Satake, H.; Ota, T.; Naganawa, S. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    Aim: To assess the clinical, computed tomography (CT), and pathological findings in patients with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing cholangitis. Materials and methods: Fifteen consecutive patients (four women and 11 men, mean age 71 years) with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing cholangitis and without the characteristic features of underlying disorders causing benign biliary strictures were retrospectively recruited. Two radiologists evaluated multiphase contrast-enhanced CT images acquired with 0.5 or 1-mm collimation. One pathologist performed all histological examinations, including IgG4 immunostaining. Results: The intrahepatic biliary ducts showed dilatation in all 15 patients, but only seven presented with jaundice. Although laboratory data were not available in all patients, serum gammaglobulin and IgG levels were elevated in five of six patients and six of eight patients, respectively. Anti-nuclear antibody was detected in three of six patients. The involved biliary ducts showed the following CT findings: involvement of the hilar biliary duct (14/15), a mean wall thickness of 4.9 mm, a smooth margin (10/15), a narrow but visible lumen (6/15), hyper-attenuation during the late arterial phase (9/15), homogeneous hyper-attenuation during the delayed phase (11/11), and no vascular invasion (14/15). Abnormal findings in the pancreas and urinary tract were detected in eight of 15 patients. In 13 patients with adequate specimens, moderate to severe lymphoplasmacytic infiltration associated with dense fibrosis was observed. Infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells was moderate or severe in nine patients and minimal or absent in four patients. Conclusion: Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing cholangitis exhibits relatively characteristic clinical and CT findings, although they are not sufficiently specific for differentiation from other biliary diseases.

  20. Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing cholangitis: assessment of clinical, CT, and pathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, S.; Nagasaka, T.; Suzuki, K.; Satake, H.; Ota, T.; Naganawa, S.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To assess the clinical, computed tomography (CT), and pathological findings in patients with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing cholangitis. Materials and methods: Fifteen consecutive patients (four women and 11 men, mean age 71 years) with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing cholangitis and without the characteristic features of underlying disorders causing benign biliary strictures were retrospectively recruited. Two radiologists evaluated multiphase contrast-enhanced CT images acquired with 0.5 or 1-mm collimation. One pathologist performed all histological examinations, including IgG4 immunostaining. Results: The intrahepatic biliary ducts showed dilatation in all 15 patients, but only seven presented with jaundice. Although laboratory data were not available in all patients, serum gammaglobulin and IgG levels were elevated in five of six patients and six of eight patients, respectively. Anti-nuclear antibody was detected in three of six patients. The involved biliary ducts showed the following CT findings: involvement of the hilar biliary duct (14/15), a mean wall thickness of 4.9 mm, a smooth margin (10/15), a narrow but visible lumen (6/15), hyper-attenuation during the late arterial phase (9/15), homogeneous hyper-attenuation during the delayed phase (11/11), and no vascular invasion (14/15). Abnormal findings in the pancreas and urinary tract were detected in eight of 15 patients. In 13 patients with adequate specimens, moderate to severe lymphoplasmacytic infiltration associated with dense fibrosis was observed. Infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells was moderate or severe in nine patients and minimal or absent in four patients. Conclusion: Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing cholangitis exhibits relatively characteristic clinical and CT findings, although they are not sufficiently specific for differentiation from other biliary diseases.

  1. Differentiating immunoglobulin g4-related sclerosing cholangitis from hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Taku; Kamisawa, Terumi; Hara, Seiichi; Kuruma, Sawako; Chiba, Kazuro; Kuwata, Go; Fujiwara, Takashi; Egashira, Hideto; Koizumi, Koichi; Fujiwara, Junko; Arakawa, Takeo; Momma, Kumiko; Kurata, Masanao; Honda, Goro; Tsuruta, Koji; Itoi, Takao

    2013-03-01

    Few studies have differentiated immunoglobulin G (IgG) 4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) from hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CC). Thus, we sought to investigate useful features for differentiating IgG4-SC from hilar CC. We retrospectively compared clinical, serological, imaging, and histological features of six patients with IgG4-SC and 42 patients with hilar CC. In patients with hilar CC, obstructive jaundice was more frequent (philar CC patients (philar or hepatic duct was completely obstructed in 83% of hilar CC patients (philar bile duct stenosis, was more frequent in IgG4-SC patients (philar CC.

  2. Individuals with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Have Elevated Levels of Biomarkers for Apoptosis but Not Necrosis.

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    Masuoka, Howard C; Vuppalanchi, Raj; Deppe, Ross; Bybee, Phelan; Comerford, Megan; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Ghabril, Marwan; Chalasani, Naga

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocyte apoptosis or necrosis from accumulation of bile salts may play an important role in the disease progression of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). The aim of the current study was to measure serum markers of hepatocyte apoptosis (cytokeratin-18 fragments--K18) and necrosis (high-mobility group protein B1--HMGB1) in adults with PSC and examine the relationship with disease severity. We measured serum levels of K18 and HMGB1 in well-phenotyped PSC (N = 37) and 39 control subjects (N = 39). Severity of PSC was assessed biochemically, histologically, and PSC Mayo risk score. Quantification of hepatocyte apoptosis was performed using TUNEL assay. The mean age of the study cohort was 49.7 ± 13.3 years and comprised of 67% men and 93% Caucasian. Serum K18 levels were significantly higher in the PSC patients compared to control (217.4 ± 78.1 vs. 157.0 ± 58.2 U/L, p = 0.001). However, HMGB1 levels were not different between the two groups (5.38 ± 2.99 vs. 6.28 ± 2.85 ng/mL, p = 0.15). Within the PSC group, K18 levels significantly correlated with AST (r = 0.5, p = 0.002), alkaline phosphatase (r = 0.5, p = 0.001), total bilirubin (r = 0.61, p ≤ 0.001), and albumin (r = -0.4, p = 0.02). Serum K18 levels also correlated with the level of apoptosis present on the liver biopsy (r = 0.8, p ≤ 0.001) and Mayo risk score (r = 0.4, p = 0.015). Serum K18 but not HMGB1 levels were increased in PSC and associated with severity of underlying liver disease and the degree of hepatocyte apoptosis.

  3. Diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis: prospective comparison of MR cholangiography with endoscopic retrograde cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberholzer, K.; Mildenberger, P.; Grebe, P.; Bantelmann, M.; Thelen, M.; Lohse, A.W.; Schadeck, T.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of MR cholangiography (MRC) in the diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) in comparison to endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). Method: 20 patients with PSC were examined by ERC and MRC (1.0 T. HASTE sequence). Visualization and pathologic changes of the extra- and intrahepatic bile ducts were evaluated with both methods. Results: Mural irregularities of the common bile duct were seen with MRC in 6/7 cases, stenoses and dilatation of the common bile duct were detected correctly in all patients. Diffuse, multifocal strictures of the intrahepatic bile duct were the most common intrahepatic findings and correctly diagnosed in all patients. Mural irregularities of the intrahepatic ducts in early stages may be missed by MRC because of the limited spatial resolution. MRC is superior to ERC in visualization of nonopacified intrahepatic ducts. Conclusions: MRC is a reliable, non-invasive method to detect typical diagnostic features of PSC. It should be considered as an adjunct to ERC in patients with suspected PSC for primary diagnosis and as an alternate method for follow-up studies. (orig.) [de

  4. Pancreatic changes in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis: MR cholangiopancreatography and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozkavukcu, Esra; Erden, Ayse; Erden, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the possible pancreatic changes and their frequencies in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) on MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), and conventional abdominal MRI. Materials and Methods: Patient group consisted of 29 PSC (13 male, 16 female) cases, whereas cohort 1 consisted of 12 female patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, and cohort 2 consisted of 17 patients (6 male, 11 female) with non-immune chronic liver disease. Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated the MR examinations paying special attention to the pancreatic size (atrophy or enlargement), T1- and T2-signal intensity of the pancreas, focal pancreatic lesion, capsule-like rim, peripancreatic edema or fluid, fascial thickening, and pancreatic ducts (dilatation or narrowing). The results are expressed as percentages. Three groups were compared using Pearson chi-square test for each feature. However, only p-value for 'dilatation of the pancreatic duct' was determined, whereas p-value could not be calculated because of the insufficient number of subjects/sequences for the other features. Results: Twelve PSC patients (41.3%) had pancreatic abnormalities. The most common pancreatic changes in PSC patients were decreased T1-signal intensity (44%) and dilatation of the pancreatic duct (13.8%), respectively. Increased T2-signal intensity was also shown in 2 PSC patients (6.9%). Conclusion: Even PSC patients without any sign of pancreatitis, can show MR changes in the pancreatic parenchyma or the pancreatic duct. The etiologies of these changes, and whether they are unique to PSC, are still controversial. Histopathological studies bringing light to these pancreatic changes are needed.

  5. Altered Cyclosporine Absorption in a Patient with Ulcerative Colitis, Sclerosing Cholangitis and Pancreatic Insufficiency

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    Mark G Swain

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic insufficiency leading to altered cyclosporine absorption is reported in a 37-year-old man with ulcerative colitis and sclerosing cholangitis. Asymptomatic chronic pancreatitis occurs frequently in patients with ulcerative colitis, and even more commonly when there is coexistent sclerosing cholangitis. However, pancreatic insufficiency has been documented in only one patient previously with ulcerative colitis and sclerosing cholangitis. Pancreatic function testing can help to identify the complex etiology of malabsorption in these patients and is recommended in patients when liver transplantation is contemplated, as pancreatic insufficiency may alter the absorption of cyclosporine.

  6. Immunosuppressive Agents for the Treatment of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xia; Luo, Xin; Hou, Jing-Ying; Wu, Shu-Yun; Li, Liang-Zong; Zheng, Ming-Hua; Wang, Ling-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Currently, there are no effective therapeutic agents for patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). This study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficiency of immunosuppressive agents (IAs) for the treatment of PSC. The literatures were searched using the following keywords singly or in combination: PSC, treatments, IAs. The primary outcome was defined as the need for liver transplantation or mortality. Two hundred sixty six patients from 7 eligible studies were analyzed. IAs had no remarkable effects on the rate of mortality or liver transplantation (relative risk, RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.58-1.62, p = 0.92). Subgroup analyses showed no significant effect of IAs co-administration therapy (IAs co-administered with ursodeoxycholic acid, IA co-administered with IA; RR 1.41, 95% CI 0.40-4.95, p = 0.60). IAs caused adverse events (AEs) such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, and pruritus (RR 1.81, 95% CI 1.07-3.07, p = 0.03). IAs therapy did not significantly improve markers of liver function except for aspartate transaminase (weighted mean difference -9.76, 95% CI -12.92 to -6.6, p IAs administrated as either monotherapy or combination therapy do not reduce the risk of mortality or liver transplantation. IAs monotherapy is associated with AEs. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Trigger mechanisms of secondary sclerosing cholangitis in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Silke; Veltzke-Schlieker, Wilfried; Adler, Andreas; Schott, Eckart; Hetzer, Roland; Schaffartzik, Walter; Tryba, Michael; Neuhaus, Peter; Seehofer, Daniel

    2015-03-31

    In recent years the development of secondary sclerosing cholangitis in critically ill patients (SSC-CIP) has increasingly been perceived as a separate disease entity. About possible trigger mechanisms of SSC-CIP has been speculated, systematic investigations on this issue are still lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and influence of promoting factors. Temporality, consistency and biological plausibility are essential prerequisites for causality. In this study, we investigated the temporality and consistency of possible triggers of SSC-CIP in a large case series. Biological plausibility of the individual triggers is discussed in a scientific context. SSC-CIP cases were recruited retrospectively from 2633 patients who underwent or were scheduled for liver transplantation at the University Hospital Charité, Berlin. All patients who developed secondary sclerosing cholangitis in association with intensive care treatment were included. Possible trigger factors during the course of the initial intensive care treatment were recorded. Sixteen patients (68% males, mean age 45.87 ± 14.64 years) with a confirmed diagnosis of SSC-CIP were identified. Of the 19 risk factors investigated, particularly severe hypotension with a prolonged decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) to <65 mmHg and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) were established as possible triggers of SSC-CIP. The occurrence of severe hypotension appears to be the first and most significant step in the pathogenesis. It seems that severe hypotension has a critical effect on the blood supply of bile ducts when it occurs together with additional microcirculatory disturbances. In critically ill patients with newly acquired cholestasis the differential diagnosis of SSC-CIP should be considered when they have had an episode of haemodynamic instability with a prolonged decrease in MAP, initial need for large amounts of blood transfusions or colloids, and early

  8. Surveillance of primary sclerosing cholangitis with ERC and brush cytology: risk factors for cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Sonja; Mustonen, Harri; Tenca, Andrea; Jokelainen, Kalle; Arola, Johanna; Färkkilä, Martti A

    2017-02-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease leading to bile duct strictures and fibrosis, and predisposing to cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Biliary dysplasia is a known precursor of CCA. In our unit, PSC patients undergo regular surveillance with ERC and brush cytology (BC), and liver transplantation is an option in case with biliary dysplasia. We evaluated the risk factors for biliary dysplasia and CCA based on ERC imaging, BC and liver function tests. Seven hundred and eighty-eight ERCs were performed with BC for 447 PSC patients. ERC images were evaluated using the modified Amsterdam score, neutrophilic inflammation was assessed in BC, and liver function tests were collected. Ploidy analysis with DNA flow cytometry was performed in cases with advanced PSC or previous suspicious BC/aneuploidy. The endpoint was either a benign disease course (follow-up for ≥2.4 years after the latest ERC), benign histology, biliary dysplasia or CCA. Benign disease course was seen in 424/447 (including 23 cases with biliary dysplasia), and CCA in 17 (3.8%) patients. Gallbladder carcinoma/carcinoma in situ was diagnosed in three patients. Advanced ERC findings, male gender, suspicious BC, aneuploidy in flow cytometry, inflammation, and elevation of ALP, bilirubin, ALT, AST, GGT, CEA and CA19-9 represented significant risk factors for CCA in univariate analysis. PSC patients with advanced bile duct disease and elevated liver enzymes, CEA or CA19-9, inflammation or suspicious BC are most likely to develop CCA. These patients may benefit from surveillance with BC if early liver transplantation is possible.

  9. Secondary Sclerosing Cholangitis in Critically Ill Patients: Clinical Presentation, Cholangiographic Features, Natural History, and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Silke; Veltzke-Schlieker, Wilfried; Adler, Andreas; Schott, Eckart; Eurich, Dennis; Faber, Wladimir; Neuhaus, Peter; Seehofer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Secondary sclerosing cholangitis in critically ill patients (SSC-CIP) is an important differential diagnosis in patients presenting with cholestasis and PSC-like cholangiographic changes in endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). As a relatively newly described entity, SSC-CIP is still underdiagnosed, and the diagnosis is often delayed. The present study aims to improve the early detection of SSC-CIP and the identification of its complications. A total of 2633 records of patients who underwent or were listed for orthotopic liver transplantation at the University Hospital Charité, Berlin, were analyzed retrospectively. The clinical presentation and outcome (mean follow-up 62.7 months) of the 16 identified SSC-CIP cases were reviewed. Cholestasis was the first sign of SSC-CIP. GGT was the predominant enzyme of cholestasis. Hypercholesterolemia occurred in at least 75% of the patients. SSC-CIP provoked a profound weight loss (mean 18 kg) in 94% of our patients. SSC-CIP was diagnosed by ERC in all patients. The 3 different cholangiographic features detected correspond roughly to the following stages: (I) evidence of biliary casts, (II) progressive destruction of intrahepatic bile ducts, and (III) picture of pruned tree. Biliary cast formation is a hallmark of SSC-CIP and was seen in 87% of our cases. In 75% of the patients, the clinical course was complicated by cholangiosepsis, cholangitic liver abscesses, acalculous cholecystitis, or gallbladder perforation. SSC-CIP was associated with worse prognosis; transplant-free survival was ∼40 months (mean). Because of its high rate of serious complications and unfavorable prognosis, it is imperative to diagnose SSC-CIP early and to differentiate SSC-CIP from other types of sclerosing cholangitis. Specific characteristics enable identification of SSC-CIP. Early cooperation with a transplant center and special attention to biliary complications are required after diagnosis of SSC-CIP. PMID:26656347

  10. MicroRNAs in Serum and Bile of Patients with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis and/or Cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigtländer, Torsten; Gupta, Shashi K; Thum, Sabrina; Fendrich, Jasmin; Manns, Michael P; Lankisch, Tim O; Thum, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are at high risk for the development of cholangiocarcinoma (CC). Analysis of micro ribonucleic acid (MiRNA) patterns is an evolving research field in biliary pathophysiology with potential value in diagnosis and therapy. Our aim was to evaluate miRNA patterns in serum and bile of patients with PSC and/or CC. Serum and bile from consecutive patients with PSC (n = 40 (serum), n = 52 (bile)), CC (n = 31 (serum), n = 19 (bile)) and patients with CC complicating PSC (PSC/CC) (n = 12 (bile)) were analyzed in a cross-sectional study between 2009 and 2012. As additional control serum samples from healthy individuals were analyzed (n = 12). The miRNA levels in serum and bile were determined with global miRNA profiling and subsequent miRNA-specific polymerase chain reaction-mediated validation. Serum analysis revealed significant differences for miR-1281 (p = 0.001), miR-126 (p = 0.001), miR-26a (p = 0.001), miR-30b (p = 0.001) and miR-122 (p = 0.034) between patients with PSC and patients with CC. All validated miRNAs were significantly lower in healthy individuals. MiR-412 (p = 0.001), miR-640 (p = 0.001), miR-1537 (p = 0.003) and miR-3189 (p = 0.001) were significantly different between patients with PSC and PSC/CC in bile. Patients with PSC and/or CC have distinct miRNA profiles in serum and bile. Furthermore, miRNA concentrations are different in bile of patients with CC on top of PSC indicating the potential diagnostic value of these miRNAs.

  11. MR imaging of primary sclerosing cholangitis - Additional value of diffusion-weighted imaging and ADC measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djokicc Kovac, Jelena [Center for Radiology and Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Clinical Center Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia)], e-mail: jelenadjokic2003@yahoo.co.uk; Maksimovic, Ruzica [Center for Radiology and Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Clinical Center Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Medicine, Univ. of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Jesic, Rada [Clinic for Gastroenterohepatology, Clinical Center Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Medicine, Univ. of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Stanisavljevic, Dejana [Inst. for Statistics, Faculty of Medicine, Univ. of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Kovac, Bojan [Military Medical Academy, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2013-04-15

    Background: Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a cholestatic liver disease with chronic inflammation and progressive destruction of biliary tree. Magnetic resonance (MR) examination with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) allows analysis of morphological liver parenchymal changes and non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis. Moreover, MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), as a part of standard MR protocol, provides insight into bile duct irregularities. Purpose: To evaluate MR and MRCP findings in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and to determine the value of DWI in the assessment of liver fibrosis. Material and Methods: The following MR findings were reviewed in 38 patients: abnormalities in liver parenchyma signal intensity, changes in liver morphology, lymphadenopathy, signs of portal hypertension, and irregularities of intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was calculated for six locations in the liver for b = 800 s/mm{sup 2}. Results: T2-weighted hyperintensity was seen as peripheral wedge-shaped areas in 42.1% and as periportal edema in 28.9% of patients. Increased enhancement of liver parenchyma on arterial-phase imaging was observed in six (15.8%) patients. Caudate lobe hypertrophy was present in 10 (26.3%), while spherical liver shape was noted in 7.9% of patients. Liver cirrhosis was seen in 34.2% of patients; the most common pattern was micronodular cirrhosis (61.5%). Other findings included lymphadenopathy (28.9%), signs of portal hypertension (36.7%), and bile duct irregularities (78.9%). The mean ADCs (x10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) were significantly different at stage I vs. stages III and IV, and stage II vs. stage IV. No significant difference was found between stages II and III. For prediction of stage {>=}II and stage {>=}III, areas under receiver-operating characteristic curves were 0.891 and 0.887, respectively. Conclusion: MR with MRCP is a necessary diagnostic procedure for diagnosis of PSC and

  12. Increased cholestatic enzymes in two patients with long-term history of ulcerative colitis: consider primary biliary cholangitis not always primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychronopoulou, Erietta; Lygoura, Vasiliki; Gatselis, Nikolaos K; Dalekos, George N

    2017-09-25

    Several hepatobiliary disorders have been reported in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) being the most specific. Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), previously known as primary biliary cirrhosis, rarely occurs in UC. We present two PBC cases of 67 and 71 years who suffered from long-standing UC. Both patients were asymptomatic but they had increased cholestatic enzymes and high titres of antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA)-the laboratory hallmark of PBC. After careful exclusion of other causes of cholestasis by MRI/magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), virological and microbiological investigations, a diagnosis of PBC associated with UC was established. The patients started ursodeoxycholic acid (13 mg/kg/day) with complete response. During follow-up, both patients remained asymptomatic with normal blood biochemistry. Although PSC is the most common hepatobiliary manifestation among patients with UC, physicians must keep also PBC in mind in those with unexplained cholestasis and repeatedly normal MRCP. In these cases, a reliable AMA testing can help for an accurate diagnosis. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Prospective evaluation of ursodeoxycholic acid withdrawal in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Ewa; Trottier, Jocelyn; Milkiewicz, Malgorzata; Raszeja-Wyszomirska, Joanna; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Barbier, Olivier; Milkiewicz, Piotr

    2014-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is no longer recommended for management of adult patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We undertook a prospective evaluation of UDCA withdrawal in a group of consecutive patients with PSC. Twenty six patients, all treated with UDCA (dose range: 10-15 mg/kg/day) were included. Paired blood samples for liver biochemistry, bile acids, and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) were collected before UDCA withdrawal and 3 months later. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was used for quantification of 29 plasma bile acid metabolites. Pruritus and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were assessed with a 10-point numeric rating scale, the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36), and PBC-40 questionnaires. UDCA withdrawal resulted in a significant deterioration in liver biochemistry (increase of alkaline phosphatase of 75.6%; Pacid analysis revealed a significant decrease in lithocholic acid and its derivatives after UDCA withdrawal, but no effect on concentrations of primary bile acids aside from an increased accumulation of their taurine conjugates. After UDCA removal cholestatic parameters, taurine species of cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid correlated with serum FGF19 levels. No significant effect on HRQoL after UDCA withdrawal was observed; however, 42% of patients reported a deterioration in their pruritus. At 3 months, discontinuation of UDCA in patients with PSC causes significant deterioration in liver biochemistry and influences concentrations of bile acid metabolites. A proportion of patients report increased pruritus, but other short-term markers of quality of life are unaffected. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  14. Ursodeoxycholic acid in patients with ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis for prevention of colon cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Imran; Choudhary, Abhishek; Arif, Murtaza; Matteson, Michelle L; Hammad, Hazem T; Puli, Srinivas R; Bechtold, Matthew L

    2012-04-01

    Colon cancer risk is high in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Ursodeoxycholic acid has been shown to have some promise as a chemopreventive agent. A meta-analysis was performed to compare the efficacy of ursodeoxycholic acid in the prevention of colonic neoplasia in patients with UC and PSC. Multiple databases were searched (January 2011). Studies examining the use of ursodeoxycholic acid vs. no ursodeoxycholic acid or placebo in adult patients with UC and PSC were included. Data were extracted in standard forms by two independent reviewers. Meta-analysis for the effect of ursodeoxycholic acid was performed by calculating pooled estimates of adenoma or colon cancer formation by odds ratio (OR) with random effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed by calculating the I (2) measure of inconsistency. RevMan 5 was utilized for statistical analysis. Four studies (n = 281) met the inclusion criteria. The studies were of adequate quality. Ursodeoxycholic acid demonstrated no overall improvement in adenoma (OR 0.53; 95 % CI: 0.19-1.48, p = 0.23) or colon cancer occurrence (OR 0.50; 95 % CI: 0.18-1.43, p = 0.20) as compared to no ursodeoxycholic acid or placebo in patients with UC and PSC. Ursodeoxycholic acid use in patients with UC and PSC does not appear to decrease the risk of adenomas or colon cancer.

  15. Detection of Cholangiocarcinoma with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Bile in Patients with and without Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albiin, N.; Smith, I.C.P.; Arnelo, U.; Lindberg, B.; Bergquist, A.; Dolenko, B.; Bryksina, N.; Bezabeh, T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Early detection of cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is very difficult, especially in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) who are at increased risk of developing CC. Purpose: To evaluate 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) of bile as a diagnostic marker for CC in patients with and without PSC. Material and Methods: The institutional review board approved the study, and all patients gave informed consent. Bile from 49 patients was sampled and investigated using 1 H-MRS. MR spectra of bile samples from 45 patients (18 female; age range 22-87 years, mean age 57 years) were analyzed both conventionally and using computerized multivariate analysis. Sixteen of the patients had CC, 18 had PSC, and 11 had other benign findings. Results: The spectra of bile from CC patients differed from the benign group in the levels of phosphatidylcholine, bile acids, lipid, and cholesterol. It was possible to distinguish CC from benign conditions in all patients with malignancy. Two benign non-PSC patients were misclassified as malignant. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 88.9%, 87.1%, and 87.8%, respectively. Conclusion: With 1 H-MRS of bile, cholangiocarcinoma could be discriminated from benign biliary conditions with or without PSC

  16. Gut barrier failure biomarkers are associated with poor disease outcome in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornai, Tamas; Palyu, Eszter; Vitalis, Zsuzsanna; Tornai, Istvan; Tornai, David; Antal-Szalmas, Peter; Norman, Gary L; Shums, Zakera; Veres, Gabor; Dezsofi, Antal; Par, Gabriella; Par, Alajos; Orosz, Peter; Szalay, Ferenc; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Papp, Maria

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the prevalence of a panel of serologic markers that reflect gut barrier dysfunction in a mixed cohort of pediatric and adult primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) patients. METHODS Sera of 67 PSC patients [median age (range): 32 (5-79) years, concomitant IBD: 67% and cirrhosis: 20%] were assayed for the presence of antibodies against to F-actin (AAA IgA/IgG) and gliadin (AGA IgA/IgG)] and for serum level of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) by ELISA. Markers of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure [LPS binding protein (LBP)] and various anti-microbial antibodies [anti-OMP Plus IgA and endotoxin core IgA antibody (EndoCAb)] were also determined. Poor disease outcome was defined as orthotopic liver transplantation and/or liver-related death during the follow-up [median: 99 (14-106) mo]. One hundred and fifty-three healthy subjects (HCONT) and 172 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients were the controls. RESULTS A total of 28.4%, 28.0%, 9% and 20.9% of PSC patients were positive for AAA IgA, AAA IgG, AGA IgA and AGA IgG, respectively. Frequencies of AAA IgA and AAA IgG (P < 0.001, for both) and AGA IgG (P = 0.01, for both) but not AGA IgA were significantly higher compared to both of the HCONT and the UC groups. In survival analysis, AAA IgA-positivity was revealed as an independent predictor of poor disease outcome after adjusting either for the presence of cirrhosis [HR = 5.15 (1.27-20.86), P = 0.022 or for the Mayo risk score (HR = 4.24 (0.99-18.21), P = 0.052]. AAA IgA-positivity was significantly associated with higher frequency of anti-microbial antibodies (P < 0.001 for EndoCab IgA and P = 0.012 for anti-OMP Plus IgA) and higher level of the enterocyte damage marker (median I-FABPAAA IgA pos vs neg: 365 vs 166 pg/mL, P = 0.011), but not with serum LBP level. CONCLUSION Presence of IgA type AAA identified PSC patients with progressive disease. Moreover, it is associated with enhanced mucosal immune response to various microbial antigens and

  17. MR elastography in primary sclerosing cholangitis: correlating liver stiffness with bile duct strictures and parenchymal changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookwalter, Candice A; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K; Eaton, John E; Smyrk, Thomas D; Ehman, Richard L

    2018-04-07

    To determine correlation of liver stiffness measured by MR Elastography (MRE) with biliary abnormalities on MR Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and MRI parenchymal features in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Fifty-five patients with PSC who underwent MRI of the liver with MRCP and MRE were retrospectively evaluated. Two board-certified abdominal radiologists in agreement reviewed the MRI, MRCP, and MRE images. The biliary tree was evaluated for stricture, dilatation, wall enhancement, and thickening at segmental duct, right main duct, left main duct, and common bile duct levels. Liver parenchyma features including signal intensity on T2W and DWI, and hyperenhancement in arterial, portal venous, and delayed phase were evaluated in nine Couinaud liver segments. Atrophy or hypertrophy of segments, cirrhotic morphology, varices, and splenomegaly were scored as present or absent. Regions of interest were placed in each of the nine segments on stiffness maps wherever available and liver stiffness (LS) was recorded. Mean segmental LS, right lobar (V-VIII), left lobar (I-III, and IVA, IVB), and global LS (average of all segments) were calculated. Spearman rank correlation analysis was performed for significant correlation. Features with significant correlation were then analyzed for significant differences in mean LS. Multiple regression analysis of MRI and MRCP features was performed for significant correlation with elevated LS. A total of 439/495 segments were evaluated and 56 segments not included in MRE slices were excluded for correlation analysis. Mean segmental LS correlated with the presence of strictures (r = 0.18, p duct strictures. Segments with increased LS show T2 hyperintensity, DWI hyperintensity, and post-contrast hyperenhancement. Global liver stiffness shows a moderate correlation with number of segmental strictures and significantly correlates with spleen stiffness, splenomegaly, and varices.

  18. Deterioration of cholestasis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiography in advanced primary sclerosing cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuers, U.; Spengler, U.; Sackmann, M.; Paumgartner, G.; Sauerbruch, T.

    1992-01-01

    Complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography specific to patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis have not yet been reported. We observed transient rises of serum bilirubin after diagnostic endoscopic retrograde cholangiography in five of 15 patients and persistent rises in three of 15

  19. Prospective evaluation of PBC-specific health-related quality of life questionnaires in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raszeja-Wyszomirska, Joanna; Wunsch, Ewa; Krawczyk, Marek; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios; Milkiewicz, Piotr

    2015-06-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis and Primary sclerosing cholangitis are autoimmune cholestatic liver diseases sharing a lot in common, including a significant impairment of patients' health-related quality of life HRQoL HRQoL in PBC is assessed with disease-specific PBC-40 and PBC-27 questionnaires. A PSC-specific questionnaire has not been developed. Neither PBC-40 nor PBC-27s applicability for PSC has been evaluated. We applied these three questionnaires for HRQoL assessment in a large homogenous cohort of PSC patients. This cross-sectional study enrolled 102 Caucasian PSCs and 53 matched healthy controls and measured HRQoL using generic SF-36, and disease-specific (PBC-40/PBC-27) questionnaires. (i) SF-36. Most SF-36 domains were significantly lower in PSCs than controls. Physical Functioning and Mental Component Summary scores were significantly lower in female patients and correlated negatively with age but not with concurrent inflammatory bowel disease. Cirrhosis was associated with lower Physical Functioning, Role Physical, General Health, Vitality and Physical Component Summary. (ii) PBC-40 and PBC-27. Both tools showed similar HRQoL impairment scoring. Fatigue and Cognitive were impaired in female patients. Several correlations existed between HRQoL and laboratory parameters, including cholestatic tests and Itch. Cirrhosis correlated with Other symptoms and Fatigue PBC-40. (iii) PBC-40 vs PBC-27. Strong correlations among most domains of both questionnaires were seen, as well as between (iv) SF-36 vs PBC-40 or SF-36 vs PBC-27. This is the first study directly comparing PBC-40, PBC-27 and SF-36 in PSC. PSC patients, especially females, show HRQoL impairment. PBC-40 and PBC-27 questionnaires could be of potential use for HRQoL assessment in PSC. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Isolated nail lichen planus with primary sclerosing cholangitis in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ajroush, N.; Al-Khenaizan, S.

    2007-01-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is an uncommon, inflammatory dermatosis with characteristic lesions affecting the skin, nails and the mucous membranes. It is rare in childhood. Although nail abnormalities have been reported in 1-10% of patients with LP, the prevalence of nail involvement in affected children is unknown. Here we report a 2-year-old child with isolated nail LP, in association with primary sclerosing cholangitis. (author)

  1.  Alkaline phosphatase normalization is a biomarker of improved survival in primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilscher, Moira; Enders, Felicity B; Carey, Elizabeth J; Lindor, Keith D; Tabibian, James H

    2016-01-01

     Introduction. Recent studies suggest that serum alkaline phosphatase may represent a prognostic biomarker in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis. However, this association remains poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance and clinical correlates of alkaline phosphatase normalization in primary sclerosing cholangitis. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with a new diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis made at an academic medical center. The primary endpoint was time to hepatobiliaryneoplasia, liver transplantation, or liver-related death. Secondary endpoints included occurrence of and time to alkaline phosphatase normalization. Patients who did and did not achieve normalization were compared with respect to clinical characteristics and endpoint-free survival, and the association between normalization and the primary endpoint was assessed with univariate and multivariate Cox proportional-hazards analyses. Eighty six patients were included in the study, with a total of 755 patient-years of follow-up. Thirty-eight patients (44%) experienced alkaline phosphatase normalization within 12 months of diagnosis. Alkaline phosphatase normalization was associated with longer primary endpoint-free survival (p = 0.0032) and decreased risk of requiring liver transplantation (p = 0.033). Persistent normalization was associated with even fewer adverse endpoints as well as longer survival. In multivariate analyses, alkaline phosphatase normalization (adjusted hazard ratio 0.21, p = 0.012) and baseline bilirubin (adjusted hazard ratio 4.87, p = 0.029) were the only significant predictors of primary endpoint-free survival. Alkaline phosphatase normalization, particularly if persistent, represents a robust biomarker of improved long-term survival and decreased risk of requiring liver transplantation in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis.

  2. Secondary Sclerosing Cholangitis in Critically Ill Patients: Clinical Presentation, Cholangiographic Features, Natural History, and Outcome: A Series of 16 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Silke; Veltzke-Schlieker, Wilfried; Adler, Andreas; Schott, Eckart; Eurich, Dennis; Faber, Wladimir; Neuhaus, Peter; Seehofer, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Secondary sclerosing cholangitis in critically ill patients (SSC-CIP) is an important differential diagnosis in patients presenting with cholestasis and PSC-like cholangiographic changes in endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). As a relatively newly described entity, SSC-CIP is still underdiagnosed, and the diagnosis is often delayed. The present study aims to improve the early detection of SSC-CIP and the identification of its complications.A total of 2633 records of patients who underwent or were listed for orthotopic liver transplantation at the University Hospital Charité, Berlin, were analyzed retrospectively. The clinical presentation and outcome (mean follow-up 62.7 months) of the 16 identified SSC-CIP cases were reviewed.Cholestasis was the first sign of SSC-CIP. GGT was the predominant enzyme of cholestasis. Hypercholesterolemia occurred in at least 75% of the patients. SSC-CIP provoked a profound weight loss (mean 18 kg) in 94% of our patients. SSC-CIP was diagnosed by ERC in all patients. The 3 different cholangiographic features detected correspond roughly to the following stages: (I) evidence of biliary casts, (II) progressive destruction of intrahepatic bile ducts, and (III) picture of pruned tree. Biliary cast formation is a hallmark of SSC-CIP and was seen in 87% of our cases. In 75% of the patients, the clinical course was complicated by cholangiosepsis, cholangitic liver abscesses, acalculous cholecystitis, or gallbladder perforation. SSC-CIP was associated with worse prognosis; transplant-free survival was ∼40 months (mean).Because of its high rate of serious complications and unfavorable prognosis, it is imperative to diagnose SSC-CIP early and to differentiate SSC-CIP from other types of sclerosing cholangitis. Specific characteristics enable identification of SSC-CIP. Early cooperation with a transplant center and special attention to biliary complications are required after diagnosis of SSC-CIP.

  3. Bile acid changes after high-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment in primary sclerosing cholangitis: relation to disease progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinakos, Emmanouil; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Kowdley, Kris V.; Befeler, Alex; Keach, Jill; Lindor, Keith

    2010-01-01

    High-dose (28-30mg/kg/day) ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) treatment improves serum liver tests in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) but does not improve survival and is associated with increased rates of serious adverse events. The mechanism for the latter undesired effect remains unclear. High-dose UDCA could result in the production of hepatotoxic bile acids, such as lithocholic acid (LCA), due to limited small bowel absorption of UDCA and conversion of UDCA by bacteria in the colon. We determined the serum bile acid composition in 56 patients with PSC previously enrolled in a randomized, double-blind controlled trial of high dose UDCA versus placebo. Samples for analysis were obtained at baseline and at the end of treatment. The mean changes in UDCA (16.86 vs 0.05 μmol/L) and total bile acid (17.21 vs −0.55 μmol/L) levels were significantly higher in the UDCA group (n=29) compared to placebo (n=27) when pretreatment levels were compared (pacid (CA), deoxycholic acid (DCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). Patients (n=9) in the UDCA group who reached clinical endpoints of disease progression (development of cirrhosis, varices, liver transplantation or death) tend to have greater increase in their post-treatment total bile acid levels (34.99 vs 9.21 μmol/L) (pacid pool including lithocholic acid. PMID:20564380

  4. High-Dose Ursodeoxycholic Acid Is Associated With the Development of Colorectal Neoplasia in Patients With Ulcerative Colitis and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, John E.; Silveira, Marina G.; Pardi, Darrell S.; Sinakos, Emmanouil; Kowdley, Kris V.; Luketic, Velimir A.C.; Harrison, M. Edwyn; McCashland, Timothy; Befeler, Alex S.; Harnois, Denise; Jorgensen, Roberta; Petz, Jan; Lindor, Keith D.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Some studies have suggested that ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) may have a chemopreventive effect on the development of colorectal neoplasia in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We examined the effects of high-dose (28–30 mg/kg/day) UDCA on the development of colorectal neoplasia in patients with UC and PSC. METHODS Patients with UC and PSC enrolled in a prior, multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial of high-dose UDCA were evaluated for the development of colorectal neoplasia. Patients with UC and PSC who received UDCA were compared with those who received placebo. We reviewed the pathology and colonoscopy reports for the development of low-grade or high-grade dysplasia or colorectal cancer. RESULTS Fifty-six subjects were followed for a total of 235 patient years. Baseline characteristics (including duration of PSC and UC, medications, patient age, family history of colorectal cancer, and smoking status) were similar for both the groups. Patients who received high-dose UDCA had a significantly higher risk of developing colorectal neoplasia (dysplasia and cancer) during the study compared with those who received placebo (hazard ratio: 4.44, 95% confidence interval: 1.30–20.10, P=0.02). CONCLUSIONS Long-term use of high-dose UDCA is associated with an increased risk of colorectal neoplasia in patients with UC and PSC. PMID:21556038

  5. Case report: A female case of isolated IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis mimicking cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianchun; Li, Guanqiao; Yang, Gang; Jia, Congwei; Li, Binglu

    2017-04-01

    IgG4-related disease is a newly recognized fibroinflammatory disorder, characterized by tumefactive lesions, storiform fibrosis and IgG4-positive plasma cells infiltration. IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) is the most common extrapancreatic manifestation of IgG4-related disease, but it is frequently associated with autoimmune pancreatitis(AIP). Only few case was reported to be diagnosed with IgG4-SC in the absence of AIP, with a striking male preponderance. Here we report a female case of isolated IgG4 related sclerosing cholangitis mimicking cholangiocarcinoma. A 58-year-old woman complaint of one-month history of jaundice and right upper quadrant discomfort, and the biliary reconstruction showed full-length wall thickening and segmental stenosis. Cholangiocarcinoma was then diagnosed. Choledochoplasty was performed, followed by Roux-en-Y anastomosis. However, pathological examination revealed IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) and the retrospective measurement of serum IgG4 was 346 mg/dL post-operatively. The patient was followed for another nine monthswithout recurrence. The differential diagnosis between cholangiocarcinoma and IgG4-SC is challenging due to significant overlap of clinical manifestations, lab tests and imaging characteristics. However, as an afterthought of this case, typical cholangiocarcinoma rarely presents full-length wall thickening. What the case taught us was pre-operative IgG4 measurement for patients with long bile duct involvement was highly recommended in order to rule out IgG4-SC.

  6. Autoimmune hepatitis/sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome in childhood: a 16-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorio, G V; Portmann, B; Karani, J; Harrison, P; Donaldson, P T; Vergani, D; Mieli-Vergani, G

    2001-03-01

    To investigate whether sclerosing cholangitis with an autoimmune serology characteristic of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and AIH are distinct entities, we studied 55 consecutive children with clinical and/or biochemical evidence of liver disease and circulating antinuclear (ANA), anti-smooth muscle (SMA), and/or liver-kidney-microsomal type 1 (LKM1) autoantibodies. They underwent liver biopsy, direct cholangiography, sigmoidoscopy, and rectal biopsy at presentation. Twenty-eight were diagnosed as AIH in the absence and 27 autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC) in the presence of radiological features of cholangiopathy. Twenty-six ASC and 20 AIH had ANA and/or SMA; 1 ASC and 8 AIH LKM1 autoantibody. Similarities between the 2 conditions included most clinical and biochemical parameters and a lower frequency of HLA DR4. Inflammatory bowel disease and histological biliary changes were more common in ASC; coagulopathy, hypoalbuminemia, lymphocytic periportal hepatitis, and HLA DR3 were more common in AIH. Histological biliary changes were observed in 65% of ASC and 31% of AIH patients. Eighty-nine percent responded to immunosuppression. Follow-up liver biopsies from 17 ASC and 18 AIH patients had similarly reduced inflammatory activity and no progression to cirrhosis. Sixteen follow-up cholangiograms from AIH patients and 9 from ASC patients were unchanged, while 8 ASC patients showed a progressive cholangiopathy. One child with AIH and ulcerative colitis developed sclerosing cholangitis 8 years after presentation. At 2 to 16 years (median, 7 years) from presentation, all patients are alive, including 4 ASC patients who underwent liver transplantation. In conclusion, ASC and AIH are similarly prevalent in childhood; cholangiography is often needed to distinguish between these 2 entities, which are likely to lie within the same disease process.

  7. Pruritus is associated with severely impaired quality of life in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Rupp, Christian; Bruhin, Miriam; Schellberg, Dieter; Weiss, Karl H; Stefan, Reinhard; Donnerstag, Nadine; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Löwe, Bernd; Juenger, Jana; Sauer, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Quality of life, fundamental to the individual patient, has shown a lack of correlation with severity in research on several diseases. Thus, we aimed to identify factors associated with quality of life in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis. The Short Form Health Survey and the Patient Health Questionnaire were used to assess quality of life and depression. Complete data sets of 113 patients were analyzed for correlation with sex, age, presence of concomitant inflammatory bowel disease and dominant stenosis, frequency of pruritus, and Mayo Risk Score. Physical functioning decreased with age (P<0.001). Further, women experienced more prominent role limitations because of physical (P<0.03) and emotional (P<0.01) problems. Although patients' quality of life and depression scores were only slightly lower than normal, more frequent pruritus was associated with a considerable reduction in quality of life in terms of physical and social functioning, general and mental health, bodily pain, vitality, and roles (because of physical problems) (P<0.01). It did not differ significantly according to the Mayo Risk Score or the presence of dominant stenoses. Depression scores were only significantly affected in patients with more frequent pruritus. Pruritus severely affects quality of life in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and is associated with depression to varying extents, although the most commonly used parameters of disease severity do not correspond to quality of life in these patients. These findings need to be considered with respect to treatment outcomes and indications for liver transplantation.

  8. The effect of silver nitrate, chloroformic garlic extract and normal saline in induction of sclerosing cholangitis in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseni, Seyed V.; Mohebzadeh, J.; Mehrabani, D.; Amini, M.; Kumar, Perikala V.; Bagheri, Mohammad H.; Sadjjadi, Seyed M.; Amini, A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to the effects of 0.5% silver nitrate, 20% chloroformic garlic extract and 0.9% normal saline in induction of sclerosing cholangitis in the bile ducts of rabbits. During a 6-months period from April to September 2006 in Shiraz University Laboratory Animal Research Center, we selected 3 equal groups of rabbits. We injected 0.5% silver nitrate, 20% chloroformic garlic extract and 0.9% normal saline into the bile ducts of each group. The animals were euthanized and autopsied after 4 months and the liver and bile ducts were removed and studied histopathologically. Cholangiography was undertaken to evaluate the presence and extent of any sclerosing cholangitis. Animals showed sclerosing cholangitis in silver nitrate group (7 [58%]), one (8%) in chloroformic garlic extract group and one (7%) in normal saline group. The difference between silver nitrate and chloroformic garlic extract groups were statistically significant and similar results were noticed between chloroformic garlic extract and normal saline groups. Twenty percent of chloroformic garlic extract had fewer complications such as sclerosing cholangitis, compared to other materials. (author)

  9. Leukemoid reaction, a rare manifestation of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a case of small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salagre, Kaustubh D; Sahay, Ravindra Nath; Patil, Anuja; Pati, Anuja; Joshi, Amita; Shukla, Akash

    2013-10-01

    A 48 year old lady presented with jaundice and exertional breathlesness. Her laboratory reports showed anaemia, reticulocytosis, leucocytosis, elevated Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase levels, hyperbillirubinemia and positive direct Coomb's test. After ruling out all the other causes of autoimmunity and hemolytic anemia, she was diagnosed as leukemoid reaction due to autoimmune hemolytic anemia with primary sclerosing cholangitis. Patient showed immediate improvement after corticosteroids.

  10. IgG4-associated sclerosing cholangitis masquerading as hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Kamal Sunder; Sali, Priyanka Akhilesh; Mansukhani, Verushka M; Shah, Rajiv; Jagannath, P

    2016-07-01

    IgG4-sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) commonly presents with type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis. Isolated IgG4-SC is rare. Differentiating IgG4-SC from cholangiocarcinoma preoperatively is challenging due to overlapping radio-clinical manifestations and difficult preoperative histology. We present three cases preoperatively diagnosed and surgically treated as hilar cholangiocarcinoma. First and second cases presented with cholangiocarcinoma with portal vein involvement and third with a malignant-appearing hilar stricture. On histopathology, IgG4-SC was diagnosed in the first two cases. Third patient had raised serum IgG4, and histopathology was inconclusive for IgG4-SC and negative for malignancy. However, she responded to steroid therapy.

  11. Sclerosing cholangitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gallstones in the bile duct) Infections in the liver, gallbladder, and bile ducts Symptoms The first symptoms are usually: Fatigue Itching ... varices (enlarged veins) Biliary cirrhosis (inflammation of the bile ducts) Liver failure Persistent jaundice Some people develop infections of ...

  12. Combination Therapy of All-Trans Retinoic Acid With Ursodeoxycholic Acid in Patients With Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: A Human Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assis, David N; Abdelghany, Osama; Cai, Shi-Ying; Gossard, Andrea A; Eaton, John E; Keach, Jill C; Deng, Yanhong; Setchell, Kenneth D R; Ciarleglio, Maria; Lindor, Keith D; Boyer, James L

    2017-02-01

    To perform an exploratory pilot study of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) combined with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). PSC is a progressive disorder for which there is no accepted therapy. Studies in human hepatocyte cultures and in animal models of cholestasis indicate that ATRA might have beneficial effects in cholestatic disorders. ATRA (45 mg/m/d, divided and given twice daily) was combined with moderate-dose UDCA in patients with PSC who had incomplete response to UDCA monotherapy. The combination was administered for 12 weeks, followed by a 12-week washout in which patients returned to UDCA monotherapy. We measured alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), bilirubin, cholesterol, bile acids, and the bile acid intermediate 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) at baseline, week 12, and after washout. Fifteen patients completed 12 weeks of therapy. The addition of ATRA to UDCA reduced the median serum ALP levels (277±211 to 243±225 U/L, P=0.09) although this, the primary endpoint, did not reach significance. In contrast, median serum ALT (76±55 to 46±32 U/L, P=0.001) and C4 (9.8±19 to 7.9±11 ng/mL, P=0.03) levels significantly decreased. After washout, ALP and C4 levels nonsignificantly increased, whereas ALT levels significantly increased (46±32 to 74±74, P=0.0006), returning to baseline. In this human pilot study, the combination of ATRA and UDCA did not achieve the primary endpoint (ALP); however, it significantly reduced ALT and the bile acid intermediate C4. ATRA appears to inhibit bile acid synthesis and reduce markers of inflammation, making it a potential candidate for further study in PSC (NCT 01456468).

  13. Analysis of U2 small nuclear RNA fragments in the bile differentiates cholangiocarcinoma from primary sclerosing cholangitis and other benign biliary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Schumacher, Brigitte; Gerges, Christian; Bracht, Thilo; Sitek, Barbara; Meyer, Helmut E; Gerken, Guido; Dechene, Alexander; Schlaak, Jörg F; Schroers, Roland; Pox, Christian; Schmiegel, Wolff; Hahn, Stephan A

    2014-07-01

    Up to now the diagnosis of early stage cholangiocarcinoma (CC) has remained difficult, with low sensitivities reported for current diagnostic methods. Based on recent promising findings about circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments (RNU2-1f) as novel blood-based biomarkers for pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma, we studied the utility of RNU2-1f as a diagnostic marker of CC in bile fluid. Bile fluid was collected from patients with CC (n = 12), controls (patients with choledocholithiasis) (n = 11) and with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC; n = 11). RNU2-1f levels were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction normalized to cel-54. Measurement of RNU2-1f levels in bile fluids enabled the differentiation of patients with CC from controls in all cases. Furthermore, RNU2-1f levels in bile fluids of patients with CC were significantly higher than in patients with PSC, resulting in a receiver-operating characteristic curve area of 0.856, with sensitivity of 67 % and specificity of 91 %. Our data suggest that the measurement of RNU2-1 fragments detected in the bile fluid can be used as a diagnostic marker for CC and should be included in future prospective diagnostic studies for this disease entity.

  14. Newly Diagnosed Colonic Adenocarcinoma: The Presenting Sign in a Young Woman with Undiagnosed Crohn’s Disease in the Absence of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis and a Normal Microsatellite Instability Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Matthew Lowenthal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ulcerative colitis has long been linked with an increased risk for colonic adenocarcinoma, whereas Crohn’s disease (CD has recently been reported to pose a similar increased risk. We report a 33-year-old healthy female with no family history who presented with abdominal pain and a colon mass. Histopathology revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma extending through the muscularis propria with metastatic lymph nodes and intact mismatch repair proteins by immunohistochemical expression and gene sequencing. The nonneoplastic grossly uninvolved background mucosa showed marked crypt distortion, crypt abscesses, CD-like lymphoid hyperplasia, transmural inflammation, and reactive epithelial atypia. Additional patient questioning revealed frequent loose stools since she was a teenager leading to diagnosis of a previously undiagnosed CD without primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC. The adenocarcinoma is suspected to be related to the underlying CD. Newly diagnosed adenocarcinoma in a young female as the presenting sign for CD in the absence of PSC is extremely rare.

  15. IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis overlapping with autoimmune hepatitis: Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyan; Sun, Li; Brigstock, David R; Qi, Lina; Gao, Runping

    2017-05-01

    IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) is the biliary manifestation of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) but the presence of IgG4-SC in the porta hepatis is difficult to differentiate from hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HCCA). IgG4-related autoimmune hepatitis (IgG4-related AIH) is extremely rare and it is not fully clear whether IgG4-related AIH is a hepatic manifestation of IgG4-RD or a subtype of AIH. We present a rare case of a 52-year-old male who was admitted with obstructive jaundice and itchy skin. He primarily presented a severe bile duct stricture in the porta hepatis and an elevated serum level of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) mimicking HCCA. The patient underwent a surgical resection of the left hepatic lobular and cholecyst as well as common bile duct with a right hepatico-jejunostomy. He was finally diagnosed as IgG4-SC accompanied with IgG4-related AIH by immunohistochemistry, but he lacked conventional autoantibodies. The patient responded well to steroid therapy and remains healthy with no signs of recurrence at six-month follow-up. This is the first case report that hepatic portal IgG4-SC overlapping with IgG4-related AIH without the presence of conventional autoantibodies. Additionally, we suggest that IgG4-RD should be always considered in case of a bile duct stricture in the porta hepatis to avoid unnecessary surgical operation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. IgG4-related disease: with emphasis on the biopsy diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Klöppel, Günter

    2018-04-01

    In 2011, chronic fibroinflammatory processes occurring simultaneously or metachronously in various organs and associated with elevated IgG4 serum levels and/or tissue infiltration with IgG4-positive plasma cells have been recognized as manifestations of a systemic disorder called IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). The histologic key findings are lymphoplasmacytic infiltration rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells combined with storiform fibrosis and obliterative phlebitis. Among the organs mainly affected by IgG4-RD are the pancreas and the extrahepatic bile ducts. The pancreatic and biliary alterations have been described under the terms autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and sclerosing cholangitis, respectively. These diseases are currently more precisely called IgG4-related pancreatitis (or type 1 AIP to distinguish it from type 2 AIP that is unrelated to IgG4-RD) and IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-related SC). Clinically and grossly, both diseases commonly imitate pancreatic and biliary adenocarcinoma, tumors that are well known for their dismal prognosis. As IgG4-RD responds to steroid treatment, making a resection of a suspected tumor unnecessary, a biopsy is often required to establish the preoperative diagnosis. This review discusses the morphologic spectrum of IgG4-related pancreatitis and IgG4-related SC and focuses on the biopsy relevant histologic features for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of these diseases.

  17. Ursodeoxycholic acid therapy for primary sclerosing cholangitis: results of a 2-year randomized controlled trial to evaluate single versus multiple daily doses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoogstraten, H. J.; Wolfhagen, F. H.; van de Meeberg, P. C.; Kuiper, H.; Nix, G. A.; Becx, M. C.; Hoek, A. C.; van Houte, D. P.; Rijk, M. C.; Salemans, J. M.; Scherpenisse, J.; Schrijver, M.; Smit, A. M.; Spoelstra, P.; Stadhouders, P. H.; Tan, T. G.; Hop, W. C.; ten Kate, F. J.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Schalm, S. W.; van Buuren, H. R.

    1998-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid has been reported to be of potential benefit for primary sclerosing cholangitis but little is known about the long-term biochemical, histological and radiological efficacy or the optimum frequency of ursodeoxycholic acid administration. A 2-year multicentre randomised controlled

  18. Vascular adhesion protein-1 is elevated in primary sclerosing cholangitis, is predictive of clinical outcome and facilitates recruitment of gut-tropic lymphocytes to liver in a substrate-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Palak J; Tickle, Joseph; Vesterhus, Mette Nåmdal; Eddowes, Peter J; Bruns, Tony; Vainio, Jani; Parker, Richard; Smith, David; Liaskou, Evaggelia; Thorbjørnsen, Liv Wenche; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Auvinen, Kaisa; Hubscher, Stefan G; Salmi, Marko; Adams, David H; Weston, Chris J

    2018-06-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is the classical hepatobiliary manifestation of IBD. This clinical association is linked pathologically to the recruitment of mucosal T cells to the liver, via vascular adhesion protein (VAP)-1-dependent enzyme activity. Our aim was to examine the expression, function and enzymatic activation of the ectoenzyme VAP-1 in patients with PSC. We examined VAP-1 expression in patients with PSC, correlated levels with clinical characteristics and determined the functional consequences of enzyme activation by specific enzyme substrates on hepatic endothelium. The intrahepatic enzyme activity of VAP-1 was elevated in PSC versus immune-mediated disease controls and non-diseased liver (pgut-tropic α4β7 + lymphocytes to hepatic endothelial cells in vitro under flow was attenuated by 50% following administration of the VAP-1 inhibitor semicarbazide (pgut bacteria-was the most efficient (yielded the highest enzymatic rate) and efficacious in its ability to induce expression of functional mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 on hepatic endothelium. In a prospectively evaluated patient cohort with PSC, elevated serum soluble (s)VAP-1 levels predicted poorer transplant-free survival for patients, independently (HR: 3.85, p=0.003) and additively (HR: 2.02, p=0.012) of the presence of liver cirrhosis. VAP-1 expression is increased in PSC, facilitates adhesion of gut-tropic lymphocytes to liver endothelium in a substrate-dependent manner, and elevated levels of its circulating form predict clinical outcome in patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Celiac Disease, Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma, and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis in One Patient: A Very Rare Association and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Majid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL is a very rare peripheral T-cell lymphoma which is mostly associated with celiac disease. However, the association of primary sclerosing cholangitis and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma is uncommon. Herein we report and discuss the first case of patient who presented simultaneously with these two rare diseases. It is a 54-year-old man who stopped gluten-free diet after 15 years history of celiac disease. The diagnosis was based on the histological examination of duodenal biopsy and the diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis was made on liver biopsy, as well as the magnetic resonance cholangiogram. The treatment of EATL is mainly based on chemotherapy in addition to the optimal management of complications and adverse events that impact on the response to treatment and clinical outcomes, although the prognosis remains remarkably very poor.

  20. Risk factors and prognosis for recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis after liver transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindström, Lina; Jørgensen, Kristin K; Boberg, Kirsten M

    2018-01-01

    PSC for prognosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All liver transplanted PSC patients in the Nordic countries between 1984 and 2007 (n = 440), identified by the Nordic Liver Transplant Registry, were studied. Data were retrieved from patients' chart reviews. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to calculate risk...

  1. Inhibition of intestinal bile acid absorption improves cholestatic liver and bile duct injury in a mouse model of sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdasaryan, Anna; Fuchs, Claudia D; Österreicher, Christoph H; Lemberger, Ursula J; Halilbasic, Emina; Påhlman, Ingrid; Graffner, Hans; Krones, Elisabeth; Fickert, Peter; Wahlström, Annika; Ståhlman, Marcus; Paumgartner, Gustav; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Trauner, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Approximately 95% of bile acids (BAs) excreted into bile are reabsorbed in the gut and circulate back to the liver for further biliary secretion. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of the ileal apical sodium-dependent BA transporter (ASBT/SLC10A2) may protect against BA-mediated cholestatic liver and bile duct injury. Eight week old Mdr2(-/-) (Abcb4(-/-)) mice (model of cholestatic liver injury and sclerosing cholangitis) received either a diet supplemented with A4250 (0.01% w/w) - a highly potent and selective ASBT inhibitor - or a chow diet. Liver injury was assessed biochemically and histologically after 4weeks of A4250 treatment. Expression profiles of genes involved in BA homeostasis, inflammation and fibrosis were assessed via RT-PCR from liver and ileum homogenates. Intestinal inflammation was assessed by RNA expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. Bile flow and composition, as well as biliary and fecal BA profiles were analyzed after 1week of ASBT inhibitor feeding. A4250 improved sclerosing cholangitis in Mdr2(-/-) mice and significantly reduced serum alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and BAs levels, hepatic expression of pro-inflammatory (Tnf-α, Vcam1, Mcp-1) and pro-fibrogenic (Col1a1, Col1a2) genes and bile duct proliferation (mRNA and immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin 19 (CK19)). Furthermore, A4250 significantly reduced bile flow and biliary BA output, which correlated with reduced Bsep transcription, while Ntcp and Cyp7a1 were induced. Importantly A4250 significantly reduced biliary BA secretion but preserved HCO3(-) and biliary phospholipid secretion resulting in an increased HCO3(-)/BA and PL/BA ratio. In addition, A4250 profoundly increased fecal BA excretion without causing diarrhea and altered BA pool composition, resulting in diminished concentrations of primary BAs tauro-β-muricholic acid and taurocholic acid. Pharmacological ASBT inhibition attenuates cholestatic liver and bile duct injury by reducing biliary BA

  2. Validation of the prognostic value of histologic scoring systems in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vries, Elisabeth M G; de Krijger, Manon; Färkkilä, Martti

    2017-01-01

    across a multicenter PSC cohort. Liver biopsies from PSC patients were collected from seven European institutions. Histologic scoring was performed using the Nakanuma, Ishak, and Ludwig scoring systems. Biopsies were independently scored by six liver pathologists for interobserver agreement.......19-5.80] for endpoint 2 and HR, 2.06 [95% CI, 1.09-3.89] for endpoint 3). Only the Nakanuma staging system was independently associated with endpoint 1: HR, 2.14 (95% CI, 1.22-3.77). Interobserver agreement was moderate for Nakanuma stage (κ = 0.56) and substantial for Nakanuma component fibrosis (κ = 0.67), Ishak...

  3. IgG4-Associated Cholangitis--A Mimic of PSC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuers, Ulrich; Hubers, Lowiek M.; Doorenspleet, Marieke; Maillette de Buy Wenniger, Lucas; Klarenbeek, Paul L.; Boonstra, Kirsten; Ponsioen, Cyriel; Rauws, Erik; de Vries, Niek

    2015-01-01

    IgG4-associated cholangitis (IAC) is an inflammatory disorder of the biliary tract representing a major manifestation of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) often with elevation of serum IgG4 levels, infiltration of IgG4+ plasma cells in the affected tissue and good response to immunosuppressive

  4. IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis and sclerosing cholangitis independent of autoimmune pancreatitis. A recurrent case after a 5-year history of spontaneous remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hideaki; Miyachi, Yasutaka

    2009-07-06

    A new clinicopathological concept of IgG4-related sclerosing disease affecting various organs has recently been proposed in relation to autoimmune pancreatitis. This report describes the case of IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis and sclerosing cholangitis independent of autoimmune pancreatitis, which recurred after a long period of spontaneous remission. An 80-year-old Japanese man presented with obstructive jaundice owing to a hepatic hilum bile duct stricture. Coincidentally, a soft tissue mass surrounding the abdominal aorta, suggesting retroperitoneal fibrosis, was identified. Unexpectedly, spontaneous regression of obstructive jaundice together with retroperitoneal fibrosis occurred. The presence of high serum IgG4 concentrations measured later led us to consider a possible association with autoimmune pancreatitis; however, there were no clinical features confirming autoimmune pancreatitis. After a 5-year history of spontaneous clinical remission, there was an elevation of serum IgG4 levels and renal dysfunction owing to bilateral hydronephrosis caused by a reemergence of the retroperitoneal mass. Evaluation by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed a biliary stricture, suggesting sclerosing cholangitis which was observed without the presence of any pancreatic duct abnormality. The subsequent excellent results obtained using steroid therapy, namely the decrease in serum IgG4 levels and the regression of the retroperitoneal mass, strongly suggested that the present case was an IgG4-related sclerosing disease. Aside from high serum IgG4 concentrations, markedly elevated levels of serum IgE was found retrospectively, although the clinical significance remains unknown. When we encounter fibrotic diseases of unknown etiology, we should measure serum IgG4 concentrations and monitor the disease activity over long periods even after achieving clinical remission.

  5. Efficacy and safety of vedolizumab as a treatment option for moderate to severe refractory ulcerative colitis in two patients after liver transplant due to primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Vicente Olmedo-Martín

    Full Text Available Vedolizumab is a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody that selectively blocks the lymphocyte integrin α4β7 and prevents its interaction with endothelial adhesion molecules and subsequent transmigration to the gastrointestinal tract. The drug was approved in 2014 for the induction and maintenance treatment of ulcerative colitis and moderate to severe Crohn's disease that is refractory or intolerant to conventional treatment with corticoids and immunosuppressants and/or anti-TNFα drugs. However, inflammatory bowel disease has a variable behavior following liver transplant. One third of patients with ulcerative colitis associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis are expected to deteriorate despite receiving immunosuppression to prevent rejection. There is limited experience with anti-TNFα agents in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in the setting of liver transplantation and the studies to date involve a limited number of cases. The efficacy and safety data of vedolizumab in this situation are unreliable and very preliminary. We present two cases with the aim to present the efficacy and safety of vedolizumab after one year of treatment in two patients who underwent a transplant due to primary sclerosing cholangitis. One case had de novo post-transplant ulcerative colitis refractory to two anti-TNFα drugs (golimumab and infliximab. The other patient had a colostomy due to fulminant colitis and developed severe ulcerative proctitis refractory to infliximab after reconstruction with an ileorectal anastomosis.

  6. Contrast enhanced liver MRI in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis: inverse appearance of focal confluent fibrosis on delayed phase MR images with hepatocyte specific versus extracellular gadolinium based contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husarik, Daniela B; Gupta, Rajan T; Ringe, Kristina I; Boll, Daniel T; Merkle, Elmar M

    2011-12-01

    To assess the enhancement pattern of focal confluent fibrosis (FCF) on contrast-enhanced hepatic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using hepatocyte-specific (Gd-EOB-DTPA) and extracellular (ECA) gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). After institutional review board approval, 10 patients with PSC (6 male, 4 female; 33-61 years) with 13 FCF were included in this retrospective study. All patients had a Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI exam, and a comparison ECA-enhanced MRI. On each T1-weighted dynamic dataset, the signal intensity (SI) of FCF and the surrounding liver as well as the paraspinal muscle (M) were measured. In the Gd-EOB-DTPA group, hepatocyte phase images were also included. SI FCF/SI M, SI liver/SI M, and [(SI liver - SI FCF)/SI liver] were compared between the different contrast agents for each dynamic phase using the paired Student's t-test. There was no significant difference in SI FCF/SI M in all imaging phases. SI liver/SI M was significantly higher for the Gd-EOB-DTPA group in the delayed phase (P DTPA group, mean [(SI liver - SI FCF)/SI liver] were as follows (values for ECA group in parentheses): unenhanced phase: 0.26 (0.26); arterial phase: 0.01 (-0.31); portal venous phase (PVP): -0.05 (-0.26); delayed phase (DP): 0.14 (-0.54); and hepatocyte phase: 0.26. Differences were significant for the DP (P DTPA-enhanced images. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of the multidetector-row computed tomography findings of IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yata, M.; Suzuki, K.; Furuhashi, N.; Kawakami, K.; Kawai, Y.; Naganawa, S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) findings of IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (EH-CCA). Materials and methods: Two radiologists who had no knowledge of the patients' clinical information retrospectively evaluated the CT findings of patients with IgG4-SC (n=33) and EH-CCA (n=39) on a consensus basis. Another radiologist measured the biliary lesions. IgG4-SC was diagnosed using the Japan Biliary Association criteria (2012) or the Mayo Clinic's HISORt criteria. EH-CCA was diagnosed based on surgical findings. Results: Compared with EH-CCA, IgG4-SC exhibited the following findings significantly more frequently: (a) wall thickening alone, (b) concentric wall thickening, (c) smooth inner margins, (d) homogeneous attenuation in the arterial phase, (e) a lesion involving the intrapancreatic bile duct, (f) smooth outer margins, (g) fully visible lumen, (h) a funnel-shaped proximal bile duct, (i) skip lesions, and (j) abnormal pancreatic findings. Conversely, (k) dual-layered attenuation in all phases was significantly more common in EH-CCA. The specificity values of parameters (e–k) were >80%. Regarding dimensions, (l) the biliary lesions were longer in IgG4-SC than in EH-CCA. (m) The diameters of the dilated proximal common bile duct and (n) the dilated proximal intrahepatic bile duct were smaller in IgG4-SC than in EH-CCA. Conclusion: A number of CT findings are useful for differentiating between IgG4-SC and EH-CCA. CT findings (e–k) are particularly useful for this purpose. - Highlights: • Some CT findings are useful for differentiating between IgG4-SC and EH-CCA. • Homogeneous attenuation in all phases was more common in IgG4-SC than in EH-CCA. • Abnormal pancreatic findings showed high sensitivity and specificity values. • Dual-layered attenuation in all phases was more common in EH-CCA than in IgG4-SC.

  8. Differential diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis and periductal infiltrating cancer in the common bile duct at dynamic CT, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and MR cholangiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Byun, Jae Ho; Lee, So Jung; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Seung Soo; Lee, Moon-Gyu [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asanbyeongwon-gil 86, Songpa-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung-Hwan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Asanbyeongwon-gil 86, Songpa-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jihun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Asanbyeongwon-gil 86, Songpa-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To compare findings at dynamic computed tomography (CT), endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) and magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) in patients with sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis (SC-AIP) and periductal infiltrating cancer in the common bile duct (CBD), and to evaluate the diagnostic performance of ERC and MRC in differentiating between the two diseases. Bile duct changes at dynamic CT, ERC and MRC were compared in 58 patients with SC-AIP and CBD involvement and 93 patients with periductal infiltrating CBD cancer. Two radiologists rated their confidence in differentiating between the two diseases and the diagnostic performances of ERC and MRC were compared. At CT, SC-AIP was more frequently associated with intrapancreatic CBD involvement, thinner CBD walls, concentric wall thickening, smooth outer margins, and lower degrees of upstream ductal dilatation and contrast enhancement (P {<=} 0.05) than CBD cancer. At ERC and MRC, SC-AIP was more frequently associated with smooth margins, gradual and symmetric narrowing, multifocal involvement and hourglass appearance (P {<=} 0.027) than CBD cancer. MRC showed good diagnostic performance comparable to ERC. Dynamic CT, ERC and MRC can be helpful in distinguishing SC-AIP from periductal infiltrating CBD cancer. MRC may be a useful diagnostic alternative to ERC in differentiating between the two diseases. (orig.)

  9. Differential diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis and periductal infiltrating cancer in the common bile duct at dynamic CT, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and MR cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Byun, Jae Ho; Lee, So Jung; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Seung Soo; Lee, Moon-Gyu; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Jihun

    2012-01-01

    To compare findings at dynamic computed tomography (CT), endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) and magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) in patients with sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis (SC-AIP) and periductal infiltrating cancer in the common bile duct (CBD), and to evaluate the diagnostic performance of ERC and MRC in differentiating between the two diseases. Bile duct changes at dynamic CT, ERC and MRC were compared in 58 patients with SC-AIP and CBD involvement and 93 patients with periductal infiltrating CBD cancer. Two radiologists rated their confidence in differentiating between the two diseases and the diagnostic performances of ERC and MRC were compared. At CT, SC-AIP was more frequently associated with intrapancreatic CBD involvement, thinner CBD walls, concentric wall thickening, smooth outer margins, and lower degrees of upstream ductal dilatation and contrast enhancement (P ≤ 0.05) than CBD cancer. At ERC and MRC, SC-AIP was more frequently associated with smooth margins, gradual and symmetric narrowing, multifocal involvement and hourglass appearance (P ≤ 0.027) than CBD cancer. MRC showed good diagnostic performance comparable to ERC. Dynamic CT, ERC and MRC can be helpful in distinguishing SC-AIP from periductal infiltrating CBD cancer. MRC may be a useful diagnostic alternative to ERC in differentiating between the two diseases. (orig.)

  10. Mapping chronic liver disease questionnaire scores onto SF-6D utility values in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalaitzakis, Evangelos; Benito de Valle, Maria; Rahman, Monira

    2016-01-01

    regression analyses were employed to devise a mapping function predicting utilities. This was validated in three random subsamples of the cohort and in a separate sample of PSC patients following liver transplantation. Adjusted R2 and root-mean-square error (RMSE) as well as Pearson’s r coefficients and mean...

  11. Type 1 Autoimmune Pancreatitis and IgG4-Related Sclerosing Cholangitis Is Associated With Extrapancreatic Organ Failure, Malignancy, and Mortality in a Prospective UK Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M.; Hurst, J.M.; Rodriguez-Justo, M.; Chapman, M.H.; Johnson, G.J.; Pereira, S.P.; Chapman, R.W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Type I autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-related SC) are now recognized as components of a multisystem IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). We aimed to define the clinical course and long-term outcomes in patients with AIP/IgG4-SC recruited from two large UK tertiary referral centers. METHODS Data were collected from 115 patients identified between 2004 and 2013, and all were followed up prospectively from diagnosis for a median of 33 months (range 1–107), and evaluated for response to therapy, the development of multiorgan involvement, and malignancy. Comparisons were made with national UK statistics. RESULTS Although there was an initial response to steroids in 97%, relapse occurred in 50% of patients. IgG4-SC was an important predictor of relapse (P IgG4-RD, including three hepatopancreaticobiliary cancers. The risk of any cancer at diagnosis or during follow-up when compared with matched national statistics was increased (odds ratio = 2.25, CI = 1.12–3.94, P = 0.02). Organ dysfunction occurred within the pancreas, liver, kidney, lung, and brain. Mortality occurred in 10% of patients during follow-up. The risk of death was increased compared with matched national statistics (odds ratio = 2.07, CI = 1.07–3.55, P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that AIP and IgG4-SC are associated with significant morbidity and mortality owing to extrapancreatic organ failure and malignancy. Detailed clinical evaluation for evidence of organ dysfunction and associated malignancy is required both at first presentation and during long-term follow-up. PMID:25155229

  12. Deposition of C3, the terminal complement complex and vitronectin in primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garred, P; Lyon, H; Christoffersen, P

    1993-01-01

    -dependent cytotoxic mechanisms in the pathogenesis. Therefore, we investigated liver biopsy specimens from 21 patients with PBC, six patients with PSC and six controls for complement deposits by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against C3d, the terminal complement complex (TCC......) and vitronectin (S-protein). We found C3d, TCC and vitronectin deposits only in the portal tracts. C3d and TCC were present in the walls of the hepatic arteries and in the connective tissue stroma but never around the bile ducts. We found vitronectin deposits throughout the connective tissue, often independent...... of the TCC deposits. When vitronectin and TCC were co-localized, the staining patterns were inverse; that is, intense staining for TCC accompanied weak staining for vitronectin and vice versa. Occasionally complete dissociation between TCC and vitronectin staining was observed. Deposits of TCC...

  13. Diagnostic Dilemma in a Patient with Jaundice: How to Differentiate between Autoimmune Pancreatitis, Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis and Pancreas Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Buechter

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A 68-year-old male patient was referred to our institution in May 2011 for a suspected tumor in the pancreatic head with consecutive jaundice. Using magnetic resonance imaging, further differentiation between chronic inflammation and a malignant process was not possible with certainty. Apart from cholestasis, laboratory studies showed increased values for CA 19-9 to 532 U/ml (normal <37 U/ml and hypergammaglobulinemia (immunoglobulin G, IgG of 19.3% (normal 8.0–15.8% with an elevation of the IgG4 subtype to 2,350 mg/l (normal 52–1,250 mg/l. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed a prominent stenosis of the distal ductus hepaticus communis caused by pancreatic head swelling and also a bihilar stenosis of the main hepatic bile ducts. Cytology demonstrated inflammatory cells without evidence of malignancy. Under suspicion of autoimmune pancreatitis with IgG4-associated cholangitis, immunosuppressive therapy with steroids and azathioprine was started. Follow-up endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after 3 months displayed regressive development of the diverse stenoses. Jaundice had disappeared and blood values had returned to normal ranges. Moreover, no tumor of the pancreatic head was present in the magnetic resonance control images. Due to clinical and radiological similarities but a consecutive completely different prognosis and therapy, it is of fundamental importance to differentiate between pancreatic cancer and autoimmune pancreatitis. Especially, determination of serum IgG4 levels and associated bile duct lesions induced by inflammation should clarify the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and legitimate immunosuppressive therapy.

  14. Een kind met primaire scleroserende cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademaker, A. A. E. M.; Benninga, M. A.; Beuers, U. H. W.; Plötz, F. B.

    2015-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a rare liver disease which is mainly diagnosed in adults. This chronic progressive disease, characterised by inflammation, fibrosis and strictures of the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts, leads to cirrhosis. There is a strong association between primary sclerosing

  15. CD8 T cells primed in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue induce immune-mediated cholangitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Daniel; Eickmeier, Ira; Kühl, Anja A; Hamann, Alf; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Schott, Eckart

    2014-02-01

    The pathogenesis of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) remains poorly understood. Since PSC predominantly occurs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmunity triggered by activated T cells migrating from the gut to the liver is a possible mechanism. We hypothesized that T cells primed in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) by a specific antigen migrate to the liver and cause cholangitis when they recognize the same antigen on cholangiocytes. We induced ovalbumin-dependent colitis in mice that express ovalbumin in biliary epithelia (ASBT-OVA mice) and crossed ASBT-OVA mice with mice that express ovalbumin in enterocytes (iFABP-OVA mice). We analyzed T-cell activation in the GALT and crossreactivity to the same antigen in the liver as well as the effects of colitis per se on antigen-presentation and T-cell activation in the liver. Intrarectal application of ovalbumin followed by transfer of CD8 OT-I T cells led to antigen-dependent colitis. CD8 T cells primed in the GALT acquired effector function and the capability to migrate to the liver, where they caused cholangitis in a strictly antigen-dependent manner. Likewise, cholangitis developed in mice expressing ovalbumin simultaneously in biliary epithelia and enterocytes after transfer of OT-I T cells. Dextran sodium sulfate colitis led to increased levels of inflammatory cytokines in the portal venous blood, induced activation of resident liver dendritic cells, and promoted the induction of T-cell-dependent cholangitis. Our data strengthen the notion that immune-mediated cholangitis is caused by T cells primed in the GALT and provide the first link between colitis and cholangitis in an antigen-dependent mouse model. © 2013 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  16. Water-soluble C60 fullerenes reduce manifestations of acute cholangitis in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznietsova, H. M.; Lynchak, O. V.; Dziubenko, N. V.; Osetskyi, V. L.; Ogloblya, O. V.; Prylutskyy, Yu I.; Rybalchenko, V. K.; Ritter, U.; Scharff, P.

    2018-03-01

    Sclerosing cholangitis is the liver disease of uncertain etiology, extremely unfavorable prognosis and lack of effective medication therapy. Therefore, the effect of water-soluble biocompatible C60 fullerenes (C60FAS) on the liver functional state on rat acute-cholangitis model was aimed to be discovered. Acute cholangitis was simulated by single α-naphthyl isothiocyanate (ANIT, 100 mg/kg) per os administration; C60FAS (0.5 mg/kg) was administered either per os or intraperitoneally in 24 and 48 h after ANIT ingestion, and in 72 h the animals were sacrificed. The activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), the total and direct bilirubin, creatinine and urea in the blood serum were determined, and the liver morphological state was assessed. In animals experienced ANIT-induced acute cholangitis, the total and direct bilirubin, creatinine, ALT, AST, ALP and LDH 1.5-4-fold increase were observed, indicating cytolysis of hepatocytes, cholestasis, and renal dysfunction. The features of periductal fibrosis, biliary epithelium atrophy, and portal-portal linking septa formation were detected, confirming the sclerosing cholangitis development. C60FAS promoted to the normalization of direct and total bilirubin levels, the ALT activity and diminution of fibrotic features. In addition, C60FAS intraperitoneal administration also normalized the ALP activity, indicating the attenuation of disease symptoms. However, the AST activity and creatinine level remained unchanged, and the LDH activity even increased, manifesting the partial persistence of cholestasis and renal dysfunction. Thus, the therapeutic application of C60FAS promotes a partial protection of liver against cholangitis.

  17. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modi, G.; Bill, P.; Campbell, H.

    1989-01-01

    A 19-year-old female patient presented in an acute state of akinetic mutism. Serological analysis of serum and cerebrospinal fluid demonstrated the presence of antibodies to measles virus. CT scan carried out during this acute phase of relapse demonstrated white matter enhancement affecting the cortical white matter of the frontal lobes and corpus callosum. These features indicate that active demyelination occurs during acute relapse in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and suggest that immunotherapy should be considered during this acute phase. (orig.)

  18. Cholangitis following percutaneous biliary drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audisio, R.A.; Bozzetti, F.; Cozzi, G.; Severini, A.; Belloni, M.; Friggerio, L.F.

    1989-01-01

    The binomial PTBD-cholangitis often stands under different and sometimes even opposite relations. Among its indications the procedure lists, the treatment of cholangitis which, on the other hand, may be itself a complication of biliary drainage. The present work proposes a critical review of cholangitis-PTBD correlations, from an ordinary clinical-radiological point of view. Different pathogenetic hypothesis of cholangitis (inflammation, cholestasis, surgical manipulation) are discussed together with risk factors (impaired macrophagic-phagocytic system, immunosuppresion, wide neoplastic liver involvement, multiple intrahepatic ductal obstructions, chronic liver diseases, aged patients, etc.). The authors also report about prevention and treatment of septic complications which must be carried out following technical and therapeutic strategies, such as chemoprophylaxis and focused antibiotic therapy according to coltural samples, slow injection of small amounts of contrast medium, peripheral branches approach, gentle handling of catheters and guidewires, flushing with saline solutions and brushing of the catheter itself, and finally use of large gauge catheters in the presence of bile sludge

  19. iPSC Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) Core was created in 2011 to accelerate stem cell research in the NHLBI by providing investigators consultation, technical...

  20. Degenrative Fibroid and Sclerosing Peritonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Critchley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing peritonitis is a rare condition characterised by ascites, peritoneal and bowel wall thickening. Causes reported in the literature include luteal ovarian the comas, peritoneal dialysis, peritoneal chemotherapy and liver cirrhosis. We report an interesting case of a woman presenting with diarrhoea, abdominal distension, ascites and pleural effusion. She was subsequently diagnosed with Sclerosing Peritonitis caused by a degenerating fibroid which was successfully treated by Total Abdominal Hysterectomy and Bilateral Salpingoophrectomy.

  1. Subareolar Sclerosing Ductal Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Esther; D'Alfonso, Timothy M; Arafah, Maria; Marrero Rolon, Rebecca; Ginter, Paula S; Hoda, Syed A

    2017-02-01

    Subareolar sclerosing duct hyperplasia (SSDH) remains to be fully characterized nearly 20 years after initial description. Thirty-five SSDH cases diagnosed over a 16-year period (January 2000 to December 2015) were reviewed. All patients were female (mean age = 59 years, range = 18-80) who had presented with a unilateral solitary lesion (left 22, right 13) with a mean size of 1.3 cm (range = 0.4-3.0 cm), and showed florid and papillary epithelial hyperplasia with dense sclerosis without involvement of nipple or areolar epidermis. Significant lesions concurrent within SSDH included low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma (n = 1), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS; n = 1), lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS; n = 1), and atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH; n = 13). No case of SSDH recurred in a mean follow-up of 44 months (range = 6-189). Subsequent significant lesions occurred in 6 patients: DCIS (n = 3; ipsilateral 2, contralateral 1), ipsilateral ADH (n = 2), and ipsilateral atypical lobular hyperplasia (n = 1). Long-term follow-up for patients with SSDH is indicated as DCIS can occur subsequently in either breast.

  2. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Hiroshi; Hattori, Hideji; Nakajima, Seijun; Iwamura, Chiyo; Tanaka, Akemi; Kim, Masayoshi; Matsuoka, Osamu; Murata, Ryosuke; Inoue, Yuichi

    1986-01-01

    We studied three children with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) who had been diagnosed between 1981 and 1983. They were treated with inosiplex and transfer factor, and one was given interferon. Clinical symptoms in all three patients sometimes improved for periods of several months. In two patients computed tomography (CT) first showed low density in the basal ganglia, which later improved and finally disappeared. In all three patients CT showed gradual enlargement of the ventricles and cerebral atrophy. Disappearance of the low-density areas may mean that some of the pathological changes of this disease, including inflammation, demyelination, and gliosis, are reversible. In two patients, we studied magnetic resonance imaging. The spin-echo images showed high intensity in the lateral portions of basal ganglia, in the parieto-occipital portions, and in the frontal portions. Inversion recovery images usually showed low intensity of the same lesions. We think that the MRI gave more useful detail than CT. We think that the improvement in the CT findings and clinical symptoms were due both to the treatment (inosiplex seemed to be especially helpful) and to the natural course of this disease. (author)

  3. Sclerosing Encapsulating Peritonitis; Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman O. Machado

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP is a rare chronic inflammatory condition of the peritoneum with an unknown aetiology. Also known as abdominal cocoon, the condition occurs when loops of the bowel are encased within the peritoneal cavity by a membrane, leading to intestinal obstruction. Due to its rarity and nonspecific clinical features, it is often misdiagnosed. The condition presents with recurrent episodes of small bowel obstruction and can be idiopathic or secondary; the latter is associated with predisposing factors such as peritoneal dialysis or abdominal tuberculosis. In the early stages, patients can be managed conservatively; however, surgical intervention is necessary for those with advanced stage intestinal obstruction. A literature review revealed 118 cases of SEP; the mean age of these patients was 39 years and 68.0% were male. The predominant presentation was abdominal pain (72.0%, distension (44.9% or a mass (30.5%. Almost all of the patients underwent surgical excision (99.2% without postoperative complications (88.1%.

  4. cholangitis associated bowel disease in 1981

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1982-08-19

    Aug 19, 1982 ... revealed the presence of PSC in 2 (1,2%) and chronic active hepatitis ... Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Radiology and Patbo- logy, University ... A pancreatic carcinoma ..... Treatment of PSC is chiefly symptomatic. As with ...

  5. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC) and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis (PSC) Metabolic diseases such as Hemochromatosis, Wilson disease and Alpha- ... FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency ...

  6. Pathogenic aspects of acute cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Borisenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at the study of dynamic pathomorphological changes of choledoch and acute cholangitis development factors determined during the experiment. 36 rats of Wistar line were under trial. The main group consisted of 30 animals undergoing the open laparotomy, choledoch ligation and puncture modeling of acute cholangitis by E. coli culture in 1 х 108 CFU/ml concentration under general anesthesia. 6 healthy rats were included in the control group. Samples of general biliary duct under autopsy for pathomorphological study were taken on the 3rd, 7th, 14th, 21st and 30th day. In panoramic samples colored by hematoxilin and eozin the degree of dystrophic, necrobiotic, hemodynamic, inflammatory and atrophic manifestations’ changes were studied. Average depth of choledoch wall and height of its epithelial lining were morphometrically estimated. Collagen of the IV type as well as expressing receptors to CD34 were defined with the help of monoclonal antibodies in choledoch epithelial cells of basal membranes and choledoch vessels endotheliocytes. In choledoch, enhancement of edema and inflammatory infiltration by lymphoplasmocytic elements with the admixture of neutrofils with granulation tissue was detected from the 3rd up to the 30th day of the experiment. From the 14th day formation of bile clots of blood was detected in choledoch clearance, part of which was locked to its de-epitheliolized internal surface. According to morphometrical study data, choledoch wall depth increased from 261.1 ± 3.13 µm on the 3rd day to 572.5 ± 3.42 µm on the 30th day of the experiment. Mucosa membrane has lost its folding on the 14th day, epitheliocytes flattening was replaced by their destruction with fragments rejection into the duct lumen by the 30th day of the experiment. The epithelium height index decreased from 14.8 ± 0.09 µm on the 3rd day to 11.7 ± 0.15 µm on the 30 day of the experiment. Collagen of the IV type fluorescence intensity of

  7. Clinicomicrobiological analysis of patients with cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Shenoy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute cholangitis is inflammation of biliary ductal system from infection with an associated biliary obstruction. This retrospective study was done to determine the factors responsible for cholangitis and the microbiological profile of the bile in patients with cholangitis. In the study involving 348 patients, 36.4% had associated malignancy. A total of 54% of the bile samples were positive for aerobic culture. Nearly 66-73% of the Escherichia coli and Klebsiella isolates were Extended spectrum beta lactamases (ESBL producers. Two isolates of Candida spps were also obtained. Polymicrobial infection was seen in 31.5% of the culture positive cases. Ideal antibiotics in case of cholangitis would be those which are excreted in the bile such as third-generation cephalosporins, ureidopenicillins, carbapenems and fluoroquinolones to combat resistance and polymicrobial aetiology. Anti-fungal drugs may also be necessary if the patient is not responding to biliary decompression and antibacterial agents to prevent fungaemia.

  8. Discrimination of suppurative cholangitis from nonsuppurative cholangitis with computed tomography (CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nam Kyung [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kimsuk@medigate.net; Lee, Jun Woo; Kim, Chang Won [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gwang Ha; Kang, Dae Hwan [Department of Gastrointestinal Internal Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Hong Jae [Department of Surgery, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: Suppurative cholangitis is characterized by obstruction, inflammation, and pyogenic infection of the biliary tract. This disease represents a true emergency. The purpose of this study was to compare the computed tomography (CT) findings between acute calculous suppurative and nonsuppurative cholangitis and to determine if there are findings that assist in the differential diagnosis. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with acute suppurative cholangitis were enrolled in this study. Findings at endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) were the standard of reference for suppurative cholangitis. To compare the findings of suppurative cholangitis with those of nonsuppurative cholangitis, 35 patients with nonsuppurative cholangitis were randomly selected. The following findings were evaluated: the presence of papillitis, the presence of stones in the ampulla, the presence of intrahepatic stones, the presence of early inhomogeneous enhancement of the liver, the degree of bile duct dilatation, the degree of bile duct wall thickening and presence of cholecystitis. Sensitivity and specificity for each of the individual findings were calculated. Statistical analyses were performed the Pearson {chi}{sup 2} test, Fisher's exact test and the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Papillitis showed the highest specificity 86% with 60% sensitivity. Marked inhomogeneous enhancement of the liver during the arterial phase showed 80% specificity with 60% sensitivity. In multivariate logistic analysis, papillitis and marked early inhomogeneous enhancement of the liver were the most significant predictors of acute suppurative cholangitis. The combination of these two CT findings improved specificity (97% specificity) for the diagnosis of suppurative cholangitis. Conclusion: Papillitis and marked early inhomogeneous enhancement of the liver were found to be the most discriminative CT findings for the diagnosis of acute suppurative cholangitis and the

  9. Expression of hepatic transporters OATP-C and MRP2 in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oswald, M.; Kullak-Ublick, G. A.; Paumgartner, G.; Beuers, U.

    2001-01-01

    In chronic cholestatic liver diseases, biliary excretion of organic anions from blood into bile is impaired. The aim of this study was to identify the underlying mechanism. Expression of the basolateral organic anion transporting polypeptide OATP-C (SLC21A6) and the canalicular multidrug resistance

  10. Distinct gut microbiota profiles in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bajer, L.; Kverka, Miloslav; Kostovčík, Martin; Macinga, P.; Dvořák, Jiří; Stehlíková, Zuzana; Březina, J.; Wohl, P.; Špičák, J.; Drastich, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 25 (2017), s. 4548-4558 ISSN 1007-9327 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-28064A Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Dysbiosis * Inflammatory bowel disease * Ulcerative colitis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.365, year: 2016

  11. Distinct gut microbiota profiles in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bajer, L.; Kverka, Miloslav; Kostovčík, M.; Macinga, P.; Dvořák, J.; Stehlíková, Z.; Březina, J.; Wohl, P.; Špičák, J.; Drastich, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 25 (2017), s. 4548-4558 ISSN 1007-9327 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-28064A Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : dysbiosis * inflammatory bowel disease * ulcerative colitis Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines OBOR OECD: Gastroenterology and hepatology Impact factor: 3.365, year: 2016

  12. CT findings in recurrent pyogenic cholangitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Seung Hye; Lim, Jae Hoon; Ko, Young Tae; Lee, Dong Ho

    1991-01-01

    Recurrent pyogenic cholangitis is characterized clinically by recurrent attacks of right upper abdominal pain, fever and jaundice, and pathologically by chronic inflammation of the bile ducts with or without pigment bile duct stones. We analyzed the CT findings of 33 cases with recurrent pyogenic cholangitis. Twenty-four cases were confirmed by operation, and 9 cases were diagnosed clinically and cholangiographically. The CT findings of recurrent pyogenic cholangitis were dilatation of the intrahepatic ducts (n = 30), dilatation of the extrahepatic ducts (n = 24) intrahepatic stones (n = 16), extrahepatic stones (n = 12), stricture of the bile ducts (n = 10), wall enhancement of the bile ducts (n = 8), gallstones (n = 8), segmental atrophy of the liver (n = 7), pneumobilia (n = 4), abscess (n = 3), and segmental enhancement (n = 1) of the liver. A CT is considered helpful when sectional imaging is needed, but sonographic findings are equivocal or not confirmative; space-occupying lesions complicated with recurrent pyogenic cholangitis: hepatic resection is planned; and imaging guidance is needed for complex drainage procedures

  13. File list: Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates mm9 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell iPSC intermediates...,SRX1178446,SRX1178449,SRX1178447,SRX897944,SRX1090865,SRX684777,SRX1090866 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell iPSC intermediates... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates mm9 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell iPSC intermediates...4,SRX1184108,SRX897944,SRX1178447,SRX684778,SRX1090865,SRX684777,SRX1090866 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates.bed ...

  11. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell iPSC intermediates... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates.bed ...

  12. Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candido, Paula de Castro Menezes; Werner, Andrea de Freitas; Pereira, Izabela Machado Flores; Matos, Breno Assuncao; Pfeilsticker, Rudolf Moreira; Silva Filho, Raul, E-mail: paulacmcandido@yahoo.com.br [Hospital Felicio Rocho, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis, a rare cause of bowel obstruction, was described as a complication associated with peritoneal dialysis which is much feared because of its severity. The authors report a case where radiological findings in association with clinical symptoms have allowed for a noninvasive diagnosis of sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis, emphasizing the high sensitivity and specificity of computed tomography to demonstrate the characteristic findings of such a condition. (author)

  13. The clinical extremes of autoimmune cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Campos

    Full Text Available Autoimmune cholangitis (AIC was first described in 1987 as immunocholangitis in three women who presented with signs and symptoms of primary biliary cholangitis (PBC, but who were antimitochondrial (AMA negative and antinuclear antibodies (ANA positive, and responded to immunosuppressive therapy with azathioprine and prednisolone (1. AIC is a rare chronic cholestatic inflammatory disease characterized by the presence of high ANA or smooth muscle antibodies (SMA but AMA seronegativity. Histologically, AIC exhibits bile duct injury (2. In terms of therapeutics, in addition to response to ursodeoxycholic acid, a prompt response to corticosteroids has also been reported in earlier stages, distinguishing it from PBC. Herein the authors describe two cases with mixed signs of PBC and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH. The diagnostic differentiation between these diseases (AIC, PBC and AIH is essential because of the different therapeutic strategies. Our cases highlight the importance of clinician awareness of the autoimmune spectrum of liver diseases.

  14. MRI in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuncay, R.; Akman-Demir, G.; Goekyigit, A.; Eraksoy, M.; Barlas, M.; Tolun, R.; Guersoy, G.

    1996-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a progressive, slow virus infection of the brain, caused by the measles virus, attacking children and young adults. We investigated 15 patients with SSPE by MRI, with 5 normal and 10 pathological results. In the early period, lesions were in the grey matter and subcortical white matter. They were asymmetrical and had a predilection for the posterior parts of the hemispheres. Later, high-signal changes in deep white matter and severe cerebral atrophy were observed. Parenchymal lesions significantly correlated with the duration of disease. A significant relationship between MRI findings and clinical stage was observed in the 1st year of the disease. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. MRI in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncay, R. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Akman-Demir, G. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Goekyigit, A. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Eraksoy, M. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Barlas, M. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Tolun, R. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Guersoy, G. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey)

    1996-10-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a progressive, slow virus infection of the brain, caused by the measles virus, attacking children and young adults. We investigated 15 patients with SSPE by MRI, with 5 normal and 10 pathological results. In the early period, lesions were in the grey matter and subcortical white matter. They were asymmetrical and had a predilection for the posterior parts of the hemispheres. Later, high-signal changes in deep white matter and severe cerebral atrophy were observed. Parenchymal lesions significantly correlated with the duration of disease. A significant relationship between MRI findings and clinical stage was observed in the 1st year of the disease. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Successful treatment of recurrent cholangitis with antibiotic maintenance therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hazel, S. J.; Speelman, P.; Tytgat, G. N.; van Leeuwen, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    The impact of antibiotic maintenance therapy on the incidence of biliary tract infection was evaluated in patients with recurrent cholangitis after resection of a malignancy at the hepatic confluence. Thirty-eight of 54 patients (70%) experienced episodes of cholangitis. In 14 of the 38 patients

  17. Analysis list: Psc [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Psc Cell line,Embryo + dm3 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/Ps...c.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/Psc.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/ky...ushu-u/dm3/target/Psc.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Psc.Cell_line.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Psc.Embryo.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Cell_line.gml,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Embryo.gml ...

  18. Sclerosing peritonitis with gross calcification: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheung Sook; Kim, Young Jae; Min, Seon Jeong; Cho, Seong Whi; Lee, Gyung Kyu; Lee, Eil Seong; Kang, Ik Won [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    Sclerosing peritonitis is an uncommon complication of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and can lead to small bowel dysfunction involving abdominal pain, progressive loss of ultrafiltration, and small intestinal obstruction. Peritoneal thickening, in which calcification can develop, often starts as al small plaque which gradually becomes larger. We report a case of CAPD-related calcifying peritonitis.

  19. Grey-Turner's sign in sclerosing peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouthard, J. M.; Krediet, R. T.; Arisz, L.

    1989-01-01

    A 41-year-old CAPD patient developed Grey-Turner's sign during the course of bacterial peritonitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. At the same time a diagnosis of sclerosing peritonitis was made by CT-scanning of the abdomen. We think that Grey-Turner's flank staining could either have been caused by

  20. A new lethal sclerosing bone dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingston, H.M.; Freeman, J.S.; Hall, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    A neonate is described with a lethal sclerosing bone dysplasia associated with prenatal fractures and craniofacial abnormalities including microcephaly, exophthalmos, hypoplastic nose and mid-face, small jaw and nodular hyperplasia of the gums. Parental consanguinity suggests that an autosomal recessive mutation is the likely aetiology. (orig.)

  1. Toward precision medicine in primary biliary cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Marco; Ronca, Vincenzo; Bruno, Savino; Invernizzi, Pietro; Mells, George F

    2016-08-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis is a chronic, cholestatic liver disease characterized by a heterogeneous presentation, symptomatology, disease progression and response to therapy. In contrast, clinical management and treatment of PBC is homogeneous with a 'one size fits all' approach. The evolving research landscape, with the emergence of the -omics field and the availability of large patient cohorts are creating a unique opportunity of translational epidemiology. Furthermore, several novel disease and symptom-modifying agents for PBC are currently in development. The time is therefore ripe for precision medicine in PBC. In this manuscript we describe the concept of precision medicine; review current approaches to risk-stratification in PBC, and speculate how precision medicine in PBC might develop in the near future. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular diagnostic testing for primary biliary cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatselis, Nikolaos K; Dalekos, George N

    2016-09-01

    A reliable liver autoimmune serology for the diagnosis of primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is of particular importance. Recognition of patients at early stages and prompt treatment initiation may alter the outcome, slow progression, delays liver failure, and improves survival. In this review, we summarize and discuss the published data obtained from literature searches from PubMed and The National Library of Medicine (USA) and our own experience on the current and potential molecular based approaches to the diagnosis of PBC. Expert commentary: Standardization of liver diagnostic serology and clinical governance are two major points as antimitochondrial antibodies are the diagnostic hallmark of the disease and PBC-specific antinuclear antibodies could assist in the diagnosis and estimation of prognosis. New biomarkers such as novel autoantibodies, genetic polymorphisms, metabolomic profiling, micro-RNA and epigenetics may assist to the understanding, diagnosis and management of the disease.

  3. File list: InP.PSC.20.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  5. File list: InP.PSC.50.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  7. File list: NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  8. File list: InP.PSC.10.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  9. File list: NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  10. File list: NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.iPSC_intermediates [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis presenting as mania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a rare, invariably fatal degenerative disease of the central nervous system developing after measles infection. Besides neurological symptoms as initial presenting symptoms, rare reports of its presentation with pure psychiatric symptoms have been reported. We here report a case of 14 year old male who initially presented with manic symptoms and then subsequently diagnosed to be suffering from SSPE. Improtance of ruling our organic conditions is emphasized.

  12. Cytogenetic study of a pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, María J; Vargas, María T; Sánchez, Ana; Ibáñez, José; González-Cámpora, Ricardo

    2009-11-01

    Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma (PSH) is an uncommon benign tumor that presents as a solitary asymptomatic and slow-growing nodule. It occurs in both young and old persons; peak incidence is in the fifth decade. Both sexes are affected by this tumor, but women more frequently than men. On histological examination, PSH shows prominent sclerotization and vascularization of the tissue. Recent studies conclude that PSH derives from type II pneumocytes, but the potential for progression and histogenesis remains controversial. We report a case of pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma in a 61-year-old woman with a neoplastic node 1 cm in diameter. The karyotype was 46,XX,t(8;18),der(14;15),+14 in all the cells analyzed. PTEN (10q23) and IgH (14q32) probes were analyzed in interphase nuclei and paraffin-embedded tissues of tumor cells. These chromosome abnormalities could provide information about the relationship of genetic changes to the biological properties of sclerosing hemangioma tumors.

  13. Ultrasonographic findings of sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jong Kyu; Lee, Hae Kyung; Moon, Chul; Hong, Hyun Sook; Kwon, Kwi Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin [Soonchunhyangi University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    To evaluate the ultrasonographic findings of the patients with sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP). Thirteen patients with surgically confirmed sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis were involved in this study. Because of intestinal obstruction, all patients had received operations. Among 13 patients, 12 cases had continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) for 2 months-12 years and 4 months from (mean; 6 years and 10 months), owing to chronic renal failure and one patient had an operation due to variceal bleeding caused by liver cirrhosis. On ultrasonographic examination, all patients showed loculated ascites which were large (n=7) or small (n=6) in amount with multiple separations. The small bowel loops were tethered posteriorly perisaltic movement and covered with the thick membrane. The ultrasonographic of findings of sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis were posteriorly tethered small bowels covered with a thick membrane and loculated ascites with multiple septa. Ultrasonographic examination can detect the thin membrane covering the small bowel loops in the early phase of the disease, therefore ultrasonography would be a helpful modality to diagnose SEP early.

  14. [Sanation of biliary system using antiseptic decasan in complex treatment of cholangitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aripova, N U; Magzumov, I Kh

    2014-02-01

    Experience of treatment of 17 patients, suffering cholangitis of various genesis, using antiseptic Decasan, is presented. Clinical efficacy of the preparation in complex treatment of cholangitis, confirmed by results of the bile bacteriological investigation, was noted.

  15. IgG4-Associated Cholangitis Can Mimic Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaydfudim, Victor M; Wang, Andrew Y; de Lange, Eduard E; Zhao, Zimin; Moskaluk, Christopher A; Bauer, Todd W; Adams, Reid B

    2015-07-01

    IgG4-associated cholangitis can mimic hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Previously reported patients with IgG4-associated cholangitis mimicking cholangiocarcinoma had elevated serum IgG4 levels and long-segment biliary strictures. However, in the absence of other diagnostic criteria for malignancy, IgG4-associated cholangitis should remain a consideration among patients with normal serum IgG4 and a hilar mass suspicious for cholangiocarcinoma. The presence of a hilar mass and a malignant-appearing biliary stricture in two patients with normal serum IgG4 prompted further evaluation and subsequent concomitant liver and bile duct resection and reconstruction. The diagnosis of IgG4-associated cholangitis was established during the pathologic evaluation of the resected specimens. IgG4-associated cholangitis is a known imitator of hilar cholangiocarcinoma and should be considered in the differential diagnosis even among serologically IgG4-negative patients with a hilar mass prior to operative resection.

  16. Immunohistochemical Examination of a Resected Advanced Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma Arising in a 29-Year-Old Male without Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taketoshi Suehiro

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A 29-year-old man with advanced hilar cholangiocarcinoma was successfully treated with an extended right lobectomy. The carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9 level was elevated to 939 IU/l, and the pathological findings revealed moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma which involved almost the entire thickness of the hepatic duct and the adjacent liver tissue (T3 and which was associated with lymph node metastasis (N1. It was a stage IIB (T3N1M0 tubular adenocarcinoma according to UICC pathological staging. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that Ki-67, cyclin D1, and MMP-7 were positive, and 14-3-3σ and p27 were negative. The pathological and immunohistochemical findings indicated high malignant potential indicating poor prognosis. We administrated the postoperative adjunct gemcitabine combined with S-1 chemotherapy. The patient is alive without recurrence and doing well two years after surgery. We also review other reports of cholangiocarcinoma patients aged less than 30 years.

  17. Biomarkers in premalignant conditions of the gastrointestinal tract: Studies on Barrett’s esophagus and primary sclerosing cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we have described our research on genetic abnormalities in (pre)malignant conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. The wide variation in biological behavior of cancerous and precancerous conditions may be largely explained by differences in genetic abnormalities. They are a source of

  18. Edwardsiella tarda-associated cholangitis associated with Lemmel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Miyajima

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Edwardsiella tarda is an unusual human pathogen. Gastroenteritis is the most frequently reported manifestation of E.tarda infection and extraintestinal infection including cholangitis has rarely been reported. The overall mortality rate for E.tarda bacteremia is, however, reported to be up to 50% (Janda and Abbott, 1993. We describe a 80-year-old diabetic woman with cholangitis and E.tarda bacteremia with a biliary obstruction associated with a large juxtapapillary duodenal diverticulum (Lemmel syndrome in the setting of past partial hepatectomy and cholecystectomy. She was successfully treated with endoscopic biliary drainage and antibacterials.

  19. Destructive Cholangitis in an Adult Jack Russell Terrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kodama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year-old female Jack Russell terrier dog exhibited vomiting and severe jaundice of the visible mucous membranes and skin. Ultrasonography revealed diffuse areas of high echogenicity and focal areas of low echogenicity in the left lobe of the liver. On macroscopic observation of the biopsied liver specimen, many scattered irregularly shaped red spots were observed on the liver surface and on the cut surface. Histopathologically, there was loss of the interlobular bile duct and cholangitis accompanied by infiltration of pigment-laden macrophages in the Glisson’s capsule. Therefore, in the present case the dog was diagnosed with destructive cholangitis.

  20. Computed tomography appearances of sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, C.; Al-Zwae, K.; Nair, S.; Cast, J.E.I.

    2007-01-01

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP) is a serious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) characterized by thickened peritoneal membranes, which lead to decreased ultra-filtration and intestinal obstruction. Its early clinical features are nonspecific, and it is often diagnosed late following laparotomy and peritoneal biopsy, when the patient develops small bowel obstruction, which can be a life-threatening complication. However, this is changing with increasing awareness of computed tomography (CT) findings in SEP. CT can yield an early, non-invasive diagnosis that may improve patient outcome. We present a review of the CT appearances of SEP

  1. Computed tomography appearances of sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, C. [Department of Radiology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: cheriangeorge@hotmail.com; Al-Zwae, K. [Department of Radiology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull (United Kingdom); Nair, S. [Department of Radiology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull (United Kingdom); Cast, J.E.I. [Department of Radiology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP) is a serious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) characterized by thickened peritoneal membranes, which lead to decreased ultra-filtration and intestinal obstruction. Its early clinical features are nonspecific, and it is often diagnosed late following laparotomy and peritoneal biopsy, when the patient develops small bowel obstruction, which can be a life-threatening complication. However, this is changing with increasing awareness of computed tomography (CT) findings in SEP. CT can yield an early, non-invasive diagnosis that may improve patient outcome. We present a review of the CT appearances of SEP.

  2. Idiopathic sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (or abdominal cocoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legakis Nikolaos

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Idiopathic sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (or abdominal cocoon is a rare cause of small bowel obstruction, especially in adult population. Diagnosis is usually incidental at laparotomy. We discuss one such rare case, outlining the fact that an intra-operative surprise diagnosis could have been facilitated by previous investigations. Case presentation A 56 year-old man presented in A&E department with small bowel ileus. He had a history of 6 similar episodes of small bowel obstruction in the past 4 years, which resolved with conservative treatment. Pre-operative work-up did not reveal any specific etiology. At laparotomy, a fibrous capsule was revealed, in which small bowel loops were encased, with the presence of interloop adhesions. A diagnosis of abdominal cocoon was established and extensive adhesiolysis was performed. The patient had an uneventful recovery and follow-up. Conclusion Idiopathic sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis, although rare, may be the cause of a common surgical emergency such as small bowel ileus, especially in cases with attacks of non-strangulating obstruction in the same individual. A high index of clinical suspicion may be generated by the recurrent character of small bowel ileus combined with relevant imaging findings and lack of other plausible etiologies. Clinicians must rigorously pursue a preoperative diagnosis, as it may prevent a "surprise" upon laparotomy and result in proper management.

  3. Idiopathic sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (or abdominal cocoon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafimidis, Costas; Katsarolis, Ioannis; Vernadakis, Spyros; Rallis, George; Giannopoulos, George; Legakis, Nikolaos; Peros, George

    2006-02-13

    Idiopathic sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (or abdominal cocoon) is a rare cause of small bowel obstruction, especially in adult population. Diagnosis is usually incidental at laparotomy. We discuss one such rare case, outlining the fact that an intra-operative surprise diagnosis could have been facilitated by previous investigations. A 56 year-old man presented in A&E department with small bowel ileus. He had a history of 6 similar episodes of small bowel obstruction in the past 4 years, which resolved with conservative treatment. Pre-operative work-up did not reveal any specific etiology. At laparotomy, a fibrous capsule was revealed, in which small bowel loops were encased, with the presence of interloop adhesions. A diagnosis of abdominal cocoon was established and extensive adhesiolysis was performed. The patient had an uneventful recovery and follow-up. Idiopathic sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis, although rare, may be the cause of a common surgical emergency such as small bowel ileus, especially in cases with attacks of non-strangulating obstruction in the same individual. A high index of clinical suspicion may be generated by the recurrent character of small bowel ileus combined with relevant imaging findings and lack of other plausible etiologies. Clinicians must rigorously pursue a preoperative diagnosis, as it may prevent a "surprise" upon laparotomy and result in proper management.

  4. Lymphocytic cholangitis in cats: a microbiological, histological and clinical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otte, C.M.A.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, a general overview is given of the healthy feline liver and feline diseases of the gall bladder and biliary tree. Lymphocytic cholangitis (LC) is one of the most common inflammatory hepatic diseases in cats. It is a chronic disease that affects the biliary tree and progresses slowly

  5. Cholangiohydatidosis: an Infrequent Cause of Obstructive Jaundice and Acute Cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manterola, Carlos; Otzen, Tamara

    One of the evolutionary complications of hepatic echinococcosis (HE) is cholangiohydatidosis, a rare cause of obstructive jaundice and cholangitis. The aim of this study was to describe the results of surgical treatment on a group of patients with cholangiohydatidosis and secondary cholangitis in terms of post-operative morbidity (POM). Case series of patients operated on for cholangiohydatidosis and cholangitis in the Department at Surgery of the Universidad de La Frontera and the Clínica Mayor in Temuco, Chile between 2004 and 2014. The minimum follow-up time was six months. The principal outcome variable was the development of POM. Other variables of interest were age, sex, cyst diameter, hematocrit, leukocytes, total bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase and transaminases, type of surgery, existence of concomitant evolutionary complications in the cyst, length of hospital stay, need for surgical re-intervention and mortality. Descriptive statistics were calculated. A total of 20 patients were studied characterized by a median age of 53 years, 50.0% female and 20.0% having two or more cysts with a mean diameter of 13.3 ± 6.3 cm. A median hospital stay of six days and follow-up of 34 months was recorded. POM was 30.0%, re-intervention rate was 10.0% and mortality rate was 5.0%. Cholangiohydatidosis is a rare cause of obstructive jaundice and cholangitis associated with significant rates of POM and mortality.

  6. Tokyo Guidelines 2018: antimicrobial therapy for acute cholangitis and cholecystitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomi, Harumi; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Schlossberg, David; Okamoto, Kohji; Takada, Tadahiro; Strasberg, Steven M.; Ukai, Tomohiko; Endo, Itaru; Iwashita, Yukio; Hibi, Taizo; Pitt, Henry A.; Matsunaga, Naohisa; Takamori, Yoriyuki; Umezawa, Akiko; Asai, Koji; Suzuki, Kenji; Han, Ho-Seong; Hwang, Tsann-Long; Mori, Yasuhisa; Yoon, Yoo-Seok; Huang, Wayne Shih-Wei; Belli, Giulio; Dervenis, Christos; Yokoe, Masamichi; Kiriyama, Seiki; Itoi, Takao; Jagannath, Palepu; Garden, O. James; Miura, Fumihiko; de Santibañes, Eduardo; Shikata, Satoru; Noguchi, Yoshinori; Wada, Keita; Honda, Goro; Supe, Avinash Nivritti; Yoshida, Masahiro; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Gouma, Dirk J.; Deziel, Daniel J.; Liau, Kui-Hin; Chen, Miin-Fu; Liu, Keng-Hao; Su, Cheng-Hsi; Chan, Angus C. W.; Yoon, Dong-Sup; Choi, In-Seok; Jonas, Eduard; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Fan, Sheung Tat; Ker, Chen-Guo; Giménez, Mariano Eduardo; Kitano, Seigo; Inomata, Masafumi; Mukai, Shuntaro; Higuchi, Ryota; Hirata, Koichi; Inui, Kazuo; Sumiyama, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2018-01-01

    Antimicrobial therapy is a mainstay of the management for patients with acute cholangitis and/or cholecystitis. The Tokyo Guidelines 2018 (TG18) provides recommendations for the appropriate use of antimicrobials for community-acquired and healthcare-associated infections. The listed agents are for

  7. Sclerosing stromal tumor of the ovary: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navjot Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing stromal tumors are benign ovarian neoplasms of the sex cord-stromal category, occurring predominantly in the second and third decades of life. Herein, we report a 23-year-old female who presented with pelvic pain, irregular menses but normal hormonal status and was diagnosed as having a right ovarian tumor. A right oophorectomy was performed, and microscopic examination revealed a sclerosing stromal tumor of the right ovary. We stress the importance of being familiar with sclerosing stromal tumors when evaluating ovarian neoplasms in young women, in order to contribute to the appropriate clinical management, preventing extensive and unnecessary surgery, and preserving fertility.

  8. Sclerosing Stromal Tumor of Ovary: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menka Khanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing stromal tumor (SST is an extremely rare and distinctive sex cord stromal tumor which occurs predominantly in the second and third decades of life. We report a case of a 32-year-old woman who developed a sclerosing stromal tumor of ovary and presented with irregular menstruation and pelvic pain. Her hormonal status was normal but CA-125 was raised. She was suspected to have a malignant tumor on computed tomography and underwent bilateral salpingo-oopherectomy. It is therefore necessary to keep in mind the possibility of sclerosing stromal tumor in a young woman.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feelings of intense happiness (euphoria), a loss of inhibition, and poor concentration. These neurologic changes cause significant ... with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy Orphanet: Nasu-Hakola disease Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 links) Alzheimer's Association Family ...

  10. Lymphoplasmacytic Sclerosing Pancreatitis and Retroperitoneal Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel K. F. Koo Ng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although cases of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LSP associated with idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis have been reported, the association is rare. We describe a 74-year-old man who presented with obstructive jaundice and weight loss. Nineteen months earlier, he had been diagnosed with idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis and treated with bilateral ureteric stents. Initial investigations were suggestive of a diagnosis of LSP, however, a malignant cause could not be ruled out. He underwent an exploratory laparotomy and frozen sections confirmed the diagnosis of LSP. An internal biliary bypass was performed using a Roux loop of jejunum, and the patient made an uneventful recovery. This case illustrates the difficulty in distinguishing LSP from pancreatic carcinoma preoperatively.

  11. Bifocal sclerosing osteosarcoma: unusual presentation and course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramovici, L.; Steiner, G.C.; Rosenberg, Z.; Kenan, S.

    1998-01-01

    Multifocal osteosarcoma is uncommon. Long-term survival of an incompletely treated case is exceptional. We report an unusual case of bifocal sclerosing osteosarcoma in a 38-year-old women that involved the left ilium and right proximal femur. The femoral lesion was resected. The tumor in the left ilium was not treated. She did not receive chemotherapy and has been free of metastases for 7 years. Recently, growth of the pelvic osteosarcoma has resulted in vascular compression and edema of the lower extremity. The patient's alkaline phosphatase has been elevated throughout. The tumor was HMB-45 positive, which has not been previously reported in osteosarcoma. The pathogenesis of multifocal osteosarcoma is discussed. (orig.)

  12. Inflammatory bowel disease after liver transplantation : Risk factors for recurrence and De novo disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonka, RC; Dijkstra, G; Haagsma, EB; Shostrom, VK; Van den Berg, AP; Kleibeuker, JH

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and can recur or develop de novo after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and severity of IBD after liver

  13. Less promising results with sclerosing ethoxysclerol injections for midportion achilles tendinopathy: a retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sterkenburg, Maayke N.; de Jonge, Milko C.; Sierevelt, Inger N.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Local injections of the sclerosing substance polidocanol (Ethoxysclerol) have shown good clinical results in patients with chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy. After training by the inventors of the technique, sclerosing Ethoxysclerol injections were applied on a group of patients

  14. MR cholangiopancreatography diagnosis for cholangitis caused by clonorchis sinensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Bing; Hu Qiugen; Wang Yan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) diagnosis for cholangitis caused by clonorchis sinensis. Methods: Fifty-four cases with cholangitis caused by clonorchis sinensis were examined by MRCP (3D FASE-Heavy T 2 WI sequence). The results of MRCP were compared with that of ERCP, laparoscopy, and pathology. Results: The diagnostic accuracy for the cause of the disease was 88.9%. Main findings on MRCP included slight dilation of the intra-hepatic biliary duct (n=46), small cystiform dilation of peripheral biliary ending (n=43), extra-hepatic biliary dilations (n=15) and strictures (n=19), and low signal intensity filling defect in the common bile duct and gallbladder (n=6). Conclusion: MRCP of biliary tree images can be obtained with 3D FASE Heavy T 2 WI sequence in considerable details. The characteristic of the cholangitis caused by clonorchis sinensis on MRCP was the slight dilation or stricture of extensive intra-hepatic biliary duct, combined with small cystiform dilation of peripheral biliary ending. MRCP was an ideal technique in diagnosing the disease

  15. Percutaneous biliary drainage in acute suppurative cholangitis with biliary sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Lyul; Cho, June Sik; Kwon, Soon Tae; Lee, Sang Jin; Rhee, Byung Chull

    1993-01-01

    Acute suppurative cholangitis is a severe inflammatory process of the bile duct occurred as result of partial or complete obstruction of the bile duct, and may manifest clinically severe form of disease, rapidly deteriorating to life-threatening condition. We analyzed emergency percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in 20 patients of acute suppurative cholangitis with biliary sepsis to evaluate the therapeutic effect and complication of the procedure. The underlying cause were 12 benign disease(stones) and eight malignant tumors and among eight malignant tumors, bile duct stones(n=4) and clonorchiasis(n=1) were combined. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was performed successfully in 17 of 20 patients resulting in improvement of general condition and failed in three patients. The procedure were preterminated due to the patient's condition in two and biliary-proto fistula was developed in one. After biliary decompression by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, effective and successful elective surgery was performed in nine cases, which were seven biliary stones and two biliary cancer with stones. Our experience suggest that emergency percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is an initial and effective treatment of choice for acute suppurative cholangitis with sepsis and a safe alternative for nonsurgical treatment

  16. Recombinant PrPSc shares structural features with brain-derived PrPSc: Insights from limited proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevillano, Alejandro M; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Younas, Neelam; Wang, Fei; R Elezgarai, Saioa; Bravo, Susana; Vázquez-Fernández, Ester; Rosa, Isaac; Eraña, Hasier; Gil, David; Veiga, Sonia; Vidal, Enric; Erickson-Beltran, Melissa L; Guitián, Esteban; Silva, Christopher J; Nonno, Romolo; Ma, Jiyan; Castilla, Joaquín; R Requena, Jesús

    2018-01-01

    Very solid evidence suggests that the core of full length PrPSc is a 4-rung β-solenoid, and that individual PrPSc subunits stack to form amyloid fibers. We recently used limited proteolysis to map the β-strands and connecting loops that make up the PrPSc solenoid. Using high resolution SDS-PAGE followed by epitope analysis, and mass spectrometry, we identified positions ~116/118, 133-134, 141, 152-153, 162, 169 and 179 (murine numbering) as Proteinase K (PK) cleavage sites in PrPSc. Such sites likely define loops and/or borders of β-strands, helping us to predict the threading of the β-solenoid. We have now extended this approach to recombinant PrPSc (recPrPSc). The term recPrPSc refers to bona fide recombinant prions prepared by PMCA, exhibiting infectivity with attack rates of ~100%. Limited proteolysis of mouse and bank vole recPrPSc species yielded N-terminally truncated PK-resistant fragments similar to those seen in brain-derived PrPSc, albeit with varying relative yields. Along with these fragments, doubly N- and C-terminally truncated fragments, in particular ~89/97-152, were detected in some recPrPSc preparations; similar fragments are characteristic of atypical strains of brain-derived PrPSc. Our results suggest a shared architecture of recPrPSc and brain PrPSc prions. The observed differences, in particular the distinct yields of specific PK-resistant fragments, are likely due to differences in threading which result in the specific biochemical characteristics of recPrPSc. Furthermore, recombinant PrPSc offers exciting opportunities for structural studies unachievable with brain-derived PrPSc.

  17. Analysis of clinical characteristics and treatment of immunoglobulin G4-associated cholangitis: A retrospective cohort study of 39 IAC patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianchun; Xu, Peiran; Li, Binglu; Hong, Tao; Liu, Wei; He, Xiaodong; Zheng, Chaoji; Zhao, Yupei

    2018-02-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)G4-associated cholangitis (IAC) is one of the common organ manifestations of IgG4-related systemic disease (ISD). IAC and autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) may mimic sclerosing cholangitis, cholangiocarcinoma, or pancreatic carcinoma. Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical, biochemical, radiological, and histological findings.To study the clinical presentation of and treatment strategy for IAC, we reviewed clinical, serologic, and imaging characteristics, as well as treatment response, in 39 patients with IAC. The majority of patients were men (82%). Clinical features on presentation included obstructive jaundice in 26 patients (67%) and abdominal pain in 20 (51%). Positive IgG4 immunostaining was seen in 27 patients. The median serum IgG4 level before treatment was 769.4 mg/dL (range, 309.1-1229.7 mg/dL). After the steroid therapy, the median serum IgG4 level in 23 patients was 247.0 mg/dL (range, 139.0-355.0 mg/dL). Cholangiograms were available in 36 (92%) patients. Stenosis of the lower part of the common bile duct was found in 26 of 39 patients. Stenosis was diffusely distributed in the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts in 14 of 39 patients. Additionally, strictures of the bile duct were detected in the hilar hepatic lesions in 27 of 39 patients. AIP was the most frequent comorbidity (35/39 in this study) of IAC. Other affected organs included eyes (n = 6), salivary glands (sialadenitis, n = 10), lymph nodes (mediastinal and axillary, n = 3), kidneys (n = 2), and the retroperitoneum (retroperitoneal fibrosis, n = 2).Regarding treatment, 29 patients were treated with steroids, of whom one underwent pancreatoduodenectomy, and one underwent choledochojejunostomy. Eight patients were treated with biliary stents. The remaining 19 patients took prednisolone alone. Eight patients achieved spontaneous resolution. Four patients with suspected pancreatic cancer or cholangiocarcinoma underwent surgery, including 2

  18. Correlation of Imaging Findings with Pathologic Findings of Sclerosing Adenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bo Bae; Shu, Kwang Sun

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mammographic and sonographic findings of pure sclerosing adenosis. We retrospectively reviewed the mammographic and sonographic findings in 40 cases of pure sclerosing adenosis confirmed by core needle biopsy (n = 23), vacuum-assisted biopsy (n = 7), excision biopsy (n = 9), and lumpectomy (n = 1) from January 2002 to March 2010. All imaging findings were analyzed according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS). Radiologic features were correlated with pathologic findings. Although most mammograms showed negative findings (57%), calcification was the most common abnormal finding of sclerosing adenosis. On sonography, the most common finding was a circumscribed oval hypoechoic mass without posterior features (78%). Most masses showed BI-RADS category 3, (75%, 27/36). Five cases showed categories 4 or 5 (14%, 5/36). Most mammographic and sonographic findings of sclerosing adenosis are non-specific and non-pathognomonic, even though sometimes sclerosing adenosis can be radiologically or histopathologically confused with malignancy

  19. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis: Clinical and Demographic Characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafique, A.; Amjad, N.; Chand, P.; Ahmed, K.; Ibrahim, S.; Zaidi, S. S. Z.; Rana, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical and demographic characteristics of children diagnosed with Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January 2000 to June 2012. Methodology: A retrospective analysis was done, regarding medical charts of 43 children under the age of 16 years with a discharge diagnosis of SSPE. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded. Results were expressed as percentages. Results: Most of the 43 patients were male (72%). The average age at presentation was 8.7 years with average duration of symptoms being 100.6 days. History of measles was present in 17 patients (39.5%). All children had seizures at presentation and 65% had cognitive impairment. Most patients required poly therapy for control of seizures. Sodium valproate was the most commonly used anti-epileptic agent; Isoprinosine was tried in 22 (51%) patients. CSF for antimeasles antibodies was positive in approximately 86% of the 40 (93%) children. EEG showed burst suppression pattern in 36 (83.7%) cases. Forty-two patients (97.6%) were discharged home in a vegetative state. Conclusion: SSPE is progressive neurodegenerative disorder. It can be prevented by timely immunization against measles. Measles antibody in the CSF is diagnostic for SSPE and is helpful in early diagnosis. Most patients experience a gradual but progressive decline in motor and cognitive functions. (author)

  20. Role of antibiotics in the treatment and prevention of acute and recurrent cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hazel, S. J.; Speelman, P.; Tytgat, G. N.; Dankert, J.; van Leeuwen, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cholangitis is usually the consequence of a combination of factors: impairment of the flow of bile and bacterial colonization of the biliary tract. Although reestablishing biliary drainage is the mainstay of treatment, antibiotics play an important role in the management of cholangitis. In this

  1. Intraductal location of the sclerosing adenosis of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Bulent; Gur, A Serhat; Bhargava, Rohit; Edington, Howard; Ahrendt, Gretchen; Soran, Atilla

    2009-01-01

    Sclerosing adenosis is a benign breast disease with non-specific images on ultrasound or mammogram. It can mimic infiltrating carcinoma when the above mentioned imaging techniques are used. Herein we present a patient with breast cancer who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and subsequently underwent mastectomy. Ductoscopy was performed to the mastectomised breast specimen as per the ductoscopy research protocol. Ductoscopy revealed several nodular lesions in the duct with no additional demonstrable intraductal pathology. The lesions were reported as sclerosing adenosis by pathologist. As to our knowledge, this is the first case in literature that demonstrates the use of ductoscopy in diagnosing the sclerosing adenosis in the breast tissue. Ductoscopy and development of ductoscopy guided biopsy techniques may be used as an early diagnostic method for the ductal breast lesions (Fig. 2, Ref. 10). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  2. Diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Chan; Kim, Dong Wook

    2006-01-01

    Diffuse sclerosing papillary carcinoma (DSPC) is a variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), but it shows more aggressive clinical course and a poorer prognosis than the other types of PTC. Most PTCs show a focal nodular pattern in the thyroid on the imaging modalities, but DSPC reveals a diffuse infiltrating configuration in the thyroid without any focal nodular lesion. To our knowledge, there are scant radiological reports of diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. In this report, we present the case of a patient with DSPC who showed the characteristic findings on sonography and computed tomography

  3. The CT appearances of sclerosing mesenteritis and associated diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wat, S.Y.J.; Harish, S.; Winterbottom, A.; Choudhary, A.K.; Freeman, A.H.

    2006-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis is characterized by non-specific inflammation of the mesenteric fat associated with variable amount of fibrosis. The aetiology is unclear; the pathogenesis is obscure, and even its nomenclature remains variable. It is a rare condition with imaging features that can be mistaken either for a mesenteric neoplasm or for a wide variety of non-neoplastic inflammatory conditions. Knowledge of the imaging features of this condition may prevent unwarranted aggressive therapy. This review discusses the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations of this condition, as well as illustrating the characteristic computed tomography (CT) features of sclerosing mesenteritis. A rational approach to the differential diagnosis is discussed

  4. Sclerosing stromal tumor of the ovary in a premenarchal female

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fefferman, Nancy R.; Pinkney, Lynne P.; Rivera, Rafael; Popiolek, Dorota; Hummel-Levine, Pascale; Cosme, Jaqueline

    2003-01-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumor (SST) is a rare benign ovarian neoplasm of stromal origin with less than 100 cases reported in the literature. Unlike the other stromal tumors, thecomas and fibromas, which tend to occur in the fifth and sixth decades, sclerosing stromal tumors predominantly affect females in the second and third decades. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound findings have been described, but have not been reported previously in the pediatric literature. We present a case of SST of the ovary in a 10-year-old premenarchal female, the youngest patient to our knowledge reported in the literature, and describe the ultrasound and CT findings with pathologic correlation. (orig.)

  5. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: A clinical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Abajirao Abajirao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a rare chronic, progressive encephalitis affecting primarily children and young adults, caused by a persistent infection of immune resistant measles virus. The aim of the present study is to describe the clinical profile and natural history of patients with SSPE. Methods: We collected data of patients with SSPE during 2004-2010 who fulfilled Dyken′s criteria. We analyzed demographical, clinical, electrophysiological, and imaging features. Results: Study included 34 patients, 26 (76.5% males with age of onset from 3 to 31 years. Twenty one patients were below 15 years of age formed childhood SSPE and 13 above 15 years of age constituted adult onset group. 85.3% had low-socioeconomic status. Eleven received measles vaccination and seven were unvaccinated. 59.9% patients had measles history. Most common presenting symptom was scholastic backwardness (52.5% followed by seizures (23.5%. Three patients each had cortical blindness, macular degeneration, decreased visual acuity, and optic atrophy. Electroencephalographic (EEG showed long interval periodic complexes and cerebrospinal fluid anti-measles antibody was positive in all. Magnetic resonance imaging was done in 70.5% with was abnormal in 52.5%. Mean incubation period of SSPE after measles was 9.6 years. The follow-up duration was 1-10 years, (average of 2 years. Only one patient died from available data of follow-up, 9 were stable and 10 deteriorated in the form of progression of staging. Conclusion: SSPE is common in low-socioeconomic status. The profile of adult onset did not differ from childhood onset SSPE, except for a longer interval between measles infection and presence of the ophthalmic symptom as presenting feature in adult onset group.

  6. PSC Matrix for Active GSA Schedules and GSA GWACs

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — The Product Service Codes (PSC) and North American Industrial Classification Systems (NAICS) are the two methods the Federal government classifies contracts. They...

  7. Sclerosing lobular hyperplasia of breast: cytomorphologic and histomorphologic features: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapur Payal

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammary sclerosing lobular hyperplasia is an uncommon benign lesion of adolescent and young women. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of mammary sclerosing lobular hyperplasia is said to show characteristic features that include an absence of stromal fragments. Case presentation In this article, we describe a case of sclerosing lobular hyperplasia that occurred in the right breast of a 12-year-old girl. Fine-needle aspiration cytology showed some fibroadenoma-like features including the presence of stromal fragments, while branched tubular fragments were not seen. The diagnosis of sclerosing lobular hyperplasia was made on histologic examination that showed preserved acinar architecture with lobular hyperplasia and sclerosis of intralobular and interlobular stroma. Conclusion Fine-needle aspiration cytology features of mammary sclerosing lobular hyperplasia are not diagnostic and overlap with those of fibroadenoma; however, a distinction between the two benign entities is of no clinical significance. The definitive diagnosis of sclerosing lobular hyperplasia requires histopathologic evaluation.

  8. Risk factors for percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage-related cholangitis in patients with malignant obstructive jaundice: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Hongtao; Zhai Renyou; Wang Jianfeng; Huang Qiang; Yu Ping; Dai Dingke

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the risk factors for percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) related cholangitis in patients with malignant obstructive jaundice. Methods: One hundred and fifty-four consecutive patients with malignant obstructive jaundice and without leukocytosis, fever and other manifestations of biliary tract infection received initial PTBD drainage. They were enrolled in this study. An uncontrolled prospective study was conducted of cholangitis occurrence within 30 days after PTBD. Twenty potential preoperative risk factors were assessed by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: Fifty-five patients (55/154, 35.7%) developed PTBD-related cholangitis, which composed of cholangitis group. Other patients composed of non-cholangitis group (99/154). The cholangitis-related mortality rate was 2.6% (4/154). Intraoperative bile culture were performed for 131 patients (131/154), including 45 in cholangitis group and 86 in non-cholangitis group. Positive result occurred in 26 patients (26/45) in cholangitis group and 17 patients (17/86) in non-cholangitis group. There was statistical significant difference between these two groups (χ 2 =19.357, P 2 = 10.470, P 2 =36.324, P 2 =9.540, P 2 =9.856, P 2 =14.196, P 2 =6.190, P 2 =5.439, P<0.05) were significantly different between cholangitis group and non-cholangitis group. By multivariate analysis, diabetes (OR=5.093, P<0.01), Child-Pugh C grade (OR=13.412, P<0.01), undrained biliary duct (OR=3.348, P<0.05), external-internal drainage (OR=3.168, P<0.05) and history of ERCP or cholangiojejunostomy (OR=8.330, P<0.01) remained significant difference. Conclusions: PTBD is an effective and safe palliative treatment for patients with malignant obstructive jaundice. Sufficient preoperative preparation and effective control of risk factors may reduce the incidence of cholangitis after PTCD. (authors)

  9. Genetic Contribution to the Pathogenesis of Primary Biliary Cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Joshita

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Formerly termed primary biliary cirrhosis, primary biliary cholangitis (PBC is a chronic and progressive cholestatic liver disease characterized by the presence of antimitochondrial antibodies. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA therapy is the most effective and approved treatment for PBC and leads to a favorable outcome in the vast majority of cases. Although the etiology of PBC has not yet been elucidated, human leukocyte antigen (HLA class II alleles have been consistently associated with disease onset for decades. Individuals in different geographic regions of the world may have varying susceptibility alleles that reflect indigenous triggering antigens. In this review, we describe the influence of HLA alleles and other gene polymorphisms on PBC along with the results of genome-wide association studies (GWAS on this disease.

  10. The Emerging Role of Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase in Primary Biliary Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Jung-Chin; Beuers, Ulrich; Oude Elferink, Ronald P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; previously referred to as primary biliary cirrhosis) is a chronic fibrosing cholangiopathy with the signature of an autoimmune disease and features of intrahepatic cholestasis. Immunosuppressing treatments are largely unsuccessful. Responsiveness to ursodeoxycholic

  11. Severe acute cholangitis after endoscopic sphincterotomy induced by barium examination: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Wu, Ya-Guang; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Su, Zhong-Xue; Xu, Jian; Xian, Guo-Zhe; Wu, Shuo-Dong

    2012-10-21

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) is considered as a possible etiological factor for severe cholangitis. We herein report a case of severe cholangitis after endoscopic sphincterotomy induced by barium examination. An adult male patient presented with epigastric pain was diagnosed as having choledocholithiasis by ultrasonography. EST was performed and the stone was completely cleaned. Barium examination was done 3 d after EST and severe cholangitis appeared 4 h later. The patient was recovered after treated with tienam for 4 d. Barium examination may induce severe cholangitis in patients after EST, although rare, barium examination should be chosen cautiously. Cautions should be also used when EST is performed in patients younger than 50 years to avoid the damage to the sphincter of Oddi.

  12. MiRNA-506 promotes primary biliary cholangitis-like features in cholangiocytes and immune activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erice, Oihane; Munoz-Garrido, Patricia; Vaquero, Javier; Perugorria, Maria J.; Fernandez-Barrena, Maite G.; Saez, Elena; Santos-Laso, Alvaro; Arbelaiz, Ander; Jimenez-Agüero, Raul; Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquin; Santamaria, Enrique; Torrano, Verónica; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Ananthanarayanan, Meenakshisundaram; Marzioni, Marco; Prieto, Jesus; Beuers, Ulrich; Oude Elferink, Ronald P.; LaRusso, Nicholas F.; Bujanda, Luis; Marin, Jose J. G.; Banales, Jesus M.

    2017-01-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease associated with autoimmune phenomena targeting intrahepatic bile duct cells (cholangiocytes). Although PBC etiopathogenesis still remains obscure, development of anti-mitochondrial auto-antibodies against pyruvate dehydrogenase

  13. A Placebo-Controlled Trial of Obeticholic Acid in Primary Biliary Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nevens, Frederik; Andreone, Pietro; Mazzella, Giuseppe; Strasser, Simone I.; Bowlus, Christopher; Invernizzi, Pietro; Drenth, Joost P. H.; Pockros, Paul J.; Regula, Jaroslaw; Beuers, Ulrich; Trauner, Michael; Jones, David E.; Floreani, Annarosa; Hohenester, Simon; Luketic, Velimir; Shiffman, Mitchell; van Erpecum, Karel J.; Vargas, Victor; Vincent, Catherine; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Shah, Hemant; Hansen, Bettina; Lindor, Keith D.; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Kowdley, Kris V.; Hooshmand-Rad, Roya; Marmon, Tonya; Sheeron, Shawn; Pencek, Richard; MacConell, Leigh; Pruzanski, Mark; Shapiro, David; Angus, Peter; Roberts, Stuart; Vogel, Wolfgang; Graziadei, Ivo; de Lédinghen, Victor; Berg, Thomas; Gotthardt, Daniel; Hartmann, Heinz; Kremer, Andreas E.; Lammert, Frank; Manns, Michael P.; Rust, Christian; Schramm, Christoph; Trautwein, Christian; Zeuzem, Stefan; Carbone, Marco; van Nieuwkerk, Carin C. M. J.; Celinski, Krzysztof; Gonciarz, Maciej; Hartleb, Marek; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Parés, Albert; Bramley, Peter; Thorburn, Douglas; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P.; Burroughs, Andrew; Chapman, Roger; Dillon, John F.; Greer, John A.; Tripathi, Dhiraj; McCune, Anne; Ryder, Stephen; Bacon, Bruce R.; Naik, Jahnavi; Wang, Lan Sun; Bodenheimer, Henry C.; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Chalasani, Naga; Forman, Lisa M.; Gordon, Stuart C.; Luketic, Velimir A.; Mayo, Marlyn; Muir, Andrew J.; Reddy, K. Gautham; Talwalker, Jayant T.; Vierling, John M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Primary biliary cholangitis ( formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis) can progress to cirrhosis and death despite ursodiol therapy. Alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin levels correlate with the risk of liver transplantation or death. Obeticholic acid, a farnesoid X receptor agonist, has

  14. A case of immunoglobulin G-4 related sclerosing disease mimicking lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Soo Hee; Lee, Young Kyung; Shim, Mi Suk; Lee, Hyang Im

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) G4-related sclerosing disease is a recently described systemic fibro-inflammatory disease associated with an elevated circulating level of IgG4 and extensive IgG4-positive lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, resulting in sclerosing inflammation involving various body organs. We experienced one case where surgery confirmed IgG4-related sclerosing disease as a solitary lung mass mimicking lung cancer. We report radiologic findings including chest computed tomography and positron emission tomography computed tomography, with clinical manifestations of IgG4-related sclerosing disease.

  15. Elevation of serum IgG4 in Western patients with autoimmune sclerosing pancreatocholangitis: a word of caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochwald, Steven N; Hemming, Alan W; Draganov, Peter; Vogel, Stephen B; Dixon, Lisa R; Grobmyer, Stephen R

    2008-04-01

    Autoimmune pancreatocholangitis is characterized by sclerosing inflammation of the biliary tree or pancreatic duct and can mimic pancreaticobiliary malignancy. Serum immunoglobin (Ig) G4 values seem to be helpful in distinguishing autoimmune pancreatocholangitis from pancreatic malignancy in the Japanese population; however, its significance in the Western population has not been well studied. We report a retrospective analysis of 7 consecutive patients with autoimmune pancreatocholangitis and compare them to 23 patients with pancreatic malignancy. Clinical presentation, diagnostic tests, and preoperative IgG4 levels were reviewed in all patients. Presence of autoimmune pancreatocholangitis or pancreatic malignancy was determined by pathologic analysis in all patients and reviewed by a single pathologist. In all patients, autoimmune pancreatocholangitis manifested in a similar fashion to pancreatic malignancy. Median IgG4 levels were far lower in pancreatic cancer patients with localized, resectable disease (24 mg/dL), locally advanced disease (24 mg/dL), and metastatic disease (28 mg/dL) as compared with patients with autoimmune pancreatocholangitis (142 mg/dL, P 100 mg/dL. In contrast, all patients with autoimmune pancreatitis or cholangitis had levels >100 mg/dL. However, in five of these seven patients, IgG4 levels were below the upper limits of normal. Autoimmune pancreatocholangitis mimics pancreatobiliary malignancy. Serum IgG4 values seem to be helpful in distinguishing autoimmune pancreatocholangitis from malignancy in the Western population. However, absolute values seem to be lower in the United States compared with Japan. The upper limit of normal as reported in laboratories in the United States may not be useful in identifying abnormally high IgG4 values. A new upper limit of normal may need to be defined because IgG subclass determinations are being used more frequently in Western patients with biliary obstruction.

  16. Bacterial cholangitis in patients with biliary atresia: impact on short-term outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, E T; Chen, H L; Ni, Y H; Lee, P I; Hsu, H Y; Lai, H S; Chang, M H

    2001-07-01

    Bacterial cholangitis (BC) is a common complication in patients with biliary atresia (BA) and is characterized by fever, acholic stools and positive blood cultures. The diagnosis is often empirical because the yield of blood cultures is low. It is difficult to differentiate BC from other febrile episodes. In order to characterize the clinical and laboratory features of BC in patients with BA, identify risk factors, and correlate cholangitis with outcome, 37 patients with BA from 1993 to 1998 who underwent a Kasai operation in our hospital were studied. The follow-up period ranged from 6 to 59 months. A total of 107 febrile episodes were documented in these patients. The diagnostic criteria for cholangitis were fever, increased jaundice, or acholic stools. The clinical features, laboratory data, results of bacterial cultures, and outcomes were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 107 febrile episodes, including 78 bouts of cholangitis and 29 non-cholangitis infections, were found in 34 patients. Patients with BC had higher postoperative bilirubin levels (P = 0.02) and less frequent use of prophylactic antibiotics (P = 0.05) than those with non-cholangitis infections. Abnormal white blood cell counts (> 12,000 or Acinetobacter baumanni, and Salmonella typhi. The sensitivity tests justified empirical therapy with ceftriaxone. The effectiveness of prophylactic trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or neomycin warrants further studies. BC was a highly prevalent postoperative complication in patients with BA, especially those with inadequate bile drainage. It significantly affected early mortality. Aggressive and complete treatment with empirical ceftriaxone was appropriate.

  17. CT guided puncture aspiration and sclerosing treatment of ovary cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yongjun; Du Xiumei; Yuan Jinrong; Chen Chanqing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the method and the curative effect with CT guided percutaneous puncture aspiration and sclerosing treatment of ovary cyst. Method: 22 ovary cysts in 22 patients were treated with percutaneous puncture aspiration and underwent repeated sclerotherapy with 99.7% ethanol injection. Among the 22 patients, 18 patients had solitary ovary cyst and was aspirated with an 18-22G gauge aspiration needle. The amount of aspirated fluid varied from 30ml-500ml and 25%-30% cyst volume was replaced by appropriate ethanol Post treatment follow-up were achieved every 3 months. Results All the Punctures were successfully completed. During the 3 months to one year follow-up, 16 ovary cyst disappeared, 6 cysts were small over 50%, without main complication. Conclusion CT guided percutaneous puncture aspiration and sclerosing treatment of ovary cyst is a treatment of choice because of its safety, low complication, and high curative effect. (authors)

  18. Sclerosing stromal tumor of the ovary: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Cho, On Koo; Kim, Yong Soo; Hahm, Chang Kok [School of Medicine, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumor of the ovary is a rare benign neoplasm, with distinctive clinical and pathologic features. It occurs predominantly in females during the second and third decades of life. Histologically, it is composed of cellular and acellular collagenized areas, and edematous stromal areas, and at ultrasonography and computed tomography is seen as a distinctive mixed solid and cystic mass lesion. We report a case of sclerosing stromal tumor of the ovary in a 15-year-old girl with a history of menorrhagia since menarche. Ultrasonography revealed the tumor as a well-defined, lobulated, heterogenous echogenic pelvic mass, while at CT, a huge pelvic mass 9 x 9 x 10 cm in size, was seen. This comprised a well-enhanced internal solid portion, a capsule, septa, and a non-enhanced cystic portion.

  19. Sclerosing polycystic adenosis of the salivary gland: a report of 16 cases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gnepp, D.R.; Wang, L.J.; Brandwein-Gensler, M.; Slootweg, P.J.; Gill, M.; Hille, J.

    2006-01-01

    Sclerosing polycystic adenosis is a recently described, extremely rare, reactive, sclerosing, inflammatory process somewhat similar to fibrocystic changes and adenosis tumor of the breast. To date, there have been 22 cases described in the literature. Because of the infrequency of this lesion, we

  20. PSC/PSI power supply control prototype based on RTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Haoli; Wang Chunhong; Tang Jingyu

    2010-01-01

    A PSC/PSI power supply control prototype was developed by using an open-source real-time operating system RTEMS and PSC/PSI power supply controller developed by BNL. The structure of the prototype, development procedures as well as testing result with a power supply of a corrector magnet were described. It can switch on/off the power supply, ramp up/down the current, and monitor the real-time states of the power supply. (authors)

  1. What Comes after Ursodeoxycholic Acid in Primary Biliary Cholangitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lin Lee; Hegade, Vinod S; Jones, David E J

    2017-01-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is a rare autoimmune liver disease characterized by chronic cholestasis. Treatment with the accepted primary therapy ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been shown to be associated with delayed disease progression probably through reduced impact of cholestatic injury on the target biliary epithelial cells. Patients with inadequate response to UDCA (which can be identified through validated biochemical criteria) are at increased risk of disease progression, need for liver transplantation, and death. Obeticholic acid (OCA) is a farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist which has been evaluated as a second-line therapy in PBC and has been recently licensed by the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency for use in patients showing an inadequate response to UDCA or who are unable to tolerate it. Although evidence for biochemical improvement by OCA is compelling, there is, as yet, no evidence that OCA improves hard clinical outcomes or quality of life. In addition, OCA may not be suitable for PBC patients with pruritus as it can worsen the symptom. Other novel agents currently in clinical development may have better side-effect profile. Fibrates have the potential but currently lack high quality evidence to support their routine clinical use in PBC. Symptom management of PBC is challenging and ASBT inhibitors and rituximab are being evaluated for pruritus and fatigue, respectively. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Recurrent cholangitis in the tropics: Worm or cast?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of biliary casts is very rare, especially in non-liver transplant patients. The etiology of these casts is uncertain but several factors have been proposed which lead to bile stasis and/or gallbladder hypo-contractility and promote cast formation. Here, we report a 54-year-old male, with diabetes and ischemic heart disease, who presented with recurrent attacks of cholangitis. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography revealed linear T1 hyperintense and T2 hypointense filling defects in the right and left hepatic ducts extending into the common hepatic duct, and a calculus in the lower common bile duct, raising a suspicion of worm in the biliary tree. In view of failed attempts at extraction on endoscopy, patient underwent surgery. At exploration, biliary casts and stones were extracted from the proximal and the second order bile ducts, with the help of intraoperative choledochoscopy and a bilio-enteric anastomosis was accomplished. Although endoscopic retrieval of the biliary cast can be employed as first-line management, surgery should be considered in case it fails.

  3. Acute Cholangitis After Bilioenteric Anastomosis for Bile Duct Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Brizuela, Edgar; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Manzur-Sandoval, Daniel; Terán-Ellis, Santiago Mier Y; Ponce-de-León, Sergio; Torres-González, Pedro; Mercado, Miguel Ángel

    2017-10-01

    The study aims to describe the clinical features, microbiology, and associated factors of acute cholangitis (AC) after bilioenteric anastomosis (BEA) for biliary duct injury (BDI). Additionally, we assessed the performance of the Tokyo Guidelines 2013 (TG13) recommendations in these patients. We conducted a case-control study of 524 adults with a history of BEA for BDI from January 2000 to January 2014. A propensity score adjustment was performed for the analysis of the independent role of the main factors identified during the univariate logistic regression procedure. We identified 117 episodes of AC in 70 patients; 51.3% were definitive AC according to the TG13 diagnostic criteria, and 39.3% did not fulfill the imaging criteria of AC. A history of post-operative biliary complications (OR 2.55, 95% CI 1.38-4.70) and the bile duct confluence preservation (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24-0.87) were associated with AC. Eighty-nine percent of the microorganisms were Enterobacteriaceae; of them, 28% were extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producers. AC is a common complication after BEA and must be suspected even in the absence of imaging findings, particulary in patients with a history of post-operative biliary complications, and/or without bile duct confluence preserved. An empirical treatment for ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae may be appropriate in patients living in countries with a high rate of bacterial drug resistance.

  4. Frequency and importance of radiologically visible coronary scleroses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, B.

    1981-01-01

    The importance of radiologically visible coronary sceleroses for an early diagnosing of coronary heart disease was investigated. In 3 mixed collectives of patients with and without coronary heart diseases who had had a coronary angiography were examined retrospectively for coronary sclerosis (group I: standard films, group II: old X-ray findings, group III: fluoroscopy before beginning coronary angiography). In the retrospective evaluation, the sensitivity to the recognition of coronary heart disease was low. With prospective examination by means of fluoroscopy, coronary calcification could be proven in 37.66% of the patients with coronary diseases (sensitivity); the specificity (no coronary calcification in persons without coronary disease) was 99%. The duration and extent of a calcification do not show a definite influence on the severity of the disease. Several coronary scleroses in one or several vessels mostly indicate a vascular disease. Coronary scleroses are not necessarily located in the same point as coronary stenoses: in 85.5% of the patients with coronary sclerosis of the left truncus, haemodynamically important stenoses were found only in following vascular regions. Considering the high specificity of coronary scleroses in the fluoroscopic picture and the high sensitivity under favourable conditions, this method seems to be suitable as a screening method for early recognition of coronary heart diseases in the asymptomatic stage. A proven coronary sclerosis should in any case be the cause for continuing the search for a coronary heart disease. The radiation exposure during fluoroscopy of coronary sclerosis is low if the adjustment is correct, it takes little time, the patient is not put to discomfort. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Computed tomographic findings of early subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, H.; Wulff, C.H.; Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography of the brain (CT) was carried out at the early stages of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) in three children. The lateral ventricles were very small and the hemispheric sulci and interhemispheric fissures were not visible in all three patients in contrast to severe atrophy found at a later stage in one patient. The early CT abnormalities were revealed at the same time as the titres of measles antibodies in blood and cerebrospinal fluid were elevated, and the characteristic periodic complexes in the electroencephalogram established the diagnosis of SSPE. The CT changes indicating brain swelling reflect the reactive changes of this slow virus infection. (orig.)

  6. An 111In-Pentetreotide Positive Sclerosing Pneumocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelli, Giordano; Bnà, Claudio; Zambelli, Claudia; Illuminati, Sonia; Bonello, Luke

    2017-04-01

    A 43-year-old woman had an incidental lung mass identified on shoulder x-ray performed for pain. Contrast-enhanced CT showed a 38-mm mass in the medial segment of the right middle lobe, with features suggestive of carcinoid tumor. A In-pentetreotide scan showed intense uptake; furthermore, fine needle aspiration biopsy yielded neuroendocrine cells confirming the carcinoid hypothesis. However, definitive surgical histology showed a sclerosing pneumocytoma. This could potentially suggest that such rare tumors, with metastatic potential, could respond to somatostatin analogue treatment.

  7. Bedside Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography Using Portable X-Ray in Acute Severe Cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rushikesh Shah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with acute cholangitis require emergent biliary decompression. Those who are hemodynamically unstable on vasopressor support and mechanical ventilation are too critically ill to move outside of the intensive care unit. This prohibits performing Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP in the endoscopy unit. Fluoroscopic guidance is required to confirm deep biliary cannulation during ERCP. There are a few reported cases of bedside ERCP using portable C-arm fluoroscopy unit or ultrasound guided cannulation. We present a unique case of life-saving emergent bedside ERCP in a severely ill patient with cholangitis and septic shock, using simple portable X-ray to confirm biliary cannulation.

  8. The new energy management policy: Indonesian PSC-gross-split applied on steam flooding project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irham, S.; Julyus, P.

    2018-01-01

    “SIPY” oil field has been producing oil using steam flooding technology since 1992 under the PSC-Cost-Recovery policy. In 2021, the contract will be finished, and a new agreement must be submitted to the Indonesian government. There are two applied fiscal policies on oil and gas management: PSC-Cost-Recovery and PSC-Gross-Split (introduced in 2017 as the new energy management plan). The contractor must choose between PSC-Cost-Recovery and PSC-Gross-split which makes more profit. The aim of this research is to determine the best oil and gas contract policy for the contractor. The methods are calculating contractor cash flow and comparing the Profitability Indexes. The results of this study are (1) Net Present Values for the PSC-Cost-Recovery and the PSC-Gross-Split are 15 MMUS and 61 MMUS, respectively; and (2) Internal Rate of Return values for the PSC-Cost-Recovery and PSC-Gross-Split are 10% and 11%, respectively. The conclusion is that the Net Present Value and Internal Rate of Return of PSC-Gross-Split are greater than those of PSC-Cost-Recovery, but in Pay Out Time of PSC-Gross-split is longer than Pay Out Time in PSC-Cost-Recovery. Thus, the new energy management policy will be more attractive than PSC-Cost-Recovery.

  9. A Recurrence of Bilateral Diffuse Sclerosing Lobular Hyperplasia of Breast: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfituri, Osama; Sonawane, Snehal; Xu, Haoliang; Warso, Michael A; Wiley, Elizabeth

    2017-12-01

    Mammary sclerosing lobular hyperplasia is an uncommon benign fibroproliferative lesion of adolescent and young women, often of African American heritage with an incidence of ~3%. Patients generally complain of a palpable, painless, or slightly tender and well-defined lump in breast. Very rarely, this lesion may be bilateral and diffuse. The definitive diagnosis of sclerosing lobular hyperplasia requires histopathologic evaluation. Here, we describe a case of diffuse sclerosing lobular hyperplasia in a 29-year-old African American woman that required bilateral mastectomy and recurred bilaterally requiring second resections. This appears to be the first report of this phenomenon.

  10. Human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neurons respond to convulsant drugs when co-cultured with hiPSC-derived astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Misawa Niki; Yamamoto, Koji; Shoji, Masanobu; Asami, Asano; Kawamata, Yuji

    2017-08-15

    Accurate risk assessment for drug-induced seizure is expected to be performed before entering clinical studies because of its severity and fatal damage to drug development. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has allowed the use of human neurons and glial cells in toxicology studies. Recently, several studies showed the advantage of co-culture system of human iPSC (hiPSC)-derived neurons with rodent/human primary astrocytes regarding neuronal functions. However, the application of hiPSC-derived neurons for seizure risk assessment has not yet been fully addressed, and not at all when co-cultured with hiPSC-derived astrocytes. Here, we characterized hiPSC-derived neurons co-cultured with hiPSC-derived astrocytes to discuss how hiPSC-derived neurons are useful to assess seizure risk of drugs. First, we detected the frequency of spikes and synchronized bursts hiPSC-derived neurons when co-cultured with hiPSC-derived astrocytes for 8 weeks. This synchronized burst was suppressed by the treatment with 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist, and D-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, an N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist. These data suggested that co-cultured hiPSC-derived neurons formed synaptic connections mediated by AMPA and NMDA receptors. We also demonstrated that co-cultured hiPSC-derived neurons showed epileptiform activity upon treatment with gabazine or kaliotoxin. Finally, we performed single-cell transcriptome analysis in hiPSC-derived neurons and found that hiPSC-derived astrocytes activated the pathways involved in the activities of AMPA and NMDA receptor functions, neuronal polarity, and axon guidance in hiPSC-derived neurons. These data suggested that hiPSC-derived astrocytes promoted the development of action potential, synaptic functions, and neuronal networks in hiPSC-derived neurons, and then these functional alterations result in the epileptiform

  11. Ulcerative colitis and esclerosant cholangitis in children and adolescents; case report and literature revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra G, Giovanna S; Edelberto Mulett V; Mario Santacoloma O

    2002-01-01

    In spite of being considered rare in the pediatric practice, the intestinal inflammatory illness is recognized now with more frequency in children of all the ages. In fact, 25 to 30% of all the patients with Crohn illness, and 20% the patients with ulcerative colitis, they consult before the 20 years. A case is presented of patient of 15 years with primary esclerosant cholangitis

  12. How the concept of biochemical response influenced the management of primary biliary cholangitis over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, W. J.; Leeman, M.; Ponsioen, C. I. J.; Boonstra, K.; van Erpecum, K. J.; Wolfhagen, F. H. J.; Kuyvenhoven, J. Ph; Vrolijk, J. M.; Drenth, J. P. H.; Witteman, E. M.; van Nieuwkerk, C. M. J.; van der Spek, B. W.; Witteman, B. J. M.; Erkelens, G. W.; Verhagen, M. A. M. T.; van Tuyl, S. A. C.; Poen, A. C.; Brouwer, J. T.; ter Borg, F.; Koek, G. H.; van Ditzhuijsen, T. J. M.; Hansen, B. E.; van Buuren, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Criteria assessing biochemical response to ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) are established risk stratification tools in primary biliary cholangitis (PBC). We aimed to evaluate to what extent liver tests influenced patient management during a three decade period, and whether this changed over time. 851

  13. Ischemic Cholangitis Caused by Transcatheter Hepatic Arterial Chemoembolization 10 Months After Resection of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kubota, Keiichi; Aoki, Taku; Hirai, Ichiro; Miyazawa, Masashi; Ohtomo, Kuni; Makuuchi, Masatoshi

    2000-01-01

    We report a case of ischemic cholangitis that occurred after transcatheter hepatic arterial chemoembolization (TAE). Ten months prior to TAE the patient had undergone central bisegmentectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma with resection of the extrahepatic bile duct. Eleven days after TAE, he developed suppurative cholangitis and multiple organ failure. Prior surgical ligation of the peribiliary arteries around the extrahepatic bile duct followed by TAE was considered to have played a crucial role in the development of ischemic cholangitis. This case demonstrates the importance of blood flow from the peribiliary arteries for the survival of the biliary epithelium

  14. Mesenteric ossification in CT indicates sclerosing peritonitis in chronic bacterial infection and pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, J.; Kirchner, E.M.; Kickuth, R.; Stein, A.

    2004-01-01

    Sclerosing peritonitis already has been described as a serious complication of the continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. But different other affections of the pertioneum such as chronic bacterial peritonitis and pancreatitis may result in sclerosing peritonitis, too. The symptom is characterised by thickened small bowel walls and periotoneal membranes as well as peritoneal calcifications which can be shown in computed tomography. We demonstrate two cases of peritoneal ossifications due to peritonitis and pancreatitis. (orig.) [de

  15. File list: Unc.PSC.50.Unclassified.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.50.Unclassified.AllCell mm9 Unclassified Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell...73,SRX355578 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.50.Unclassified.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Unc.PSC.05.Unclassified.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.Unclassified.AllCell mm9 Unclassified Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell...8,SRX1034724 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.Unclassified.AllCell.bed ...

  17. Generation of iPSC line iPSC-FH2.1 in hypoxic conditions from human foreskin fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Questa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human foreskin fibroblasts were used to generate the iPSC line iPSC-FH2.1 using the EF1a-hSTEMCCA-loxP vector expressing OCT4, SOX2, c-MYC and KLF4, in 5% O2 culture conditions. Stemness was confirmed, as was pluripotency both in vivo and in vitro, in normoxia and hypoxia. Human Embryonic Stem Cell (hESC line WA-09 and reprogrammed fibroblast primary culture HFF-FM were used as controls.

  18. Molecular and radiological diagnosis of sclerosing bone dysplasias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hul, Wim van; Vanhoenacker, Filip; Balemans, Wendy; Janssens, Katrien; Schepper, A.M. de

    2001-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a quantitative trait for which the heritability of the variance is estimated to be up to 80%, based on epidemiological and twin studies. Further illustration of the involvement of genetic factors in bone homeostasis, is the existence of an extended group of genetic conditions associated with an abnormal bone density. The group of conditions with increased bone density has long been poorly studied and understood at the molecular genetic level but recently, thanks to recent developments in molecular genetics and genomics, for some of them major breakthroughs have been made. These findings will make the molecular analysis of such patients an additional tool in diagnostics and in genetic counseling. However, the initial identification of affected patients is still largely dependent upon recognition of clinical and radiological stigmata of the disease. Therefore, in this overview of sclerosing bone dysplasias, the classical clinical and radiological signs of this group of disorders will be discussed along with the new molecular insights

  19. Molecular and radiological diagnosis of sclerosing bone dysplasias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hul, Wim van E-mail: vhul@uia.ac.be; Vanhoenacker, Filip; Balemans, Wendy; Janssens, Katrien; Schepper, A.M. de

    2001-12-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a quantitative trait for which the heritability of the variance is estimated to be up to 80%, based on epidemiological and twin studies. Further illustration of the involvement of genetic factors in bone homeostasis, is the existence of an extended group of genetic conditions associated with an abnormal bone density. The group of conditions with increased bone density has long been poorly studied and understood at the molecular genetic level but recently, thanks to recent developments in molecular genetics and genomics, for some of them major breakthroughs have been made. These findings will make the molecular analysis of such patients an additional tool in diagnostics and in genetic counseling. However, the initial identification of affected patients is still largely dependent upon recognition of clinical and radiological stigmata of the disease. Therefore, in this overview of sclerosing bone dysplasias, the classical clinical and radiological signs of this group of disorders will be discussed along with the new molecular insights.

  20. Radiologic bone changes of polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelae, P.; Virtama, P.

    1982-01-01

    More than 50 cases of polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia (PLO) with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy (SL) have been described in Finland, Sweden, Japan, and in the USA. Radiographic bone changes, including symmetrical cystic lesions in the small bones of the extremities and trabecular loss in the distal ends of the long tubular bones, represent primary abnormalities in the diagnosis of the disease. Neuropsychiatric symptoms, frontal syndrome, and pyramidal signs make the patients dangerous to themselves. They are often involved in traffic accidents are prone to multiple spontaneous or almost spontaneous fractures. PLO usually starts with slight bone pain around the age of 20 years. Progress is very slow during the next ten years, but faster after the age of 40 years. The patients usually die before the age of 50 years having total dementia and epileptiform convulsions. (orig.)

  1. Pelvic pain in a young patient: Sclerosing stromal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huriye Ayşe Parlakgümüş

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sclerosing stromal tumors are rare, benign sex chord stromal tumors. They are usually unilateral and are seen in second or third decades. The complaint at admission may be menstrual irregularity, pelvic pain, palpable pelvic mass, precocious puberty and postmenopausal bleeding. Because the complaint at admission and radiological findings are not specific to SSTs preoperative diagnosis is challenging. Herein we present the sonographical, intraoperative and histopathological findings of a SST diagnosed during laparoscopy in a patient who admitted with chronic pelvic pain and received pelvic inflammatory disease and endometriosis treatment and differential diagnosis of SSTs with the other ovarian tumors. Case report: 24 years old nulliparous patient first admitted to the gynecology department with the complaint of foul smelling vaginal discharge and pelvic pain. The diagnosis was pelvic inflammatory disease and the patient received antibiotics. The pelvic examination was normal except the mass in the right ovary which had similar echogenity to the ovary. Because of the pelvic pain the mass was assumed to be an endometrioma and the patient was prescribed an oral contraceptive treatment for 3 months. Because of the persistent pelvic pain a diagnostic laparoscopy was performed which revealed a 2 cm, pinkish- white, exophytic lesion originating from the right ovary. Pathological examination reported the mass to be a sclerosing stromal tumor. After the treatment the patient no longer complained of vaginal discharge but pelvic pain still persisted. After the operation the patient no longer complained of pelvic pain. Conclusion: Although SSTs are rare, they should be kept in mind when a young patient admits with menstrual irregularity, pelvic pain and hirsutism, particularly if the pain is refractory to treatment.

  2. 9+ Years of CALIOP PSC Data: An Evolving Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.

    2015-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play key roles in the springtime chemical depletion of ozone at high latitudes. PSC particles provide sites for heterogeneous chemical reactions that transform stable chlorine and bromine reservoir species into highly reactive ozone-destructive forms. Furthermore, large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) PSC particles can irreversibly redistribute odd nitrogen through gravitational sedimentation, which prolongs the ozone depletion process by slowing the reformation of the stable chlorine reservoirs. However, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of PSC processes, particularly concerning the details of NAT particle formation. Spaceborne observations from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar on the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite are providing a rich new dataset for studying PSCs on unprecedented vortex-wide scales. In this paper, we examine the vertical and spatial distribution of PSCs in the Antarctic and Arctic on vortex-wide scales for entire PSC seasons over the more than nine-year data record.

  3. Comparative effects of Potash Sodium Chloride (PSC) mixture and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Honey (Mellifica sp) is produced by Apis mellifera africana, widely consumed without prescription or restriction, and has been shown to possess wound healing and antitusive properties. Comparative study of the effects of honey paste and Potash Sodium Chloride (PSC) mixture on the healing of incisional wound on albino ...

  4. Communication overhead on the Intel iPSC-860 hypercube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on the Intel iPSC-860 hypercube in order to evaluate the overhead of interprocessor communication. It is demonstrated that: (1) contrary to popular belief, the distance between two communicating processors has a significant impact on communication time, (2) edge contention can increase communication time by a factor of more than 7, and (3) node contention has no measurable impact.

  5. The new management policy: Indonesian PSC-Gross split applied on CO2 flooding project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irham, S.; Sibuea, S. N.; Danu, A.

    2018-01-01

    “SIAD” oil field will be developed by CO2 flooding. CO2, a famous pollutant gas, is injected into the oil reservoir to optimize the oil recovery. This technique should be conducted economically according to the energy management policy in Indonesia. In general, Indonesia has two policy contracts on oil and gas: the old one is PSC-Cost-Recovery, and the new one is PSC-Gross-Split (introduced in 2017 as the new energy management plan). The contractor must choose between PSC-Cost-Recovery and PSC-Gross-Split which makes more profit. The aim of this paper is to show the best oil and gas contract policy for the contractor. The methods are calculating and comparing the economic indicators. The result of this study are (1) NPV for the PSC-Cost-Recovery is -46 MUS, while for the PSC-Gross-Split is 73 MUS, and (2) IRR for the PSC-Cost-Recovery is 9%, whereas for the PSC-Gross-Split is 11%. The conclusion is that the NPV and IRR for PSC-Gross-Split are greater than the NPV and IRR of PSC-Cost-Recovery, but POT in PSC-Gross-split is longer than POT in PSC-Cost-Recovery. Thus, in this case, the new energy policy contract can be applied for CO2 flooding technology since it yields higher economic indicators than its antecendent.

  6. Can gravity waves significantly impact PSC occurrence in the Antarctic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Woollands

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A combination of POAM III aerosol extinction and CHAMP RO temperature measurements are used to examine the role of atmospheric gravity waves in the formation of Antarctic Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs. POAM III aerosol extinction observations and quality flag information are used to identify Polar Stratospheric Clouds using an unsupervised clustering algorithm.

    A PSC proxy, derived by thresholding Met Office temperature analyses with the PSC Type Ia formation temperature (TNAT, shows general agreement with the results of the POAM III analysis. However, in June the POAM III observations of PSC are more abundant than expected from temperature threshold crossings in five out of the eight years examined. In addition, September and October PSC identified using temperature thresholding is often significantly higher than that derived from POAM III; this observation probably being due to dehydration and denitrification. Comparison of the Met Office temperature analyses with corresponding CHAMP observations also suggests a small warm bias in the Met Office data in June. However, this bias cannot fully explain the differences observed.

    Analysis of CHAMP data indicates that temperature perturbations associated with gravity waves may partially explain the enhanced PSC incidence observed in June (relative to the Met Office analyses. For this month, approximately 40% of the temperature threshold crossings observed using CHAMP RO data are associated with small-scale perturbations. Examination of the distribution of temperatures relative to TNAT shows a large proportion of June data to be close to this threshold, potentially enhancing the importance of gravity wave induced temperature perturbations. Inspection of the longitudinal structure of PSC occurrence in June 2005 also shows that regions of enhancement are geographically associated with the Antarctic Peninsula; a known mountain wave "hotspot". The

  7. Recurrent acute pancreatitis and cholangitis in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

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    Kambiz Yazdanpanah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is an inherited disorder associated with multiple cyst formation in the different organs. Development of pancreatic cyst in ADPKD is often asymptomatic and is associated with no complication. A 38-year-old man with ADPKD was presented with six episodes of acute pancreatitis and two episodes of cholangitis in a period of 12 months. Various imaging studies revealed multiple renal, hepatic and pancreatic cysts, mild ectasia of pancreatic duct, dilation of biliary system and absence of biliary stone. He was managed with conservative treatment for each attack. ADPKD should be considered as a potential risk factor for recurrent acute and/or chronic pancreatitis and cholangitis.

  8. Recurrent pyogenic cholangitis in Asian immigrants: use of ultrasonography, computed tomography, and cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federle, M.P.; Cello, J.P.; Laing, F.C.; Jeffery, R.B. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Five cases of recurrent pyogenic cholangitis (RPC) were studied by ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and cholangiography. All patients were recent immigrants from the Orient or Indonesia and had had recurrent attacks of cholangitis for many years. The bile was infected by E. coli and the biliary ducts were dilated; in addition, extrahepatic bile-pigment calculi we represent in all 5 and intrahepatic calculi in 4. Abdominal ultrasound usually failed to demonstrate duct calculi and extrahepatic dilatation due to the soft, mud-like consistency of the stones. CT was successful in showing the calculi and the full extent of dilatation. The authors conclude that preoperative diagnosis of RPC is best achieved by awareness of the characteristic clinical presentation and the findings on abdominal CT. Preoperative cholangiography provides excellent detail, but poses the danger of biliary sepsis requiring antibiotics

  9. Echocardiographic evaluation of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

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    Derya Çimen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a slowly progressive, inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease caused by virus infection in the central nervous system. Since there are a limited number of studies in the literature evaluating the cardiovascular functions of patients with SSPE, the present study evaluates the patients with SSPE using tissue Doppler echocardiography and compares them between the control group in order to shed some light on the subject. Methods: The study is a prospective observational study. 49 patients (17 female, 32 male with SSPE were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups: Stage 2 (n=29 and Stage 3 (n=20. Echocardiographic data were compared with a control group of 26 which is the same average age. All children underwent a detailed echocardiography, which contained an M-mode, pulse Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging. Results: Sinus tachycardia ( >100 beats/min in children was detected in nineteen (38.7% patients. There were not significant differences between parameters of systolic and diastolic function of the heart. Stage 2 group, EF: 69.9±6.4; SF: 39.2±5.58; and MPI (mitral: 0.38±0.03 and MPI (tricuspid: 0.39±0.10. And in the Stage 3 group, EF: 68.5±7.0, SF: 37.8±5.34, MPI (mitral: 0.37±0.09 and MPI (tricuspid: 0.38±0.12. In the control group EF:70.96±5.54; SF:39.96±5.05 and MPI(mitral: 0.35±0.06 MPI (tricuspid:0.36±0.04 and statistically meaningful differences were not found between patients and control groups (p >0.05. Conclusion: Cardiac functions may be preserved and cardiac functions constitute no significant risks of mortality in the advanced stages of patients with Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, which is a group of chronic and bedridden patients.

  10. Antibacterial Therapy of Acute Cholecystitis and Cholangitis (According to Tokyo Guidelines2013

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    Yu.M. Stepanov

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotics should be used wisely in antimicrobial therapy in each institution, region and country. The recent global spread of antibiotic resistance gives us a warning in the modern practice. Tokyo Guidelines 2013 provide practical guidance for physicians and surgeons involved in the treatment of community-acquired and hospital acute biliary infection. Much remains uncertain in this view. Continuous monitoring of local resistance to antibiotics and further studies in acute cholecystitis and cholangitis should be justified.

  11. Use of Lactobacillus casei rhamnosus to Prevent Cholangitis in Biliary Atresia After Kasai Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Tien-Hau; Bu, Ling-Nan; Wu, Jia-Feng; Chen, Huey-Ling; Chen, An-Chyi; Lai, Ming-Wei; Shih, Hsiang-Hung; Lee, I-Hsien; Hsu, Hong-Yuan; Ni, Yen-Hsuan; Chang, Mei-Hwei

    2015-05-01

    Recurrent cholangitis may aggravate cholestatic liver cirrhosis in biliary atresia (BA) after the Kasai operation. This pilot study aimed to investigate whether Lactobacillus casei rhamnosus has the prophylactic efficacy for recurrent cholangitis in comparison with the conventional neomycin prophylaxis. Twenty jaundice-free patients with BA ages 0 to 3 years who underwent a Kasai operation were enrolled and randomized into 2 groups with 10 patients each: neomycin (25 mg · kg · day for 4 days/wk) and L casei rhamnosus (8 × 10 colony-forming unit per day) groups. The treatment duration was 6 months. Bacterial stool cultures were performed before treatment and 1, 3, and 6 months after starting treatment. In addition, 10 patients with BA with similar status but without prophylaxis served as the historical control group. In the Lactobacillus group, 2 patients (20%, mean 0.03 ± 0.07 episodes per month) developed cholangitis during the study period, with the same frequency as in the neomycin group and significantly lower than that in the control group (80%, P = 0.005, mean 0.22 ± 0.16 episodes per month). The mean change in body weight z score during the 6 months in the Lactobacillus group was 0.97 ± 0.59, which was significantly better than that in the control group (-0.01 ± 0.79, P = 0.006). In bacterial stool cultures, the Lactobacillus and Escherichia coli populations significantly increased and decreased, respectively, in the Lactobacillus group. The use of L casei rhamnosus was as effective as neomycin in preventing cholangitis in patients with BA who underwent Kasai operation, and therefore could be considered as a potential alternative prophylactic regimen.

  12. New developments in the treatment of primary biliary cholangitis – role of obeticholic acid

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    Jhaveri MA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Manan A Jhaveri, Kris V Kowdley Liver Care Network, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC is a chronic autoimmune cholestatic liver disease that predominantly affects women in early to middle age. It is typically associated with autoantibodies to mitochondrial antigens and results in immune-mediated destruction of small and medium-sized intrahepatic bile ducts leading to cholestasis, hepatic fibrosis and may progress to cirrhosis or hepatic failure and, in some cases, hepatocellular carcinoma. The clinical presentation and the natural history of PBC have improved over the years due to recognition of earlier widespread use of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA; about one-third of patients show suboptimal biochemical response to UDCA with poor prognosis. Until recently, UDCA was the only US Food and Drug Administration approved agent for this disease for more than two decades; obeticholic acid was approved in 2016 for treatment of patients with PBC with a suboptimal response or intolerance to UDCA. Currently, liver transplantation is the most effective treatment modality for PBC patients with end-stage liver disease. This review will focus on the recent advances in therapy of primary biliary cholangitis, with emphasis on obeticholic acid. Keywords: primary biliary cholangitis, obeticholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid

  13. A case of cholestatic hepatitis associated with histologic features of acute cholangitis

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    Takeuchi H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Hajime Takeuchi1, Toru Kaneko1, Toshikazu Otsuka1, Kumiko Tahara1, Tadashi Motoori2, Makoto Ohbu3, Masaya Oda4, Hiroaki Yokomori11Department of Internal Medicine; 2Division of Pathology, Kitasato Medical Center Hospital, Kitasato University, Saitama; 3Department of Pathology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Saitama Social Insurance Hospital, Saitama; 5Organized Center of Clinical Medicine, International University of Health and Welfare, Sanno Hospital, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: This report describes a case showing histologic features of acute cholangitis with an over-the-counter drug. A 48-year-old woman was diagnosed with general malaise and progressive jaundice. A thorough review of her medical history revealed that the patient had taken an over-the-counter drug, Pabron Gold®, which she had used previously, that may have caused liver injury. Laboratory investigations revealed jaundice and liver dysfunction. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography detected no extrahepatic biliary duct dilatation or stones. Liver biopsy indicated acute cholangitis involving neutrophils and eosinophils. Electron microscopy revealed fragmented nuclei, indicating that the degenerative bile duct-related epithelial cells were in an apoptotic process.Keywords: liver injury, over-the-counter drug, histologic features, acute cholangitis, electron microscopy, Pabron Gold

  14. 9+ Years of CALIPSO PSC Observations: An Evolving Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.

    2015-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play a crucial role in the springtime chemical depletion of ozone at high latitudes. PSC particles (primarily supercooled ternary solution, or STS droplets) provide sites for heterogeneous chemical reactions that transform stable chlorine and bromine reservoir species into highly reactive ozone-destructive forms. Furthermore, large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) PSC particles can irreversibly redistribute odd nitrogen through gravitational sedimentation (a process commonly known as denitrification), which prolongs the ozone depletion process by slowing the reformation of the stable chlorine reservoirs. Spaceborne observations from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar on the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite are providing a rich new dataset for studying PSCs. CALIPSO is an excellent platform for studying polar processes with CALIOP acquiring, on average, over 300,000 backscatter profiles daily at latitudes between 55o and 82o in both hemispheres. PSCs are detected in the CALIOP backscatter profiles using a successive horizontal averaging scheme that enables detection of strongly scattering PSCs (e.g., ice) at the finest possible spatial resolution (5 km), while enhancing the detection of very tenuous PSCs (e.g., low number density NAT) at larger spatial scales (up to 135 km). CALIOP PSCs are separated into composition classes (STS; liquid/NAT mixtures; and ice) based on the ensemble 532-nm scattering ratio (the ratio of total-to-molecular backscatter) and 532-nm particulate depolarization ratio (which is sensitive to the presence of non-spherical, i.e. NAT and ice particles). In this paper, we will provide an overview of the CALIOP PSC detection and composition classification algorithm and then examine the vertical and spatial distribution of PSCs in the Arctic and Antarctic on vortex-wide scales for entire PSC seasons over the more than nine-year data

  15. Sclerosing thymoma: case report Timoma esclerosante: relato de caso

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    Gesine Gregorio Siqueira

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case of thymoma in a 36-year old woman, who was initially diagnosed with severe myasthenia gravis and subsequently undergone surgical resection. During surgery tumor was found at the anterior mediastinum, tightly attached to the phrenic nerve, pleura and pericardium. Histological assessment showed large areas of sclerosis and fibrous collagenous tissue as well as islands of epithelial and lymphoid cells. Sclerosing thymoma, which is a rare subtype of thymoma (Relatamos um caso raro de timoma em uma mulher de 36 anos de idade, com clínica e diagnóstico de miastenia gravis de difícil controle clínico, submetida à ressecção cirúrgica. No intraoperatório, observou-se tumor no mediastino anterior, firmemente aderido ao nervo frênico, à pleura e ao pericárdio. Ao exame histológico, foram evidenciadas extensas áreas de tecido fibrocolagenoso e esclerose, assim como ilhas de células epiteliais e células linfoides. Diagnosticado timoma esclerosante, subtipo raro de timoma (< 1%, sendo este o primeiro caso relatado no Brasil. A paciente apresentou melhora parcial dos sintomas associados à miastenia gravis.

  16. Radiologic Findings of Immunoglobulin G4 Related Sclerosing Esophagitis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sun; Kim, Su Young; Lee, Byung Hoon; Hwang, Yoon Joon; Han, Yoon Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Koyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    We describe a case of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing esophagitis occurring in a 63-year-old man with progressive dysphagia and 10-kg weight loss over 9 months. An esophagoscopy revealed significant stricture with diffuse mucosal friability and ulceration at mid esophagus level. Barium esophagogram showed diffuse stenosis at the mid and lower esophagus levels with ulcerations and irregularity of the mucosa. Multidetector computed tomography revealed diffuse edematous and circumferential thickening of the submucosa and muscle layer of this esophageal segment. Fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) revealed diffuse mild FDG uptake in mid to lower esophagus. Although benign inflammatory lesion was suspected based on the imaging findings, the patient underwent surgery for worsening esophageal stricture and the esophageal lesion was pathologically confirmed as IgG4-related sclerosing esophagitis. Radiologic benignancy and high clinical suspicion for IgG4-related sclerosing disease may help making a proper decision and avoiding unnecessary operation.

  17. Radiologic Findings of Immunoglobulin G4 Related Sclerosing Esophagitis: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sun; Kim, Su Young; Lee, Byung Hoon; Hwang, Yoon Joon; Han, Yoon Hee

    2012-01-01

    We describe a case of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing esophagitis occurring in a 63-year-old man with progressive dysphagia and 10-kg weight loss over 9 months. An esophagoscopy revealed significant stricture with diffuse mucosal friability and ulceration at mid esophagus level. Barium esophagogram showed diffuse stenosis at the mid and lower esophagus levels with ulcerations and irregularity of the mucosa. Multidetector computed tomography revealed diffuse edematous and circumferential thickening of the submucosa and muscle layer of this esophageal segment. Fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) revealed diffuse mild FDG uptake in mid to lower esophagus. Although benign inflammatory lesion was suspected based on the imaging findings, the patient underwent surgery for worsening esophageal stricture and the esophageal lesion was pathologically confirmed as IgG4-related sclerosing esophagitis. Radiologic benignancy and high clinical suspicion for IgG4-related sclerosing disease may help making a proper decision and avoiding unnecessary operation.

  18. Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis in chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis;preoperative catheter drainage : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon [Dankook Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis is a well recognized, but uncommon, complication of chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. I report a case of sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis in which percutaneous catheter drainage was performed preoperatively. Ultrasonography(US) and computed tomography(CT) showed a large multi-septated cystic mass which occupied nearly all the peritoneal cavity. Percutaneous drainage with two 8.5 French catheters was preoperatively performed under fluoroscopy and about 2100 ml of bloody fluid was drained for 20 days. On follow-up CT, the size of the cyst had significantly decreased and anoperation was performed. It is considered that percutaneous catheter drainage is useful in the preoperative decompression of sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis.

  19. Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis in chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis;preoperative catheter drainage : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hoon

    1996-01-01

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis is a well recognized, but uncommon, complication of chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. I report a case of sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis in which percutaneous catheter drainage was performed preoperatively. Ultrasonography(US) and computed tomography(CT) showed a large multi-septated cystic mass which occupied nearly all the peritoneal cavity. Percutaneous drainage with two 8.5 French catheters was preoperatively performed under fluoroscopy and about 2100 ml of bloody fluid was drained for 20 days. On follow-up CT, the size of the cyst had significantly decreased and anoperation was performed. It is considered that percutaneous catheter drainage is useful in the preoperative decompression of sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis

  20. Sclerosing Variant of the Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma: Imaging Findings in an Atypical Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Lamas Constantino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma remains one of the most enigmatic lung cancers, demonstrating varied growth patterns, mixed histological features, and confusing clinical manifestations. This paper reports a case of an unusual form of presentation: a sclerosing type associated with desmoplastic reaction and cicatrization. A 75-year-old woman was admitted with persistent dry cough and progressive dyspnea. Physical examination showed bilateral inspiratory crackles. A chest radiograph and high-resolution computed tomography demonstrated confluent airspace nodules, forming areas of consolidation in both lungs, with signs of architectural distortion. The lung biopsy revealed a nonmucinous sclerosing bronchioloalveolar carcinoma.

  1. A national standard for psychosocial safety climate (PSC): PSC 41 as the benchmark for low risk of job strain and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Tessa S; Dollard, Maureen F; Richards, Penny A M

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of research from around the world now permeating occupational health and safety (OHS) legislation and guidelines, there remains a lack of tools to guide practice. Our main goal was to establish benchmark levels of psychosocial safety climate (PSC) that would signify risk of job strain (jobs with high demands and low control) and depression in organizations. First, to justify our focus on PSC, using interview data from Australian employees matched at 2 time points 12 months apart (n = 1081), we verified PSC as a significant leading predictor of job strain and in turn depression. Next, using 2 additional data sets (n = 2097 and n = 1043) we determined benchmarks of organizational PSC (range 12-60) for low-risk (PSC at 41 or above) and high-risk (PSC at 37 or below) of employee job strain and depressive symptoms. Finally, using the newly created benchmarks we estimated the population attributable risk (PAR) and found that improving PSC in organizations to above 37 could reduce 14% of job strain and 16% of depressive symptoms in the working population. The results provide national standards that organizations and regulatory agencies can utilize to promote safer working environments and lower the risk of harm to employee mental health. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Neonatal Transplantation Confers Maturation of PSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes Conducive to Modeling Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Gun-Sik; Lee, Dong I.; Tampakakis, Emmanouil; Murphy, Sean; Andersen, Peter; Uosaki, Hideki; Chelko, Stephen; Chakir, Khalid; Hong, Ingie; Seo, Kinya; Vincent Chen, Huei-Sheng; Chen, Xiongwen; Basso, Cristina; Houser, Steven R.; Tomaselli, Gordon F.

    2017-01-01

    Summary: Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) offer unprecedented opportunities for disease modeling and personalized medicine. However, PSC-derived cells exhibit fetal-like characteristics and remain immature in a dish. This has emerged as a major obstacle for their application for late-onset diseases. We previously showed that there is a neonatal arrest of long-term cultured PSC-derived cardiomyocytes (PSC-CMs). Here, we demonstrate that PSC-CMs mature into adult CMs when transplanted into neonata...

  3. Neonatal Transplantation Confers Maturation of PSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes Conducive to Modeling Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gun-Sik Cho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs offer unprecedented opportunities for disease modeling and personalized medicine. However, PSC-derived cells exhibit fetal-like characteristics and remain immature in a dish. This has emerged as a major obstacle for their application for late-onset diseases. We previously showed that there is a neonatal arrest of long-term cultured PSC-derived cardiomyocytes (PSC-CMs. Here, we demonstrate that PSC-CMs mature into adult CMs when transplanted into neonatal hearts. PSC-CMs became similar to adult CMs in morphology, structure, and function within a month of transplantation into rats. The similarity was further supported by single-cell RNA-sequencing analysis. Moreover, this in vivo maturation allowed patient-derived PSC-CMs to reveal the disease phenotype of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, which manifests predominantly in adults. This study lays a foundation for understanding human CM maturation and pathogenesis and can be instrumental in PSC-based modeling of adult heart diseases. : Pluripotent stem cell (PSC-derived cells remain fetal like, and this has become a major impediment to modeling adult diseases. Cho et al. find that PSC-derived cardiomyocytes mature into adult cardiomyocytes when transplanted into neonatal rat hearts. This method can serve as a tool to understand maturation and pathogenesis in human cardiomyocytes. Keywords: cardiomyocyte, maturation, iPS, cardiac progenitor, neonatal, disease modeling, cardiomyopathy, ARVC, T-tubule, calcium transient, sarcomere shortening

  4. Acute cholangitis due to afferent loop syndrome after a Whipple procedure: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliotis, John; Karnabatidis, Demetrios; Vaxevanidou, Archodoula; Datsis, Anastasios C; Rogdakis, Athanasios; Zacharis, Georgios; Siamblis, Demetrios

    2009-08-25

    Patients with resection of stomach and especially with Billroth II reconstruction (gastro jejunal anastomosis), are more likely to develop afferent loop syndrome which is a rare complication. When the afferent part is obstructed, biliary and pancreatic secretions accumulate and cause the distention of this part. In the case of a complete obstruction (rare), there is a high risk developing necrosis and perforation. This complication has been reported once in the literature. A 54-year-old Greek male had undergone a pancreato-duodenectomy (Whipple procedure) one year earlier due to a pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Approximately 10 months after the initial operation, the patient started having episodes of cholangitis (fever, jaundice) and abdominal pain. This condition progressively worsened and the suspicion of local recurrence or stenosis of the biliary-jejunal anastomosis was discussed. A few days before his admission the patient developed signs of septic cholangitis. Our case demonstrates a rare complication with serious clinical manifestation of the afferent loop syndrome. This advanced form of afferent loop syndrome led to the development of huge enterobiliary reflux, which had a serious clinical manifestation as cholangitis and systemic sepsis, due to bacterial overgrowth, which usually present in the afferent loop. The diagnosis is difficult and the interventional radiology gives all the details to support the therapeutic decision making. A variety of factors can contribute to its development including adhesions, kinking and angulation of the loop, stenosis of gastro-jejunal anastomosis and internal herniation. In order to decompress the afferent loop dilatation due to adhesions, a lateral-lateral jejunal anastomosis was performed between the afferent loop and a small bowel loop.

  5. Generation of sclerosant foams by mechanical methods increases the foam temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lulu; Wong, Kaichung; Connor, David; Fakhim, Babak; Behnia, Masud; Parsi, Kurosh

    2017-08-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of agitation on foam temperature. Methods Sodium tetradecyl sulphate and polidocanol were used. Prior to foam generation, the sclerosant and all constituent equipment were cooled to 4-25℃ and compared with cooling the sclerosant only. Foam was generated using a modified Tessari method. During foam agitation, the temperature change was measured using a thermocouple for 120 s. Results Pre-cooling all the constituent equipment resulted in a cooler foam in comparison with only cooling the sclerosant. A starting temperature of 4℃ produced average foam temperatures of 12.5 and 13.2℃ for sodium tetradecyl sulphate and polidocanol, respectively. It was also found that only cooling the liquid sclerosant provided minimal cooling to the final foam temperature, with the temperature 20 and 20.5℃ for sodium tetradecyl sulphate and polidocanol, respectively. Conclusion The foam generation process has a noticeable impact on final foam temperature and needs to be taken into consideration when creating foam.

  6. Case report 834: Chronic sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible with long bone periostitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A; Carneiro, R; Pollock, L; Shaw, D

    1994-04-01

    We present the case of a patient with primary chronic osteomyelitis of the mandible, the radiological appearance of which is compatible with a diagnosis of chronic sclerosing osteomyelitis. The accompanying femoral and tibial periosteal reactive new bone formation and the benign clinical course suggest that this presentation may represent a form of chronic multifocal osteomyelitis.

  7. Diffuse sclerosing variant of thyroid carcinoma presenting as Hashimoto thyroiditis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukasović, Anamarija; Kuna, Sanja Kusacić; Ostović, Karmen Trutin; Prgomet, Drago; Banek, Tomislav

    2012-11-01

    The aim of report is to present a case of a rare diffuse sclerosing variant of a papillary thyroid carcinoma. A 15-year old girl referred for ultrasound examination because of painless thyroid swelling lasting 10 days before. An ultrasound of the neck showed diffusely changed thyroid parenchyma, without nodes, looking as lymphocytic thyroiditis Hashimoto at first, but with snow-storm appearance, predominantly in the right lobe. Positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO-AT) also suggested Hashimoto thyroiditis. Repeated US-FNAB (fine needle-aspiration biopsy) of the right lobe revealed diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma and patient underwent total thyreoidectomy. Patohistologic finding confirmed diffuse sclerosing variant of a papillary thyroid carcinoma in the both thyroid lobes and several metastatic lymph nodes. Two months later patient recived radioablative therapy with 3700 MBq (100 mCi) of 1-131 followed by levothyroxine replacement. At the moment, patient is without evidence of local or distant metastases and next regular control is scheduled in 6 months. In conclusion, a diffuse sclerosing variant is rare form of papillary thyroid carcinoma that echographically looks similar to Hashimoto thyroiditis and sometimes could be easily overlooked.

  8. Falciform ligament abscess from left sided portal pyaemia following malignant obstructive cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Leigh R

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Abscess formation of the falciform ligament is incredibly rare and perplexing when encountered for the first time. It is reported to occur in the setting of cholecystitis and cholangitis, but the pathophysiology is poorly understood. In this case report, we present a 73-year-old man with falciform ligament abscess following cholangitis from an obstructive ampullary carcinoma. The patient was referred to the Royal Adelaide Hospital from a country hospital, with progressive jaundice, anorexia and nausea. Prior to transfer, he deteriorated with cholangitis, dehydration and renal failure. On arrival, his abdomen was exquisitely tender along the course of the falciform ligament. His blood tests revealed an elevated white cell count of 14.9 x 103/μl, bilirubin of 291μmol/l and creatinine of 347 μmol/l. His CA 19-9 was markedly elevated at 35,000 kU/l. A non-contrast computed tomography (CT demonstrated gross biliary dilatation and a collection tracking along the path of the falciform ligament to the umbilicus. The patient was commenced on intravenous antibiotics and underwent an urgent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram (ERCP with sphincterotomy and biliary stent drainage. Cholangiogram revealed a grossly dilated biliary tree, with abrupt transition at the ampulla, which on biopsy confirmed an obstructing ampullary carcinoma. Following ERCP, his jaundice and abdominal tenderness resolved. He was optimized over 4 weeks for an elective pancreaticoduodenectomy. At operation, we found abscess transformation of the falciform ligament. Copious amounts of pus and necrotic material was drained. Part of the round ligament was resected along the undersurface of the liver. Histology showed that there was prominent histiocytic inflammation with granular acellular eosinophilic components. The patient recovered slowly but uneventfully. A contrast CT scan undertaken 2 weeks post-operatively (approximately 7 weeks after the initial CT revealed

  9. Potential of iPSC-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Treating Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hynes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cell-like populations have been derived from mouse-induced pluripotent stem cells (miPSC-MSC with the capability for tissue regeneration. In this study, murine iPSC underwent differentiation towards an MSC-like immunophenotype. Stable miPSC-MSC cultures expressed the MSC-associated markers, CD73, CD105, and Sca-1, but lacked expression of the pluripotency marker, SSEA1, and hematopoietic markers, CD34 and CD45. Functionally, miPSC-MSC exhibited the potential for trilineage differentiation into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes and the capacity to suppress the proliferation of mitogen-activated splenocytes. The efficacy of miPSC-MSC was assessed in an acute inflammation model following systemic or local delivery into mice with subcutaneous implants containing heat-inactivated P. gingivalis. Histological analysis revealed less inflammatory cellular infiltrate within the sponges in mice treated with miPSC-MSC cells delivered locally rather than systemically. Assessment of proinflammatory cytokines in mouse spleens found that CXCL1 transcripts and protein were reduced in mice treated with miPSC-MSC. In a periodontitis model, mice subjected to oral inoculation with P. gingivalis revealed less bone tissue destruction and inflammation within the jaws when treated with miPSC-MSC compared to PBS alone. Our results demonstrated that miPSC-MSC derived from iPSC have the capacity to control acute and chronic inflammatory responses associated with the destruction of periodontal tissue. Therefore, miPSC-MSC present a promising novel source of stromal cells which could be used in the treatment of periodontal disease and other inflammatory systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Global synchronization algorithms for the Intel iPSC/860

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Steven R.; Davis, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    In a distributed memory multicomputer that has no global clock, global processor synchronization can only be achieved through software. Global synchronization algorithms are used in tridiagonal systems solvers, CFD codes, sequence comparison algorithms, and sorting algorithms. They are also useful for event simulation, debugging, and for solving mutual exclusion problems. For the Intel iPSC/860 in particular, global synchronization can be used to ensure the most effective use of the communication network for operations such as the shift, where each processor in a one-dimensional array or ring concurrently sends a message to its right (or left) neighbor. Three global synchronization algorithms are considered for the iPSC/860: the gysnc() primitive provided by Intel, the PICL primitive sync0(), and a new recursive doubling synchronization (RDS) algorithm. The performance of these algorithms is compared to the performance predicted by communication models of both the long and forced message protocols. Measurements of the cost of shift operations preceded by global synchronization show that the RDS algorithm always synchronizes the nodes more precisely and costs only slightly more than the other two algorithms.

  11. Less promising results with sclerosing ethoxysclerol injections for midportion achilles tendinopathy: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sterkenburg, Maayke N; de Jonge, Milko C; Sierevelt, Inger N; van Dijk, C Niek

    2010-11-01

    Local injections of the sclerosing substance polidocanol (Ethoxysclerol) have shown good clinical results in patients with chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy. After training by the inventors of the technique, sclerosing Ethoxysclerol injections were applied on a group of patients in our center. Sclerosing Ethoxysclerol injections will yield good results in the majority of patients. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. In 113 patients (140 tendons) with Achilles tendinopathy, we identified 62 patients (70 tendons) showing neovascularization on color Doppler ultrasound. Fifty-three Achilles tendons (48 patients) were treated with sclerosing Ethoxysclerol injections, with intervals of 6 weeks and a maximum of 5 sessions. Treatment was completed when neovascularization or pain had disappeared, or when there was no positive treatment effect after 3 to 4 sessions. Forty-eight patients (20 women and 28 men) with a median age of 45 years, (range, 33-68 years) were treated. Median symptom duration was 23 months (range, 3-300 months). Fifty-three tendons were treated with a median of 3 sessions of Ethoxysclerol injections. Six weeks after the last injection, 35% of patients had no complaints, 9% had minimal symptoms, 42% were the same, and 14% had more complaints. Women were 3.8 times (95% confidence interval: 1.1-13.8) more likely to have unsatisfactory outcome than men. Pain correlated positively with neovessels on ultrasound (P < .01). At 2.7 to 5.1 year follow-up, 53% had received additional (surgical/conservative) treatment; 3 of these patients (7.5%) still had complaints of Achilles tendinopathy. In 6 patients, complaints that were still present 6 weeks after treatment had resolved spontaneously by final follow-up. Our study did not confirm the high beneficial value of sclerosing neovascularization in patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Despite the retrospective design of our study, we consider it important to stress that injection of Ethoxysclerol may

  12. Hemagglutinin-specific neutralization of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Muñoz-Alía

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a progressive, lethal complication of measles caused by particular mutants of measles virus (MeV that persist in the brain despite high levels of neutralizing antibodies. We addressed the hypothesis that antigenic drift is involved in the pathogenetic mechanism of SSPE by analyzing antigenic alterations in the MeV envelope hemagglutinin protein (MeV-H found in patients with SSPE in relation to major circulating MeV genotypes. To this aim, we obtained cDNA for the MeV-H gene from tissue taken at brain autopsy from 3 deceased persons with SSPE who had short (3-4 months, SMa79, average (3.5 years, SMa84, and long (18 years, SMa94 disease courses. Recombinant MeVs with a substituted MeV-H gene were generated by a reverse genetic system. Virus neutralization assays with a panel of anti-MeV-H murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs or vaccine-immunized mouse anti-MeV-H polyclonal sera were performed to determine the antigenic relatedness. Functional and receptor-binding analysis of the SSPE MeV-H showed activity in a SLAM/nectin-4-dependent manner. Similar to our panel of wild-type viruses, our SSPE viruses showed an altered antigenic profile. Genotypes A, G3, and F (SSPE case SMa79 were the exception, with an intact antigenic structure. Genotypes D7 and F (SSPE SMa79 showed enhanced neutralization by mAbs targeting antigenic site IIa. Genotypes H1 and the recently reported D4.2 were the most antigenically altered genotypes. Epitope mapping of neutralizing mAbs BH015 and BH130 reveal a new antigenic site on MeV-H, which we designated Φ for its intermediate position between previously defined antigenic sites Ia and Ib. We conclude that SSPE-causing viruses show similar antigenic properties to currently circulating MeV genotypes. The absence of a direct correlation between antigenic changes and predisposition of a certain genotype to cause SSPE does not lend support to the proposed antigenic drift as a

  13. File list: Oth.PSC.05.Biotin.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Oth.PSC.20.Biotin.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Oth.PSC.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Oth.PSC.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Oth.PSC.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Oth.PSC.05.TEAD4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Oth.PSC.10.TEAD4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  8. File list: ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. File list: Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  12. File list: ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: ALL.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. File list: Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: InP.PSC.05.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.PSC.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.PSC.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  2. File list: Pol.PSC.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Oth.PSC.20.Nanog.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.20.Nanog.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Nanog Pluripotent stem cell SRX213808,S...1351,SRX1141349,SRX1141350,SRX651982,SRX213820 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.20.Nanog.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.PSC.05.Nanog.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.Nanog.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Nanog Pluripotent stem cell SRX248286,S...3864,SRX1141351,SRX1141350,SRX651982,SRX213820 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.Nanog.AllCell.bed ...

  5. Myosin light chain 2-based selection of human iPSC-derived early ventricular cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizy, Alexandra; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Hu, Bin; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Willis, B Cicero; Zarzoso, Manuel; Ramirez, Rafael J; Sener, Michelle F; Mundada, Lakshmi V; Klos, Matthew; Devaney, Eric J; Vikstrom, Karen L; Herron, Todd J; Jalife, José

    2013-11-01

    Applications of human induced pluripotent stem cell derived-cardiac myocytes (hiPSC-CMs) would be strengthened by the ability to generate specific cardiac myocyte (CM) lineages. However, purification of lineage-specific hiPSC-CMs is limited by the lack of cell marking techniques. Here, we have developed an iPSC-CM marking system using recombinant adenoviral reporter constructs with atrial- or ventricular-specific myosin light chain-2 (MLC-2) promoters. MLC-2a and MLC-2v selected hiPSC-CMs were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and their biochemical and electrophysiological phenotypes analyzed. We demonstrate that the phenotype of both populations remained stable in culture and they expressed the expected sarcomeric proteins, gap junction proteins and chamber-specific transcription factors. Compared to MLC-2a cells, MLC-2v selected CMs had larger action potential amplitudes and durations. In addition, by immunofluorescence, we showed that MLC-2 isoform expression can be used to enrich hiPSC-CM consistent with early atrial and ventricular myocyte lineages. However, only the ventricular myosin light chain-2 promoter was able to purify a highly homogeneous population of iPSC-CMs. Using this approach, it is now possible to develop ventricular-specific disease models using iPSC-CMs while atrial-specific iPSC-CM cultures may require additional chamber-specific markers. © 2013.

  6. File list: Oth.PSC.20.Smarca4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  7. File list: Oth.PSC.10.Smarca4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  8. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.ZHBTc4 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  9. File list: Oth.PSC.05.Myc.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  10. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.EpiLC [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. File list: Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.EpiSC [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  12. File list: Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.EpiLC [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.P19 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  14. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.P19 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. File list: Oth.PSC.10.Myc.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  16. File list: Oth.PSC.50.Myc.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  17. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  18. File list: His.PSC.10.H2APERIODZac.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  19. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.P19 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.EpiSC [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.EpiSC [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.EpiLC [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.P19 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.EpiLC [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: His.PSC.05.H2APERIODZac.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.05.H2APERIODZac.AllCell mm9 Histone H2A.Zac Pluripotent stem cell SRX111870... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.05.H2APERIODZac.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.PSC.20.Myc.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Oth.PSC.50.Kdm4c.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: His.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_cells hg19 Histone Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX110016,S...315,SRX381309 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX040379...,SRX040378,SRX135563,SRX040376,SRX040377,SRX189427,SRX189400,SRX189399 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: His.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells hg19 Histone Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX317576,S...077,SRX317607 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX65...RX146524 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_cells mm9 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX9773...30,SRX146522,SRX146547 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...X385956,SRX385955,SRX385958,SRX385957 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...X385958,SRX385956,SRX385955,SRX385957 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  19. File list: NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  20. File list: Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...353849,SRX353851,SRX353852,SRX353850 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  1. File list: NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  2. File list: His.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodies ...SRX385956,SRX385955,SRX385958,SRX385957 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  5. File list: InP.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 Input control Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...s SRX212083,SRX385954,SRX109458,SRX109456,SRX109460,SRX026526 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  6. File list: ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...X385956,SRX385955,SRX385958,SRX385957 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  7. File list: His.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodies ...SRX385956,SRX385955,SRX385958,SRX385957 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  8. File list: NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  11. File list: His.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodies ...SRX385955,SRX385956,SRX385958,SRX385957 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  12. File list: Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...203366,SRX203359,SRX353849,SRX353851 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  13. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...353851,SRX353849,SRX353852,SRX353850 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  14. File list: NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  15. File list: InP.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 Input control Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...s SRX385954,SRX212083,SRX109456,SRX109460,SRX109458,SRX026526 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...X385956,SRX385958,SRX385957,SRX353850 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  17. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  18. File list: DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  20. File list: InP.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 Input control Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...s SRX109460,SRX109458,SRX212083,SRX109456,SRX385954,SRX026526 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.50.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...353852,SRX353850,SRX203366,SRX203357 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid Bodie...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  3. File list: InP.PSC.50.AllAg.EpiLC [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.50.AllAg.EpiLC mm9 Input control Pluripotent stem cell EpiLC SRX823839,SRX5...5,SRX823838,SRX823831,SRX823826,SRX590324 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.50.AllAg.EpiLC.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.PSC.10.Etv2.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.10.Etv2.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Etv2 Pluripotent stem cell SRX652259,SRX...652260 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.10.Etv2.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_cells hg19 Histone Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX110015,S...315,SRX381309 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.PSC.50.Biotin.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.50.Biotin.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Biotin Pluripotent stem cell SRX477548...68,SRX172568,SRX218274,SRX327702,SRX213792,SRX213794,SRX172567,SRX312228,SRX327701 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.50.Biotin.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.PSC.10.Biotin.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.10.Biotin.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Biotin Pluripotent stem cell SRX218273...69,SRX984573,SRX115147,SRX327702,SRX984572,SRX984568,SRX115145,SRX172568,SRX218274 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.10.Biotin.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.PSC.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pluripot...833412,SRX149642,SRX702059 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: InP.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies mm9 Input control Pluripotent stem cell Embryoid B...odies SRX109460,SRX109458,SRX212083,SRX109456,SRX385954,SRX026526 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.20.AllAg.Embryoid_Bodies.bed ...

  11. File list: InP.PSC.05.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.05.Input_control.AllCell mm9 Input control Input control Pluripotent stem c... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.05.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: InP.PSC.20.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.20.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control Pluripotent stem ...RX342850,ERX342851 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.PSC.20.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: InP.PSC.10.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.10.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control Pluripotent stem ...RX342849,ERX342851 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.PSC.10.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX977417,SR...RX127376,SRX146530,SRX146522,SRX146547,SRX333561,SRX035985,SRX1090869 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.STAP_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.STAP_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell STAP cells SRX...472660,SRX472654,SRX472663,SRX472661,SRX472656,SRX472665,SRX472662,SRX472655,SRX472664 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.STAP_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.STAP_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.STAP_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell STAP cells SRX...472660,SRX472663,SRX472654,SRX472665,SRX472656,SRX472662,SRX472661,SRX472664,SRX472655 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.STAP_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX97...7435,SRX027462,SRX977434 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_cells mm9 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell iPS cells SRX9774...30,SRX146524,SRX146547,SRX146522 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_cells.bed ...

  19. Sexually localized expression of pseudo-self compatibility (PSC) in Petunia X hybrida Hort : 2. Stylar inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, M N; Ascher, P D

    1986-01-01

    A previously identified S-linked stylar-inactivation PSC factor (Flaschenriem and Ascher 1979b) was studied for its location relative to S. Plants exhibiting complete stylar-inactivation PSC were those with higher multigenic PSC background level than plants with only S-linked partial stylar-inactivation PSC. A pollen-mediated pseudo-self compatibility (PMPSC) adjustment factor was offered as a device to focus on stylar-inactivation PSC by removing some male origin, multigenic PSC. The stylar inactivation factor was not tightly linked to S but affected expression of only the allele to which it was linked. A three part interacting association of genetic material governing self incompatibility (SI) is proposed. The parts of S are the SI identity gene, S-specific PSC genes and, finally, PSC genes which are not S-specific in action. The complete association is termed the SI-complex.

  20. A case of autoimmune cholangitis misdiagnosed for cholangiocarcinoma: How to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović Igor I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Autoimmune cholangitis or immunoglobulin G4-associated cholangitis (IAC has been recently regarded as a new clinical and histopathological entity and is a part of a complex autoimmune disorder - IgG4-related systemic disease (ISD. ISD is an autoimmune disease with multi-organic involvement, characterized with IgG4-positive plasmocytic infiltration of various tissues and organs with a consequent sclerosis, which responds well to steroid therapy. Most commonly affected organs are the pancreas (autoimmune pancreatitis, [AIP] and the common bile duct (IAC. IAC and cholangiocarcinoma (CCA share many clinical, laboratory and imaging findings. Case Outline. We present a case of a 60-year-old male with a biliary stricture of a common bile duct, which was clinically considered as a bile duct carcinoma and treated surgically. Definite histopathological findings and immunohistochemistry revealed profound chronic inflammation, showing lymphoplasmacytic IgG-positive infiltration of a resected part of a common bile duct, highly suggestive for the diagnosis of IAC. In addition, postoperative IgG4 serum levels were also increased. Conclusion. It is of primary clinical importance to make a difference between IAC and CCA, in order to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention. Therefore, IAC should be considered in differential diagnosis in similar cases.

  1. An immunoglobulin G-4 related sclerosing disease of the small bowel: CT and small bowel series findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Young Hwan; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Min, Seon Jeong; Woo, Ji Young; Kim, Jeong Won; Hong, Hye Sook; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing disease is rare and is known to involve various organs. We present a case of histologically proven IgG4-related sclerosing disease of the small bowel with imaging findings on computed tomography (CT) and small bowel series. CT showed irregular wall thickening, loss of mural stratification and aneurysmal dilatation of the distal ileum. Small bowel series showed aneurysmal dilatations, interloop adhesion with traction and abrupt angulation.

  2. Effects of Melittin Treatment in Cholangitis and Biliary Fibrosis in a Model of Xenobiotic-Induced Cholestasis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Hyun Kim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cholangiopathy is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the liver, which is characterized by cholangitis, ductular reaction and biliary-type hepatic fibrosis. There is no proven medical therapy that changes the course of the disease. In previous studies, melittin was known for attenuation of hepatic injury, inflammation and hepatic fibrosis. This study investigated whether melittin provides inhibition on cholangitis and biliary fibrosis in vivo. Feeding 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC to mice is a well-established animal model to study cholangitis and biliary fibrosis. To investigate the effects of melittin on cholangiopathy, mice were fed with a 0.1% DDC-containing diet with or without melittin treatment for four weeks. Liver morphology, serum markers of liver injury, cholestasis markers for inflammation of liver, the degree of ductular reaction and the degree of liver fibrosis were compared between with or without melittin treatment DDC-fed mice. DDC feeding led to increased serum markers of hepatic injury, ductular reaction, induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and biliary fibrosis. Interestingly, melittin treatment attenuated hepatic function markers, ductular reaction, the reactive phenotype of cholangiocytes and cholangitis and biliary fibrosis. Our data suggest that melittin treatment can be protective against chronic cholestatic disease in DDC-fed mice. Further studies on the anti-inflammatory capacity of melittin are warranted for targeted therapy in cholangiopathy.

  3. Electrophysiological analysis of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) using multi-electrode arrays (MEAs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala, Luca; Ward-van Oostwaard, Dorien; Tertoolen, Leon G.J.; Mummery, Christine L.; Bellin, Milena

    2017-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes can now be derived with high efficiency from both human embryonic and human induced-Pluripotent Stem Cells (hPSC). hPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) are increasingly recognized as having great value for modeling cardiovascular diseases in humans, especially arrhythmia syndromes.

  4. Urgent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is not superior to early ERCP in acute biliary pancreatitis with biliary obstruction without cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Seung; Chung, Moon Jae; Park, Jeong Youp; Bang, Seungmin; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Chung, Jae Bock

    2018-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common diagnosis worldwide, with gallstone disease being the most prevalent cause (50%). The American College of Gastroenterology recommends urgent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) (within 24 h) for patients with biliary pancreatitis accompanied by cholangitis. Most international guidelines recommend that ERCP be performed within 72 h in patients with biliary pancreatitis and a bile duct obstruction without cholangitis, but the optimal timing for endoscopy is controversial. We investigated the optimal timing for ERCP in patients with biliary pancreatitis and a bile duct obstruction without cholangitis, and whether performing endoscopy within 24 h is superior to performing it after 24 h. We analyzed the clinical data of 505 patients with newly diagnosed acute pancreatitis, from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2014. We divided the patients into two groups according to the timing of ERCP: pancreatitis and a bile duct obstruction without cholangitis. The mean age of the patients was 55 years (range: 26-90 years). Bile duct stones and biliary sludge were identified on endoscopy in 45 (61.6%) and 11 (15.0%) patients, respectively. The timing of ERCP within 72 h was not associated with ERCP-related complications (P = 0.113), and the total length of hospital stay was not different between urgent and early ERCP (5.9 vs. 5.7 days, P = 0.174). No significant differences were found in total length of hospitalization or procedural-related complications, in patients with biliary pancreatitis and a bile duct obstruction without cholangitis, according to the timing of ERCP (< 24 h vs. 24-72 h).

  5. Engineering-derived approaches for iPSC preparation, expansion, differentiation and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Li, Ling; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Gao, Ge; Yao, Rui; Sun, Wei

    2017-07-31

    Remarkable achievements have been made since induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were first introduced in 2006. Compared with non-pluripotent stem cells, iPSC research faces several additional complexities, such as the choice of extracellular matrix proteins, growth and differentiation factors, as well as technical challenges related to self-renewal and directed differentiation. Overcoming these challenges requires the integration of knowledge and technologies from multiple fields including cell biology, biomaterial science, engineering, physics and medicine. Here, engineering-derived iPSC approaches are reviewed according to three aspects of iPSC studies: preparation, expansion, differentiation and applications. Engineering strategies, such as 3D systems establishment, cell-matrix mechanics and the regulation of biophysical and biochemical cues, together with engineering techniques, such as 3D scaffolds, cell microspheres and bioreactors, have been applied to iPSC studies and have generated insightful results and even mini-organs such as retinas, livers and intestines. Specific results are given to demonstrate how these approaches impact iPSC behavior, and related mechanisms are discussed. In addition, cell printing technologies are presented as an advanced engineering-derived approach since they have been applied in both iPSC studies and the construction of diverse tissues and organs. Further development and possible innovations of cell printing technologies are presented in terms of creating complex and functional iPSC-derived living tissues and organs.

  6. Neonatal Transplantation Confers Maturation of PSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes Conducive to Modeling Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Gun-Sik; Lee, Dong I; Tampakakis, Emmanouil; Murphy, Sean; Andersen, Peter; Uosaki, Hideki; Chelko, Stephen; Chakir, Khalid; Hong, Ingie; Seo, Kinya; Chen, Huei-Sheng Vincent; Chen, Xiongwen; Basso, Cristina; Houser, Steven R; Tomaselli, Gordon F; O'Rourke, Brian; Judge, Daniel P; Kass, David A; Kwon, Chulan

    2017-01-10

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) offer unprecedented opportunities for disease modeling and personalized medicine. However, PSC-derived cells exhibit fetal-like characteristics and remain immature in a dish. This has emerged as a major obstacle for their application for late-onset diseases. We previously showed that there is a neonatal arrest of long-term cultured PSC-derived cardiomyocytes (PSC-CMs). Here, we demonstrate that PSC-CMs mature into adult CMs when transplanted into neonatal hearts. PSC-CMs became similar to adult CMs in morphology, structure, and function within a month of transplantation into rats. The similarity was further supported by single-cell RNA-sequencing analysis. Moreover, this in vivo maturation allowed patient-derived PSC-CMs to reveal the disease phenotype of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, which manifests predominantly in adults. This study lays a foundation for understanding human CM maturation and pathogenesis and can be instrumental in PSC-based modeling of adult heart diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sclerosing lymphangitis of the penis associated with marked penile oedema and skin erosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karray, Mehdi; Litaiem, Noureddine; Jones, Mariem; Zeglaoui, Faten

    2017-07-27

    Sclerosing lymphangitis of the penis is a benign, under-reported condition consisting of a asymptomatic firm cord-like swelling around the coronal sulcus of the penis usually affecting men in the second or third decade of life. Penile oedema and erosions are rarely reported. Clinical signs may be remarkable contrasting with the self-limited character of the disease. We report a new case of sclerosing lymphangitis of the penis occurring in a 59-year-old patient marked by penile swelling and several overlying skin erosions, and discuss the clinical features and the pathogenesis aspects of the disease. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Brain CT and MRI findings of a long-term case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoshiba, Kazunori; Ota, Kohei; Komatsuzaki, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Itsuro; Maruyama, Shoichi

    1987-11-01

    Our study involved a long-term case (ten years) of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The case began with a 23 year-old experiencing visual deterioration. During the course of his illness, amnesia, autism and abnormal behavior were observed without any myoclonus. On the electroencephalogram, periodic synclonous discharge was shown in the early stage of his illness and subsequently disappeared. The brain CT and the MRI disclosed diffuse lesions in both cortical and subcortical areas of the cerebral hemispheres. The location and spread of lesions were more clearly revealed by the MRI than the brain CT. These findings suggest that the MRI is more useful than the brain CT in the diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

  9. Brain CT and MRI findings of a long-term case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoshiba, Kazunori; Ota, Kohei; Komatsuzaki, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Itsuro; Maruyama, Shoichi

    1987-01-01

    Our study involved a long-term case (ten years) of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The case began with a 23 year-old experiencing visual deterioration. During the course of his illness, amnesia, autism and abnormal behavior were observed without any myoclonus. On the electroencephalogram, periodic synclonous discharge was shown in the early stage of his illness and subsequently disappeared. The brain CT and the MRI disclosed diffuse lesions in both cortical and subcortical areas of the cerebral hemispheres. The location and spread of lesions were more clearly revealed by the MRI than the brain CT. These findings suggest that the MRI is more useful than the brain CT in the diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. (author)

  10. Air contamination in the sclerosing foam for the treatment of varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Franciscis, S; Nobile, Cga; Larosa, E; Montemurro, R; Serra, R

    2016-03-01

    Fluids and drugs formulated for intravenous infusion may potentially promote the growth of microorganisms that can cause infections. The aim of this study is to test the sterility of sclerosing foam. Polidocanol was used for the production of the foam. The Tessari method was used in order to generate the foam. The preparation was carried out both in the operating theater and in an outpatient room. A validation test with microorganisms was also performed. The measurements showed no evident growth of microorganisms and in the validation tests the foam appeared to even display bacteriostatic and/or bactericide properties. Sclerosing foam seems to be safe from a microbiological point of view. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. A Radial Sclerosing Lesion Mimicking Breast Cancer on Mammography in a Young Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Furukawa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A spiculated mass on a mammogram is highly suggestive of malignancy. We report the case of a 32-year-old woman with a radial sclerosing lesion that mimicked breast cancer on mammography. She visited her physician after palpating a lump in her left breast. Mammography showed architectural distortion in the upper inner quadrant of the left breast. Ultrasonography showed a low echoic area with an ambiguous boundary. Core needle biopsy was performed because of the suspicion of malignancy. Histological examination did not reveal any malignant cells. After 6 months, the breast lump became larger and the patient was referred to our hospital. Mammography performed in our hospital showed a spiculated mass, and therefore mammotome biopsy was performed. Histological examination revealed dense fibroelastic stroma with a wide variety of mastopathic changes, leading to a diagnosis of a radial sclerosing lesion. One year after the biopsy, the lump on her left breast had disappeared and mammography showed no spiculated mass.

  12. Sclerosing lipogranuloma of the eyelid: unusual complication following nasal packing in endoscopic sinus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Balakrishnan; Singh, Rohit; Manusrut, Manusrut; Hazarika, Manali

    2015-03-06

    An eyelid or orbital lipogranuloma can occur following nasal packing with liquid paraffin, petroleum jelly or an antibiotic-based cream. It usually presents a few weeks or months after the initial procedure. We present a report of three such cases of sclerosing lipogranuloma involving the eyelid, which occurred following a sinonasal surgery where nasal packing using petroleum jelly was performed. The typical clinical course and the classical histopathological features are highlighted. All cases were diagnosed by histopathological examination as sclerosing lipogranuloma. Complete surgical removal resulted in complete resolution on 1 month follow-up. The diagnosis is based on a high degree of suspicion following a detailed history of prior use of lipid-based products for nasal packing following endonasal surgery. Histopathology is diagnostic. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice, however, due to its infiltrative nature, it may be difficult to obtain a complete cure. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Development of Embedded EM Sensors for Estimating Tensile Forces of PSC Girder Bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Won; Lee, Chaggil; Park, Seunghee

    2017-01-01

    The tensile force of pre-stressed concrete (PSC) girders is the most important factor for managing the stability of PSC bridges. The tensile force is induced using pre-stressing (PS) tendons of a PSC girder. Because the PS tendons are located inside of the PSC girder, the tensile force cannot be measured after construction using conventional NDT (non-destructive testing) methods. To monitor the induced tensile force of a PSC girder, an embedded EM (elasto-magnetic) sensor was proposed in this study. The PS tendons are made of carbon steel, a ferromagnetic material. The magnetic properties of the ferromagnetic specimen are changed according to the induced magnetic field, temperature, and induced stress. Thus, the tensile force of PS tendons can be estimated by measuring their magnetic properties. The EM sensor can measure the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic materials in the form of a B (magnetic density)-H (magnetic force) loop. To measure the B-H loop of a PS tendon in a PSC girder, the EM sensor should be embedded into the PSC girder. The proposed embedded EM sensor can be embedded into a PSC girder as a sheath joint by designing screw threads to connect with the sheath. To confirm the proposed embedded EM sensors, the experimental study was performed using a down-scaled PSC girder model. Two specimens were constructed with embedded EM sensors, and three sensors were installed in each specimen. The embedded EM sensor could measure the B-H loop of PS tendons even if it was located inside concrete, and the area of the B-H loop was proportionally decreased according to the increase in tensile force. According to the results, the proposed method can be used to estimate the tensile force of unrevealed PS tendons. PMID:28867790

  14. Segmentectomy for giant pulmonary sclerosing haemangiomas with high serum KL-6 levels

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroda, Hiroaki; Mun, Mingyon; Okumura, Sakae; Nakagawa, Ken

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 61-year old female patient with a giant pulmonary sclerosing haemangioma (PSH) and an extremely high preoperative serum KL-6 level. During an annual health screening, the patient showed a posterior mediastinal mass on chest radiography. Chest computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-circumscribed 60 mm diameter nodule with a marked contrast enhancement in the left lower lobe. The preoperative serum KL-6 level was elevated to 8204 U/ml. We performed a fo...

  15. Shear wave elastography diagnosis of the diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Nianyu; Xu, Youfeng; Huang, Pintong; Zhang, Shengmin; Wang, Hongwei; Yu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to report the shear wave elastography (SWE) findings in a patient with the diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (DSVPTC). Since patients with DSVPTC may present with typical clinicopathological features and initially appear to have Hashimoto's thyroiditis, a thorough clinical evaluation and an early diagnosis are important. A 20-year-old female patient presented with a 1-month history of a neck mass and sore throat. Conventional ultrasound and SWE ...

  16. Case report. Sclerosing peritoneal mesothelioma in a dog: histopathological, histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rita D'Angelo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesotheliomas are rare neoplasm affecting on rare occasions both animals and humans and which arise from the mesothelial cells lining the coelomic cavities. We report herein the histopathological, histochemical and immunohistochemical findings in a dog affected by sclerosing peritoneal mesothelioma, a rare variant of canine mesothelioma, and submitted to laparotomy in December 2012 (Teramo, Italy. Our data confirm that mesothelioma still represents a diagnostic challenge and that immunohistochemistry can be extremely useful as supportive diagnostic technique.

  17. The B-mode Sonography and Sonoelastographic Features of Sclerosing Adenosis of the Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myong, Joo Hwa; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Ahn, Young I; Yoon, Soo Kyoung; Lee, A Won; Yim, Kwang Il; Kim, Tae Eun; Song, Byung Joo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the B-mode sonographic and sonoelastographic features of high risk lesions of the breast. From April 2009 to February 2010, 1390 patients with breast lesions underwent US-guided core-biopsy. Among them, 13 lesions were confirmed to be pure sclerosing adenosis by subsequent surgical excision or on imaging follow-up of more than 1 year. Two radiologists retrospectively analyzed the B-mode sonography according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System classification. The sonoelastographic images were classified into 5 elasticity scores according to the Itoh classification and the strain ratio between the mass and the surrounding fat tissue was reviewed. We considered the sonoelastographic patterns to be suspicious for the case with a score of 4 and 5 and a strain ratio of more than a 2.24. The common B-mode sonographic features of sclerosing adenosis were an irregular shape (69.2%, 9 of 13), an indistinct margin (92.3%, 12 of 13), hypoechogenicity (76.9%, 10 of 13) and category 4A, a low suspicion of malignancy (61.5%, 8 of 13). The common sonoelastographic features were a score of 2 (42%, 6 of 13) and a strain ratio < 2.24 (69.2%, 9 of 13). Sclerosing adenosis showed suspicious B-mode sonographic findings, but it had benign sonolastographic features

  18. The B-mode Sonography and Sonoelastographic Features of Sclerosing Adenosis of the Breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myong, Joo Hwa; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Ahn, Young I; Yoon, Soo Kyoung; Lee, A Won; Yim, Kwang Il; Kim, Tae Eun; Song, Byung Joo [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the B-mode sonographic and sonoelastographic features of high risk lesions of the breast. From April 2009 to February 2010, 1390 patients with breast lesions underwent US-guided core-biopsy. Among them, 13 lesions were confirmed to be pure sclerosing adenosis by subsequent surgical excision or on imaging follow-up of more than 1 year. Two radiologists retrospectively analyzed the B-mode sonography according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System classification. The sonoelastographic images were classified into 5 elasticity scores according to the Itoh classification and the strain ratio between the mass and the surrounding fat tissue was reviewed. We considered the sonoelastographic patterns to be suspicious for the case with a score of 4 and 5 and a strain ratio of more than a 2.24. The common B-mode sonographic features of sclerosing adenosis were an irregular shape (69.2%, 9 of 13), an indistinct margin (92.3%, 12 of 13), hypoechogenicity (76.9%, 10 of 13) and category 4A, a low suspicion of malignancy (61.5%, 8 of 13). The common sonoelastographic features were a score of 2 (42%, 6 of 13) and a strain ratio < 2.24 (69.2%, 9 of 13). Sclerosing adenosis showed suspicious B-mode sonographic findings, but it had benign sonolastographic features

  19. MDM2 Amplification and PI3KCA Mutation in a Case of Sclerosing Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kikuchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare sclerosing variant of rhabdomyosarcoma characterized by prominent hyalinization and pseudovascular pattern has recently been described as a subtype biologically distinct from embryonal, alveolar, and pleomorphic forms. We present cytogenetic and molecular findings as well as experimental studies of an unusual case of sclerosing rhabdomyosarcoma. The primary lesion arose within the plantar subcutaneous tissue of the left foot of an otherwise healthy 23-year-old male who eventually developed pulmonary nodules despite systemic chemotherapy. Two genetic abnormalities identified in surgical and/or autopsy samples of the tumor were introduced into 10T1/2 murine fibroblasts to determine whether these genetic changes cooperatively facilitated transformation and growth. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a complex abnormal hyperdiploid clone, and MDM2 gene amplification was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cancer gene mutation screening using a combination of multiplexed PCR and mass spectroscopy revealed a PIK3CA exon 20 H1047R mutation in the primary tumor, lung metastasis, and liver metastasis. However, this mutation was not cooperative with MDM2 overexpression in experimental assays for transformation or growth. Nevertheless, MDM2 and PIK3CA are genes worthy of further investigation in patients with sclerosing rhabdomyosarcoma and might be considered in the enrollment of these patients into clinical trials of targeted therapeutics.

  20. Novel strategies and therapeutic options for the management of primary biliary cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Amardeep; Jones, David E

    2017-10-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is a chronic autoimmune liver disease. It has a varied course of progression ranging from being completely asymptomatic to aggressive disease leading to cirrhosis and resulting in liver transplantation. In addition, symptoms can be debilitating and can have a major impact on quality of life. For decades, there was only one anti-cholestatic agent available to target this disease and that was only effective in around half of patients, with little or no effect on symptoms. With increasing understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of PBC and potential targets for drug treatment, pharmaceutical companies have shown a greater interest in this rare disease. A large number of novel therapeutic molecules have been developed and are currently being evaluated. In this review article all the novel molecules in use and in trials targeting cholestasis and symptoms in PBC are discussed.

  1. Congenital double bile duct presenting as recurrent cholangitis in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.D. Chakravarty

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Double common bile duct (DCBD is a rare congenital anomaly. Most of these bile duct anomalies are associated with bile duct stones, anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction (APBJ, pancreatitis and bile duct or gastric cancers. Early detection and treatment is important to avoid long term complications. Surgical resection of the anomalous bile duct and reconstruction of the biliary enteric anastomosis is the treatment of choice. We report a rare case of DCBD anomaly in a girl, who presented with recurrent cholangitis. She had type Va DCBD anomaly. She underwent successful resection of the bile duct and reconstruction of the biliary enteric anastomosis. Preoperative imaging and diagnosis of the congenital biliary anomaly is very important to avoid intraoperative bile duct injury. Review of the literature shows very few cases of type Va DCBD, presenting with either bile duct stones or APBJ.

  2. Toxicogenomic analysis reveals profibrogenic effects of trichloroethylene in autoimmune-mediated cholangitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, Anna K; Sullivan, Bradley P; Kassel, Karen M; Joshi, Nikita; Luyendyk, James P

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to environmental chemicals increases the risk of developing autoimmune liver disease. However, the identity of specific chemical perpetrators and the mechanisms whereby environmental chemicals modify liver disease is unclear. Previous studies link exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) with the development of autoimmune liver disease and exacerbation of autoimmunity in lupus-prone MRL mice. In this study, we utilized NOD.c3c4 mice, which spontaneously develop autoimmune cholangitis bearing resemblance to some features of primary biliary cirrhosis. Nine-week-old female NOD.c3c4 mice were given TCE (0.5 mg/ml) or its vehicle (1% Cremophor-EL) in drinking water for 4 weeks. TCE had little effect on clinical chemistry, biliary cyst formation, or hepatic CD3+ T-cell accumulation. Hepatic microarray profiling revealed a dramatic suppression of early growth response 1 (EGR1) mRNA in livers of TCE-treated mice, which was verified by qPCR and immunohistochemical staining. Consistent with a reported link between reduced EGR1 expression and liver fibrosis, TCE increased hepatic type I collagen (COL1A1) mRNA and protein levels in livers of NOD.c3c4 mice. In contrast, TCE did not increase COL1A1 expression in NOD.ShiLtJ mice, which do not develop autoimmune cholangitis. These results suggest that in the context of concurrent autoimmune liver disease with a genetic basis, modification of hepatic gene expression by TCE may increase profibrogenic signaling in the liver. Moreover, these studies suggest that NOD.c3c4 mice may be a novel model to study gene-environment interactions critical for the development of autoimmune liver disease. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Management of acute cholangitis as a result of occlusion from a self-expandable metallic stent in patients with malignant distal and hilar biliary obstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Isayama, Hiroyuki

    2017-04-01

    Acute cholangitis as a result of common bile duct stones can be managed; however, cholangitis caused by occlusion with a biliary self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) in patients with an unresectable malignant biliary obstruction has not been fully discussed. The acute cholangitis clinical guidelines (Tokyo Guidelines 2013) recommend following the same procedure as that used for cholangitis; however, the patient's condition, including performance status, tumor extension or staging, and prognosis must be considered. Most physicians manage cholangitis from a SEMS occlusion using a two-step procedure. They insert endoscopic drainage with a plastic stent or insert a nasobiliary drainage tube, which does not exacerbate sepsis. Addition or replacement of a biliary SEMS is required in many cases depending on the cause of the occlusion. Tumor ingrowth through the stent mesh is common in uncovered SEMS and requires placement of another stent in an in-stent method. However, covered SEMS tends to be occluded by sludge, so it must be replaced because of the bacterial biofilm that forms on the covering membrane. The location of the biliary stricture (hilar or distal) should also be considered. Strategies for managing cholangitis as a result of occlusion by a biliary SEMS remain controversial, so prospective clinical trials are needed. © 2017 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2017 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  4. Methamphetamine increases Prion Protein and induces dopamine-dependent expression of protease resistant PrPsc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrucci, M; Ryskalin, L; Biagioni, F; Gambardella, S; Busceti, C L; Falleni, A; Lazzeri, G; Fornai, F

    2017-07-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPc) is physiologically expressed within selective brain areas of mammals. Alterations in the secondary structure of this protein lead to scrapie-like prion protein (PrPsc), which precipitates in the cell. PrPsc has been detected in infectious, inherited or sporadic neurodegenerative disorders. Prion protein metabolism is dependent on autophagy and ubiquitin proteasome. Despite not being fully elucidated, the physiological role of prion protein relates to chaperones which rescue cells under stressful conditions.Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused drug which produces oxidative stress in various brain areas causing mitochondrial alterations and protein misfolding. These effects produce a compensatory increase of chaperones while clogging cell clearing pathways. In the present study, we explored whether METH administration modifies the amount of PrPc. Since high levels of PrPc when the clearing systems are clogged may lead to its misfolding into PrPsc, we further tested whether METH exposure triggers the appearance of PrPsc. We analysed the effects of METH and dopamine administration in PC12 and striatal cells by using SDS-PAGE Coomassie blue, immune- histochemistry and immune-gold electron microscopy. To analyze whether METH administration produces PrPsc aggregates we used antibodies directed against PrP following exposure to proteinase K or sarkosyl which digest folded PrPc but misfolded PrPsc. We fond that METH triggers PrPsc aggregates in DA-containing cells while METH is not effective in primary striatal neurons which do not produce DA. In the latter cells exogenous DA is needed to trigger PrPsc accumulation similarly to what happens in DA containing cells under the effects of METH. The present findings, while fostering novel molecular mechanisms involving prion proteins, indicate that, cell pathology similar to prion disorders can be mimicked via a DA-dependent mechanism by a drug of abuse.

  5. Generation of iPSC lines from primary human chorionic villi cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Lichtner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Primary human chorionic villi (CV cells were used to generate the iPSC line by retroviral transduction of the four Yamanaka-factors OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC. Pluripotency was confirmed both in vivo and in vitro. The transcriptomes of the CV-derived iPSC lines and the human embryonic stem cell lines—H1 and H9 have a Pearson correlation of 0.929 and 0.943 respectively.

  6. Autoimmune liver serology: current diagnostic and clinical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios-P; Invernizzi, Pietro; Mackay, Ian-R; Vergani, Diego

    2008-06-07

    Liver-related autoantibodies are crucial for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AiLD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and the sclerosing cholangitis variants in adults and children. AIH-1 is specified by anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and smooth muscle antibody (SMA). AIH-2 is specified by antibody to liver kidney microsomal antigen type-1 (anti-LKM1) and anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1). SMA, ANA and anti-LKM antibodies can be present in de-novo AIH following liver transplantation. PBC is specified by antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) reacting with enzymes of the 2-oxo-acid dehydrogenase complexes (chiefly pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E2 subunit) and disease-specific ANA mainly reacting with nuclear pore gp210 and nuclear body sp100. Sclerosing cholangitis presents as at least two variants, first the classical primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) mostly affecting adult men wherein the only (and non-specific) reactivity is an atypical perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (p-ANCA), also termed perinuclear anti-neutrophil nuclear antibodies (p-ANNA) and second the childhood disease called autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC) with serological features resembling those of type 1 AIH. Liver diagnostic serology is a fast-expanding area of investigation as new purified and recombinant autoantigens, and automated technologies such as ELISAs and bead assays, become available to complement (or even compete with) traditional immunofluorescence procedures. We survey for the first time global trends in quality assurance impacting as it does on (1) manufacturers/purveyors of kits and reagents, (2) diagnostic service laboratories that fulfill clinicians' requirements, and (3) the end-user, the physician providing patient care, who must properly interpret test results in the overall clinical context.

  7. Primary (Poorly Differentiated Sclerosing Liposarcoma of Temporal Region. An Uncommon Tumor in a Rare Site: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha CK Rao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Liposarcoma (LS in the head and neck region is a rare tumor. The sclerosing variant of LS is a subtype of well-differentiated LS characterized by areas of conventional LS admixed with hypocellular areas of stromal sclerosis that show atypical lipomatous cells. The (poorly differentiated sclerosing LS, on the other hand, is more cellular with atypical, pleomorphic and often bizarre giant tumor cells admixed with atypical lipoblasts. We report a case of poorly differentiated sclerosing LS of temporal region in a 49-year-old man. Radiologically, the tumor was dumbbell shaped with intra and extra cranial extension. In this case, we discuss the clinico-radiological and pathological findings of an unusual tumor in a rare location. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2015; 3(1.000: 33-35

  8. Modelling neurodegenerative diseases in vitro: Recent advances in 3D iPSC technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie J Siney

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC 12 years ago has fostered the development of innovative patient-derived in vitro models for better understanding of disease mechanisms. This is particularly relevant to neurodegenerative diseases, where availability of live human brain tissue for research is limited and post-mortem interval changes influence readouts from autopsy-derived human tissue. Hundreds of iPSC lines have now been prepared and banked, thanks to several large scale initiatives and cell banks. Patient- or engineered iPSC-derived neural models are now being used to recapitulate cellular and molecular aspects of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including early and pre-clinical disease stages. The broad relevance of these models derives from the availability of a variety of differentiation protocols to generate disease-specific cell types and the manipulation to either introduce or correct disease-relevant genetic modifications. Moreover, the use of chemical and physical three-dimensional (3D matrices improves control over the extracellular environment and cellular organization of the models. These iPSC-derived neural models can be utilised to identify target proteins and, importantly, provide high-throughput screening for drug discovery. Choosing Alzheimer’s disease (AD as an example, this review describes 3D iPSC-derived neural models and their advantages and limitations. There is now a requirement to fully characterise and validate these 3D iPSC-derived neural models as a viable research tool that is capable of complementing animal models of neurodegeneration and live human brain tissue. With further optimization of differentiation, maturation and aging protocols, as well as the 3D cellular organisation and extracellular matrix to recapitulate more closely, the molecular extracellular-environment of the human brain, 3D iPSC-derived models have the potential to deliver new knowledge, enable discovery of novel

  9. Garre's chronic diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis of the sacrum: a rare condition mimicking malignancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nasir, N

    2012-02-03

    Garre\\'s chronic diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis (DSOM) is a rare disease that occurs most commonly in the mandible. We present a case of sacral DSOM that simulated an expanding destructive sacral tumour. Treatment was conducted on the basis of the available experience with the mandibular form of the disease, with partial symptomatic relief, but progressive sclerosis of the sacral lesion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case initially presenting in the sacrum. As an osteolytic expanding lesion simulating malignancy, it is important to recognize this entity in the sacrum.

  10. Immunoglobulin G4-Related Sclerosing Disease Involving the Urethra: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jin Woo; KIm, Sang Youn; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup; Moon, Kyung Chul

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing disease is a systemic disease characterized by extensive IgG4-positive plasma cells and T-lymphocyte infiltration in various organs. We described the imaging findings of an IgG4-related inflammatory pseudotumor in the urethra. The urethral mass showed isoattenuation on unenhanced CT images, delayed enhancement on enhanced CT images, iso- to slight hyper-intensity on T1 and T2 weighted magnetic resonance images, diffusion restriction on diffusion weighted images, and heterogeneously low echogeneity on ultrasonography.

  11. Sclerosing adenosis: mammographic and ultrasonographic findings with clinical and histopathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenhan-Bilgen, Isil; Memis, Aysenur; Uestuen, Esin Emin; Oezdemir, Necmettin; Erhan, Yildiz

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings of sclerosing adenosis, a relatively uncommon entity which may sometimes mimic carcinoma. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the records of 33700 women, who have undergone mammographic examination at our institution between January 1985 and July 2001 revealed 43 histopathologically proven sclerosing adenosis. The history, physical examination, mammographic and ultrasonographic findings were analyzed in all patients. In 30 patients, the nonpalpable lesions were preoperatively localized by the needle-hookwire system under the guidance of mammography (n=22) or ultrasonography (US) (n=8). Radiological features were correlated with histopathological findings. Results: The age of the patients varied between 32 and 55 years (mean, 43.7 years). Only two patients had a family history of breast cancer. In six patients, the presenting complaint was mastalgia. A palpable mass was present in 13 cases. The mammographic findings were; microcalcifications in 24 (55.8%) (clustered in 22, diffuse in two), mass in five (11.6%), asymmetric focal density in three (6.9%), and focal architectural distortion in three (6.9%) patients. Four of the masses were irregularly contoured, while one was well-circumscribed. On US, focal acoustic shadowing without a mass configuration was noted in the three patients who showed asymmetrical focal density on mammography. In eight patients, who showed normal mammograms, a solid mass was detected on US. Two masses had discrete well-circumscribed oval or lobulated contours, while six showed microlobulation and irregularity. In one case, the irregularly contoured mass had marked posterior acoustic shadowing. Two of the three patients, who had focal architectural distortion on mammograms, had an irregularly contoured solid mass, while the third presented as focal acoustic shadowing without a mass configuration. Conclusion: Sclerosing adenosis mostly presents as a nonpalpable

  12. Sclerosing mucoepidermoid carcinoma with eosinophilia of the thyroid: A cytological dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chayanika Pantola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing mucoepidermoid carcinoma with eosinophilia (SMECE of the thyroid is a rare primary thyroid tumor arising in a background of Hashimoto′s/lymphocytic thyroiditis and has been recently introduced in the World Health Organization (WHO classification of thyroid tumors. It is characterized by extensive sclerosis, squamous and glandular differentiation, and inflammatory infiltrate rich in eosinophil. Here, we are discussing the cytological features of this rare case in a 35-year-old female presented with thyroid swelling and lymph-node enlargement.

  13. Human iPSC for Therapeutic Approaches to the Nervous System: Present and Future Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giuseppina Cefalo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many central nervous system (CNS diseases including stroke, spinal cord injury (SCI, and brain tumors are a significant cause of worldwide morbidity/mortality and yet do not have satisfying treatments. Cell-based therapy to restore lost function or to carry new therapeutic genes is a promising new therapeutic approach, particularly after human iPSCs became available. However, efficient generation of footprint-free and xeno-free human iPSC is a prerequisite for their clinical use. In this paper, we will first summarize the current methodology to obtain footprint- and xeno-free human iPSC. We will then review the current iPSC applications in therapeutic approaches for CNS regeneration and their use as vectors to carry proapoptotic genes for brain tumors and review their applications for modelling of neurological diseases and formulating new therapeutic approaches. Available results will be summarized and compared. Finally, we will discuss current limitations precluding iPSC from being used on large scale for clinical applications and provide an overview of future areas of improvement. In conclusion, significant progress has occurred in deriving iPSC suitable for clinical use in the field of neurological diseases. Current efforts to overcome technical challenges, including reducing labour and cost, will hopefully expedite the integration of this technology in the clinical setting.

  14. CHANDRA X-RAY DETECTION OF THE ENIGMATIC FIELD STAR BP Psc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastner, Joel H.; Montez, Rodolfo; Rodriguez, David; Zuckerman, B.; Perrin, Marshall D.; Grosso, Nicolas; Forveille, Thierry; Graham, James R.

    2010-01-01

    BP Psc is a remarkable emission-line field star that is orbited by a dusty disk and drives a parsec-scale system of jets. We report the detection by the Chandra X-ray Observatory of a weak X-ray point source coincident with the centroids of optical/IR and submillimeter continuum emission at BP Psc. As the star's photosphere is obscured throughout the visible and near-infrared, the Chandra X-ray source likely represents the first detection of BP Psc itself. The X-rays most likely originate with magnetic activity at BP Psc and hence can be attributed either to a stellar corona or to star-disk interactions. The log of the ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity, log(L X /L bol ), lies in the range -5.8 to -4.2. This is smaller than log(L X /L bol ) ratios typical of low-mass, pre-main sequence stars, but is well within the log(L X /L bol ) range observed for rapidly rotating (FK Com-type) G giant stars. Hence, the Chandra results favor an exotic model wherein the disk/jet system of BP Psc is the result of its very recently engulfing a companion star or a giant planet, as the primary star ascended the giant branch.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as New Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment of Primary Biliary Cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Arsenijevic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC is a chronic autoimmune cholestatic liver disease characterized by the progressive destruction of small- and medium-sized intrahepatic bile ducts with resultant cholestasis and progressive fibrosis. Ursodeoxycholic acid and obethicholic acid are the only agents approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of PBC. However, for patients with advanced, end-stage PBC, liver transplantation is still the most effective treatment. Accordingly, the alternative approaches, such as mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplantation, have been suggested as an effective alternative therapy for these patients. Due to their immunomodulatory characteristics, MSCs are considered as promising therapeutic agents for the therapy of autoimmune liver diseases, including PBC. In this review, we have summarized the therapeutic potential of MSCs for the treatment of these diseases, emphasizing molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for MSC-based effects in an animal model of PBC and therapeutic potential observed in recently conducted clinical trials. We have also presented several outstanding problems including safety issues regarding unwanted differentiation of transplanted MSCs which limit their therapeutic use. Efficient and safe MSC-based therapy for PBC remains a challenging issue that requires continuous cooperation between clinicians, researchers, and patients.

  16. Comparison of two editions of Tokyo guidelines for the management of acute cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gang; Han, Lu; Yang, Yunsheng; Linghu, Enqiang; Li, Wen; Cai, Fengchun; Kong, Jinyan; Wang, Xiangdong; Meng, Jiangyun; Du, Hong; Wang, Hongbin; Huang, Qiyang; Hyder, Quratulain; Zhang, Xiuli

    2014-02-01

    The Tokyo guidelines from 2007 (TG07) and 2013 (TG13) were compared for the management of acute cholangitis (AC). We reviewed patients with clinically-proven AC by detecting purulent biles during biliary drainage. TG07 and TG13 were compared regarding diagnosis, severity grading and prognostic values. New risk factors for 30-day mortality were investigated. Definite diagnosis for 120 eligible patients was made in 104 (86.7%) and 101 (84.2%) cases by TG07 and TG13, respectively (P = 0.36), higher than 61 (50.8%) by Charcot's triad (P < 0.001). Diagnostic overlap and concordance (κ) are 90.8% (109/120) and 0.63 (P < 0.0001). Patients classified into mild and moderate grades by TG07 and TG13 differed significantly (P = 0.043). Both guidelines could not predict clinical outcomes except the needs for multi ERCP session by TG13. Intrahepatic obstruction (OR = 11.2, 95% CI: 1.55-226.9) and hypoalbuminemia (≤ 25.0 g/l; OR = 17.3, 95% CI: 3.5-313.6) were independent risk factors for 30-day mortality in multivariate model. Two guidelines are reproducible and reliable in AC diagnosis but different in severity grading. TG13 are more practical for immediate severity grading, enabling planning treatment upon admission. Intrahepatic obstruction is a new candidate predictor of 30-day mortality for further assessment. © 2013 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  17. Primary Biliary Cholangitis Associated with Skin Disorders: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terziroli Beretta-Piccoli, Benedetta; Guillod, Caroline; Marsteller, Igor; Blum, Roland; Mazzucchelli, Luca; Mondino, Chiara; Invernizzi, Pietro; Gershwin, M Eric; Mainetti, Carlo

    2017-08-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is a rare autoimmune cholestatic liver disease. It is often associated with extrahepatic autoimmune diseases. Skin disorders are sporadically reported in association with PBC. We report an unusual case of PBC associated with acquired reactive perforating dermatosis (ARPD) and present a review of the literature on skin disorders associated with PBC. Our patient presented to the dermatology department with generalized pruritus associated with nodular perforating skin lesions on the trunk, and cholestatic liver disease of unknown origin. After having established both diagnosis of ARPD and PBC, she was managed in an interdisciplinary manner, and both her skin and liver conditions improved gradually. Only one similar case is reported in the literature, in that case, the liver disease was not treated. By reviewing the literature, we found that lichen planus, vitiligo, and psoriasis are the most frequent skin disorders associated with PBC. However, there is only limited data about specific skin disorders associated with PBC. This case report of a patient with PBC associated with ARPD underlines the importance of interdisciplinary management of patients with rare liver diseases combined with rare skin disorders. The present review of the literature shows that probably, immune-mediated skin conditions are not more frequent in PBC patients than in the general population. However, the available data are scant; there is a need for high-quality data on skin conditions associated with PBC.

  18. An experimental study for efficacy of acetic acid as a sclerosing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Chan; Oh, Ju Hyung; Yoon, Yup; Ko, Young Tae; Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong; Lim, Joo Won

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of acetic acid as a sclerosing agent by observation of histologic change in urinary bladder epithelium after the instillation of acetic acid. Urinary bladder of the rabbit was catheterized with a Foley catheter, and acetic acid of 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% concentration was instilled for 5 minutes. After evacuation of the acid, the bladder was irrigated three times with normal saline. After two days, gross and histologic examinations of the bladder were performed. A bladder into which 10% acetic acid had been instilled revealed a nearly normal epithelium without denudation. In two cases, 20% acetic acid was instilled;one revealed partial denudation of the epithelium and the other revealed complete denudation. Mild to moderate interstitial edema and vascular congestion of the bladder wall were evident in all cases in which acid at a concentration of 30% or more had been instilled. In all cases in which the concentration of acid was greater than 30%, the epithelium was completely denuded. An acetic acid concentration of 40% or more is sufficient to completely destroy the epithelium of rabbit urinary bladder, and may be effective as a new sclerosing agent in cases of renal or hepatic cyst

  19. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Primary Biliary Cholangitis Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis What Is Reye’s Syndrome? Wilson’s Disease Liver Disease Resources OVERVIEW Find a ...

  20. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Jaundice In Newborns Diseases of the Liver Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency Liver Cancer Liver Cysts Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Primary Biliary Cholangitis Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis ...

  1. A syntactical comparison between pair sentential calculus PSC and Gupta's definitional calculus Cn

    OpenAIRE

    石井,忠夫

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we will compare two logical systems PSC and Cn with a syntactical point of view. Because both notions of the pair-sentence with stage number in PSC and Gupta's sentence-definition with revision stage number in Cn are very similar, and both can deal with paradoxical sentences like a simple Liar sentence. His system was defined as a predicate calculus, but here we will introduce the propositional version of Cn for the comparison, and we had the following results: (1) C0 is a sublo...

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  11. File list: Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. Cadmium and lead accumulations and agronomic quality of a newly bred pollution-safe cultivar (PSC) of water spinach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Mu, Yang-Xiu; He, Chun-Tao; Fu, Hui-Ling; Wang, Xue-Song; Gong, Fei-Yue; Yang, Zhong-Yi

    2018-04-01

    Breeding for pollution-safe cultivars (PSCs) can reduce pollutant accumulation in crops. However, the PSC breeding would face the risk of nutritional quality reduction, which is usually ignored in conventional breeding programs targeting to increase crop yield or nutritional quality. Thus, the doubt whether the risk would exist has to be clarified for supporting the PSC breeding. In the present study, a newly bred Cd/Pb-PSC of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatic Forsk.) and its parents (QLQ with low-Cd/Pb accumulation ability and T308 with high yield) of water spinach were employed to clarify the above-mentioned issue. Yields, and concentrations of Cd, Pb, nitrite, and organic and inorganic nutrients in shoots of the three experimental lines were determined. There were no significant differences in Cd/Pb concentration between the new PSC and QLQ, in nitrite content between the new PSC and its two parents and in yield between the new PSC and T308. It is decisively significant that shoot concentrations of organic and inorganic nutrients in the Cd/Pb-PSC were as high as those in one of its parents. It is affirmed that the breeding operations (crossing and consequently continuous selfing) for lowering Cd/Pb accumulation capacity of water spinach would not lower the nutritional values of the obtained Cd/Pb-PSCs from the breeding, which should be a pillar that supports the feasibility to minimize Cd/Pb pollution in vegetables using PSC-breeding method.

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  5. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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