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Sample records for scleroderma research oxford

  1. Scleroderma Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will continue. Learn more The SRF: A Four Star Charity The SRF has achieved the highest possible ... Saget share about his connection to scleroderma and what he is doing to make a difference. Click ...

  2. Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scleroderma means hard skin. It is a group of diseases that cause abnormal growth of connective tissue. ... their shape and helps keep them strong. In scleroderma, the tissue gets hard or thick. It can ...

  3. Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress in these diseases. Contact Us NIAMS Archive Viewers and Players Social Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy ...

  4. The EULAR Scleroderma Trials and Research Group (EUSTAR): an international framework for accelerating scleroderma research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Alan; Ladner, Ulf M; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco

    2008-11-01

    Systemic sclerosis has a complex pathogenesis and a multifaceted clinical spectrum without a specific treatment. Under the auspices of the European League Against Rheumatism, the European League Against Rheumatism Scleroderma Trials And Research group (EUSTAR) has been founded in Europe to foster the study of systemic sclerosis with the aim of achieving equality of assessment and care of systemic sclerosis patients throughout the world according to evidence-based principles. EUSTAR created the minimal essential data set, a simple two-page form with basic demographics and mostly yes/no answers to clinical and laboratory parameters, to track patients throughout Europe. Currently, over 7000 patients are registered from 150 centres in four continents, and several articles have been published with the data generated by the minimal essential data set. A commitment of EUSTAR is also to teaching and educating, and for this reason there are two teaching courses and a third is planned for early in 2009. These courses have built international networks among young investigators improving the quality of multicentre clinical trials. EUSTAR has organized several rounds of 'teach the teachers' to further standardize the skin scoring. EUSTAR activities have extended beyond European borders, and EUSTAR now includes experts from several nations. The growth of data and biomaterial might ensure many further fruitful multicentre studies, but the financial sustainability of EUSTAR remains an issue that may jeopardize the existence of this group as well as that of other organizations in the world.

  5. Scleroderma with Nodular Scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chutika Srisuttiyakorn

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nodular scleroderma is a rare variant of scleroderma which can occur in connection with systemic sclerosis or morphea. A biopsy from the lesion can demonstrate the scleroderma pattern, i.e., keloid pattern or mixed type. Treatment is challenging, and several treatments modalities have been reported with unsatisfactory results. Main Observations: We present a case of systemic sclerosis in a 50-year-old female who developed nodular scleroderma in the absence of deterioration of the scleroderma condition. Although no additional treatment was given, the lesions remained stable without progression. Conclusions: Although this condition is rare, it has been reported sporadically, and clinicians should be able to recognize this variant in cases of scleroderma presenting with firm nodules or plaques.

  6. Nailfold capillaroscopy in systemic sclerosis: data from the EULAR scleroderma trials and research (EUSTAR) database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingegnoli, Francesca; Ardoino, Ilaria; Boracchi, Patrizia; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2013-09-01

    The aims of this study were to obtain cross-sectional data on capillaroscopy in an international multi-center cohort of Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) and to investigate the frequency of the capillaroscopic patterns and their disease-phenotype associations. Data collected between June 2004 and October 2011 in the EULAR Scleroderma Trials and Research (EUSTAR) registry were examined. Patients' profiles based on clinical and laboratory data were obtained by cluster analysis and the association between profiles and capillaroscopy was investigated by multinomial logistic regression. 62 of the 110 EUSTAR centers entered data on capillaroscopy in the EUSTAR database. 376 of the 2754 patients (13.65%) were classified as scleroderma pattern absent, but non-specific capillary abnormalities were noted in 55.48% of the cases. Four major patients' profiles were identified characterized by a progressive severity for skin involvement, as well as an increased number of systemic manifestations. The "early" and "active" scleroderma patterns were generally observed in patients with mild/moderate skin involvement and a low number of disease manifestations, while the "late" scleroderma pattern was found more frequently in the more severe forms of the disease. These data indicate the importance of capillaroscopy in SSc management and that capillaroscopic patterns are directly related to the extent of organ involvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Localized Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Is Localized Scleroderma Diagnosed? Doctors who are familiar with scleroderma, or who are experts at examining ... systemic treatment with a medication or other treatment interventions (for example, ultraviolet light), are reserved for more ...

  8. International Team Identifies Biomarker for Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spotlight on Research International Team Identifies Biomarker for Scleroderma By Kirstie Saltsman, Ph.D. | May 5, 2014 ... molecule correlates with a more severe form of scleroderma, a chronic autoimmune disorder that involves the abnormal ...

  9. EULAR recommendations for the treatment of systemic sclerosis: a report from the EULAR Scleroderma Trials and Research group (EUSTAR)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowal-Bielecka, O.; Landewé, R.; Avouac, J.; Chwiesko, S.; Miniati, I.; Czirjak, L.; Clements, P.; Denton, C.; Farge, D.; Fligelstone, K.; Földvari, I.; Furst, D. E.; Müller-Ladner, U.; Seibold, J.; Silver, R. M.; Takehara, K.; Toth, B. Garay; Tyndall, A.; Valentini, G.; van den Hoogen, F.; Wigley, F.; Zulian, F.; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco

    2009-01-01

    The optimal treatment of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a challenge because the pathogenesis of SSc is unclear and it is an uncommon and clinically heterogeneous disease affecting multiple organ systems. The aim of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Scleroderma Trials and Research group

  10. Risk Factors for Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here: Home For Patients Risk Factors Risk Factors for Scleroderma The cause of scleroderma is ... what biological factors contribute to scleroderma pathogenesis. Genetic Risk Scleroderma does not tend to run in families ...

  11. Scleroderma Mimickers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Nadia D.; Hummers, Laura K.

    2017-01-01

    Opinion statement Cutaneous fibrosing disorders encompass a diverse array of diseases united by the presence of varying degrees of dermal sclerosis. The quality and distribution of skin involvement, presence or absence of systemic complications and unique associated laboratory abnormalities often help to distinguish between these diseases. It is imperative that an effort is made to accurately differentiate between scleroderma and its mimics, in order to guide long-term management and facilitate implementation of the appropriate treatment modality where indicated. PMID:28473954

  12. Dental Care in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Care in Scleroderma People living with scleroderma face unique challenges while trying to maintain their oral ... They are more likely to be affected by dental conditions such as small mouth, dry mouth, jaw ...

  13. Scleroderma and Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scleroderma and Sexuality INTRODUCTION If you or your partner have been diagnosed with scleroderma, you may be wondering how this will ... will continue to find satisfaction and enjoyment through sexuality. If you are single, you may wonder how ...

  14. Pulmonary Hypertension in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    PULMONARY HYPERTENSION IN SCLERODERMA PULMONARY HYPERTENSION Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the blood vessels of the lungs. If the high ... the right side of the heart. Patients with scleroderma are at increased risk for developing PH from ...

  15. Radiocarbon facility at the Research Laboratory for Archaeology in Oxford - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, N.R.; Hedges, R.E.M.; Wand, J.O.; Hall, E.T.

    1981-01-01

    The Oxford accelerator mass spectrometry facility is primarily intended for radiocarbon work. It has been designed and built within the department, except for the 3 MV tandem, which is being purchased from General Ionex and is still awaited. This system has been described many times before, so this paper will not give a comprehensive description of the facility, but only cover in detail areas of recent progress, or areas where our approach differs from other labs

  16. Tips for Living with Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients Tips for Living Tips for Living with Scleroderma Ways to help manage your symptoms The Scleroderma ... help find improved therapies and a cure for scleroderma! Your gift today will be matched to have ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: systemic scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Systemic scleroderma Systemic scleroderma Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Systemic scleroderma is an autoimmune disorder that affects the skin ...

  18. Novel Insights Into Causes of Scleroderma Offer Potential New Treatment Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spotlight on Research Novel Insights Into Causes of Scleroderma Offer Potential New Treatment Strategies By Kirstie Saltsman, Ph.D. | December 15, 2013 In scleroderma, immune cells invade the skin, but the role ...

  19. The petrography of the Jurassic core from the Harwell research site. Part 1: Kimmeridge Clay, Corallian Beds and Oxford Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milodowski, A.E.

    1983-06-01

    Detailed examination by mineralogical and petrological techniques has enabled a detailed characterisation of the lithologies of the Oxford Clay, Corallian Beds and the Kimmeridge Clay beneath the Harwell Research Site. Information obtained has revealed the nature of the bulk mineralogy, pore-types, pore-surface mineralogy and post-depositional alteration of the rocks. Diagenesis has played an important part in determining the mineralogy, porosity and fabric of the rocks and has had the greatest variation of effects in the Corallian Beds, determining the phases now in contact with groundwater. It is these authigenic phases that are of key interest in assessing the behaviour of radionuclides which may be released into the local groundwater systems. The importance of the different pore-types characterised during this investigation and of the mineral phases lining these potential pathways for groundwater movement are discussed in detail at the end of this report. Diagenesis has reduced primary porosity in many of the Corallian rocks by calcite precipitation. In such rocks where a cohesive cement is present, groundwater flow must occur along large-scale fractures and more slowly along intercrystalline grain-boundary cracks. (author)

  20. Mimics of scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveri K Nalianda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis is a rare autoimmune connective tissue disorder characterised typically by tightening and tethering of skin. However, several other disorders are also characterised by hardening and thickening of skin. These mimics can be potentially confused with systemic sclerosis, leading to a misdiagnosis. This review describes the aetiopathogenesis, clinical features and treatment of Morphea (localised scleroderma, Scleredema, Scleromyxoedema, Eosinophilic fasciitis, Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis, Diabetic Cheiroarthropathy, chronic GVHD, POEMS syndrome and drug induced scleroderma like illness. A careful and thorough clinical assessment is essential in order to differentiate these mimics from each other and from systemic sclerosis, establish the diagnosis, and initiate appropriate treatment.

  1. 2013 American College of Rheumatology/European League against rheumatism classification criteria for systemic sclerosis outperform the 1980 criteria: data from the Canadian Scleroderma Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhajeri, Hebah; Hudson, Marie; Fritzler, Marvin; Pope, Janet; Tatibouet, Solène; Markland, Janet; Robinson, David; Jones, Niall; Khalidi, Nader; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Masetto, Ariel; Sutton, Evelyn; Mathieu, Jean-Pierre; Ligier, Sophie; Grodzicky, Tamara; LeClercq, Sharon; Thorne, Carter; Gyger, Geneviève; Smith, Douglas; Fortin, Paul R; Larché, Maggie; Baron, Murray

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the sensitivity of the new 2013 classification criteria for systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) in an independent cohort of SSc subjects and to assess the contribution of individual items of the criteria to the overall sensitivity. SSc subjects from the Canadian Scleroderma Research Group cohort were assessed. Sensitivity was determined in several subgroups of patients. In patients without the criterion of skin thickening proximal to the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints, we recalculated sensitivity after removing the individual criterion. A total of 724 SSc patients were included. Most were women (86%), mean age was 55.8 years, mean disease duration was 10.9 years, and 59% had limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc). Overall, the sensitivity of the 2013 criteria was 98.3% compared to 88.3% for the 1980 criteria. This pattern was consistent among those with lcSSc (98.8% versus 85.6%), anticentromere antibodies (98.9% versus 79.8%), disease duration ≤3 years (98.7% versus 84.7%), and no skin involvement proximal to the MCP joints (97% versus 60%). In the latter subgroup, removing Raynaud's phenomenon and sclerodactyly from the criteria reduced the sensitivity to 77% and 79%, respectively. Removing both sclerodactyly and puffy fingers reduced the sensitivity to 62%. The 2013 SSc classification criteria classify more SSc patients than the 1980 criteria. The improvement in sensitivity is most striking in those with lcSSc, especially those without skin involvement proximal to the MCP joints. The addition of Raynaud's phenomenon and puffy fingers to the 2013 criteria accounts for important gains in sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Scleroderma: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, T. A.; Marpaung, B.

    2018-03-01

    Scleroderma is a complex disease in which extensive fibrosis, vascular alterations, and autoantibodies against various cellular antigens are among the principal features.[1,2] The prevalenceranging from 50 to 300 cases per 1 million persons with women are at much higher risk. The average age of diagnosis is the fifth decades of life.[2] There is no cure for scleroderma, but many of its problems and complications can be treated.[3-7]A 54-year-old female patient with main complains limitation of motion and mouth, stiffness and painful joints in the hands and feet, thickening on the skin in the chest and trunk for eight years, purplish red spots on arms and legs intermittent for tenyears. On physical examination found sclerosis lesions, sclerodactyly on fingers and toes, telangiectasias in the antebrachii and cruris region. On laboratory, examination showed ANA test 10.7 and Anti DS DNA 123. The histopathological of the skin result is scleroderma. The patient was diagnosed with scleroderma and treated with methotrexate 7.5 mg/weeks, ciclosporin 2×100 mg/day, omeprazole 2×20 mg. After seven days of therapy, there is aclinical improvement, and the patient becomes anoutpatient treatment.

  3. Predictive value of European Scleroderma Group Activity Index in an early scleroderma cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevskaya, Tatiana; Baron, Murray; Pope, Janet E

    2017-07-01

    To estimate the effect of disease activity, as measured by the European Scleroderma Research Group Activity Index (EScSG-AI), on the risk of subsequent organ damage in a large systemic sclerosis (SSc) cohort. Of 421 SSc patients from the Canadian Scleroderma Research Group database with disease duration of ⩽ 3 years, 197 who had no evidence of end-stage organ damage initially and available 3 year follow-up were included. Disease activity was assessed by the EScSG-AI with two variability measures: the adjusted mean EScSG-AI (the area under the curve of the EScSG-AI over the observation period) and persistently active disease/flare. Outcomes were based on the Medsger severity scale and included accrual of a new severity score (Δ ⩾ 1) overall and within organ systems or reaching a significant level of deterioration in health status. After adjustment for covariates, the adjusted mean EScSG-AI was the most consistent predictor of risk across the study outcomes over 3 years in dcSSc: disease progression defined as Δ ⩾ 1 in any major internal organ, significant decline in forced vital capacity and diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide, severity of visceral disease and HAQ Disability Index worsening. In multivariate analysis, progression of lung disease was predicted solely by adjusted mean EScSG-AI, while the severity of lung disease was predicted the adjusted mean EScSG-AI, older age, modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS) and initial severity. The EScSG-AI was associated with patient- and physician-assessed measures of health status and overpowered the mRSS in predicting disease outcomes. Disease activity burden quantified with the adjusted mean EScSG-AI predicted the risk of deterioration in health status and severe organ involvement in dcSSc. The EScSG-AI is more responsive when done repeatedly and averaged. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email

  4. [When thinking to scleroderma?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, E

    2007-09-01

    Scleroderma encompasses an heterogeneous group of autoimmune disorders characterized by an hidebound thickened skin involvement. When the changes are limited to the skin, localized scleroderma is suspected. Although the latter is most often a benign disease, it may be exceptionally associated with involvement of multiple organs, mainly the neurological system. At the opposite, systemic sclerosis is a serious disorder associated with high morbidity and even mortality and defined by an extended skin sclerosis, multiple organ involvement and general symptoms. Raynaud phenomena is nearly always present at the beginning of the disease. Identifying initial manifestations of the disease (Raynaud phenomena, diffuse non pitting edema, symmetrical polyarthritis with tendon friction rubs, dysphagia associated with mucosal telangiectasia) may allow the clinician to rapidly transfer the patient to a specialized reference center in order to organize a multidisciplinary approach and to prompt optimum therapy.

  5. New Oxford style manual

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The New Oxford Style Manual brings together two essential reference works in a single volume: New Hart's Rules and the New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors. New Hart's Rules, Oxford's definitive guide to style, consists of 20 chapters that provide authoritative and expert advice on how to prepare copy for publication. Topics covered include how to use italic, roman, and other type treatments, numbers and dates, law and legal references, illustrations, notes and references, and bibliographies. The guidelines are complemented by the New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors, which features 25,000 alphabetically arranged entries giving authoritative advice on those words and names which raise questions time and time again because of spelling, capitalization, hyphenation, or cultural and historical context. Entries give full coverage of recommended spellings, variant forms, confusable words, hyphenation, capitalization, foreign and specialist terms, proper names, and abbreviations. The dictionary a...

  6. Scleroderma, Stress and CAM Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka-Kit Hui

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease influenced by interplay among genetic and environmental factors, of which one is stress. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is frequently used to treat stress and those diseases in which stress has been implicated. Results are presented from a survey of patients with scleroderma. Respondents were a convenient sample of those attending a national conference in Las Vegas in 2002. Findings implicate stress in the onset, continuation and exacerbation of scleroderma. The implication is that CAM providers may be filling an important patient need in their provision of services that identify and treat stress and its related disorders.

  7. Localized scleroderma: imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.; Uziel, Y.; Chuang, S.; Silverman, E.; Krafchik, B.; Laxer, R.

    1994-01-01

    Localized scleroderma is distinct from the diffuse form of scleroderma and does not show Raynaud's phenomenon and visceral involvement. The imaging features in 23 patients ranging from 2 to 17 years of age (mean 11.1 years) were reviewed. Leg length discrepancy and muscle atrophy were the most common findings (five patients), with two patients also showing modelling deformity of the fibula. One patient with lower extremity involvement showed abnormal bone marrow signals on MR. Disabling joint contracture requiring orthopedic intervention was noted in one patient. In two patients with ''en coup de sabre'' facial deformity, CT and MR scans revealed intracranial calcifications and white matter abnormality in the ipsilateral frontal lobes, with one also showing migrational abnormality. In a third patient, CT revealed white matter abnormality in the ipsilateral parietal lobe. In one patient with progressive facial hemiatrophy, CT and MR scans showed the underlying hypoplastic left maxillary antrum and cheek. Imaging studies of areas of clinical concern revealed positive findings in half our patients. (orig.)

  8. Localized scleroderma: imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, P. (Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)); Uziel, Y. (Div. of Rheumatology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)); Chuang, S. (Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)); Silverman, E. (Div. of Rheumatology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)); Krafchik, B. (Div. of Dermatology, Dept. of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)); Laxer, R. (Div. of Rheumatology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada))

    1994-06-01

    Localized scleroderma is distinct from the diffuse form of scleroderma and does not show Raynaud's phenomenon and visceral involvement. The imaging features in 23 patients ranging from 2 to 17 years of age (mean 11.1 years) were reviewed. Leg length discrepancy and muscle atrophy were the most common findings (five patients), with two patients also showing modelling deformity of the fibula. One patient with lower extremity involvement showed abnormal bone marrow signals on MR. Disabling joint contracture requiring orthopedic intervention was noted in one patient. In two patients with ''en coup de sabre'' facial deformity, CT and MR scans revealed intracranial calcifications and white matter abnormality in the ipsilateral frontal lobes, with one also showing migrational abnormality. In a third patient, CT revealed white matter abnormality in the ipsilateral parietal lobe. In one patient with progressive facial hemiatrophy, CT and MR scans showed the underlying hypoplastic left maxillary antrum and cheek. Imaging studies of areas of clinical concern revealed positive findings in half our patients. (orig.)

  9. Surgical Management of Localized Scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hyun; Lim, Soo Yeon; Lee, Jang Hyun; Ahn, Hee Chang

    2017-09-01

    Localized scleroderma is characterized by a thickening of the skin from excessive collagen deposits. It is not a fatal disease, but quality of life can be adversely affected due to changes in skin appearance, joint contractures, and, rarely, serious deformities of the face and extremities. We present six cases of localized scleroderma in face from our surgical practice. We reviewed six localized scleroderma cases that were initially treated with medication and then received follow-up surgery between April 2003 and February 2015. Six patients had facial lesions. These cases presented with linear dermal sclerosis on the forehead, oval subcutaneous and dermal depression in the cheek. En coup de sabre (n=4), and oval-shaped lesion of the face (n=2) were successfully treated. Surgical methods included resection with or without Z-plasty (n=3), fat graft (n=1), dermofat graft (n=1), and adipofascial free flap (n=1). Deformities of the affected parts were surgically corrected without reoccurrence. We retrospectively reviewed six cases of localized scleroderma that were successfully treated with surgery. And we propose an algorithm for selecting the best surgical approach for individual localized scleroderma cases. Although our cases were limited in number and long-term follow-up will be necessary, we suggest that surgical management should be considered as an option for treating scleroderma patients.

  10. Biomarkers in Scleroderma: Progressing from Association to Clinical Utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligon, Colin; Hummers, Laura K

    2016-03-01

    Scleroderma is a heterogenous disease characterized by autoimmunity, a characteristic vasculopathy, and often widely varying extents of deep organ fibrosis. Recent advances in the understanding of scleroderma's evolution have improved the ability to identify subgroups of patients with similar prognosis in order to improve risk stratification, enrich clinical trials for patients likely to benefit from specific therapies, and identify promising therapeutic targets for intervention. High-throughput technologies have recently identified fibrotic and inflammatory effectors in scleroderma that exhibit strong prognostic ability and may be tied to disease evolution. Increasingly, the use of collections of assayed circulating proteins and patterns of gene expression in tissue has replaced single-marker investigations in understanding the evolution of scleroderma and in objectively characterizing disease extent. Lastly, identification of shared patterns of disease evolution has allowed classification of patients into latent disease subtypes, which may allow rapid clinical prognostication and targeted management in both clinical and research settings. The concept of biomarkers in scleroderma is expanding to include nontraditional measures of aggregate protein signatures and disease evolution. This review examines the recent advances in biomarkers with a focus on those approaches poised to guide prospective management or themselves serve as quantitative surrogate disease outcomes.

  11. Malignancies in Patients with Anti-RNA Polymerase III Antibodies and Systemic Sclerosis: Analysis of the EULAR Scleroderma Trials and Research Cohort and Possible Recommendations for Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaroni, Maria-Grazia; Cavazzana, Ilaria; Colombo, Enrico; Dobrota, Rucsandra; Hernandez, Jasmin; Hesselstrand, Roger; Varju, Cecilia; Nagy, Gabriella; Smith, Vanessa; Caramaschi, Paola; Riccieri, Valeria; Hachulla, Eric; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra; Chatelus, Emmanuel; Romanowska-Próchnicka, Katarzyna; Araújo, Ana Carolina; Distler, Oliver; Allanore, Yannick; Airò, Paolo

    2017-05-01

    To analyze the characteristics of anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies (anti-RNAP3)- positive patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) in the European League Against Rheumatism Scleroderma Trials and Research group (EUSTAR) registry with a focus on the risk of cancer and the characteristics of malignancies, and the aim to provide guidelines about potential cancer screening in these patients. (1) Analysis of the EUSTAR database: 4986 patients with information on their anti-RNAP3 status were included. (2) Case-control study: additional retrospective data, including malignancy history, were queried in 13 participating EUSTAR centers; 158 anti-RNAP3+ cases were compared with 199 local anti-RNAP3- controls, matched for sex, cutaneous subset, disease duration, and age at SSc onset. (3) A Delphi exercise was performed by 82 experts to reach consensus for cancer screening in anti-RNAP3+ patients. In the EUSTAR registry, anti-RNAP3 were associated in multivariable analysis with renal crisis and diffuse cutaneous involvement. In the case-control study, anti-RNAP3 were associated with gastric antral vascular ectasia, rapid progression of skin involvement, and malignancies concomitant to SSc onset (OR 7.38, 95% CI 1.61-33.8). When compared with other anti-RNAP3+ patients, those with concomitant malignancies had older age (p < 0.001) and more frequent diffuse cutaneous involvement (p = 0.008). The Delphi exercise highlighted the need for malignancy screening at the time of diagnosis for anti-RNAP3+ patients and tight followup in the following years. Anti-RNAP3+ patients with SSc have a high risk of concomitant malignancy. These results have implications for clinical practice and suggest regular screening for cancer in anti-RNAP3+ patients.

  12. BILATERAL CHOROIDAL EXCAVATION IN JUVENILE LOCALIZED SCLERODERMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Mackenzie L; Day, Shelley

    2018-01-01

    To describe a case of bilateral choroidal excavation in a patient with juvenile localized scleroderma. Case report. An asymptomatic 12-year-old boy with localized scleroderma presented for examination and was found to have bilateral areas of choroidal excavation temporal to the fovea. Previous reports of ocular complications of localized scleroderma have primarily described adnexal and anterior segment changes. This is the second report of choroidal changes in a patient with localized scleroderma, and the first in a pediatric patient.

  13. [Microstomia as a complication of scleroderma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phoa, K.H.; Baat, P. de; Baat, C. de

    2003-01-01

    Scleroderma is a rare connective tissue disease of unknown origin. It is characterized by increased collagen deposition leading to fibrosis and degeneration of the skin and sometimes of internal organs. There are two main groups of scleroderma: circumscribed scleroderma and systemic sclerosis.

  14. Oxford dictionary of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Alan

    The dictionary is derived from the Concise Science Dictionary, first published by Oxford University Press in 1984 (third edition, 1996). It consists of all the entries relating to physics in that dictionary, together with some of those entries relating to astronomy that are required for an understanding of astrophysics and many entries that relate to physical chemistry. It also contains a selection of the words used in mathematics that are relevant to physics, as well as the key words in metal science, computing, and electronics. For this third edition a number of words from quantum field physics and statistical mechanics have been added. Cosmology and particle physics have been updated and a number of general entries have been expanded.

  15. 1 March 2012 - British University of Oxford Head of the Mathematical, Physical & Life Sciences Division A. N. Halliday FRS signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    1 March 2012 - British University of Oxford Head of the Mathematical, Physical & Life Sciences Division A. N. Halliday FRS signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

  16. [Nodules on localized scleroderma or morphea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayle, P; Bazex, J; Marguery, M-C; Lamant, L

    2005-02-01

    Localized scleroderma or morphea usually appears as flat or depressed lesions. We report 3 cases of morphea with atypical appearance, alternating pigmented and depigmented patches with nodules or sclerous bands, occurring in adult men. The occurrence of nodular elements on generalized or localized scleroderma, although rare, was first reported in the literature by Addisson in 1884. These nodules usually appear during evolution. These scleroderma are then described as being keloidal or nodular. We report 3 cases of nodules on localized scleroderma which appeared at the beginning of the dermatosis and where the scleroderma had a similar unusual irregularly pigmented appearance.

  17. Corticosteroids in Myositis and Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postolova, Anna; Chen, Jennifer K; Chung, Lorinda

    2017-01-01

    Synopsis Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) involve inflammation of the muscles and are classified based on the patterns of presentation and immunohistopathologic features on skin and muscle biopsy into four categories: dermatomyositis, polymyositis, inclusion body myositis, and immune mediated necrotizing myopathy. The term “scleroderma” refers to fibrosis of the skin. Localized scleroderma (morphea) is skin-limited, while systemic sclerosis (SSc) is associated with vascular and internal organ involvement. Although there is a paucity of randomized clinical trials, treatment with systemic corticosteroids (CS) is the standard of care for IIM with muscle and organ involvement. The extra-cutaneous features of systemic sclerosis are frequently treated with CS, however high doses have been associated with scleroderma renal crisis in high-risk patients. CS monotherapy is neither recommended for the cutaneous manifestations of dermatomyositis nor scleroderma. While CS can be effective first line agents, their significant side effect profile encourages concomitant treatment with other immunosuppressive medications to enable timely tapering. PMID:26611554

  18. [Localized scleroderma (morphea)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Waafa; Dupin, Nicolas

    2006-12-01

    DEFINITION AND FREQUENCY: Localized scleroderma, also known as morphea, is a sclerotic condition limited to the skin. The specific clinical entity depends on the extent, linear disposition and depth of the lesions. Morphea is ten times more prevalent than systemic sclerosis, and its prognosis is generally good: superficial forms resolve within 3 years. In the absence of symptoms, examinations to detect systemic involvement are purposeless. Plaque morphea is the most frequent clinical presentation. Serious manifestations include extensive morphea that may involve the entire skin or linear forms, especially in children, where they may be severe, especially on the face. There are no immunological markers clearly associated with morphea and no causative agents have been implicated in its pathogenesis, although sclerodermiform dermatitis is reported to be associated with some drugs and toxic agents. There is no consensual treatment for morphea. Treatment should be decided according to severity and extent of lesions. Limited lesions may be treated with local steroids such as class IV corticosteroids. Systemic treatment (methotrexate) should be discussed in extensive and linear forms when there is a risk of functional or esthetic complications.

  19. Localized scleroderma of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opere, Elisa; Oleaga, Laura; Ibanez, Teresa; Grande, Domingo

    2002-01-01

    We report a 44-year-old patient with right-breast morphea. Mammography, MRI and needle biopsy were used for assessment of the case. Mammography demonstrated thickening of the skin and the subcutaneous tissue. The MRI showed replacement of the subcutaneous and breast fat by a low signal intensity, non-enhancing tissue. Skin biopsy confirmed the histological features of scleroderma. (orig.)

  20. [Localized scleroderma (morphea) in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibel, L

    2012-02-01

    Localized scleroderma or morphea is a sclerosing connective tissue disease of the skin, which may affect underlying tissues such as subcutis, muscle and bone. Many patients show extracutaneous symptoms and antinuclear antibodies, however, secondary transformation into systemic sclerosis does not occur. Localized scleroderma usually begins in childhood with a wide variation in its clinical spectrum. The linear variant is the most common subtype in children, associated with a progressive course and increased risk of complications. The disease may progress over years and result in severe functional and cosmetic disability. The etiology of localized scleroderma remains unknown. A genetic background is suspected, while triggers such as trauma, vaccinations and infections may lead to secondary immunologic phenomena. Localized scleroderma often remains unrecognized for a long time, resulting in substantial delay in treatment. The combination of systemic corticosteroids and methotrexate has been established as first-line therapy for progressive (usually linear) disease, whereas phototherapy (UVA-1 or UVB-narrow band) is suitable for adolescents with superficial circumscribed subtypes.

  1. Localized scleroderma of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opere, Elisa; Oleaga, Laura; Ibanez, Teresa; Grande, Domingo [Department of Radiology, Hospital de Basurto, Bilbao (Spain)

    2002-06-01

    We report a 44-year-old patient with right-breast morphea. Mammography, MRI and needle biopsy were used for assessment of the case. Mammography demonstrated thickening of the skin and the subcutaneous tissue. The MRI showed replacement of the subcutaneous and breast fat by a low signal intensity, non-enhancing tissue. Skin biopsy confirmed the histological features of scleroderma. (orig.)

  2. Leadership Styles of Oxford House Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komer, Anne C; Jason, Leonard A; Harvey, Ronald; Olson, Brad

    Oxford House recovery homes are unusual compared to most recovery homes in that they function entirely without the use of staff; instead members are elected to officer positions. The aim of this study was to perform preliminary analysis of the types of leadership styles utilized by members of oxford house. Twentynine house residents of five Oxford Houses were asked to rate their own leadership styles using the leader behavior description questionnaire and the multifactor leader questionnaire. Results showed that participants were more likely to use person-oriented behaviors above task-oriented actions. Transformational leadership was associated with higher outcomes than Transactional leadership. Implications for future research are discussed.

  3. Scleroderma: nomenclature, etiology, pathogenesis, prognosis, and treatments: facts and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fett, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Scleroderma refers to a heterogeneous group of autoimmune fibrosing disorders. The nomenclature of scleroderma has changed dramatically in recent years, with morphea (localized scleroderma), limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis, diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis, and systemic sclerosis sine scleroderma encompassing the currently accepted disease subtypes. Major advances have been made in the molecular studies of morphea and systemic sclerosis; however, their etiologies and pathogenesis remain incompletely understood. Although morphea and systemic sclerosis demonstrate activation of similar inflammatory and fibrotic pathways, important differences in signaling pathways and gene signatures indicate they are likely biologically distinct processes. Morphea can cause significant morbidity but does not affect mortality, whereas systemic sclerosis has the highest disease-specific mortality of all autoimmune connective tissue diseases. Treatment recommendations for morphea and systemic sclerosis are based on limited data and largely expert opinions. Current collaborative efforts in morphea and systemic sclerosis research will hopefully lead to better understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of these rare and varied diseases and improved treatment options. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Localized scleroderma: clinical spectrum and therapeutic update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careta, Mariana Figueiroa; Romiti, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Scleroderma is a rare connective tissue disease that is manifested by cutaneous sclerosis and variable systemic involvement. Two categories of scleroderma are known: systemic sclerosis, characterized by cutaneous sclerosis and visceral involvement, and localized scleroderma or morphea which classically presents benign and self-limited evolution and is confined to the skin and/or underlying tissues. Localized scleroderma is a rare disease of unknown etiology. Recent studies show that the localized form may affect internal organs and have variable morbidity. Treatment should be started very early, before complications occur due to the high morbidity of localized scleroderma. In this review, we report the most important aspects and particularities in the treatment of patients diagnosed with localized scleroderma.

  5. Localized scleroderma: clinical spectrum and therapeutic update*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careta, Mariana Figueiroa; Romiti, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Scleroderma is a rare connective tissue disease that is manifested by cutaneous sclerosis and variable systemic involvement. Two categories of scleroderma are known: systemic sclerosis, characterized by cutaneous sclerosis and visceral involvement, and localized scleroderma or morphea which classically presents benign and self-limited evolution and is confined to the skin and/or underlying tissues. Localized scleroderma is a rare disease of unknown etiology. Recent studies show that the localized form may affect internal organs and have variable morbidity. Treatment should be started very early, before complications occur due to the high morbidity of localized scleroderma. In this review, we report the most important aspects and particularities in the treatment of patients diagnosed with localized scleroderma. PMID:25672301

  6. The Oxford Handbook of Applied Ethnomusicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Talam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In July 2015, Oxford University Press published a substantial volume titled The Oxford Handbook of Applied Ethnomusicology, co-edited by two eminent ethnomusicologists, Svanibor Pettan and Jeff Todd Titon. The book is an impressive collection of different approaches in applied ethnomusicology, developed through a combination of ethnographic research (personal experiences and fieldwork in different parts of the world and contemporary scholarship.

  7. Mycobacterium intracellulare Infection Mimicking Progression of Scleroderma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Simon; Engelhart, Merete; Thybo, Sören

    2017-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with scleroderma who developed Mycobacterium intracellulare infection, which for more than a year mimicked worsening of her connective tissue disorder. The patient was diagnosed with scleroderma based on puffy fingers that developed into sclerodactyly, abnormal......, unfortunately with significant scarring. Immunodeficiency testing was unremarkable. In summary, an infection with Mycobacterium intracellulare was mistaken for an unusually severe progression of scleroderma....

  8. Localized scleroderma and regional inflammatory myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivković, Saša A; Freiberg, William; Lacomis, David; Domsic, Robyn T; Medsger, Thomas A

    2014-05-01

    Inflammatory myopathy is rare in localized scleroderma. We report 2 new cases of regional inflammatory myopathy associated with localized scleroderma and review 10 reported cases of localized scleroderma associated with an inflammatory myopathy with regional muscle involvement, more often in the upper extremities. Serum creatine kinase was mildly elevated or normal. Histopathology often showed perimysial inflammation and plasma cell infiltration. These cases demonstrate that inflammatory myopathy should be considered in patients with localized scleroderma and regional muscle weakness, pain or atrophy. Muscle biopsy can confirm the diagnosis of myositis, which if identified, will require anti-inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive therapy. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Women Leaders in Oxford House

    OpenAIRE

    Timpo, Phyllis; Price, Temple; Salina, Doreen; Witek, Caroline; Pommer, Nicole; Jason, Leonard A.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examined women assuming leadership roles in Oxford Houses, which are communal, democratically run recovery settings for substance use disorder. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 women Oxford House leaders who shared their thoughts and experiences on leadership. Several themes emerged from qualitative data analysis, most notably that stepping up and accepting a leadership role in Oxford House had a positive effect on self-esteem, which is vital to women w...

  10. Scleroderma mimicker – Eosinophilic fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debanjali Sinha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic fasciitis is an uncommon connective tissue disorder characterized by thickening of the deep fascia and overlying skin and subcutaneous tissue. It may mimic scleroderma and other scleroderma-like conditions. It may be a manifestation of paraneoplastic disorders or may be associated with hematological disorders including lymphomas. Definitive diagnosis is made on histological examination of a deep skin biopsy revealing thickened deep fascia and infiltration by lymphocytes and eosinophils. Enhancement of deep fascia on Gadolinium contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging may be used as a substitute for skin biopsy. Ultrasound imaging is an evolving imaging tool for diagnosing it. Glucocorticoids with or without immunosuppressive agents remains the mainstay of therapy with good response, generally. A younger age of onset, morphea like lesions and dermal fibrosclerosis is more likely to be associated with the refractory disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment may result in better outcomes in terms of morbidity and quality of life of the patients.

  11. Localized Scleroderma: A Clinical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tratenberg, Mark; Gutwein, Farrah; Rao, Varuni; Sperber, Kirk; Wasserrman, Amy; Ash, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Localized scleroderma (LS) is characterized by excessive collagen deposition leading to thickening of the dermis, subcutaneous tissue or both. The outcome for most patients with localized scleroderma is directly related to the type and stage of the affected tissue. The major challenge for untreated patients is not increased mortality risk, rather deformity and growth defects from skin, muscle and bone abnormalities. Treatment is individualized to type and stage of the lesion and may include pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies. Among the pharmacologic modalities, methotrexate with systemic glucocorticoids is currently the mainstay of treatment. More controlled trials are needed to determine the length of treatment and the maintenance dose of this combination therapy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Scleroderma in children: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulian, Francesco; Cuffaro, Giorgio; Sperotto, Francesca

    2013-09-01

    Scleroderma, in its localized and systemic presentation, represents the third most frequent rheumatic condition in childhood after juvenile idiopathic arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Early diagnosis, appropriate assessment and effective treatment are crucial to improve the long-term outcome. Recent studies, concerning histopathology and clinical associations with other conditions, open new horizons on the etiopathogenesis of scleroderma. New developments have been also reached in the field of outcome measures. In juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS), new techniques such as Doppler and laser Doppler imaging have shown their usefulness for the daily monitoring of the patients. In juvenile systemic sclerosis (JSSc), a new severity score has been developed and needs to be validated in future trials. Finally, a randomized, double-blind controlled trial, a multicenter consensus statement and long-term follow-up studies have confirmed the important role of methotrexate (MTX) for the treatment of JLS. Studies over recent years highlighted the role of imaging as outcome measures for JLS and introduced a severity score for JSSc. New studies on MTX confirmed its important role for the treatment of JLS.

  13. The Oxford handbook of economic inequality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salverda, W.; Nolan, B.; Smeeding, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    The essential guide for students and researchers interested in economic inequality Contains 27 original research contributions from the top names in economic inequality. The Oxford Handbook of Economic Inequality presents a new and challenging analysis of economic inequality, focusing primarily on

  14. Corticosteroids in Myositis and Scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postolova, Anna; Chen, Jennifer K; Chung, Lorinda

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) involve inflammation of the muscles and are classified by the patterns of presentation and immunohistopathologic features on skin and muscle biopsy into 4 categories: dermatomyositis, polymyositis, inclusion body myositis, and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. Systemic corticosteroid (CS) treatment is the standard of care for IIM with muscle and organ involvement. The extracutaneous features of systemic sclerosis are frequently treated with CS; however, high doses have been associated with scleroderma renal crisis in high-risk patients. Although CS can be effective first-line agents, their significant side effect profile encourages concomitant treatment with other immunosuppressive medications to enable timely tapering. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Biomarkers in scleroderma: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latika Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease characterized by indolent obliterative vasculopathy and widespread fibrosis. The two main morphological manifestations of the disease overlap and may make it difficult to separate activity from damage. Many patients, especially those with the limited subset of the disease, have an indolent course without clear-cut inflammatory manifestations. There is a felt need for validated biomarkers, which can differentiate activity from damage, and yet be sensitive to change with therapy. Multiplex arrays of biomarkers have ushered an era of targeted or personalized medicine based on phenotypic characteristics in an individual.

  16. Women Leaders in Oxford House.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpo, Phyllis; Price, Temple; Salina, Doreen; Witek, Caroline; Pommer, Nicole; Jason, Leonard A

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examined women assuming leadership roles in Oxford Houses, which are communal, democratically run recovery settings for substance use disorder. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 women Oxford House leaders who shared their thoughts and experiences on leadership. Several themes emerged from qualitative data analysis, most notably that stepping up and accepting a leadership role in Oxford House had a positive effect on self-esteem, which is vital to women with a history of substance abuse. Barriers to leadership were also identified such as negative interpersonal relationships with other women. A number of methods mentioned to increase the number of women leaders included: developing workshops, providing positive encouragement, and accessing existing female role models. The implications of this study are discussed.

  17. Esophagectomy in Scleroderma: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Yekeler

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma is a generalized autoimmune disease with variable involvement of the skin and major organs (esophagus, lung, heart and kidney. Scleroderma is essentially a skin disease that frequently involves the digestive system. In scleroderma, the esophagus is the most frequently affected organ of the digestive system, and esophageal dysmotility, reflux and stricture may be observed in the advanced stage. Balloon dilatation and bougienage are generally sufficient in patients developing stricture, and the number of cases in whom resection is performed is very low. In a 20-year-old patient with difficulty in taking even liquid foods, tests revealed sclerodermal involvement of the distal end of the esophagus and stricture. Esophageal resection and gastric replacement were performed. Such systemic diseases as scleroderma, although rare, must be considered in the differential diagnosis of nonmalignant dysphagia, and resection must be borne in mind as a surgical option in cases of advanced stricture.

  18. Paraneoplastic Scleroderma: Are There Any Clues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlickova, Hana; Durčanská, Veronika; Vašků, Vladimír

    2016-04-01

    Dear Editor, Scleroderma associated with neoplasia is rare, with only a small number of cases reported. We describe 4 patients with paraneoplastic scleroderma who were treated at the I. Department of Dermatovenereology, St. Anna Hospital, during the period between 2004 and 2014. The patients were diagnosed with cholangiogenic carcinoma, endometrial carcinoma, prostatic adenocarcinoma, and adenoma of the suprarenal gland. In the case of concurrent scleroderma and tumor, four situations may occur: they can develop independently of each other; scleroderma may be induced by the tumor; the tumor can develop in the scleroderma; or the tumor can be induced by immunosuppressive therapy. Sclerotization of the skin was described in association with lung cancer, carcinoid, plasma cell dyscrasia, cancer of the ovary, cervix, breast, esophagus, stomach, nasopharynx, melanoma, and sarcoma (1,2,5,7,10). Symptoms may be induced by substances secreted by the tumor (hormones, cytokines, etc.) (9). Tumorous cells further induce cytotoxic and autoantibody response. Scleroderma is characterized by immunological dysregulation, vasculopathy, and hyperproduction of the extracellular matrix by activated fibroblasts. Endothelial, inflammatory, and mesenchymal cells produce cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors e.g. Interleukin-1 (IL1), Interleukin-6 (IL6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF α), collagen alpha 1, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) (3), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). This factor is also produced by lung cancer cells (4). The clinical picture of scleroderma and paraneoplastic scleroderma is similar. Diffuse thickening of the skin and/or sclerodermatous plaques can be seen. The histological picture is consistent with scleroderma. Capillaroscopy changes, antinuclear antibodies (ANA), sclerodactyly, and Raynaud phenomenon suggest the diagnosis of systemic scleroderma (SS) (4). Our patients did not fulfill enough of the criteria for SS. Both diffuse and

  19. Localized scleroderma: a series of 52 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, C; Rabhi, S; Kettaneh, A; Fabre, B; Fardet, L; Tiev, K P; Cabane, J

    2009-05-01

    Localized scleroderma also called morphea is a skin disorder of undetermined cause. The widely recognized Mayo Clinic Classification identifies 5 main morphea types: plaque, generalized, bullous, linear and deep. Whether each of these distinct types has a particular clinical course or is associated with some patient-related features is still unclear. We report here a retrospective series of patients with localized scleroderma with an attempt to identify features related to the type of lesion involved. The medical records of all patients with a diagnosis of localized scleroderma were reviewed by skilled practitioners. Lesions were classified according to the Mayo Clinic Classification. The relationship between each lesion type and various clinical features was tested by non-parametrical methods. The sample of 52 patients included 43 females and 9 males. Median age at onset was 30 y (range 1-76). Frequencies of patients according to morphea types were: plaque morphea 41 (78.8%) (including morphea en plaque 30 (57.7%) and atrophoderma of Pasini-Pierini 11 (21.1%)), linear scleroderma 14 (26.9%). Nine patients (17.3%) had both types of localized scleroderma. Median age at onset was lower in patients with linear scleroderma (8 y (range 3-44)) than in others (36 y (range 1-77)) (p=0.0003). Head involvement was more common in patients with linear scleroderma (37.5%) than in other subtypes (11.1%) (p=0.05). Atrophoderma of Pasini-Pierini was never located at the head. Systemic symptoms, antinuclear antibodies and the rheumatic factor were not associated with localized scleroderma types or subtypes. These results suggest that morphea types, in adults are not associated with distinct patient features except for age at disease onset (lower) and the localization on the head (more frequent), in patients with lesions of the linear type.

  20. UVA1 a promising approach for scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyal, Uma; Bhatta, Anil Kumar; Wang, Xiu Li

    2017-01-01

    Scleroderma is a complex connective tissue disease characterized by fibrosis, vasculopathy, and immune system dysfunction. The heterogeneity of disease presentation and poorly understood etiology has made the management of scleroderma difficult. The available treatment options like immunosuppressive agents are associated with potentially hazardous side effects and physiotherapy, which to a certain degree helps to minimize the loss of function in digits and limbs, has only limited success. Also, studies investigating antifibrotic therapies have failed to report any significant improvement. Hence, there is currently no effective therapy for scleroderma. Recently, phototherapy has been extensively studied and found to be effective in treating scleroderma. Initially psoralen + ultraviolet A (PUVA) significantly enriched the therapeutic panel, but more recently ultraviolet A1 (UVA1) is seen to replace PUVA therapy. This might be because of UVA1 therapy being free of side effects seen with psoralens such as nausea, vomiting or photokeratitis. In addition, UVA1 is seen to lower risk of phototoxic reactions with deeper penetration of radiation. The present review will put some light on the use of UVA1 for treating cutaneous lesion in scleroderma and we aim to find the most benefitted group of patients and most effective dose of UVA1 for different types of scleroderma. PMID:28979701

  1. Keloidal Scleroderma: Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sama Kassira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We report a rare case of keloidal scleroderma and provide an analysis of similar cases. Results. A 41 year-old woman presented with dark brown, indurated, exophytic nodules over the chest along with smaller hyperpigmented plaques scattered over the abdomen, with concomitant sclerodactyly. The clinical, laboratory, and pathological findings were consistent with a diagnosis of keloidal scleroderma. The patient was treated with methotrexate, resulting in reduced firmness of her plaques and no new lesions. A literature review of previously reported cases was performed using keywords including keloidal morphea, keloidal scleroderma, nodular morphea, and nodular scleroderma. In our review, the majority of patients were African American and female. 91% of cases had nodular lesions with distribution on the trunk. The majority of patients exhibited sclerodactyly and pulmonary involvement was reported in 28%1. The majority of patients were ANA positive (63% and only 10% demonstrated anti-SCL-70 positivity. Conclusion. Keloidal scleroderma is a rare presentation, which can often be clinically confused with keloid and scar formation. Due to this being a rare variant, our knowledge of treatment options and efficacy is limited. Methotrexate could be considered as an initial treatment option for patients with progressive keloidal scleroderma.

  2. Presentations and treatment of childhood scleroderma: localized scleroderma, eosinophilic fasciitis, systemic sclerosis, and graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrich, Christian Michael; Fiebig, Barbara; Hahn, Gabriele; Suttorp, Meinolf; Gahr, Manfred

    2011-07-01

    Juvenile scleroderma is a rare connective tissue disease that involves the skin and subcutaneous tissue. Among all presentations of juvenile scleroderma, localized scleroderma (JLSc) is the most frequent, followed by systemic disease (JSSc) and eosinophilic fasciitis (EF). In posttransplantation chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), scleroderma-like skin involvement can occur. Systemic forms of juvenile scleroderma and GvHD can affect the internal organs, such as the lungs, the gastrointestinal tract, the heart, and kidneys and cause disability and severe, sometimes lethal, complications. Here, the authors give an overview of different presentations of juvenile scleroderma. They report their experience with the different forms and presentations of scleroderma, diagnostic workups, treatment, and outcome of all forms of childhood scleroderma in the context of the existing literature.

  3. Validation of the Body Concealment Scale for Scleroderma (BCSS): Replication in the Scleroderma Patient-centered Intervention Network (SPIN) Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jewett, L.R.; Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Carrier, M.E.; Malcarne, V.L.; Harcourt, D.; Rumsey, N.; Mayes, M.D.; Assassi, S.; Körner, A.; Fox, R.S.; Gholizadeh, S.; Mills, S.D.; Fortune, C.; Thombs, B.D.

    2017-01-01

    Body concealment is an important component of appearance distress for individuals with disfiguring conditions, including scleroderma. The objective was to replicate the validation study of the Body Concealment Scale for Scleroderma (BCSS) among 897 scleroderma patients. The factor structure of the

  4. Oxford House Recovery Homes: Characteristics and Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Leonard A.; Ferrari, Joseph R.

    2010-01-01

    One of the largest examples of a community-based, mutual-help residential community for high risk substance abuse individuals is Oxford House. In the U.S., over 9,800 people live in these self-run dwellings where they obtain jobs, pay utility bills, and learn to be responsible citizens. Beginning with one single rented residence in the mid 1970s, Oxford Houses now number over 1,300. These rented homes are helping to deal with drug addiction and community re-entry by providing stable housing without any limits on length of stay, a network of job opportunities, and support for abstinence. An exploration of the research on these unique settings highlights the strengths of such a community-based approach to addressing addiction. New roles for psychologists in working with these types of support systems are identified. PMID:20577571

  5. Current and future direction in the management of scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Sean M; Shapiro, Lee; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-09-01

    Scleroderma is a heterogeneous disease with a complex etiology. As more information is gained about the underlying mechanisms and the improved classifications of scleroderma subtypes, treatments can be better personalized. Improving scleroderma patients' early diagnosis before end organ manifestations occur should improve clinical trial design and outcomes. Two recently FDA-approved antifibrotics for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis may be effective treatments in patients with pulmonary fibrosis secondary to scleroderma after further investigation. The potential impact of Nanobiotechnology in improving the efficacy and safety of existing antifibrotics and immunomodulators might present an exciting new approach in the management of scleroderma.

  6. Abnormalities in the Regulators of Angiogenesis in Patients with Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    HUMMERS, LAURA K.; HALL, AMY; WIGLEY, FREDRICK M.; SIMONS, MICHAEL

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine plasma levels of regulators of angiogenesis in patients with scleroderma and to correlate those levels with manifestations of scleroderma-related vascular disease. Methods Plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), endostatin, pro-MMP-1, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), placental growth factor (PlGF), and FGF-4 were examined by ELISA in a cross-sectional study of 113 patients with scleroderma and 27 healthy controls. Simple and multivariate regression models were used to look for associations between factor levels and clinical disease characteristics. Results There were marked differences in the levels of pro-angiogenic growth factors between patients with scleroderma and controls, with significant elevations of VEGF, PDGF, FGF-2, and PlGF among patients with scleroderma (p scleroderma patients compared to controls (MMP-9 and pro-MMP-1) (p scleroderma, but had a positive correlation with right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) as measured by echocardiogram (p scleroderma (p scleroderma. The levels of some factors correlate with measures of vascular disease among patients with scleroderma. Dysregulated angiogenesis may play a role in the development of scleroderma vascular disease. PMID:19228661

  7. Caring for the Patient With Limited Systemic Scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachner, Kelly Denise

    2016-01-01

    Systemic scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is a rare, autoimmune, collagen-vascular disease of unknown etiology that affects the connective tissues of the skin, internal organs, as well as the small blood vessels. There are 3 subclasses of systemic scleroderma: limited cutaneous, diffuse cutaneous, and sine scleroderma. Prognosis depends on the extent of organ involvement. Complications of systemic scleroderma can involve the cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, renal, integumentary, and the skeletal-muscular systems. Because systemic scleroderma is not common, many orthopaedic nurses may be unfamiliar with how to best provide care. This article provides information about the complexity of the different types of this disease and the basic nursing care of the patient with the most common subclass of systemic scleroderma, limited cutaneous systemic scleroderma.

  8. Review of the Oxford Cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davey, G.

    1990-01-01

    The Oxford Cryocooler incorporates a linear drive compressor operating close to resonance. All dynamic seals are noncontacting clearance seals maintained by mounting the piston and displacer on mechanical suspension systems with infinite fatigue life. The displacer is pneumatically driven but controlled by a miniature linear motor. The cooler is therefore nonwearing and performance can be maintained even in adverse environments by servo control of piston and displacer strokes and relative phase. Split and integral, single- and two-stage coolers have been produced with operating temperatures between 30 K and 200 K, refrigeration powers between 50 mW and several watts and capable of operating in ambient temperatures from -40 C to 70 C. A current project aims to extend the refrigeration power to 500 watts at 80 K. Experimental optimisation techniques have been devised for rapid development of high efficiency coolers

  9. Localized Scleroderma, Systemic Sclerosis and Cardiovascular Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselvig, Jeanette Halskou; Kofoed, Kristian; Wu, Jashin J

    2018-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that patients with systemic sclerosis have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. To determine whether patients with systemic sclerosis or localized scleroderma are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, a cohort study of the entire Danish population aged ≥ 18...... and ≤ 100 years was conducted, followed from 1997 to 2011 by individual-level linkage of nationwide registries. Multivariable adjusted Cox regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) for a composite cardiovascular disease endpoint. A total of 697 patients with localized scleroderma and 1......,962 patients with systemic sclerosis were identified and compared with 5,428,380 people in the reference population. In systemic sclerosis, the adjusted HR was 2.22 (95% confidence interval 1.99-2.48). No association was seen between patients with localized scleroderma and cardiovascular disease. In conclusion...

  10. An unusual dental phenomenon in systemic scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElCridly, Mahmoud

    1989-01-01

    Systemic scleroderma is a disease of unknown etiology characterized by excessive deposition of collagen and other connective tissue components in the skin and several internal organs. The most common oral findings are rigidity and thinness of lips, circumoral fibrosis which causes microstomia and inability to open the mouth widely. Involvement of tongue may lead to its decreased mobility and diminished size. Radiographic findings that have been classically associated with systemic scleroderma are widening of the periodontal ligament spaces and destruction of lamina dura, usually in posterior teeth. Intraoral radiographs of presented cases revealed apical resorption of the roots and destruction of the lamina dura verified on extraction of the teeth. This oral finding appears not to have been recorded by previous investigators of scleroderma. (author)

  11. Linear scleroderma following Blaschko′s lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhopadhyay Amiya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Blaschko′s lines form a pattern, which many diseases are found to follow, but linear scleroderma following Blaschko′s lines is a controversial entity rarely reported in the literature. A 24-year-old man presented with multiple linear, atrophic, hyperpigmented lesions punctuated by areas of depigmentations on the left half of the trunk distributed on the anterior, lateral and posterior aspects. The lesions were distributed in a typical S-shaped line. Antinuclear antibody and antihistone antibody tests were negative. Histopathological examination of the skin from the affected area showed features suggestive of scleroderma. Here, we present a case of linear scleroderma following Blaschko′s lines in a male patient - an entity reported only three times so far.

  12. Musculoskeletal MRI findings of juvenile localized scleroderma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eutsler, Eric P. [Nemours Children' s Health System/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Horton, Daniel B. [Nemours Children' s Health System/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Wilmington, DE (United States); Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Department of Pediatrics, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Epelman, Monica [Nemours Children' s Health System/Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Orlando, FL (United States); Finkel, Terri [Nemours Children' s Health System/Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Orlando, FL (United States); Averill, Lauren W. [Nemours Children' s Health System/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Juvenile localized scleroderma comprises a group of autoimmune conditions often characterized clinically by an area of skin hardening. In addition to superficial changes in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, juvenile localized scleroderma may involve the deep soft tissues, bones and joints, possibly resulting in functional impairment and pain in addition to cosmetic changes. There is literature documenting the spectrum of findings for deep involvement of localized scleroderma (fascia, muscles, tendons, bones and joints) in adults, but there is limited literature for the condition in children. We aimed to document the spectrum of musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of both superficial and deep juvenile localized scleroderma involvement in children and to evaluate the utility of various MRI sequences for detecting those findings. Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated 20 MRI studies of the extremities in 14 children with juvenile localized scleroderma. Each imaging sequence was also given a subjective score of 0 (not useful), 1 (somewhat useful) or 2 (most useful for detecting the findings). Deep tissue involvement was detected in 65% of the imaged extremities. Fascial thickening and enhancement were seen in 50% of imaged extremities. Axial T1, axial T1 fat-suppressed (FS) contrast-enhanced and axial fluid-sensitive sequences were rated most useful. Fascial thickening and enhancement were the most commonly encountered deep tissue findings in extremity MRIs of children with juvenile localized scleroderma. Because abnormalities of the skin, subcutaneous tissues and fascia tend to run longitudinally in an affected limb, axial T1, axial fluid-sensitive and axial T1-FS contrast-enhanced sequences should be included in the imaging protocol. (orig.)

  13. Periostin in Mature Stage Localized Scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Woo; Park, Jung Tae; Kim, Jung Ho; Koh, Seong-Joon; Yoon, Hyun-Sun; Cho, Soyun; Park, Hyun-Sun

    2017-06-01

    Periostin is a novel matricellular protein expressed in many tissues, including bone, periodontal ligament, and skin. Although its expression is prominent in various fibrotic conditions, studies of periostin in localized scleroderma are rare. To investigate the expression of periostin and other molecules in localized scleroderma. A retrospective study of 14 patients with confirmed mature stage localized scleroderma was undertaken. Fourteen age-matched and biopsy site-matched subjects with normal skin were included as controls. Collagen fiber deposition, periostin, procollagen, transforming growth factor-β, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 expression were assessed and compared between the two groups. Co-localization of α-smooth muscle actin and periostin was evaluated using confocal microscopy. Periostin was predominantly expressed along the dermo-epidermal junction in the controls. Conversely, patients with localized scleroderma demonstrated increased collagen fiber deposition and periostin expression that was more widely distributed along the entire dermis. MMP-1 staining showed increased expression in the epidermis and dermis of patients compared to scanty expression in the controls. A semi-quantitative evaluation showed a higher proportion of excessive collagen bundle deposition (57.1% vs. 7.1%, p =0.013), diffuse periostin positivity (42.9% vs. 0%, p =0.016), and moderate MMP-1 positivity (71.4% vs. 7.1%, p =0.001) in patients than in the controls. Compared to the controls, patients with localized scleroderma had enhanced periostin expression corresponding to increased collagen fiber deposition and unexpected overexpression of MMP-1. The results of this human in vivo study may implicate the pathogenesis of localized scleroderma.

  14. Musculoskeletal MRI findings of juvenile localized scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eutsler, Eric P.; Horton, Daniel B.; Epelman, Monica; Finkel, Terri; Averill, Lauren W.

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile localized scleroderma comprises a group of autoimmune conditions often characterized clinically by an area of skin hardening. In addition to superficial changes in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, juvenile localized scleroderma may involve the deep soft tissues, bones and joints, possibly resulting in functional impairment and pain in addition to cosmetic changes. There is literature documenting the spectrum of findings for deep involvement of localized scleroderma (fascia, muscles, tendons, bones and joints) in adults, but there is limited literature for the condition in children. We aimed to document the spectrum of musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of both superficial and deep juvenile localized scleroderma involvement in children and to evaluate the utility of various MRI sequences for detecting those findings. Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated 20 MRI studies of the extremities in 14 children with juvenile localized scleroderma. Each imaging sequence was also given a subjective score of 0 (not useful), 1 (somewhat useful) or 2 (most useful for detecting the findings). Deep tissue involvement was detected in 65% of the imaged extremities. Fascial thickening and enhancement were seen in 50% of imaged extremities. Axial T1, axial T1 fat-suppressed (FS) contrast-enhanced and axial fluid-sensitive sequences were rated most useful. Fascial thickening and enhancement were the most commonly encountered deep tissue findings in extremity MRIs of children with juvenile localized scleroderma. Because abnormalities of the skin, subcutaneous tissues and fascia tend to run longitudinally in an affected limb, axial T1, axial fluid-sensitive and axial T1-FS contrast-enhanced sequences should be included in the imaging protocol. (orig.)

  15. Musculoskeletal MRI findings of juvenile localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eutsler, Eric P; Horton, Daniel B; Epelman, Monica; Finkel, Terri; Averill, Lauren W

    2017-04-01

    Juvenile localized scleroderma comprises a group of autoimmune conditions often characterized clinically by an area of skin hardening. In addition to superficial changes in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, juvenile localized scleroderma may involve the deep soft tissues, bones and joints, possibly resulting in functional impairment and pain in addition to cosmetic changes. There is literature documenting the spectrum of findings for deep involvement of localized scleroderma (fascia, muscles, tendons, bones and joints) in adults, but there is limited literature for the condition in children. We aimed to document the spectrum of musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of both superficial and deep juvenile localized scleroderma involvement in children and to evaluate the utility of various MRI sequences for detecting those findings. Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated 20 MRI studies of the extremities in 14 children with juvenile localized scleroderma. Each imaging sequence was also given a subjective score of 0 (not useful), 1 (somewhat useful) or 2 (most useful for detecting the findings). Deep tissue involvement was detected in 65% of the imaged extremities. Fascial thickening and enhancement were seen in 50% of imaged extremities. Axial T1, axial T1 fat-suppressed (FS) contrast-enhanced and axial fluid-sensitive sequences were rated most useful. Fascial thickening and enhancement were the most commonly encountered deep tissue findings in extremity MRIs of children with juvenile localized scleroderma. Because abnormalities of the skin, subcutaneous tissues and fascia tend to run longitudinally in an affected limb, axial T1, axial fluid-sensitive and axial T1-FS contrast-enhanced sequences should be included in the imaging protocol.

  16. Pediatric scleroderma: systemic or localized forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torok, Kathryn S

    2012-04-01

    Pediatric scleroderma includes 2 major groups of clinical entities, systemic sclerosis (SSc) and localized scleroderma (LS). Although both share a common pathophysiology, their clinical manifestations differ. LS is typically confined to the skin and underlying subcutis, with up to a quarter of patients showing extracutaneous disease manifestations such as arthritis and uveitis. Vascular, cutaneous, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and musculoskeletal involvement are most commonly seen in children with SSc. Treatment of both forms targets the active inflammatory stage and halts disease progression; however, progress needs to be made toward the development of more effective antifibrotic therapy to help reverse disease damage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nodular Scleroderma - Successful Treatment With Extracorporeal Photochemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina U

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Nodular seleroderma is rare variant of circumscribed scleroderma (morphea. Treatment is often unsatisfactory. This report is on the use of extracorporeal photochemotherapy. A 12 year old girl and a 49 year old woman have been treated once a month on two consecutive days. A complete remission was achieved in one patient after 10 months and an almost complete remission in the young girl after 6 months. The treatment was well-tolerated and no severe side â€" effects occurred. In contrast to previous attempts in treating nodular scleroderma with different modalities, ECP seems to be an effective therapy.

  18. Cutaneous Manifestations of Scleroderma and Scleroderma-Like Disorders: a Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreli, Caterina; Gasparini, Giulia; Parodi, Aurora; Cozzani, Emanuele; Rongioletti, Franco; Atzori, Laura

    2017-12-01

    Scleroderma refers to an autoimmune connective tissue fibrosing disease, including three different subsets: localized scleroderma, limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis, and diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis with divergent patterns of organ involvement, autoantibody profiles, management, and prognostic implications. Although systemic sclerosis is considered the disease prototype that causes cutaneous sclerosis, there are many other conditions that can mimic and be confused with SSc. They can be classified into immune-mediated/inflammatory, immune-mediated/inflammatory with abnormal deposit (mucinoses), genetic, drug-induced and toxic, metabolic, panniculitis/vascular, and (para)neoplastic disorders according to clinico-pathological and pathogenetic correlations. This article reviews the clinical presentation with emphasis on cutaneous disease, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment options available for the different forms of scleroderma firstly and for scleroderma-like disorders, including scleromyxedema, scleredema, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, eosinophilic fasciitis, chronic graft-versus-host disease, porphyria cutanea tarda, diabetic stiff-hand syndrome (diabetic cheiroartropathy), and other minor forms. This latter group of conditions, termed also scleroderma mimics, sclerodermiform diseases, or pseudosclerodermas, shares the common thread of skin thickening but presents with distinct cutaneous manifestations, skin histology, and systemic implications or disease associations, differentiating each entity from the others and from scleroderma. The lack of Raynaud's phenomenon, capillaroscopic abnormalities, or scleroderma-specific autoantibodies is also important diagnostic clues. As cutaneous involvement is the earliest, most frequent and characteristic manifestation of scleroderma and sclerodermoid disorders, dermatologists are often the first-line doctors who must be able to promptly recognize skin symptoms to provide the affected patient a correct

  19. Development of thermoluminescence dating techniques at Oxford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, S.J.

    1977-01-01

    The two-decade long history of thermoluminescene as a pottery dating method is surveyed with particular reference to the various problems that have been encountered in the Oxford Laboratory's research programme. Effects, such as supralinearity and radon emanation, are explained in terms of how they are measured and how their existence influences thermoluminescence (TL) dating accuracy (currently close to plus minus 7% per analysis). Illustrations of Thermoluminescence (TL) applications include a Nok culture terracotta from Nigeria and a Cambodia bronze Buddha figure of the Khmer period, dated ising the ceramic-like casting-core retained within it. (author)

  20. Recent results from the Oxford EBIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, David N [Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Ezekiel, Toleme Z [Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Green, Felicia M [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Smith, Claire J [Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Silver, Joshua D [Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    Here we summarise the present status of the experimental programme of the Oxford electron beam ion trap. Most notably this research has recently culminated in the successful measurement of the 2s{sub 1/2}-2p{sub 3/2} transition in hydrogenlike nitrogen by a laser resonance method. We also introduce preliminary results from some computational investigations of both electron beam transport and the trapped ion ensemble. In particular, we show that the contribution of the magnetic field to ion confinement has a potentially measurable effect on the ion phase space distribution.

  1. Usage Notes in the Oxford American Dictionary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, R. Thomas

    1981-01-01

    Compares the "Oxford American Dictionary" with the "American Heritage Dictionary." Examines the dictionaries' differences in philosophies of language, introductory essays, and usage notes. Concludes that the "Oxford American Dictionary" is too conservative, paternalistic, and dogmatic for the 1980s. (DMM)

  2. Pathogenesis and treatment modalities of localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valančienė, Greta; Jasaitienė, Daiva; Valiukevičienė, Skaidra

    2010-01-01

    Localized scleroderma is a chronic inflammatory disease primarily of the dermis and subcutaneous fat that ultimately leads to a scar-like sclerosis of connective tissue. The disorder manifests as various plaques of different shape and size with signs of skin inflammation, sclerosis, and atrophy. This is a relatively rare inflammatory disease characterized by a chronic course, unknown etiology, and insufficiently clear pathogenesis. Many factors may influence its appearance: trauma, genetic factors, disorders of the immune system or hormone metabolism, viral infections, toxic substances or pharmaceutical agents, neurogenic factors, and Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Various therapeutic modalities are being used for the treatment of localized scleroderma. There is no precise treatment scheme for this disease. A majority of patients can be successfully treated with topical pharmaceutical agents and phototherapy, but some of them with progressive, disseminated, and causing disability localized scleroderma are in need of systemic treatment. The aim of this article is not only to dispute about the clinical and morphological characteristics of localized scleroderma, but also to present the newest generalized data about the possible origin, pathogenesis, and treatment modalities of this disease.

  3. Challenges and strategies for coping with scleroderma: implications for a scleroderma-specific self-management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milette, Katherine; Thombs, Brett D; Maiorino, Kristina; Nielson, Warren R; Körner, Annett; Peláez, Sandra

    2018-05-09

    The purpose of this study was to explore challenges faced by patients with systemic sclerosis, also called scleroderma, in coping with their disease and the strategies they used to face those challenges. Five focus groups were held with scleroderma patients (4 groups, n = 34) and health care professionals who have experience treating scleroderma (1 group, n = 8). Participants' discussions were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis. Participants reported challenges accessing information (e.g., knowledgeable specialists), dealing with negative emotions (e.g., stress due to misunderstandings with loved ones), and accessing resources (e.g., helpful products or devices). Strategies for overcoming challenges were also discussed (e.g., advocating for own needs). When faced with significant challenges while coping with scleroderma, patients develop strategies to manage better and improve their quality of life. To help them cope, patients would benefit from easier access to supportive interventions, including tailored scleroderma self-management programs. Although the challenges experienced by patients with scleroderma are unique, findings from this study might help better understand patients' perspectives regarding coping and disease management for other chronic diseases as well. Implications for Rehabilitation People living with rare diseases, including the rare autoimmune disease scleroderma, face unique challenges and often do not have access to disease-specific educational or other support resources. People with scleroderma report that they face challenges in accessing information, including knowledgeable healthcare providers; managing difficult social interactions and negative emotions; and accessing resources. Strategies employed by scleroderma patients to overcome these challenges include seeking connections to other people with scleroderma or scleroderma patient organizations, actively seeking out local resources, and learning to

  4. Aberrant Recapitulation of Developmental Program: Novel Target in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0472 TITLE: “Aberrant Recapitulation of Developmental Program: Novel Target in Scleroderma ” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE Aberrant Recapitulation of Developmental Program: Novel Target in Scleroderma 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0472 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Fibrosis in scleroderma is associated

  5. Oxford CyberSEM: remote microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M; Kirkland, A; Cockayne, D; Meyer, R

    2008-01-01

    The Internet has enabled researchers to communicate over vast geographical distances, sharing ideas and documents. e-Science, underpinned by Grid and Web Services, has enabled electronic communications to the next level where, in addition to document sharing, researchers can increasingly control high precision scientific instruments over the network. The Oxford CyberSEM project developed a simple Java applet via which samples placed in a JEOL 5510LV Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) can be manipulated and examined collaboratively over the Internet. Designed with schoolchildren in mind, CyberSEM does not require any additional hardware or software other than a generic Java-enabled web browser. This paper reflects on both the technical and social challenges in designing real-time systems for controlling scientific equipments in collaborative environments. Furthermore, it proposes potential deployment beyond the classroom setting.

  6. Unilateral Enophthalmos in Linear Scleroderma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, So hyun; Hwang, Hee Young; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Hyung Sik [Gachon University, Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    Linear scleroderma is an uncommon subtype of localized scleroderma, which is characterized by a linear streak that crosses dermatomes and is associated with the tracking of fibrosis from the skin into deeper tissues, including muscle and fascia. A severe form of this condition sometimes causes growth atrophy of bone and supporting tissue in the affected area. Enophthalmos as a manifestation of linear scleroderma is very rare and occurs due to the replacement of orbital fat and muscle with collagen, which finally leads to atrophy of the affected orbit. This report introduces imaging findings of two cases of enophthalmos caused by linear scleroderma

  7. Unilateral Enophthalmos in Linear Scleroderma: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, So hyun; Hwang, Hee Young; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2010-01-01

    Linear scleroderma is an uncommon subtype of localized scleroderma, which is characterized by a linear streak that crosses dermatomes and is associated with the tracking of fibrosis from the skin into deeper tissues, including muscle and fascia. A severe form of this condition sometimes causes growth atrophy of bone and supporting tissue in the affected area. Enophthalmos as a manifestation of linear scleroderma is very rare and occurs due to the replacement of orbital fat and muscle with collagen, which finally leads to atrophy of the affected orbit. This report introduces imaging findings of two cases of enophthalmos caused by linear scleroderma

  8. Gastrointestinal symptoms and motility disorders in patients with systemic scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palasciano Giuseppe

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on gastrointestinal symptoms, dysfunctions, and neurological disorders in systemic scleroderma are lacking so far. Methods Thirty-eight scleroderma patients (34 limited, 4 diffuse, 60 healthy controls and 68 dyspeptic controls were scored for upper and lower gastrointestinal symptoms (dyspepsia, bowel habits, gastric and gallbladder emptying to liquid meal (functional ultrasonography and small bowel transit (H2-breath test. Autonomic nerve function was assessed by cardiovascular tests. Results The score for dyspepsia (mainly gastric fullness was greater in scleroderma patients than healthy controls, but lower than dyspeptic controls who had multiple symptoms, instead. Scleroderma patients with dyspepsia had a longer disease duration. Fasting antral area and postprandial antral dilatation were smaller in scleroderma patients than dyspeptic and healthy controls. Gastric emptying was delayed in both scleroderma patients (particularly in those with abnormal dyspeptic score and dyspeptic controls, who also showed a larger residual area. Despite gallbladder fasting and postprandial volumes were comparable across the three groups, gallbladder refilling appeared delayed in dyspeptic controls and mainly dependent on delayed gastric emptying in scleroderma. Small intestinal transit was also delayed in 74% of scleroderma and 66% of dyspeptic controls. Bowel habits were similar among the three groups. Autonomic neuropathy was not associated with dyspepsia, gastric and gallbladder motility and small intestinal transit. Conclusion In scleroderma patients dyspepsia (mainly gastric fullness, restricted distension of the gastric antrum and diffuse gastrointestinal dysmotility are frequent features. These defects are independent from the occurrence of autonomic neuropathy.

  9. New directions for patient-centred care in scleroderma: the Scleroderma Patient-centred Intervention Network (SPIN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombs, Brett D.; Jewett, Lisa R.; Assassi, Shervin; Baron, Murray; Bartlett, Susan J.; Costa Maia, Angela; El-Baalbaki, Ghassan; Furst, Daniel E.; Gottesman, Karen; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Hudson, Marie; Ann Impens, PhD; Korner, Annett; Leite, Catarina; Mayes, Maureen D.; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Motivala, Sarosh J.; Mouthon, Luc; Nielson, Warren R.; Plante, Diane; Poiraudeau, Serge; Poole, Janet L.; Pope, Janet; Sauve, Maureen; Steele, Russell J.; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.; Taillefer, Suzanne; van den Ende, Cornelia H.; Erin Arthurs, BSc; Bassel, Marielle; Delisle, Vanessa; Milette, Katherine; Leavens, Allison; Razykov, Ilya; Khanna, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc), or scleroderma, is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disorder characterised by thickening and fibrosis of the skin and by the involvement of internal organs such as the lungs, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, and heart. Because there is no cure, feasibly-implemented and easily accessible evidence-based interventions to improve health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are needed. Due to a lack of evidence, however, specific recommendations have not been made regarding non-pharmacological interventions (e.g. behavioural/psychological, educational, physical/occupational therapy) to improve HRQoL in SSc. The Scleroderma Patient-centred Intervention Network (SPIN) was recently organised to address this gap. SPIN is comprised of patient representatives, clinicians, and researchers from Canada, the USA, and Europe. The goal of SPIN, as described in this article, is to develop, test, and disseminate a set of accessible interventions designed to complement standard care in order to improve HRQoL outcomes in SSc. PMID:22244687

  10. Polymyositis and the Spectrum of Scleroderma Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Cochicho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polymyositis (PM is usually associated to other autoimmune or connective tissue diseases. The authors report the case of a 59-year-old man with pulmonary fibrosis, who presented with constitutional symptoms and gradually developed proximal muscle weakness, Raynaud phenomenon, and dysphagia. Besides creatine kinase (CK elevation, he had positive anti-Polymyositis-Scleromyositis (PM-Scl and anti-Sjögren's-syndrome A (SSA antibodies. Nailfold capillaroscopy showed a scleroderma pattern and muscle biopsy revealed necrosis, regeneration of muscle fibers, and inflammatory infiltrate. Prednisolone was started, with great improvement. Taking into account the overlap features between PM and systemic sclerosis sine scleroderma, it is important to closely monitor the patient for signs of pulmonary and cardiac decompensation.

  11. Morphea and other localized forms of scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Rebecca; Sendejo, Chelsea; Jacobe, Heidi

    2012-11-01

    Morphea, also known as localized scleroderma, is a disorder of excessive collagen deposition leading to thickening of the dermis and/or subcutaneous tissues and may cause significant morbidity. This review will describe new developments in the evaluation and management of morphea as well as its pathophysiology. The reader will be able to apply these findings to patient management. The recent development of validated outcome measures (i.e. the localized scleroderma cutaneous assessment tool) as well as consensus treatment recommendations provide a platform for collaboration among specialties to develop both standardized assessment tools and therapeutic trials. New studies have also begun to investigate the immunological underpinnings of morphea. The promise of evidence-based treatments for morphea in the near future will provide better care for patients with morphea and understanding its pathophysiology will lay groundwork for the development of new treatments.

  12. Tumor-like calcifications with scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, E.; Kulenkampff, H.A.; Kortenhaus, H.

    1987-01-01

    In patients with progressive scleroderma, interstitial calcifications are present to a varying extent. They are mostly located in the soft tissues of the fingers, resembling points, commas or dashes. They may also appear as 'calcinosis universalis' and reach a considerable size. Thus they mimic proliferative tumors. Scintigraphy, proving the existence of further calcifications can be helpful. We report the case of a female patient who presented with such a 'pseudotumor' of unusual size, site and extent in the lumbar region. (orig.) [de

  13. Progressive systemic scleroderma (A case report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jung Suh; Kwon, Chung Sik

    1974-01-01

    This is a report of a rare case of progressive systemic scleroderma involving the skin, lungs, bones, esophagus, duodenum, and colon in a 27 year old Korean female whose chief complaints were generalized edema, knee joint pain, hard and indurated skin lesions on the anterior chest, neck, both upper and lower extremities with loss of pain and touch sensation for one year. A review of literature is submitted

  14. Case for diagnosis. Localized scleroderma or morphea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyoshi, Carolina; Wojcik, Adma Silva de Lima; Vencato, Elisa Milani Oba; Taques, Guilherme Ribas; Fillus Neto, José; Brenner, Fabiane Andrade Mulinari

    2010-01-01

    Localized scleroderma or morphea is a chronic disease of the connective tissue. Its etiology may be autoimmune and the condition results from a disturbance in collagen synthesis and deposition, clinically represented by sclerotic skin lesions. Some plaques may be yellowish, which can be misleading at diagnosis. This article reports the case of an adolescent girl who concomitantly presented erythematous lesions and yellowish lesions, both of which constitute clinical manifestations of the disease.

  15. Progressive systemic scleroderma (A case report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jung Suh; Kwon, Chung Sik [Chonnam University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    This is a report of a rare case of progressive systemic scleroderma involving the skin, lungs, bones, esophagus, duodenum, and colon in a 27 year old Korean female whose chief complaints were generalized edema, knee joint pain, hard and indurated skin lesions on the anterior chest, neck, both upper and lower extremities with loss of pain and touch sensation for one year. A review of literature is submitted.

  16. Book Review: Die Oxford Kortspelgids | Ponelis | Lexikos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Title: Die Oxford Kortspelgids. Book Author: A.S. Coetser. 1ste uitgawe 1993, ix + 379 pp. ISBN 0-19-570802-4. Kaapstad: Oxford University Press. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux demonstrated by hepatobiliary imaging in scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawaf, N.W.; Orzel, J.A.; Weiland, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    Radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging was performed on a patient with a longstanding history of scleroderma who presented with abdominal pain suggestive of biliary disease. Cystic duct patency was documented after 10 min with tracer accumulation in the second portion of the duodenum which failed to progress consistent with the duodenal hypomotility of scleroderma. The patient was given intravenous Kinevac resulting in gastroesophageal reflux of radionuclide

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux demonstrated by hepatobiliary imaging in scleroderma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawaf, N.W.; Orzel, J.A.; Weiland, F.L.

    1987-03-01

    Radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging was performed on a patient with a longstanding history of scleroderma who presented with abdominal pain suggestive of biliary disease. Cystic duct patency was documented after 10 min with tracer accumulation in the second portion of the duodenum which failed to progress consistent with the duodenal hypomotility of scleroderma. The patient was given intravenous Kinevac resulting in gastroesophageal reflux of radionuclide.

  19. [Localized scleroderma: a retrospective study about 92 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fékih, Nadia; Réjaibi, Iménc; Kamoun, Hajer; Zéglaoui, Faten; Fazaa, Bécima; Kharfi, Monia; Kamoun, Mohamed Ridha

    2009-09-01

    Sclerodermas are rare affections which can be located or generalized. Localized form is the most frequent. The purpose of this study was to describe epidemiologic, clinics, biological, immunological, therapeutic, evolutionary characteristics of the localized scleroderma through a personal series and the data of the literature. We have performed a retrospective study on all patients followed in the department of dermatology of the Hospital Charles Nicole during 14 years period. Our study was about 92 cases of localized scleroderma (73 were females and 19 males). The mean age was 35 years (between 2 and 72 years). The majority of localised sclerodermas (66.2% of the cases) appeared before 40 years with a maximum of frequency between 10 and 30 years (41.6%). Only 11.9% of the cases were observed before 10 years. They were 51 cases (55%) of morphea, 35 cases (38%) of scleroderma in bands including 32 linear scleroderma and 3 scleroderma en coup de sabre, 5 cases (5.5%) of generalized morphea and 1 case (0.15%) of deep morphea. Average therapeutic was specified among 63 patients (87%), and the evolution could be appreciated among 45 patients. The epidemiologic data observed in our series are comparable with those reported in the literature. Therapeutic difficulties and risks of functional after-effects, particular in scleroderma in bands, remain the principal concern for all the authors.

  20. Phenomenon of isomorphic provoking responses in cases of limited scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talnikova Е.Е.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the historical origin of the term "Koebner phenomenon". The literature data reflect the etiology, pathogenesis and epidemiology of isomorphic mechanisms provoking responses in lichen planus, psoriasis, scleroder-ma, syphilis. Variants of the Koebner phenomenon's classifications are given. The clinical cases of limited scleroderma after mechanical injury are described.

  1. Neurologic involvement in scleroderma: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Tiago Nardi; Peres, Fernando Augusto; Lapa, Aline Tamires; Marques-Neto, João Francisco; Appenzeller, Simone

    2013-12-01

    To perform a systematic review of neurologic involvement in Systemic sclerosis (SSc) and Localized Scleroderma (LS), describing clinical features, neuroimaging, and treatment. We performed a literature search in PubMed using the following MeSH terms, scleroderma, systemic sclerosis, localized scleroderma, localized scleroderma "en coup de sabre", Parry-Romberg syndrome, cognitive impairment, memory, seizures, epilepsy, headache, depression, anxiety, mood disorders, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D), SF-36, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), neuropsychiatric, psychosis, neurologic involvement, neuropathy, peripheral nerves, cranial nerves, carpal tunnel syndrome, ulnar entrapment, tarsal tunnel syndrome, mononeuropathy, polyneuropathy, radiculopathy, myelopathy, autonomic nervous system, nervous system, electroencephalography (EEG), electromyography (EMG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Patients with other connective tissue disease knowingly responsible for nervous system involvement were excluded from the analyses. A total of 182 case reports/studies addressing SSc and 50 referring to LS were identified. SSc patients totalized 9506, while data on 224 LS patients were available. In LS, seizures (41.58%) and headache (18.81%) predominated. Nonetheless, descriptions of varied cranial nerve involvement and hemiparesis were made. Central nervous system involvement in SSc was characterized by headache (23.73%), seizures (13.56%) and cognitive impairment (8.47%). Depression and anxiety were frequently observed (73.15% and 23.95%, respectively). Myopathy (51.8%), trigeminal neuropathy (16.52%), peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy (14.25%), and carpal tunnel syndrome (6.56%) were the most frequent peripheral nervous system involvement in SSc. Autonomic neuropathy involving cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems was regularly described

  2. Capillary regeneration in scleroderma: stem cell therapy reverses phenotype?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo N Fleming

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease with a characteristic vascular pathology. The vasculopathy associated with scleroderma is one of the major contributors to the clinical manifestations of the disease.We used immunohistochemical and mRNA in situ hybridization techniques to characterize this vasculopathy and showed with morphometry that scleroderma has true capillary rarefaction. We compared skin biopsies from 23 scleroderma patients and 24 normal controls and 7 scleroderma patients who had undergone high dose immunosuppressive therapy followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplant. Along with the loss of capillaries there was a dramatic change in endothelial phenotype in the residual vessels. The molecules defining this phenotype are: vascular endothelial cadherin, a supposedly universal endothelial marker required for tube formation (lost in the scleroderma tissue, antiangiogenic interferon alpha (overexpressed in the scleroderma dermis and RGS5, a signaling molecule whose expression coincides with the end of branching morphogenesis during development and tumor angiogenesis (also overexpressed in scleroderma skin. Following high dose immunosuppressive therapy, patients experienced clinical improvement and 5 of the 7 patients with scleroderma had increased capillary counts. It was also observed in the same 5 patients, that the interferon alpha and vascular endothelial cadherin had returned to normal as other clinical signs in the skin regressed, and in all 7 patients, RGS5 had returned to normal.These data provide the first objective evidence for loss of vessels in scleroderma and show that this phenomenon is reversible. Coordinate changes in expression of three molecules already implicated in angiogenesis or anti-angiogenesis suggest that control of expression of these three molecules may be the underlying mechanism for at least the vascular component of this disease. Since rarefaction has been little studied, these data may have

  3. Recent Developments in the Classification, Evaluation, Pathophysiology, and Management of Scleroderma Renal Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghossein, Cybele; Varga, John; Fenves, Andrew Z

    2016-01-01

    Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is an uncommon complication of systemic sclerosis. Despite the advent of angiotensin-converting inhibitor therapy, SRC remains a life-threatening complication. Recent studies have contributed to a better understanding of SRC, but much remains unknown regarding its pathophysiology, risk factors, and optimal management. Genetic studies provide evidence that immune dysregulation might be a contributing factor, providing hope that further research in this direction might illuminate pathogenesis and provide novel predictors for this complication.

  4. The Making of the "Oxford English Dictionary."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, Simon

    2003-01-01

    Summarizes remarks made to open the Gallaudet University conference on Dictionaries and the Standardization of languages. It concerns the making of what is arguably the world's greatest dictionary, "The Oxford English Dictionary." (VWL)

  5. Systemic involvement in localized scleroderma/morphea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorkiewicz-Petkow, Anna; Kalinska-Bienias, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Localized scleroderma (LoSc), also known as morphea, is a rare fibrosing disorder of the skin and underlying tissues. Sclerosis is mainly limited to the skin, but subcutaneous tissue, fascia, and underlying muscles and bone may also be involved. In some cases, systemic manifestation with visceral abnormalities may occur. Several publications have focused on significant aspects of LoSc: genetics, immunity, epidemiology, scoring systems, and unification of classifications. Clinical studies featuring large cohorts with the disease published by various international study groups have been of great value in furthering the diagnostic and therapeutic management of LoSc. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Scleroderma renal crisis and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome related to the use of clomiphene in a patient with scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobak, Senol; Hacivelioglu, Servet; Gungor, Selen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented a 28-year-old female with systemic sclerosis who developed scleroderma renal crisis and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome following clomiphene administration. Urgent therapy including angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and supportive care resulted in regression and eventually resolution of all the clinical and laboratory symptoms. Although scleroderma renal crisis is a fatal complication of high-dose corticosteroids, rarely is this seen with the use of ACE inhibitors. This case report aimed to investigate the potential capacity of the selective oestrogen receptor modulator clomiphene to induce scleroderma renal crisis as well as corticosteroids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Oxidative stress parameters in localized scleroderma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, F; Sener, S; Akbaş, A; Metin, A; Kirbaş, S; Neselioglu, S; Erel, O

    2016-11-01

    Localized scleroderma (LS) (morphea) is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease with unknown cause that progresses with sclerosis in the skin and/or subcutaneous tissues. Its pathogenesis is not completely understood. Oxidative stress is suggested to have a role in the pathogenesis of localized scleroderma. We have aimed to determine the relationship of morphea lesions with oxidative stress. The total oxidant capacity (TOC), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), paroxonase (PON) and arylesterase (ARES) activity parameters of PON 1 enzyme levels in the serum were investigated in 13 LS patients (generalized and plaque type) and 13 healthy controls. TOC values of the patient group were found higher than the TOC values of the control group (p < 0.01). ARES values of the patient group was found to be higher than the control group (p < 0.0001). OSI was significantly higher in the patient group when compared to the control (p < 0.005). Oxidative stress seems to be effective in the pathogenesis. ARES levels have increased in morphea patients regarding to the oxidative stress and its reduction. Further controlled studies are required in wider series.

  8. [Morphea or juvenile localised scleroderma: Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Alexis; Gallo, Silvanna; Jaramillo, Pedro; de Toro, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Morphea or juvenile localised scleroderma (JLS) is an autoimmune, inflammatory, chronic, slowly progressive connective tissue disease of unknown cause that preferably affects skin and underlying tissues. To report a case of Juvenil Localised scleroderma in an 8-year old girl, contributing to an early diagnosis and treatment. The case is presented of an 8 year-old girl who presented with indurated hypopigmented plaques, of linear distribution in the right upper extremity of two years onset, together with papery texture hyperpigmented indurated plaques with whitish areas of thinned skin in right lower extremity, and leg and ankle swelling. The clinical features and diagnostic tests, including histology were compatible with linear and pansclerotic JLS. She started with immunosuppressive therapy, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy. We report a case of linear and pansclerotic ELJ type, in which there was a 2 year delay in diagnosis, however the response to treatment was positive as expected. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. [Clinical characteristics of patients with juvenile localized scleroderma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiu-Ning; Du, Wei; Hu, Bin; Liu, Pai; Yuan, Xie

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics of juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS). The clinical data of 100 outpatients with JLS who were admitted to PUMC Hospital from 2000 to 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. Of a total of 100 cases, 51 (51%) were confirmed as linear scleroderma, 26 (26%) as plaque morphea, 26 (26%) as deep morphea, 12 (12%) as generalized morphea, and 15 (15%) as a mixed subtype. Nine patients (9%) had family histories of rheumatic or autoimmune diseases, while 16 (16%) might be triggered by unknown factors. Totally 84 patients underwent antinuclear antibody tests and 38 patients (45.2%) had positive results. Linear scleroderma are the most frequent subtype of JLS. Localized scleroderma may be associated with some autoimmune-related causes.

  10. Recurrent ovary cancer presenting with scleroderma - A rare case report

    OpenAIRE

    Sargin, Betul; Gurer, Gulcan; Bozbas, Gulnur; Noyan, Fatih; Barut, Kayra; Tataroglu, Canten

    2017-01-01

    Scleroderma is a chronic autoimmune multisystem disorder which is characterizedby progressive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Ovary cancers with sclerodermahave been reported in the literature. But recurrent ovary cancer with sclerodermahas not been reported before. Here, we report a 65 -year old female patient presentingwith recurrent ovary cancer and subsequently diagnosed with scleroderma. Due toliterature sources, this is the first case of presenting with recurrent ovary cancera...

  11. JUVENILE SCLERODERMA-what has changed in the meantime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrovic, Amra; Sahin, Sezgin; Barut, Kenan; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2018-04-22

    Juvenile scleroderma is a rarely seen chronic connective tissue disorder characterized by stiffening of the skin. The frequency of the disease was reported as one per million. According to organ involvement, the disease is divided into two main forms: systemic and localized scleroderma. Since it is uncommon in children, many aspects of the disease remain discussable. With this review, we aimed to revise recent findings and new developments in this rare condition. Skin manifestations are most prominent feature of the systemic form, followed by musculoskeletal and vascular involvement. Cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and renal disorders are rare in childhood. Combination of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (methotrexate, mycophenolate-mofetil, cyclosporine) and steroid reprents the first line therapy. Bosentan is used for cases with pulmonary hypertension and for extensive digital ulcerations. Biological treatment emerges as a useful treatment option in most severe form of the disease. Localized scleroderma is characterized with sclerodermatosis of the skin. Internal organ involvement is not expected. Classification of the local scleroderma is made according to the size and localization of the skin changes. There are few different therapeutical options but there is no specific therapy for the localized scleroderma. Many data regarding disease features and treatment options in juvenile scleroderma are based on studies among adults. There is a striking need for multicentric, prospective studies among children with juvenile scleroderma.Emerging biological agents and new treatment options are showing promising results. Anyhow, juvenile scleroderma remains a mystery with many aspects of the disease waiting to be solved. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Echocardiographic study of the cardiac state in systemic scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotel'nikova, G.P.; Guseva, N.G.

    1986-01-01

    Echocardiographic investigation in 65 patients with systemic scleroderma showed that the left ventricular syes and indices of central hemodynamics were frequently lowered in them; an increase in sizes was observed mainly in the patients with stage 2-3 of disease. Echocardiography made it possible to specify the nature of cardiac pathology and brought to light some additional features of the involvement of different heart membranes in systemic scleroderma

  13. The Oxford English Dictionary: A Brief History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritze, Ronald H.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the development of English dictionaries in general and the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) in particular. The discussion covers the decision by the Philological Society to create the dictionary, the principles that guided its development, the involvement of James Augustus Henry Murray, the magnitude and progress of the project, and the…

  14. The Oxford Picture Dictionary. Beginning Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Marjorie

    The beginning workbook of the Oxford Picture Dictionary is in full color and offers vocabulary reinforcement activities that correspond page for page with the dictionary. Clear and simple instructions with examples make it suitable for independent use in the classroom or at home. The workbook has up-to-date art and graphics, explaining over 3700…

  15. The "New Oxford English Dictionary" Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Heather

    1993-01-01

    Describes the conversion of the 22,000-page Oxford English Dictionary to an electronic version incorporating a modified Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) syntax. Explains that the database designers chose structured markup because it supports users' data searching needs, allows textual components to be extracted or modified, and allows…

  16. Validation of the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale in scleroderma: A Scleroderma Patient-centered Intervention Network cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gholizadeh, S.; Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Carrier, M.E.; Mills, S.D.; Fox, R.S.; Jewett, L.R.; Gottesman, K.; Roesch, S.C.; Thombs, B.D.; Malcarne, V.L.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Individuals with visible differences due to medical conditions, such as systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma), have reported difficulty navigating social situations because of issues such as staring, invasive questions, and rude comments. Fears or anxiety linked to situations in which

  17. Treatment of GI dysmotility in scleroderma with the new enterokinetic agent prucalopride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Bartelsman, J. F. W. M.; Lauwers, L.; Tytgat, G. N. J.

    2002-01-01

    Scleroderma is a multisystem disorder frequently resulting in disturbed GI motility. Although, especially early in the disease, symptomatic improvement is achieved with prokinetic agents, more severe GI manifestations of scleroderma may be difficult to treat, leading to parenteral feeding and

  18. Lung diffusion of soluble radioaerosols in scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, S.K.; Taplin, G.V.; Tashkin, D.P.; Elam, D.

    1978-01-01

    Diffusion rates of soluble radioaerosols of sodium pertechnetate (/sup 99m/TcO 4 ; mol. wt. 163) and diethylentriaminepentaacetate (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA; mol. wt. 492) were determined in ten normal subjects and ten patients with scleroderma having lung involvement. Twenty millicuries (mCi) each of /sup 99m/TcO 4 and /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA in 5 ml saline were aerosolized and inhaled on two different days. Initial lung retention after three minutes of administration was approximately 2 mCi. Two regions of interest over each posterior lung field were monitored with a scintillation camera and data were stored on magnetic tape. Decreasing levels of radioactivity were plotted semilogarithmically and half time (T 1 / 2 ) removal rates were calculated

  19. Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science and Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    DESCRIPTION The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science and Medicine provides reliable definitions of sports science and medicine terms. It provides an invaluable reference book for anyone interested in the captivating subject of sport. PURPOSE This dictionary aims to include almost every sports science, anatomy, physiology, biomechanical, injuries description, and psychological term as related to sports medicine and science and support the explanations by illustrations wherever necessary. AUDIEN...

  20. Evaluation of liver function tests in scleroderma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Gehan Ibrahim Abdelrazek; Abdulrahman, Awni Ali

    2012-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a clinically heterogeneous, systemic disorder which affects the connective tissue of the skin, internal organs, and the walls of blood vessels. It is characterized by alterations of the microvasculature, disturbances of the immune system and by massive deposition of collagen and other matrix substances in the connective tissue. This study was done to evaluate the frequency of liver disease in patients with scleroderma and, secondarily, to study the frequency of infection of hepatitis B and C virus in these patients and determine frequency of serum auto-antibodies in this disease. We studied patients with scleroderma, localized or systemic, in the outpatient clinic of rheumatology and dermatology departments, at King Khalid University Hospital. As for a comparison, healthy persons coming to the clinic with the same mean age were considered as control group. Forty patients with the diagnosis of scleroderma included in this work, 35% had elevated gamma-glutamyl-transferase (γ-GT), 30% had elevated alkaline phosphatase (AP) and in 17.5%, the alanine-amino-transferase (ALT) was above the reference values. The ALT had changed to be more in scleroderma patients than in controls. Twenty percent (20%) of the patients tested positive for anti-smooth muscle antibodies (anti-SMA) and only one patient had anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA). There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding antibody testing. Anti-HCV antibodies were observed in one patient, and HBsAg was detected in another scleroderma patient. There was no patient with clinically significant hepatic disease. In this study, although changes in liver enzymes in patients with scleroderma were not uncommon, there was no scleroderma patient with clinical manifestations of liver disease.

  1. Predictors of Longitudinal Quality of Life in Juvenile Localized Scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardalan, Kaveh; Zigler, Christina K; Torok, Kathryn S

    2017-07-01

    Localized scleroderma can negatively affect children's quality of life (QoL), but predictors of impact have not been well described. We sought to identify predictors of QoL impact in juvenile localized scleroderma patients. We analyzed longitudinal data from a single-center cohort of juvenile localized scleroderma patients, using hierarchical generalized linear modeling (HGLM) to identify predictors of QoL impact. HGLM is useful for nested data and allows for evaluation of both time-variant and time-invariant predictors. The number of extracutaneous manifestations (ECMs; e.g., joint contracture and hemifacial atrophy) and female sex predicted negative QoL impact, defined as a Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index score >1 (P = 0.019 for ECMs and P = 0.002 for female sex). As the time since the initial visit increased, the odds of reporting a negative QoL impact decreased (P scleroderma than cutaneous features. Further study is required to determine which ECMs have the most impact on QoL, which factors underlie sex differences in QoL in localized scleroderma, and why increasing the time since the initial visit appears to be protective. An improved understanding of predictors of QoL impact may allow for the identification of patients at risk of poorer outcomes and for the tailoring of treatment and psychosocial support. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Race and Association With Disease Manifestations and Mortality in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manno, Rebecca L.; Shah, Ami A.; Woods, Adrianne; Le, Elizabeth N.; Boin, Francesco; Hummers, Laura K.; Wigley, Fredrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Experience suggests that African Americans may express autoimmune disease differently than other racial groups. In the context of systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), we sought to determine whether race was related to a more adverse expression of disease. Between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 2009, a total of 409 African American and 1808 white patients with scleroderma were evaluated at a single university medical center. While the distribution by sex was virtually identical in both groups, at 82% female, African American patients presented to the center at a younger mean age than white patients (47 vs. 53 yr; p scleroderma-specific autoantibody status, and for the socioeconomic measures of educational attainment and health insurance status, diminished these risk estimates (RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0–1.6). The heightened risk of mortality persisted in strata defined by age at disease onset, diffuse cutaneous disease, anticentromere seropositivity, decade of care at the center, and among women. These findings support the notion that race is related to a distinct phenotypic profile in scleroderma, and a more unfavorable prognosis among African Americans, warranting heightened diagnostic evaluation and vigilant care of these patients. Further, we provide a chronologic review of the literature regarding race, organ system involvement, and mortality in scleroderma; we furnish synopses of relevant reports, and summarize findings. PMID:23793108

  3. Cancer and Scleroderma: A Paraneoplastic Disease with Implications for Malignancy Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ami A.; Rosen, Livia Casciola

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent data suggest a paraneoplastic mechanism of scleroderma pathogenesis in unique subsets of scleroderma patients. In this article, we review these data, explore potential links between cancer and scleroderma, and propose an approach to malignancy screening in scleroderma. Recent findings Emerging data have demonstrated that patients with scleroderma and RNA polymerase III autoantibodies have a significantly increased risk of cancer within a few years of scleroderma onset. Genetic alterations in the gene encoding RNA polymerase III (POLR3A) have been identified, and patients with somatic mutations in POLR3A have evidence of mutation specific T cell immune responses with generation of cross-reactive RNA polymerase III autoantibodies. These data strongly suggest that scleroderma is a by-product of anti-tumor immune responses in some patients. Additional epidemiologic data demonstrate that patients developing scleroderma at older ages may also have a short cancer-scleroderma interval, suggestive of paraneoplastic disease. Summary Scleroderma may be a paraneoplastic disease in unique patient subsets. Aggressive malignancy screening in these patients may aid in early cancer detection. Further study is required to determine whether cancer therapy could improve scleroderma outcomes in this patient population. PMID:26352736

  4. Scleroderma and dentistry: Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Shantanu; Kalkur, Chaithra; Sattur, Atul P; Bornstein, Michael M; Melton, Fred

    2016-10-24

    Scleroderma is a chronic connective tissue disorder with unknown etiology. It is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix in the connective tissues causing vascular disturbances which can result in tissue hypoxia. These changes are manifested as atrophy of the skin and/or mucosa, subcutaneous tissue, muscles, and internal organs. Such changes can be classified into two types, namely, morphea (localized) and diffuse (systemic). Morphea can manifest itself as hemifacial atrophy (Parry-Romberg syndrome) although this remains debatable. Hence, we present a case of morphea, associated with Parry-Romberg syndrome, and a second case with the classical signs of progressive systemic sclerosis. Case one: A 20-year-old man of Dravidian origin presented to our out-patient department with a complaint of facial asymmetry, difficulty in speech, and loss of taste sensation over the last 2 years. There was no history of facial trauma. After physical and radiological investigations, we found gross asymmetry of the left side of his face, a scar on his chin, tongue atrophy, relative microdontia, thinning of the ramus/body of his mandible, and sclerotic lesions on his trunk. Serological investigations were positive for antinuclear antibody for double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid and mitochondria. A biopsy was suggestive of morphea. Hence, our final diagnosis was mixed morphea with Parry-Romberg syndrome. Case two: A 53-year-old woman of Dravidian origin presented to our out-patient department with a complaint of gradually decreasing mouth opening over the past 7 years. Her medical history was noncontributory. On clinical examination, we found her perioral, neck, and hand skin to be sclerotic. Also, her fingers exhibited bilateral telangiectasia. An oral examination revealed completely edentulous arches as well as xerostomia and candidiasis. Her serological reports were positive for antinuclear antibodies against centromere B, Scl-70, and Ro-52. A hand and

  5. German guidelines for the diagnosis and therapy of localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuter, Alexander; Krieg, Thomas; Worm, Margitta; Wenzel, Jörg; Moinzadeh, Pia; Kuhn, Annegret; Aberer, Elisabeth; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Horneff, Gerd; Reil, Emma; Weberschock, Tobias; Hunzelmann, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    Localized scleroderma designates a heterogeneous group of sclerotic skin disorders. Depending on the subtype, severity, and site affected, adjacent structures such as adipose tissue, muscles, joints, and bones may be involved. This is an update of the existing German AWMF (Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany) guidelines (classification: S2k). These guidelines provide an overview of the definition, epidemiology, classification, pathogenesis, laboratory workup, histopathology, clinical scoring systems, as well as imaging and device-based workup of localized scleroderma. Moreover, consensus-based recommendations are given on the management of localized scleroderma depending on its clinical subtype. Treatment recommendations are presented in a therapeutic algorithm. No financial support was given by any pharmaceutical company. The guidelines are valid until July 2019. © 2016 The Authors | Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  6. Evaluation of mean platelet volume in localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahali, Anil Gulsel; Su, Ozlem; Emiroglu, Nazan; Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Kaya, Mehmet Onur; Onsun, Nahide

    2017-01-01

    Localized scleroderma is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by sclerosis of the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. Platelets play an important role in inflammation. Following activation, platelets rapidly release numerous mediators and cytokines, which contribute to inflammation. To evaluate whether there was any relation between localized scleroderma and platelet parameters. Forty-one patients with localized scleroderma were enrolled in the study. The control group consisted of 30 healthy subjects. The mean platelet volume level in the patient group was 9.9 ± 1.3 fl and in the control group was 7.6 ± 1.1 fl. This difference was statistically significant (pscleroderma. Platelet parameters may be used as markers for evaluating disease severity and inflammatory processes. Thus, there is a need for more detailed and prospective studies.

  7. Scleroderma keratinocytes promote fibroblast activation independent of transforming growth factor beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Sara S; Reed, Tamra J; Berthier, Celine C; Tsou, Pei-Suen; Liu, Jianhua; Gudjonsson, Johann E; Khanna, Dinesh; Kahlenberg, J Michelle

    2017-11-01

    SSc is a devastating disease that results in fibrosis of the skin and other organs. Fibroblasts are a key driver of the fibrotic process through deposition of extracellular matrix. The mechanisms by which fibroblasts are induced to become pro-fibrotic remain unclear. Thus, we examined the ability of SSc keratinocytes to promote fibroblast activation and the source of this effect. Keratinocytes were isolated from skin biopsies of 9 lcSSc, 10 dcSSc and 13 control patients. Conditioned media was saved from the cultures. Normal fresh primary fibroblasts were exposed to healthy control and SSc keratinocyte conditioned media in the presence or absence of neutralizing antibodies for TGF-β. Gene expression was assessed by microarrays and real-time PCR. Immunocytochemistry was performed for α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), collagen type 1 (COL1A1) and CCL5 expression. SSc keratinocyte conditioned media promoted fibroblast activation, characterized by increased α-SMA and COL1A1 mRNA and protein expression. This effect was independent of TGF-β. Microarray analysis identified upregulation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) pathways in both SSc subtypes. Scleroderma keratinocytes exhibited increased expression of NF-κB-regulated cytokines and chemokines and lesional skin staining confirmed upregulation of CCL5 in basal keratinocytes. Scleroderma keratinocytes promote the activation of fibroblasts in a TGF-β-independent manner and demonstrate an imbalance in NF-κB1 and PPAR-γ expression leading to increased cytokine and CCL5 production. Further study of keratinocyte mediators of fibrosis, including CCL5, may provide novel targets for skin fibrosis therapy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. Scleroderma of geriatric age and scleroderma-like paraneoplastic syndrome – description of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Marek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (Ssc is an autoimmune connective tissue disease of unknown origin, characterized by progressive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Immune reactions taking part in Ssc pathogenesis may contribute to cancer development; therefore patients with risk factors for this disease require observation for a neoplastic process. On the other hand, symptoms of Ssc may be a mask of various cancers. Differentiating between the idiopathic form of Ssc and scleroderma-like paraneoplastic syndrome often causes a lot of difficulties. The article presents two cases of Ssc at the beginning of the disease after 60 years of age. The first case was diagnosed as Ssc, whereas in the second case the defined diagnosis was scleroderma-like syndrome in the course of colorectal cancer. This paper presents an analysis of differential diagnostic procedures which were performed and led to the final diagnosis, mentions types of cancers co-occurring with Ssc and suggests a screening scheme for cancer development in patients with a diagnosis of Ssc.

  9. Molecular subsets in the gene expression signatures of scleroderma skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Milano

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma is a clinically heterogeneous disease with a complex phenotype. The disease is characterized by vascular dysfunction, tissue fibrosis, internal organ dysfunction, and immune dysfunction resulting in autoantibody production.We analyzed the genome-wide patterns of gene expression with DNA microarrays in skin biopsies from distinct scleroderma subsets including 17 patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc with diffuse scleroderma (dSSc, 7 patients with SSc with limited scleroderma (lSSc, 3 patients with morphea, and 6 healthy controls. 61 skin biopsies were analyzed in a total of 75 microarray hybridizations. Analysis by hierarchical clustering demonstrates nearly identical patterns of gene expression in 17 out of 22 of the forearm and back skin pairs of SSc patients. Using this property of the gene expression, we selected a set of 'intrinsic' genes and analyzed the inherent data-driven groupings. Distinct patterns of gene expression separate patients with dSSc from those with lSSc and both are easily distinguished from normal controls. Our data show three distinct patient groups among the patients with dSSc and two groups among patients with lSSc. Each group can be distinguished by unique gene expression signatures indicative of proliferating cells, immune infiltrates and a fibrotic program. The intrinsic groups are statistically significant (p<0.001 and each has been mapped to clinical covariates of modified Rodnan skin score, interstitial lung disease, gastrointestinal involvement, digital ulcers, Raynaud's phenomenon and disease duration. We report a 177-gene signature that is associated with severity of skin disease in dSSc.Genome-wide gene expression profiling of skin biopsies demonstrates that the heterogeneity in scleroderma can be measured quantitatively with DNA microarrays. The diversity in gene expression demonstrates multiple distinct gene expression programs in the skin of patients with scleroderma.

  10. Parry-Romberg Syndrome Associated with Localized Scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Maletic

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Parry-Romberg syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous disorder of unknown origin. It is characterized by progressive facial hemiatrophy and frequently overlaps with a condition known as linear scleroderma ‘en coup de sabre’. Neurological involvement is frequently described in these patients, including migraine, facial pain and epilepsy, which represent the commonest neurological conditions, sometimes associated with brain abnormalities ipsilaterally to the skin lesions. We present a case of Parry-Romberg syndrome with neurological involvement in a patient with diagnosed localized scleroderma (morphea.

  11. Limited scleroderma and early detection of visceral changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyuzhnaya, L.D.; Potsibina, V.V.; Stychinskaya, L.P.; Turik, N.V.

    1989-01-01

    The state of liver, kidneys, osteoarticular apparatus at the early stages of development of limited scleroderma and with the exclusion of visceral changes on the basis of clinical-laboratory studies is investigated. 11 patients with scleroderma in the age of 7-18 years were examined. Osteoscintigraphy with 99m TC-phosphone and dynamic scintigraphy of kidneys without additional introduction of RF, and hepatocholecyctoscintigraphy with 99m tc-HIPA of the patients were realized. The conclusion is made that radionuclide investigation methods permit to reveal various visceral changes, which are not recognizable by clinical methods

  12. Parry-Romberg Syndrome Associated with Localized Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletic, Jelena; Tsirka, Vassiliki; Ioannides, Panos; Karacostas, Dimitrios; Taskos, Nikolaos

    2010-01-01

    Parry-Romberg syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous disorder of unknown origin. It is characterized by progressive facial hemiatrophy and frequently overlaps with a condition known as linear scleroderma ‘en coup de sabre’. Neurological involvement is frequently described in these patients, including migraine, facial pain and epilepsy, which represent the commonest neurological conditions, sometimes associated with brain abnormalities ipsilaterally to the skin lesions. We present a case of Parry-Romberg syndrome with neurological involvement in a patient with diagnosed localized scleroderma (morphea). PMID:20671858

  13. OXFORD DICTIONARY OF SPORTS SCIENCE AND MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kent

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science and Medicine provides reliable definitions of sports science and medicine terms. It provides an invaluable reference book for anyone interested in the captivating subject of sport. PURPOSE This dictionary aims to include almost every sports science, anatomy, physiology, biomechanical, injuries description, and psychological term as related to sports medicine and science and support the explanations by illustrations wherever necessary. AUDIENCE As a comprehensive dictionary of sports science and medicine, it will be of particular help to medical specialists and general practitioners, as well as students of PE, coaches, and athletes who need to understand the anatomical structures and physiological processes which affect athletic performance. Any member of public interested in health and fitness; exercise and sport or wants to understand what the obscure terms mean, like jogger's nipple, social loafing, and Zatopek phenomenon will also benefit from this book. FEATURES The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science and Medicine features terms in A to Z fashion at all the major areas of sports science and medicine including: anatomy, physiology/exercise physiology, biomechanics, training principles and techniques, nutrition, sports psychology and sociology, sports injuries and rehabilitation. A team of prominent contributors and advisers put together this dictionary in the first edition. The third edition includes around 8000 cross-referenced terms which have been updated or added since the first edition. There are plenty of illustrations wherever appropriate to make the terms easily understandable. ASSESSMENT A must-have dictionary for all medics practising in sports and exercise medicine, as well as students of medicine, physical education, nursing and physiotherapy. Even coaches, trainers, biomechanical experts; in fact anyone who has a special interest in this area will find this dictionary useful.

  14. Exploring Sources of Emotional Distress among People Living with Scleroderma: A Focus Group Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie T Gumuchian

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis, or scleroderma, is a chronic and rare connective tissue disease with negative physical and psychological implications. Sources of emotional distress and the impact they have on the lives of people with scleroderma are not well understood.To gain an in-depth understanding of the emotional experiences and sources of emotional distress for women and men living with scleroderma through focus group discussions.Three semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted (two in English, one in French with a total of 22 people with scleroderma recruited through the Scleroderma Society of Ontario in Hamilton, Ontario and a scleroderma clinic in Montreal, Canada. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and then coded for emerging themes using thematic inductive analysis.Core themes representing sources of emotional distress were identified, including: (a facing a new reality; (b the daily struggle of living with scleroderma; (c handling work, employment and general financial burden; (d changing family roles; (e social interactions; and (f navigating the health care system. Collectively, these themes refer to the stressful journey of living with scleroderma including the obstacles faced and the emotional experiences beginning prior to receiving a diagnosis and continuing throughout the participants' lives.Scleroderma was portrayed as being an unpredictable and overwhelming disease, resulting in many individuals experiencing multiple sources of emotional distress. Interventions and supportive resources need to be developed to help individuals with scleroderma and people close to them manage and cope with the emotional aspects of the disease.

  15. Primary biliary cirrhosis and scleroderma complicated by Barrett's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-04-06

    Apr 6, 1991 ... primary biliary cirrhosis, CREST syndrome, and chronic pancreatitis. Thorax. 1983; 38: 316-317. 9. Okano Y, Nisbikai M, Sato A. Scleroderma, primary biliary cirrhosis, and. Sjogren's syndrome after cosmetic breast augmentation with silicone injec- tion: a case reporfof possible human adjuvant disease.

  16. A Patient with Localized Scleroderma Successfully Treated with Etretinate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Yuki; Ikeda, Takaharu; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2014-01-01

    There are several treatment methods for localized scleroderma, but treatment is difficult when the lesion is widely distributed. We encountered a case who was treated successfully with etretinate, a vitamin A derivative. The usefulness of this agent is discussed. PMID:25408646

  17. A Patient with Localized Scleroderma Successfully Treated with Etretinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Shima

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There are several treatment methods for localized scleroderma, but treatment is difficult when the lesion is widely distributed. We encountered a case who was treated successfully with etretinate, a vitamin A derivative. The usefulness of this agent is discussed.

  18. Localized severe scleroderma: a retrospective study of 26 pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltramelli, Matilde; Vercellesi, Paolo; Frasin, Adina; Gelmetti, Carlo; Corona, Fabrizia

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile localized scleroderma includes different conditions characterized by skin hardening with increased collagen deposition. Although juvenile localized scleroderma is considered a relatively benign disease, lesions may extend through the dermis, subcutaneous tissue, muscles, and the underlying bone, leading to significant functional and cosmetic deformities. Furthermore, extracutaneous manifestations are described. We retrospectively analyzed a cohort of 26 patients with severe Juvenile localized scleroderma with particular attention to clinical features, therapy, and long-term outcome. A subgroup of three patients has been further evaluated with infrared thermography. Our findings were consistent with the current literature for demographic, laboratory, and clinical characteristics at disease onset, but, with our patients, the prevalence of extracutaneous manifestations was higher, thus confirming the potential for severe juvenile localized scleroderma to affect organs other than the skin, without increased risk of development toward systemic sclerosis. Correlation between various treatments and clinical endpoint showed that systemic therapy lead to a better outcome: in particular, methotrexate appeared the most effective drug, capable in halting the progression of the disease and sometimes inducing its regression. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The new Oxford dictionary of English

    CERN Document Server

    Hanks, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    This dictionary focuses on English as it is really used in the late 20th century, informed by available evidence and thinking. Its defining style makes it possible to give the most complete picture of English as it is used today, providing authoritative and comprehensive coverage of the language. Compiled after in-depth analysis of computerized databases of current English, this dictionary is the first to base its coverage on the evidence of real English. Accessibility is one of the dictionary's key aims; a rapid-reference page design separates out parts of speech, word histories, phrases, and derivatives to make information easy to find, and the most modern meaning of each word, as used by the majority of people, is placed first within each entry. Contemporary rules are given on question of usage, providing relevant advice on problems old and new. Word history notes not only explain the linguistic roots of words, but also tell the story of how a word's meaning and form have changed over time. Oxford's worldw...

  20. The Oxford SWIFT integral field spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatte, Niranjan; Tecza, Matthias; Clarke, Fraser; Goodsall, Timothy; Lynn, James; Freeman, David; Davies, Roger L.

    2006-06-01

    We present the design of the Oxford SWIFT integral field spectrograph, a dedicated I and z band instrument (0.65μm micron - 1.0μm micron at R~4000), designed to be used in conjunction with the Palomar laser guide star adaptive optics system (PALAO, and its planned upgrade PALM-3000). It builds on two recent developments (i) the improved ability of second generation adaptive optics systems to correct for atmospheric turbulence at wavelengths less than or equal to 1μm micron, and (ii) the availability of CCD array detectors with high quantum efficiency at very red wavelengths (close to the silicon band edge). Combining these with a state-of-the-art integral field unit design using an all-glass image slicer, SWIFT's design provides very high throughput and low scattered light. SWIFT simultaneously provides spectra of ~4000 spatial elements, arranged in a rectangular field-of-view of 44 × 89 pixels. It has three on-the-fly selectable pixel scales of 0.24", 0.16" and 0.08'. First light is expected in spring 2008.

  1. Clinicopathological study of 81 cases of localized and systemic scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succaria, F; Kurban, M; Kibbi, A-G; Abbas, O

    2013-02-01

    Scleroderma is a connective tissue disease that includes localized and systemic forms. Our recent encounter with a morphea case exhibiting prominent perineural inflammation microscopically prompted us to assess the features of all patients diagnosed with morphea/scleroderma at our institution. To describe the clinicopathological features of all patients diagnosed with morphea/scleroderma at American University of Beirut Medical Center (AUB-MC) between 1999 and 2010, and compare our findings with those published in the literature. A total of 81 cases (63 women and 18 men) were identified, of which 73 were localized (morphea) and eight were systemic scleroderma. Clinically, plaque type morphea was the most common variant both in adults and children, and seven (9%) cases of morphea were associated with lichen sclerosis et atrophicus (LSA). Histopathologically, perineural inflammation was observed in 49% of cases, and may serve, in addition to other features including lichen sclerosis-like changes (observed in exclusively nine cases of morphea), more diffuse dermal and less subcutaneous sclerosis, and intense inflammation, as clues favouring diagnosis of morphea over systemic sclerosis. The features of morphea/scleroderma patients in this study are generally comparable to those published in the literature, with few differences. Clinically, plaque type morphea was the most common variant both in adults and children and LSA was a frequent association. Histopathologically, perineural inflammation was commonly observed and may serve in addition to lichen sclerosis-like changes and intense inflammation as clues favouring diagnosis of morphea over systemic sclerosis. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2012 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  2. The Oxford History of English Lexicography. Volume I: General ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A.P. Cowie (Editor). The Oxford History of English Lexicography. Volume I: General-purpose Dictionaries. Volume II: Specialized Dictionaries. 2009. Volume I: xviii + 467 pp., Volume II: xix + 551 pp. ISBN Volume I–II: 978-0-19-928562-4. Volume I: 978-0-19-928560-0. Volume II: 978-0-19-928561-7. Oxford: Oxford University ...

  3. Development of Consensus Treatment Plans for Juvenile Localized Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suzanne C.; Torok, Kathryn S.; Pope, Elena; Dedeoglu, Fatma; Hong, Sandy; Jacobe, Heidi T.; Rabinovich, C. Egla; Laxer, Ronald M.; Higgins, Gloria C.; Ferguson, Polly J.; Lasky, Andrew; Baszis, Kevin; Becker, Mara; Campillo, Sarah; Cartwright, Victoria; Cidon, Michael; Inman, Christi J; Jerath, Rita; O'Neil, Kathleen M.; Vora, Sheetal; Zeft, Andrew; Wallace, Carol A.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Fuhlbrigge, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop standardized treatment plans, clinical assessments, and response criteria for active, moderate to high severity juvenile localized scleroderma (jLS). Background jLS is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder associated with substantial morbidity and disability. Although a wide range of therapeutic strategies have been reported in the literature, a lack of agreement on treatment specifics and accepted methods for clinical assessment of have made it difficult to compare approaches and identify optimal therapy. Methods A core group of pediatric rheumatologists, dermatologists and a lay advisor was engaged by the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) to develop standardized treatment plans and assessment parameters for jLS using consensus methods/nominal group techniques. Recommendations were validated in two face-to-face conferences with a larger group of practitioners with expertise in jLS and with the full membership of CARRA, which encompasses the majority of pediatric rheumatologists in the U.S and Canada. Results Consensus was achieved on standardized treatment plans that reflect the prevailing treatment practices of CARRA members. Standardized clinical assessment methods and provisional treatment response criteria were also developed. Greater than 90% of pediatric rheumatologists responding to a survey (67% of CARRA membership) affirmed the final recommendations and agreed to utilize these consensus plans to treat patients with jLS. Conclusions Using consensus methodology, we have developed standardized treatment plans and assessment methods for jLS. The high level of support among pediatric rheumatologists will support future comparative effectiveness studies and enable the development of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of jLS. PMID:22505322

  4. Malignancy in scleroderma patients from south west England: a population-based cohort study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Siau, Keith

    2010-01-08

    The pathophysiological relationship between scleroderma and malignancy remains poorly understood. Although some previous studies have demonstrated an increased malignancy risk in patients with scleroderma, others have been inconclusive. We aimed to determine if patients with scleroderma had an increased risk of malignancy compared to an age- and sex-matched local South West England population, and if there were any important differences between scleroderma patients with and without malignancy. Methods of this study are as follows. Notes were obtained on all local scleroderma patients (n = 68) locally, and those diagnosed with malignancy verified by contacting each patient\\'s general practitioner. Expected malignancy figures were obtained from age- and sex-stratified regional prevalence data provided by the South West Cancer Intelligence Service registry. Among the patients, 22.1% with scleroderma were identified with concurrent malignancy. Affected sites were of the breast (n = 5), haematological system (n = 5), skin (n = 4), and unknown primary (n = 1). Overall, malignancy risk was found to be increased in scleroderma (RR = 3.15, 95% CI 1.77-5.20, p = 0.01). In particular, this risk was the highest for haematological malignancies (RR = 18.5, 95% CI 6-43, p = 0.03), especially for non-Hodgkin\\'s lymphoma (RR = 25.8, 95% CI 5-75, p = 0.10). The majority of patients (86.7%) developed malignancy after the onset of scleroderma (mean = 6.9 years). Age of >70 and patients with limited scleroderma were significant risk factors for a patient with scleroderma to have a concurrent malignancy; however, no increased risk was found in patients with any particular pattern of organ involvement, cytotoxic usage or serology. To conclude, in this small patient cohort, we have found that scleroderma is associated with an increased risk of malignancy. This risk is statistically significant in patients with limited scleroderma. Patients who are elderly and those with limited disease

  5. Radiotherapy of early breast cancer in scleroderma patients: our experience with four cases and a short review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyrgias G

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available George Kyrgias1,2, Kiki Theodorou3,4, Anna Zygogianni1, Konstantinos Tsanadis2, Stefanos Zervoudis5, John Tzitzikas6, Michael Koukourakis71Academic Radiotherapy, University of Thessaly, Medical School, Greece; 2Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospital of Larissa, Greece; 3Academic Medical Physics, University of Thessaly, Medical School, Greece; 4Medical Physics Department, University Hospital of Larissa, 5Breast Unit, REA Hospital, Athens, Greece; 6Radiation Oncology Department, AHEPA University Hospital of Thessaloniki, Greece; 7Radiotherapy-Oncology Department, University Hospital of Alexandroupolis, GreecePurpose: Connective vascular diseases (CVD, including scleroderma, are reported to represent for some researchers a relative contraindication and for others absolute contraindication for radiotherapy. The purpose of our study is to add four new cases to the existing body of international literature and to determine whether women with pre-existing scleroderma who have been surgically treated for early breast cancer could undergo postsurgical radiotherapy without serious early and late complications.Patients and methods: From May 1998 to November 2010, we irradiated for early breast cancer four patients suffering from pre-existing scleroderma; after conservative surgery, we performed whole breast postoperative radiotherapy of 50.4 Gy total dose to the whole breast plus a 9 Gy boost to the tumor bed. We reviewed the records of all four patients and evaluated the early and late reactions using acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG], American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA and late radiation morbidity scoring scheme (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC], Brussels, Belgium and RTOG.Results: After a median follow-up of 105 months (range 12–155 months the early and late toxicity concerning the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the lungs, and the heart have

  6. A Case Report of Successful Treatment of Recalcitrant Childhood Localized Scleroderma with Infliximab and Leflunomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Ian D; Weiser, Peter; Torok, Kathryn S

    2015-01-01

    Herein we report successful treatment of an adolescent Caucasian female with severe progressive localized scleroderma (mixed subtype, including generalized morphea and linear scleroderma of the trunk/limb) using infliximab and leflunomide. The patient demonstrated improvement after the first 9 months of therapy based on her clinical examination, objective measures, and patient and parent global assessments. Infliximab is a potential treatment option for pediatric localized scleroderma patients who have progression of disease or who are unable to tolerate the side effect profile of more standard systemic therapy. Larger longitudinal studies or case series are needed to confirm and further investigate infliximab's role in localized scleroderma.

  7. Development of consensus treatment plans for juvenile localized scleroderma: a roadmap toward comparative effectiveness studies in juvenile localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suzanne C; Torok, Kathryn S; Pope, Elena; Dedeoglu, Fatma; Hong, Sandy; Jacobe, Heidi T; Rabinovich, C Egla; Laxer, Ronald M; Higgins, Gloria C; Ferguson, Polly J; Lasky, Andrew; Baszis, Kevin; Becker, Mara; Campillo, Sarah; Cartwright, Victoria; Cidon, Michael; Inman, Christi J; Jerath, Rita; O'Neil, Kathleen M; Vora, Sheetal; Zeft, Andrew; Wallace, Carol A; Ilowite, Norman T; Fuhlbrigge, Robert C

    2012-08-01

    Juvenile localized scleroderma (LS) is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder associated with substantial morbidity and disability. Although a wide range of therapeutic strategies has been reported in the literature, a lack of agreement on treatment specifics and accepted methods for clinical assessment has made it difficult to compare approaches and identify optimal therapy. Our objective was to develop standardized treatment plans, clinical assessments, and response criteria for active, moderate to high severity juvenile LS. A core group of pediatric rheumatologists, dermatologists, and a lay advisor was engaged by the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) to develop standardized treatment plans and assessment parameters for juvenile LS using consensus methods/nominal group techniques. Recommendations were validated in 2 face-to-face conferences with a larger group of practitioners with expertise in juvenile LS and with the full membership of CARRA, which encompasses the majority of pediatric rheumatologists in the US and Canada. Consensus was achieved on standardized treatment plans that reflect the prevailing treatment practices of CARRA members. Standardized clinical assessment methods and provisional treatment response criteria were also developed. Greater than 90% of pediatric rheumatologists responding to a survey (66% of CARRA membership) affirmed the final recommendations and agreed to utilize these consensus plans to treat patients with juvenile LS. Using consensus methodology, we have developed standardized treatment plans and assessment methods for juvenile LS. The high level of support among pediatric rheumatologists will support future comparative effectiveness studies and enable the development of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of juvenile LS. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  8. Clinical and Autoimmune Profile of Scleroderma Patients from Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Pradhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma is a disorder characterized by fibrosis of skin and visceral organs. Pathogenesis of scleroderma is complex and is incompletely understood as yet. Autoantibodies in SSc represent a serologic hallmark which have clinical relevance, with diagnostic and prognostic potential. Objectives. To study distribution of clinical manifestations and to identify frequency of autoantibodies among subtypes of scleroderma patients from Western India. Methodology. One hundred and ten scleroderma patients were clinically classified according to the American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR criteria. All these patients were in active stage of disease. Clinical manifestations were recorded at the time of presentation. Autoantibodies were tested in them by indirect immunofluorescence test and ELISA. Immunoglobulin levels were estimated by nephelometer. These parameters were further correlated with clinical presentation of the disease. Results. Scleroderma patients had M : F ratio of 1 : 10 where mean age at evaluation was 34.7±10.7 years and a mean disease duration was 43.7±35 months. Clinical subtypes showed that 45 patients (40.9% had diffused cutaneous (dcSSc lesions, 32 patients (29.1% had limited cutaneous (lcSSc lesions, and 33 patients (30% had other autoimmune overlaps. The overall frequency of ANA in SSc patients studied was 85.5%. The frequency of anti-Scl70, anti-centromere, anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA, and anti-keratinocyte antibodies (AKA was 62.7%, 22.7%, 30%, and 40.9%, respectively. Anti-Scl70 antibodies were significantly high (75.6% versus 46.9% among dcSSc patients (P<0.0115 whereas anti-centromere antibodies were significantly high (9% versus 38% among lcSSc patients when these two subtypes were compared (P<0.0044. Conclusion. This study supports that there are geoepidemiological variations among scleroderma patients for their clinical

  9. Neurologic Involvement in Scleroderma en Coup de Sabre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Tiago Nardi; Marques Neto, João Francisco; Lapa, Aline Tamires; Peres, Fernando Augusto; Guirau, Caio Rodrigues; Appenzeller, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Localized scleroderma is a rare disease, characterized by sclerotic lesions. A variety of presentations have been described, with different clinical characteristics and specific prognosis. In scleroderma en coup de sabre (LScs) the atrophic lesion in frontoparietal area is the disease hallmark. Skin and subcutaneous are the mainly affected tissues, but case reports of muscle, cartilage, and bone involvement are frequent. These cases pose a difficult differential diagnosis with Parry-Romberg syndrome. Once considered an exclusive cutaneous disorder, the neurologic involvement present in LScs has been described in several case reports. Seizures are most frequently observed, but focal neurologic deficits, movement disorders, trigeminal neuralgia, and mimics of hemiplegic migraines have been reported. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have aided the characterization of central nervous system lesions, and cerebral angiograms have pointed to vasculitis as a part of disease pathogenesis. In this paper we describe the clinical and radiologic aspects of neurologic involvement in LScs. PMID:22319646

  10. Update on the classification and treatment of localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielsa Marsol, I

    2013-10-01

    Morphea or localized scleroderma is a distinctive inflammatory disease that leads to sclerosis of the skin and subcutaneous tissues. It comprises a number of subtypes differentiated according to their clinical presentation and the structure of the skin and underlying tissues involved in the fibrotic process. However, classification is difficult because the boundaries between the different types of morphea are blurred and different entities frequently overlap. The main subtypes are plaque morphea, linear scleroderma, generalized morphea, and pansclerotic morphea. With certain exceptions, the disorder does not have serious systemic repercussions, but it can cause considerable morbidity. In the case of lesions affecting the head, neurological and ocular complications may occur. There is no really effective and universal treatment so it is important to make a correct assessment of the extent and severity of the disease before deciding on a treatment approach. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  11. Barrett esophagus in scleroderma: Increased incidence and radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recht, M.P.; Levine, M.S.; Katzka, D.A.; Reynolds, J.C.; Saul, S.H.; Ouyang, A.; Cohen, S.

    1986-01-01

    Thirteen patients with scleroderma underwent esophagography and endoscopy because of symptoms of reflux esophagitis or dysphagia, or both. Five had biopsy-proved Barrett esophagus, and two of those five had esophageal adencarcinomas. In a blinded review of the barium studies, Barrett esophagus was thought to be probable in one case, possible in seven, and unlikely in five. Five of eight patients in the first two groups had Barrett esophagus on endoscopy, but none in the third group had this disease. The author's initial experience, therefore, suggests that a definitive radiologic diagnosis of Barrett esophagus is not possible in most patients with scleroderma. However, endoscopy may be avoided when Barrett esophagus is considered unlikely on esophagography

  12. A Practical Approach to Juvenile Dermatomyositis and Juvenile Scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Liza J; Pain, Clare E

    2016-02-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis and juvenile scleroderma are rare multisystem autoimmune disorders. Although they share some pathognomonic hallmarks with adult onset myositis or scleroderma, there are significant differences in presentation, characteristics and associated features when the diseases present in childhood. In view of this, and the rarity of the conditions, it is important for care to be led by teams with expertise in pediatric rheumatology conditions. Prognosis has improved significantly in the West; likely due to early diagnosis and aggressive treatment with immunosuppressive medications. However, this trend is not replicated in the developing world. Early recognition of these diseases is crucial to achieve rapid and sustained remission and prevent disease or medication associated complications. This article aims to provide a practical overview for recognition, diagnosis and treatment of these conditions.

  13. A case of cutaneous scleroderma with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H P Nandeesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing cholangitis comprises of a spectrum of cholestatic conditions that are characterized by patchy fibrosis, inflammation and destruction of intra hepatic and extrahepatic ducts. We report a case of a 42 year old woman who presented with darkening of skin with yellowish discolouration of the eyes. Clinical examination revealed icterus, taut skin with hepatosplenomegaly. Liver function tests showed a cholestatic picture. Skin biopsy showed features of cutaneous scleroderma. MRCP and Liver biopsy was suggestive of sclerosing cholangitis.

  14. Use of the international systemic scleroderma activity index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Nikolayevna Starovoitova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Up to now, it is difficult to determine systemic scleroderma (SSD activity because of the lack of validated tools to estimate changes in the pathological process. Attempts have been made to develop unified activity assessing methods for many years. The indices proposed by the European SSD Group are most popular today. This paper gives the results of using this index in a cohort of Russian patients.

  15. The skeletal changes of progressive systemic scleroderma (PSS), of exclusive Raynaud phenomenon and of circumscript scleroderma in a gamma camera scintigraph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulbrich, T.

    1987-01-01

    The bases of this study are the skeletal scintigraphs of altogether 34 patients with the three forms of scleroderma mentioned in the title. The PSS shows a polytropic, symmetric distribution pattern, the exclusive Raynaud's phenomenon shows a basic skeleton which is unchanged in contrast to circumscript scleroderma, with which also the larger joints are relatively more frequently attacked than the little ones. As a result of high sensitivity skeletal scintiscanning makes possible an early recognition of osseous changes and is there with superior to X-radiology and should then see an increased use for the clarification of the diagnosis of arthropathy in scleroderma. (TRV) [de

  16. Technology evaluation: TroVax, Oxford Biomedica

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reiniš, Milan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2004), s. 436-442 ISSN 1464-8431 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : anticancer * vaccine * viral vector-based gene therapy Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.117, year: 2004

  17. Esclerose sistêmica e sarcoidose Scleroderma and sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Guidolin

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descrevem o caso de uma paciente com esclerose sistêmica (ES - forma limitada - com comprometimento pulmonar tipo fibrose intersticial. Após sete anos sem acompanhamento, foram identificados gânglios mediastinais e esplenomegalia. A biópsia de linfonodos mostrou granuloma não caseoso sugestivo de sarcoidose. Estamos mostrando, neste caso, a associação de ES e sarcoidose, para chamar a atenção para esse fato e enfatizar que a sarcoidose deve ser lembrada no diagnóstico diferencial das complicações pulmonares da esclerodermia.The authors describe the case of a patient with limited scleroderma and interstitial lung disease. Follow-up was lost for seven years, when patient returned presenting nodular mediastinal enlargement and splenomegaly. Lymph node biopsy showed granulomatous lesions without caseum suggestive of sarcoidosis. This case is being presented to remind the association of scleroderma and sarcoidosis as a possible differential diagnosis of scleroderma pulmonary complications.

  18. Scleroderma in the Caribbean: characteristics in a Dominican case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Paola; Vásquez, Ricardo; López, Persio David; Then, Jossiell; Tineo, Carmen; Loyo, Esthela

    2014-01-01

    Scleroderma is a rare disease with limited data in Latin America. Preliminary genetic studies suggest a strong African ascendance in the Dominican Republic, which could modulate the expression of the disease. The objective of this study is to describe the clinical and demographic characteristics of scleroderma in a series of 26 Dominican patients. Patients who fulfilled the EULAR/ACR criteria for scleroderma were selected from the Rheumatology Department of a tertiary health center; systemic sclerosis subtypes were defined according to the EULAR classification. Clinical and demographic information was obtained retrospectively from clinical records. Mean age at time of onset was 32.6±15 years; 68% of patients had 40 years of age or less. 73% of patients was feminine, with a female:male ratio of 2.7:1. The most affected systems were pulmonary and gastrointestinal; renal affection was scarce. Anti-Scl-70 antibodies were positive in 64% of patients, sometimes in coexistence with anti-centromere antibodies. The prevalence of systemic sclerosis is lower in the Dominican population than the reported elsewhere. The age of onset of the disease seems to be lower in the Dominican population than that reported in literature. A different pattern of autoantibodies is observed in this population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Discovery or Extinction of New Scleroderma Species in Amazonia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuri G Baseia

    Full Text Available The Amazon Forest is a hotspot of biodiversity harboring an unknown number of undescribed taxa. Inventory studies are urgent, mainly in the areas most endangered by human activities such as extensive dam construction, where species could be in risk of extinction before being described and named. In 2015, intensive studies performed in a few locations in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest revealed three new species of the genus Scleroderma: S. anomalosporum, S. camassuense and S. duckei. The two first species were located in one of the many areas flooded by construction of hydroelectric dams throughout the Amazon; and the third in the Reserva Florestal Adolpho Ducke, a protected reverse by the INPA. The species were identified through morphology and molecular analyses of barcoding sequences (Internal Transcribed Spacer nrDNA. Scleroderma anomalosporum is characterized mainly by the smooth spores under LM in mature basidiomata (under SEM with small, unevenly distributed granules, a characteristic not observed in other species of the genus, the large size of the basidiomata, up to 120 mm diameter, and the stelliform dehiscence; S. camassuense mainly by the irregular to stellate dehiscence, the subreticulated spores and the bright sulfur-yellow colour, and Scleroderma duckei mainly by the verrucose exoperidium, stelliform dehiscence, and verrucose spores. Description, illustration and affinities with other species of the genus are provided.

  20. Targeting miR-155 to Treat Experimental Scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qingran; Chen, Jie; Li, Wei; Bao, Chunde; Fu, Qiong

    2016-02-01

    Scleroderma is a refractory autoimmune skin fibrotic disorder. Alterations of microRNAs in lesional skin could be a new approach to treating the disease. Here, we found that expression of miR-155 was up regulated in lesional skin tissue from patients with either systemic or localized scleroderma, and correlated with fibrosis area. Then we demonstrated the potential of miR-155 as a therapeutic target in pre-clinical scleroderma models. MiR-155(-/-) mice were resistant to bleomycin induced skin fibrosis. Moreover, topical antagomiR-155 could effectively treat mice primed with subcutaneous bleomycin. In primary skin fibroblast, miR-155 silencing could inhibit collagen synthesis function, as well as signaling intensity of two pro-fibrotic pathways, Wnt/β-catenin and Akt, simultaneously. We further showed that miR-155 could regulate the two pathways via directly targeting casein kinase 1α (CK1α) and Src homology 2-containing inositol phosphatase-1 (SHIP-1), as previous reports. Mice with miR-155 knockout or topical antagomir-155 treatment showed inhibited Wnt/β-catenin and Akt signaling in skin upon bleomycin challenge. Together, our data suggest the potential of miR-155 silencing as a promising treatment for dermal fibrosis, especially in topical applications.

  1. Pediatric Scleroderma –Systemic and Localized Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torok, Kathryn S.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis statement Pediatric scleroderma includes two major groups of clinical entities, systemic sclerosis (SSc) and localized scleroderma (LS). Although both share a common pathophysiology, with an initial inflammatory phase associated with endothelial activation, and a later fibrotic phase evidenced by collagenization of tissue and appreciable skin thickness, their clinical manifestations differ. LS is typically confined to the skin and underlying subcutis, and though not fatal like SSc, up to a quarter of the patients may have extracutaneous disease manifestations, such as arthritis and uveitis. While any organ may be affected in SSc, vascular (Raynaud’s phenomenon), cutaneous (skin thickening), GI, pulmonary and musculoskeletal involvement are most commonly seen in children. Auto-antibody profiles in childhood onset SSc can assist in predicting internal organ involvement. Treatment for both forms of scleroderma targets the active inflammatory stage and halts disease progression; however, progress still needs to be made towards the development of a more effective anti-fibrotic therapy to help reverse disease damage. PMID:22560576

  2. Cytokine profiles in localized scleroderma and relationship to clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzinski, Katherine; Torok, Kathryn S

    2011-08-01

    Localized scleroderma (LS) is a disfiguring autoimmune disease of the skin and underlying tissue that mainly affects the pediatric population. Inflammation of the tissue leads to fibrosis and atrophy, causing physical and psychological disability that can continue throughout childhood into adulthood. Available therapies for LS have had variable effects and are associated with morbidity themselves. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of LS, especially during the active inflammatory phase, would lead to more directed and efficacious therapies. As in systemic sclerosis (SSc), the other form of scleroderma, T-helper (Th) cells and their associated cytokines have been suggested to contribute significantly to the pathophysiology of LS supported by the presence of cytokines from these lineages in the sera and tissue of LS patients. It is postulated that the imbalance between Th1/Th2/Th17 cell subsets drives inflammation in the early stages of disease (Th1 and Th17 predominant) and fibrosis in the later stages of scleroderma (Th2 predominant). We review the available experimental data regarding cytokines in LS and compare them to available clinical disease severity and activity features. This provides the platform to launch further investigations into the role of select cytokines in the pathogenesis of LS and to provide directed therapeutic options in the future. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. End-Stage Kidney Disease From Scleroderma in the United States, 1996 to 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donal J. Sexton

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The incidence of ESKD from scleroderma appears to have declined in the United States since 1996. ESKD from scleroderma is associated with an enhanced likelihood of recovery of kidney function and death, a reduced likelihood of transplantation, and similar outcomes after transplantation.

  4. Evaluation of heart rhythm variability and arrhythmia in children with systemic and localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Jacek; Dabrowski, Rafal; Luczak, Dariusz; Kwiatkowska, Malgorzata; Musiej-Nowakowska, Elzbieta; Kowalik, Ilona; Szwed, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate possible disturbances in autonomic regulation and cardiac arrhythmias in children with localized and systemic scleroderma. There were 40 children included in the study: 20 with systemic and 20 with localized scleroderma. The control group comprised 20 healthy children. In 24-hour Holter recording, the average rate of sinus rhythm was significantly higher in the groups with systemic and localized scleroderma than in the control group, but there was no significant difference between them. The variability of heart rhythm in both groups was significantly decreased. In the group with systemic scleroderma, single supraventricular ectopic beats were observed in 20% and runs were seen in 40% of patients. In the group with localized scleroderma, supraventricular single ectopic beats occurred in 35% of patients and runs in 45% of those studied. Ventricular arrhythmia occurred in 2 children with systemic scleroderma, but in 1 child, it was complex. The most frequent cardiac arrhythmias in both types of scleroderma in children were of supraventricular origin, whereas ventricular arrhythmias did not occur very often. There were no significant differences in autonomic disturbances manifesting as a higher heart rate and decreased heart rate variability between localized and systemic scleroderma.

  5. Exploring sources of emotional distress among people living with scleroderma: A focus group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gumuchian, S.T.; Peláez, S.; Delisle, V.C.; Carrier, M.E.; Jewett, L.R.; El-Baalbaki, G.; Fortune, C.; Hudson, M.; Impens, A.; Körner, A.; Persmann, J.; Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Bartlett, S.J.; Thombs, B.D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Systemic sclerosis, or scleroderma, is a chronic and rare connective tissue disease with negative physical and psychological implications. Sources of emotional distress and the impact they have on the lives of people with scleroderma are not well understood. Objectives: To gain an

  6. Validation of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morley D

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available David Morley, Sarah Dummett, Laura Kelly, Jill Dawson, Ray Fitzpatrick, Crispin Jenkinson Health Services Research Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Purpose: There is growing interest in the management of long-term conditions and in keeping people active and participating in the community. Testing the effectiveness of interventions that aim to affect activities and participation can be challenging without a well-developed, valid, and reliable instrument. This study therefore aims to develop a patient-reported outcome measure, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ, which is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF and fully compliant with current best practice guidelines. Methods: Questionnaire items generated from patient interviews and based on the nine chapters of the ICF were administered by postal survey to 386 people with three neurological conditions: motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. Participants also completed the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 and EQ-5D-5L. Results: Thus, 334 participants completed the survey, a response rate of 86.5%. Factor analysis techniques identified three Ox-PAQ domains, consisting of 23 items, accounting for 72.8% of variance. Internal reliability for the three domains was high (Cronbach's α: 0.81–0.96, as was test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation: 0.83–0.92. Concurrent validity was demonstrated through highly significant relationships with relevant domains of the MOS SF-36 and the EQ-5D-5L. Assessment of known-groups validity identified significant differences in Ox-PAQ scores among the three conditions included in the survey. Conclusion: Results suggest that the Ox-PAQ is a valid and reliable measure of participation and activity. The measure will now be validated in

  7. Prospective study to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcome of patients with scleroderma of the face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careta, Mariana Figueiroa; Leite, Claudia da Costa; Cresta, Fernando; Albino, Jose; Tsunami, Mirian; Romiti, Ricardo

    2013-09-01

    Scleroderma featuring rare connective tissue disease that manifests as skin sclerosis and variable systemic involvement. Two categories of scleroderma are known: systemic sclerosis, characterized by cutaneous sclerosis and visceral involvement and localized scleroderma or morphea which classically presents benign evolution and self-limited, confined to the skin and/or underlying tissue. Recent studies show that the localized form may possibly course with involvement of internal organs and variable morbidity. This study aimed to determine the demographic characteristics, the prevalence of systemic manifestations and laboratory findings, as well as the association with autoimmune diseases, and the evolution of neurological findings, both clinical as brain MRI in patients with scleroderma of the face and its relation with the activity skin. Patients with localized scleroderma with facial involvement were evaluated and underwent neurological examination, magnetic resonance imaging and ophthalmology evaluation. After 3years, the patients were subjected again to MRI. We studied 12 patients with localized scleroderma of the face. Of this total, headache being the most frequent complaint found in 66.7% of patients, 33.3% had neurological changes possibly associated with scleroderma. As for ophthalmologic evaluation, 25% of patients showed abnormalities. The most frequent parenchymal finding was the presence of lesions with hyperintense or hypointense signal in 75% of patients, followed by ventricular asymmetry at 16.7%. Of the patients who had neurological deficits, 75% also had a change to MRI. In all patients, imaging findings after 3years were unchanged. During this interval of 3years, 25% of patients showed signs of activity of scleroderma. Patients with localized scleroderma of the face have a high prevalence of neurological and ophthalmological changes. Based on these findings, we suggest that all cases of localized scleroderma of the face should be thoroughly

  8. OXFORD HANDBOOK OF SPORT AND EXERCISE MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domhnall MacAuley

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION This flexicover handbook presents a user-friendly overview into the evolving discipline of sports medicine. The growing scientific and research base is summarised and essential views on treatment, preventive strategies, and optimal exercise recommendation are discussed briefly in the relevant chapters. This book has been designed for everyday use for the practitioners working in this medical field. It also has blank pages for the readers' own updates. PURPOSE This guide book aims to display the common problems and diagnoses in sports and exercise medicine and to concentrate on the up-to-date approaches, management plans, and evidence-based procedures of treatment at the same time. AUDIENCE As a comprehensive basic text this guide book could be useful for lecturers, teachers, practitioners and students of exercise and sports medicine as well as GPs, nurses and others who are especially interested in this field. FEATURES This handbook is partitioned into 24 chapters focusing on the needs of the patient and offering an immediate guide to all aspects of diagnosis and treatment, epidemiology, exercise benefits and physiological issues. The chapters are: 1. Immediate care, 2. Sports injury, 3. Benefits of exercise, 4. Physiothrepy and rehabilitation, 5. Hip and pelvis, 6. Knee, 7. Ankle and lower leg, 8. Foot, 9. Shoulder, 10. Elbow and forearm, 11. Wrist and hand, 12. Head and face, 13. Spine, 14. Cardiorespiratory, 15. Abdomen, 16. Infectious disease, 17. Arthritis, 18. Dermatology, 19. Disability, 20. Physiology, 21. Metabolic, 22. Women, 23. Aids to performance, 24. The team physician. ASSESSMENT This is a must-have handbook for all medics practising in sports and exercise medicine, as well as anyone who has a special interest in this area, especially GPs, nurses, physiotherapists; even coaches, trainers, biomechanical experts. I believe they will enjoy making use of this guide book as it is right to the point, easy to read and

  9. News from the Library: You need never be lost for words again - Oxford Reference Online and Oxford Dictionaries Pro

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2012-01-01

    Whether you are looking for an English word definition or want to check the correct usage of a word, we can offer you a solution: Oxford Reference Online.   It includes a wide range of monolingual and bilingual dictionaries, but also subject-specific reference books on physics, astronomy or mathematics. All these works are fully indexed and cross-searchable. Two highlights from this vast collection of reference works are the Concise Oxford English Dictionary and the Oxford Dictionary of English, which is the online counterpart of the compact, single-volume dictionary of current English language. As the name says, Oxford Dictionaries Pro focuses on language dictionaries. Particularly noteworthy are the dictionaries for writers and editors. On a dedicated web page you will find access to: - The "New Hart's Rules", providing information on all aspects of writing and preparing copy for publication, whether in print or electronically - The New Oxford Dictionary for Wri...

  10. Factors Affecting Applications to Oxford and Cambridge--Repeat Survey. Executive Summary with Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Kate; White, Kerensa; Styles, Ben; Morrison, Jo

    2005-01-01

    This research follows up a study conducted in 1998 by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) to investigate teachers' and students' views on the factors affecting students' choices of whether or not to apply to Oxford and Cambridge universities. It identifies what has changed since 1998 and areas in which the universities could…

  11. Women leadership in Oxford House: examining their strengths and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Margaret I; Dziekan, Marta M; Horin, Elizabeth V; Jason, Leonard A; Ferrari, Joseph R; Olson, Bradley D

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the perspectives and definition of leadership by women and mothers with children (n = 40) affiliated with Oxford Houses, a communal mutual-help recovery setting. Participants were asked questions relating to their experiences living in an Oxford House including the strengths and challenges encountered and how leadership impacted the stability in their house. Results illustrated the value of female leadership and highlighted the characteristics deemed important for women leaders in Oxford House, as well as some differences between these women's perception of leadership and the standard definition of leadership. The implications of the findings and how they may be useful to women's and mothers' with children houses are discussed.

  12. Incidence of childhood linear scleroderma and systemic sclerosis in the UK and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Ariane L; Ennis, Holly; Bhushan, Monica; Silman, Alan J; Baildam, Eileen M

    2010-02-01

    Childhood scleroderma encompasses a rare, poorly understood spectrum of conditions. Our aim was to ascertain the incidence of childhood scleroderma in its different forms in the UK and Ireland, and to describe the age, sex, and ethnicity of the cases. The members of 5 specialist medical associations including pediatricians, dermatologists, and rheumatologists were asked to report all cases of abnormal skin thickening suspected to be localized (including linear) scleroderma or systemic sclerosis (SSc) in children scleroderma and 7 (7%) with SSc. This gave an incidence rate per million children per year of 3.4 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 2.7-4.1) for localized scleroderma, including an incidence rate of 2.5 (95% CI 1.8-3.1) for linear scleroderma, and 0.27 (95% CI 0.1-0.5) for SSc. Of the 87 localized cases, 62 (71%) had linear disease. Of localized disease cases, 55 (63%) were female, 71 (82%) were classified as white British, and the patients' mean age when first seen in secondary care was 10.4 years. Of the 7 SSc cases, all were female, 6 (86%) were white British, and the mean age when first seen was 12.1 years. The median delay between onset and being first seen was 13.1 months for localized scleroderma and 7.2 months for SSc. These data provide additional estimates of the incidence of this rare disorder and its subforms.

  13. Scleroderma in hospital settings in Lomé: 50 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akakpo, A S; Teclessou, J N; Mouhari-Touré, A; Saka, B; Matakloe, H; Kakpovi, K; Kombate, K; Pitché, P

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to document the epidemiological and clinical profile, treatment used, and outcome of patients with scleroderma in hospital settings in Lomé. This descriptive study examined the records of all patients seen as outpatients or admitted for scleroderma in hospital dermatology and rheumatology departments in Lomé during the 20-year period of 1993-2012. During the study period, 50 (0.04%) of the 121,021 patients seen in these departments had scleroderma. There were 29 cases of localized scleroderma and 21 systemic cases, predominantly women (sex-ratio=0.2). The patients' mean age was 36 years. All patients with systemic scleroderma had speckled achromia (100%), and most (90.48%) had cutaneous sclerosis. After a mean follow-up period of 43.5 days, 71.43% of the patients had been lost to follow-up. All of the patients with localized scleroderma had cutaneous sclerosis, and the rate of loss to follow-up (after a mean of 17 days) was 96.55%. The results of this study confirm the extreme rarity of scleroderma in the teaching hospitals in Lomé and a clear female predominance. It points out the difficulty of management, which both influences and is aggravated by the high rate of loss to follow-up.

  14. The frequency of pulmonary hypertension in patients with juvenile scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amra Adrovic

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile scleroderma (JS represents a rarely seen group of connective tissue diseases with multiple organ involvement. Cardiac involvement in JSS is well known and, although rare in children, it may be an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Therefore, an early determination of cardio-vascular and pulmonary involvement is of the most relevance to reduce the mortality in patients with juvenile scleroderma. The aim of the study was to explore the non-invasive methods (Doppler echocardiography, pulmonary function tests, Forced vital capacity (FVC and Carbon monoxide diffusion capacity (DLCO in the assessment of the cardiopulmonary involvement in patients with JS. The assessment of pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP and risk factors for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH were made by the measurement of maximum tricuspid insufficiency (TI, end-diastolic pulmonary insufficiency (PI, ratio of acceleration time (AT to ejection time (ET (AT/ET, right atrial pressure (RAP and contraction of vena cava inferior during inspiration. Thirty-five patients with confirmed JS were included in the study. The mean age of onset of the disease was 9.57 years (median 10 years, range 2-18 years. The mean disease duration and follow-up time was 2 years (median 1 year, range 0.5-8 years and 3.57 years (median 2 years, range 0.5-14.5 years, respectively.The values of all the analyzed parameters including TI, PI, AT/ET, PAP, FVC and DLCO were found to be within normal ranges in all the patients tested, confirming an uncommonness of cardiopulmonary involvement in patients with juvenile scleroderma.

  15. The frequency of pulmonary hypertension in patients with juvenile scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrovic, Amra; Oztunc, Funda; Barut, Kenan; Koka, Aida; Gojak, Refet; Sahin, Sezgin; Demir, Tuncalp; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2015-08-22

    Juvenile scleroderma (JS) represents a rarely seen group of connective tissue diseases with multiple organ involvement. Cardiac involvement in JSS is well known and, although rare in children, it may be an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Therefore, an early determination of cardio-vascular and pulmonary involvement is of the most relevance to reduce the mortality in patients with juvenile scleroderma. The aim of the study was to explore the non-invasive methods (Doppler echocardiography, pulmonary function tests), Forced vital capacity (FVC) and Carbon monoxide diffusion capacity (DLCO) in the assessment of the cardiopulmonary involvement in patients with JS. The assessment of pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and risk factors for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) were made by the measurement of maximum tricuspid insufficiency (TI), end-diastolic pulmonary insufficiency (PI), ratio of acceleration time (AT) to ejection time (ET) (AT/ET), right atrial pressure (RAP) and contraction of vena cava inferior during inspiration. Thirty-five patients with confirmed JS were included in the study. The mean age of onset of the disease was 9.57 years (median 10 years, range 2-18 years). The mean disease duration and follow-up time was 2 years (median 1 year, range 0.5-8 years) and 3.57 years (median 2 years, range 0.5-14.5 years), respectively.The values of all the analyzed parameters including TI, PI, AT/ET, PAP, FVC and DLCO were found to be within normal ranges in all the patients tested, confirming an uncommonness of cardiopulmonary involvement in patients with juvenile scleroderma.

  16. ANCA-associated vasculitis in scleroderma: a case series of fourteen patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly P. Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimyeloperoxidase (MPO, perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA, and/or clinically evident vasculitis in patients with scleroderma have been reported only rarely. The clinical significance and prognosis of ANCA-associated vasculitis in systemic sclerosis is uncertain. To report a case and identify the clinical characteristics of scleroderma patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis. Patients with both vasculitis and scleroderma occurring between 1976 to 2006 were identified using an electronic diagnostic index. These diagnoses were confirmed by retrospective review of complete medical records. Clinical features and outcomes recorded included age at vasculitis diagnosis, connective tissue disease (CTD features, type of scleroderma (limited or diffuse; ANCA serology, vasculitic organ system manifestations; and death. Fourteen cases of scleroderma patients with ANCA-associated and/or small vessel vasculitis were identified. The majority (71% were female, with mean age at vasculitis diagnosis 53 years. Seven patients (50% had overlap CTD features, and the majority (79% had limited variant of scleroderma. All of the 10 patients tested were MPO and pANCA positive. Seven patients (50% had glomerulonephritis, 11 (79% pulmonary involvement including 3 with pulmonary-renal syndrome, 6 skin purpura, and 5 mononeuritis multiplex and/or peripheral neuropathy. Six patients (43% died during followup to 2008. The presence of pANCA-associated small vessel vasculitis is a rarely reported complication of scleroderma. It occurs most commonly in women with limited scleroderma and most commonly includes pulmonary and/or renal involvement, including severe organ-threatening manifestations and death. Further studies are needed to clarify the role and clinical impact of ANCA in scleroderma patients with and without vasculitis.

  17. Localized scleroderma and its implications on quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalia Mebius

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma is a disease of unknown etiology, which affects the connective tissue, is characterized histologically by a change in collagen synthesis with increased deposition, and dermal infiltration and thickening of the skin, asymmetric distribution without involvement of internal organs in this way (localized of the disease, but can lead, in some cases, important aesthetic and functional impairment of the patient. In our case, it is believed that the disease has already developed completely and now there is an overlap disease of old age, which makes their daily activities and independence.

  18. Scleroderma Renal Crisis: A Reversible Cause of Left Ventricular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Milla, Juan; Gaebelt, Hans Paul; Sánchez-Pernaute, Olga; Kallmeyer, Andrea; Romero, José; Farré, Jerónimo

    2018-05-02

    We report a case of acute left ventricular dysfunction due to myocarditis, in the setting of a scleroderma renal crisis. The case is particularly intriguing for the favorable outcome of both symptoms and heart function following immunosuppressive therapy. We also highlight the changes observed over time with image techniques as well as in electrocardiograms. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. New developments in juvenile systemic and localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foeldvari, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    Juvenile localized scleroderma (jLS) and juvenile systemic sclerosis (jSS) are both orphan diseases, with jLS around 10 times more frequent than jSS. In recent years the time gap between the appearance of symptoms and diagnosis has become significantly shorter. This review focuses on the new classifications of jSS and jLS, and on the developments and adaptations of the outcome measures for certain organ involvements whereby progress has been made regarding pediatric patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tumor-like calcifications with scleroderma. Thibierge-Weissenbach-Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, E.; Kulenkampff, H.A.; Kortenhaus, H.

    1987-12-01

    In patients with progressive scleroderma, interstitial calcifications are present to a varying extent. They are mostly located in the soft tissues of the fingers, resembling points, commas or dashes. They may also appear as 'calcinosis universalis' and reach a considerable size. Thus they mimic proliferative tumors. Scintigraphy, proving the existence of further calcifications can be helpful. We report the case of a female patient who presented with such a 'pseudotumor' of unusual size, site and extent in the lumbar region.

  1. Renal diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures in progressive systemic scleroderma (PSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammari, B.; Hotze, A.; Gruenwald, F.; Biersack, H.J.; Blitz, H.; Kuester, W.; Kreysel, H.W.

    1989-02-01

    The involvement of kidneys in progressive systemic scleroderma (PSS) is one of the most frequent causes of death in this disease. Using clinical criteria and laboratory tests only the frequency of kidney involvement would be clearly underestimated. Invasive diagnostic procedures such as biopsy and angiography can not be applied in those patients. Nuclear medicine techniques (hippurate clearance, DMSA-scan), however, offer non invasive and sensitive methods in the diagnosis of renal involvement in PSS patients. In our study 46 of 76 patients (60%) revealed pathologic findings. The mentioned diagnostic techniques show a high sensitivity and are in agreement with pathological findings described in PSS.

  2. Renal diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures in progressive systemic scleroderma (PSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammari, B.; Hotze, A.; Gruenwald, F.; Biersack, H.J.; Blitz, H.; Kuester, W.; Kreysel, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    The involvement of kidneys in progressive systemic scleroderma (PSS) is one of the most frequent causes of death in this disease. Using clinical criteria and laboratory tests only the frequency of kidney involvement would be clearly underestimated. Invasive diagnostic procedures such as biopsy and angiography can not be applied in those patients. Nuclear medicine techniques (hippurate clearance, DMSA-scan), however, offer non invasive and sensitive methods in the diagnosis of renal involvement in PSS patients. In our study 46 of 76 patients (60%) revealed pathologic findings. The mentioned diagnostic techniques show a high sensitivity and are in agreement with pathological findings described in PSS. (orig.) [de

  3. Treatment of morphea or localized scleroderma: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Fernanda Aguiar Santos; Carneiro, Sueli; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia

    2010-10-01

    Scleroderma is a disease that affects the microvasculature and the connective tissue. These alterations produce fibrosis and blood vessel occlusion. Its cause is still unknown, although the exaggerated synthesis of collagens I and IV, detected in skin and vessels, may be related to genetic, immunologic and, less frequently, exogenous factors as inhalation of silica and polyvinyl chloride. There is a localized and a systemic form, which affects both adults and children. The treatment of the localized form, also called morphea, is still controversial, and, in this article, the authors will discuss the main agents that were found to improve the lesions and symptoms.

  4. Oxford engineering students to study new solutions for vacuum chambers

    CERN Multimedia

    Department of Engineering Science - University of Oxford

    2012-01-01

    In April, eleven engineering science students in their third year at Oxford University were invited here to present their design ideas for new vacuum chamber materials to be used in accelerators. We publish below an abstract of the article that the University of Oxford featured on its website.   The 11 Oxford students who worked at CERN on alternatives to beryllium in vacuum chambers. (Photo courtesy of the Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford.) Engineering Science students invited to design for CERN’s Large Hadron Collider In April, eleven Engineering Science students in their third year were invited to the CERN laboratory in Geneva to present their ideas for new vacuum chamber designs for the experiments of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Their design objectives were to propose alternatives to beryllium – the material used for some of the existing experimental vacuum chambers. Beryllium (chemical element with the symbol Be and atomic number 4) is to...

  5. A neoteric multidrug combination: novel approach to limited cutaneous systemic scleroderma involving the face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M Hari; Kumar, M Siva; Kumar, Sabitha Hari; Kumar, Kingsly Selva

    2016-01-01

    Limited cutaneous scleroderma is a subtype of scleroderma limited to the skin of the face, hands, feet and forearms. We present a case of a 45-year-old woman affected by limited cutaneous systemic scleroderma involving the orofacial region and causing restricted mouth opening. The patient showed noteworthy improvement of the skin lesion by use of a combination of intralesional corticosteroid with hyaluronidase and various multiantioxidants, resulting in amelioration of her mouth opening problem. The patient gave her full informed written consent to this report being published. PMID:27033280

  6. A neoteric multidrug combination: novel approach to limited cutaneous systemic scleroderma involving the face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M Hari; Kumar, M Siva; Kumar, Sabitha Hari; Kumar, Kingsly Selva

    2016-03-31

    Limited cutaneous scleroderma is a subtype of scleroderma limited to the skin of the face, hands, feet and forearms. We present a case of a 45-year-old woman affected by limited cutaneous systemic scleroderma involving the orofacial region and causing restricted mouth opening. The patient showed noteworthy improvement of the skin lesion by use of a combination of intralesional corticosteroid with hyaluronidase and various multiantioxidants, resulting in amelioration of her mouth opening problem. The patient gave her full informed written consent to this report being published. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. Systemic scleroderma diagnosed after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tetsuo; Kakei, Masae

    1994-01-01

    A case of systemic scleroderma in which the symptoms became prominent after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer is reported. A 68-year-old woman, who had undergone a radical mastectomy for breast carcinoma at the age of 63 and thereafter received radiotherapy at 65, 66 and 67 years of age, visited our clinic complaining of skin sclerosis and Raynaud's phenomenon which she had noticed since the age of 65. The physical examination revealed not only postirradiation fibrosis and pigmentation, but also edematous sclerosis and the pigmentation of her extremities, as well as short frenulum of the tongue and digital pitting scars. She demonstrated serum anti-topoisomerase I antibodies, esophageal dysfunction and lung fibrosis. The histopathology of the forearm skin showed edema of the upper dermis as well as increased and homogenized collagen bundles in the middle and lower dermis. Since similar cases have been reported, it is considerable that radiation therapy may have thus worsened the lesions of scleroderma in this patient as well. (author)

  8. Systemic scleroderma diagnosed after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Tetsuo; Kakei, Masae (Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1994-10-01

    A case of systemic scleroderma in which the symptoms became prominent after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer is reported. A 68-year-old woman, who had undergone a radical mastectomy for breast carcinoma at the age of 63 and thereafter received radiotherapy at 65, 66 and 67 years of age, visited our clinic complaining of skin sclerosis and Raynaud's phenomenon which she had noticed since the age of 65. The physical examination revealed not only postirradiation fibrosis and pigmentation, but also edematous sclerosis and the pigmentation of her extremities, as well as short frenulum of the tongue and digital pitting scars. She demonstrated serum anti-topoisomerase I antibodies, esophageal dysfunction and lung fibrosis. The histopathology of the forearm skin showed edema of the upper dermis as well as increased and homogenized collagen bundles in the middle and lower dermis. Since similar cases have been reported, it is considerable that radiation therapy may have thus worsened the lesions of scleroderma in this patient as well. (author).

  9. Measurement of transepidermal water loss in localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďurčanská, Veronika; Jedličková, Hana; Vašků, Vladimír

    2016-05-01

    Localized scleroderma (LS) is a disease characterized by fibrotic changes in the dermis. Connective tissue growth factor and transforming growth factor β2 are the main mediators of fibrogenesis; this, along with excessive connective tissue production, affects epidermal keratinocytes, and thereby contributes to the changed quality of skin barrier. The objective of this article was to study the objective measurement of the skin barrier quality in LS with transepidermal water loss (TEWL) meter. The measurements of TEWL were performed on LS plaques in all three stages of various body locations. Control measurements were made on the contralateral side of healthy skin. The difference between TEWL in LS area and the contralateral side of the healthy skin was evaluated. A higher average TEWL 7.86 g/m(2) /h (SD 5.29) was observed on LS plaques compared with the control measurements on healthy skin 6.39 g/m(2) /h (SD 2.77). TEWL average values decreased from the inflammatory stage, through the sclerotic and to the atrophic stage. The mean difference 1.301 g/m(2) /h (SD 5.16) was found between TEWL on LS plaques and on the contralateral healthy skin in 82 measurements, i.e., a higher TEWL was observed in LS. The difference was statistically significant with p = 0.0250. Although fibrogenesis in scleroderma is localized in dermis, the skin barrier changes can be detected. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Localized scleroderma en coup de sabre in the Neurology Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, João; Rocha, João; Sousa, Filipa; Macedo, Cristiana; Soares-Fernandes, João; Cerqueira, João; Maré, Ricardo; Lourenço, Esmeralda; Pereira, João

    2016-07-01

    Localized scleroderma en coup de sabre (LScs) is a form of localized scleroderma thought to be an autoimmune disorder. Central nervous system involvement is not rare and neurological manifestations include seizures, focal neurological deficits, headache and neuropsychiatric changes. Patients attending the Neurology Clinic with the final diagnosis of LScs with neurological manifestations were identified and clinical and imagiological records reviewed. Five patients (0.024%) had LScs with neurological involvement, presenting with transient focal neurologic deficits, seizures, headache or migraine with aura. Neuroimaging studies confirmed localized skin depression and showed bone thinning, white matter lesions, brain calcifications, sulcal effacement and meningeal enhancement. Three patients experienced clinical improvement after immunosuppressive therapy, and in two of these patients neuroimaging findings also improved. Recognizing typical dermatologic changes is keystone for the diagnosis of LScs with neurological involvement. It is a diagnosis of exclusion and extensive etiological diagnostic evaluation should be performed. Treatment options, including conservative follow-up or immunosuppressive therapy, should be carefully considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence of localized scleroderma in the Krasnodar territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Tlish

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors conducted a study of particular features of the course of localized scleroderma in the south of Russia (Krasnodar territory. 65 case histories were analyzed. Women suffered from the disease 2.8 times more often than men; one half of the sample (55.4% included patients aged 35-55; the disease duration of over a year prevailed (69.8%; the disease occurred against the background of an endocrine pathology in one third of all cases; one third of all women developed the disease during the postmenopausal period. Plaque scleroderma (56.9%, white spot disease (von Zumbusch psoriasis (16.9% and idiopathic atrophoderma of Pasini and Pierini (12.3% belonged to the key clinical forms. The average number of lesions was 2.4 ± 1.2 while almost a half of the patients (47.7% had three or more lesions. The clinical manifestations localized mostly on the back (46.5% and stomach (34.9%.

  12. Esophageal dysmotility in scleroderma: a prospective study of 183 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahcene, M; Oumnia, N; Matougui, N; Boudjella, M; Tebaibia, A; Touchene, B

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors of esophageal motor disorders in systemic sclerosis. In 183 consecutive cases of scleroderma, as diagnosed by American College of Rheumatology criteria (1980). Patients' mean age was 40.6+/-13.3 years, the gender ratio was 0.13 and the average duration of disease was 6.8+/-7.5 years. A localized, cutaneous form was observed in 148 patients (81%) and a diffuse form in 35 (19%). All patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and standard esophageal manometry. Esophageal symptoms and reflux esophagitis were found in 108 (59%) and 68 (37%) of patients, respectively. Esophageal motor disorders were present in 148 patients (81%), and were associated with a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter in 114 (62%). The presence of these motor abnormalities was not related to age, gender, skin extension or duration of disease. Esophageal motor disorders were present in almost all patients with esophageal symptoms or esophagitis, and were also found in 48 (64%) of the asymptomatic patients. Esophageal motor disorders are frequently seen in scleroderma, especially in cases with clinical symptoms, but are not associated with a specific form of the disease.

  13. Race and association with disease manifestations and mortality in scleroderma: a 20-year experience at the Johns Hopkins Scleroderma Center and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelber, Allan C; Manno, Rebecca L; Shah, Ami A; Woods, Adrianne; Le, Elizabeth N; Boin, Francesco; Hummers, Laura K; Wigley, Fredrick M

    2013-07-01

    Experience suggests that African Americans may express autoimmune disease differently than other racial groups. In the context of systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), we sought to determine whether race was related to a more adverse expression of disease. Between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 2009, a total of 409 African American and 1808 white patients with scleroderma were evaluated at a single university medical center. While the distribution by sex was virtually identical in both groups, at 82% female, African American patients presented to the center at a younger mean age than white patients (47 vs. 53 yr; p scleroderma-specific autoantibody status, and for the socioeconomic measures of educational attainment and health insurance status, diminished these risk estimates (RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.6). The heightened risk of mortality persisted in strata defined by age at disease onset, diffuse cutaneous disease, anticentromere seropositivity, decade of care at the center, and among women. These findings support the notion that race is related to a distinct phenotypic profile in scleroderma, and a more unfavorable prognosis among African Americans, warranting heightened diagnostic evaluation and vigilant care of these patients. Further, we provide a chronologic review of the literature regarding race, organ system involvement, and mortality in scleroderma; we furnish synopses of relevant reports, and summarize findings.

  14. Treatment of linear scleroderma with oral 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) in seven children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.F. Elst (Elisabeth); L.W.A. van Suijlekom-Smit (Lisette); A.P. Oranje (Arnold)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractLinear scleroderma is a connective tissue disorder that characteristically involves the skin. Skin induration and pigmentary changes present in a linear distribution. Severe functional and cosmetic disability may occur, especially in growing children. No effective therapy for the

  15. Predictors of end stage lung disease in a cohort of patients with scleroderma

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, C; Knight, C; Lunt, M; Black, C; Silman, A

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the incidence of severe lung disease in patients with scleroderma and identify the combination(s) of features present at first assessment which would be useful to predict future risk of severe lung disease.

  16. INTERSTITIAL LUNG-DISEASE AND MYOSITIS IN A PATIENT WITH SIMULTANEOUSLY OCCURRING SARCOIDOSIS AND SCLERODERMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GROEN, H; POSTMA, DS; KALLENBERG, CGM

    1993-01-01

    A patient initially presented with sarcoidosis in combination with myositis of sarcoid origin and Raynaud's phenomenon. During the course of his disease, he additionally developed scleroderma. Bronchoalveolar lavage, performed because of increase of interstitial markings in the presence of enlarged

  17. Alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) in the skin of patient with localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi-Kuwata, Nobuyo; Makino, Takamitsu; Inoue, Yuji; Takeya, Motohiro; Ihn, Hironobu

    2009-08-01

    Localized scleroderma is a connective tissue disorder that is limited to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. Macrophages have been reported to be particularly activated in patients with skin disease including systemic sclerosis and are potentially important sources for fibrosis-inducing cytokines, such as transforming growth factor beta. To clarify the features of immunohistochemical characterization of the immune cell infiltrates in localized scleroderma focusing on macrophages, skin biopsy specimens were analysed by immunohistochemistry. The number of cells stained with monoclonal antibodies, CD68, CD163 and CD204, was calculated. An evident macrophage infiltrate and increased number of alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) in their fibrotic areas were observed along with their severity of inflammation. This study revealed that alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) may be a potential source of fibrosis-inducing cytokines in localized scleroderma, and may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of localized scleroderma.

  18. Emergency Surgery in a Patient with Scleroderma - Anaesthetic Challenges: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teena Bansal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma (progressive systemic sclerosis is a multisystem disease involving the skin, airway, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, renal and cardiac systems that can pose a significant challenge for the anaesthetist. The multisystem involvement of scleroderma can impact on every aspect of anaesthetic care especially airway management. There are no specific contraindications to the use of any type of anaesthesia, although the selection must be guided by identification of organ dysfunction. The anaesthetist must be aware of the organs involved, the severity of the disease and the associated anaesthetic considerations and potential risks in order to safely & skilfully manage the patient with scleroderma. We hereby present a case report of a patient with scleroderma for emergency orbital decompression because of orbital cellulitis.

  19. Brain cavernomas associated with en coup de sabre linear scleroderma: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxer Ronald M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Linear scleroderma is a form of localized scleroderma that primarily affects the pediatric population. When it occurs on the scalp or forehead, it is termed "en coup de sabre". In the en coup de sabre subtype, many extracutaneous associations, mostly neurological, have been described. A patient with linear scleroderma en coup de sabre was noted to have ipsilateral brain cavernomas by magnetic resonance imaging. Using a worldwide pediatric rheumatology electronic list-serve, another patient with the same 2 conditions was identified. These two patients are reported in this study. Consideration of neuroimaging studies to disclose abnormal findings in patients with linear scleroderma en coup de sabre is important for potentially preventing and treating neurological manifestations associated with this condition.

  20. First record of Scleroderma polyrhizum Pers. (Gasteromycetes from Brazil Primeiro registro de Scleroderma polyrhizum Pers. (Gasteromycetes para o Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuri Goulart Baseia

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The ectomycorrhizal, gasteroid fungus, Scleroderma polyrhizum is recorded from Brazil for the first time, growing under Caryocar brasiliense Camb. (Caryocaraceae a widespread native tree of the Brazilian "cerrado" vegetation. Macro and microscopic features were described using basidiocarps from fresh and dried material treated according to the traditional methodology for Gasteromycetes. The characteristics of the material were close to those of the original description given by Persoon. All material collected was associated with roots of C brasiliense.Scleroderma polyrhizum, um gasteromiceto ectomicorrízico, é registrado pela primeira vez para o Brasil, crescendo sob Caryocar brasillense Camb. (Caryiocaraceae espécie arbórea comum e nativa da vegetação de cerrado brasileiro. Os caracteres macro e microscópicos foram descritos a partir de basidiocarpos frescos e secos, segundo a metodologia tradicional utilizada em estudos taxonómicos de Gasteromycetes. As características do material analisado foram similares à descrição original fornecida por Persoon. Todo material coletado estava associado a raízes de C. brasillense.

  1. Evaluation of serum concentrations of the selected cytokines in patients with localized scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Budzyńska-Włodarczyk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Localized scleroderma is an autoimmune disease primarily affecting the skin. The cause of disease remains unexplained although environmental factors are implicated, which are likely to be responsible for activation of the endothelium and subsequent inflammation leading to excessive synthesis of collagen and extracellular matrix components. Aim: To determine concentrations of interleukin (IL-27, transforming growth factor (TGF-β1, TGF-β2, IL-6, and sIL-6R in patients with localized scleroderma compared to controls and to assess the relations between their levels and laboratory markers. Material and methods: The study encompassed 17 females with localized scleroderma (aged 25–67. The control group consisted of 30 age-matched healthy women. The blood was sampled from the basilic vein. Serum levels of cytokines were determined using ELISA. Results : The TGF-β2 levels were found to be significantly lower in patients with localized scleroderma compared to controls. Concentrations of TGF-β1 were decreased in scleroderma patients when compared to controls but without statistical significance. There were no significant differences in serum IL-6, sIL-6R and IL-27 levels between patients and the control group; however, we found a significant positive correlation between the level of sIL-6 and ESR among subjects with localized scleroderma. Conclusions : The findings of decreased serum levels of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 in patients with localized scleroderma demonstrate a possible association of these cytokines with pathogenesis of the disease. The results suggest also that sIL-6R is likely to be involved in inflammation in patients with localized scleroderma.

  2. Evaluation of serum concentrations of the selected cytokines in patients with localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzyńska-Włodarczyk, Jolanta; Michalska-Jakubus, Małgorzata M; Kowal, Małgorzata; Krasowska, Dorota

    2016-02-01

    Localized scleroderma is an autoimmune disease primarily affecting the skin. The cause of disease remains unexplained although environmental factors are implicated, which are likely to be responsible for activation of the endothelium and subsequent inflammation leading to excessive synthesis of collagen and extracellular matrix components. To determine concentrations of interleukin (IL)-27, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, TGF-β2, IL-6, and sIL-6R in patients with localized scleroderma compared to controls and to assess the relations between their levels and laboratory markers. The study encompassed 17 females with localized scleroderma (aged 25-67). The control group consisted of 30 age-matched healthy women. The blood was sampled from the basilic vein. Serum levels of cytokines were determined using ELISA. The TGF-β2 levels were found to be significantly lower in patients with localized scleroderma compared to controls. Concentrations of TGF-β1 were decreased in scleroderma patients when compared to controls but without statistical significance. There were no significant differences in serum IL-6, sIL-6R and IL-27 levels between patients and the control group; however, we found a significant positive correlation between the level of sIL-6 and ESR among subjects with localized scleroderma. The findings of decreased serum levels of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 in patients with localized scleroderma demonstrate a possible association of these cytokines with pathogenesis of the disease. The results suggest also that sIL-6R is likely to be involved in inflammation in patients with localized scleroderma.

  3. [3H]thymidine labeling of dermal endothelial cells in scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmajer, R.; Perlish, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate [ 3 H] thymidine labeling of endothelial cells of skin capillaries in localized scleroderma (LS) and systemic scleroderma (SS). Skin specimens from 14 patients with SS, 5 with LS, and 9 matched controls were studied by in vitro autoradiography. Capillaries from patients with SS showed a statistically significant increase in endothelial cell labeling when compared to vessels from controls

  4. A Case of Localized Scleroderma in a Sculptor and His Wife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakst, Richard; Kovarik, Carrie; Werth, Victoria P.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The etiology of localized scleroderma is unknown, and its pathogenetic relationship to its systemic counterpart is unclear. Environmental exposures, notably to silica dust, have long been suspected in the pathogenesis of the disorder. However, its’ relationship to the localized variant has not been well described. Here we present two cases of localized scleroderma in a sculptor and his wife who have extensive exposure to silica dust. PMID:19955998

  5. Localized scleroderma: a clinical study at a single center in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Jung Won; Kim, Jinseok; Kim, Jae-Wang

    2013-08-01

    Localized scleroderma (morphea) is a rare autoimmune disease limited to the skin, characterized by cutaneous fibrosing and obstructive vasculopathy. Localized scleroderma may invade into the subcutaneous fat layer and cause permanent functional disability. Because of its rarity, there have been few clinical surveys of patients with localized scleroderma in Korea. The aim of this study was to elucidate the clinical presentation, serological data, and clinical outcomes of localized scleroderma. This was a retrospective survey conducted by reviewing available medical records during a 7 year-period from 2004 to 2010 in a single medical center in Jeju Island, South Korea. In total 43 patients with localized scleroderma were included. Localized scleroderma occurred primarily in females (female to male ratio 2.6 : 1.0). Most patients were between 10 and 29 years of age and the mean age at diagnosis was 26.2 years. Plaque (51.2%) and linear morphea (37.2%) were most common. No case was associated with systemic scleroderma (systemic sclerosis). The most common site of plaque morphea was the trunk (47.8%). In the linear type, the most common site was head-neck (52.9%). Fluorescent antinuclear antibody was positive in 23.3% of all cases. Treatment included systemic corticosteroids, colchicine, anti-malarial agents, D-penicillamine or intralesional triamcinolone injection. Clinical improvement, including significant and partial response, was seen in only 62.8% of treated patients. Localized scleroderma is a chronic inflammatory condition confined to the skin. In order to exclude other conditions, thorough history taking, physical examination, serologic studies and histopathologic examinations should be conducted. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Mortality and causes of death of 344 Danish patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Halberg, P; Ullman, S

    1998-01-01

    To determine survival, mortality and causes of death in Danish patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), and to analyse how these parameters are influenced by demographic variables and the extent of skin involvement.......To determine survival, mortality and causes of death in Danish patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), and to analyse how these parameters are influenced by demographic variables and the extent of skin involvement....

  7. Subcorneal Pustular Dermatosis: A Case Report of a Patient with Diffuse Scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mokhtari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Subcorneal pustular dermatosis (SPD or Sneddon-Wilkinson disease is a rare, benign, chronic, sterile pustular eruption which is associated with various systemic diseases including immunoglobinopathies, neoplasms, and autoimmune disorders. This paper reports a case of SPD in a patient with diffuse scleroderma in a 37-year-old woman. The hypothesis that immune dysregulation may play a role in the pathogenesis of SPD was supposed by the coexistence of diffuse scleroderma and SPD in our patient.

  8. Juvenile localized scleroderma with port wine stain: Coincidental or possible common pathogenetic association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seval Dogruk Kacar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Port wine stain and juvenile localized scleroderma are two different dermatoses usually encountered in pediatric age group. Up to now, there are reports of morphea patients initially diagnosed and treated as port wine stain. Coexistence of both diseases is not found yet. We herein present a case of juvenile localized scleroderma on the left side of trunk, with congenital port wine stain located on the ipsilateral face at V1-V2 distribution.

  9. Juvenile localized scleroderma with port wine stain: coincidental or possible common pathogenetic association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacar, Seval Dogruk; Ozuguz, Pinar; Polat, Serap; Kacar, Emre; Polat, Onur; Tokyol, Cigdem

    2015-01-01

    Port wine stain and juvenile localized scleroderma are two different dermatoses usually encountered in pediatric age group. Up to now, there are reports of morphea patients initially diagnosed and treated as port wine stain. Coexistence of both diseases is not found yet. We herein present a case of juvenile localized scleroderma on the left side of trunk, with congenital port wine stain located on the ipsilateral face at V1-V2 distribution.

  10. Early recovery after fast-track Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Stig; Dalsgaard, Jesper; Bjerggaard, Karin

    2012-01-01

    trauma. We investigated changes in leg-extension power (LEP) in the first month after MIS Oxford UKA and its relation to pain, knee motion, functional performance, and knee function. Patients and methods In 35 consecutive Oxford UKA patients, LEP was measured 1 week before and 1 month after surgery...... together with knee motion, knee swelling, the 30-second chair-stand test, and Oxford knee score. Assessment of knee pain at rest and walking was done using a visual analog scale. Results 30 patients were discharged on the day after surgery, and 5 on the second day after surgery. LEP and functional...... performance reached the preoperative level after 1 month. Only slight postoperative knee swelling was observed with rapid restoration of knee flexion and function. A high level of pain during the first postoperative night and day fell considerably thereafter. None of the patients needed physiotherapy...

  11. Influence of childhood scleroderma on physical function and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baildam, Eileen M; Ennis, Holly; Foster, Helen E; Shaw, Lindsay; Chieng, Alice S E; Kelly, Jane; Herrick, Ariane L; Richards, Helen L

    2011-01-01

    there have been few studies of quality of life in childhood scleroderma and these focused predominantly on self-perception and the influence of skin lesions. Our cross-sectional study aimed to describe the influence of childhood scleroderma on physical function and quality of life in relation to clinical and demographic measures. children with either localized scleroderma or systemic sclerosis (SSc) attending pediatric rheumatology clinics, together with their parents or guardians, were asked to complete a set of 4 validated measures. Clinical and demographic data were provided by consultant pediatric rheumatologists. in total, 28 children and their parents/guardians participated in the study (68% female, median age 13 yrs; 86% localized scleroderma, 14% SSc). The median Child Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) score was 0.1 (range 0-3, 0 indicating no impairment), the median Child Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) score was 5 (range 0-30, 0 indicating no impairment), and the median Child Quality of Life Questionnaire (CQOL) function score was 26 (range 0-105, 0 indicating no impairment). Family activity, measured by the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ-PF50), was also moderately impaired by scleroderma, with a median score of 83 (0-100, 100 indicating no impairment). scleroderma had only a moderate effect on quality of life and physical function as measured by the 4 validated instruments. Although a small number of children reported greater impairment, this is an encouraging finding, given its potential disfiguring and debilitating effects.

  12. The Oxford Handbook of the History of Linguistics

    OpenAIRE

    Laborda, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    La reseña presenta el libro que K. Allan ha editado, The Oxford Handbook of the History of Linguistics (2013), en la colección de la Oxford University Press sobre Lingüística. En la obra participan más de treinta especialistas, que tratan de la historia en Occidente y, en menor medida, en Oriente. Los ámbitos de estudio respetan un orden tradicional: el sonido, la sintaxis y el significado y, como relativa novedad, la lingüística aplicada. Un interés complementario de la obr...

  13. Validation of the Danish version of Oxford Shoulder Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, Lars Henrik; Noergaard, Peter Moensted; Brorson, Stig

    2011-01-01

    The Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) is a patient-administered condition-specific questionnaire for patients with degenerative or inflammatory shoulder disease. The purpose of this study was to validate a Danish translation of the OSS and to compare it with the Constant Score (CS).......The Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) is a patient-administered condition-specific questionnaire for patients with degenerative or inflammatory shoulder disease. The purpose of this study was to validate a Danish translation of the OSS and to compare it with the Constant Score (CS)....

  14. Determination of muscle microcirculation of the limbs of healthy persons and patients with scleroderma by means of /sup 133/Xe clearance. 2. Examination of patients with progressive scleroderma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenitzsch, I.; Wiemers, U.; Haustein, U.F.; Schneider, G. (Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Radiologische Klinik)

    1984-01-01

    By means of /sup 133/Xe muscle clearance the blood flow of the musculus tibialis anterior and the musculus opponens pollicis was determined during nonischemic work and after 3 minutes ischemia in patients with progressive scleroderma and additionally of the ischemic musculus opponens pollicis following contrast baths. In relation to 53 patients with normal vessels the reactive hyperemia of the musculus tibialis anterior after ischemia and of the musculus opponens pollicis after heat, cold as well as arterial flow decreasing was significantly decreased in patients with scleroderma and was as a disturbance of the microcirculation realized. For scientific problems in progressive scleroderma the /sup 133/Xe muscle clearance is suitable as to the musculus opponens pollicis.

  15. The Courtrai chest from New College, Oxford, re-examined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    The paper concerns the age estimation of the Courtrai chest from New College Oxford, using the accelerator mass spectrometer method. Radiocarbon dating of the wood in the chest revealed a date around 1280, which is in agreement with dates determined using the dendrochronological technique. (UK)

  16. Classic Classroom Activities: The Oxford Picture Dictionary Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Renee; Adelson-Goldstein, Jayme; Shapiro, Norma

    This teacher resource book offers over 100 reproducible communicative practice activities and 768 picture cards based on the vocabulary of the Oxford Picture Dictionary. Teacher's notes and instructions, including adaptations for multilevel classes, are provided. The activities book has up-to-date art and graphics, explaining over 3700 words. The…

  17. Validation of the Danish version of the Oxford Elbow Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plaschke, Hans Christian; Jørgensen, Andreas Møller; Thillemann, Theis Muncholm

    2013-01-01

    The Oxford Elbow Score (OES) is a patient-related outcome measure quantifying quality of life in relation to elbow disorders. This 12-item patient-administered English questionnaire comprises three domains: function, social-psychological status and pain. The purpose of this study was to examine...

  18. An Analysis of the Oxford Bilingual School Dictionary: Northern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Oxford Bilingual School Dictionary: Northern Sotho and English (De Schryver 2007) is a welcome addition to dictionaries that have been compiled for school use in particular. Its novelty and appeal lie in the fact that the lemmas and Northern Sotho mini-grammar are based on a corpus of general language usage and ...

  19. PEOPLE IN PHYSICS: Interview with Scott Durow, Software Engineer, Oxford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Conducted by Paul

    1998-05-01

    Scott Durow was educated at Bootham School, York. He studied Physics, Mathematics and Chemistry to A-level and went on to Nottingham University to read Medical Physics. After graduating from Nottingham he embarked on his present career as a Software Engineer based in Oxford. He is a musician in his spare time, as a member of a band and playing the French horn.

  20. Changing Traditions: Automation and the Oxford College Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Suzanne

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of automation in the Oxford College Libraries (England) begins with background on the university library system, which consists of numerous independent libraries. Centralized and decentralized automation activities are described, and hardware and software for the microcomputer-based system at the University College Library are…

  1. Linear scleroderma en coup de sabre including abnormal dental development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørberg, M; Lauesen, S R; Daugaard-Jensen, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Linear scleroderma en coup de sabre (SCS) is a rare skin condition, where dense collagen is deposited in a localised groove of the head and neck area resembling the stroke of a sabre. The SCS may involve the oral cavity, but the severity and relation to this skin abnormality is unknow...... with a left-sided skin defect (SCS) and a left-sided local malformation in her dentition. It is possible that there is a developmental connection between these two left-sided defects, both with an ectodermal origin.......-UP: The patient has been regularly controlled and treated since she was first diagnosed. A surgical and orthodontic treatment was performed to ensure optimal occlusion, space and alveolar bone development. The present age of the patient is 14 years and 10 months. CONCLUSION: This case demonstrated a patient...

  2. Systemic Sclerosis Sine Scleroderma in Mexican Patients. Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Lastra, Olga; Sauceda-Casas, Christian Alexis; Domínguez, María Del Pilar Cruz; Alvarez, Sergio Alberto Mendoza; Sepulceda-Delgado, Jesús

    2017-01-03

    Systemic sclerosis sine scleroderma (ssSSc) is a form of systemic sclerosis that is characterized by Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), visceral involvement without thickening of skin and anticentromere antibodies (ACA). We studied 10 ssSsc patients with a prevalence of 2%. The clinical signs were: RP 9/10, esophageal manifestations 8/10, pulmonary arterial hypertension 4/10, interstitial lung disease 4/10, cardiac signs 3/10 and ACA 8/10. In patients with RP, esophageal dysmotility, interstitial lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension should be tested for ACA in order to establish a prompt diagnosis and treatment of ssSSc. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  3. Porphyria Cutanea Tarda Presenting with Scleroderma, Ichthyosis, Alopecia, and Vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E. MacGillivray

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT is a cutaneous porphyria that presents later in life with cutaneous findings in sun-exposed sites. We report a complex case of PCT in a 67-year-old woman with an unusual constellation of cutaneous findings: scleroderma, acquired ichthyosis, and nonscarring alopecia. Possible triggers for her PCT include tamoxifen treatment for breast cancer and carrier status of the hemochromatosis gene. High-dose chloroquine was used to successfully achieve clinical remission and normalize her uroporphyrins. While on chloroquine she developed extensive classic vitiligo. It is not clear if this is another feature of her complex and unusual PCT, or a consequence of her antimalarial therapy.

  4. From Localized Scleroderma to Systemic Sclerosis: Coexistence or Possible Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilia, Giuggioli; Michele, Colaci; Emanuele, Cocchiara; Amelia, Spinella; Federica, Lumetti; Clodoveo, Ferri

    2018-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) and localized scleroderma (LoS) are two different diseases that may share some features. We evaluated the relationship between SSc and LoS in our case series of SSc patients. We analysed the clinical records of 330 SSc patients, in order to find the eventual occurrence of both the two diseases. Eight (2.4%) female patients presented both the two diagnoses in their clinical histories. Six developed LoS prior to SSc; in 4/6 cases, the presence of autoantibodies was observed before SSc diagnosis. Overall, the median time interval between LoS and SSc diagnosis was 18 (range 0-156) months. LoS and SSc are two distinct clinical entities that may coexist. Moreover, as anecdotally reported in pediatric populations, we suggested the possible development of SSc in adult patients with LoS, particularly in presence of Raynaud's phenomenon or antinuclear antibodies before the SSc onset.

  5. Choroidal sclerosis in localized scleroderma (morphea en plaque).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic, S; Petrovic, L; Risimic, D; Kosanovic-Jakovic, N; Jaksic, V; Djakovic, Z; Stojkovic, M; Risovic, D; Ivankovic, Lj; Ivancevic-Milenkovic, M

    2008-01-01

    Plaque morphea is a superficial type of morphea (localized scleroderma) which is characterized by various fibrotic areas of the dermis without systemic features. We present a 63-year-old man with morphea en plaque. The skin on his forearms and feet was taut, thickened and hidebound with scattered telangiectatic changes. Autoantibody profile was obtained and only ANA were positive (1:80). The patient had a decreased vision in the only functional, left eye. Our case is specific because the patient negated any kind of health problem, meaning the morphea and visual deterioration were of outstanding importance for him. Choroidal sclerosis and fundus appearance was extremely impressive and, to our knowledge, this is the first report of such unique case of ocular involvement in the literature. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. A cross-sectional electromyography assessment in linear scleroderma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Muscle atrophy and asymmetric extremity growth is a common feature of linear scleroderma (LS). Extra-cutaneous features are also common and primary neurologic involvement, with sympathetic dysfunction, may have a pathogenic role in subcutaneous and muscle atrophy. The aim was investigate nerve conduction and muscle involvement by electromyography in pediatric patients with LS. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of LS pediatric patients who had regular follow up at a single pediatric center from 1997–2013. We selected participants if they had consistently good follow up and enrolled consecutive patients in the study. We examined LS photos as well as clinical, serological and imaging findings. Electromyograms (EMG) were performed with bilateral symmetric technique, using surface and needle electrodes, comparing the affected side with the contralateral side. Abnormal muscle activity was categorized as a myopathic or neurogenic pattern. Results Nine LS subjects were selected for EMG, 2 with Parry-Romberg/Hemifacial Atrophy Syndrome, 7 linear scleroderma of an extremity and 2 with mixed forms (linear and morphea). Electromyogram analysis indicated that all but one had asymmetric myopathic pattern in muscles underlying the linear streaks. Motor and sensory nerve conduction was also evaluated in upper and lower limbs and one presented a neurogenic pattern. Masticatory muscle testing showed a myopathic pattern in the atrophic face of 2 cases with head and face involvement. Conclusion In our small series of LS patients, we found a surprising amount of muscle dysfunction by EMG. The muscle involvement may be possibly related to a secondary peripheral nerve involvement due to LS inflammation and fibrosis. Further collaborative studies to confirm these findings are needed. PMID:25053924

  7. The spectrum of muscle histopathologic findings in 42 weak scleroderma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Julie J.; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Lloyd, Thomas E.; Corse, Andrea M.; Casciola-Rosen, Livia; Shah, Ami A.; Boin, Francesco; Hummers, Laura K.; Mammen, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if distinct muscle pathological features exist in scleroderma subjects with weakness. Methods This retrospective study included weak scleroderma subjects with muscle biopsies available for review. Biopsies were systematically assessed for individual pathologic features including inflammation, necrosis, fibrosis, and acute neurogenic atrophy. Based on the aggregate individual features, biopsies were assigned a histopathologic category of polymyositis, dermatomyositis, necrotizing myopathy, non-specific myositis, “acute denervation”, “fibrosis only”, or “other”. Clinical data analyzed included autoantibody profiles, scleroderma subtype and disease duration, Medsger muscle severity scores, creatine kinase (CK), electromyography (EMG), and muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results 42 subjects (79% female and 64% diffuse scleroderma) were included in this study. Necrosis (67%), inflammation (48%), acute neurogenic atrophy (48%), and fibrosis (33%) were the most prevalent pathologic features. The presence of fibrosis was strongly associated with anti-PM-Scl antibodies. Histopathologic categories included non-specific myositis (36%), necrotizing myopathy (21%), dermatomyositis (7%), “acute denervation” (7%), “fibrosis only” (7%), and polymyositis (5%). Disease duration of scleroderma at the time of muscle biopsy was shorter in polymyositis than other histopathologic categories. Patients with anti-PM-Scl and Scl-70 antibodies also had a shorter disease duration than those with other auto-antibody profiles. Conclusion Non-specific myositis and necrotizing myopathy were the most common histopathologic categories in weak scleroderma subjects. Surprisingly, nearly half of the subjects studied had histological evidence of acute motor denervation (acute neurogenic atrophy); this has not been previously reported. Taken together, these observations suggest that a variety of pathologic mechanisms may underlie the development of

  8. Clinicohistopathological correlations in juvenile localized scleroderma: studies on a subset of children with hypopigmented juvenile localized scleroderma due to loss of epidermal melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Joanne J; Chen, Tina S; Gilliam, Anita C; McCalmont, Timothy H; Gilliam, Amy E

    2011-08-01

    Localized scleroderma or morphea is a connective tissue disorder characterized by fibrosis of the skin and subcutaneous tissue. Excessive accumulation of collagen underlies the fibrosis, yet the pathogenesis is unknown. A subset of localized scleroderma/morphea, juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS), affects children and adolescents. The clinical and microscopic features of JLS have not been fully characterized. The goal is to better characterize the microscopic features of JLS. We collected a distinctive data set of 35 children with JLS, 19 (54%) of whom presented with hypopigmented lesions, and performed a retrospective chart and pathology review. We had adequate tissue for immunostaining studies on 8 of these individuals. We found that: (1) CD34 and factor XIIIa immunostaining, reported previously in adult morphea and scleroderma, when used with clinical information, is valuable for confirming a diagnosis of JLS; and (2) presence of hypopigmented lesions in JLS correlates with immunostaining studies. Decreased numbers of MelanA(+) melanocytes were present at the dermoepidermal junction in lesional skin in two of 3 children with hypopigmented JLS and in two of 4 children with nonhypopigmented JLS. The number of cases is small, a function of the small number of children who have biopsy specimens with material sufficient for multiple immunostaining procedures. These results provide a useful immunostaining method for confirmation of the diagnosis of JLS. They suggest a complex autoimmune phenotype in some children with JLS. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Autoantigens targeted in scleroderma patients with vascular disease are enriched in endothelial lineage cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Zsuzsanna H.; Cottrell, Tricia R.; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Antiochos, Brendan; Zambidis, Elias T.; Park, Tea Soon; Halushka, Marc K.; Gutierrez-Alamillo, Laura; Cimbro, Raffaello; Rosen, Antony; Casciola-Rosen, Livia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Scleroderma patients with autoantibodies to centromere proteins (CENPs) and/or interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) are at increased risk of severe vascular complications. We set out to define whether these autoantigens are enriched in cells of the vasculature. Methods Successive stages of embryoid bodies (EBs) as well as vascular progenitors were used to evaluate the expression of scleroderma autoantigens IFI16 and CENP by immunoblotting. CD31 was included to mark early blood vessels. IFI16 and CD31 expression were defined in skin paraffin sections from scleroderma patients and from healthy controls. IFI16 expression was determined by flow cytometry in circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and circulating progenitor cells (CPCs). Results Expression of CENP-A, IFI16 and CD31 was enriched in EBs at days 10 and 12 of differentiation, and particularly in cultures enriched in vascular progenitors (IFI16, CD31, CENPs A and-B). This pattern was distinct from that of comparator autoantigens. Immunohistochemical staining of skin paraffin sections showed enrichment of IFI16 in CD31-positive vascular endothelial cells in biopsies from scleroderma patients and normal controls. Flow cytometry analysis revealed IFI16 expression in CPCs, but minimal expression in CECs. Conclusion Expression of scleroderma autoantigens IFI16 and CENPs, which are associated with severe vascular disease, is increased in vascular progenitors and mature endothelial cells. High level, lineage-enriched expression of autoantigens may explain the striking association between clinical phenotypes and the immune targeting of specific autoantigens. PMID:27159521

  10. The Assessment of Health-Related Quality of Life in Scleroderma-Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad M Lari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pulmonary involvement is the most common cause of mortality and disability in patients with systemic sclerosis and it significantly affects the quality of life in these patients. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary involvement seems necessary in patients with SSc. In this study, we aimed to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQoL in patients with Scleroderma-Interstitial Lung Disease (SSc-ILD and its relationship with pulmonary function parameters. Materials and Methods: Considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 25 patients with SSc-ILD were enrolled in this cross-sectional study from April 2012 to June 2013. Full tests of lung function, including body plethysmography and diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO, 6-minute walk distance (6MWD, and pulse oximetry were performed. The HRQoL was assessed using St. George’s and CAT questionnaires; also, dyspnea was evaluated for all the patients, using modified medical research council (MMRC scale. Afterwards, the relationship between the total scores of HRQoL questionnaires and the severity of lung disease was analyzed, based on the recorded variables. Results: The mean age of the patients was 40.36±9.50 years and the mean duration of the disease was 7.16±4.50 years. A statistically significant inverse correlation was observed between 6MWD (r=-0.50, P=0.01, DLCO (r=-0.67, P

  11. Detection of autoimmune antibodies in localized scleroderma by synthetic oligonucleotide antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Simone; Jørgensen, Christian Damsgaard; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we developed a series of synthetic oligonucleotides that allowed us to investigate the details on the antigen recognition by autoimmune antibodies in localized scleroderma subjects. Besides dramatically improved analytical specificity of the assay, our data suggests a potential...... linking for antibodies to DNA to the biological status of disease state in localized scleroderma. Moreover, introducing chemical modifications into short synthetic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules completely changed the binding titers of corresponding antibodies...... and their clinical relevance. The strongest observed effect was registered for the localized scleroderma skin damage index (LoSDI) on the IgG antibodies to TC dinucleotide-rich double-stranded antigen (p

  12. Hippocampal atrophy and developmental regression as first sign of linear scleroderma "en coup de sabre".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhelst, Helene E; Beele, Hilde; Joos, Rik; Vanneuville, Benedicte; Van Coster, Rudy N

    2008-11-01

    An 8-year-old girl with linear scleroderma "en coup de sabre" is reported who, at preschool age, presented with intractable simple partial seizures more than 1 year before skin lesions were first noticed. MRI revealed hippocampal atrophy, controlaterally to the seizures and ipsilaterally to the skin lesions. In the following months, a mental and motor regression was noticed. Cerebral CT scan showed multiple foci of calcifications in the affected hemisphere. In previously reported patients the skin lesions preceded the neurological signs. To the best of our knowledge, hippocampal atrophy was not earlier reported as presenting symptom of linear scleroderma. Linear scleroderma should be included in the differential diagnosis in patients with unilateral hippocampal atrophy even when the typical skin lesions are not present.

  13. The Japanese Words Adopted into The Pocket Oxford Dictionary

    OpenAIRE

    今里, 智晃

    1993-01-01

    This paper aims to give a comparative analysis of the six POD editions on the basis of the Japanese words adopted into them. There have been many words borrowed from Japanese into English. For example, bonze and sake2 were naturalized in English a long time ago.The new 1992 edition of The Pocket Oxford Dictionary contains 39 Japanese words, some of which are futon, ikebana and sumo. But, needless to say, karaoke must be one of the latest examples we can see in English dictionaries that are of...

  14. Health-related quality of life, optimism, and coping strategies in persons suffering from localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szramka-Pawlak, B; Dańczak-Pazdrowska, A; Rzepa, T; Szewczyk, A; Sadowska-Przytocka, A; Żaba, R

    2013-01-01

    The clinical course of localized scleroderma may consist of bodily deformations, and bodily functions may also be affected. Additionally, the secondary lesions, such as discoloration, contractures, and atrophy, are unlikely to regress. The aforementioned symptoms and functional disturbances may decrease one's quality of life (QoL). Although much has been mentioned in the medical literature regarding QoL in persons suffering from dermatologic diseases, no data specifically describing patients with localized scleroderma exist. The aim of the study was to explore QoL in localized scleroderma patients and to examine their coping strategies in regard to optimism and QoL. The study included 41 patients with localized scleroderma. QoL was evaluated using the SKINDEX questionnaire, and levels of dispositional optimism were assessed using the Life Orientation Test-Revised. In addition, individual coping strategy was determined using the Mini-MAC scale and physical condition was assessed using the Localized Scleroderma Severity Index. The mean QoL score amounted to 51.10 points, with mean scores for individual components as follows: symptoms = 13.49 points, emotions = 21.29 points, and functioning = 16.32 points. A relationship was detected between QoL and the level of dispositional optimism as well as with coping strategies known as anxious preoccupation and helplessness-hopelessness. Higher levels of optimism predicted a higher general QoL. In turn, greater intensity of anxious preoccupied and helpless-hopeless behaviors predicted a lower QoL. Based on these results, it may be stated that localized scleroderma patients have a relatively high QoL, which is accompanied by optimism as well as a lower frequency of behaviors typical of emotion-focused coping strategies.

  15. Thrombocytopenia Associated with Localized Scleroderma: Report of Four Pediatric Cases and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Ankur Kumar; Gupta, Anju; Dogra, Sunil; Rawat, Amit; Suri, Deepti; Ahluwalia, Jasmina; Singh, Surjit

    2017-07-01

    We report on four children with localized scleroderma (morphea) and thrombocytopenia. All four had the en coup de sabre subtype of morphea and had varying degrees of thrombocytopenia (8 × 10 9 /L to 120 × 10 9 /L). None of them had major bleeding manifestations, and thrombocytopenia resolved with treatment of morphea. (One patient was also given an injection of anti-D immunoglobulin.) We propose that thrombocytopenia associated with localized scleroderma is usually benign and requires no specific therapy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Successful autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for a patient with rapidly progressive localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Velu; Sharma, Ajay; Sharma, Sanjeevan; Das, Satyaranjan; Bhakuni, Darshan S; Narayanan, Krishnan; Nair, Vivek; Shankar, Subramanian

    2015-03-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) for rapidly progressive disease has not been reported in localized scleroderma. Our patient, a 16-year-old girl had an aggressive variant of localized scleroderma, mixed subtype (linear-generalized) with Parry Romberg syndrome, with no internal organ involvement, that was unresponsive to immunosuppressive therapy and was causing rapid disfigurement. She was administered autologous HSCT in June 2011 and has maintained drug-free remission with excellent functional status at almost 3.5 years of follow-up. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Experiencing work as a daily challenge: the case of scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Cindy; Poole, Janet L; Allaire, Saralynn

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the physical and discretionary aspects of work that people with scleroderma (SSc) find difficult. This article describes the findings from a study that explored the challenges and adaptations made by individuals with SSc to continue to work. Thirty-two employed individuals with SSc participated. Participants were predominantly women (82%), white (79%), and well educated (M = 16.9 years). The average age was 47.3 years, and 60.6% were married. Mean disease duration was 9.7 years, and 56.2% had diffuse SSc. Mean years on the job was 10.2 (SD ± 8.8), and 71.9% worked at least 35 hours per week. Participants engaged in a single structured interview about work-related challenges and adaptations. Content and thematic analysis was used to identify key themes across the interviews. Employees with SSc experienced Work as a daily challenge. This central theme described the general work experience for most participants. Three subthemes described their specific experiences: The work environment: Opportunities, challenges, and accommodations; Career planning; and Supportive others. The participants were anxious to find scenarios that allowed them to continue to work. Worksite accommodations and flexibility in scheduling can make the difference between working and disability.

  18. Scleroderma and the temporomandibular joint: reconstruction in 2 variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntosh, Robert Bruce; Shivapuja, Prasanna-Kumar; Naqvi, Rabia

    2015-06-01

    This article reviews the pathophysiology of scleroderma (systemic sclerosis [SSc]) and its destructive effects on the mandible in general and the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in particular. It discusses the considerations of operating on patients with devastating chronic disease and presents 2 cases of TMJ reconstruction in patients with the diagnosis. Two patients with different degrees of SSc involvement underwent TMJ reconstruction with costochondral grafts. The patients represent the surgical considerations pertinent to this disease and different outcomes as determined by the variance in severity of their afflictions. The 2 patients tolerated the surgeries well and exhibited improvement in function in the long-term. One patient thrives and continues to do well despite her SSc approximately 10 years postoperatively; the second patient died of her disease approximately 9 years after her initial surgical care. The experience with these 2 cases showed that patients with SSc can safely undergo TMJ reconstruction with anticipated good results, but that the overall severity of the disease remains paramount in determining the feasibility of corrective surgery under this diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Elevated serum BAFF levels in patients with localized scleroderma in contrast to other organ-specific autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Takashi; Hasegawa, Minoru; Matsushita, Yukiyo; Echigo, Takeshi; Wayaku, Takamasa; Horikawa, Mayuka; Ogawa, Fumihide; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Sato, Shinichi

    2007-02-01

    Serum levels of B-cell activating factor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF), a potent B-cell survival factor, are elevated in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis and systemic sclerosis (SSc). The objective of this study was to determine serum BAFF levels and relate the results to the clinical features in patients with organ-specific autoimmune diseases of the skin, such as localized scleroderma and autoimmune bullous diseases. Serum BAFF levels were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 44 patients with localized scleroderma, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris/pemphigus foliaceus, 20 with bullous pemphigoid and 30 healthy controls. Twenty patients with SSc and 20 with SLE were also examined as disease controls. Serum BAFF levels were elevated in localized scleroderma patients compared with healthy controls. Concerning localized scleroderma subgroups, patients with generalized morphea, the severest form of localized scleroderma, had higher serum BAFF levels than linear scleroderma or morphea patients. The BAFF levels of generalized morphea were comparable with those of SSc or SLE. Furthermore, serum BAFF levels correlated positively with antihistone antibody levels and the severity of skin lesion as well as the number of skin lesions. By contrast, serum BAFF levels were not significantly elevated in patients with pemphigus or pemphigoid. These results suggest that BAFF may be contributing to autoimmunity and disease development in localized scleroderma.

  20. The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morley D

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available David Morley, Sarah Dummett, Laura Kelly, Jill Dawson, Ray Fitzpatrick, Crispin JenkinsonNuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UKBackground: With an ageing population and increasing demands on health and social care services, there is growing importance attached to the management of long-term conditions, including maximizing the cost-effectiveness of treatments. In line with this, there is increasing emphasis on the need to keep people both active and participating in daily life. Consequently, it is essential that well developed and validated instruments that can meaningfully assess levels of participation and activity are widely available. Current measures, however, are largely focused on disability and rehabilitation, and there is no measure of activity or participation for generic use that fully meets the standards set by regulatory bodies such as the US Food and Drug Administration. Here we detail a protocol for the development and validation of a new patient-reported outcome measure (PROM for assessment of participation and activity in people experiencing a variety of health conditions, ie, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ. The stages incorporated in its development are entirely in line with current regulations and represent best practice in the development of PROMs.Methods: Development of the Ox-PAQ is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. The project incorporates a new strategy of engaging with stakeholders from the outset in an attempt to identify those characteristics of PROMs considered most important to a range of potential users. Items will be generated through interviews with patients from a range of conditions. Pretesting of the instrument will be via cognitive interviews and focus groups. A postal survey will be conducted, with data subject to factor and Rasch analysis in order to

  1. Development and preliminary validation of the Scleroderma Support Group Leader Self-efficacy Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, N.E.; Gumuchian, S.T.; Delisle, V.C.; Pé pin, M.; Malcarne, V.L.; Carrier, M.E.; Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Pelá ez, S.; El-Baalbaki, G.; Thombs, B.D.

    2018-01-01

    Support groups are an important resource for people living with systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma). Peer support group leaders play an important role in the success and sustainability of SSc support groups, but face challenges that include a lack of formal training. An SSc support group leader

  2. Frequency of motor alterations detected through manometry in patients with esophageal symptoms and scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Y López, N; Lugo-Zamudio, G; Barbosa-Cobos, R E; Wong-Lam, A; Torres-López, E

    Scleroderma can present with esophageal involvement causing important morbidity. To describe the manometric findings and clinical characteristics of patients with scleroderma and esophageal symptoms. Patients with scleroderma and esophageal symptoms were evaluated through esophageal manometry within the time frame of one year. Descriptive statistics were carried out and the continuous variables were expressed as means and standard deviation. Frequencies were expressed as percentages. The study included 24 female patients with a mean age of 53.5 years and mean disease progression of 7.84 years. The most frequent findings were short and hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter (mean length 1.58cm and mean tone 9.49mmHg) and ineffective esophageal motility (mean non-transmitted waves 92.91%, mean effective primary peristalsis 40.05%, and mean amplitude 13.11mmHg). The most frequent symptom was dysphagia. Scleroderma is associated with lower esophageal sphincter alterations and symptomatic ineffective esophageal motility. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Acute and regressive scleroderma concomitant to an acute CMV primary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulabchand, Radjiv; Khellaf, Lakhdar; Forestier, Amandine; Costes, Valerie; Foulongne, Vincent; le Quellec, Alain; Guilpain, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    To describe the pathophysiological mechanisms involving cytomegalovirus (CMV) primary infection and natural killer (NK) cell expansion in the development of localized scleroderma. A 43-year-old woman presented acute erythematous discoloration and skin thickening concerning face, neck, trunk, abdomen, and the four limbs, predominantly in proximal areas. Our case did not respond to systemic sclerosis criteria diagnosis. However, skin and muscle biopsy revealed early scleroderma associated with capillary thrombi, and tissue infiltration with NK cells (CD56+/Granzyme B). Scleroderma was attributed to CMV primary infection responsible for cytolytic hepatitis (7-fold over the limit) and circulating NK cell excess. After 6 months of prednisone and a 2-year follow-up, a complete resolution of symptoms was observed. Our observation suggests a potential triggering role of CMV primary infection in the development of scleroderma. Histological features from our observation addresses the role of CMV and NK cells in the development of endothelial damage and fibrotic process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Association of Immunological Cell Profiles with Specific Clinical Phenotypes of Scleroderma Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada, David; Mayayo, Teodoro; González-Rodríguez, María Luisa; Rabasco, Antonio María; Lahoz, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to search the correlation among immunological profiles and clinical phenotypes of scleroderma in well-characterized groups of scleroderma patients, comparing forty-nine scleroderma patients stratified according to specific clinical phenotypes with forty-nine healthy controls. Five immunological cell subpopulations (B, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, NK, and monocytes) and their respective stages of apoptosis and activation were analyzed by flow cytometry, in samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Analyses of results were stratified according to disease stage, time since the diagnosis, and visceral damage (pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cardiac affliction) and by time of treatment with corticosteroids. An increase in the percentages of monocytes and a decrease in the B cells were mainly related to the disease progression. A general apoptosis decrease was found in all phenotypes studied, except in localized scleroderma. An increase of B and NK cells activation was found in patients diagnosed more than 10 years ago. Specific cell populations like monocytes, NK, and B cells were associated with the type of affected organ. This study shows how, in a heterogeneous disease, proper patient's stratification according to clinical phenotypes allows finding specific cellular profiles. Our data may lead to improvements in the knowledge of prognosis factors and to aid in the analysis of future specific therapies. PMID:24818126

  5. Localized Scleroderma, Systemic Sclerosis and Cardiovascular Risk: A Danish Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselvig, Jeanette Halskou; Kofoed, Kristian; Wu, Jashin J; Dreyer, Lene; Gislason, Gunnar; Ahlehoff, Ole

    2018-03-13

    Recent findings indicate that patients with systemic sclerosis have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. To determine whether patients with systemic sclerosis or localized scleroderma are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, a cohort study of the entire Danish population aged ≥ 18 and ≤ 100 years was conducted, followed from 1997 to 2011 by individual-level linkage of nationwide registries. Multivariable adjusted Cox regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) for a composite cardiovascular disease endpoint. A total of 697 patients with localized scleroderma and 1,962 patients with systemic sclerosis were identified and compared with 5,428,380 people in the reference population. In systemic sclerosis, the adjusted HR was 2.22 (95% confidence interval 1.99-2.48). No association was seen between patients with localized scleroderma and cardiovascular disease. In conclusion, systemic sclerosis is a significant cardiovascular disease risk factor, while patients with localized scleroderma are not at increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

  6. U3 snoRNP associates with fibrillarin a component of the scleroderma clumpy nucleolar domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrera-Esparza, Rafael; Kruse, Lars; von Essen, Marina

    2002-01-01

    by ELISA was recognized by the clumpy scleroderma serum from the majority of patients. In situ hybridization assays showed that the fibrillarin tagged by the elicited antibodies was colocalized with U3 snoRNP in the nucleolus in a clumpy manner and coprecipitated the U3 snoRNP. In conclusion...

  7. Reduced coronary flow and resistance reserve in primary scleroderma myocardial disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitenberg, A.; Foult, J.M.; Kahan, A.; Perennec, J.; Devaux, J.Y.; Menkes, C.J.; Amor, B.

    1986-01-01

    The maximum coronary vasodilator capacity after intravenous dipyridamole (0.14 mg X kg-1 X min-1 X 4 minutes) was studied in seven patients with primary scleroderma myocardial disease and compared to that of seven control subjects. Hemodynamic data and left ventricular angiographic data were not different in the two groups. The coronary flow reserve was evaluated by the dipyridamole/basal coronary sinus blood flow ratio (D/B CSBF) and the coronary resistance reserve by the dipyridamole/basal coronary resistance ratio (D/B CR). Coronary reserve was greatly impaired in the group with primary scleroderma myocardial disease: D/B CSBF was lower than in the control group (2.54 +/- 1.37 vs 4.01 +/- 0.56, respectively; p less than 0.05) and D/B CR was higher than in the control group (0.47 +/- 0.25 vs 0.23 +/- 0.04, respectively; p less than 0.05). Such a decreased coronary flow and resistance reserve in patients with primary scleroderma myocardial disease was not explained by an alteration of left ventricular function. It may be an important contributing factor in the pathogenesis of primary scleroderma myocardial disease

  8. Use of mycophenolate mofetil in patients with severe localized scleroderma resistant or intolerant to methotrexate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, Jorre S.; Marsman, Diane; van de Kerkhof, Peter C M; Hoppenreijs, Esther P A H; Knaapen, Hanneke K A; Radstake, Timothy R D; de Jong, Elke M G J; Seyger, Marieke M B

    2016-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in patients with localized scleroderma (LoS) resistant or intolerant to previous treatment with methotrexate (MTX). A case series of patients with LoS treated with MMF. Outcome was assessed through clinical examination. Adverse events

  9. Parapiptadenia rigida MYCORRHIZATION WITH SPORES OF Scleroderma citrinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerusa Pauli Kist Steffen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ectomycorrhizal fungal inoculation in forestry seedlings aids plant establishment and growth in the field. The objectives of this study were: to determine the mycorrhizal capacity of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Scleroderma citrinum in Parapiptadenia rigida (red angico seedlings and to evaluate the viability of a mycorrhizal inoculation technique for forest seedlings involving the use of spores. Mature spores were inoculated in the substrate (75% soil and 25% carbonized rice husk, totaling 1.5 grams of fungal spores per liter of substrate. P. rigida seeds were sown in substrates inoculated or not inoculated with fungal spores in presence or absence of Pinus echinata and Eucalyptus citriodora essential oil: not inoculated (T1, inoculated (T2, inoculated more pine essential oil (T3, inoculated more eucalyptus essential oil (T4. Seedlings of Pinus elliottii were used for a positive control of mycorrhizal inoculation (T5 and not inoculated (T6 with fungal spores. At 90 days after sowing, the base stem diameter, height, fresh and dry weight of shoots and roots, percentage of root colonization and Dickson Index were determined. The presence of fungal structures in P. rigida and P. elliottii roots inoculated with S. citrinum spores was observed, demonstrating the occurrence of an ectomycorrhizal association. The application of pine and eucalyptus essential oils in the substrate increased the percentage of ectomycorrhizal colonization in P. rigida seedlings. The addition of S. citrinum mature spores in the substrate used for seedling production is a viable practice for ectomycorrhizal inoculation and it can be used in forest nurseries in controlled mycorrhization programs.

  10. Peripheral blood cytokine and chemokine profiles in juvenile localized scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torok, Kathryn S.; Kurzinski, Katherine; Kelsey, Christina; Yabes, Jonathan; Magee, Kelsey; Vallejo, Abbe N.; Medsger, Thomas; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate peripheral blood T-helper (TH) cell associated cytokine and chemokine profiles in localized scleroderma (LS), and correlate them with clinical disease features, including disease activity parameters. Methods A 29-plex Luminex platform was used to analyze the humoral profile of plasma samples from 69 pediatric LS patients and 71 healthy pediatric controls. Cytokine/chemokine levels were compared between these two groups and within LS patients, focusing on validated clinical outcome measures of disease activity and damage in LS. Results Plasma levels of IP-10, MCP-1, IL-17a, IL-12p70, GM-CSF, PDGF-bb, IFN-α2, and IFN-γ were significantly higher in LS compared to healthy controls. Analysis within the LS group demonstrated IP-10, TNF-α and GM-CSF correlated with clinical measures of disease activity. Several cytokines/chemokines correlated with anti-histone antibody, while only a few correlated with positive ANA and single-stranded DNA antibody. Conclusion This is the first time that multiple cytokines and chemokines have been examined simultaneously LS. In general, a TH-1 (IFN-γ) and TH-17 (IL-17a) predominance was demonstrated in LS compared to healthy controls. There is also an IFN–γ signature with elevated IP-10, MCP-1 and IFN-γ, which has been previously demonstrated in systemic sclerosis, suggesting a shared pathophysiology. Within the LS patients, those with active disease demonstrated IP-10, TNF-α and GM-CSF, which may potentially serve as biomarkers of disease activity in the clinical setting. PMID:26254121

  11. Fox-2 protein regulates the alternative splicing of scleroderma-associated lysyl hydroxylase 2 messenger RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Puneet; Yeowell, Heather N

    2010-04-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis [SSc]) is a complex connective tissue disorder characterized by hardening and thickening of the skin. One hallmark of scleroderma is excessive accumulation of collagen accompanied by increased levels of pyridinoline collagen crosslinks derived from hydroxylysine residues in the collagen telopeptide domains. Lysyl hydroxylase 2 (LH2), an important alternatively spliced enzyme in collagen biosynthesis, acts as a collagen telopeptide hydroxylase. Changes in the pattern of LH2 alternative splicing, favoring increased inclusion of the alternatively spliced LH2 exon 13A, thereby increasing the levels of the long transcript of LH2 (LH2[long]), are linked to scleroderma disease. This study was undertaken to examine the role played by RNA binding protein Fox-2 in regulating exon 13A inclusion, which leads to the generation of scleroderma-associated LH2(long) messenger RNA (mRNA). Phylogenetic sequence analysis of introns flanking exon 13A was performed. A tetracycline-inducible system in T-Rex 293 cells was used to induce Fox-2 protein, and endogenous LH2(long) mRNA was determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. An LH2 minigene was designed, validated, and used in Fox-2 overexpression and mutagenesis experiments. Knockdown of Fox-2 was performed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and in fibroblasts from SSc patients. Overexpression of Fox-2 enhanced the inclusion of exon 13A and increased the generation of LH2(long) mRNA, whereas knockdown of Fox-2 decreased LH2(long) transcripts. Mutational analysis of an LH2 minigene demonstrated that 2 of the 4 Fox binding motifs flanking LH2 exon 13A are required for inclusion of exon 13A. In early passage fibroblasts derived from patients with scleroderma, the knockdown of Fox-2 protein significantly decreased the endogenous levels of LH2(long) mRNA. Our findings indicate that Fox-2 plays an integral role in the regulation of LH2 splicing. Knockdown of Fox-2 and other methods to decrease

  12. Pigmentation abnormalities in systemic scleroderma examined by using a colorimeter (Choromo Meter CR-200).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, M; Kachi, H; Matubara, K; Mori, S; Kitajima, Y

    1996-03-01

    Cutaneous colors of the dorsum of the hands (A), the distal forearms (B; 5 cm from the wrists), the proximal forearm (C; proximal 1/3 from the elbow) and sternal skin region (D) in patients with systemic scleroderma (73 cases; M:F = 16:57) systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or dermatomyositis (27 cases; M:F = 7:20) and healthy controls (HC) (36 cases; M:F = 8:28) was characterized by a XYZ colorimetric system (CIE, 1931) using a colorimeter (Choromo Meter CR-200, Minolta Camera Co. Ltd., Osaka). The index Y, which means color value shows a lower value in male HC and in patients with systemic scleroderma, especially in the more severe type with hyperpigmentation (score 5-6; the system proposed by Ishikawa) than that of female HC. The values of indices x and y, which relate to reddish (erythema with hyperpigmentation) and greenish color (pale), respectively, were higher in the exposed portion of the severe type of systemic scleroderma with hyperpigmentation, especially male and older patients, and in unexposed portions of the female group without hyperpigmentation. Histopathologically, there was prominent pigmentation in the upper dermis of the forearm in the severe type of systemic scleroderma, so that melanin quantity may be closely related to the decrease in index Y. There was no statistical significance in the value of indices Y, x and y between HC, SLE and dermatomyositis. This method may contribute not only to diagnosis of systemic scleroderma and differentiation from other collagen diseases, but also studies of clinical follow-up and effects of medication.

  13. Pirfenidone gel in patients with localized scleroderma: a phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castellanos, Marco; Tlacuilo-Parra, Alberto; Sánchez-Enríquez, Sergio; Vélez-Gómez, Ezequiel; Guevara-Gutiérrez, Elizabeth

    2015-01-28

    Localized scleroderma is an inflammatory disease in its first stages and a fibrotic process in later stages, principally mediated by the transforming growth factor β. To date, there is no standard treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness and safety of 8% pirfenidone gel in patients with localized scleroderma. This was an open phase II clinical trial that included 12 patients. Treatment with pirfenidone was indicated, three times daily for 6 months. Patients were evaluated clinically with the modified Localized Scleroderma Skin Severity Index (mLoSSI), as well with a durometer and histologically using hematoxylin and eosin stain and Masson's trichrome stain. The baseline mLoSSI average scores were 5.83 ± 4.80 vs. 0.83 ± 1.75 (P = 0.002) at 6 months. The initial durometer induration of the scleroderma plaques was 35.79 ± 9.10 vs. 32.47 ± 8.97 at 6 months (P = 0.05). We observed histopathological improvement with respect to epidermal atrophy, inflammation, dermal or adipose tissue fibrosis and annex atrophy from 12.25 ± 3.25 to 9.75 ± 4.35 (P = 0.032). The 8% pirfenidone gel application was well tolerated, and no side effects were detected. This is the first study on the therapeutic use of pirfenidone gel in localized scleroderma. It acts on both the inflammatory and the fibrotic phases. Considering its effectiveness, good safety profile and the advantage of topical application, pirfenidone is a treatment option in this condition.

  14. [Localized Scleroderma of Lower Extremities:Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-dan; Wang, Hong-wei; Wu, Zhi-hong; Hou, Bo; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Yan; Feng, Feng; Jin, Zheng-yu; Yuan, Xie

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical and musculoskeletal characteristics of localized scleroderma with lower extremities affected. All the localized scleroderma patients,who received magnetic resonance (MR ) examinations of affected lower extremities at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from April 2013 to June 2014,were retrospectively reviewed. Their clinical data and laboratory results of antinuclear antibody,anti-double stranded-DNA antibody, and anti-extractable nuclear antigen antibody were collected and analyzed. All the MR examinations were non-contrast imaging using Siemens Skyra 3.0T MR scanner. There were 16 localized scleroderma patients with lower extremities affected, 11 of whom were linear scleroderma, 4 generalized morphea, and 1 deep morphea. Female to male ratio was 1:2.2. The mean age was 22.5 years. The mean time span was 7.4 years. Four of the 14 patients (28.6%) who received antinuclear antibody test were positive. All the 10 patients who received anti-double stranded-DNA antibody test and the 7 patients who received anti-extractable nuclear antigen antibody test were negative. The most common musculoskeletal MR features were subcutaneous septal thickening (16/16) and fascial thickening (11/16). The thickened speta and fascia could either be hypointenstiy or hyperintensity on turbo inversion recovery magnitude/proton density weighted imaging. Other MR manifestations were intramuscular speta thickening (3/16), muscular abnormal signals (1/16), and bone marrow abnormal signals (2/16). Musculoskeletal manifestations of the lower extremities with localized scleroderma can be well revealed using MR imaging.

  15. Oxford Nanopore MinION Sequencing and Genome Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengyun Lu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The revolution of genome sequencing is continuing after the successful second-generation sequencing (SGS technology. The third-generation sequencing (TGS technology, led by Pacific Biosciences (PacBio, is progressing rapidly, moving from a technology once only capable of providing data for small genome analysis, or for performing targeted screening, to one that promises high quality de novo assembly and structural variation detection for human-sized genomes. In 2014, the MinION, the first commercial sequencer using nanopore technology, was released by Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT. MinION identifies DNA bases by measuring the changes in electrical conductivity generated as DNA strands pass through a biological pore. Its portability, affordability, and speed in data production makes it suitable for real-time applications, the release of the long read sequencer MinION has thus generated much excitement and interest in the genomics community. While de novo genome assemblies can be cheaply produced from SGS data, assembly continuity is often relatively poor, due to the limited ability of short reads to handle long repeats. Assembly quality can be greatly improved by using TGS long reads, since repetitive regions can be easily expanded into using longer sequencing lengths, despite having higher error rates at the base level. The potential of nanopore sequencing has been demonstrated by various studies in genome surveillance at locations where rapid and reliable sequencing is needed, but where resources are limited.

  16. The 'gender gap' in final examination results at Oxford University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellanby, J; Martin, M; O'Doherty, J

    2000-08-01

    A lower proportion of women than men obtain first class degrees at British universities (the so-called gender gap). At Oxford University, this difference is not seen in all degree subjects but is found both in some Arts and in some Science subjects. We have used a questionnaire administered under supervision to undergraduates 2 to 3 months before their final examination to assess factors which might be expected to affect examination performance. These included measures of verbal and non-verbal reasoning (Alice Heim AH6 test), self-esteem, motivation, responses to stresses of examinations and of personal relationships, happiness, risk-taking and working patterns. We have also obtained a detailed breakdown of the marks the students were given in the examination. Women scored higher on negative emotions while men scored higher on self-esteem, their perception of their own academic efficacy and on risk-taking strategies, but none of these factors predicted outcome. Verbal reasoning ability did predict outcome but there was no gender difference. Hence, it is concluded that the gender gap is not due to any of these individual differences and is more likely to be related to the nature of the academic assessment system.

  17. Transcriptomic immune response of Tenebrio molitor pupae to parasitization by Scleroderma guani.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Ying Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Host and parasitoid interaction is one of the most fascinating relationships of insects, which is currently receiving an increasing interest. Understanding the mechanisms evolved by the parasitoids to evade or suppress the host immune system is important for dissecting this interaction, while it was still poorly known. In order to gain insight into the immune response of Tenebrio molitor to parasitization by Scleroderma guani, the transcriptome of T. molitor pupae was sequenced with focus on immune-related gene, and the non-parasitized and parasitized T. molitor pupae were analyzed by digital gene expression (DGE analysis with special emphasis on parasitoid-induced immune-related genes using Illumina sequencing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a single run, 264,698 raw reads were obtained. De novo assembly generated 71,514 unigenes with mean length of 424 bp. Of those unigenes, 37,373 (52.26% showed similarity to the known proteins in the NCBI nr database. Via analysis of the transcriptome data in depth, 430 unigenes related to immunity were identified. DGE analysis revealed that parasitization by S. guani had considerable impacts on the transcriptome profile of T. molitor pupae, as indicated by the significant up- or down-regulation of 3,431 parasitism-responsive transcripts. The expression of a total of 74 unigenes involved in immune response of T. molitor was significantly altered after parasitization. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: obtained T. molitor transcriptome, in addition to establishing a fundamental resource for further research on functional genomics, has allowed the discovery of a large group of immune genes that might provide a meaningful framework to better understand the immune response in this species and other beetles. The DGE profiling data provides comprehensive T. molitor immune gene expression information at the transcriptional level following parasitization, and sheds valuable light on the molecular

  18. Transcriptomic immune response of Tenebrio molitor pupae to parasitization by Scleroderma guani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia-Ying; Yang, Pu; Zhang, Zhong; Wu, Guo-Xing; Yang, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Host and parasitoid interaction is one of the most fascinating relationships of insects, which is currently receiving an increasing interest. Understanding the mechanisms evolved by the parasitoids to evade or suppress the host immune system is important for dissecting this interaction, while it was still poorly known. In order to gain insight into the immune response of Tenebrio molitor to parasitization by Scleroderma guani, the transcriptome of T. molitor pupae was sequenced with focus on immune-related gene, and the non-parasitized and parasitized T. molitor pupae were analyzed by digital gene expression (DGE) analysis with special emphasis on parasitoid-induced immune-related genes using Illumina sequencing. In a single run, 264,698 raw reads were obtained. De novo assembly generated 71,514 unigenes with mean length of 424 bp. Of those unigenes, 37,373 (52.26%) showed similarity to the known proteins in the NCBI nr database. Via analysis of the transcriptome data in depth, 430 unigenes related to immunity were identified. DGE analysis revealed that parasitization by S. guani had considerable impacts on the transcriptome profile of T. molitor pupae, as indicated by the significant up- or down-regulation of 3,431 parasitism-responsive transcripts. The expression of a total of 74 unigenes involved in immune response of T. molitor was significantly altered after parasitization. obtained T. molitor transcriptome, in addition to establishing a fundamental resource for further research on functional genomics, has allowed the discovery of a large group of immune genes that might provide a meaningful framework to better understand the immune response in this species and other beetles. The DGE profiling data provides comprehensive T. molitor immune gene expression information at the transcriptional level following parasitization, and sheds valuable light on the molecular understanding of the host-parasitoid interaction.

  19. Transcriptomic Immune Response of Tenebrio molitor Pupae to Parasitization by Scleroderma guani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia-Ying; Yang, Pu; Zhang, Zhong; Wu, Guo-Xing; Yang, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Background Host and parasitoid interaction is one of the most fascinating relationships of insects, which is currently receiving an increasing interest. Understanding the mechanisms evolved by the parasitoids to evade or suppress the host immune system is important for dissecting this interaction, while it was still poorly known. In order to gain insight into the immune response of Tenebrio molitor to parasitization by Scleroderma guani, the transcriptome of T. molitor pupae was sequenced with focus on immune-related gene, and the non-parasitized and parasitized T. molitor pupae were analyzed by digital gene expression (DGE) analysis with special emphasis on parasitoid-induced immune-related genes using Illumina sequencing. Methodology/Principal Findings In a single run, 264,698 raw reads were obtained. De novo assembly generated 71,514 unigenes with mean length of 424 bp. Of those unigenes, 37,373 (52.26%) showed similarity to the known proteins in the NCBI nr database. Via analysis of the transcriptome data in depth, 430 unigenes related to immunity were identified. DGE analysis revealed that parasitization by S. guani had considerable impacts on the transcriptome profile of T. molitor pupae, as indicated by the significant up- or down-regulation of 3,431 parasitism-responsive transcripts. The expression of a total of 74 unigenes involved in immune response of T. molitor was significantly altered after parasitization. Conclusions/Significance obtained T. molitor transcriptome, in addition to establishing a fundamental resource for further research on functional genomics, has allowed the discovery of a large group of immune genes that might provide a meaningful framework to better understand the immune response in this species and other beetles. The DGE profiling data provides comprehensive T. molitor immune gene expression information at the transcriptional level following parasitization, and sheds valuable light on the molecular understanding of the host

  20. Valuation of scleroderma and psoriatic arthritis health states by the general public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hays Ron D

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Psoriatic arthritis (PsA and scleroderma (SSc are chronic rheumatic disorders with detrimental effects on health-related quality of life. Our objective was to assess health values (utilities from the general public for health states common to people with PsA and SSc for economic evaluations. Methods Adult subjects from the general population in a Midwestern city (N = 218 completed the SF-12 Health Survey and computer-assisted 0-100 rating scale (RS, time trade-off (TTO, range: 0.0-1.0 and standard gamble (SG, range: 0.0-1.0 utility assessments for several hypothetical PsA and SSc health states. Results Subjects included 135 (62% females, 143 (66% Caucasians, and 62 (28% African-Americans. The mean (SD scores for the SF-12 Physical Component Summary scale were 52.9 (8.3 and for the SF-12 Mental Component Summary scale were 49.0 (9.1, close to population norms. The mean RS, TTO, and SG scores for PsA health states varied with severity, ranging from 20.2 to 63.7 (14.4-20.3 for the RS 0.29 to 0.78 (0.24-0.31 for the TTO, and 0.48 to 0.82 (0.24-0.34 for the SG. The mean RS, TTO, and SG scores for SSc health states were 25.3-69.7 (15.2-16.3 for the RS, 0.36-0.80 (0.25-0.31 for the TTO, and 0.50-0.81 (0.26-0.32 for the SG, depending on disease severity. Conclusion Health utilities for PsA and SSc health states as assessed from the general public reflect the severity of the diseases. These descriptive findings could have implications regarding comparative effectiveness research for tests and treatments for PsA and SSc.

  1. Orofacial Manifestations and Temporomandibular Disorders of Systemic Scleroderma: An Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Crincoli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma is a disorder involving oral and facial tissues, with skin hardening, thin lips, deep wrinkles, xerostomia, tongue rigidity, and microstomia. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of oral manifestations and temporomandibular disorders (TMD in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc patients compared with healthy people. Eighty patients (6 men, 74 women fulfilling ACR/EULAR SSc Criteria were enrolled. A randomly selected group of 80 patients, matched by sex and age served as control group. The examination for TMD signs and symptoms was based on the standardized Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD through a questionnaire and clinical examination. SSc patients complained more frequently (78.8% of oral symptoms (Xerostomia, dysgeusia, dysphagia and stomatodynia than controls (28.7% (χ2 = 40.23 p = 0.001. TMD symptoms (muscle pain on chewing, difficulty in mouth opening, headaches were complained by 92.5% of SSc patients and by 76.2% of controls (χ2 = 8.012 p = 0.005. At the clinical examination, 85% of SSc patients showed restricted opening versus 20.0% of controls (χ2 = 67.77 p = 0.001, 81.2% of SSc showed reduced right lateral excursion versus 50% of controls (χ2 = 17.316 p = 0.001; 73.8% of SSc showed limited left lateral excursion versus 53.8% of controls (χ2 = 6.924 p = 0.009; and 73.8% of SSc had narrow protrusion versus 56.2% of controls (χ2 = 5.385 p = 0.02.

  2. Development of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: constructing an item pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Laura Kelly, Crispin Jenkinson, Sarah Dummett, Jill Dawson, Ray Fitzpatrick, David Morley Health Services Research Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Purpose: The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire is a patient-reported outcome measure in development that is grounded on the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF. The study reported here aimed to inform and generate an item pool for the new measure, which is specifically designed for the assessment of participation and activity in patients experiencing a range of health conditions. Methods: Items were informed through in-depth interviews conducted with 37 participants spanning a range of conditions. Interviews aimed to identify how their condition impacted their ability to participate in meaningful activities. Conditions included arthritis, cancer, chronic back pain, diabetes, motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and spinal cord injury. Transcripts were analyzed using the framework method. Statements relating to ICF themes were recast as questionnaire items and shown for review to an expert panel. Cognitive debrief interviews (n=13 were used to assess items for face and content validity. Results: ICF themes relevant to activities and participation in everyday life were explored, and a total of 222 items formed the initial item pool. This item pool was refined by the research team and 28 generic items were mapped onto all nine chapters of the ICF construct, detailing activity and participation. Cognitive interviewing confirmed the questionnaire instructions, items, and response options were acceptable to participants. Conclusion: Using a clear conceptual basis to inform item generation, 28 items have been identified as suitable to undergo further psychometric testing. A large-scale postal survey will follow in order to refine the instrument further and

  3. Review: G.-M. de Schryver et al. (Eds.). Oxford Bilingual School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. G.-M. de Schryver et al. (Eds.). Oxford Bilingual School Dictionary: IsiXhosa and English. 2014, 562 pp. ISBN 978-0-19-576682-0. Cape Town: Oxford University Press Southern Africa. Price R129.95.

  4. β-thymosins and interstitial lung disease: study of a scleroderma cohort with a one-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messana Irene

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background β-thymosins play roles in cytoskeleton rearrangement, angiogenesis, fibrosis and reparative process, thus suggesting a possible involvement in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis. The aim of the study was to investigate the presence of thymosins β4, β4 sulfoxide, and β10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of scleroderma patients with interstitial lung disease and the relation of these factors with pulmonary functional and radiological parameters. Methods β-thymosins concentrations were determined by Reverse Phase-High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray-Mass Spectrometry in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of 46 scleroderma patients with lung involvement and of 15 controls. Results Thymosin β4, β4 sulfoxide, and β10 were detectable in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients and controls. Thymosin β4 levels were significantly higher in scleroderma patients than in controls. In addition, analyzing the progression of scleroderma lung disease at one-year follow-up, we have found that higher thymosin β4 levels seem to have a protective role against lung tissue damage. Thymosin β4 sulfoxide levels were higher in the smokers and in the scleroderma patients with alveolitis. Conclusions We describe for the first time β-thymosins in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of scleroderma lung disease. Thymosin β4 seems to have a protective role against lung tissue damage, while its oxidation product mirrors an alveolar inflammatory status.

  5. Occupational and environmental scleroderma. Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Rivas, Manuel; Moreno, Rafael; Corbella, Xavier

    2017-03-01

    The etiology of systemic sclerosis (SSc) remains unknown; however, several occupational and environmental factors have been implicated. Our objective was to perform a meta-analysis of all studies published on SSc associated with occupational and environmental exposure. The review was undertaken by means of MEDLINE and SCOPUS from 1960 to 2014 and using the terms: "systemic," "scleroderma," or "systemic sclerosis/chemically induced" [MesH]. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used for the qualifying assessment. The inverse variance-weighted method was performed. The meta-analysis of silica exposure included 15 case-control studies [overall OR 2.81 (95%CI 1.86-4.23; p < 0.001)] and 4 cohort studies [overall RR 17.52 (95%CI 5.98-51.37; p < 0.001)]; the meta-analysis of solvents exposure included 13 case-control studies (overall OR 2.00 [95%CI 1.32-3.02; p = 0.001); the meta-analysis of breast implants exposure included 4 case-control studies (overall OR 1.68 (95%CI 1.65-1.71; p < 0.001)) and 6 cohort studies (overall RR 2.13 (95%CI 0.86-5.27; p = 0.10)); the meta-analysis of epoxy resins exposure included 4 case-control studies (overall OR 2.97 (95%CI 2.31-3.83; p < 0.001)), the meta-analysis of pesticides exposure included 3 case-control studies (overall OR 1.02 (95%CI 0.78-1.32; p = 0.90)) and, finally, the meta-analysis of welding fumes exposure included 4 studies (overall OR 1.29 (95%CI 0.44-3.74; p = 0.64)). Not enough studies citing risks related to hair dyes have been published to perform an accurate meta-analysis. Silica and solvents were the two most likely substances related to the pathogenesis of SSc. While silica is involved in particular jobs, solvents are widespread and more people are at risk of having incidental contact with them.

  6. Comparing HLA shared epitopes in French Caucasian patients with scleroderma.

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    Doua F Azzouz

    Full Text Available Although many studies have analyzed HLA allele frequencies in several ethnic groups in patients with scleroderma (SSc, none has been done in French Caucasian patients and none has evaluated which one of the common amino acid sequences, (67FLEDR(71, shared by HLA-DRB susceptibility alleles, or (71TRAELDT(77, shared by HLA-DQB1 susceptibility alleles in SSc, was the most important to develop the disease. HLA-DRB and DQB typing was performed for a total of 468 healthy controls and 282 patients with SSc allowing FLEDR and TRAELDT analyses. Results were stratified according to patient's clinical subtypes and autoantibody status. Moreover, standardized HLA-DRß1 and DRß5 reverse transcriptase Taqman PCR assays were developed to quantify ß1 and ß5 mRNA in 20 subjects with HLA-DRB1*15 and/or DRB1*11 haplotypes. FLEDR motif is highly associated with diffuse SSc (χ(2 = 28.4, p<10-6 and with anti-topoisomerase antibody (ATA production (χ(2 = 43.9, p<10-9 whereas TRAELDT association is weaker in both subgroups (χ(2 = 7.2, p = 0.027 and χ(2 = 14.6, p = 0.0007 respectively. Moreover, FLEDR motif- association among patients with diffuse SSc remains significant only in ATA subgroup. The risk to develop ATA positive SSc is higher with double dose FLEDR than single dose with respectively, adjusted standardised residuals of 5.1 and 2.6. The increase in FLEDR motif is mostly due to the higher frequency of HLA-DRB1*11 and DRB1*15 haplotypes. Furthermore, FLEDR is always carried by the most abundantly expressed ß chain: ß1 in HLA DRB1*11 haplotypes and ß5 in HLA-DRB1*15 haplotypes.In French Caucasian patients with SSc, FLEDR is the main presenting motif influencing ATA production in dcSSc. These results open a new field of potential therapeutic applications to interact with the FLEDR peptide binding groove and prevent ATA production, a hallmark of severity in SSc.

  7. Validation of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, David; Dummett, Sarah; Kelly, Laura; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Jenkinson, Crispin

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the management of long-term conditions and in keeping people active and participating in the community. Testing the effectiveness of interventions that aim to affect activities and participation can be challenging without a well-developed, valid, and reliable instrument. This study therefore aims to develop a patient-reported outcome measure, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ), which is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) and fully compliant with current best practice guidelines. Questionnaire items generated from patient interviews and based on the nine chapters of the ICF were administered by postal survey to 386 people with three neurological conditions: motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. Participants also completed the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and EQ-5D-5L. Thus, 334 participants completed the survey, a response rate of 86.5%. Factor analysis techniques identified three Ox-PAQ domains, consisting of 23 items, accounting for 72.8% of variance. Internal reliability for the three domains was high (Cronbach's α: 0.81-0.96), as was test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation: 0.83-0.92). Concurrent validity was demonstrated through highly significant relationships with relevant domains of the MOS SF-36 and the EQ- 5D-5L. Assessment of known-groups validity identified significant differences in Ox-PAQ scores among the three conditions included in the survey. Results suggest that the Ox-PAQ is a valid and reliable measure of participation and activity. The measure will now be validated in a range of further conditions, and additional properties, such as responsiveness, will also be assessed in the next phase of the instrument's development.

  8. Book review: Dexter Hoyos, Mastering the West. Rome and Carthage at War, Oxford-New York, Oxford University Press, 2015, pp. XXI, 337; ISBN 9780199860104

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    Gabriele Demurtas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay offers a critical review of the volume by Dexter Hoyos «Mastering the West. Rome and Carthage at War», published in 2015 in Oxford-New York by the Oxford University Press, focused on the conflicts that involved Rome and Carthage between 264 and 146 BC for the supremacy in the western Mediterranean.

  9. The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, David; Dummett, Sarah; Kelly, Laura; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Jenkinson, Crispin

    2013-01-01

    With an ageing population and increasing demands on health and social care services, there is growing importance attached to the management of long-term conditions, including maximizing the cost-effectiveness of treatments. In line with this, there is increasing emphasis on the need to keep people both active and participating in daily life. Consequently, it is essential that well developed and validated instruments that can meaningfully assess levels of participation and activity are widely available. Current measures, however, are largely focused on disability and rehabilitation, and there is no measure of activity or participation for generic use that fully meets the standards set by regulatory bodies such as the US Food and Drug Administration. Here we detail a protocol for the development and validation of a new patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) for assessment of participation and activity in people experiencing a variety of health conditions, ie, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ). The stages incorporated in its development are entirely in line with current regulations and represent best practice in the development of PROMs. Development of the Ox-PAQ is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. The project incorporates a new strategy of engaging with stakeholders from the outset in an attempt to identify those characteristics of PROMs considered most important to a range of potential users. Items will be generated through interviews with patients from a range of conditions. Pretesting of the instrument will be via cognitive interviews and focus groups. A postal survey will be conducted, with data subject to factor and Rasch analysis in order to identify appropriate dimensions and redundant items. Reliability will be assessed by Cronbach's alpha and item-total correlations. A second, large-scale postal survey will follow, with the Ox-PAQ being

  10. Scleroderma renal crisis in a case of mixed connective tissue disease

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    Mukul Vij

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD is an overlap syndrome first defined in 1972 by Sharp et al. In this original study, the portrait emerged of a connective tissue disorder sharing features of systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma and polymyositis. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC is an extremely infrequent but serious complication that can occur in MCTD. The histologic picture of SRC is that of a thrombotic micro-angiopathic process. Renal biopsy plays an important role in confirming the clinical diagnosis, excluding overlapping/superimposed diseases that might lead to acute renal failure in MCTD patients, helping to predict the clinical outcome and optimizing patient management. We herewith report a rare case of SRC in a patient with MCTD and review the relevant literature.

  11. Scleroderma renal crisis in a case of mixed connective tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Mukul; Agrawal, Vinita; Jain, Manoj

    2014-07-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is an overlap syndrome first defined in 1972 by Sharp et al. In this original study, the portrait emerged of a connective tissue disorder sharing features of systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) and polymyositis. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is an extremely infrequent but serious complication that can occur in MCTD. The histologic picture of SRC is that of a thrombotic micro-angiopathic process. Renal biopsy plays an important role in confirming the clinical diagnosis, excluding overlapping/superimposed diseases that might lead to acute renal failure in MCTD patients, helping to predict the clinical outcome and optimizing patient management. We herewith report a rare case of SRC in a patient with MCTD and review the relevant literature.

  12. Atypical Neuroimaging Manifestations of Linear Scleroderma “en coup de sabre”

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. ALLMENDINGER, Andrew; A. RICCI, Joseph; S. DESAI, Naman; VISWANADHAN, Narayan; RODRIGUEZ, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Linear scleroderma “en coup de sabre” is a subset of localized scleroderma with band-like sclerotic lesions typically involving the fronto-parietal regions of the scalp. Patients often present with neurologic symptoms. On imaging, patients may have lesions in the cerebrum ipsilateral to the scalp abnormality. Infratentorial lesions and other lesions not closely associated with the overlying scalp abnormality, such as those found in the cerebellum, have been reported, but are extremely uncommon. We present a case of an 8-year-old boy with a left fronto-parietal “en coup de sabre” scalp lesion and describe the neuroimaging findings of a progressively enlarging left cerebellar lesion discovered incidentally on routine magnetic resonance imaging. Interestingly, the patient had no neurologic symptoms given the size of the mass identified. PMID:26401155

  13. Towards a Unified University Infrastructure: The Data Management Roll-Out at the University of Oxford

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    James A. J. Wilson

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Since presenting a paper at the International Digital Curation Conference 2010 conference entitled ‘An Institutional Approach to Developing Research Data Management Infrastructure’, the University of Oxford has come a long way in developing research data management (RDM policy, tools and training to address the various phases of the research data lifecycle. Work has now begun on integrating these various elements into a unified infrastructure for the whole university, under the aegis of the Data Management Roll-out at Oxford (Damaro Project.This paper will explain the process and motivation behind the project, and describes our vision for the future. It will also introduce the new tools and processes created by the university to tie the individual RDM components together. Chief among these is the ‘DataFinder’ – a hierarchically-structured metadata cataloguing system which will enable researchers to search for and locate research datasets hosted in a variety of different datastores from institutional repositories, through Web 2 services, to filing cabinets standing in department offices. DataFinder will be able to pull and associate research metadata from research information databases and data management plans, and is intended to be CERIF compatible. DataFinder is being designed so that it can be deployed at different levels within different contexts, with higher-level instances harvesting information from lower-level instances enabling, for example, an academic department to deploy one instance of DataFinder, which can then be harvested by another at an institutional level, which can then in turn be harvested by another at a national level.The paper will also consider the requirements of embedding tools and training within an institution and address the difficulties of ensuring the sustainability of an RDM infrastructure at a time when funding for such endeavours is limited. Our research shows that researchers (and indeed departments

  14. Netrin-1 regulates fibrocyte accumulation in the decellularized fibrotic scleroderma lung microenvironment and in bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huanxing; Zhu, Yangyang; Pan, Hongyi; Chen, Xiaosong; Balestrini, Jenna L.; Lam, TuKiet T.; Kanyo, Jean E.; Eichmann, Anne; Gulati, Mridu; Fares, Wassim H.; Bai, Hanwen; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol A.; Gan, Ye; Peng, Xueyan; Moore, Meagan W.; White, Eric S.; Sava, Parid; Gonzalez, Anjelica L.; Cheng, Yuwei; Niklason, Laura E.; Herzog, Erica L.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Fibrocytes are collagen-producing leukocytes that accumulate in Scleroderma-associated interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD) via unknown mechanisms. The extracellular matrix (ECM) influences cellular phenotypes. However, a relationship between the lung ECM and fibrocytes in Scleroderma has not been explored. This study uses a novel translational platform based on decellularized human lungs to determine whether the scleroderma lung ECM controls fibrocyte development from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Methods Decellularized scaffolds prepared from healthy and fibrotic Scleroderma lung explants underwent biomechanical evaluation using tensile testing and biochemical analysis using proteomics. Cells from healthy and SSc-ILD subjects were cultured on these scaffolds, and CD45+Pro-ColIα1+ cells meeting criteria for fibrocytes were quantified. The contribution of Netrin-1 to fibrosis was assessed using neutralizing antibodies in this system and via the inhalational administration of bleomycin to Netrin-1+/− mice. Results Compared to control lung scaffold, SSc-ILD lung scaffolds showed aberrant anatomy, enhanced stiffness, and abnormal extracellular matrix composition. Culture of control cells in Scleroderma scaffolds increased Pro-ColIα1+ production, which was stimulated by enhanced stiffness and abnormal ECM composition. SSc-ILD cells demonstrated increased Pro-ColIα1 responsiveness to Scleroderma lung scaffolds, but not enhanced stiffness. Enhanced Netrin-1 expression was seen on CD14lo SSc-ILD cells and antibody mediated Netrin-1 neutralization attenuated CD45+Pro-ColIα1+ detection in all settings. Netrin-1+/− mice were protected from bleomycin induced lung fibrosis and fibrocyte accumulation. Conclusion Factors present in Scleroderma lung matrices regulate fibrocyte accumulation via a Netrin-1-dependent pathway. Netrin-1 regulates bleomycin induced murine pulmonary fibrosis. Netrin-1 might be a novel therapeutic target in SSc-ILD. PMID:26749424

  15. Progressive Hemifacial Atrophy and Linear Scleroderma En Coup de Sabre: A Spectrum of the Same Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Khamaganova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Similar clinical and histhopathological features in progressive hemifacial atrophy and linear scleroderma en coup de sabre are well known. Trauma may predispose to the development of both diseases. The lack of association with anti-Borrelia antibodies was shown in both cases as well. The otolaryngological and endocrine disorders may be associated findings in both diseases. However, there are certain differences in neurological and ophthalmological changes in the diseases.

  16. Mechanical properties of the gastro-esophageal junction in health, achalasia, and scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, F; Fonollosa, V; Vilardell, M; Malagelada, J R

    2000-07-01

    Manometric assessment of the gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) is deceptive in that ignores key dynamic properties of the junction, such as resistance to flow and compliance. Our aim was to investigate the mechanical properties of the GEJ comprising intraluminal pressure (measured by manometry), resistance to flow and compliance (measured by resistometry). We studied 8 healthy subjects, 11 patients with achalasia and 11 patients with scleroderma. We used a pneumatic resistometer, previously developed and validated in our laboratory. The resistometer consists of a flaccid polyurethane 5-cm cylinder connected to an electronically regulated nitrogen-injection system; the instrument records nitrogen flow through the cylinder while maintaining a constant pressure gradient between its proximal and distal ends. By placing the cylinder successively in the proximal stomach and along the GEJ we measured the GEJ-gastric resistance gradient (GEJ resistance minus gastric resistance) and were able to calculate the cumulative resistance (sum of resistance exerted at each pressure level), peak resistance (at any injection pressure), nil resistance point (injection pressure in mmHg at which GEJ resistance equals gastric resistance), and compliance slope (flow/pressure relationship). We found that GEJ resistance to flow (cumulative resistance, peak resistance, and nil resistance point) is significantly increased in achalasia and decreased in scleroderma (P < 0.05 versus health) while GEJ compliance is diminished in achalasia (P < 0.05 versus health) and normal in scleroderma. Achalasia is a disease characterized by increased GEJ resistance and rigidity. By contrast, although scleroderma is characterized by decreased GEJ resistance, GEJ compliance may be normal.

  17. Antitopoisomerase antibody positivity predates nailfold capillaroscopy abnormalities in scleroderma. Postulated classification of 'prescleroderma'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, H; Champion, D; Wu, J C; Giallussi, J; McGrath, M; Manolios, N

    2011-02-01

    In a patient with early topoisomerase antibody-positive scleroderma, antinuclear antibody positivity was fortuitously observed to predate nailfold capillaroscopy changes. Using this case as a template, the prediagnostic phase of the presumed multifactorial disease may be divided into 5 temporal phases--phase 1 representing conception and intrauterine environment, phase 2 representing the extrauterine environment predating environmental exposure; phase 3 representing the early post-environmental exposure interval with no detectable perturbed body status; phase 4 representing the post-environmental exposure interval characterized by autoantibody production and microvascular changes, and phase 5, the symptomatic clinical prediagnostic interval (Raynaud's, skin, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, cardiorespiratory) prompting scleroderma diagnosis. Temporal classification of prescleroderma aids in both the understanding and definition of scleroderma 'onset'. If altered nailfold capillaries and autoantibodies develop at comparable rates, and if the findings from this case--that autoantibody changes precede microvascular changes--are truly representative of the preclinical disease phase, then these findings argue that the evolution of the disease is from within the vessel outwards, rather than vice versa. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  18. Radiotherapy for malignancy in patients with scleroderma: The Mayo Clinic experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, Douglas G.; Miller, Robert C.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Osborn, Thomas G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency of acute and chronic adverse effects in patients with scleroderma who receive radiotherapy for treatment of cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed of 20 patients with scleroderma who received radiotherapy. Acute and chronic toxic effects attributable to radiotherapy were analyzed, and freedom from radiation-related toxicity was calculated. Results: Of the 20 patients, 15 had acute toxic effects, with Grade 3 or higher toxicity for 3 patients. Seven patients had self-limited Grade 1 or 2 radiation dermatitis, and no patient had Grade 3 or higher radiation dermatitis. Thirteen patients had chronic toxic effects, with Grade 3 or higher chronic toxicity for 3 patients. The median estimated time to any grade chronic toxicity was 0.4 years, and the median estimated time to Grade 3 or higher chronic toxicity has not been reached. Conclusions: The results suggest that although some patients with scleroderma treated with radiation experience considerable toxic effects, the occurrence of Grade 3 or higher toxicity may be less than previously anticipated

  19. Autologous fat transplantation for depressed linear scleroderma-induced facial atrophic scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Mi Ryung; Jung, Jin Young; Chung, Kee Yang

    2008-12-01

    Facial linear scleroderma results in depressed atrophic scars. Autologous fat transplantation has been widely used, and fat appears to be an ideal material for filling depressed atrophic scars and contour deformities, but long-term results for autologous fat transplantation are controversial. To review the short- and long-term results of 20 patients who underwent multiple autologous fat transplantations for depressed atrophic scar correction. Twenty patients with clinically inactive facial linear scleroderma were included. They received at least two transplantations and had a 12-month follow-up evaluation. On the forehead, 51% to 75% improvement (average grading scale: 2.4) was achieved when observed at least 12 months after the last treatment. For the chin, correction was poor (average grading scale: 0.7) with less than 25% improvement. The infraorbital area showed fair correction, but the nose showed poor correction. Two of three patients with scalp reduction surgery showed excellent results, showing only slight scar widening. Autologous fat transplantation is an effective method for long-term correction of depressed atrophic scars left by linear scleroderma on the forehead but is less effective for corrections on the nose, infraorbital area, and chin.

  20. Scanning laser Doppler imaging may predict disease progression of localized scleroderma in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, L J; Shipley, J; Newell, E L; Harris, N; Clinch, J G; Lovell, C R

    2013-07-01

    Localized scleroderma is a rare but potentially disfiguring and disabling condition. Systemic treatment should be started early in those with active disease in key functional and cosmetic sites, but disease activity is difficult to determine clinically. Superficial blood flow has been shown to correlate with disease activity in localized scleroderma. To examine whether superficial blood flow measured by laser Doppler imaging (LDI) has the potential to predict disease progression and therefore select patients for early systemic treatment. A group of 20 individuals had clinical assessment and scanning LDI blood-flow measurements of 32 affected body sites. After a mean follow-up of 8.7 months their clinical outcome was compared with the results of the initial LDI assessment. Eleven out of 15 patients with an assessment of active LDI had progressed clinically, and 16 out of the 17 scans with inactive LDI assessment had not progressed, giving a positive predictive value of 73% and a negative predictive value of 94%. We believe that LDI can be a useful tool in predicting disease progression in localized scleroderma, and it may help clinicians to decide which patients to treat early. © 2013 The Authors BJD © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  1. Paraneoplastic scleroderma-like tissue reactions in the setting of an underlying plasma cell dyscrasia: a report of 10 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, Cynthia M; Iwenofu, Hans; Nuovo, Gerard J

    2013-07-01

    Systemic plasma cell dyscrasias have diverse manifestations in the skin and include an inflammatory paraneoplastic process. We encountered cases of scleroderma and eosinophilic fasciitis in the setting of an underlying plasma cell dyscrasia. Ten cases of scleroderma-like tissue reactions in the setting of an underlying plasma cell dyscrasia were encountered. The biopsies were stained for Transforming growth factor (Transforming growth factor) beta, IgG4, kappa, and lambda. Patients presented with a sclerodermoid reaction represented by eosinophilic fasciitis (5 cases), morphea (3 cases), and systemic scleroderma (2 cases). The mean age of presentation was 70 years with a striking female predominance (4:1). Acral accentuation was noted in 8 cases. In 6 of the cases, the cutaneous sclerosis antedated (4 cases) by weeks to 2 years or occurred concurrently (2 cases) with the initial diagnosis of the plasma cell. The biopsies showed changes typical of eosinophilic fasciitis and/or scleroderma. In 5 cases, light chain-restricted plasma cells were present on the biopsy. There was staining of the plasma cells for Transforming growth factor beta in 3 out of 5 cases tested. In any older patient presenting with a sudden onset of eosinophilic fasciitis or scleroderma especially with acral accentuation, investigations should be conducted in regards to an underlying plasma cell dyscrasia.

  2. [Using the polymerase chain reaction to Borrelia burgdorferi infection in localized scleroderma injure (morphea), in Venezuelan patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-León, Fabiola; Arocha, Francisco; Hassanhi, Manzur; Arévalo, Julio

    2010-09-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme Borreliosis, an infectious multisystemic disease transmitted to humans by the Ixodes ticks bite. A possible association of Borrelia burgdorferi with localized scleroderma has been postulated. However, published data do not provide unequivocal results. Previous serologic analysis of patients with localized scleroderma in South American countries (including Venezuela), have been reported as yielding some reactivity. The present study looked for evidence of Borrelia burgdorferi infection in venezuelan patients with localized scleroderma, using the polymerase chain reaction to analyze 21 skin samples of patients with this skin condition. The results were negative in all the samples studied. Our data do not support an association of Borrelia burgdorferi infection and the sclerotic lesions of localized scleroderma; but do not rule out the possibility of a relationship between localized scleroderma and an unknown geno-specie of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex, a different Borrelia specie or a different spirochetal organism, as the etiological agents of the skin lesions in this area.

  3. Evaluation of Peripheral Blood Circulation Disorder in Scleroderma Patients Using an Optical Sensor with a Pressurization Mechanism.

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    Yoshiki Yamakoshi

    Full Text Available Blood circulation function of peripheral blood vessels in skin dermis was evaluated employing an optical sensor with a pressurization mechanism using the blood outflow and reflow characteristics. The device contains a light source and an optical sensor. When applied to the skin surface, it first exerts the primary pressure (higher than the systolic blood pressure, causing an outflow of blood from the dermal peripheral blood vessels. After two heartbeats, the pressure is lowered (secondary pressure and blood reflows into the peripheral blood vessels. Hemoglobin concentration, which changes during blood outflow and reflow, is derived from the received light intensity using the Beer-Lambert law. This method was evaluated in 26 healthy female volunteers and 26 female scleroderma patients. In order to evaluate the blood circulation function of the peripheral blood vessels of scleroderma patients, pressurization sequence which consists of primary pressure followed by secondary pressure was adopted. Blood reflow during the first heartbeat period after applying the secondary pressure of 40mmHg was (mean±SD 0.059±0.05%mm for scleroderma patients and 0.173±0.104%mm for healthy volunteers. Blood reflow was significantly lower in scleroderma patients than in healthy volunteers (p<0.05. This result indicates that the information necessary for assessing blood circulation disorder of peripheral blood vessels in scleroderma patients is objectively obtained by the proposed method.

  4. The Oxford Probe: an open access five-hole probe for aerodynamic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, B. F.; Povey, T.

    2017-03-01

    The Oxford Probe is an open access five-hole probe designed for experimental aerodynamic measurements. The open access probe can be manufactured by the end user via additive manufacturing (metal or plastic). The probe geometry, drawings, calibration maps, and software are available under a creative commons license. The purpose is to widen access to aerodynamic measurement techniques in education and research environments. There are many situations in which the open access probe will allow results of comparable accuracy to a well-calibrated commercial probe. We discuss the applications and limitations of the probe, and compare the calibration maps for 16 probes manufactured in different materials and at different scales, but with the same geometrical design.

  5. The Oxford Probe: an open access five-hole probe for aerodynamic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, B F; Povey, T

    2017-01-01

    The Oxford Probe is an open access five-hole probe designed for experimental aerodynamic measurements. The open access probe can be manufactured by the end user via additive manufacturing (metal or plastic). The probe geometry, drawings, calibration maps, and software are available under a creative commons license. The purpose is to widen access to aerodynamic measurement techniques in education and research environments. There are many situations in which the open access probe will allow results of comparable accuracy to a well-calibrated commercial probe. We discuss the applications and limitations of the probe, and compare the calibration maps for 16 probes manufactured in different materials and at different scales, but with the same geometrical design. (paper)

  6. Metabolism of carbon-14 labelled l-tryptophan, l-kynerenine and hydroxy-l-kynerenine in miners with scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankes, L.V.; De Bruin, E.; Jansen, C.R.; Voster, L.; Schmaeler, M.

    1977-01-01

    Six South African white miners were studied with the 2-g l-tryptophan load test and tracer doses of L-tryptophan-7a-carbon-14, L-kynurenine-keto-carbon-14 and hydroxy-L-kynerenine-keto-carbon-14. The breath 14 CO 2 and 14 urinary metabolites were measured. When they were compared with a previous study of American women with scleroderma, similar 14 CO 2 and tryptophan metabolite excretion patterns were observed in the data from the miners. The labelled quinolinic acid excretion was more significantly elevated in the South African miners' urine than in the urine of the American women. The data from both studies suggest that some patients with scleroderma have an altered step in the tryptophan metabolic pathway after hydroxy-anthranilic acid. What relationship exists between the induction of pulmonary silicosis and the subsequent development of scleroderma, requires additional human studies

  7. Mild Cognitive Impairment as a single sign of brain hemiatrophy in patient with Localized Scleroderma and Parry-Romberg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimiec, Elzbieta; Klimkowicz-Mrowiec, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Neurologic involvement is well recognized in Systemic Scleroderma and increasingly reported in Localized Scleroderma. MRI brain abnormalities are often associated with symptoms such as seizures or headaches. In some cases they may be clinically silent. We describe a 23 years old female with head, trunk and limbs scleroderma who developed Parry-Romberg Syndrome. Brain MRI showed ipsilateral temporal lobe atrophy without any prominent neurologic symptoms. Neuropsychological examination revealed Mild Cognitive Impairment. During the 7 years of follow up we have noticed progression of face atrophy but no progression of brain atrophy. Cognitive functions have been stable. This case highlight that major MRI brain abnormalities in LS may occur with only subtle clinical manifestation such as Mild Cognitive Impairment. Copyright © 2016 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. Internal consistency reliability and validity of the Hebrew translation of the Oxford Happiness Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, L J; Katz, Y J

    2000-08-01

    The Hebrew translation of the Oxford Happiness Inventory and the short form Revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire were completed by 298 undergraduate women in Israel. The findings confirm the internal reliability of the Hebrew translation of the Oxford Happiness Inventory and support the construct validity according to which "happiness is a thing called stable extraversion."

  9. G.-M. de Schryver (Editor. Oxford Bilingual School Dictionary: Zulu and English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.J. Prinsloo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Oxford Bilingual School Dictionary: Zulu and English (henceforth OZSD is the latest addition to the bidirectional English–isiZulu bilingual dictionary market and is based on the same successful and prize-winning formula used for the Oxford Northern Sotho School Dictionary (ONSD published in 2007.

  10. High prevalence of occult left heart disease in scleroderma-pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Benjamin D; Shimony, Avi; Langleben, David; Hirsch, Andrew; Rudski, Lawrence; Schlesinger, Robert; Eisenberg, Mark J; Joyal, Dominique; Hudson, Marie; Boutet, Kim; Serban, Alexandrina; Masetto, Ariel; Baron, Murray

    2013-10-01

    Our study aimed to determine the prevalence of occult left-heart disease in patients with scleroderma and pulmonary hypertension. In patients with pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary artery pressure (mean PAP)≥25 mmHg), differentiation between pre- and post-capillary pulmonary hypertension has been made according to pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) less than or more than 15 mmHg, respectively. We performed a retrospective chart review of 107 scleroderma patients. All patients with suspected pulmonary hypertension had routine right or left heart catheterisation with left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) measurement pre-/post-fluid challenge. We extracted demographic, haemodynamic and echocardiographic data. Patients were classified into one of four groups: haemodynamically normal (mean PAP15 mmHg); occult PVH (mean PAP≥25 mmHg, PAWP≤15 mmHg, LVEDP>15 mmHg before or after fluid challenge); and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) (mean PAP≥25 mmHg, PAWP≤15 mmHg and LVEDP≤15 mmHg before or after fluid challenge). 53 out of 107 patients had pulmonary hypertension. Based on the PAWP-based definition, 29 out of 53 had PAH and 24 out of 53 had PVH. After considering the resting and post-fluid-challenge LVEDP, 11 PAH patients were reclassified as occult PVH. The occult PVH group was haemodynamically, echocardiographically and demographically closer to the PVH group than the PAH group. PVH had high prevalence in our scleroderma-pulmonary hypertension population. Distinguishing PAH from PVH with only PAWP may result in some PVH patients being misclassified as having PAH.

  11. Esclerodermia localizada: Diagnósticos diferenciales Localized scleroderma: Differential diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MB Leroux

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available La esclerodermia localizada constituye un desorden autoinmune órgano específico, que compromete sobre todo la piel. Se caracteriza por inflamación seguida de esclerosis e incluye distintas formas clínicas. La etiología de la esclerodermia localizada no ha sido establecida. El diagnóstico diferencial incluye cuadros esclerodermiformes, desencadenados por factores intrínsecos y extrínsecos que están siendo estudiados. Entre ellos se incluyen: exposición a radiaciones o tóxicos, consumo de medicamentos, infecciones y enfermedades de origen endocrino-metabólico, genético e inflamatorio. En primer lugar, se debe descartar la esclerodermia sistémica. En segundo lugar, se clasifican las entidades con predominio de esclerosis o atrofia. Por último, se incluyen algunas enfermedades en un cuadro comparativo.Localized scleroderma is an autoimmune organ specific disorder with an important skin compromise. It is an inflammatory process with several distinct clinical characteristics. The etiology of localized scleroderma has not been established yet. Differential diagnosis includes sclerodermiform onset unchained by intrinsic and extrinsic factors that are presently studied. Among them must be taking into account: exposure to radiation or toxic agents, therapeutic drugs, infections and diseases of endocrine, metabolic, genetic or inflammatory etiology. Firstly, it must be point out that systemic scleroderma must be ruled out. Secondly, disorders predominantly with sclerosis and atrophy must be classified and lastly, some other diseases are included in a comparative table.

  12. Scleroderma and pulmonary hypertension Esclerodermia e hipertensão pulmonar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Fagan

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with scleroderma are at increased risk for the development of pulmonary hypertension, and the development of unexplained dyspnea or an isolated decrease in diffusing capacity should prompt evaluation. Echocardiography is often helpful in this situation, with further testing being performed as indicated. Because the prognosis of untreated pulmonary hypertension occurring in the setting of scleroderma is generally quite poor, vigilance is required on the part of physicians following this "at risk" group of patients. The past decade has seen important advances in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, including intravenous epoprostenol, oral bosentan and subcutaneously infused treprostinil. As new therapies are developed for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, it is essential that patients with scleroderma-related disease are included in clinical trials.Pacientes com esclerodermia têm risco aumentado para desenvolver hipertensão pulmonar. O aparecimento de dispnéia e/ou a diminuição da capacidade de difusão devem levar à suspeita imediata dessa complicação. A ecodopplercardiografia é importante para o diagnóstico e o seguimento desses casos. Os casos não tratados de hipertensão pulmonar em esclerodermia têm mau prognóstico, daí a necessidade em manter sob vigilância estes pacientes. Na última década surgiram avanços para o tratamento da hipertensão arterial pulmonar, incluindo os medicamentos epoprostenol EV, bosentan VO e treprostinil SC. À medida que novas terapias vão sendo desenvolvidas, torna-se necessário a realização de estudos clínicos de maior validade.

  13. Scleroderma "en coup de sabre" With Epilepsy and Uveitis Successfully Treated With Tocilizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osminina, Maria; Geppe, Nathalia; Afonina, Elena

    2018-06-18

    Case history of a small girl outlet with epilepsy, followed by scleroderma skin damage and uveitis, neurovasculitis with white matter foci in brain on the side of skin lesion in two months, immunologic disease activity. Resistance to conventional immunosuppressive therapy forced us to initiate the treatment with tocilizumab. It was well tolerated and led to significant improvement of brain, ocular and skin manifestations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  14. The preliminary evaluation on sclerodermas of newborn baby with thyroid hormone and β2-MG ria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Junchi; Du Sujun

    1995-01-01

    The combined determination of thyroid hormone and β 2 -MG may be used as the sensitive indication of the early degeneration of liver and kidney function. It is probably due to the damage of liver and kidney by scleroderma in newborn baby. The observation of 68 cases show that the serum levels of T 3 ,FT 3 in the concentration of thyroid hormone decreased significantly, and syndrome of the low serum T 3 , high serum rT 3 are taken place. Whereas, the serum level of β 2 -MG is increased significantly

  15. Spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by scleroderma-induced aneurysm: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.; Neidl, K.; Contier-Dippel, B.; Huber, G.; Ernst, E.

    1995-01-01

    We introduce a 58-year-old woman who suffered from progressive systemic scleroderma (PSS) associated with trigeminal sensory neuropathy for approximately 10 years. She then had a stroke from spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SSAH). Spinal digital subtraction angiography (DSA) revealed two aneurysms and smaller dilations of the afferent vessel that could also be seen by MRI. Three asymptomatic brain infarctions in different vascular regions could be revealed by CCT. The SSAH, ischemic lesions and aneurysms were probably caused by vasculitic affections induced by PSS. (orig.)

  16. Imaging features in calcinosis circumscripta, a rare type of subcutaneous calcification in localized scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratiksha Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcinosis cutis circumscripta is a rare condition in which abnormal deposition of calcium seen in the dermis and subcutaneous tissue, it is associated with localized scleroderma. A 30-year-old female presented with an area of extensive calcification involving the right gluteal region, lateral aspect of right thigh and a small area on left thigh detected on radiograph with atrophy of subcutaneous tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography were done for further evaluation and the findings were of calcification and atrophy involving the skin and subcutaneous tissue.

  17. Spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by scleroderma-induced aneurysm: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, J. [Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie der Universitaetskliniken des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Neidl, K. [Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie der Universitaetskliniken des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Contier-Dippel, B. [Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie der Universitaetskliniken des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Huber, G. [Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie der Universitaetskliniken des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Ernst, E. [Neurologische Abt., Caritas Krankenhaus, Dillingen (Germany)

    1995-11-01

    We introduce a 58-year-old woman who suffered from progressive systemic scleroderma (PSS) associated with trigeminal sensory neuropathy for approximately 10 years. She then had a stroke from spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SSAH). Spinal digital subtraction angiography (DSA) revealed two aneurysms and smaller dilations of the afferent vessel that could also be seen by MRI. Three asymptomatic brain infarctions in different vascular regions could be revealed by CCT. The SSAH, ischemic lesions and aneurysms were probably caused by vasculitic affections induced by PSS. (orig.)

  18. Inhibition of collagen production in scleroderma fibroblast cultures by a connective tissue glycoprotein extracted from normal dermis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maquart, F.X.; Bellon, G.; Cornillet-Stoupy, J.; Randoux, A.; Triller, R.; Kalis, B.; Borel, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    It was shown in a previous paper that a connective tissue glycoprotein (CTGP) extracted from normal rabbit dermis was able to inhibit total protein and collagen syntheses by normal dermis fibroblast cultures. In the present study, the effects of CTGP on scleroderma fibroblasts were investigated. [ 14 C]Proline incorporation into total proteins of the supernatant was not significantly different from that found in controls. By contrast, the amount of collagen, expressed as percentage of total secreted protein, was far higher in scleroderma cultures than in normal ones (14.4% +/- 6.0% vs 4.6% +/- 0.9%). Addition of CTGP to the medium induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of [ 14 C]proline incorporation into proteins from both control and scleroderma cells. In control cultures, no significant decrease of the percentage of collagen was observed, but over 60 micrograms/ml, both cytotoxic effects and inhibition of protein synthesis occurred. In scleroderma cultures, the inhibition was twice as effective on collagen as on noncollagen protein synthesis. The inhibition of collagen secretion was not related either to changes in collagen hydroxylation or to the intracellular catabolism of newly synthesized procollagen

  19. Evaluation of medium-dose UVA1 phototherapy in localized scleroderma with the cutometer and fast Fourier transform method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rie, M. A.; Enomoto, D. N. H.; de Vries, H. J. C.; Bos, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of medium-dose UVA1 phototherapy in patients with localized scleroderma. Method: A controlled pilot study with medium-dose UVA1 (48 J/cm(2)) was performed. The results were evaluated by means of a skin score and two objective methods for quantifying sclerosis

  20. Disability, fatigue, pain and their associates in early diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis: the European Scleroderma Observational Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peytrignet, Sébastien; Denton, Christopher P; Lunt, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Our aim was to describe the burden of early dcSSc in terms of disability, fatigue and pain in the European Scleroderma Observational Study cohort, and to explore associated clinical features. Methods: Patients completed questionnaires at study entry, 12 and 24 months, including the HA...

  1. Validation of the Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease Scale: A Scleroderma Patient-Centered Intervention Network cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riehm, K.E.; Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Carrier, M.E.; Bartlett, S.J.; Malcarne, V.L.; Mouthon, L.; Nielson, W.R.; Poiraudeau, S.; Nielsen, K.; Baron, M.; Frech, T.; Hudson, M.; Pope, J.; Sauvé, M.; Suarez-Almazor, M.E.; Wigley, F.M.; Thombs, B.D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Self-management programs for patients with chronic illnesses, including rheumatic diseases, seek to enhance self-efficacy for performing health management behaviors. No measure of self-efficacy has been validated for patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma). The objective of

  2. Translation, cross-culturally adaptation and validation of the Danish version of Oxford Hip Score (OHS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Aksel

    there was no properly translated, adapted and validated Danish language version available, a translation to Danish, cross-culturally adaptation and validation of the Danish Oxford Hip Score was warranted. Material and Methods: We translated and cross-culturally adapted the Oxford Hip Score into Danish, in accordance......Objective: The Oxford Hip Score is a patient reported outcome questionnaire designed to assess pain and function in patients undergoing total hip arthroplaty (THA). The Oxford Hip Score is valid, reliable and consistent, and different language versions have been developed. Since.......9 % ceiling effect on this cohort of postoperative patients. Only in 1.2 % of the patients no sum score could be calculated, due to missing items. In relation to construct validity 80 % of predefined hypothesis were confirmed. The different items had an intraclass correlation in the range of 0...

  3. Phillip Louw: Oxford Afrikaans-Engels / English-Afrikaans Skoolwoordeboek / School Dictionary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton F. Prinsloo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Die Oxford Afrikaans–Engels/English–Afrikaans Skoolwoordeboek is as skoolwoor-deboek 'n puik hulpbron vir leerders. Dit is egter meer as net 'n woordeboek, soos wat 'n oorsig dadelik toon.

  4. Annotated catalogue of the types of Braconidae (Hymenoptera) in the Oxford University Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.; O'Toole, C.

    1993-01-01

    An annotated catalogue of the types of Braconidae in the Hope Entomological Collections, University Museum, Oxford, is given. The following new combinations are proposed: Aleiodes rothneyi (Shenefelt, 1975); Aniphiaulax agraensis (Cameron, 1897); Balcemena ruficollis (Cameron, 1899); Bicarinibracon

  5. The role of ultrasound imaging in the evaluation of peripheral nerve in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagliafico, Alberto; Panico, Nicoletta; Resmini, Eugenia; Derchi, Lorenzo E.; Ghio, Massimo; Martinoli, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients affected by scleroderma may complain of sensory disturbances especially in the hands. Purpose: To study the imaging features of upper limb nerves in patients affected by scleroderma (SSc). Materials and method: Twenty-five patients affected only by SSc were prospectively evaluated with high-resolution US and magnetic resonance (MRI) or computer tomography (CT) when necessary (2 patients). Median and ulnar nerves were evaluated bilaterally. Nerve conduction studies were performed in the symptomatic patients (n = 10). Results of imaging studies were correlated with disease duration, autoimmunity and immunosuppression. Nerves of SSc patients were compared with a control group of 90 patients matched for age and body mass index. Results: The prevalence of sensory disturbances revealed by clinical examination was 40%. In symptomatic SSc patients (n = 10) US evaluation revealed nerve abnormalities in 70% of cases (n = 7/10). n = 2 had a carpal tunnel syndrome. n = 5 had cubital tunnel syndrome. In two of them CT and MR were necessary to identify the compressed nerve at the level of the elbow due to the presence of calcifications. There was no association between the presence of an entrapment neuropathy and disease duration, autoantibodies and immunosuppression. Conclusion: Ultrasound, CT and MR may detect nerve abnormalities in 70% of SSc patients complaining of neurologic disturbances in the hands. The results of imaging studies support the hypothesis of a vascular dependent neuropathy in SSc.

  6. Esophageal function scintigraphy as parameter for organ involvement of progressive systemic scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leisner, B.; Koenig, G.; Hundegger, K.; Luderschmidt, C.

    1986-01-01

    Involvement of internal organs such as lungs, heart and kidneys, is a life-threatening complication in progressive systemic scleroderma (PSS). However, the earliest and the most frequent internal manifestation of PSS is that of esophageal dysfunction. This study was undertaken to determine whether the new, sensitive and noninvasive esphageal function scintigraphy (EFS) enables us to identify patients likely to develop pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. 131 patients with PSS of different clinical types and courses underwent EFS. The esophageal clearance of a sup(99m)Tc-tagged 15 ml water bolus was measured. In normals, 91 +- 4.8% of the maximal rate were cleared from the ROI comprising the whole esophagus 10 sec after T max was reached. For comparison, chest X-rays and pulmonary function data were used. In the presence of interstitial lung disease EFS gave normal results in four patients only (sensitivity, 89%). All cases with either severely impaired lung function or signs of fibrosis on X-ray films showed esophageal clearance values below 40%. Moreover, esophageal motility disorders were seen in 32 among 43 patients with normal lung function. There was a correlationi between the stage and progression (reflected by unspecific signs of inflammation) and the incidence and severity of both lung function impairment and esophageal dysfunction. In conclusion, functional scintigraphy proved to be a very sensitive diagnostic procedure in the screening for internal manifestations of progressive systemic scleroderma. (Author)

  7. Systemic sclerosis complicated with localized scleroderma-like lesions induced by Köbner phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigusa, Ryosuke; Asano, Yoshihide; Yamashita, Takashi; Takahashi, Takehiro; Nakamura, Kouki; Miura, Shunsuke; Ichimura, Yohei; Toyama, Tetsuo; Taniguchi, Takashi; Sumida, Hayakazu; Tamaki, Zenshiro; Miyazaki, Miki; Yoshizaki, Ayumi; Sato, Shinichi

    2018-03-01

    Scleroderma is a chronic disease of unknown etiology characterized by skin fibrosis and is divided into two clinical entities: systemic sclerosis (SSc) and localized scleroderma (LSc). In general, LSc is rarely complicated with SSc, but a certain portion of SSc patients manifests bilateral symmetric LSc-like lesions on the trunk and extremities. We investigated SSc patients with LSc-like lesions to clarify the underlying pathophysiology. Nine SSc cases complicated with LSc-like lesions were clinically and histologically characterized. SSc patients with LSc-like lesions exhibited multiple progressive hyper- and/or hypo-pigmented plaques with mild sclerosis symmetrically distributed on the trunk and extremities, especially abdominal region. In histological assessment, epidermal IL-1α expression was elevated in both forearms and LSc-like lesions of these patients to a greater extent than in forearms of control patients (SSc patients without LSc-like lesions). Of note, the infiltration and degranulation of mast cells were evident throughout the dermis of LSc-like lesions, while detectable to a lesser extent in forearms of SSc patients with LSc-like lesions and control patients. The epidermis of SSc patients with LSc-like lesions seems to possess an inflammatory phenotype, leading to the activation of mast cells in the dermis of mechanically stressed skin. Köbner phenomenon may be involved in the induction of LSc-like lesions in a certain subset of SSc. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Systemic sclerosis and localized scleroderma--current concepts and novel targets for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distler, Oliver; Cozzio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic autoimmune disease with a high morbidity and mortality. Skin and organ fibrosis are key manifestations of SSc, for which no generally accepted therapy is available. Thus, there is a high unmet need for novel anti-fibrotic therapeutic strategies in SSc. At the same time, important progress has been made in the identification and characterization of potential molecular targets in fibrotic diseases over the recent years. In this review, we have selected four targeted therapies, which are tested in clinical trials in SSc, for in depths discussion of their preclinical characterization. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulators such as riociguat might target both vascular remodeling and tissue fibrosis. Blockade of interleukin-6 might be particularly promising for early inflammatory stages of SSc. Inhibition of serotonin receptor 2b signaling links platelet activation to tissue fibrosis. Targeting simultaneously multiple key molecules with the multityrosine kinase-inhibitor nintedanib might be a promising approach in complex fibrotic diseases such as SSc, in which many partially independent pathways are activated. Herein, we also give a state of the art overview of the current classification, clinical presentation, diagnostic approach, and treatment options of localized scleroderma. Finally, we discuss whether the novel targeted therapies currently tested in SSc could be used for localized scleroderma.

  9. Physiologic abnormalities of cardiac function in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follansbee, W.P.; Curtiss, E.I.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.; Steen, V.D.; Uretsky, B.F.; Owens, G.R.; Rodnan, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    To investigate cardiopulmonary function in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma, we studied 26 patients with maximal exercise and redistribution thallium scans, rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography, pulmonary-function testing, and chest roentgenography. Although only 6 patients had clinical evidence of cardiac involvement, 20 had abnormal thallium scans, including 10 with reversible exercise-induced defects and 18 with fixed defects (8 had both). Seven of the 10 patients who had exercise-induced defects and underwent cardiac catheterization had normal coronary angiograms. Mean resting left ventricular ejection fraction and mean resting right ventricular ejection fraction were lower in patients with post-exercise left ventricular thallium defect scores above the median (59 +/- 13 per cent vs. 69 +/- 6 per cent, and 36 +/- 12 per cent vs. 47 +/- 7 per cent, respectively). The authors conclude that in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of myocardial perfusion are common and appear to be due to a disturbance of the myocardial microcirculation. Both right and left ventricular dysfunction appear to be related to this circulatory disturbance, suggesting ischemically mediated injury

  10. The role of ultrasound imaging in the evaluation of peripheral nerve in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliafico, Alberto, E-mail: atagliafico@sirm.org [Department of Radiology, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Panico, Nicoletta [Division of Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Resmini, Eugenia [Department of Endocrinological and Medical Sciences (DiSEM), Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Derchi, Lorenzo E. [Department of Radiology, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Ghio, Massimo [Division of Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Martinoli, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of Genova, Genova (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    Background: Patients affected by scleroderma may complain of sensory disturbances especially in the hands. Purpose: To study the imaging features of upper limb nerves in patients affected by scleroderma (SSc). Materials and method: Twenty-five patients affected only by SSc were prospectively evaluated with high-resolution US and magnetic resonance (MRI) or computer tomography (CT) when necessary (2 patients). Median and ulnar nerves were evaluated bilaterally. Nerve conduction studies were performed in the symptomatic patients (n = 10). Results of imaging studies were correlated with disease duration, autoimmunity and immunosuppression. Nerves of SSc patients were compared with a control group of 90 patients matched for age and body mass index. Results: The prevalence of sensory disturbances revealed by clinical examination was 40%. In symptomatic SSc patients (n = 10) US evaluation revealed nerve abnormalities in 70% of cases (n = 7/10). n = 2 had a carpal tunnel syndrome. n = 5 had cubital tunnel syndrome. In two of them CT and MR were necessary to identify the compressed nerve at the level of the elbow due to the presence of calcifications. There was no association between the presence of an entrapment neuropathy and disease duration, autoantibodies and immunosuppression. Conclusion: Ultrasound, CT and MR may detect nerve abnormalities in 70% of SSc patients complaining of neurologic disturbances in the hands. The results of imaging studies support the hypothesis of a vascular dependent neuropathy in SSc.

  11. Presentation of the Book “The Golden Horde in World History” (Oxford, Great Britain, April 7–8, 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Giniyatullina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available April 8, 2017 the multi-authored monograph “The Golden Horde in World History” (Kazan, Sh.Marjani Institute of History of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences Publ., 2017. 968 p. + 28 p. with colour insert was presented at the conference “Tatars in World History” (April 7–8, 2017, Oxford, Great Britain. The conference was organized by the University of Oxford and Sh.Marjani Institute of History of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences. The idea was also supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation, the World Congress of Tatars, the Alliance of Tatars of Europe and the Association of Tatars of Great Britain. The conference was opened with welcoming speeches by the deputy mayor of Oxford, Ray Hamberstone; Head of Sh.Marjani Institute of History of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences, Rafael Khakimov; famous British historian, specialist in early medieval Russia, the Caucasus and Byzantium, Professor Jonathan Shepard. Also the adviser on information, press and culture, Konstantin Shlykov, welcomed the guests and participants of the conference on behalf of the Embassy of the Russian Federation in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. In his welcoming address, Head of Sh.Marjani Institute of History of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences, Rafael Khakimov, noted that the monograph “The Golden Horde in World History” is the fruit of the joint work of the researchers of Sh.Marjani Institute of History of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences and the University of Oxford. Now these works are also available in English at the Bodleian Library of Oxford University. The chief editor of “The Golden Horde in World History”, a researcher at the University of Oxford, Marie Favereau, thanked colleagues from the Institute of History of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences and from the Institute of Russian History of the Russian Academy of Sciences for fruitful academic cooperation and stressed the importance of conducting further research on

  12. Reliability of digital ulcer definitions as proposed by the UK Scleroderma Study Group: A challenge for clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael; Tracey, Andrew; Bhushan, Monica; Chakravarty, Kuntal; Denton, Christopher P; Dubey, Shirish; Guiducci, Serena; Muir, Lindsay; Ong, Voon; Parker, Louise; Pauling, John D; Prabu, Athiveeraramapandian; Rogers, Christine; Roberts, Christopher; Herrick, Ariane L

    2018-06-01

    The reliability of clinician grading of systemic sclerosis-related digital ulcers has been reported to be poor to moderate at best, which has important implications for clinical trial design. The aim of this study was to examine the reliability of new proposed UK Scleroderma Study Group digital ulcer definitions among UK clinicians with an interest in systemic sclerosis. Raters graded (through a custom-built interface) 90 images (80 unique and 10 repeat) of a range of digital lesions collected from patients with systemic sclerosis. Lesions were graded on an ordinal scale of severity: 'no ulcer', 'healed ulcer' or 'digital ulcer'. A total of 23 clinicians - 18 rheumatologists, 3 dermatologists, 1 hand surgeon and 1 specialist rheumatology nurse - completed the study. A total of 2070 (1840 unique + 230 repeat) image gradings were obtained. For intra-rater reliability, across all images, the overall weighted kappa coefficient was high (0.71) and was moderate (0.55) when averaged across individual raters. Overall inter-rater reliability was poor (0.15). Although our proposed digital ulcer definitions had high intra-rater reliability, the overall inter-rater reliability was poor. Our study highlights the challenges of digital ulcer assessment by clinicians with an interest in systemic sclerosis and provides a number of useful insights for future clinical trial design. Further research is warranted to improve the reliability of digital ulcer definition/rating as an outcome measure in clinical trials, including examining the role for objective measurement techniques, and the development of digital ulcer patient-reported outcome measures.

  13. How to Find Optimal National Model of Pension System: the Projection on Russia (Book Review: Barr, N. Pension reform: A short guide [Text] / N. Barr, P. Diamond. – Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2010. – 261 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Avakovich Tumanyants

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Find Optimal National Model of Pension System: the Projection on Russia (Book Review: Barr, N. Pension reform: A short guide [Text] / N. Barr, P. Diamond. – Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2010. – 261 p.

  14. Myocardial function and perfusion in the CREST syndrome variant of progressive systemic sclerosis. Exercise radionuclide evaluation and comparison with diffuse scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follansbee, W.P.; Curtiss, E.I.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.; Owens, G.R.; Steen, V.D.; Rodnan, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    Myocardial function and perfusion were evaluated in 22 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis with the CREST syndrome using exercise and radionuclide techniques, pulmonary function testing, and chest roentgenography. The results were compared with a similar study of 26 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma. The prevalence of thallium perfusion abnormalities was similar in the groups with CREST syndrome and diffuse scleroderma, (64 percent versus 77 percent), but the defects were significantly smaller in the CREST syndrome (p less than 0.01). Reperfusion thallium defects in the absence of extramural coronary artery disease were seen in 38 percent of patients with diffuse scleroderma. This finding was not seen in any of the patients with the CREST syndrome. In diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of both right and left ventricular function were related to larger thallium perfusion defects. In the CREST syndrome, abnormalities of left ventricular function were minor, were seen only during exercise, and were unrelated to thallium perfusion defects. Abnormal resting right ventricular function was seen in 36 percent of the patients with the CREST syndrome and was associated with an isolated decrease in diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide. It is concluded that the cardiac manifestations of the CREST syndrome are distinct from those found in diffuse scleroderma. Unlike diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of left ventricular function in the CREST syndrome are minor and are unrelated to abnormalities of coronary perfusion. Right ventricular dysfunction in the CREST syndrome appears to be primarily related to pulmonary vascular disease

  15. Book Review: MACBETH, Danielle. Realizing Reason: A Narrative of Truth and Knowing. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, 494 pp., $99.00 (hbk, ISBN 9780198704751

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Valente

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We review Danielle Macbeth's book Realizing Reason, published by Oxford University Press in 2014. This extensive book is composed by nine chapters in which Macbeth critically presents the development of mathematical practices in the Western world - from its founding in Ancient Greece's diagrammatic practices to the apogee of mathematical logic in the nineteenth and twentieth-centuries - while offering a revaluation of its present stage by means of a reconsideration of Gottlob Frege's philosophical contributions. In this review, we present a summary of each chapter's contents and make general considerations about them.

  16. The Vermont oxford neonatal encephalopathy registry: rationale, methods, and initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2006, the Vermont Oxford Network (VON) established the Neonatal Encephalopathy Registry (NER) to characterize infants born with neonatal encephalopathy, describe evaluations and medical treatments, monitor hypothermic therapy (HT) dissemination, define clinical research questions, and identify opportunities for improved care. Methods Eligible infants were ≥ 36 weeks with seizures, altered consciousness (stupor, coma) during the first 72 hours of life, a 5 minute Apgar score of ≤ 3, or receiving HT. Infants with central nervous system birth defects were excluded. Results From 2006–2010, 95 centers registered 4232 infants. Of those, 59% suffered a seizure, 50% had a 5 minute Apgar score of ≤ 3, 38% received HT, and 18% had stupor/coma documented on neurologic exam. Some infants experienced more than one eligibility criterion. Only 53% had a cord gas obtained and only 63% had a blood gas obtained within 24 hours of birth, important components for determining HT eligibility. Sixty-four percent received ventilator support, 65% received anticonvulsants, 66% had a head MRI, 23% had a cranial CT, 67% had a full channel encephalogram (EEG) and 33% amplitude integrated EEG. Of all infants, 87% survived. Conclusions The VON NER describes the heterogeneous population of infants with NE, the subset that received HT, their patterns of care, and outcomes. The optimal routine care of infants with neonatal encephalopathy is unknown. The registry method is well suited to identify opportunities for improvement in the care of infants affected by NE and study interventions such as HT as they are implemented in clinical practice. PMID:22726296

  17. The Dictionary Unit for South African English. South African Concise Oxford Dictionary

    OpenAIRE

    Rajend Mesthrie

    2011-01-01

    The South African Concise Oxford Dictionary (henceforth SACOD) is a South Af-rican version of the Concise Oxford Dictionary, the first time that this particular hybrid has been prepared. It is testimony to the enduring success of the work of the Dictionary Unit for South African English at Rhodes University, headed by teams that included Jean and William Branford in the 1970s, Penny Silva in the 1990s and now, Kathryn Kavanagh. The lexicographical work from the unit saw the publication of fou...

  18. Long term effects on potential repository sites: the alteration of the Lower Oxford Clay during weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milowdowski, A.E.; Bloodworth, A.J.; Wilmot, R.D.

    1985-09-01

    The report is one of a short series describing work carried out to investigate the long-term effects of various geological processes on the performance of both shallow and deep repositories for low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. This paper deals with the alteration as a result of weathering of the Lower Oxford Clay, a potential host rock for shallow disposal of wastes. A description of the Lower Oxford Clay is given, along with the weathering of argillaceous rocks. Investigations of the weathering at the Elstow Storage Depot are described, as well as the implications for radioactive waste disposal. (U.K.)

  19. This is my neighborhood: comparing United States and Australian Oxford House Neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Joseph R; Jason, Leonard A; Blake, Ron; Davis, Margaret I; Olson, Bradley D

    2006-01-01

    The number of Oxford Houses, communal-living, mutual help settings for persons in recovery of alcohol and substance abuse, has spread across the United States and recently in and around Melbourne, Australia. In this study 55 US and 6 AU Houses were compared descriptively for their neighborhood characteristics. Across settings, there were greater similarities than significant differences in the locations. Results imply that Australian Oxford Houses are "safe and sober" settings for persons in recovery consistent with the original United States model in physical dwelling settings.

  20. Lichen sclerosus et atrophicans, scleroderma en coup de sabre and Lyme borreliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Bonin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Lichen sclerosus et atrophicans (LSA is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology, characterized by atrophy. We report a case of LSA with frontoparietal distribution, mimicking scleroderma en coup de sabre, causing scarring alopecia. The case was associated with Borrelia infection. The lesion improved with 2 cycles of antibiotic therapy with ceftriaxone 2 gr /day i.v for 21 days associated with UVA-1 therapy and local and systemic vitamin E supply (400 mg 2x/day per os for 3 months. This case stresses the importance of identifying clinical manifestations associated with Lyme disease and the use of tissue PCR to detect borrelial DNA in patients with these lesions, but characterized by negative serology for Borrelia.

  1. Do scleroderma patients look young?: Evaluation by using facial imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamura, Soichiro; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Kajihara, Ikko; Makino, Katsunari; Aoi, Jun; Ichihara, Asako; Makino, Takamitsu; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2017-01-01

    These days various collagen supplements have widely been marketed. However, it has not been scientifically proved whether increasing collagen can actually prevent skin aging. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by thickening of the skin caused by accumulation of collagen. In this study, we tried to evaluate facial skin characteristics and skin aging of SSc patients by using digital imaging system. As the result, the severity of wrinkles, texture and pores were significantly lower in SSc patients than control subjects. Among them, wrinkles showed better correlation with skin thickness score. Therefore, increased amount of collagen in scleroderma skin may directly affect wrinkles. In conclusion, attempt on collagen induction itself is reasonable and effective strategy in order to keep young appearance, although oral collagen supplementation may not directly reach to the skin.

  2. Microcirculatory disorders in scleroderma systematica: an association with vascular wall stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulyana Yuryevna Ruzhentsova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of regulation of peripheral vascular tone and their association with the endothelial structure and function of large vessels in patients with scleroderma systematica (SDS. Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 25 patients with SDS (mean age, 47±2.6 years; mean disease duration, 8.3+1.7 years and 15 apparently healthy individuals matched for age and gender. Comprehensive examination involved laboratory and instrumental studies, laser Doppler study to evaluate endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilation, as well as applanation tonometry calculating the pulse wave velocity and augmentation index. Results. All the patients were found to have impaired peripheral vascular responsiveness as compared to the controls. The examination established a relationship between the magnitude of endothelium-dependent vasodilation and the stiffness index of large vessels. There was no association between endothelium-independent vasodilation and vascular elasticity parameters.

  3. The expression of myocardial injury in cold induced myocardial imaging and echocardiography of systematic scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jiugen; Zhu Xiaojun; Jiang Ningyi; Chen Shaoxiong

    1999-01-01

    The study was performed with cold-induced 99m Tc(MIBI) myocardial imaging (MI) in 23 patients with systematic scleroderma. The left ventricular function and wall motion were also observed by dimensional echocardiography (UCG). 14 patients had myocardial perfusion abnormalities visualized by MI, including 5 cases with fixed defects of 9 segments, 3 cases with reversible defects of 6 segments and 6 cases with both fixed and reversible one of 14 segments. The positive rate in myocardial imaging had no significant differences between patients with and without Raynaud's phenomenon (0.5>P>0.25). Compared with baseline, the ejection fraction, stroke volume, cardiac output were significantly decreased during cold-induced in patients with abnormal myocardial scintigraphy (P<0.05), and had significant difference compared with normal group (P<0.05). 4 cases with cold-induced reversible perfusion defects had anatomically correlated regional ventricular hypokinesia in UCG

  4. [Clinical, endoscopic and morphological manifestations of oesophageal lesion in systemic scleroderma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karateev, A E; Movsiian, A E; Anan'eva, M M; Radenska-Lopovok, S G

    2014-01-01

    Oesophageal lesion is the commonest visceral manifestation of systemic scleroderma (SSD) affecting the quality of life and fraught with serious complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical, endoscopic andmorphological manifestations of oesophageal lesion in systemic scleroderma and its relationships with other clinical symptoms and pharmacotherapy of the disease. 479 patients with SSD (93.7% women, 6.3% men, mean age 48.7 +/- 19.2 yr). All of them underwent EGDS in 2005-2010. 123 patients were examined for the detection of Barrett's oesophagus (BO), total screening regardless of complaints was conducted in 2010. Control group included 1018 age and sex-matched patients with RA who underwent EGDS in 2008-2009. Oesophageal lesions occurred much more frequently in SSD than in RA. Oesophageal symptoms were documented in 70.0 and 29.9% cases, non-erosive oesopahgitis in 28.8 and 1.5%, erosive esophagitis in 22.5 and 2.2% ulcers in 0.8 and 0% (p < 0.001). BO manifested as intestinal metaplasia (histological study of mucosal biopsy) was found in 30 SSD patients (4.2%). Screening revealed BO in 8.9% of the patients. The development of erosive oesophagitis was unrelated to the age of the patients, duration of the disease and its form (localized or diffusive), lung pathology or Sjogren's syndrome. Cytotoxic medicines significantly increased the frequency of erosive oesophagitis, it tended to increase under effect of NSAID and low doses of aspirin. Long-term intake of PPI did not reduce the risk of oesophagitis and BO. Half of the patients with SSD have oesophagitis. Over 20% of them suffer its complications (erosion and ulcers) and 9% have BO. All such patients need endoscopic study ofoesophagus regardless of clinical symptoms.

  5. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody negative crescentic paucimmune glomerulonephritis in a case of scleroderma with systemic lupus erythematosus overlap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Tewari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal Involvement in scleroderma is a known problem and the manifestations are well described. Renal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is also well known. However, in scleroderma and SLE overlap syndrome, the renal findings may vary being a combination of features of immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis as well as thrombotic microangiopathy. We report a case in which the renal manifestation in such a situation was of a focal necrotising pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with crescents, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody negative. To the best of our knowledge, such manifestations have not been described before. Renal dysfunction in a normotensive setting in such a case should direct one towards evaluation for other causes and should prompt a kidney biopsy. This would be valuable in delineating the pathological process in the kidney and would help in guiding therapy.

  6. The Dictionary Unit for South African English. South African Concise Oxford Dictionary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajend Mesthrie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The South African Concise Oxford Dictionary (henceforth SACOD is a South Af-rican version of the Concise Oxford Dictionary, the first time that this particular hybrid has been prepared. It is testimony to the enduring success of the work of the Dictionary Unit for South African English at Rhodes University, headed by teams that included Jean and William Branford in the 1970s, Penny Silva in the 1990s and now, Kathryn Kavanagh. The lexicographical work from the unit saw the publication of four editions of the Dictionary of Southern African English (1978, 1980, 1987, 1991, a South African Pocket Oxford Dictionary (SAPOD and the Dictionary of South African English on Historical Principles (DOSAEHP (1995. SACOD differs from the rest in several ways. It is larger in scope than SAPOD, smaller than DOSAEHP, and unlike DOSAE and DOSAEHP, does not deal with South African words alone. Based on the 10th edition of the Concise Oxford Dictionary SACOD has excised some words from the parent, whilst adding many new words of general English as well as of South Africa.

  7. Grammar Coding in the "Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wekker, Herman

    1992-01-01

    Focuses on the revised system of grammar coding for verbs in the fourth edition of the "Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English" (OALD4), comparing it with two other similar dictionaries. It is shown that the OALD4 is found to be more favorable on many criteria than the other comparable dictionaries. (16 references) (VWL)

  8. Repeatability of the Oxford Foot Model for Kinematic Gait Analysis of the Foot and Ankle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeve, S.; Vos, J.; Weijers, P.; Verbruggen, J.; Willems, P.; Poeze, M.; Meijer, K.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Kinematic gait analysis via the multi-segmental Oxford foot model (OFM) may be a valuable addition to the biomechanical examination of the foot and ankle. The aim of this study is to assess the repeatability of the OFM in healthy subjects. METHODS: Nine healthy subjects, without a

  9. Software for relativistic atomic structure theory: The grasp project at oxford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parpia, F.A.; Grant, I.P.

    1991-01-01

    GRASP is an acronym for General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Program. The objective of the GRASP project at Oxford is to produce user-friendly state-of-the-art multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) software packages for rleativistic atomic structure theory

  10. Repeatability of the Oxford Foot Model in children with foot deformity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCahill, Jennifer; Stebbins, Julie; Koning, Bart; Harlaar, Jaap; Theologis, Tim

    Introduction The Oxford Foot Model (OFM) is a multi-segment, kinematic model developed to assess foot motion. It has previously been assessed for repeatability in healthy populations. To determine the OFM's reliability for detecting foot deformity, it is important to know repeatability in

  11. Translation and cultural adaptation of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) into Persian language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavian, Alireza; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Birjandinejad, Ali; Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Kachooei, Amir Reza

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we aimed to translate and test the validity and reliablity of the Persian version of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire in foot and ankle patients. We translated the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire to Persian language according to the accepted guidelines, then assessed the psychometric properties including the validity and reliability on 308 patients with long-standing foot and ankle problems. To test the reliability, we calculated the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) for test-retest reliability and measured Cronbach's alpha to test the internal consistency. To test the construct validity of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire we also administered the Short-Form 36 to patients. Construct validity was supported by significant correlation with SF36 subscales except for pain subscale of the persian MOXFQ with mental health of the SF36 (r=0.207). Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.79 for the total MOXFQ and ranged from 0.83 to 0.89 for the three subscales. Cronbach's alpha for pain, walking/standing, and social interaction was 0.86, 0.88, and 0.89, respectively, and was 0.79 for the total MOXFQ showing good internal consistency in each domain. The Persian Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire health scoring system is a valid and reliable patient-reported instrument for foot and ankle problems. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Developing a Structured Teaching Plan for Psychiatry Tutors at Oxford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Taiar, Hasanen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this thesis was to examine the teaching ways I undertook in teaching medical students and to examine the use of a structured teaching plan for the academic and clinical tutors in psychiatry. The teaching plan was developed for use, initially by Oxford University Academic tutors at the Department of Psychiatry. In addition,…

  13. The Why, What, and Impact of GPA at Oxford Brookes University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the introduction at Oxford Brookes University of a Grade Point Average (GPA) scheme alongside the traditional honours degree classification. It considers the reasons for the introduction of GPA, the way in which the scheme was implemented, and offers an insight into the impact of GPA at Brookes. Finally, the paper considers…

  14. Cardiovascular assessment of asymptomatic patients with juvenile-onset localized and systemic scleroderma: 10 years prospective observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiec, A; Dabrowski, R; Wozniak, J; Jasek, S; Chwyczko, T; Kowalik, I; Musiej-Nowakowska, E; Szwed, H

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present study was non-invasive evaluation of the cardiovascular system in asymptomatic young adult patients with juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS) and juvenile systemic sclerosis (JSS). A group of 34 consecutive children with scleroderma were prospectively observed in the study. The control group (CG) consisted of 20 healthy subjects. In each subject 12-lead electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, ECG Holter, and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring examinations were performed at the baseline visit and after 10 years. Additionally, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentrations were measured after 10 years. Examinations were performed in 13 patients with JLS and 15 with JSS at the final visit. Two children had died (one from each group). Four patients were alive but refused the final visit. After 10 years, a higher prevalence of ventricular extrasystoles (p = 0.01) and an elevated pulmonary arterial pressure (JLS: p = 0.04, JSS: p = 0.03) were observed in both groups, but in comparison with the controls there was no significant difference at the final visit. In JLS patients more cases of left ventricle diastolic dysfunction, hypertension, and sinus tachycardia were diagnosed at the final visit (p ≤ 0.05). More atrioventricular block episodes in both groups of scleroderma patients were observed. Over the 10 years, arterial hypertension was diagnosed in three patients from the JLS group and in two with JSS. There were no significant differences in BNP concentrations at the final visit. The results of the present study show that juvenile scleroderma seems to be more benign than adult-onset disease. This observational study shows subclinical, not severe, cardiac abnormalities in adult patients with juvenile-onset disease.

  15. Successful combination treatment of a patient with progressive juvenile localized scleroderma (morphea) using imatinib, corticosteroids, and methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamo, Yasuji; Ochiai, Toyoko

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of progressive juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS or morphea) treated with a combination of imatinib, corticosteroids, and methotrexate. This therapy halted the progressive skin thickening and the hand and finger joint deformity in the early stages of the disease. We conclude that imatinib used in addition to standard treatment with systemic corticosteroids and methotrexate may be of therapeutic benefit for individuals with JLS. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Aberrant immune response with consequent vascular and connective tissue remodeling - causal to scleroderma and associated syndromes such as Raynaud phenomenon and other fibrosing syndromes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, Nedim; Park, Sung-Hyun; Reibman, Joan; Grunig, Gabriele

    2016-11-01

    Scleroderma and other autoimmune-induced connective tissue diseases are characterized by dysfunctions in the immune system, connective tissue and the vasculature. We are focusing on systemic sclerosis (SSc)-associated pulmonary hypertension, which remains a leading cause of death with only a 50-60% of 2-year survival rate. Much research and translational efforts have been directed at understanding the immune response that causes SSc and the networked interactions with the connective tissue and the vasculature. One of the unexpected findings was that in some cases the pathogenic immune response in SSc resembles the immune response to helminth parasites. During coevolution, means of communication were developed which protect the host from over-colonization with parasites and which protect the parasite from excessive host responses. One explanation for the geographically clustered occurrence of SSc is that environmental exposures combined with genetic predisposition turn on triggers of molecular and cellular modules that were once initiated by parasites. Future research is needed to further understand the parasite-derived signals that dampen the host response. Therapeutic helminth infection or treatment with parasite-derived response modifiers could be promising new management tools for autoimmune connective tissue diseases.

  17. Theology amongst the sciences: A personal view from the University of Oxford

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E. Gillingham

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on two individuals who have each made a seminal contribution to the debates between theology and the sciences in Oxford - Charles Darwin (in the mid�19th century, and Richard Dawkins (from the 1990s to the present day. It introduces Darwin by way of a more personal and visual view from Worcester College Chapel. The restoration of the chapel took place at about the same time as the debates between Huxley and Wilberforce in the Oxford University Museum over Charles Darwin�s On the Origin of the Species. The first part of the paper then traces these debates back: first to an earlier period of disputation represented by Galileo Galilei (c. 1564�1642, and then to a period of greater accommodation represented by Isaac Newton (1643�1727. Darwin represents a third, more controversial, stage. The paper then looks at a fourth period, from the mid�20th century onwards, which is marked by more eirenical attempts to demarcate science and theology by seeing the former again as asking the �how� questions and the latter, the �why� questions. It then focuses on a fifth, more disputatious stage, which was initiated by Richard Dawkins, professor in the Public Understanding of Science until 2008. Professor Dawkins challenges the idea that theology cannot be studied, because its focus is a non-existent object, �God�.The second part of the paper looks at various Oxford projects and Oxford theologians who have risen to this contemporary challenge. They include the work of the Ian Ramsey Centre; Justin Barret�s and John Trigg�s joint � 2 million project, supported by the John Templeton foundation, which examines scientific ideas about religion and the mind; Richard Harries, Bishop of Oxford from 1987 to 2006, who has conducted a number of media interviews with Richard Dawkins; Keith Ward, who has written several books engaging not only with Dawkins but is also the Cambridge Professor of Mathematics, Stephen Hawking; and

  18. Aerosol trace metals, particle morphology and total gaseous mercury in the atmosphere of Oxford, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, M. L. I.; Meheran, N.; Mather, T. A.; de Hoog, J. C. M.; Pyle, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    An investigation of atmospheric trace metals was conducted in Oxford, UK, a small city ˜60 miles northwest of London, in 2007 and 2008. Concentrations of Sr, Mo, Cd, Pb, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn in aerosol were measured in bulk and size segregated samples. In addition, total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentrations were monitored semi-continuously by cold vapour-atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. Metal concentrations in Oxford were intermediate between previously reported levels of UK rural and urban areas for most metals studied and levels of Cd, Ni and Pb were within European guidelines. Metal concentrations appeared to be influenced by higher traffic volume on a timescale of hours. The influence of traffic on the aerosols was also suggested by the observation of carbonaceous particles via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Air mass back trajectories suggest air masses arriving in Oxford from London and mainland Europe contained the highest metal concentrations. Aerosol samples collected over Bonfire Weekend, a period of intense firework use and lighting of bonfires in the UK, showed metal concentrations 6-46 times higher than at other times. Strontium, a tracer of firework release, was present at higher concentrations and showed a change in its size distribution from the coarse to fine mode over Bonfire Weekend. The presence of an abundance of spherical Sr particles was also confirmed in SEM images. The average TGM concentration in Oxford was 3.17 ng m -3 (st. dev. 1.59) with values recorded between 1.32 and 23.2 ng m -3. This is a higher average value than reported from nearby rural locations, although during periods when air was arriving from the west, similar concentrations to these rural areas were seen in Oxford. Comparison to meteorological data suggests that TGM in Oxford's air is highest when wind is arriving from the east/southeast. This may be due to emissions from London/mainland Europe with a possible contribution from emissions from a local

  19. Juvenile Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the tongue. Obvious cases of en coup de sabre and Parry Romberg syndrome differ significantly, but many children present with cross-over manifestations, which can make it difficult to determine with certainty which form of ... en coup de sabre is mixed. If the lesions are confined ...

  20. Autoantibodies in scleroderma and their association with the clinical profile of the disease. A study of 66 patients from southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skare, Thelma Larocca; Fonseca, Adriano Erlon; Luciano, Alan Campos; Azevedo, Pedro Ming

    2011-01-01

    Scleroderma is a fairly rare connective tissue disease whose autoantibody profile is associated with different clinical manifestations. The prevalence of autoantibodies in scleroderma is influenced by race and genetics. To study the prevalence of anti-Scl-70, anti-centromere (ACA) and anti-U1-RNP antibodies in patients with scleroderma in southern Brazil and verify their association with clinical manifestations of the disease. A retrospective study involving 66 patients with scleroderma for the presence of anti-Scl-70, anti-centromere and anti-U1-RNP and of clinical manifestations such as Raynaud's phenomenon, digital micro scars, digital necrosis, telangiectasias, calcinosis, pulmonary fibrosis, pleuritis, pericarditis, cardiomyopathy, arthralgia and arthritis, skin sclerosis, joint contractures, tendon friction rubs, pulmonary hypertension, esophageal disorders and renal crisis. The prevalence of anti-Scl-70 was 17.8% , that of ACA was 33.3% and the prevalence of U1 RNP was 11.8%. Anti-Scl-70 was associated with the diffuse form of the disease (p = 0.015), presence of cardiomyopathies (p = 0.016) and digital micro scars (p = 0.05). Anti-centromere was more common in the limited form, although it was not statistically significant, and had a protective role associated with cardiomyopathies (p = 0.005). Anti-U1-RNP was more common in the overlap forms (p = 0.0004). The prevalence and profile of clinical associations of autoantibodies in Brazilian patients with scleroderma are similar to those found in the literature.

  1. Comparing ultraviolet light A photo(chemo)therapy with Methotrexate protocol in childhood localized scleroderma: Evidence from systematic review and meta-analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrani, Edoardo; Foeldvari, Ivan; Lopez, Jordi Anton; Cimaz, Rolando; Simonini, Gabriele

    2018-03-14

    Localized scleroderma is a skin fibrosing disorder that, if untreated, may result in severe disability. The purpose of this systematic review is to compare the present evidence concerning the effectiveness of Methotrexate versus phototherapy, alone or associated with Psoralen, in childhood localized scleroderma. A systematic search between January 1996 and May 2017 was performed to identify studies investigating the efficacy of Methotrexate (MTX) or phototherapy (UVA) for treating localized scleroderma with onset ≤18 years. Due to a lack of validated clinical criteria, four clinical response criteria were used to assess the treatment efficacy as primary outcome. We determined a combined estimate of the proportion of children responding to MTX and UVA. A total of 19 studies was included (8 MTX; 11 UVA). In the methotrexate group, 193 children were included in the analysis; in the phototherapy group, a total of 48 treated children. For both groups age, disease subtype, glucocorticoids (GCs) use, and side effects of treatment were also analyzed. The meta-analysis suggested that UVA and MTX protocols have both a favorable effect in active lesions of childhood localized scleroderma. However, MTX resulted significantly superior to UVA, with or without Psoralen. Our study supports the combination of MTX and GCs in patients with a high risk of complication. Phototherapy with UVA1 could represent a therapeutic option in patients with limited scleroderma, where lesions do not cross joints and they do not lead to potential cosmetic changes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The thickness of the A1 pulleys reflects the disability of hand mobility in scleroderma. A pilot study using high-frequency ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliafico, Alberto, E-mail: atagliafico@sirm.org [Department of Radiology, National Institute for Cancer Research, Genova (Italy); Panico, Nicoletta [Division of Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Serafini, Giovanni [Department of Radiology, Santa Corona Hospital, Pietra Ligure (Italy); Ghio, Massimo [Division of Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Martinoli, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of Genova, Genova (Italy)

    2011-02-15

    Background: Hand involvement in scleroderma is a serious concern. Clinical tests to asses hand dysfunction are based on the experience of the clinician. Objective: To asses if utrasonographic (US) measurement of A1 pulley thickness may be used as an indicator of hand mobility in scleroderma. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval and patient informed consent was obtained. Twenty-eight patients affected suffering from scleroderma and 40 healthy controls were prospectively evaluated by two blinded radiologists with US, with a transducer operating at 17 MHz. A1 pulley thickness was measured and correlated with the Hand Mobility in Scleroderma Test (HAMIS) and disease duration. Results: The thickness of the A1 pulley was greater in sclerodermic patients than in controls (p < 0.05). Intra and inter-observer agreement were better for ultrasound (0.94;0.88) than for HAMIS tests (0.71;0.70). A good correlation between pulley thickness, hand mobility and disease duration was found (r = 0.78, p < 0.018; r = 0.54, p < 0.05). Conclusion: A1 pulley thickness measured on ultrasound correlates with hand mobility and disease duration. Ultrasound is an useful tool to evaluate hand disability in scleroderma.

  3. The thickness of the A1 pulleys reflects the disability of hand mobility in scleroderma. A pilot study using high-frequency ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagliafico, Alberto; Panico, Nicoletta; Serafini, Giovanni; Ghio, Massimo; Martinoli, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hand involvement in scleroderma is a serious concern. Clinical tests to asses hand dysfunction are based on the experience of the clinician. Objective: To asses if utrasonographic (US) measurement of A1 pulley thickness may be used as an indicator of hand mobility in scleroderma. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval and patient informed consent was obtained. Twenty-eight patients affected suffering from scleroderma and 40 healthy controls were prospectively evaluated by two blinded radiologists with US, with a transducer operating at 17 MHz. A1 pulley thickness was measured and correlated with the Hand Mobility in Scleroderma Test (HAMIS) and disease duration. Results: The thickness of the A1 pulley was greater in sclerodermic patients than in controls (p < 0.05). Intra and inter-observer agreement were better for ultrasound (0.94;0.88) than for HAMIS tests (0.71;0.70). A good correlation between pulley thickness, hand mobility and disease duration was found (r = 0.78, p < 0.018; r = 0.54, p < 0.05). Conclusion: A1 pulley thickness measured on ultrasound correlates with hand mobility and disease duration. Ultrasound is an useful tool to evaluate hand disability in scleroderma.

  4. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Turkish version of Oxford hip score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuğay, Baki Umut; Tuğay, Nazan; Güney, Hande; Hazar, Zeynep; Yüksel, İnci; Atilla, Bülent

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to translate the Oxford hip score (OHS) into Turkish and to evaluate the psychometric properties by testing the internal consistency, reproducibility, construct validity, and responsiveness in patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA). Oxford hip score was translated and culturally adapted according to the guidelines in the literature. Seventy patients (mean age 61.45 ± 9.29 years) with hip osteoarthritis participated in the study. Patients completed the Turkish Oxford hip score (OHS-TR), the Short-Form 36 (SF-36), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index (WOMAC). Internal consistency was tested using Cronbach's α coefficient. Patients completed OHS-TR questionnaire twice in 7 days for determining the reproducibility. Correlation between the total results of both tests was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Validity was assessed by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficient between the OHS-TR and WOMAC and SF-36 scores. Floor and ceiling effects were analyzed. The internal consistency was high (Cronbach's α 0.93). The construct validity showed a significant correlation between the OHS-TR and WOMAC and related SF-36 domains (p < 0.001). The ICC's ranged between 0.80 and 0.99. There was no floor or ceiling effect in total OHS-TR score. The OHS-TR questionnaire is valid, reliable, and responsive for the Turkish-speaking patients with hip OA.

  5. Rubidium-strontium ages from the Oxford Lake-Knee Lake greenstone belt, northern Manitoba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, G.S.; Cheung, S.-P.

    1980-01-01

    Rb-Sr whole-rock ages have been determined for rocks from the Oxford Lake-Knee Lake-Gods Lake geenstone belt in the Superior Province of northeastern Manitoba. The age of the Magill Lake Pluton is 2455 +- 35 Ma(lambda 87 Rb = 1.42 x 10 -11 yr -1 ), with an initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio of 0.7078 +- 0.0043. This granite stock intrudes the Oxford Lake Group, so it is post-tectonic and probably related to the second, weaker stage of metamorphism. The age of the Bayly Lake Pluton is 2424 +- 74 Ma, with an initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio of 0.7029 +- 0.0001. This granodioritic batholith complex does not intrude the Oxford Lake Group. It is syn-tectonic and metamorphosed. The age of volcanic rocks of the Hayes River Group, from Goose Lake (30 km south of Gods Lake Narrows), is 2680 +- 125 Ma, with an initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio of 0.7014 +- 0.0009. The age for the Magill Lake and Bayly Lake Plutons can be interpreted as the minimum ages of granite intrusion in the area. The age for the Hayes River Group volcanic rocks is consistent with Rb-Sr ages of volcanic rocks from other Archean greenstone belts within the northwestern Superior Province. (auth)

  6. The relationship between skin symptoms and the scleroderma modification of the health assessment questionnaire, the modified Rodnan skin score, and skin pathology in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemek, Jessica; Man, Ada; Hinchcliff, Monique; Varga, John; Simms, Robert W; Lafyatis, Robert

    2016-05-01

    To determine how well skin symptoms considered specific to SSc are captured by patient reported outcomes currently used for assessing patients with SSc, the SHAQ, or skin disease, the Skindex-29; and how well these symptoms correlate with the extent of skin disease on physical exam and skin pathology. SSc patients completed the scleroderma modification of the Health Assessment Questionnaire (SHAQ), Skindex-29 and a Skin Symptom Assessment questionnaire developed for this study. Correlations were assessed between the Skin Symptom Assessment and SHAQ, Skindex-29, modified Rodnan skin score, and skin pathological features including myofibroblast staining completed on the same date. Tight, hard and rigid/stiff skin symptoms correlated moderately highly with the modified Rodnan skin score (r = 0.445, P = 0.0008; r = 0.486, P = 0.0002; and r = 0.488, P = 0.0002, respectively). Tight skin symptoms correlated moderately with myofibroblast infiltration (r = 0.544, P = 0.0023) and hyalinized collagen (r = 0.442, P = 0.0164), while both hard and rigid/stiff skin correlated moderately with inflammation (r = 0.401, P = 0.0310 and r = 0.513, P = 0.0045), myofibroblast infiltration(r = 0.480, P = 0.0084 and r = 0.527, P = 0.0033) and hyalinized collagen (r = 0.453, P = 0.0137 and r = 0.478, P = 0.0087), while the SHAQ was not found to correlate with any of these pathological changes. In contrast, painful skin symptoms correlated moderately with the SHAQ (r = 0.413, P = 0.0073), and with the three domains of Skindex-29: Symptoms, Emotions and Functioning. Skindex-29 indicates that dcSSc patient skin symptoms are nearly as severe as those of patients with psoriasis or atopic dermatitis. Patient reported skin symptoms correlate with clinical and pathological measures in the skin. A validated patient reported skin symptom instrument might considerably improve evaluation of SSc skin disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for

  7. Antifibrotic effects of crocetin in scleroderma fibroblasts and in bleomycin-induced sclerotic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghua Song

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the antifibrotic effects of crocetin in scleroderma fibroblasts and in sclerotic mice. METHODS: Skin fibroblasts that were isolated from three systemic scleroderma (SSc patients and three healthy subjects were treated with crocetin (0.1, 1 or 10 μM. Cell proliferation was measured with an MTT assay. Alpha-smooth muscle actin was detected via an immunohistochemical method. Alpha 1 (I procollagen (COL1A1, alpha 1 (III procollagen (COL3A1, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-1 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP-1 mRNA levels were measured using real-time PCR. SSc mice were established by the subcutaneous injection of bleomycin. Crocetin (50 mg/kg/d was injected intraperitoneally for 14 days. Dermal thickness and lung fibrosis were assessed with Masson's trichrome staining. Plasma ET-1 was detected with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Skin and lung ET-1 and COL1A1 mRNA levels were measured via real-time PCR. RESULTS: Crocetin inhibited the proliferation of SSc and normal fibroblasts, an effect that increased with crocetin concentration and incubation time. Crocetin decreased the expression of α-SMA and the levels of mRNA for COL1A1, COL3A1 and matrix metalloproteinase-1, while crocetin increased TIMP-1 mRNA levels in both SSc and normal fibroblasts. Skin and lung fibrosis was induced, and the levels of ET-1 in the plasma, skin and lungs were elevated in bleomycin-injected mice. Crocetin alleviated the thickening of the dermis and lung fibrosis; decreased COL1A1 mRNA levels in the skin and lung; and simultaneously decreased ET-1 concentrations in the plasma and ET-1 mRNA levels in the skin and lungs of the bleomycin-induced sclerotic mice, especially during the early phase (weeks 1-3. CONCLUSION: Crocetin inhibits cell proliferation, differentiation and collagen production in SSc fibroblasts. Crocetin alleviates skin and lung fibrosis in a bleomycin-induced SSc mouse model, in part due to a

  8. Determination of muscle microcirculation of the limbs of healthy persons and patients with scleroderma by means of 133Xe clearance. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poenitzsch, I.; Wiemers, U.; Haustein, U.F.; Schneider, G.

    1984-01-01

    By means of 133 Xe muscle clearance the blood flow of the musculus tibialis anterior and the musculus opponens pollicis was determined during nonischemic work and after 3 minutes ischemia in patients with progressive scleroderma and additionally of the ischemic musculus opponens pollicis following contrast baths. In relation to 53 patients with normal vessels the reactive hyperemia of the musculus tibialis anterior after ischemia and of the musculus opponens pollicis after heat, cold as well as arterial flow decreasing was significantly decreased in patients with scleroderma and was as a disturbance of the microcirculation realized. For scientific problems in progressive scleroderma the 133 Xe muscle clearance is suitable as to the musculus opponens pollicis. (author)

  9. Metabolism of /sup 14/C-labelled L-tryptophan, L-kynurenine, and hydroxy-L-kynurenine in miners with scleroderma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankes, L.V.; De Bruin, E.; Jansen, C.R.; Vorster, L.; Schmaeler, M.

    1977-03-19

    Six South African white miners were studied with the 2-g L-tryptophan load test and tracer doses of L-tryptophan-7a-/sup 14/C, L-kynurenine-keto-/sup 14/C and hydroxy-L-kynurenine-keto-/sup 14/C. The breath /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and 14 urinary metabolites were measured. When they were compared with a previous study of American women with scleroderma, similar /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and tryptophan metabolite excretion patterns were observed in the data from the miners. The labelled quinolinic acid excretion was more significantly elevated in the South African miners' urine than in the urine of the American women. The data from both studies suggest that some patients with scleroderma have an altered step in the tryptophan metabolic pathway after hydroxy-anthranilic acid. What relationship exists between the induction of pulmonary silicosis and the subsequent development of scleroderma, requires additional human studies.

  10. Learning lessons from the past: A historical exploration of a century of business education at Oxford and Cambridge (1900s-2000s)

    OpenAIRE

    Arena , Lise; Dang , Rani Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    This research aims to identify a set of generative mechanisms which are shared by business schools' process of development in their search for strategic comparative advantage. We use a processual approach (Pettigrew, 1997) based on two detailed historical studies supported by unexplored archival data and interviews: the case of the Saïd Business School at the University of Oxford and the case of the Judge Business School at the University of Cambridge (1990s - 2000s). Preliminary results indi...

  11. The Localized Scleroderma Skin Severity Index and Physician Global Assessment of Disease Activity: A Work in Progress Toward Development of Localized Scleroderma Outcome Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARKACHAISRI, THASCHAWEE; VILAIYUK, SOAMARAT; LI, SUZANNE; O’NEIL, KATHLEEN M.; POPE, ELENA; HIGGINS, GLORIA C.; PUNARO, MARILYNN; RABINOVICH, EGLA C.; ROSENKRANZ, MARGALIT; KIETZ, DANIEL A.; ROSEN, PAUL; SPALDING, STEVEN J.; HENNON, TERESA R.; TOROK, KATHRYN S.; CASSIDY, ELAINE; MEDSGER, THOMAS A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop and evaluate a Localized Scleroderma (LS) Skin Severity Index (LoSSI) and global assessments’ clinimetric property and effect on quality of life (QOL). Methods A 3-phase study was conducted. The first phase involved 15 patients with LS and 14 examiners who assessed LoSSI [surface area (SA), erythema (ER), skin thickness (ST), and new lesion/extension (N/E)] twice for inter/intrarater reliability. Patient global assessment of disease severity (PtGA-S) and Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) were collected for intrarater reliability evaluation. The second phase was aimed to develop clinical determinants for physician global assessment of disease activity (PhysGA-A) and to assess its content validity. The third phase involved 2 examiners assessing LoSSI and PhysGA-A on 27 patients. Effect of training on improving reliability/validity and sensitivity to change of the LoSSI and PhysGA-A was determined. Results Interrater reliability was excellent for ER [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.71], ST (ICC 0.70), LoSSI (ICC 0.80), and PhysGA-A (ICC 0.90) but poor for SA (ICC 0.35); thus, LoSSI was modified to mLoSSI. Examiners’ experience did not affect the scores, but training/practice improved reliability. Intrarater reliability was excellent for ER, ST, and LoSSI (Spearman’s rho = 0.71–0.89) and moderate for SA. PtGA-S and CDLQI showed good intrarater agreement (ICC 0.63 and 0.80). mLoSSI correlated moderately with PhysGA-A and PtGA-S. Both mLoSSI and PhysGA-A were sensitive to change following therapy. Conclusion mLoSSI and PhysGA-A are reliable and valid tools for assessing LS disease severity and show high sensitivity to detect change over time. These tools are feasible for use in routine clinical practice. They should be considered for inclusion in a core set of LS outcome measures for clinical trials. PMID:19833758

  12. Nutritional research in World War 2: the Oxford Nutrition Survey and its research potential 50 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxley, R R; Lloyd, B B; Goldacre, M; Neil, H A

    2000-08-01

    To investigate the nutritional status of the population of the UK during the Second World War, nutritional surveys were commissioned in 1941. These included surveys of two groups of pregnant women: the first comprised 120 working-class women who were studied in the spring of 1942, and a second group of 253 women in 1944. Both groups were followed up until after delivery. Detailed biochemical assessments were performed on each subject. Our statistical analysis of the haematological data showed that nearly 25% of women from the 1942 group were deficient in protein, over 60% were deficient in Fe and vitamin A, and over 70% had severe vitamin C deficiency. The findings were reported to the Ministries of Health and Food who instigated a food supplementation policy at the end of 1942 that entitled pregnant women in the UK to extra rations of fruit, dairy produce and to a supply of cod-liver-oil tablets. A second group of 253 pregnant women were studied 15 months later which enabled the effects of this programme to be investigated. Supplementation reduced the proportion of women with vitamin A concentrations below the normal range from 63% to 38%, and vitamin C from 78% to 20%, but protein and Fe concentrations were not increased but actually declined. These findings continued to exert an influence over government food policy for pregnant women until the abolition of rationing in 1954.

  13. Lupus erythematosus and localized scleroderma coexistent at the same sites: a rare presentation of overlap syndrome of connective-tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascucci, Anabella; Lynch, Peter J; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-05-01

    Overlap syndromes are known to occur with connective-tissue diseases (CTDs). Rarely, the overlap occurs at the same tissue site. We report the case of a patient with clinical and histopathologic findings consistent with the presence of discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and localized scleroderma within the same lesions. Based on our case and other reported cases in the literature, the following features are common in patients with an overlap of lupus erythematosus (LE) and localized scleroderma: predilection for young women, photodistributed lesions, DLE, linear morphology clinically, and positivity along the dermoepidermal junction on direct immunofluorescence. Most patients showed good response to antimalarials, topical steroids, or systemic steroids.

  14. Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble interleukin-2 receptors (sIL-2R) in scleroderma skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Klaus; Deleuran, Mette; Heickendorff, Lene

    1998-01-01

    In order to investigate whether soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble interleukin-2 receptors (sIL-2R) were present in scleroderma skin, and to compare their levels to concentrations measured in plasma and clinical parameters, we examined suction blister fluid and plasma...... from 13 patients with systemic sclerosis and 11 healthy volunteers. Suction blisters and biopsies were from the transition zone between normal skin and scleroderma, and uninvolved abdominal skin. The levels of sICAM-1 and sIL-2R were significantly increased in both plasma and suction blister fluid from...

  15. Parasitization by Scleroderma guani influences expression of superoxide dismutase genes in Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia-Ying; Ze, Sang-Zi; Stanley, David W; Yang, Bin

    2014-09-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme involved in detoxifying reactive oxygen species. In this study, we identified genes encoding the extracellular and intracellular copper-zinc SODs (ecCuZnSOD and icCuZnSOD) and a manganese SOD (MnSOD) in the yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor. The cDNAs for ecCuZnSOD, icCuZnSOD, and MnSOD, respectively, encode 24.55, 15.81, and 23.14 kDa polypeptides, which possess structural features typical of other insect SODs. They showed 20-94% identity to other known SOD sequences from Bombyx mori, Musca domestica, Nasonia vitripennis, Pediculus humanus corporis, and Tribolium castaneum. Expression of these genes was analyzed in selected tissues and developmental stages, and following exposure to Escherichia coli and parasitization by Scleroderma guani. We recorded expression of all three SODs in cuticle, fat body, and hemocytes and in the major developmental stages. Relatively higher expressions were detected in late-instar larvae and pupae, compared to other developmental stages. Transcriptional levels were upregulated following bacterial infection. Analysis of pupae parasitized by S. guani revealed that expression of T. molitor SOD genes was significantly induced following parasitization. We infer that these genes act in immune response and in host-parasitoid interactions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Parasitization by Scleroderma guani influences protein expression in Tenebrio molitor pupae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia-Ying; Wu, Guo-Xing; Ze, Sang-Zi; Stanley, David W; Yang, Bin

    2014-07-01

    Ectoparasitoid wasps deposit their eggs onto the surface and inject venom into their hosts. Venoms are chemically complex and they exert substantial impact on hosts, including permanent or temporary paralysis and developmental arrest. These visible venom effects are due to changes in expression of genes encoding physiologically relevant proteins. While the influence of parasitization on gene expression in several lepidopterans has been reported, the molecular details of parasitoid/beetle relationships remain mostly unknown. This shortcoming led us to pose the hypothesis that envenomation by the ectoparasitic ant-like bethylid wasp Scleroderma guani leads to changes in protein expression in the yellow mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor. We tested our hypothesis by comparing the proteomes of non-parasitized and parasitized host pupae using iTRAQ-based proteomics. We identified 41 proteins that were differentially expressed (32↑- and 9↓-regulated) in parasitized pupae. We assigned these proteins to functional categories, including immunity, stress and detoxification, energy metabolism, development, cytoskeleton, signaling and others. We recorded parallel changes in mRNA levels and protein abundance in 14 selected proteins following parasitization. Our findings support our hypothesis by documenting changes in protein expression in parasitized hosts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Decreased interleukin-20 expression in scleroderma skin contributes to cutaneous fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Hideo; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Asano, Yoshihide; Trojanowska, Maria; Nakayama, Wakana; Inoue, Kuniko; Honda, Noritoshi; Kajihara, Ikko; Makino, Katsunari; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2014-06-01

    To clarify the role of interleukin-20 (IL-20) in the regulatory mechanism of extracellular matrix expression and to determine the contribution of IL-20 to the phenotype of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of collagen, Fli-1, IL-20, and IL-20 receptor (IL-20R) were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array, immunoblotting, immunohistochemical staining, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and real-time PCR. PCR array revealed that IL-20 decreased gene expression of α2(I) collagen (0.03-fold), Smad3 (0.02-fold), and endoglin (0.05-fold) in cultured normal dermal fibroblasts. Fli-1 protein expression was induced by IL-20 (~2-fold). The inhibition of collagen by IL-20, the induction of Fli-1 by IL-20, and the reduction of Smad3 and endoglin by IL-20 were also observed in SSc fibroblasts. Serum IL-20 levels were reduced only slightly in SSc patients but were significantly decreased in patients with scleroderma spectrum disorders (the prodromal stage of SSc) compared with those in normal subjects (111.3 pg/ml versus 180.4 pg/ml; P value of IL-20 and IL-20R, their function and expression in vivo should be further studied. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Assessment of extent of skin involvement in scleroderma using shear wave elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Wakhlu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis [SSc] is a rare autoimmune disease which manifests as fibrosis in the skin and other internal organs. Conventionally, the modified Rodnan skin score (MRSS has been used to quantify the extent of skin fibrosis (resulting in skin tightness in SSc. This technique, although widely validated, is limited by the requirement of a trained, experienced assessor. Recent literature suggests that utilization of the objective ultrasound-based assessment of skin fibrosis utilizing shear wave elastography (SWE may be a more robust technique to detect early skin tightness in SSc. Methods: We evaluated the use of SWE (assessed by an experienced radiologist in 24 patients with SSc compared with 16 healthy controls. Results: Our patients were predominantly females, with median disease duration of 1.5 years and median MRSS of 17. There was minimal intraobserver variation in the assessment of SWE. Patients with SSc had higher SWE values (mean elasticity [Emean] compared to healthy controls at most assessed sites for the MRSS. The Emeancorrelated significantly at all sites with the MRSS scores. At the sites where MRSS was scored as 0 (normal, the Emeanin patients with SSc was higher when compared with similarly clinical normal skin in patients with SSc, suggesting potential early involvement of these areas of the skin with fibrosis. Conclusion: SWE is a promising tool to objectively assess skin fibrosis in SSc and may be useful in detecting early, subclinical skin involvement in this disease.

  19. Mortality Risk Prediction in Scleroderma-Related Interstitial Lung Disease: The SADL Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisset, Julie; Vittinghoff, Eric; Elicker, Brett M; Hu, Xiaowen; Le, Stephanie; Ryu, Jay H; Jones, Kirk D; Haemel, Anna; Golden, Jeffrey A; Boin, Francesco; Ley, Brett; Wolters, Paul J; King, Talmadge E; Collard, Harold R; Lee, Joyce S

    2017-11-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with scleroderma (Scl). Risk prediction and prognostication in patients with Scl-ILD are challenging because of heterogeneity in the disease course. We aimed to develop a clinical mortality risk prediction model for Scl-ILD. Patients with Scl-ILD were identified from two ongoing longitudinal cohorts: 135 patients at the University of California, San Francisco (derivation cohort) and 90 patients at the Mayo Clinic (validation cohort). Using these two separate cohorts, a mortality risk prediction model was developed and validated by testing every potential candidate Cox model, each including three or four variables of a possible 19 clinical predictors, for time to death. Model discrimination was assessed using the C-index. Three variables were included in the final risk prediction model (SADL): ever smoking history, age, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (% predicted). This continuous model had similar performance in the derivation (C-index, 0.88) and validation (C-index, 0.84) cohorts. We created a point scoring system using the combined cohort (C-index, 0.82) and used it to identify a classification with low, moderate, and high mortality risk at 3 years. The SADL model uses simple, readily accessible clinical variables to predict all-cause mortality in Scl-ILD. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Gammadelta receptor bearing T cells in scleroderma: enhanced interaction with vascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaleh, M B; Fan, P S; Otsuka, T

    1999-05-01

    In view of the documented perivascular mononuclear cell infiltration in the involved organs in scleroderma (SSc) and the reported accumulation of gammadelta-T cells in SSc skin and lung, we evaluated gammadelta-T cell interaction with endothelial cells (EC) in vitro. gammadelta- and alphabeta-T cells were isolated from BPMN of SSc patients with early diffuse disease and of matched control subjects by an immunomagnetic method after stimulation with mycobacterium lysate and interleukin-2 for 2 weeks. Lymphocyte adhesion, proliferation, and cytotoxicity to EC were investigated. SSc gammadelta-T cells adhered to cultured EC and proliferated at higher rates than control cells. Furthermore, significant EC cytotoxicity by SSc gammadelta was seen. The cytotoxicity was blocked by addition of anti-gammadelta-TCR antibody and by anti-granzyme A antibody but not by anti-MHC class I and II antibodies. Expression of granzyme A mRNA was seen in five/five SSc gammadelta-T cells and in one/five control cells. alphabeta-T cells from both SSc and control subjects were significantly less interactive with EC than gammadelta-T cells. The data demonstrate EC recognition by SSc gammadelta-T cells and propose gammadelta-T cells as a possible effector cell type in the immune pathogenesis of SSc. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  1. Clinical and laboratory features of systemic sclerosis complicated with localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toki, Sayaka; Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Kanai, Sahori; Yamanaka, Masayoshi; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2015-03-01

    Localized scleroderma (LSc) primarily affects skin, whereas systemic sclerosis (SSc) affects skin and various internal organs. LSc and SSc are considered to be basically different diseases, and there is no transition between them. However, LSc and SSc have several common characteristics, including endothelial cell dysfunction, immune activation, and excess fibrosis of the skin, and there exist several SSc cases complicated with LSc during the course of SSc. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of SSc patients with LSc remain unclear. We investigated the clinical and laboratory features of 8 SSc patients with LSc among 220 SSc patients (3.6%). The types of LSc included plaque (5/8), guttate (2/8), and linear type (1/8). All cases were diagnosed as having SSc within 5 years before or after the appearance of LSc. In three cases of SSc with LSc (37.5%), LSc skin lesions preceded clinical symptoms of SSc. Young age, negative antinuclear antibody, and positive anti-RNA polymerase III antibody were significantly prevalent in SSc patients with LSc. The positivity of anticentromere antibody tended to be prevalent in SSc patients without LSc. No significant difference in the frequency of complications, such as interstitial lung disease, reflux esophagitis, and pulmonary artery hypertension, was observed. The awareness of these characteristic of SSc with LSc are essential to establish an early diagnosis and treatment. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  2. Pathogenesis and therapeutic approaches for improved topical treatment in localized scleroderma and systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, I; Taylor, M; Rosenberg, A; Foldvari, M

    2009-03-01

    SSc is a chronic progressive disorder of unknown aetiology characterized by excess synthesis and deposition of collagen and other extracellular matrix components in a variety of tissues and organs. Localized scleroderma (LS) differs from SSc in that with LS only skin and occasionally subcutaneous tissues are involved. Although rarely life threatening, LS can be disfiguring and disabling and, consequently, can adversely affect quality of life. There is no known effective treatment for LS, and various options, including, as examples, corticosteroids and other immunomodulatory agents, ultraviolet radiation and vitamin D analogues, are of unproven efficacy. Clinical trials evaluating combination therapy such as corticosteroids with MTX or UVA1 exposure with psoralens have not been established as consistently effective. New immunomodulators such as tacrolimus and thalidomide are also being evaluated. A better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of LS has led to evaluation of new treatments that modulate profibrotic cytokines such as TGF-beta and IL-4, regulate assembly and deposition of extracellular matrix components, and restore Th1/Th2 immune balance by administering IL-12 or IFN-gamma. IFN-gamma acts by directly inhibiting collagen synthesis and by restoring immune balance. In this review, we evaluate current and future treatment options for LS and cutaneous involvement in SSc. Recent advances in therapy focus mainly on anti-fibrotic agents. Delivery of these drugs into the skin as the target tissue might be a key factor in developing more effective and safer therapy.

  3. Pulmonary clearance of sup 99m Tc-DTPA aerosol in patients with progressive systemic scleroderma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateno, Madoka; Nakano, Akihiko; Hasegawa, Akira; Watanabe, Naoyuki; Oriuchi, Noboru; Inoue, Tomio; Endo, Keigo (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine); Sasaki, Yasuhito

    1992-05-01

    Alveolar epithelial permeability was assessed in 32 patients with progressive systemic scleroderma (PSS), using {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA aerosol. Immediately after the inhalation of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA aerosol for 3 to 6 minutes under normal tidal breathing, lung was imaged sequentially for 30 minutes from the posterior by a gamma camera and exponential fitting was processed on the time activity curve. T{sub 1/2} (min) was used as a parameter for the evaluation of permeability of alveolar epithelium. Patients with collagen disease showed shorter T{sub 1/2} (T{sub 1/2}=43.7{+-}23.8 min) than the normal volunteers (T{sub 1/2}=76.8{+-}8.7 min). No significant difference was observed between patients with or without interstitial changes on the chest CT. Significant correlation was not observed between T{sub 1/2} and %VC or %DLco. In 8 cases, studies were repeated in the interval of 3 to 19 months. Improvement of T{sub 1/2} was seen in 4 cases, independent of CT findings. These results suggest that {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA aerosol clearance study provides information independent from other lung examinations, and may be useful for the assessment of lung interstitial changes in patients with PSS. (author).

  4. Effects of bosentan on collagen type I synthesis on in vitro culture of scleroderma skin fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Soldano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the effects of a non-selective endothelin (ETA/B receptors antagonist, on collagen type I (COLI synthesis on in vitro culture of scleroderma (SSc skin fibroblasts (Fb. Fb were obtained from skin biopsies of 6 female SSc patients (mean age 64. 1±6 years, after informed consent and Ethical Committee Approval. Cells were treated with endothelin-I [ET-I, 100nM] for 24 and 48 hrs, pre-treated for I hr with ETA/B receptors antagonist [10nM] alone or followed by ET-I for 24 and 48 hrs. Untreated Fb were used as controls. Immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis were performed to evaluate COLI synthesis. ET-I increased COLI synthesis both at 24 and 48 hrs when compared to controls. ETA/B receptor antagonost blocks the increased COLI synthesis ET-I-mediated both at 24 and 48 hrs vs. ET-I. Results showed that ET-I receptors blockage by ETA/B receptors antagonist might prevent the excessive synthesis of COLI, supporting its positive action in the management of skin fibrosis.

  5. Pulmonary clearance of 99mTc-DTPA aerosol in patients with progressive systemic scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateno, Madoka; Nakano, Akihiko; Hasegawa, Akira; Watanabe, Naoyuki; Oriuchi, Noboru; Inoue, Tomio; Endo, Keigo; Sasaki, Yasuhito.

    1992-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial permeability was assessed in 32 patients with progressive systemic scleroderma (PSS), using 99m Tc-DTPA aerosol. Immediately after the inhalation of 99m Tc-DTPA aerosol for 3 to 6 minutes under normal tidal breathing, lung was imaged sequentially for 30 minutes from the posterior by a gamma camera and exponential fitting was processed on the time activity curve. T 1/2 (min) was used as a parameter for the evaluation of permeability of alveolar epithelium. Patients with collagen disease showed shorter T 1/2 (T 1/2 =43.7±23.8 min) than the normal volunteers (T 1/2 =76.8±8.7 min). No significant difference was observed between patients with or without interstitial changes on the chest CT. Significant correlation was not observed between T 1/2 and %VC or %DLco. In 8 cases, studies were repeated in the interval of 3 to 19 months. Improvement of T 1/2 was seen in 4 cases, independent of CT findings. These results suggest that 99m Tc-DTPA aerosol clearance study provides information independent from other lung examinations, and may be useful for the assessment of lung interstitial changes in patients with PSS. (author)

  6. Impact of a new simplified disability scoring system for adult patients with localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okiyama, Naoko; Asano, Yoshihide; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Motegi, Sei-Ichiro; Koizumi, Haruka; Hasegawa, Minoru; Ishikawa, Osamu; Sato, Shinichi; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Fujimoto, Manabu; Ihn, Hironobu

    2018-04-01

    Localized scleroderma (LoS) involves dermal but not internal inflammation and fibrosis. Cosmetic changes often impact quality of life (QOL), however, impairment of activities of daily living (ADL) in LoS patients has not been investigated. To determine what factor(s) are associated with ADL in adult patients with LoS, we performed a retrospective observational study in 177 Japanese adult LoS patients using a novel LoS disability score based on Barthel's indices of ADL: feeding, bathing, grooming, dressing, bowels, bladder, toilet use, transfers, mobility and stairs. LoS disability scores increased in proportion to the number of affected body parts but were not correlated to age and duration of illness. The presence of leg lesions significantly impaired ADL of LoS patients compared with lesions on other body parts. Patients treated with systemic medications, who tended to have multiple lesions, presented higher LoS disability scores than those without systemic treatments. Our study proposes that physicians evaluate ADL, not only QOL, in LoS patients. Our findings using LoS disability scoring indicate that multiple affected body parts and leg lesions are risk factors for ADL impairment. © 2018 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  7. Ranking current and prospective NO2 pollution mitigation strategies: An environmental and economic modelling investigation in Oxford Street, London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanjean, A P R; Gallagher, J; Monks, P S; Leigh, R J

    2017-06-01

    Air pollution continues to be a problem in the urban environment. A range of different pollutant mitigation strategies that promote dispersion and deposition exist, but there is little evidence with respect to their comparative performance from both an environmental and economic perspective. This paper focuses on examining different NO 2 mitigation strategies such as trees, buildings facades coated with photocatalytic paint and solid barriers in Oxford Street in London. The case study findings will support ranking the environmental and economic impacts of these different strategies to improve personal exposure conditions on the footpath and on the road in a real urban street canyon. CFD simulations of airflow and NO 2 dispersion in Oxford Street in London were undertaken using the OpenFOAM software platform with the k-ε model, taking into account local prevailing wind conditions. Trees are shown to be the most cost-effective strategy, with a small reduction in NO 2 concentrations of up to 0.7% on the road. However, solid barriers with and without the application of photocatalytic paint and an innovative material (20 times more expensive than trees) can improve air quality on the footpaths more substantially, up to 7.4%, yet this has a significant detrimental impact on NO 2 concentrations (≤23.8%) on the road. Photocatalytic paint on building surfaces presented a minimal environmental reductions (1.2%) and economic (>100 times more expensive than trees) mitigation strategy. The findings recognised the differences between footpath and road concentrations occurred and that a focused examination of three pollution hotspots can provide more cost effective pollution mitigation. This study considers how a number of pollutant mitigation measures can be applied in a single street canyon and demonstrates the strengths and weaknesses of these strategies from economic and environmental perspectives. Further research is required to extrapolate the findings presented here to

  8. Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race: Performance, Pacing and Tactics Between 1890 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Andrew M; Guy, Joshua H; Hettinga, Florentina J

    2016-10-01

    Currently no studies have examined the historical performances of Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race crews in the context of performance, pacing and tactics which is surprising as the event has routinely taken place annually for over 150 years on the same course. The purpose of this study was twofold, to firstly examine the historical development of performances and physical characteristics of crews over 124 years of the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race between 1890 and 2014 and secondly to investigate the pacing and tactics employed by crews over that period. Linear regression modelling was applied to investigate the development of performance and body size for crews of eight male individuals over time from Boat Race archive data. Performance change over time was further assessed in 10-year clusters while four intra-race checkpoints were used to examine pacing and tactics. Significant correlations were observed between performance and time (1890-2014) for both Oxford (r = -0.67; p tactical advantage from commencing on either the Surrey or Middlesex station beyond chance alone; however, all crews (n = 228) adopted a fast-start strategy, with 81 % of victories achieved by the crew leading the race at the first intra-race checkpoint (24 % of total distance). Crews leading the race at the final checkpoint (83 % of total distance; 1143 m) achieved victory on 94 % of occasions. Performances and physical characteristics of the crews have changed markedly since 1890, with faster heavier crews now common. Tactically, gaining the early lead position with a fast-start strategy seems particularly meaningful to success in the Boat Race throughout the years, and has been of greater importance to race outcome than factors such as the starting station.

  9. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Danish version of the Oxford hip score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, A; Odgaard, Anders; Overgaard, S

    2012-01-01

    missing to calculate a sum score. Construct validity was adequate and 80% of our predefined hypotheses regarding the correlation between scores on the Danish OHS and the other questionnaires were confirmed. The intraclass correlation (ICC) of the different items ranged from 0.80 to 0.95 and the average......Objectives The Oxford hip score (OHS) is a 12-item questionnaire designed and developed to assess function and pain from the perspective of patients who are undergoing total hip replacement (THR). The OHS has been shown to be consistent, reliable, valid and sensitive to clinical change following...

  10. The Oxford SWIFT Spectrograph: first commissioning and on-sky results

    OpenAIRE

    Thatte, Niranjan; Tecza, Mathias; Clarke, Fraser; Goodsall, Timothy; Fogarty, Lisa; Houghton, Ryan; Salter, Graeme; Scott, Nicholas; Davies, Roger L.; Bouchez, Antonin; Dekany, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Oxford SWIFT spectrograph, an I & z band (6500-10500 A) integral field spectrograph, is designed to operate as a facility instrument at the 200 inch Hale Telescope on Palomar Mountain, in conjunction with the Palomar laser guide star adaptive optics system PALAO (and its upgrade to PALM3000). SWIFT provides spectra at R(≡λ/▵λ)~4000 of a contiguous two-dimensional field, 44 x 89 spatial pixels (spaxels) in size, at spatial scales of 0.235";, 0.16", and 0.08" per spaxel. It employs two 250μ...

  11. Oligosaccharide modification by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-V in macrophages are involved in pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Arisa; Yutani, Mizuki; Terao, Mika; Kimura, Akihiro; Itoi, Saori; Murota, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Eiji; Katayama, Ichiro

    2015-08-01

    Oligosaccharide modification by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-V (GnT-V), which catalyses the formation of β1,6 GlcNAc (N-acetylglucosamine) branches on N-glycans, is associated with various pathologies, such as cancer metastasis, multiple sclerosis and liver fibrosis. In this study, we demonstrated the involvement of GnT-V in the pathophysiology of scleroderma. High expression of GnT-V was observed in infiltrating cells in skin section samples from systemic and localized patients with scleroderma. Most of the infiltrating cells were T cells and macrophages, most of which were CD163(+) M2 macrophages. To determine the role of GnT-V in scleroderma, we next investigated skin sclerosis in GnT-V knockout (MGAT5(-/-) ) mice. Expression of GnT-V was also elevated in bleomycin (BLM)-injected sclerotic skin, and MGAT5(-/-) mice were resistant to BLM-induced skin sclerosis with reduced collagen type 1 α1 content, suggesting the biological significance of GnT-V in skin sclerosis. Furthermore, the number of CD163(+) M2 macrophages and CD3-positive T cells in BLM-induced skin sclerosis was significantly fewer in MGAT5(-/-) mice. In bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), IL-4-induced expressions of Fizz1 and Ym1 were significantly reduced in MGAT5(-/-) mice-derived BMDMs. Taken together, these results suggest the induction of GnT-V in skin sclerosis progression is possibly dependent on increased numbers of M2 macrophages in the skin, which are important for tissue fibrosis and remodelling. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Initial evaluation of an ultrasound measure for assessing the activity of skin lesions in juvenile localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S C; Liebling, M S; Haines, K A; Weiss, J E; Prann, A

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the construct validity of 2 proposed measures (the Ultrasound Disease Activity [U-DA] and the Tissue Thickness Score [TTS]) for evaluating sonographic differences in juvenile localized scleroderma skin lesions. We conducted a retrospective review of juvenile localized scleroderma patients who had ultrasound scans of their skin lesions between October 2005 and February 2009. Imaged lesions were classified as active or inactive based upon clinical assessment. Lesions had to have been imaged within 1 month of a clinic visit or have the same clinical assessment during both the visit before and the visit after the scan. Two physicians scored the scans using the U-DA, which scores for differences in lesion echogenicity and vascularity compared with normal tissue. Tissue thickness differences were evaluated by percent differences and by using the TTS. Wilcoxon's rank sum test was performed to assess differences. We studied 52 scans from 21 patients, 32 scans of active skin lesions and 20 scans of inactive skin lesions. Features reported by clinicians as indicative of active disease included erythema, warmth, violaceous color, new lesion, expansion of lesion, and induration. The U-DA was significantly different between active and inactive skin lesions (P = 0.0010) with significant differences found for the parameters of total echogenicity, hypodermis echogenicity, and deep tissue layer vascularity (P = 0.0014, P = 0.0023, and P = 0.0374, respectively). No significant differences were found for tissue layer thickness or TTS. The U-DA may be a useful tool in the identification of localized scleroderma activity. Further study is needed to prospectively evaluate the validity, reliability, and sensitivity of this potential monitoring tool. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Radiation-induced skin injury in the animal model of scleroderma: implications for post-radiotherapy fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanath; Kolozsvary, Andrew; Kohl, Robert; Lu, Mei; Brown, Stephen; Kim, Jae Ho

    2008-01-01

    Radiation therapy is generally contraindicated for cancer patients with collagen vascular diseases (CVD) such as scleroderma due to an increased risk of fibrosis. The tight skin (TSK) mouse has skin which, in some respects, mimics that of patients with scleroderma. The skin radiation response of TSK mice has not been previously reported. If TSK mice are shown to have radiation sensitive skin, they may prove to be a useful model to examine the mechanisms underlying skin radiation injury, protection, mitigation and treatment. The hind limbs of TSK and parental control C57BL/6 mice received a radiation exposure sufficient to cause approximately the same level of acute injury. Endpoints included skin damage scored using a non-linear, semi-quantitative scale and tissue fibrosis assessed by measuring passive leg extension. In addition, TGF-β1 cytokine levels were measured monthly in skin tissue. Contrary to our expectations, TSK mice were more resistant (i.e. 20%) to radiation than parental control mice. Although acute skin reactions were similar in both mouse strains, radiation injury in TSK mice continued to decrease with time such that several months after radiation there was significantly less skin damage and leg contraction compared to C57BL/6 mice (p < 0.05). Consistent with the expected association of transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) with late tissue injury, levels of the cytokine were significantly higher in the skin of the C57BL/6 mouse compared to TSK mouse at all time points (p < 0.05). TSK mice are not recommended as a model of scleroderma involving radiation injury. The genetic and molecular basis for reduced radiation injury observed in TSK mice warrants further investigation particularly to identify mechanisms capable of reducing tissue fibrosis after radiation injury

  14. IMPORTANCE OF CYCLOPHOSPHANUM IN THE TREATMENT OF INTERSTITIAL LUNG LESION IN PATIENTS WITH SCLERODERMA SYSTEMATICA (A REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Aleksandrova Koneva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung diseases (ILD are a common manifestation of scleroderma systematica (SSD that along with pulmonary arterial hypertension remains the leading cause of death in this nosological entity. As of now, cyclophosphanum remains the only immunosuppressant recommended by the European League against Rheumatism for the treatment of ILD in SSD. The paper analyzes the papers providing evidence for the efficacy of cyclophosphanum in ILD in patients with SSD. It also considers the regimens and duration of treatment with cyclophosphanum, ways of evaluating its efficacy and effects on extrapulmonary manifestations of SSD. It is concluded that cyclophosphanum has a positive, predominantly stabilizing, effect on the course of ILD in SSD.

  15. Deep Mapping and Screen Tourism: The Oxford of Harry Potter and Inspector Morse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Cateridge

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes that the experiences of screen tourists in Oxford help to create a theoretical “deep map” of the city which explores place through narrative. Building on the travel writing of William Least Heat-Moon and other recent work in the spatial humanities, two case studies of major screen tourism drivers are considered and analyzed. The British television drama Inspector Morse (1987–2000 explores the ambiguity of Oxford intellectualism through its central character. Morse’s love of high culture, especially music, provides suggestive additional layers for multimedia mapping, which are realized online through user-adapted Google Maps and geolocated images posted on the Flickr service. Harry Potter fans may not be “pure” or independent screen tourists, but they provide a wealth of data on their interactions with filming locations via social media such as Instagram. This data provides emotional as well as factual evidence, and is accumulating into an ever richer and deeper digital map of human experience.

  16. Accurate Typing of Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Genes by Oxford Nanopore Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Xiao, Fangzhou; Hoisington-Lopez, Jessica; Lang, Kathrin; Quenzel, Philipp; Duffy, Brian; Mitra, Robi David

    2018-04-03

    Oxford Nanopore Technologies' MinION has expanded the current DNA sequencing toolkit by delivering long read lengths and extreme portability. The MinION has the potential to enable expedited point-of-care human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing, an assay routinely used to assess the immunologic compatibility between organ donors and recipients, but the platform's high error rate makes it challenging to type alleles with accuracy. We developed and validated accurate typing of HLA by Oxford nanopore (Athlon), a bioinformatic pipeline that i) maps nanopore reads to a database of known HLA alleles, ii) identifies candidate alleles with the highest read coverage at different resolution levels that are represented as branching nodes and leaves of a tree structure, iii) generates consensus sequences by remapping the reads to the candidate alleles, and iv) calls the final diploid genotype by blasting consensus sequences against the reference database. Using two independent data sets generated on the R9.4 flow cell chemistry, Athlon achieved a 100% accuracy in class I HLA typing at the two-field resolution. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cemented versus Uncemented Oxford Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: Is There a Difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Akan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The use of uncemented unicompartmental knee prostheses has recently increased. However, few studies on the outcomes of uncemented unicompartmental knee prostheses have been performed. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of cemented and uncemented Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. This retrospective observational study evaluated the clinical and radiological outcomes of 263 medial Oxford unicompartmental prostheses (141 cemented, 122 uncemented implanted in 235 patients. The mean follow-up was 42 months in the cemented group and 30 months in the uncemented group. Results. At the last follow-up, there were no significant differences in the clinical results or survival rates between the two groups. However, the operation time in the uncemented unicompartmental knee arthroplasty group was shorter than that in the cemented unicompartmental knee arthroplasty group. In addition, the cost of uncemented arthroplasty was greater. Conclusion. Despite the successful midterm results in the uncemented unicompartmental knee arthroplasty group, a longer follow-up period is required to determine the best fixation mode.

  18. Parroquia católica en Oxford, Gran Bretaña

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahrends, Peter

    1974-03-01

    Full Text Available This strange new building was commissioned Í0 accommodate the expanding activities of the Newman Community which acts as a religious and social center for the Catholics of the University of Oxford. The following have been constructed: a chapel, a multiple-use room, entrance hall, bar, library, meeting room, eight bedrooms, small lounges and kitchen, etc. Part of the already existing building was used for the installation of another kitchen and several bathrooms. The best possible advantage has been taken of the lot which is narrow and irregularly shaped. Construction consists basically of brick walls, with columns, reinforced concrete stairs and castings.Este curioso y nuevo edificio se ha edificado para subsanar la creciente expansión de actividades de la Comunidad Newman, que actúa como centro religioso y social para los católicos de la Universidad de Oxford. Han sido construidos: una capilla, una sala de usos múltiples, entrada, bar, biblioteca, sala de reuniones, ocho dormitorios, pequeñas salitas y cocina, etc., aprovechando parte del edificio existente para ubicar otra cocina y varios cuartos de baño. El solar, que era estrecho y de forma irregular, se ha aprovechado al máximo. La construcción se ha llevado a cabo, fundamentalmente, a base de muros de fábrica de ladrillo, con pilares, forjados y escaleras de hormigón armado.

  19. “To Live in Hearts We Leave Behind is Not to Die.” Remembrance Sunday at Pusey House, Oxford University, A Review of Worship at Oxford University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter L. Kraus

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, religious participation by students of all faiths at Universities in the United Kingdom has seen a steady increase in attendance. This brief essay is a case study of worship by members of the University Community at Pusey House at the University of Oxford, which reflects the trend. On a crisp fall, November day, the twenty-third Sunday after Trinity (8th of November 2015 I had the opportunity to attend services at Pusey House, Oxford on Remembrance Sunday while on sabbatical at The University of Oxford (St. Stephen’s House.

  20. Remaking the medico-legal scene: a social history of the late-Victorian coroner in Oxford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurren, Elizabeth T

    2010-04-01

    There have been wide-ranging debates about medicine and the law encapsulated in the figure of the coroner in Victorian England. Recently the historical literature on coroners has been enriched by macro-studies. Despite this important research, the social lives of coroners and their daily interactions remain relatively neglected in standard historical accounts. This article redresses that issue by examining the working life of the coroner for Oxford during the late-Victorian era. Edward Law Hussey kept very detailed records of his time in office as coroner. New research material makes it feasible to trace his professional background, from doctor of the sick poor, to hospital house surgeon and then busy coroner. His career trajectory, personal interactions, and professional disputes, provide an important historical prism illuminating contemporary debates that occupied coroners in their working lives. Hussey tried to improve his medico-legal reach and the public image of his coroner's office by reducing infanticide rates, converting a public mortuary, and acquiring a proper coroner's court. His campaigns had limited success because the social scene in which he worked was complicated by the dominance of health and welfare agencies that resented his role as an expanding arm of the Victorian information state.

  1. Esophageal abnormalities in juvenile localized scleroderma: is it associated with other extracutaneous manifestations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valões, Clarissa C M; Novak, Glaucia V; Brunelli, Juliana B; Kozu, Katia T; Toma, Ricardo K; Silva, Clovis A

    To assess esophageal involvement (EI) in juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS) population and the possible association between this gastrointestinal manifestation and demographic data, clinical features, laboratory exams, treatments and outcomes. For a period of 30 years, 5881 patients with rheumatic diseases were followed in our Pediatric Rheumatology Division. EI was defined by the presence of symptoms (solid/liquid dysphagia, heartburn, esophageal regurgitation, nausea/vomiting and epigastralgia) and confirmed by at least one EI exam abnormality: barium contrast radiography, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and 24-hour esophageal pH-monitoring. JLS was observed in 56/5881 patients (0.9%), mainly linear morphea subtype. EI was observed in 23/56(41%) of JLS patients. Eight(35%) of 23 EI patients with JLS were symptomatic and presented heartburn(5/8), solid and liquid dysphagia(3/8), nausea and epigastralgia(1/8). The frequency of any cumulative extracutaneous manifestations (calcinosis, arthritis/arthralgia, central nervous system, interstitial pneumonitis, mesangial nephritis and/or arrhythmia) was significantly higher in JLS patients with EI compared to those without this complication (56% vs. 24%, p=0.024). No differences were evidenced in demographic data, JLS subtypes and in each extracutaneous manifestation in both groups (p>0.05). The frequency of methotrexate use was significantly higher in JLS patients with EI compared to those without (52% vs. 12%, p=0.002). Autoantibody profile (antinuclear antibodies, anti-SCL-70, rheumatoid factor, anticentromere, anti-cardiolipin, anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB) was similar in both groups (p>0.05). Our study demonstrated that EI was frequently observed in JLS patients, mainly in asymptomatic patients with linear subtype. EI occurred in JLS patients with other extracutaneous manifestations and required methotrexate therapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  2. Quantitative nanohistological investigation of scleroderma: an atomic force microscopy-based approach to disease characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strange AP

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adam P Strange,1 Sebastian Aguayo,1 Tarek Ahmed,1 Nicola Mordan,1 Richard Stratton,2 Stephen R Porter,3 Susan Parekh,4 Laurent Bozec1 1Department of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, UCL Eastman Dental Institute, 2Centre for Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Diseases, Royal Free Hospital, UCL Medical School, 3UCL Eastman Dental Institute, 4Department of Pediatrics, UCL Eastman Dental Institute, London, UK Abstract: Scleroderma (or systemic sclerosis, SSc is a disease caused by excess crosslinking of collagen. The skin stiffens and becomes painful, while internally, organ function can be compromised by the less elastic collagen. Diagnosis of SSc is often only possible in advanced cases by which treatment time is limited. A more detailed analysis of SSc may provide better future treatment options and information of disease progression. Recently, the histological stain picrosirius red showing collagen register has been combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM to study SSc. Skin from healthy individuals and SSc patients was biopsied, stained and studied using AFM. By investigating the crosslinking of collagen at a smaller hierarchical stage, the effects of SSc were more pronounced. Changes in morphology and Young’s elastic modulus were observed and quantified; giving rise to a novel technique, we have termed “quantitative nanohistology”. An increase in nanoscale stiffness in the collagen for SSc compared with healthy individuals was seen by a significant increase in the Young’s modulus profile for the collagen. These markers of stiffer collagen in SSc are similar to the symptoms experienced by patients, giving additional hope that in the future, nanohistology using AFM can be readily applied as a clinical tool, providing detailed information of the state of collagen. Keywords: rheumatology, adjunct diagnosis, picrosirius red, collagen, nanohistology

  3. Is occupational exposure to solvents associated with an increased risk for developing systemic scleroderma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drexler Hans

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our study was aimed to investigate in a German collective if there are any hints for an increased occupational or environmental risk to develop systemic sclerosis, especially, focussing on work-related exposure to solvents. Moreover, we tried to evaluate the feasibility of a sampling method addressing support groups. Methods A standardised questionnaire was published in two journals subscribed by members of two different support groups and all members were asked to complete the questionnaire and to return it anonymously. The subjects were not informed on the scientific hypotheses, nor did they know who of them belonged to the case group (scleroderma or to the control group (multiple sclerosis. Results 175 questionnaires could be included in the statistical analysis. As expected, a female predominance was in our collective. In the male subpopulation, the occupational exposure to solvents was higher in the case group than in the control-group (70% versus 45.8%. Based only on the male subgroup, a tendency for an association between occupational exposure to solvents and the risk to develop systemic sclerosis was found. Conclusion According to our experience in this case-control-study exposure misclassification, qualitative or quantitative, was an eminent problem. Within such a setting, it is generally very difficult to establish an exact dose-response relationship due to incomplete, imprecise or missing data concerning duration of exposure, frequency of use and kind of solvent. Additionally, a well-known problem in studies based on self-reported questionnaires is the so-called volunteer bias. Unfortunately, but similar to other studies assessing epidemiologic factors in such a rare disease, our study was of limited power, especially in the subgroups defined by gender.

  4. Esophageal abnormalities in juvenile localized scleroderma: is it associated with other extracutaneous manifestations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa C.M. Valões

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To assess esophageal involvement (EI in juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS population and the possible association between this gastrointestinal manifestation and demographic data, clinical features, laboratory exams, treatments and outcomes. Methods: For a period of 30 years, 5881 patients with rheumatic diseases were followed in our Pediatric Rheumatology Division. EI was defined by the presence of symptoms (solid/liquid dysphagia, heartburn, esophageal regurgitation, nausea/vomiting and epigastralgia and confirmed by at least one EI exam abnormality: barium contrast radiography, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and 24-hour esophageal pH-monitoring. Results: JLS was observed in 56/5881 patients (0.9%, mainly linear morphea subtype. EI was observed in 23/56(41% of JLS patients. Eight(35% of 23 EI patients with JLS were symptomatic and presented heartburn(5/8, solid and liquid dysphagia(3/8, nausea and epigastralgia(1/8. The frequency of any cumulative extracutaneous manifestations (calcinosis, arthritis/arthralgia, central nervous system, interstitial pneumonitis, mesangial nephritis and/or arrhythmia was significantly higher in JLS patients with EI compared to those without this complication (56% vs. 24%, p = 0.024. No differences were evidenced in demographic data, JLS subtypes and in each extracutaneous manifestation in both groups (p > 0.05. The frequency of methotrexate use was significantly higher in JLS patients with EI compared to those without (52% vs. 12%, p = 0.002. Autoantibody profile (antinuclear antibodies, anti-SCL-70, rheumatoid factor, anticentromere, anti-cardiolipin, anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB was similar in both groups (p > 0.05. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that EI was frequently observed in JLS patients, mainly in asymptomatic patients with linear subtype. EI occurred in JLS patients with other extracutaneous manifestations and required methotrexate therapy.

  5. microRNA-7 down-regulation mediates excessive collagen expression in localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etoh, Mitsuhiko; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Makino, Katsunari; Yamane, Keitaro; Nakayama, Wakana; Aoi, Jun; Honda, Noritoshi; Kajihara, Ikko; Makino, Takamitsu; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2013-01-01

    Localized scleroderma (LSc), a connective tissue disorder restricted to the skin and subcutaneous tissue, is characterized by skin fibrosis due to an excessive deposition of types I collagen. The mechanism of such fibrosis is still unknown, but epigenetics may play some roles in the excessive collagen expression. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of fibrosis seen in LSc, focusing on microRNA (miRNA). miRNA expression was determined by PCR array, real-time PCR, and in situ hybridization. The function of miRNA was evaluated using specific inhibitor. Immunoblotting was performed to detect α2(I) collagen protein. PCR array analysis using tissue miRNA demonstrated miR-7 level was significantly decreased in LSc skin as well as keloid tissue compared to normal skin in vivo. In situ hybridization also showed miR-7 expression in dermal fibroblasts was decreased in LSc dermis. The transfection of specific inhibitor for miR-7 into cultured normal dermal fibroblasts resulted in the up-regulation of α2(I) collagen protein in vitro. Also, the serum levels of miR-7 were significantly decreased in LSc patients compared with healthy controls, but serum miR-29a levels not. Systemic or local down-regulation of miR-7 may contribute to the pathogenesis of LSc via the overexpression of α2(I) collagen, and serum miR-7 may be useful as a disease marker. Investigation of the regulatory mechanisms of LSc by miRNA may lead to new treatments by the transfection into the lesional skin of this disease.

  6. Interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 as a potential biomarker in localized scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence and levels of interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) in the plasma and skin of pediatric localized scleroderma (LS) patients compared to those of healthy pediatric controls and to determine if IP-10 levels correlate to clinical disease activity measures. Methods The presence of IP-10 in the plasma was analyzed using a Luminex panel in 69 pediatric patients with LS and compared to 71 healthy pediatric controls. Of these patients, five had available skin biopsy specimens with concurrent clinical and serological data during the active disease phase, which were used to analyze the presence and location of IP-10 in the skin by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results IP-10 levels were significantly elevated in the plasma of LS patients compared to that of healthy controls and correlated to clinical disease activity measures in LS. Immunohistochemistry staining of IP-10 was present in the dermal infiltrate of LS patients and was similar to that found in psoriasis skin specimens, the positive disease control. Conclusions Elevation of IP-10 levels in the plasma compared to those of healthy controls and the presence of IP-10 staining in the affected skin of LS patients indicates that IP-10 is a potential biomarker in LS. Furthermore, significant elevation of IP-10 in LS patients with active versus inactive disease and correlations between IP-10 levels and standardized disease outcome measures of activity in LS strongly suggest that IP-10 may be a biomarker for disease activity in LS. PMID:24499523

  7. The Localized Scleroderma Cutaneous Assessment Tool: responsiveness to change in a pediatric clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Christina E; Torok, Kathryn S

    2013-08-01

    Lack of agreement on how to accurately capture disease outcomes in localized scleroderma (LS) has hindered the development of efficacious treatment protocols. The LS Cutaneous Assessment Tool (LoSCAT), consisting of the modified LS Skin Severity Index (mLoSSI) and the LS Damage Index, has potential for use in clinical trials. The goal of this article is to further evaluate the clinical responsiveness of the LoSCAT. Based on the modifiable nature of disease activity versus damage, we expected the mLoSSI to be responsive to change. At 2 study visits, a physician completed the LoSCAT and Physician Global Assessment (PGA) of Disease Activity and of Disease Damage for 29 patients with LS. Spearman correlations were used to examine the relationships between the change in the LoSCAT and the PGA scores. To evaluate contrasted group validity, patients were grouped according to disease activity classification and change scores of groups were compared. Minimal clinically important differences were calculated and compared with the standard error of measurement. Change in the mLoSSI score correlated strongly with change in the PGA of Disease Activity score, whereas change in the LS Damage Index score correlated weakly with change in the PGA of Disease Damage score. The mLoSSI and PGA of Disease Activity exhibited contrasted group validity. Minimal clinically important differences for the activity measures were greater than the respective standard errors of measurement. Only 2 study visits were included in analysis. This study gives further evidence that the LoSCAT, specifically the mLoSSI, is a responsive, valid measure of activity in LS and should be used in future treatment studies. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Scleroderma dermal microvascular endothelial cells exhibit defective response to pro-angiogenic chemokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabquer, Bradley J.; Ohara, Ray A.; Stinson, William A.; Campbell, Phillip L.; Amin, M. Asif; Balogh, Beatrix; Zakhem, George; Renauer, Paul A.; Lozier, Ann; Arasu, Eshwar; Haines, G. Kenneth; Kahaleh, Bashar; Schiopu, Elena; Khanna, Dinesh; Koch, Alisa E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Angiogenesis plays a critical role in SSc (scleroderma). The aim of this study was to examine the expression of growth-regulated protein-γ (Gro-γ/CXCL3), granulocyte chemotactic protein 2 (GCP-2/CXCL6) and their receptor CXCR2 in endothelial cells (ECs) isolated from SSc skin and determine whether these cells mount an angiogenic response towards pro-angiogenic chemokines. The downstream signalling pathways as well as the pro-angiogenic transcription factor inhibitor of DNA-binding protein 1 (Id-1) were also examined. Methods. Skin biopsies were obtained from patients with dcSSc. ECs were isolated via magnetic positive selection. Angiogenesis was measured by EC chemotaxis assay. Results. Gro-γ/CXCL3 and GCP-2/CXCL6 were minimally expressed in both skin types but elevated in SSc serum. Pro-angiogenic chemokine mRNA was greater in SSc ECs than in normal ECs. SSc ECs did not migrate to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Gro-γ/CXCL3, GCP-2/CXCL6 or CXCL16. The signalling pathways stimulated by these chemokines were also dysregulated. Id-1 mRNA in SSc ECs was lower compared with normal ECs, and overexpression of Id-1 in SSc ECs increased their ability to migrate towards VEGF and CXCL16. Conclusion. Our results show that SSc ECs are unable to respond to pro-angiogenic chemokines despite their increased expression in serum and ECs. This might be due to the differences in the signalling pathways activated by these chemokines in normal vs SSc ECs. In addition, the lower expression of Id-1 also decreases the angiogenic response. The inability of pro-angiogenic chemokines to promote EC migration provides an additional mechanism for the impaired angiogenesis that characterizes SSc. PMID:26705326

  9. A long-term follow-up study of methotrexate in juvenile localized scleroderma (morphea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulian, Francesco; Vallongo, Cristina; Patrizi, Annalisa; Belloni-Fortina, Anna; Cutrone, Mario; Alessio, Maria; Martino, Silvana; Gerloni, Valeria; Vittadello, Fabio; Martini, Giorgia

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies report that methotrexate (MTX) is beneficial in the treatment of juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS) but little is known about its long-term effectiveness. We assessed the therapeutic role of MTX in children with JLS who were followed up for a prolonged period. A cohort of patients with JLS, previously enrolled in a double-blind, randomized controlled trial and treated with oral MTX (15 mg/m(2)/wk) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/d, maximum 50 mg) for the first 3 months, were prospectively followed up. Lesions were evaluated clinically, with infrared thermography, and by a computerized skin score. Response to treatment was defined as: (1) no new lesions; (2) skin score rate less than 1; and (3) decrease in lesion temperature by at least 10% compared with baseline. Clinical remission (CR) on medication was defined when response was maintained, on treatment, for at least 6 months, and complete CR when response was maintained, without treatment, for at least 6 months. Of 65 patients treated with MTX, 48 (73.8%) were responders, 10 (15.4%) relapsed by 24 months since MTX start, and 7 (10.8%) were lost to follow-up. Among the responders, 35 (72.9%) maintained CR for a mean of 25 months and 13 (27.1%) were in CR on medication. Adverse effects seen in 28 patients (48.3%) were generally mild and never required treatment discontinuation. The use of objective measures not widely available, such as infrared thermography and computerized skin score, makes it difficult to compare data from previous studies. Long-term MTX therapy is beneficial and well tolerated for JLS. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimmagadda, M.; Faillace, E.; Yu, C.

    1994-01-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site in Oxford, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Single nuclide and total uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the former Alba Craft Laboratory site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios (Yu et al. 1993). The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation

  11. Assessment of practical and experimental work in physics through OCEA (Oxford Certificate of Educational Achievement)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephy, Richard

    1986-07-01

    For some years there has been a growing recognition of the need for changes in assessment patterns in school science. These changes include a move towards criterion-based assessment linking to objectives and an increased emphasis on the assessment of practical and experimental skills. These changes are, to a significant extent, embodied in the new GCSE assessment schemes and will thus affect all students and teachers of physics from September (1986). At least 20% of the total assessment in GCSE physics examinations must be of practical and experimental skills, and at least half of this must be carried out in the laboratory environment. One development which addresses the needs and problems outlined above is the science component of OCEA, the Oxford Certificate of Educational Achievement. Because this covers a much wider field than assessment of practical and experimental skills in physics, a brief description of the whole project is given.

  12. Violation of a local form of the Lieb-Oxford bound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhena, J. G.; Räsänen, E.; Lehtovaara, L.; Marques, M. A. L.

    2012-05-01

    In the framework of density-functional theory, several popular density functionals for exchange and correlation have been constructed to satisfy a local form of the Lieb-Oxford bound. In its original global expression, the bound represents a rigorous lower limit for the indirect Coulomb interaction energy. Here we employ exact-exchange calculations for the G2 test set to show that the local form of the bound is violated in an extensive range of both the dimensionless gradient and the average electron density. Hence, the results demonstrate the severity in the usage of the local form of the bound in functional development. On the other hand, our results suggest alternative ways to construct accurate density functionals for the exchange energy.

  13. Photographic monitoring of soiling and decay of roadside walls in central Oxford, England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornbush, Mary J.; Viles, Heather A.

    2008-12-01

    As part of the Environmental Monitoring of Integrated Transport Strategies (EMITS) project, which examined the impact of the Oxford Transport Strategy (OTS) on the soiling and decay of buildings and structures in central Oxford, England, a simple photographic survey of a sample of roadside walls was carried out in 1997, with re-surveys in 1999 and 2003. Thirty photographs were taken each time, covering an area of stonework approximately 30 × 30 cm in dimensions at 1-1.3 m above pavement level. The resulting images have been used to investigate, both qualitatively as well as quantitatively, the progression of soiling and decay. Comparison of images by eye reveals a number of minor changes in soiling and decay patterns, but generally indicates stability except at one site where dramatic, superficial damage occurred over 2 years. Quantitative analysis of decay features (concavities resulting from surface blistering, flaking, and scaling), using simple techniques in Adobe Photoshop, shows variable pixel-based size proportions of concavities across 6 years of survey. Colour images (in Lab Color) generally have a reduced proportion of pixels, representing decay features in comparison to black and white (Grayscale) images. The study conveys that colour images provide more information both for general observations of soiling and decay patterns and for segmentation of decay-produced concavities. The study indicates that simple repeat photography can reveal useful information about changing patterns of both soiling and decay, although unavoidable variation in external lighting conditions between re-surveys is a factor limiting the accuracy of change detection.

  14. Polyethylene wear in Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement: a retrieval study of 47 bearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, B J L; Longino, D; Pandit, H; Svard, U; Gill, H S; Dodd, C A F; Murray, D W; Price, A J

    2010-03-01

    The Oxford Unicompartmental Knee replacement (UKR) was introduced as a design to reduce polyethylene wear. There has been one previous retrieval study involving this implant, which reported very low rates of wear in some specimens but abnormal patterns of wear in others. There has been no further investigation of these abnormal patterns. The bearings were retrieved from 47 patients who had received a medial Oxford UKR for anteromedial osteoarthritis of the knee. None had been studied previously. The mean time to revision was 8.4 years (sd 4.1), with 20 having been implanted for over ten years. The macroscopic pattern of polyethylene wear and the linear penetration were recorded for each bearing. The mean rate of linear penetration was 0.07 mm/year. The patterns of wear fell into three categories, each with a different rate of linear penetration; 1) no abnormal macroscopic wear and a normal articular surface, n = 16 (linear penetration rate = 0.01 mm/year); 2) abnormal macroscopic wear and normal articular surfaces with extra-articular impingement, n = 16 (linear penetration rate = 0.05 mm/year); 3) abnormal macroscopic wear and abnormal articular surfaces with intra-articular impingement +/- signs of non-congruous articulation, n = 15 (linear penetration rate = 0.12 mm/year). The differences in linear penetration rate were statistically significant (p < 0.001). These results show that very low rates of polyethylene wear are possible if the device functions normally. However, if the bearing displays suboptimal function (extra-articular, intra-articular impingement or incongruous articulation) the rates of wear increase significantly.

  15. Professor Daniel M Segal and studies of collision and `half-collision' complexes at Imperial College London and Oxford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Keith

    2018-03-01

    We discuss Danny Segal's key roles in the development of the spectroscopy of collision complexes at Imperial College and Oxford. We explain how his work lead to a number of new insights into collision dynamics in external fields.

  16. Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Persian Version of the Oxford Knee Score in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosein Ebrahimzadeh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Oxford Knee Score (OKS is a short patient-reported outcome instrument that measures pain and physical activity related to knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate, construct validity and consistent reliability of the Persian version of the OKS. Methods: The case series consisted of 80 patients who were clinically diagnosed with having knee osteoarthritis. All patients were requested to fill-in the Persian OKS and Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36. Correlation analysis between the Persian versions of these two instruments was then carried out. The scores of the Persian SF-36 were used to evaluate convergent and divergent validity of the 12-item Persian OKS. Results: From a total of 80 patients, 63 were female (79% and the remaining 17 were male (21% with a mean age of 52.2 years. In the present study, high Cronbach’s alpha of 0.95 confirms excellent internal consistency of the Persian OKS scale similar to previous investigations. The results confirm that the Persian version of this instrument is valid and reliable, similar to its English index and its subsequent translations in different languages. Conclusion: The Persian OKS is a reliable instrument to evaluate knee function in patients with knee osteoarthritis and is a useful tool for outcome measurement in clinical research.

  17. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the persian version of the oxford knee score in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hosein; Makhmalbaf, Hadi; Birjandinejad, Ali; Soltani-Moghaddas, Seyed Hosein

    2014-11-01

    The Oxford Knee Score (OKS) is a short patient-reported outcome instrument that measures pain and physical activity related to knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate, construct validity and consistent reliability of the Persian version of the OKS. The case series consisted of 80 patients who were clinically diagnosed with having knee osteoarthritis. All patients were requested to fill-in the Persian OKS and Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). Correlation analysis between the Persian versions of these two instruments was then carried out. The scores of the Persian SF-36 were used to evaluate convergent and divergent validity of the 12-item Persian OKS. From a total of 80 patients, 63 were female (79%) and the remaining 17 were male (21%) with a mean age of 52.2 years. In the present study, high Cronbach's alpha of 0.95 confirms excellent internal consistency of the Persian OKS scale similar to previous investigations. The results confirm that the Persian version of this instrument is valid and reliable, similar to its English index and its subsequent translations in different languages. The Persian OKS is a reliable instrument to evaluate knee function in patients with knee osteoarthritis and is a useful tool for outcome measurement in clinical research.

  18. Validation of the translated Oxford ankle foot questionnaire in 82 Danish children aged between five and 16 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinkevich, P; Møller-Madsen, B; Gottliebsen, M; Kjeldgaard Pedersen, L; Rahbek, O

    2015-03-01

    We present the validation of a translation into Danish of the Oxford ankle foot questionnaire (OxAFQ). We followed the Isis Pros guidelines for translation and pilot-tested the questionnaire on ten children and their parents. Following modifications we tested the validity of the final questionnaire on 82 children (36 boys and 45 girls) with a mean age of 11.7 years (5.5 to 16.0) and their parents. We tested the reliability (repeatability (test-retest), child-parent agreement, internal consistency), feasibility (response rate, time to completion, floor and ceiling effects) and construct validity. The generic child health questionnaire was used for comparison. We found good internal consistency for the physical and the school and play domains, but lower internal consistency for the emotional domain. Overall, good repeatability was found within children and parents as well as agreement between children and parents. The OxAFQ was fast and easy to complete, but we observed a tendency towards ceiling effects in the school and play and emotional domains. To our knowledge this is the first independent validation of the OxAFQ in any language. We found it valid and feasible for use in the clinic to assess the impact on children's lives of foot and/or ankle disorders. It is a valuable research tool. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  19. Comparison of neonatal intensive care: Trento area versus Vermont Oxford Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pederzini Fabio

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S. Chiara hospital is the only neonatal intensive care unit (NICU in the Province of Trento (Italy. It serves a population of about 460000 people with about 5000 infants per year, admitting the totality of the inborn and outborn VLBWI of the province. The aim of this work is to compare mortality, morbidity and neonatal treatment of the very low birth weight infants (VLBWI of Trento area with those recorded in the Vermont Oxford Network (VON during 2004. Methods In this retrospective analysis, the rates of complications and related treatments reported in VLBWI admitted in the S. Chiara NICU during the period 2000–2005 were compared with those recorded in the VON in 2004. The analysis included both the total populations and different weight groups. Results The frequency of inborn infants was significantly higher in Trento than in VON: 91% vs 84% (MH 8.56; p-value 0.003. The administration of prenatal steroids (82% vs 74%; MH 7.47 and p-value 0.006 and caesarean section were significantly more frequent in the Trento area than in VON. In Trento significantly more VLBWI with BW ≤ 1000 grams were given surfactant prophylaxis compared with VON and significantly fewer VLBWI in every Trento weight group developed RDS (MH 18.55; p-value 0.00001. Overall rates of complications (CLD, PDA, NEC, IVH were significantly lower than in the Vermont Oxford Network. In CLD and PDA the differences were marked also in infants weighting less than 1000 grams. Overall rates of PNX, PVL, severe grade of ROP and mortality were similar in the two populations. In Trento, significantly more infants were discharged on human milk than in VON, in both the overall population and in BW sub-groups. Conclusion On the basis of this analysis, a less aggressive therapeutic strategy based on perinatal prevention in global management, such as that employed in Trento area, may be associated with an improvement in clinical outcomes in very low birth weight infants.

  20. Quantitative Assessment of Skin Stiffness in Localized Scleroderma Using Ultrasound Shear-Wave Elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyun; Yan, Feng; Yang, Yujia; Xiang, Xi; Qiu, Li

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasound shear-wave elastography (US-SWE) in characterization of localized scleroderma (LS), as well as in the disease staging. A total of 21 patients with 37 LS lesions were enrolled in this study. The pathologic stage (edema, sclerosis or atrophy) of the lesions was characterized by pathologic examination. The skin elastic modulus (E-values including E mean , E min , E max and E sd ) and thickness (h) was evaluated both in LS lesions and site-matched unaffected skin (normal controls) using US-SWE. The relative difference of E-values (E RD ) was calculated between each pair of lesions and its normal control for comparison among different pathologic stages. Of the 37 LS lesions, 2 were in edema, 22 were in sclerosis and 13 were in atrophy. US-SWE results showed a significant increase of skin elastic modulus and thickness in all lesions (p < 0.001 in sclerosis and p < 0.05 in atrophy) compared with the normal controls. The measured skin elastic modulus and thickness were greater in sclerosis than in atrophy. However, once normalized by skin thickness, the atrophic lesions, which were on average thinner, appeared significantly stiffer than those of the sclerosis (normalized E RD : an increase of 316.3% in atrophy vs. 50.6% in sclerosis compared with the controls, p = 0.007). These findings suggest that US-SWE allows for quantitative evaluation of the skin stiffness of LS lesions in different stages; however, the E-values directly provided by the US-SWE system alone do not distinguish between the stages, and the normalization by skin thickness is necessary. This non-invasive, real-time imaging technique is an ideal tool for assessing and monitoring LS disease severity and progression. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prima la musica: insegnare il melodramma a Oxford negli Anni 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Senici

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available La tavola rotonda ‘L’opera monta in cattedra: didattica del melodramma’, coordinata da Lorenzo Bianconi e Annamaria Cecconi nel novembre 2007 in occasione dell’XI Colloquio di Musicologia del «Saggiatore musicale», includeva un mio breve intervento sull’esperienza didattica maturata in moduli d’argomento operistico nell’Università di Oxford, dove ho insegnato dal 1998 al 2008. L’intento era di fornire dati utili a un esercizio comparativo, il quale permettesse d’osservare le esperienze di docenti sia d’università sia di conservatorii italiani dalla prospettiva d’un sistema universitario molto diverso da ambo le istituzioni e che però, come vedremo, per le sue caratteristiche pare collocarsi a cavallo tra le due. Le pagine che seguono costituiscono un ripensamento sistematico di quelle riflessioni, nella speranza che esse possano tuttora risultare di qualche interesse a chi riflette sulla didattica del melodramma in Italia. Dopo aver delineato in breve il contesto istituzionale, presenterò un questionario proposto a due gruppi di studenti; sui risultati esporrò poi qualche riflessione conclusiva, tenendo presenti i temi proposti dal testo-base della tavola rotonda e la discussione che ebbe luogo a Bologna. Avverto infine che, benché io scriva quasi sempre al presente, ciò che dico si riferisce al periodo del mio insegnamento oxoniense: dal 2008 alcune cose possono essere cambiate.

  2. Mantel--Haenszel analysis of Oxford data. II. Independent effects of fetal irradiation subfactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneale, G.W.; Stewart, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    A Mantel-Haenszel analysis of fetal irradiation subfactors indicated that most of the extra x-rayed cases in the Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancers were radiation induced. First trimester exposures were rare but probably ten times more dangerous than later exposures. Ratios of observed: expected numbers of cancer deaths were lower for children with abnormal x-rays than for other x-rayed children, and lower for recent than remote exposures. The first of these differences was probably due to several antenatal conditions having positive associations with obstetric radiography and several causes of early (noncancer) deaths; the second one was probably due to a progressive lowering of film doses between 1940 and the present time. A rare cause of fetal irradiation (hydramnios), whose associations with congenital defects are well documented, led to the discovery that two faults in the International Classification of Diseases and Causes of Death have contributed to mistaken ideas about the etiology of childhood cancers: Neoplasms were not listed among the official causes of stillbirths, and cystic tumors of the kidneys and lungs of infants were not listed as neoplasms

  3. An Analysis of The Oxford Guide to Practical Lexicography (Atkins and Rundell 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles-Maurice de Schryver

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: Since at least a decade ago, the lexicographic community at large has been demandingthat a modern textbook be designed — one that would place corpora at the centre of the lexicographicenterprise. Written by two of the most respected practising lexicographers, this book hasfinally arrived, and delivers on very many levels. This review article presents a critical analysis ofits features.

    Keywords: LEXICOGRAPHY, LEARNERS' DICTIONARY, MONOLINGUAL, BILINGUAL,CORPUS, FRAME SEMANTICS, ENGLISH, FRENCH, TEXTBOOK

    Samenvatting: Een analyse van The Oxford Guide to Practical Lexicography(Atkins en Rundell 2008. Al minstens tien jaar lang eist de volledige lexicografischegemeenschap dat een modern tekstboek zou worden ontworpen — één dat corpora in het centrumvan de lexicografische belangstelling zou plaatsen. Geschreven door twee van de meest gerespecteerdepraktiserende lexicografen, is dit boek er nu eindelijk, en het ontgoochelt niet. Dit recensieartikelanalyseert de kenmerken ervan kritisch.

    Sleutelwoorden: LEXICOGRAFIE, LEERWOORDENBOEK, VERKLAREND (MONOLINGUAAL,VERTALEND (BILINGUAAL, CORPUS, FRAME SEMANTICS, ENGELS, FRANS,TEKSTBOEK

  4. Radiological characterization survey results for Gaskill Hall, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio (OXO015)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinhans, K.R.; Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    Between October 1952 and February 1957, National Lead of Ohio (NLO), a primary contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), subcontracted certain uranium machining operations to Alba Craft Laboratory, Incorporated, located at 10-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio. In 1992, personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) confirmed the presence of residual radioactive materials from the AEC-related operations in and around the facility in amounts exceeding the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Although the amount of uranium found on the property posed little health hazard if left undisturbed, the levels were sufficient to require remediation to bring radiological conditions into compliance with current guidelines, thus ensuring that the public and the environment are protected. Because it was suspected that uranium may have been used in the past in the immediate vicinity of Alba Craft in a Miami University building a team from ORNL, performed a radiological characterization survey of that structure in January 1994. The survey was conducted at the request of DOE as a precautionary measure to ensure that no radioactive residuals were present at levels exceeding guidelines. The survey included the determination of directly measured radiation levels and the collection of smear samples to detect possible removable alpha and beta-gamma activity levels, and comparison of these data to the guidelines. Results of the survey showed that all measurements were below the applicable guideline limits set by DOE

  5. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Portuguese version of the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rui Soles; Caldeira, Carolina Quintal; Rodrigues, Mónica Vieira; Felícia, Sabine Cardoso; Cavalheiro, Luís Manuel; Ferreira, Pedro Lopes

    2018-03-08

    To translate and culturally adapt the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) to the European Portuguese language, and to test its reliability (internal consistency, reproducibility and measurement error) and validity (construct validity). The OSS Portuguese version was obtained through translations, back-translations, consensus panels, clinical review and cognitive pre-test. Portuguese OSS, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaires, and the visual analogue scales of pain at rest [VAS rest] and during movement [VAS movement] were applied to 111 subjects with shoulder pain (degenerative or inflammatory disorders) and recommended for physical therapy. A clinical and sociodemographic questionnaire was also applied. The reliability was good, with a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.90, an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.92, a standard error of measurement (SEM) of 2.59 points and a smallest detectable change (SDC) of 7.18 points. Construct validity was supported by the confirmation of three initial hypotheses involving expected significant correlation between OSS and other measures (DASH, VAS rest and VAS movement) and between OSS and the number of days of work absenteeism. The Portuguese OSS version presented suitable psychometric properties, in terms of reliability (internal consistency, reproducibility and measurement error) and validity (construct validity).

  6. The Oxford SWIFT Spectrograph: first commissioning and on-sky results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatte, Niranjan; Tecza, Mathias; Clarke, Fraser; Goodsall, Timothy; Fogarty, Lisa; Houghton, Ryan; Salter, Graeme; Scott, Nicholas; Davies, Roger L.; Bouchez, Antonin; Dekany, Richard

    2010-07-01

    The Oxford SWIFT spectrograph, an I & z band (6500-10500 A) integral field spectrograph, is designed to operate as a facility instrument at the 200 inch Hale Telescope on Palomar Mountain, in conjunction with the Palomar laser guide star adaptive optics system PALAO (and its upgrade to PALM3000). SWIFT provides spectra at R(≡λ/▵λ)~4000 of a contiguous two-dimensional field, 44 x 89 spatial pixels (spaxels) in size, at spatial scales of 0.235", 0.16", and 0.08" per spaxel. It employs two 250μm thick, fully depleted, extremely red sensitive 4k X 2k CCD detector arrays (manufactured by LBNL) that provide excellent quantum efficiency out to 1000 nm. We describe the commissioning observations and present the measured values of a number of instrument parameters. We also present some first science results that give a taste of the range of science programs where SWIFT can have a substantial impact.

  7. Determination of baroreflex sensitivity during the modified Oxford maneuver by trigonometric regressive spectral analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gasch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Differences in spontaneous and drug-induced baroreflex sensitivity (BRS have been attributed to its different operating ranges. The current study attempted to compare BRS estimates during cardiovascular steady-state and pharmacologically stimulation using an innovative algorithm for dynamic determination of baroreflex gain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Forty-five volunteers underwent the modified Oxford maneuver in supine and 60° tilted position with blood pressure and heart rate being continuously recorded. Drug-induced BRS-estimates were calculated from data obtained by bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Spontaneous indices were derived from data obtained during rest (stationary and under pharmacological stimulation (non-stationary using the algorithm of trigonometric regressive spectral analysis (TRS. Spontaneous and drug-induced BRS values were significantly correlated and display directionally similar changes under different situations. Using the Bland-Altman method, systematic differences between spontaneous and drug-induced estimates were found and revealed that the discrepancy can be as large as the gain itself. Fixed bias was not evident with ordinary least products regression. The correlation and agreement between the estimates increased significantly when BRS was calculated by TRS in non-stationary mode during the drug injection period. TRS-BRS significantly increased during phenylephrine and decreased under nitroprusside. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The TRS analysis provides a reliable, non-invasive assessment of human BRS not only under static steady state conditions, but also during pharmacological perturbation of the cardiovascular system.

  8. Validity and cross-cultural adaptation of the persian version of the oxford elbow score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Kachooei, Amir Reza; Vahedi, Ehsan; Moradi, Ali; Mashayekhi, Zeinab; Hallaj-Moghaddam, Mohammad; Azami, Mehran; Birjandinejad, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Oxford Elbow Score (OES) is a patient-reported questionnaire used to assess outcomes after elbow surgery. The aim of this study was to validate and adapt the OES into Persian language. After forward-backward translation of the OES into Persian, a total number of 92 patients after elbow surgeries completed the Persian OES along with the Persian DASH and SF-36. To assess test-retest reliability, 31 randomly selected patients (34%) completed the Persian OES again after three days while abstaining from all forms of therapeutic regimens. Reliability of the Persian OES was assessed by measuring intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for test-retest reliability and Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency. Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to test the construct validity. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.92 showing excellent reliability. Cronbach's alpha for function, pain, and social-psychological subscales was 0.95, 0.86, and 0.85, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.85 for the overall questionnaire and 0.90, 0.76, and 0.75 for function, pain, and social-psychological subscales, respectively. Construct validity was confirmed as the Spearman correlation between OES and DASH was 0.80. Persian OES is a valid and reliable patient-reported outcome measure to assess postsurgical elbow status in Persian speaking population.

  9. Gut Microbiota Confers Resistance of Albino Oxford Rats to the Induction of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisavljević, Suzana; Dinić, Miroslav; Jevtić, Bojan; Đedović, Neda; Momčilović, Miljana; Đokić, Jelena; Golić, Nataša; Mostarica Stojković, Marija; Miljković, Đorđe

    2018-01-01

    Albino Oxford (AO) rats are extremely resistant to induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE is an animal model of multiple sclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS), with established autoimmune pathogenesis. The autoimmune response against the antigens of the CNS is initiated in the peripheral lymphoid tissues after immunization of AO rats with CNS antigens. Subsequently, limited infiltration of the CNS occurs, yet without clinical sequels. It has recently become increasingly appreciated that gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) and gut microbiota play an important role in regulation and propagation of encephalitogenic immune response. Therefore, modulation of AO gut microbiota by antibiotics was performed in this study. The treatment altered composition of gut microbiota in AO rats and led to a reduction in the proportion of regulatory T cells in Peyer's patches, mesenteric lymph nodes, and in lymph nodes draining the site of immunization. Upregulation of interferon-γ and interleukin (IL)-17 production was observed in the draining lymph nodes. The treatment led to clinically manifested EAE in AO rats with more numerous infiltrates and higher production of IL-17 observed in the CNS. Importantly, transfer of AO gut microbiota into EAE-prone Dark Agouti rats ameliorated the disease. These results clearly imply that gut microbiota is an important factor in AO rat resistance to EAE and that gut microbiota transfer is an efficacious way to treat CNS autoimmunity. These findings also support the idea that gut microbiota modulation has a potential as a future treatment of multiple sclerosis.

  10. Validation of the Italian version of the Oxford Ankle Foot Questionnaire for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Nicolò; Romeo, Giovanni; Bonifacini, Carlo; Viganò, Marco; Bianchi, Alberto; Malerba, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to translate the Oxford Ankle Foot Questionnaire (OAFQ) into Italian, to perform a cross-cultural adaptation and to evaluate its psychometric properties. The Italian OAFQ was developed according to the recommended forward/backward translation protocol and evaluated in pediatric patients treated for symptomatic flatfoot deformity. Feasibility, reliability, internal consistency, construct validity [comparing OAFQ domains with Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ) domains] and responsiveness to surgical treatment were assessed. A total of 61 children and their parents were enrolled in the study. Results showed satisfactory levels of internal consistency for both children and parent forms. The test-retest reliability was confirmed by high ICC values for both child and parents subscales. Good construct validity was showed by patterns of relationships consistent with theoretically related domains of the CHQ. After surgery, the mean OAFQ scores improved in all the domains after treatment with the subtalar arthroereisis, for both children and parent scales (p valid instrument in order to evaluate interventions used to treat children's foot or ankle problem, but needs further study on different clinical settings.

  11. Results of RNV studies and /sup 201/Tl myocardial scintigraphy in patients with progressive systemic scleroderma (PSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammari, B.; Hotze, A.; Gruenwald, F.; Biersack, H.J.; Biltz, H.; Kuester, W.

    1988-12-01

    Prognosis of progressive systemic scleroderma (PSS) depends directly on the extent of visceral organ involvement, and in particular, on the cardiac, renal and pulmonary appearance. Therapeutic approaches therefore require periodic followup with non-invasive methods to evaluate the actual course of disease and the success of therapy. Tl-201 scintigraphy showed pathologic heart abnormalities in 47% and RNV in 23% of the PSS patients. Our results and published data reveal the sensitivity of both myocardial scans and RNV in the evaluation of patients with PSS. Other current methods for the diagnosis of heart diseases, however, such as echocardiography should also be performed. In patients with PSS coronary angiography, however, usually shows normal coronary vessels.

  12. Quality of life after TIA and stroke: ten-year results of the Oxford Vascular Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Gray, Alastair M; Bull, Linda; Welch, Sarah; Cuthbertson, Fiona; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-10-29

    To evaluate the 5-year impact of stroke and TIA on utility and quality-adjusted survival. TIA and stroke patients from a UK population-based study (Oxford Vascular Study) were recruited from 2002 to 2007, and followed up until 2012. Quality of life was assessed over 5 years using the EQ-5D (EuroQol-5 Dimensions), with responses converted into utilities ranging from -0.59 (worse than death) to 1 (perfect health), using UK population valuations. Utilities for stroke and TIA patients were compared with those in matched controls obtained from the 2006 Health Survey for England. Five-year quality-adjusted life years were estimated by combining utility and survival information. Four hundred forty TIA and 748 stroke patients were ascertained and included. Utility remained constant at approximately 0.78 over the 5 years after TIA. Utility improved from 0.64 one month after stroke to 0.70 at 6 months (p = 0.006), remaining at approximately 0.70 thereafter. Matched controls had considerably higher utility levels than stroke/TIA patients (0.85, p TIA and 2.21 (2.15-2.37) after stroke, varying considerably by severity (minor: 2.94; moderate: 1.65; and severe: 0.70). Quality-adjusted survival is low over the 5 years after stroke and TIA, with severity and recurrent stroke being major predictors. There remains considerable scope for improvements in acute treatment and secondary prevention to improve the quality of life after TIA and stroke.

  13. Clinical Outcomes and Risks of Single-stage Bilateral Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty via Oxford Phase III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis often affects the joint bilaterally, and the single-stage (SS unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA is advantageous in terms of a single anesthesia administration, a short hospital stay, lower medical costs, and enhanced patient convenience. However, the complication risk of SS UKA continues to be debated. The aim of this article was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, complications, and functional recovery of SS and two-stage (TS UKA. Methods: From January 2008 to December 2013, we compared a series of 36 SS UKA with 45 TS UKA for osteoarthritis. The mean age was 65.4 years (range: 55-75 years. The mean body mass index was 25.2 kg/m 2 (range: 22-29 kg/m 2 . The pre- and post-operative Oxford Knee Scores (OKSs, complications, operative times, tourniquet times, the amount of drainage, and hemoglobin (Hb were evaluated. The Chi-square test, Fisher′s exact test, and paired and grouped t-tests were used in this study. Results: The mean follow-up was 50 months. No complications of death, fat embolism, deep vein thrombosis, and prosthetic infection were reported. Patients who underwent SS UKA had a shorter cumulative anesthesia time (113.5 vs. 133.0 min, P 0.05. At the final follow-up, the mean OKS improved from 39.48 ± 5.69 to 18.83 ± 3.82 (P 0.05. Patients who underwent SS UKA had a faster recovery. Conclusions: The single-staged UKA offers the benefits of a single anesthesia administration, reduced total anesthetic time, decreased overall rehabilitation time, and absence of an increase in perioperative mortality or complications compared with the TS bilateral UKA.

  14. Postremediation dose assessment for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamboj, S.; Nimmagadda, M.; Yu, C.

    1996-04-01

    Potential maximum radiation dose rates were calculated for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site in Oxford, Ohio, which was involved in machining of uranium metal in the 1950s for the U.S. atomic energy program. The site is not currently being used. The residual radioactive material guidelines (RESRAD) computer code, which implements the methodology described in the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines, was sued in this evaluation. Three potential land use scenarios were considered for the former Alba Craft site; the scenarios vary with regard to the type of site use, time spent at the site by the exposed individual, and sources of food consumed. Scenario A (a possible land use scenario) assumed industrial use of the site; Scenario B (a likely future land use scenario) assumed residential use of the site; and Scenario C (a possible but unlikely land use scenario) assumed the presence of a resident farmer. For scenario A, it was assumed that any water used for domestic or industrial activities would be from uncontaminated off-site municipal sources. The water used for drinking, household purposes, and irrigation was assumed to be from uncontaminated municipal sources in Scenario B; groundwater drawn from a well located at the downgradient edge of the contaminated zone would be the only source of water for drinking, irrigation, and raising livestock in Scenario C. The results of the evaluation indicated that the DOE dose limit of 100 mrem/yr would not be exceeded for any of the scenarios analyzed. The potential maximum dose rates for Scenarios A, B, and C are 0.64, 2.0, and 11 mrem/yr, respectively

  15. The Oxford Ankle Foot Questionnaire for children: responsiveness and longitudinal validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher; Doll, Helen; Davies, Neville; Wainwright, Andrew; Theologis, Tim; Willett, Keith; Fitzpatrick, Ray

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate how scores from the Oxford Ankle Foot Questionnaire change over time and with treatment using both distribution-based and anchor-based approaches. Eighty children aged 5-16 and their parent or career completed questionnaires at orthopaedic or trauma outpatient clinics. They were asked to complete and return a second set of questionnaires again within 2 weeks (retest), and then mailed a third set of questionnaires to complete again after 2 months (follow-up). The follow-up questionnaires included a global rating of change 'transition' item. Child- and parent-reported mean domain scores (Physical, School & Play, and Emotional) were all stable at retest, whereas positive mean changes were observed at follow-up. As we hypothesised, trauma patients had poorer scores than elective patients at baseline, and showed greater improvement at follow-up. For trauma patients, mean changes in per cent scores were large (scores improved between 40 and 56 for the Physical and School & Play domains, and 17 and 21 for Emotional); all effect sizes (ES) were large (>0.8). For elective patients, the mean improvement in per cent scores were more moderate (Physical: child 10, ES = 0.4, parent 11, ES = 0.5; School & Play child 0, ES = 0, parent 9 ES = 0.4; Emotional: child 6, ES = 0.2; parents 8, ES > 0.3). Minimal detectable change (MDC(90)), an indication of measurement error, ranged from 6 to 8. Half the standard deviation of baseline scores ranged from 11 to 18. Minimal important difference could only be calculated for elective patients (9 child and 13 parent ratings), these ranged from 7 to 17. The findings support the responsiveness and longitudinal validity of the scales. Changes in domain scores of, or exceeding, the MDC(90) (6-8) are likely to be beyond measurement error; further work is required to refine the estimate of change that can be considered important.

  16. Anatomical masking of pressure footprints based on the Oxford Foot Model: validation and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomozzi, Claudia; Stebbins, Julie A

    2017-03-01

    Plantar pressure analysis is widely used in the assessment of foot function. In order to assess regional loading, a mask is applied to the footprint to sub-divide it into regions of interest (ROIs). The most common masking method is based on geometric features of the footprint (GM). Footprint masking based on anatomical landmarks of the foot has been implemented more recently, and involves the integration of a 3D motion capture system, plantar pressure measurement device, and a multi-segment foot model. However, thorough validation of anatomical masking (AM) using pathological footprints has not yet been presented. In the present study, an AM method based on the Oxford Foot Model (OFM) was compared to an equivalent GM. Pressure footprints from 20 young healthy subjects (HG) and 20 patients with clubfoot (CF) were anatomically divided into 5 ROIs using a subset of the OFM markers. The same foot regions were also identified by using a standard GM method. Comparisons of intra-subject coefficient of variation (CV) showed that the OFM-based AM was at least as reliable as the GM for all investigated pressure parameters in all foot regions. Clinical relevance of AM was investigated by comparing footprints from HG and CF groups. Contact time, maximum force, force-time integral and contact area proved to be sensitive parameters that were able to distinguish HG and CF groups, using both AM and GM methods However, the AM method revealed statistically significant differences between groups in 75% of measured variables, compared to 62% using a standard GM method, indicating that the AM method is more sensitive for revealing differences between groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Repeatability of the Oxford Foot Model in children with foot deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCahill, Jennifer; Stebbins, Julie; Koning, Bart; Harlaar, Jaap; Theologis, Tim

    2018-03-01

    The Oxford Foot Model (OFM) is a multi-segment, kinematic model developed to assess foot motion. It has previously been assessed for repeatability in healthy populations. To determine the OFM's reliability for detecting foot deformity, it is important to know repeatability in pathological conditions. The aim of the study was to assess the repeatability of the OFM in children with foot deformity. Intra-tester repeatability was assessed for 45 children (15 typically developing, 15 hemiplegic, 15 clubfoot). Inter-tester repeatability was assessed in the clubfoot population. The mean absolute differences between testers (clubfoot) and sessions (clubfoot and hemiplegic) were calculated for each of 15 clinically relevant, kinematic variables and compared to typically developing children. Children with clubfoot showed a mean difference between visits of 2.9° and a mean difference between raters of 3.6° Mean absolute differences were within one degree for the intra and inter-rater reliability in 12/15 variables. Hindfoot rotation, forefoot/tibia abduction and forefoot supination were the most variable between testers. Overall the clubfoot data were less variable than the typically developing population. Children with hemiplegia demonstrated slightly higher differences between sessions (mean 4.1°), with the most reliable data in the sagittal plane, and largest differences in the transverse plane. The OFM was designed to measure different types of foot deformity. The results of this study show that it provides repeatable results in children with foot deformity. To be distinguished from measurement artifact, changes in foot kinematics as a result of intervention or natural progression over time must be greater than the repeatability reported here. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Sensitivity of the Oxford Foot Model to marker misplacement: A systematic single-case investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Christopher P; Walsh, Henry P J; Gillett, Jarred G

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this paper was to systematically assess the effect of Oxford Foot Model (OFM) marker misplacement on hindfoot relative to tibia, and forefoot relative to hindfoot kinematic calculations during the stance phase of gait. Marker trajectories were recorded with an 8-camera motion analysis system (Vicon Motion Systems Ltd., UK) and ground reaction forces were recorded from three force platforms (AMTI, USA). A custom built marker cluster consisting of 4 markers in a square arrangement (diagonal distance 2 cm) was used to assess the effect of marker misplacement in the superior, inferior, anterior and posterior direction for the sustentaculum tali (STL), the proximal 1st metatarsal (P1M), distal 5th metatarsal (D5M), proximal 5th metatarsal (P5M) and lateral calcaneus (LCA) markers. In addition manual movement of the heel complex 1 cm superiorly, inferiorly, medially and laterally, and also an alignment error of 10° inversion and 10° eversion was assessed. Clinically meaningful effects of marker misplacement were determined using a threshold indicating the minimal clinically important difference. Misplacement of the heel-wand complex had the most pronounced effect on mean kinematic profiles during the stance phase across all degrees-of-freedom with respect to hindfoot-tibia and forefoot-hindfoot angles. Vertical marker misplacement of the D5M and P5M markers affected the sagittal plane, and to a lesser extent frontal plane, forefoot-hindfoot kinematics. In conclusion, the OFM is highly sensitive to misplacement of the heel-wand complex in all directions and the P5M marker in the vertical direction. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of foot kinematics wearing high heels using the Oxford foot model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meizi; Gu, Yaodong; Baker, Julien Steven

    2018-04-29

    Wearing high heels is thought to lead to various foot disorders and injuries such as metatarsal pain, Achilles tendon tension, plantar fasciitis and Haglund malformation. However, there is little available information explaining the specific mechanisms and reasons why wearing high heels causes foot deformity. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the foot kinematics of high heel wearers and compare any differences with barefoot individuals using the Oxford Foot Model (OFM). Fifteen healthy women aged 20-25 years were measured while walking barefoot and when wearing high heels. The peak value of angular motion for the hallux with respect to the forefoot, the forefoot with respect to the hind foot, and the hind foot with respect to the tibia were all analyzed. Compared to the barefoot, participants wearing high heels demonstrated larger hallux dorsiflexion (22.55∘± 1.62∘ VS 26.6∘± 2.33∘ for the barefoot; P= 0.001), and less hallux plantarflexion during the initial stance phase (-4.86∘± 2.32∘ VS -8.68∘± 1.13∘; Pfoot demonstrated a larger dorsiflexion in the horizontal plane (16.59∘± 1.69∘ VS 12.08∘± 0.9∘; Pfoot extension rotation (-5.49∘± 0.69∘ VS -10.73∘± 0.42∘; P= 0.001). These findings complement existing kinematic evidence that wearing high heels can lead to foot deformities and injuries.

  20. Simple shoulder test and Oxford Shoulder Score: Persian translation and cross-cultural validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghdi, Soofia; Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Rustaie, Nilufar; Akbari, Mohammad; Ebadi, Safoora; Senobari, Maryam; Hasson, Scott

    2015-12-01

    To translate, culturally adapt, and validate the simple shoulder test (SST) and Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) into Persian language using a cross-sectional and prospective cohort design. A standard forward and backward translation was followed to culturally adapt the SST and the OSS into Persian language. Psychometric properties of floor and ceiling effects, construct convergent validity, discriminant validity, internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability, standard error of the measurement (SEM), smallest detectable change (SDC), and factor structure were determined. One hundred patients with shoulder disorders and 50 healthy subjects participated in the study. The PSST and the POSS showed no missing responses. No floor or ceiling effects were observed. Both the PSST and POSS detected differences between patients and healthy subjects supporting their discriminant validity. Construct convergent validity was confirmed by a very good correlation between the PSST and POSS (r = 0.68). There was high internal consistency for both the PSST (α = 0.73) and the POSS (α = 0.91 and 0.92). Test-retest reliability with 1-week interval was excellent (ICCagreement = 0.94 for PSST and 0.90 for POSS). Factor analyses demonstrated a three-factor solution for the PSST (49.7 % of variance) and a two-factor solution for the POSS (61.6 % of variance). The SEM/SDC was satisfactory for PSST (5.5/15.3) and POSS (6.8/18.8). The PSST and POSS are valid and reliable outcome measures for assessing functional limitations in Persian-speaking patients with shoulder disorders.

  1. Reduction of regulatory T cells in skin lesions but not in peripheral blood of patients with systemic scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, S; Kretz, C C; Ruland, V; Stumpf, C; Haust, M; Hartschuh, W; Hartmann, M; Enk, A; Suri-Payer, E; Oberle, N; Krammer, P H; Kuhn, A

    2011-08-01

    To determine the frequency and suppressive capacity of regulatory T cells (T(reg)) and their association with clinical parameters in patients with systemic scleroderma (SSc). Peripheral blood from 25 patients with SSc, 15 patients with localised scleroderma (LS) and 29 healthy controls (HC) was studied. Analysis of CD4(+) forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)(+) and CD4(+)CD25(++)Foxp3(+) T(reg) subpopulations was carried out by flow cytometry and cell proliferation was quantified by (3)H-thymidine incorporation. Quantitative analysis of T(reg) was further performed in skin biopsies from 17 patients with SSc and 21 patients with LS using anti-CD4 and anti-Foxp3 monoclonal antibodies for immunohistochemistry. The frequency of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) and CD4(+)CD25(++)Foxp3(+) T(reg) in peripheral blood from patients with SSc was not significantly different from that of patients with LS or HC. The suppressive capacity of CD4(+)CD25(++) T(reg) in SSc was also found to be similar to that of HC. Phenotypic and functional data revealed no significant difference between the limited or diffuse form of SSc. Moreover, therapy with bosentan showed no significant effect on the frequency of T(reg) during the course of the disease. However, the frequency of T(reg) in skin lesions from patients with SSc or LS, determined as the percentage of CD4(+) cells expressing Foxp3 in the inflammatory infiltrate, was significantly reduced compared with other inflammatory skin diseases. These results indicate that although the authors found no defect in the frequency or function of peripheral T(reg) subpopulations, the reduction of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T(reg) in the skin of patients with SSc may be important in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  2. The Words First Attested in Shakespeare and Their Later Obsolescence : A Study Based on the Oxford English Dictionary

    OpenAIRE

    鉄村, 明美

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to classify the words that first attested in Shakespeare’s works and to investigate the characteristics of ‘obsolete’ words in the texts with reference to the Oxford English Dictionary. The words first attested in Shakespeare’s works were selected using the Oxford English Dictionary Online. Next, these words were divided into two groups: ‘obsolete lexical items’ and ‘current lexical items’. The results for each of Shakespeare’s works and for sources of neologisms(der...

  3. First results of functional RES scintigraphy using sup(99m)-Tc-labeled human serum albumin millimicrospheres in progressive scleroderma: Possibility of early diagnosis of lung involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munz, D.L.; Altmeyer, P.; Ehrenheim, C.; Tuengerthal, S.; Holzmann, H.; Hoer, G.; Frankfurt Univ.

    1984-01-01

    Functional RES scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-labeled human serum albumin millimicrospheres (sup(99m)Tc-HSA-MM) was conducted in 11 female patients suffering from progressive scleroderma. The RES scan revealed abnormalities in the bone marrow in eight patients as well as pathological changes of the liver in 2 cases. 7 patients showed diffusely enhanced concentrations of sup(99m)Tc-HSA-MM in the lung, whereas X-ray picture and pulmonary function test revealed pathological findings in only 4 patients, respectively. Humoral inflammatory and immunologic parameters, too, indicated abnormalities less frequently than the lung scan. Thus functional RES scintigraphy seems to be a very sensitive approach to the assessment and possibly to the early diagnosis of lung involvement in progressive scleroderma. (orig.) [de

  4. First results of functional RES scintigraphy using sup(99m)-Tc-labeled human serum albumin millimicrospheres in progressive scleroderma: Possibility of early diagnosis of lung involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munz, D.L.; Altmeyer, P.; Ehrenheim, C.; Tuengerthal, S.; Holzmann, H.; Hoer, G.

    1984-01-01

    Functional RES scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-labeled human serum albumin millimicrospheres (sup(99m)Tc-HSA-MM) was conducted in 11 female patients suffering from progressive scleroderma. The RES scan revealed abnormalities in the bone marrow in eight patients as well as pathological changes of the liver in 2 cases. 7 patients showed diffusely enhanced concentrations of sup(99m)Tc-HSA-MM in the lung, whereas X-ray picture and pulmonary function test revealed pathological findings in only 4 patients, respectively. Humoral inflammatory and immunologic parameters, too, indicated abnormalities less frequently than the lung scan. Thus functional RES scintigraphy seems to be a very sensitive approach to the assessment and possibly to the early diagnosis of lung involvement in progressive scleroderma.

  5. Cyclophosphamide-refractory scleroderma-associated interstitial lung disease: remarkable clinical and radiological response to a single course of rituximab combined with high-dose corticosteroids.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2011-10-01

    We would like to report our experience of using rituximab in cyclophosphamide refractory, rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) in a patient with limited scleroderma. A 40-year-old man presented with 10-week history of inflammatory polyarthritis, which responded to a short course of oral corticosteroids. However, 3 weeks later, he developed new onset of exertional dyspnoea. High-resolution CT of the thorax was suggestive of early ILD. Surgical lung biopsy showed features of fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia. He was diagnosed with scleroderma on the basis of: presence of anticentromere antibodies, Raynaud\\'s phenomenon, pulmonary fibrosis, digital oedema and hypomotility along with a dilated oesophagus. He was treated aggressively with pulse doses of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide; however, his ILD continued to deteriorate. At this stage, he received rituximab (two pulses of 1 g each), which led to a gradual clinical improvement. Now, 12 months since his rituximab infusion, he walks 2 miles daily without any exertional dyspnoea.

  6. A rare association of localized scleroderma type morphea, vitiligo, autoimmune hypothyroidism, pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonilla Abadía, Fabio; Muñoz Buitrón, Evelyn; Ochoa, Carlos D.; Carrascal, Edwin; Cañas Dávila, Carlos Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The localized scleroderma (LS) known as morphea, presents a variety of clinical manifestations that can include systemic involvement. Current classification schemes divide morphea into categories based solely on cutaneous morphology, without reference to systemic disease or autoimmune phenomena. This classification is likely incomplete. Autoimmune phenomena such as vitiligo and Hashimoto thyroiditis associated with LS have been reported in some cases suggesting an autoimmune basis. To our kno...

  7. Proceedings of Patient Reported Outcome Measure’s (PROMs) Conference Oxford 2017: Advances in Patient Reported Outcomes Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velikova, Galina; Valderas, Jose M.; Potter, Caroline; Batchelder, Laurie; A’Court, Christine; Baker, Matthew; Bostock, Jennifer; Coulter, Angela; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Forder, Julien; Fox, Diane; Geneen, Louise; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Jenkinson, Crispin; Jones, Karen; Kelly, Laura; Peters, Michele; Mulhern, Brendan; Labeit, Alexander; Rowen, Donna; Meadows, Keith; Elliott, Jackie; Brazier, John E.; Knowles, Emma; Keetharuth, Anju; Brazier, John E.; Connell, Janice; Carlton, Jill; Buck, Lizzie Taylor; Ricketts, Thomas; Barkham, Michael; Goswami, Pushpendra; Salek, Sam; Ionova, Tatyana; Oliva, Esther; Fielding, Adele K.; Karakantza, Marina; Al-Ismail, Saad; Collins, Graham P.; McConnell, Stewart; Langton, Catherine; Jennings, Daniel M.; Else, Roger; Kell, Jonathan; Ward, Helen; Day, Sophie; Lumley, Elizabeth; Phillips, Patrick; Duncan, Rosie; Buckley-Woods, Helen; Aber, Ahmed; Jones, Gerogina; Michaels, Jonathan; Porter, Ian; Gangannagaripalli, Jaheeda; Davey, Antoinette; Ricci-Cabello, Ignacio; Haywood, Kirstie; Hansen, Stine Thestrup; Valderas, Jose; Roberts, Deb; Gumber, Anil; Podmore, Bélène; Hutchings, Andrew; van der Meulen, Jan; Aggarwal, Ajay; Konan, Sujith; Price, Andrew; Jackson, William; Bottomley, Nick; Philiips, Michael; Knightley-Day, Toby; Beard, David; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Greenhalgh, Joanne; Gooding, Kate; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Valderas, Chema; Wright, Judy; Dalkin, Sonia; Meads, David; Black, Nick; Fawkes, Carol; Froud, Robert; Carnes, Dawn; Price, Andrew; Cook, Jonathan; Dakin, Helen; Smith, James; Kang, Sujin; Beard, David; Griffiths, Catrin; Guest, Ella; Harcourt, Diana; Murphy, Mairead; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Salisbury, Chris; Carlton, Jill; Elliott, Jackie; Rowen, Donna; Gao, Anqi; Price, Andrew; Beard, David; Lemanska, Agnieszka; Chen, Tao; Dearnaley, David P.; Jena, Rajesh; Sydes, Matthew; Faithfull, Sara; Ades, A. E.; Kounali, Daphne; Lu, Guobing; Rombach, Ines; Gray, Alastair; Jenkinson, Crispin; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Holch, Patricia; Holmes, Marie; Rodgers, Zoe; Dickinson, Sarah; Clayton, Beverly; Davidson, Susan; Routledge, Jacqui; Glennon, Julia; Henry, Ann M.; Franks, Kevin; Velikova, Galina; Maguire, Roma; McCann, Lisa; Young, Teresa; Armes, Jo; Harris, Jenny; Miaskowski, Christine; Kotronoulas, Grigorios; Miller, Morven; Ream, Emma; Patiraki, Elizabeth; Geiger, Alexander; Berg, Geir V.; Flowerday, Adrian; Donnan, Peter; McCrone, Paul; Apostolidis, Kathi; Fox, Patricia; Furlong, Eileen; Kearney, Nora; Gibbons, Chris; Fischer, Felix; Gibbons, Chris; Coste, Joel; Martinez, Jose Valderas; Rose, Matthias; Leplege, Alain; Shingler, Sarah; Aldhouse, Natalie; Al-Zubeidi, Tamara; Trigg, Andrew; Kitchen, Helen; Davey, Antoinette; Porter, Ian; Green, Colin; Valderas, Jose M.; Coast, Joanna; Smith, Sarah; Hendriks, Jolijn; Black, Nick; Shah, Koonal; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Ramos-Goni, Juan-Manuel; Kreimeier, Simone; Herdman, Mike; Devlin, Nancy; Finch, Aureliano Paolo; Brazier, John E.; Mukuria, Clara; Zamora, Bernarda; Parkin, David; Feng, Yan; Bateman, Andrew; Herdman, Mike; Devlin, Nancy; Patton, Thomas; Gutacker, Nils; Shah, Koonal

    2017-01-01

    The proceedings contain 36 papers. The topics discussed include: using patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) in cancer care; validation of the long-term conditions questionnaire (LTCQ) in a diverse sample of health and social care users in England; the national institutes of health

  8. Rasch analysis of the Dutch version of the Oxford elbow score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Haan J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Jeroen de Haan1, Niels Schep2, Wim Tuinebreijer2, Peter Patka2, Dennis den Hartog21Department of Surgery and Traumatology, Westfriesgasthuis, Hoorn, the Netherlands; 2Department of Surgery and Traumatology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, the NetherlandsBackground: The Oxford elbow score (OES is a patient-rated, 12-item questionnaire that measures quality of life in relation to elbow disorders. This English questionnaire has been proven to be a reliable and valid instrument. Recently, the OES has been translated into Dutch and examined for its reliability, validity, and responsiveness in a group of Dutch patients with elbow pathology. The aim of this study was to analyze the Dutch version of the OES (OES-DV in combination with Rasch analysis or the one-parameter item response theory to examine the structure of the questionnaire.Methods: The OES-DV was administered to 103 patients (68 female, 35 male. The mean age of the patients was 44.3 ± 14.7 (range 15–75 years. Rasch analysis was performed using the Winsteps® Rasch Measurement Version 3.70.1.1 and a rating scale parameterization.Results: The person separation index, which is a measure of person reliability, was excellent (2.30. All the items of the OES had a reasonable mean square infit or outfit value between 0.6 and 1.7. The threshold of items were ordered, so the categories can function as intended. Principal component analysis of the residuals partly confirmed the multidimensionality of the English version of the OES. The OES distinguished 3.4 strata, which indicates that about three ranges can be differentiated.Conclusion: Rasch analysis of the OES-DV showed that the data fit to the stringent Rasch model. The multidimensionality of the English version of the OES was partly confirmed, and the four items of the function and three items of the pain domain were recognized as separate domains. The category rating scale of the OES-DV works well. The OES can

  9. The reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Dutch version of the Oxford elbow score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patka Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Oxford elbow score (OES is an English questionnaire that measures the patients' subjective experience of elbow surgery. The OES comprises three domains: elbow function, pain, and social-psychological effects. This questionnaire can be completed by the patient and used as an outcome measure after elbow surgery. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the Dutch version of the translated OES for reliability, validity and responsiveness with respect to patients after elbow trauma and surgery. Methods The 12 items of the English-language OES were translated into Dutch and then back-translated; the back-translated questionnaire was then compared to the original English version. The OES Dutch version was completed by 69 patients (group A, 60 of whom had an elbow luxation, four an elbow fracture and five an epicondylitis. QuickDASH, the visual analogue pain scale (VAS and the Mayo Elbow Performance Index (MEPI were also completed to examine the convergent validity of the OES in group A. To calculate the test-retest reliability and responsiveness of the OES, this questionnaire was completed three times by 43 different patients (group B. An average of 52 days elapsed between therapy and the administration of the third OES (SD = 24.1. Results The Cronbach's α coefficients for the function, pain and social-psychological domains were 0.90, 0.87 and 0.90, respectively. The intra-class correlation coefficients for the domains were 0.87 for function, 0.89 for pain and 0.87 for social-psychological. The standardised response means for the domains were 0.69, 0.46 and 0.60, respectively, and the minimal detectable changes were 27.6, 21.7 and 24.0, respectively. The convergent validity for the function, pain and social-psychological domains, which were measured as the Spearman's correlation of the OES domains with the MEPI, were 0.68, 0.77 and 0.77, respectively. The Spearman's correlations of the OES domains with QuickDASH were

  10. Research Paper ISSN 0189-6016©2008

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adewunmi

    for Scientific Research into Plant Medicine (CSRPM), Ghana, was assessed for its ... The study design was based on an open, prospective, non-comparative clinical trial in .... Medicine, 4th Edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford pp 572, 644.

  11. 19th Biennial International Nineteenth-Century Music Conference, Faculty of Music, University of Oxford, 11.-13. 7. 2016

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Myslivcová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 53, 2-3 (2016), s. 300-301 ISSN 0018-7003. [19th Biennial International Nineteenth-Century Music Conference. Oxford, 11.07.2016-13.07.2016] Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : music ological conference * nineteenth-century music * Antonin Dvorak * opera Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  12. The Psychometric Analysis of the Persian Version of the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning of Rebecca L. Oxford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Seyed Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The current study aims to analyze the psychometric qualities of the Persian adapted version of Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) developed by Rebecca L. Oxford (1990). Three instruments were used: Persian adapted version of SILL, a Background Questionnaire, and Test of English as a Foreign Language. Two hundred and thirteen Iranian…

  13. Translation and validation of the Dutch version of the Oxford 12-item knee questionnaire for knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkamp, Daniël; Breugem, Stefan J. M.; Sierevelt, Inger N.; Blankevoort, Leendert; van Dijk, C. Nick

    2005-01-01

    Background In 1998, the Oxford 12-item knee questionnaire was developed by Dawson et al. as a self-administered disease- and site-specific questionnaire, specifically developed for knee arthroplasty patients. Since then, it has proven to be an effective outcome questionnaire, and is widely used.

  14. Comparison between the Harris- and Oxford Hip Score to evaluate outcomes one-year after total hip arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, Hanneke; Lindeboom, Robert; Kuipers, Sander E.; Vervest, Ton M. J. S.

    2017-01-01

    Harris Hip Score (HHS) is a surgeon administered measurement for assessing hip function before and after total hip arthroplasties (THA). Patient reported outcome measurements (PROMs) such as the Oxford Hip Score (OHS) are increasingly used. HHS was compaired to the OHS assessing whether the HHS can

  15. The variability in Oxford hip and knee scores in the preoperative period: is there an ideal time to score?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, C; Holmes, D; Khan, T; Cockshott, S; Lewis, J; Stephen, A

    2018-01-01

    Background All NHS-funded providers are required to collect and report patient-reported outcome measures for hip and knee arthroplasty. Although there are established guidelines for timing such measures following arthroplasty, there are no specific time-points for collection in the preoperative period. The primary aim of this study was to identify whether there was a significant amount of variability in the Oxford hip and knee scores prior to surgical intervention when completed in the outpatient clinic at the time of listing for arthroplasty or when completed at the preoperative assessment clinic. Methods A prospective cohort study of patients listed for primary hip or knee arthroplasty was conducted. Patients were asked to fill in a preoperative Oxford score in the outpatient clinic at the time of listing. They were then invited to fill in the official outcome measures questionnaire at the preoperative assessment clinic. The postoperative Oxford score was then completed when the patient was seen again at their postoperative follow up in clinic. Results Of the total of 109 patients included in this study period, there were 18 (17%) who had a worse score of 4 or more points difference and 43 (39.4%) who had an improvement of 4 or more points difference when the scores were compared between time of listing at the outpatient and at the preoperative assessment clinic. There was a statistically significant difference (P = 0.0054) in the mean Oxford scores. Conclusions The results of our study suggest that there should be standardisation of timing for completing the preoperative patient-reported outcome measures.

  16. Happiness as stable extraversion : internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire among undergraduate students\\ud \\ud

    OpenAIRE

    Robbins, Mandy; Francis, Leslie J.; Edwards, Bethan

    2010-01-01

    The Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (OHQ) was developed by Hills and Argyle (2002) to provide a more accessible equivalent measure of the Oxford Happiness Inventory (OHI). The aim of the present study was to examine the internal consistency reliability, and construct validity of this new instrument alongside the Eysenckian dimensional model of personality. The Oxford Happiness Questionnaire was completed by a sample of 131 undergraduate students together with the abbreviated form of the Revise...

  17. THE ANALYSIS OF SONG-TEXT COLLECTION BELONGS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY: Bodleian Library of Oxford University With The Number of 127 and 128

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Nuri Parmaksiz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The song-text collections have great significance in consequence of their tasks in Turkish Music. The music performers have received support from song-text collections in remembering the modes, rhythms, the composers and especially the lyrics consisting short or long poems related to the each of the songs which they intend to keep in their minds.Today, those collections demonstrate the researchers employing modes, composers, forms and rhythms the musical works recorded in their contents and the transformation which Turkish Music has experienced throughout centuries.In this study, a song-text collection of the 16th century recorded in the Bodleian Library of Oxford University with the number of 127 and 128 was analyzed. The finding which obtain from song-text collection which analyzed with systematic musicology and historical methodology is expected to contribute importantly. Keywords: XVI. century, Turkish Music, song-text collection, Bodleian Library

  18. The Career Trajectories of English Language Teachers. Oxford Studies in Comparative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Penny, Ed.; Craig, Cheryl, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    This volume identifies, illustrates, compares, contrasts and provides informed reflective commentary on the diverse career trajectories of English language teachers, teacher educators and researchers. Increased migration and globalisation pressures have led to dramatic changes in English language teaching over the last few decades. The resulting…

  19. Signature Pedagogy/Powerful Pedagogy: The Oxford Tutorial System in the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Lee Shulman's concept of signature pedagogies in the professions has captured the imagination of many researchers and educators. In higher education, the concept has been extended to teaching in particular disciplines, and it is here argued that the concept of signature pedagogy can be usefully extended to an influential teaching system in the…

  20. Biotechnology Conference: Protein Engineering Held in Oxford, United Kingdom on 5-8 April 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-27

    engineered by protein engineering was reported by J. new variants which are now being checked. Brange (Novo Research Institute, Bags- Studies of a cassette...to Brange . Therefore, multidomain protein consisting of five Brange and his group applied protein en- putative domains: the fribonectin finger

  1. Down-regulation of microRNA-196a in the sera and involved skin of localized scleroderma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Takamitsu; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Etoh, Mitsuhiko; Yamane, Keitaro; Kajihara, Ikko; Makino, Katsunari; Ichihara, Asako; Igata, Toshikatsu; Sakai, Keisuke; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Localized scleroderma (LSc) exhibits fibrosis of the skin and subcutaneous tissue. LSc shows an excessive deposition of type 1 collagen. To elucidate the mechanism of type 1 collagen overexpression in LSc, we investigated the epigenetics, focusing on microRNA (miRNA). miRNA expression profile was determined by PCR array analysis. The expression of microRNA-196a (miR-196a) in the skin tissue was examined by in situ hybridization or real-time PCR. The serum levels of miR-196a were measured by real-time PCR. PCR array analysis demonstrated that the miR-196a level was markedly decreased in LSc skin tissue in vivo. The transfection of specific inhibitor for miR-196a into normal cultured human dermal fibroblasts led to the up-regulation of type 1 collagen protein in vitro. Furthermore, the serum levels of miR-196a were significantly decreased in LSc patients. Down-regulation of miR-196a and subsequent overexpression of type 1 collagen in dermal fibroblasts may play a key role in the pathogenesis of LSc. The serum levels of miR-196a may be useful as a diagnostic marker of LSc.

  2. The wonder of their voices: The 1946 Holocaust interviews of David Boder (New York: Oxford, 2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Alan C

    2012-05-01

    Writing a study of psychologist David Boder's 1946 displaced persons (DP) interview project gave me a chance to further document the substantial early response to the Holocaust. This was clearly one important piece of my study, and one that was eminently straightforward. Yet much of the research on Boder's project at the point in time that I carried it out was elliptical, partly because the primary interview materials were coming to light at an astonishing pace, partly because the archive collections were virtually untapped, and partly because of the misconception of Boder and his interview project itself.

  3. Freqüência de alterações hepáticas em pacientes com esclerodermia Frequency of hepatic abnormalities in patients with scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariene Paixão

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a freqüência das doenças hepáticas em pacientes com esclerodermia e, secundariamente, estudar a freqüência de infecção pelos vírus B e C da hepatite nesses pacientes, assim como a freqüência de auto-anticorpos séricos. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: estudaram-se pacientes com diagnóstico de esclerodermia, localizada ou sistêmica, acompanhados no Ambulatório de Reumatologia do Hospital Santa Izabel. Como grupo de comparação, foram estudados pacientes com diagnóstico de acne vulgar. RESULTADOS: dos 65 pacientes com diagnóstico de esclerodermia incluídos nesse trabalho, 35% apresentaram a gama-glutamiltransferase (gama-GT alterada, 30% tiveram a fosfatase alcalina aumentada e 17,1%, a alaninoaminotransferase (ALT acima dos valores de referência. A ALT apresentou-se mais alterada nos pacientes do que nos controles. Apenas um indivíduo dos 41 testados apresentou positividade para o anticorpo antimitocôndria enquanto 19% tinham anticorpo antimúsculo liso, não se observando diferença estatística na positividade desses anticorpos entre os dois grupos. Um paciente apresentou o HBsAg positivo e outro foi positivo para o anticorpo anti-HCV. Nenhum paciente apresentou manifestações clínicas de doença hepática. CONCLUSÕES: no presente estudo, embora as alterações de enzimas hepáticas em pacientes com esclerodermia não tenham sido incomuns, não se observou nenhum caso com manifestações clínicas de doença hepática.INTRODUCTION: to determine the frequency of hepatic disease in patients with scleroderma and, secondarily, to investigate the frequency of hepatitis B and C virus infection and determine the frequency of autoantibodies in this disease. MATERIAL AND METHODS: patients with scleroderma followed at Hospital Santa Izabel were included in the study and patients with acne vulgaris served as a comparison group. RESULTS: considering the 65 scleroderma patients, 35% had elevated gamma

  4. Localized scleroderma: assessment of the therapeutic response to phototherapy Esclerodermia cutânea: avaliação da resposta terapêutica à fototerapia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Buense

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scleroderma is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by progressive connective tissue sclerosis and microcirculatory changes. Localized scleroderma is considered a limited disease. However, in some cases atrophic and deforming lesions may be observed that hinder the normal development. Literature reports indicate phototherapy as a therapeutic modality with favorable response in cutaneous forms of scleroderma. OBJECTIVES: This study had the purpose of assessing the phototherapy treatment for localized scleroderma. METHODS: Patients with localized scleroderma were selected for phototherapy treatment. They were classified according to the type of localized scleroderma and evolutive stage of the lesions. Clinical examination and skin ultrasound were used to demonstrate the results thus obtained. RESULTS: Some clinical improvement was observed after an average of 10 phototherapeutic sessions. All skin lesions were softer at clinical palpation with scores reduction upon pre and post treatment comparison. The ultrasound showed that most of the assessed lesions presented a decrease in dermal thickness, and only five maintained their previous measure. Treatment response was similar regardless of the type of phototherapeutic treatment employed. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed treatment was effective for all lesions, regardless of the phototherapeutic modality employed. The improvement was observed in all treated skin lesions and confirmed by clinical evaluation and skin ultrasound.FUNDAMENTOS: A esclerodermia é uma doença autoimune caracterizada pela esclerose progressiva do tecido conjuntivo e alterações da microcirculação. A forma cutânea é considerada uma doença autolimitada. No entanto, em alguns casos, ocorrem lesões atróficas, deformantes, que dificultam o desenvolvimento normal. Relatos da literatura apontam a fototerapia como uma modalidade terapêutica com resposta favorável nas formas cutâneas da esclerodermia. OBJETIVOS

  5. Localized morphea. A rare but significant secondary complication following breast cancer radiotherapy. Case report and review of the literature on radiation reaction among patients with scleroderma/morphea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, Thomas; Csere, Peter; Guenther, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    Purpose and approach: to report a case of morphea (localized scleroderma) in a patient following breast cancer therapy and to summarize the current literature. Results and conclusion: the occurrence of morphea is an unexpected late effect (approximately 1 year after the end of radiation therapy) which occurs frequently in the irradiated breast in women with breast-conserving therapy. The pathogenesis is unclear. The main differential diagnoses are recurrence of carcinoma and a radiogenic subcutaneous fibrosis (in most cases, the final diagnosis can only be made by means of a biopsy). Diagnosis and therapy must be performed in cooperation between dermatologist and radiooncologist. (orig.)

  6. Localized morphea. A rare but significant secondary complication following breast cancer radiotherapy. Case report and review of the literature on radiation reaction among patients with scleroderma/morphea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Thomas; Csere, Peter [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Guenther, Claudia [Dept. of Dermatology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    Purpose and approach: to report a case of morphea (localized scleroderma) in a patient following breast cancer therapy and to summarize the current literature. Results and conclusion: the occurrence of morphea is an unexpected late effect (approximately 1 year after the end of radiation therapy) which occurs frequently in the irradiated breast in women with breast-conserving therapy. The pathogenesis is unclear. The main differential diagnoses are recurrence of carcinoma and a radiogenic subcutaneous fibrosis (in most cases, the final diagnosis can only be made by means of a biopsy). Diagnosis and therapy must be performed in cooperation between dermatologist and radiooncologist. (orig.)

  7. [CLINICAL APPLICATION OF OXFORD MOBILE-BEARING BIPOLAR PROSTHESIS UNICOMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY FOR SINGLE COMPARTMENTAL KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangzeng; Cheng, Shao; Wang, Yisheng

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) in the treatment of single compartmental knee osteoarthritis. Between June 2011 and July 2013, 22 cases of single compartmental knee osteoarthritis were treated by Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis UKA. Of 22 cases, 8 were male and 14 were female with an average age of 65 years (range, 45-80 years); the left knee was involved in 12 cases, and the right knee in 10 cases, with a mean disease duration of 32.5 months (range, 8-90 months). The mean weight was 55.2 kg (range, 50-65 kg), and the mean body mass index was 20.8 kg/m2 (range, 17-25 kg/m2). Osteoarthritis involved in the single knee medial compartment in all patients. Knee society score (KSS) and range of motion (ROM) were measured to evaluate the knee joint function. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients, and there was no complication of infection, bedsore, or deep venous thrombosis. Postoperative follow-up was 2-4 years (mean, 3.2 years). The X-ray films showed good position of prosthesis, no prosthesis dislocation, or periprosthetic infection during follow-up. Knee ROM, KSS function score, and KSS clinical score were significantly improved at 1 week after operation and at last follow-up when compared with preoperative ones (P 0.05). Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis UKA is an effective method to treat single compartmental knee osteoarthritis, with the advantages of less trauma, earlier rehabilitation exercise, near physiological state in joint function, and less risk of complications.

  8. 15x optical zoom and extreme optical image stabilisation: diffraction limited integral field spectroscopy with the Oxford SWIFT spectrograph

    OpenAIRE

    Tecza, Matthias; Thatte, Niranjan; Clarke, Fraser; Lynn, James; Freeman, David; Roberts, Jennifer; Dekany, Richard

    2012-01-01

    When commissioned in November 2008 at the Palomar 200 inch Hale Telescope, the Oxford SWIFT I and z band integral field spectrograph, fed by the adaptive optics system PALAO, provided a wide (3×) range of spatial resolutions: three plate scales of 235 mas, 160 mas, and 80 mas per spaxel over a contiguous field-of-view of 89×44 pixels. Depending on observing conditions and guide star brightness we can choose a seeing limited scale of 235 mas per spaxel, or 160 mas and 80 mas per spaxel for ver...

  9. New reductions of the Astrographic Catalogue. Plate adjustments of the Algiers, Oxford I and II, and Vatican Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, S. E.; Martin, J. C.; Jackson, E. S.; Corbin, T. E.

    1996-07-01

    The U. S. Naval Observatory is in the process of making new reductions of the Astrographic Catalogue using a modern reference catalog, the ACRS, and new data analysis and reduction software. Currently ten AC zones have been reduced. This papers discusses the reduction models and results from the Algiers, Oxford I and II, and Vatican zones (those of the Cape zone are discussed elsewhere). The resulting star positions will be combined with those of the U.S. Naval Observatory's Twin Astrograph Catalog to produce a catalog of positions and proper motions in support of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  10. Oxford Shoulder Score: A Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Validation Study of the Persian Version in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Birjandinejad, Ali; Razi, Shiva; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Reza Kachooei, Amir

    2015-09-01

    Oxford shoulder score is a specific 12-item patient-reported tool for evaluation of patients with inflammatory and degenerative disorders of the shoulder. Since its introduction, it has been translated and culturally adapted in some Western and Eastern countries. The aim of this study was to translate the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) in Persian and to test its validity and reliability in Persian speaking population in Iran. One hundred patients with degenerative or inflammatory shoulder problem participated in the survey in 2012. All patients completed the Persian version of OSS, Persian DASH and the SF-36 for testing validity. Randomly, 37 patients filled out the Persian OSS again three days after the initial visit to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.93. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93. In terms of validity, there was a significant correlation between the Persian OSS and DASH and SF-36 scores (P Persian version of the OSS proved to be a valid, reliable, and reproducible tool as demonstrated by high Cronbach's alpha and Pearson's correlation coefficients. The Persian transcript of OSS is administrable to Persian speaking patients with shoulder condition and it is understandable by them.

  11. Functional and phenotypical comparison of myofibroblasts derived from biopsies and bronchoalveolar lavage in mild asthma and scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansson Lennart

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated fibroblasts, which have previously been obtained from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, are proposed to be important cells in the fibrotic processes of asthma and scleroderma (SSc. We have studied the motility for BALF derived fibroblasts in patients with SSc that may explain the presence of these cells in the airway lumen. Furthermore, we have compared phenotypic alterations in activated fibroblasts from BALF and bronchial biopsies from patients with mild asthma and SSc that may account for the distinct fibrotic responses. Methods Fibroblasts were cultured from BALF and bronchial biopsies from patients with mild asthma and SSc. The motility was studied using a cell migration assay. Western Blotting was used to study the expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, ED-A fibronectin, and serine arginine splicing factor 20 (SRp20. The protein expression pattern was analyzed to reveal potential biomarkers using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and sequencing dual matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF. The Mann-Whitney method was used to calculate statistical significance. Results Increased migration and levels of ED-A fibronectin were observed in BALF fibroblasts from both groups of patients, supported by increased expression of RhoA, Rac1, and the splicing factor SRp20. However, these observations were exclusively accompanied by increased expression of α-SMA in patients with mild asthma. Compared to BALF fibroblasts in mild asthma, fibroblasts in SSc displayed a differential protein expression pattern of cytoskeletal- and scavenger proteins. These identified proteins facilitate cell migration, oxidative stress, and the excessive deposition of extracellular matrix observed in patients with SSc. Conclusion This study demonstrates a possible origin for fibroblasts in the airway lumen in patients with SSc and important differences between fibroblast

  12. Esophageal Motor Abnormalities in Patients With Scleroderma: Heterogeneity, Risk Factors, and Effects on Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Michael D; Umar, Sarah B; Griffing, W Leroy; DiBaise, John K; Lacy, Brian E; Vela, Marcelo F

    2017-02-01

    Systemic scleroderma (SSc) is associated with esophageal aperistalsis and hypotensive esophagogastric junction pressure, although there could be a gradation in esophageal motor dysfunction. We characterized esophageal motor function by high-resolution esophageal manometry (HRM) and assessed associations between SSc severity, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and HRM findings in patients. We performed a prospective study of 200 patients with SSc and 102 patients without SSc (controls) who underwent HRM at Mayo Clinic Arizona from May 2006 through January 2015. We used data on integrated relaxation pressure, distal contractile integral, and distal latency to classify esophageal motility disorders according to the Chicago Classification v 3.0. A subset of subjects (n = 122) completed SSc-specific gastrointestinal symptom and HRQOL questionnaires. HRM findings, symptoms, and HRQOL data were compared among diffuse SSc, limited SSc, and control subjects. Categorical variables were compared by using the χ 2 or Fisher exact test; continuous variables were compared by using Mann-Whitney or Kruskal-Wallis test. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between severity of esophageal dysmotility and baseline clinical factors. Among patients with SSc, 83 had diffuse SSc (42%), and 117 had limited SSc (58%). Absent contractility was more frequent in patients with SSc than in controls (56% vs 13%; P esophagus (esophagogastric junction pressure with absent contractility) was only observed in 33% of patients (34% with diffuse SSc vs 32% limited SSc) (P = .880). Severe esophageal dysmotility was associated with disease duration, interstitial lung disease, and higher gastrointestinal symptom scores (P esophagus in only one-third of patients with SSc. Esophageal motor function appears to be heterogeneous in SSc. Esophageal dysmotility reduces HRQOL in patients with SSc. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pressure and pain In Systemic sclerosis/Scleroderma - an evaluation of a simple intervention (PISCES: randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcacer-Pitarch Begonya

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot problems associated with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc/Scleroderma have been reported to be both common and disabling. There are only limited data describing specifically, the mechanical changes occurring in the foot in SSc. A pilot project conducted in preparation for this trial confirmed the previous reports of foot related impairment and reduced foot function in people with SSc and demonstrated a link to mechanical etiologies. To-date there have been no formal studies of interventions directed at the foot problems experienced by people with Systemic Sclerosis. The primary aim of this trial is to evaluate whether foot pain and foot-related health status in people with Systemic Sclerosis can be improved through the provision of a simple pressure-relieving insole. Methods The proposed trial is a pragmatic, multicenter, randomised controlled clinical trial following a completed pilot study. In four participating centres, 140 consenting patients with SSc and plantar foot pain will be randomised to receive either a commercially available pressure relieving and thermally insulating insole, or a sham insole with no cushioning or thermal properties. The primary end point is a reduction in pain measured using the Foot Function Index Pain subscale, 12 weeks after the start of intervention. Participants will complete the primary outcome measure (Foot Function Index pain sub-scale prior to randomisation and at 12 weeks post randomisation. Secondary outcomes include participant reported pain and disability as derived from the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Questionnaire and plantar pressures with and without the insoles in situ. Discussion This trial protocol proposes a rigorous and potentially significant evaluation of a simple and readily provided therapeutic approach which, if effective, could be of a great benefit for this group of patients. Trial registration number ISRCTN: ISRCTN02824122

  14. Access to care for children and young people diagnosed with localized scleroderma or juvenile SSc in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Daniel P; Baildam, Eileen M; Amin, Tania S; Cruikshank, Mary K; Davidson, Joyce E; Dixon, Jennifer; Martin, Neil S; Ohlsson, Victoria; Pilkington, Clarissa; Rangaraj, Satyapal; Riley, Philip; Sundaramoorthy, Chitra; Walsh, Jo; Foster, Helen E

    2012-07-01

    To describe pathways of care and referral to paediatric rheumatology from onset of first symptom (noticed by the patient or their family) to diagnosis for children and young people diagnosed with localized scleroderma (LS) or juvenile SSc (jSSc). Retrospective case note audit of patients under paediatric rheumatology care who presented during January 2005-January 2010. Data included disease subtype, sex, age at key points in the referral pathway and health care professional (HCP) contact. All patient and HCP data were pseudo-anonymized in accordance with good clinical practice. Data were from eight UK centres that saw 89 cases: 62 females, 26 males; 73 LS, 16 jSSc. Median time from first symptom to first HCP review was 4 (range 0-72) months (LS) and 1 (range 0-50) month (jSSc). Median time from first symptom to paediatric rheumatology review was 15 (range 1-103) months (LS) and 7 (range 0-50) months (jSSc). Median time from first HCP review to first paediatric rheumatology review was 11 (range 0-103) months (LS) and 2 (range 0-10) months. First HCP seen (74%) was usually a general practitioner. The referring HCP to paediatric rheumatology was usually a dermatologist (56%) for LS. Median time from first symptom to diagnosis was 13 (range 1-102) months (LS) and 8 (range 1-50) months (jSSc). A prolonged interval occurs from first symptom to definitive diagnosis, which may adversely affect outcome. There is a need to raise awareness of this rare diagnosis and facilitate earlier recognition.

  15. Quantification of differences between nailfold capillaroscopy images with a scleroderma pattern and normal pattern using measures of geometric and algorithmic complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urwin, Samuel George; Griffiths, Bridget; Allen, John

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to quantify and investigate differences in the geometric and algorithmic complexity of the microvasculature in nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC) images displaying a scleroderma pattern and those displaying a 'normal' pattern. 11 NFC images were qualitatively classified by a capillary specialist as indicative of 'clear microangiopathy' (CM), i.e. a scleroderma pattern, and 11 as 'not clear microangiopathy' (NCM), i.e. a 'normal' pattern. Pre-processing was performed, and fractal dimension (FD) and Kolmogorov complexity (KC) were calculated following image binarisation. FD and KC were compared between groups, and a k-means cluster analysis (n  =  2) on all images was performed, without prior knowledge of the group assigned to them (i.e. CM or NCM), using FD and KC as inputs. CM images had significantly reduced FD and KC compared to NCM images, and the cluster analysis displayed promising results that the quantitative classification of images into CM and NCM groups is possible using the mathematical measures of FD and KC. The analysis techniques used show promise for quantitative microvascular investigation in patients with systemic sclerosis.

  16. Quantitative texture-based assessment of one-year changes in fibrotic reticular patterns on HRCT in scleroderma lung disease treated with oral cyclophosphamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun J.; Brown, Matthew S. [David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Center for Computer Vision and Imaging Biomarker, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Elashoff, Robert [David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Department of Biostatistics and Biomathematics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Li, Gang [School of Public Health, UCLA, Department of Biostatistics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gjertson, David W. [School of Public Health and David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Department of Biostatistics and Pathology, Los Angeles (United States); Lynch, David A. [National Jewish Health, Radiology Department, Denver, CO (United States); Strollo, Diane C. [UPMC Presbyterian, Radiology Department, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kleerup, Eric; Tashkin, Donald P. [David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Department of Med-Pul and Critical Care, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Chong, Daniel; Shah, Sumit K.; Ahmad, Shama; Abtin, Fereidoun; Goldin, Jonathan G. [David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2011-12-15

    The Scleroderma Lung Study showed the efficacy of cyclophosphamide in modestly improving the forced vital capacity (FVC) compared with placebo over 1 year. Using changes in texture-based scores that quantify lung fibrosis as the percentage involvement of reticulation patterns, the effectiveness of cyclophosphamide was re-assessed by examining its impact on quantitative lung fibrosis (QLF). Axial HRCT images were acquired (1-mm slice thickness, 10-mm increments) in the prone position at inspiration. A validated model for quantifying interstitial disease patterns was applied to images from 83 subjects at baseline and 12 months. Scores were calculated for six zones (upper, mid, lower of the right/left lung) and the whole lung. Average changes were compared. Correlations were performed between QLF and physiological and clinical scores. From the most severe zones identified at baseline, QLF scores decreased by 2.6% in the cyclophosphamide group, whereas they increased by 9.1% in the placebo group, leading to {proportional_to}12% difference (p = 0.0027). Between-treatment difference in whole lung QLF was {proportional_to}5% (p = 0.0190). Significant associations were observed between changes in QLF and FVC (r = -0.33), dyspnea score (r = -0.29), and consensus visual score (p = 0.0001). QLF scores provide an objective quantitative tool for assessing treatment efficacy in scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease. (orig.)

  17. Quantitative texture-based assessment of one-year changes in fibrotic reticular patterns on HRCT in scleroderma lung disease treated with oral cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun J.; Brown, Matthew S.; Elashoff, Robert; Li, Gang; Gjertson, David W.; Lynch, David A.; Strollo, Diane C.; Kleerup, Eric; Tashkin, Donald P.; Chong, Daniel; Shah, Sumit K.; Ahmad, Shama; Abtin, Fereidoun; Goldin, Jonathan G.

    2011-01-01

    The Scleroderma Lung Study showed the efficacy of cyclophosphamide in modestly improving the forced vital capacity (FVC) compared with placebo over 1 year. Using changes in texture-based scores that quantify lung fibrosis as the percentage involvement of reticulation patterns, the effectiveness of cyclophosphamide was re-assessed by examining its impact on quantitative lung fibrosis (QLF). Axial HRCT images were acquired (1-mm slice thickness, 10-mm increments) in the prone position at inspiration. A validated model for quantifying interstitial disease patterns was applied to images from 83 subjects at baseline and 12 months. Scores were calculated for six zones (upper, mid, lower of the right/left lung) and the whole lung. Average changes were compared. Correlations were performed between QLF and physiological and clinical scores. From the most severe zones identified at baseline, QLF scores decreased by 2.6% in the cyclophosphamide group, whereas they increased by 9.1% in the placebo group, leading to ∝12% difference (p = 0.0027). Between-treatment difference in whole lung QLF was ∝5% (p = 0.0190). Significant associations were observed between changes in QLF and FVC (r = -0.33), dyspnea score (r = -0.29), and consensus visual score (p = 0.0001). QLF scores provide an objective quantitative tool for assessing treatment efficacy in scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease. (orig.)

  18. MRI of the fingers in patients with systemic scleroderma. Early results of contrast-enhanced examinations on a dedicated MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonel, H.; Seemann, M.; Reiser, M.; Messer, G.; Walchner, M.; Roecken, M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose. To estimate disease activity in patients with systemic sclerosis using contrast-enhanced MRI of the skin. Material and Methods. In a pre-study, sequences of a low-field (0.2 T) scanner (Artoscan, Esaote, Genova, Italy) were optimized for detection of intravenous contrast (0.1 mmol/l Gd-DTPA) in six patients with the autoimmune disease systemic scleroderma. Based on the results of the pre-study, 17 patients with scleroderma (7 sclerotic/10 active inflammatory disease) were scanned using gradient-spoiled 3D GRE sequences (FA 90 , TR 100 ms, TE 18 ms), which had been established as most sensitive for intravenous contrast. Contrast enhancement of the skin was determined quantitatively by contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR), comparing post- to pre-contrast and dynamic scans (for 6 min, 1 acquisition/min). Patients in the chronic state with sclerodactylia and active inflammation of the hands were considered separately and compared to a control group (n=10) matched according to age. Results. CNR increase after intravenous contrast was significantly higher in patients with active disease (86±16% increase) than sclerosing disease (29±3%, p [de

  19. Pulsed dye laser in the treatment of localized scleroderma and its effects on CD34+ and factor XIIIa+ cells: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Abeer Attia; Shokir, Hisham; Soliman, Mona; Salah, Lila; Fathy, Sahar

    2013-06-01

    Localized scleroderma (morphea) is characterized by hardening and thickening of the dermis due to excessive collagen deposition. A decreased number of CD34+ cells and an increased number of Factor XIIIa+ cells are seen in the affected skin. The flashlamp pulsed dye laser (FLPDL) has been used in the treatment of localized morphea with promising results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of the pulsed dye laser in localized scleroderma and to assess its effect on CD34+ cells, Factor XIIIa+ cells, and blood vessels. Thirty patients with plaque morphea were treated with a FLPDL (585 nm wavelength, 450 μs pulse duration). Fluence ranged from 7.5 to 8.5 J/cm(2). Sessions were performed biweekly for a maximum of 6 months. Clinical, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical assessments were performed. Patients showed varying degrees of improvement of indurated skin. There was no worsening or further improvement at the treated sites during the follow-up assessments at 3, 6, and 12 months. An increased number of CD34+ cells were found in both the upper and the lower dermis, and a decreased number of Factor XIIIa+ cells were found in the lower dermis. The FLPDL is effective in the treatment of morphea, as confirmed by the changes in the pathologic tissue and levels of CD34+ and Factor XIIIa+ cells.

  20. Ecology and ranging behaviour of Red foxes in the city of Oxford / Ecologia e comportamento della volpe (Vulpes vulpes nella città di Oxford

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Patrick Doncaster

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Red foxes (Vulpes vulpes living in the city of Oxford, like those in its neighbouring suburbs, are organized into social groups which each defend a territory. While territories in the suburbs are spatially stable, those in the city continually drift in location. They move in synchrony with their neighbours and the prevailing pattern is a honeycomb of group ranges of relatively small but constant size. The city environment is characterized by a high level of disturbance, which may favour range mobility, and by a patchy and highly divided mosaic of habitats. A quantification of patch density leads us to propose an explanation for the small size of territories and the existence of more adults than a single pair, in terms of the dispersion of habitat patches and competition for food resources contained therein. Riassunto Le popolazioni di Volpe (Vulpes vulpes insediate nella città di Oxford e nelle aree suburbane limitrofe sono organizzate in gruppi sociali che difendono un proprio territorio. Mentre i territori nelle aree suburbane sono spazialmente stabili, quelli presenti in città cambiano continuamente posizione. Questi ultimi si muovono sincronicamente con quelli limitrofi e la disposizione prevalente è simile al favo delle api con territori relativamente piccoli, ma di dimensioni costanti. L'ambiente cittadino è caratterizzato da elevato disturbo, che può favorire la mobilita dei territori, e da un mosaico molto vario di ambienti. La presenza di territori di ridotte dimensioni occupati da più adulti e non da una singola coppia di volpi sembra dipendere dall'alternanza e variabilità degli ambienti e dalla competizione per le risorse alimentari.

  1. Up to 10-year follow-up of the Oxford medial partial knee arthroplasty - 695 cases from a single institution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner Kristensen, Per; Holm, Henriette A; Varnum, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Partial knee arthroplasty (PKA) has shown obvious advantages compared to total knee arthroplasty, but survival of PKA from different institutions and registries has differed. In our institution, 695 consecutive Oxford medial PKAs were performed from 2002 to 2011 with mean follow-up of 4.6 years....... The overall 10.7-year survival rate was 85.3% (95% CI: 78.7%-90.0%), and no difference in survival for gender and age younger or older than 60 years was found. One year after PKA, 94.3% were very satisfied or satisfied, as were 93.6% six years postoperatively. The revision rate was 7.3% (n=51), and the most...

  2. Oxford Knee Score: cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Turkish version in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuğay, Baki Umut; Tuğay, Nazan; Güney, Hande; Kınıklı, Gizem İrem; Yüksel, İnci; Atilla, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    The Oxford Knee Score (OKS) is a valid, short, self-administered, and site- specific outcome measure specifically developed for patients with knee arthroplasty. This study aimed to cross-culturally adapt and validate the OKS to be used in Turkish-speaking patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. The OKS was translated and culturally adapted according to the guidelines in the literature. Ninety-one patients (mean age: 55.89±7.85 years) with knee osteoarthritis participated in the study. Patients completed the Turkish version of the Oxford Knee Score (OKS-TR), Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index (WOMAC) questionnaires. Internal consistency was tested using Cronbach's α coefficient. Patients completed the OKS-TR questionnaire twice in 7 days to determine the reproducibility. Correlation between the total results of both tests was determined by Spearman's correlation coefficient and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Validity was assessed by calculating Spearman's correlation coefficient between the OKS, WOMAC, and SF-36 scores. Floor and ceiling effects were analyzed. Internal consistency was high (Cronbach's α: 0.90). The reproducibility tested by 2 different methods showed no significant difference (p>0.05). The construct validity analyses showed a significant correlation between the OKS and the other scores (p<0.05). There was no floor or ceiling effect in total OKS score. The OKS-TR is a reliable and valid measure for the self-assessment of pain and function in Turkish-speaking patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

  3. Dynamic RSA for the evaluation of inducible micromotion of Oxford UKA during step-up and step-down motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsager, Kristian; Kaptein, Bart L; Rømer, Lone; Jørgensen, Peter B; Stilling, Maiken

    2017-06-01

    Background and purpose - Implant inducible micromotions have been suggested to reflect the quality of the fixation interface. We investigated the usability of dynamic RSA for evaluation of inducible micromotions of the Oxford Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty (UKA) tibial component, and evaluated factors that have been suggested to compromise the fixation, such as fixation method, component alignment, and radiolucent lines (RLLs). Patients and methods - 15 patients (12 men) with a mean age of 69 (55-86) years, with an Oxford UKA (7 cemented), were studied after a mean time in situ of 4.4 (3.6-5.1) years. 4 had tibial RLLs. Each patient was recorded with dynamic RSA (10 frames/second) during a step-up/step-down motion. Inducible micromotions were calculated for the tibial component with respect to the tibia bone. Postoperative component alignment was measured with model-based RSA and RLLs were measured on screened radiographs. Results - All tibial components showed inducible micromotions as a function of the step-cycle motion with a mean subsidence of up to -0.06 mm (95% CI: -0.10 to -0.03). Tibial component inducible micromotions were similar for cemented fixation and cementless fixation. Patients with tibial RLLs had 0.5° (95% CI: 0.18-0.81) greater inducible medio-lateral tilt of the tibial component. There was a correlation between postoperative posterior slope of the tibial plateau and inducible anterior-posterior tilt. Interpretation - All patients had inducible micromotions of the tibial component during step-cycle motion. RLLs and a high posterior slope increased the magnitude of inducible micromotions. This suggests that dynamic RSA is a valuable clinical tool for the evaluation of functional implant fixation.

  4. Roy Ellen, Stephen J. Lycett, Sarah E. Johns, eds., 2013, Understanding Cultural Transmission in Anthropology: A Critical Synthesis New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clelia Viecelli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available recensione: Roy Ellen, Stephen J. Lycett, Sarah E. Johns, eds., 2013, Understanding Cultural Transmission in Anthropology: A Critical Synthesis New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books di Clelia Viecelli

  5. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Joseph Daniels1,&, Ruth Nduati1,2, James Kiarie1,3, Carey Farquhar1,4,5 .... or basic science research career (Socio-Behavioral Research, .... a research environment that supports knowledge sharing to develop research ...

  6. Internal consistency, reliability, and temporal stability of the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire short-form: Test-retest data over two weeks

    OpenAIRE

    MCGUCKIN, CONOR

    2006-01-01

    PUBLISHED The Oxford Happiness Questionnaire short-form is a recently developed eight-item measure of happiness. This study evaluated the internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability of the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire short-form among 55 Northern Irish undergraduate university students who completed the measure on two occasions separated by two weeks. Internal consistency of the measure on both occasions was satisfactory at both Time 1 (alpha = .62) and Time 2 (alpha = ....

  7. Tradurre nel contesto pluriglosso dell'arabo con l'aiuto di un nuovo dizionario bilingue. Riflessioni sull'Oxford Arabic Dictionary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Maria Tresso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Translating in the Arabic Plurilingual Context with the Help of a New Bilingual Dictionary. Some remarks on the Oxford Arabic Dictionary. A bilingual dictionary from English, the International language for communication, to Arabic nowadays represents one of the major challenges in the fields of translation studies and teaching. The Oxford Arabic Dictionary, with is corpus-based word list represents a good point of departure for future lexicographical works and for the development of teaching of Modern Standard Arabic.

  8. The Challenge of Setting Standards for a Worldwide Constituency: Research Implications from the IASB’s Early History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camfferman, Kees; Zeff, Stephen A.

    2018-01-01

    Based on Camfferman and Zeff [(2015). Aiming for global accounting standards: The International Accounting Standards Board, 2001–2011. Oxford: Oxford University Press] we reflect on possibilities for academic research on the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and its International

  9. The Oxford Questionnaire on the Emotional Side-effects of Antidepressants (OQuESA): development, validity, reliability and sensitivity to change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jonathan; Cole, Victoria; Doll, Helen; Goodwin, Guy M

    2012-09-01

    Some patients with major depression report a restricted range of emotions that may appear to arise as a side-effect of treatment with antidepressants. It is uncertain whether this phenomenon, sometimes called emotional blunting, represents residual symptoms of depression or side-effects of antidepressant treatment. There is currently no adequate instrument to measure this phenomenon. A draft questionnaire was developed from patient-derived qualitative data, refined using cognitive interviewing, and administered on three occasions to patients taking antidepressants. Statistical methods including factor analysis were used to reduce the size of the draft questionnaire, and to assess the performance of the resulting Oxford Questionnaire on the Emotional Side-effects of Antidepressants (OQuESA). 207 patients completed the OQuESA on at least one occasion. Their BDI-II scores and self-reported emotional blunting were spread across the possible range. The factor analysis resulted in four dimensions: 'not caring', 'emotional detachment', 'reduction in positive emotions', and 'general reduction in emotions'. The OQuESA appears to be acceptable, valid, and reliable, with sensitivity to change. The OQuESA offers promise as an effective self-report measure of the symptoms of emotional blunting in patients with depression. It can be used as a clinical tool, to facilitate the identification of patients with the syndrome of emotional blunting. It should also be used in research studies, to advance our understanding of the nature, causes and treatment of this phenomenon. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. THE REAL PREVALENCE OF EROSIVE ESOPHAGITIS AND BARRETT'S ESOPHAGUS IN SYSTEMIC SCLERODERMA: DATA FROM 12-MONTHS PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Evgenievich Karateev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Complicated forms of reflux-esophagitis, i.e., erosive esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus (BE — are common types of visceral pathology in systemic scleroderma (SSD, which require adequate therapy and follow up. Although real prevalence of esophageal involvement in SSD in Russian patients remains uncertain. Objective — to identify prevalence of erosive esophagitis and BE, and to quantify gastro-intestinal (GI symptoms in patients with SSD. Material and methods. During 1 year (December 2009 — January 2011 all consecutive SSD patients, hospitalized to FSBI «SRIR» RAMS, after signing informed consent, were subjected to esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy of esophageal mucosa in upper 1/3. Totally 123 patients were examined (96,8% females, 3,2% males, aged 50,5±13,1 years. Esophageal mucous was evaluated for presence of pathologic changes and BE (intestinal metaplasia in biopsy samples was a BE diagnostic criterion. SODA questionnaire was used to quantify GIT symptoms Results. Erosive esophagitis was detected in 30 (24,3% patients, BE — in 11 (8,9%. In 80% of patients marked changes in esophageal mucosa were associated with typical symptoms (heartburn, regurgitaion, dysphagia, while in some cases (in 3 patients erosive esophagitis and BE were asymptomatic. Quantitative evaluation of symptoms with SODA questionnaire demonstrated clear correlation between subjective assessment and severity of esophageal pathologic changes. In patients with erosive gastritis and BE the SODA «pain» and «non-pain» parameters scores were significantly higher and satisfaction in dyspepsia management was lower (p<0,05, then in individuals without erosions and mucosal inflammation. Here was no clear correlation between esophageal pathology and SSD type (limited, diffuse, age, duration of the disease, presence of pulmonary interstitial lesion and Sjogren's syndrome. Patients with erosive esophagitis were significantly more often (36,6% using proton pomp

  11. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A descriptive qualitative research design was used to determine whether participants ... simulation as a teaching method; a manikin offering effective learning; confidence ..... Tesch R. Qualitative Research: Analysis Types and Software Tools.

  12. 16 December 2013 - Hooke Professor of Experimental Physics and Pro Vice Chancellor University of Oxford Prof. I. Walmsley visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, Physics Department, ATLAS Collaboration P. Wells and Chair, CMS Collaboration Board, Oxford University and Purdue University I. Shipsey

    CERN Document Server

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    16 December 2013 - Hooke Professor of Experimental Physics and Pro Vice Chancellor University of Oxford Prof. I. Walmsley visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, Physics Department, ATLAS Collaboration P. Wells and Chair, CMS Collaboration Board, Oxford University and Purdue University I. Shipsey

  13. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    research process, as part of which students must find and appraise evidence from research.[5] This highlights that teaching research methodology is inclined towards equipping students ... Students believed that evidence-based practice was vital, yet their understanding of the concept was restricted when compared with the.

  14. Defects in the Zeta Chain Expression (ζ in a Group of Patients with SLE, Scleroderma and Late-onset Arthritis, Colombia 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heber Siachoque-Montañez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, Scleroderma and late-onset arthritis are autoimmune inflammatory diseases (EIA characterized by autoantibody production and presence of abnormal T cells which generate defective immune response. The abnormal expression of key signaling molecules in the defective function of T-lymphocytes plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. The T-cells exhibit numerous abnormalities TCRζ1 signaling complex, these aberrations result in altered expression of cytokines and some biochemical events involved in the expression of surface molecules. Defects in the complex may be associated TCRζ to steroids used in autoimmune disease patients due to their powerful anti-inflammatory activity and immunosuppressive properties. The synthetic corticosteroids such as examethasone inhibit the transcriptional activity of some factors such as NFKB and AP-1, which regulate the synthesis of certain cytokines and could be involved in the TCRζ synthesis. Material and Methods: A case-control study, with a 1:1 ratio of cases and controls (13:13. Cases were patients with active autoimmune disease (6 patients with SLE, 5 patients with scleroderma and 2 patients with lateonset arthritis, who have not started treatment with corticosteroids. Controls were patients with no autoimmune disease. The diagnosis was made by the criteria established by the American College of Rheumatology for patients with SLE, scleroderma and late-onset arthritis. A 10 mL sample was obtained by venipuncture whole blood. Total RNA was extracted and RT-PCR was performed using a set of primers flanking a region of 138 base pairs involving exons 2, 3 and 4 of the ζ chain. Results: The values of Z chain amplification showed significant differences in patients with autoimmune disease (0.8214 } 0.1787, med = 0.7368 compared with the control group (0.9225 } 0.1272, med = 0.9830 (p = 0.045, Mann-Withney non-parametric one tailed exact

  15. Assessment of esophageal involvement in systemic sclerosis and morphea (localized scleroderma) by clinical, endoscopic, manometric and pH metric features: a prospective comparative hospital based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Tasleem; Masood, Qazi; Singh, Jaswinder; Hassan, Iffat

    2015-02-15

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a generalized disorder of unknown etiology affecting the connective tissue of the body. It affects the skin and various internal organs. Gastrointestinal tract involvement is seen in almost 90% of the patients. Esophagus is the most frequently affected part of the gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal motility disturbance classically manifests as a reduced lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) and loss of distal esophageal body peristalsis. Consequently, SSc patients may be complicated by erosive esophagitis and eventually by Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Morphea, also known as localized scleroderma, is characterized by predominant skin involvement, with occasional involvement of subjacent muscles and usually sparing the internal organs. The involvement of esophagus in morphea has been studied very scarcely. The proposed study will investigate the esophageal involvement in the two forms of scleroderma (systemic and localized), compare the same and address any need of upper gastrointestinal evaluation in morphea (localized scleroderma) patients. 56 and 31 newly and already diagnosed cases of SSc and morphea respectively were taken up for the study. All the patients were inquired about the dyspeptic symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation and/or dysphagia). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, esophageal manometry and 24-hour pH monitoring were done in 52, 47 and 41 patients of SSc; and 28, 25 and 20 patients of morphea respectively. Esophageal symptoms were present in 39 cases (69.6%) of SSc which were mild in 22 (39.3%), moderate in 14 (25%), severe in three (5.3%); while only four cases (7.1%) of morphea had esophageal symptoms all of which were mild in severity. Reflux esophagitis was seen in 17 cases (32.7%) of SSc and only two cases (7.14%) of morphea. Manometric abnormalities were seen in 32 cases (68.1%) of SSc and none in morphea. Ambulatory 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring documented abnormal reflux in

  16. Disease course and long-term outcome of juvenile localized scleroderma: Experience from a single pediatric rheumatology Centre and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Giorgia; Fadanelli, Gloria; Agazzi, Anna; Vittadello, Fabio; Meneghel, Alessandra; Zulian, Francesco

    2018-05-03

    Juvenile Localized Scleroderma (JLS) is a rare disorder that may cause severe aesthetic sequelae and functional disability. To date, data on natural history and long-term outcome are discordant and difficult to compare due to the heterogeneity of clinical subtypes, treatments and methods to evaluate activity and outcome in previous studies. A retrospective and cross-sectional study including 133 patients followed between January 1991 and December 2016 was conducted at our Pediatric Rheumatology Centre. Disease course was drawn by retrospective analysis of patients' clinical features, treatment, disease course and outcome at the last evaluation. Disease activity and severity of tissue damage were assessed by using parameters derived from the Localized Scleroderma Cutaneous Assessment Tool (LoSCAT) and thermography. Most patients achieved complete remission, as only 12.5%, all with the linear subtype, had still active disease after over 10 years of follow-up. At least one disease relapse occurred in 22.2% of patients and first flare was observed 20 months after first treatment discontinuation. Mild tissue damage was observed in more than half of patients, in 25.4% was moderate and in 23.0% severe; 19.8% presented a functional limitation. The entity of skin and subcutaneous fat loss established at the early stages of the disease as 27.8% of patients with shorter disease duration had severe damage and the rates remained constant in patients with longer follow-up. The delay in start of systemic treatment was associated with longer disease activity and higher relapse rate. Patients with linear scleroderma (LS), pansclerotic morphea (PM) and mixed subtype (MS) presented more severe aesthetic and functional damage but did not differ from other subtypes as for rate of complete remission. JLS in some patients can be a very aggressive disease with persistent activity after >10 years and/or several disease relapses. As tissue damage establishes early in disease course a

  17. Trends in hospital admission rates for anorexia nervosa in Oxford (1968-2011) and England (1990-2011): database studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Josephine; Hall, Nick; Yeates, David G R; Goldacre, Michael

    2016-02-01

    To report on long-term trends in hospital admission rates for anorexia nervosa using two English datasets. We used data on hospital day-case and inpatient care across five decades in the Oxford Record Linkage Study (ORLS), and similar data for all England from 1990. We analysed rates of admission for anorexia nervosa in people aged 10-44 years, using hospital episodes (counting every admission) and first-recorded admissions (counting only the first record for each person). Former Oxford NHS Region; and England. None; anonymous statistical records were used. In the longstanding ORLS, the age-standardised first-recorded admission rate for women was 2.7 (95% confidence interval 1.6-3.8) per 100,000 female population aged 10-44 years in 1968-1971; 2.7 (2.1-3.3) in 1992-1996; and 6.3 (5.5-7.2) in 2007-2011. Male rates were zero in the 1960s; 0.07 (0.0-0.1) per 100,000 men in 1992-1996; and 0.4 (0.2-0.6) in 2007-2011. In England, female rates increased from 4.2 (4.0-4.4) in 1998-2001 to 6.9 (6.7-7.1) in 2007-2011; and the corresponding male rates were 0.2 (0.1-0.3) and 0.5 (0.4-0.6). Episode-based admission rates rose more than person-based rates. The highest rates by far were in girls and women aged 15-19 years. In recent years, anorexia nervosa has become a greater burden on secondary care: not only have admission rates increased but so too have multiple admissions per person with anorexia nervosa. The increase in admission rates might reflect an increase in prevalence rates of anorexia nervosa in the general population, but other explanations, including lower clinical thresholds for admission, are possible and are discussed. © The Royal Society of Medicine.

  18. A review of initiatives to reduce energy-related CO2 emissions from the city of Oxford: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Rajat

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews three key initiatives undertaken in the historical city of Oxford to bring about reductions in energy-related CO 2 emissions on a city-wide scale. The author has been part of all the three initiatives. In 2002, a collaborative partnership between academia, industry and city council started the Oxford Solar Initiative (OSI) which uses a community-based approach to help households and organisations in Oxford, financially and technically, to install solar energy systems and energy efficiency measures in buildings. So far OSI has facilitated the installation of 80 active solar systems, over 450 energy efficiency measures and 3,000 low energy bulbs. The scientific basis of OSI is a GIS-based DECoRuM model which estimates and maps baseline energy use and CO 2 emissions on a house-by house level, identifies 'pollution' hotspots, predicts the potential for reductions in CO 2 emissions and monitors reductions achieved as a result of deploying energy efficiency measures and renewable energy systems. The application of DECoRuM model to a case study in Oxford shows that CO 2 emission reductions above 60 % are possible, at a cost of between GBP 6 to GBP 77 per tonne of CO 2 emissions saved, depending upon the package of measures used, and the scenario of capital costs (low or high) employed. The OSI and DECoRuM projects have led to the development of an action-oriented Oxford Climate Change Action Plan (OCCAP) which constructs an accurate CO 2 emissions inventory for Oxford city for a baseline year, establishes CO 2 reduction targets and proposes action for each of the energy-related sectors to meet those targets. The OCCAP will be implemented by Oxford City Council and provides a useful example for other cities in their endeavour for emission reductions

  19. A review of initiatives to reduce energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions from the city of Oxford: past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Rajat [Dept. of Architecture, School of the Built Environment, Oxford Brookes Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    This paper reviews three key initiatives undertaken in the historical city of Oxford to bring about reductions in energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions on a city-wide scale. The author has been part of all the three initiatives. In 2002, a collaborative partnership between academia, industry and city council started the Oxford Solar Initiative (OSI) which uses a community-based approach to help households and organisations in Oxford, financially and technically, to install solar energy systems and energy efficiency measures in buildings. So far OSI has facilitated the installation of 80 active solar systems, over 450 energy efficiency measures and 3,000 low energy bulbs. The scientific basis of OSI is a GIS-based DECoRuM model which estimates and maps baseline energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions on a house-by house level, identifies 'pollution' hotspots, predicts the potential for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions and monitors reductions achieved as a result of deploying energy efficiency measures and renewable energy systems. The application of DECoRuM model to a case study in Oxford shows that CO{sub 2} emission reductions above 60 % are possible, at a cost of between GBP 6 to GBP 77 per tonne of CO{sub 2} emissions saved, depending upon the package of measures used, and the scenario of capital costs (low or high) employed. The OSI and DECoRuM projects have led to the development of an action-oriented Oxford Climate Change Action Plan (OCCAP) which constructs an accurate CO{sub 2} emissions inventory for Oxford city for a baseline year, establishes CO{sub 2} reduction targets and proposes action for each of the energy-related sectors to meet those targets. The OCCAP will be implemented by Oxford City Council and provides a useful example for other cities in their endeavour for emission reductions.

  20. Oxford Partial Knee Replacement as a Gateway to Outpatient Arthroplasty “Lessons Learned along the Journey”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Berend

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Oxford Partial Knee Replacement was approved for implantation in the US in 2004 after the surgeon completed an educational training requirement.  Since then my knee practiced has expanded to over 50% partial knee.  This experience coupled with refinement of surgical techniques, anesthesia protocols, and patient selection has facilitated the transformation to same day discharge for partial knee cases and has quickly transitioned to total hip, total knee, and selected revision surgeries.  Patient selection has also expanded for outpatient joints and is now based on medical screening criteria and insurance access.  Over a two-year period we have performed over 1,000 outpatient arthroplasty procedures with no readmissions for pain control.   Overall readmission rate for all reasons was 2%.  Patient satisfaction scores were 98% Great-Good for 2014-15.  The combination of a partial knee replacement practice and an outpatient joint program brings the best VALUE to the patients, surgeons, and the arthroplasty system and represents the future of arthroplasty care.

  1. Minimally important change was estimated for the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire after foot/ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jill; Boller, Irene; Doll, Helen; Lavis, Grahame; Sharp, Robert; Cooke, Paul; Jenkinson, Crispin

    2014-06-01

    To ascertain the smallest amounts of change for the three Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) domains that are likely to be clinically meaningful and beyond measurement error for conditions affecting the foot/ankle. Estimates were compared with those from the Short-Form 36 (SF-36). A prospective observational study of 671 consecutive patients undergoing foot or ankle surgery at an orthopedic hospital. Before and 9 months after surgery, patients completed the MOXFQ and SF-36; transition items (anchor) asked about perceived changes in foot/ankle pain or problems since the surgery. Four hundred ninety-one patients completed pre- and postoperative questionnaires. Anchor-based minimal clinically important change (MCIC) values were ~13 points for each of the MOXFQ Walking/standing (W/S), Pain, and Social Interaction (S-I) domains [and greater than the standard error of measurement (SEM)]. MCIC values for all SF-36 domains fell within the SEM. Between-group MCIDs for the MOXFQ were W/S, 16.2; Pain, 9.9; S-I, 9.3. Distribution-based minimal detectable change (MDC90) values for the MOXFQ were ~11, ~12, and ~16 score points for the W/S, Pain, and S-I scales, respectively. This article provides information for aiding the interpretability of MOXFQ outcomes data and for planning future studies. The SF-36 is not recommended as a primary outcome for foot/ankle surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessing the utility of the Oxford Nanopore MinION for snake venom gland cDNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D. Hargreaves

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Portable DNA sequencers such as the Oxford Nanopore MinION device have the potential to be truly disruptive technologies, facilitating new approaches and analyses and, in some cases, taking sequencing out of the lab and into the field. However, the capabilities of these technologies are still being revealed. Here we show that single-molecule cDNA sequencing using the MinION accurately characterises venom toxin-encoding genes in the painted saw-scaled viper, Echis coloratus. We find the raw sequencing error rate to be around 12%, improved to 0–2% with hybrid error correction and 3% with de novo error correction. Our corrected data provides full coding sequences and 5′ and 3′ UTRs for 29 of 33 candidate venom toxins detected, far superior to Illumina data (13/40 complete and Sanger-based ESTs (15/29. We suggest that, should the current pace of improvement continue, the MinION will become the default approach for cDNA sequencing in a variety of species.

  3. Assessing the utility of the Oxford Nanopore MinION for snake venom gland cDNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Adam D; Mulley, John F

    2015-01-01

    Portable DNA sequencers such as the Oxford Nanopore MinION device have the potential to be truly disruptive technologies, facilitating new approaches and analyses and, in some cases, taking sequencing out of the lab and into the field. However, the capabilities of these technologies are still being revealed. Here we show that single-molecule cDNA sequencing using the MinION accurately characterises venom toxin-encoding genes in the painted saw-scaled viper, Echis coloratus. We find the raw sequencing error rate to be around 12%, improved to 0-2% with hybrid error correction and 3% with de novo error correction. Our corrected data provides full coding sequences and 5' and 3' UTRs for 29 of 33 candidate venom toxins detected, far superior to Illumina data (13/40 complete) and Sanger-based ESTs (15/29). We suggest that, should the current pace of improvement continue, the MinION will become the default approach for cDNA sequencing in a variety of species.

  4. 15x optical zoom and extreme optical image stabilisation: diffraction limited integral field spectroscopy with the Oxford SWIFT spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecza, Matthias; Thatte, Niranjan; Clarke, Fraser; Lynn, James; Freeman, David; Roberts, Jennifer; Dekany, Richard

    2012-09-01

    When commissioned in November 2008 at the Palomar 200 inch Hale Telescope, the Oxford SWIFT I and z band integral field spectrograph, fed by the adaptive optics system PALAO, provided a wide (3×) range of spatial resolutions: three plate scales of 235 mas, 160 mas, and 80 mas per spaxel over a contiguous field-of-view of 89×44 pixels. Depending on observing conditions and guide star brightness we can choose a seeing limited scale of 235 mas per spaxel, or 160 mas and 80 mas per spaxel for very bright guide star AO with substantial increase of enclosed energy. Over the last two years PALAO was upgraded to PALM-3000: an extreme, high-order adaptive optics system with two deformable mirrors with more than 3000 actuators, promising diffraction limited performance in SWIFT's wavelength range. In order to take advantage of this increased spatial resolution we upgraded SWIFT with new pre-optics allowing us to spatially Nyquist sample the diffraction limited PALM-3000 point spread function with 16 mas resolution, reducing the spaxel scale by another factor of 5×. We designed, manufactured, integrated and tested the new pre-optics in the first half of 2011 and commissioned it in December 2011. Here we present the opto-mechanical design and assembly of the new scale changing optics, as well as laboratory and on-sky commissioning results. In optimal observing conditions we achieve substantial Strehl ratios, delivering the near diffraction limited spatial resolution in the I and z bands.

  5. Validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire for hallux valgus deformity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talu, Burcu; Bayramlar, Kezban; Bek, Nilgün; Yakut, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) in patients affected by hallux valgus in order to assess the accuracy of this cross-cultural adaption. Thirty female volunteers aged between 18 and 55 years were included in the study. Subjects with hallux valgus were asked to complete the MOXFQ and the Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). After receiving permission from the author, the MOXFQ was translated into Turkish twice and then back translated to English, after which its compatibility was evaluated. The Turkish version of the MOXFO was applied twice, 1-3 days apart, to the study subjects. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were assessed using Cronbach's alpha and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), respectively. Construct validity was assessed with the use of Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, using a priori hypothesized correlations with SF-36 domains. Subjects achieved similar scores at the first and second administration of the questionnaire (validity was supported by the presence of all the hypothesized correlations, with SF-36 within its physical parameters. The Turkish version of the MOXFQ is a valid and reliable tool for evaluating foot pain and functional status in patients affected by hallux valgus.

  6. Reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Spanish Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) in patients with foot or ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés, Juan B Gerstner; Winson, Ian; Goldhahn, Sabine; Castro, Michael D; Swords, Michael P; Grujic, Leslie; Rammelt, Stefan; Sands, Andrew K

    2016-03-01

    The Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) has been validated in Spanish for use in patients undergoing foot and ankle surgery. 120 patients completed the MOXFQ and the SF-36 before surgery and 6 and 12 months postoperative. Surgeons completed the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Clinical Rating System. Psychometric properties were assessed for all three MOXFQ dimensions, and for the MOXFQ Index. The Spanish MOXFQ demonstrated consistency with Cronbach's alpha values between 0.65 and 0.90, and reliability ([ICCs] >0.95). It shows a moderate to strong correlation between the Walking/standing dimension and the related domains of the SF-36 (|r|>0.6), the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Scale (|r|>0.47) and Hallux-MTP-IP Scale (|r|>0.64). Responsiveness was excellent, (effect sizes >2.1). The respective minimal detectable change (MDC90) was 14.18 for the MOXFQ Index. The Spanish version of the MOXFQ showed good psychometric properties in patients with foot and ankle disorders. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Results of the radiological survey at the former Alba Craft Laboratory site properties, Oxford, Ohio (OXO001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Brown, K.S.; Mathis, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the former Alba Craft Laboratory Site Properties, Oxford, Ohio. The survey was performed in July and September of 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, primarily 238 U, from uranium machining operations conducted for National Lead of Ohio, a prime Atomic Energy Commission contractor. The survey included scan measurement of direct radiation levels inside and outside the former laboratory, outdoors on eight properties adjoining the former laboratory, and the city right-of-way adjacent to the surveyed properties. Radionuclide concentrations were determined in outdoor surface and subsurface soil samples taken from each property and the exterior of the laboratory. Fixed surface residual radioactivity was measured inside the laboratory and outside the building. Air samples were collected, direct exposure was measured, and samples were collected to measure transferable radioactivity inside the building. Results of the survey indicate areas where surface and soil contamination level s are above the DOE guidelines for uncontrolled areas

  8. Benchmarking of the Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencing for quantitative and qualitative assessment of cDNA populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomopoulos, Spyros; Wang, Yu Chang; Djambazian, Haig; Badescu, Dunarel; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2016-08-24

    To assess the performance of the Oxford Nanopore Technologies MinION sequencing platform, cDNAs from the External RNA Controls Consortium (ERCC) RNA Spike-In mix were sequenced. This mix mimics mammalian mRNA species and consists of 92 polyadenylated transcripts with known concentration. cDNA libraries were generated using a template switching protocol to facilitate the direct comparison between different sequencing platforms. The MinION performance was assessed for its ability to sequence the cDNAs directly with good accuracy in terms of abundance and full length. The abundance of the ERCC cDNA molecules sequenced by MinION agreed with their expected concentration. No length or GC content bias was observed. The majority of cDNAs were sequenced as full length. Additionally, a complex cDNA population derived from a human HEK-293 cell line was sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2500, PacBio RS II and ONT MinION platforms. We observed that there was a good agreement in the measured cDNA abundance between PacBio RS II and ONT MinION (rpearson = 0.82, isoforms with length more than 700bp) and between Illumina HiSeq 2500 and ONT MinION (rpearson = 0.75). This indicates that the ONT MinION can sequence quantitatively both long and short full length cDNA molecules.

  9. Nailfold capillaroscopy in primary biliary cirrhosis: a useful tool for the early diagnosis of scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovoli, Francesco; Granito, Alessandro; Giampaolo, Luca; Frisoni, Magda; Volta, Umberto; Fusconi, Marco; Masi, Chiara; Lenzi, Marco

    2014-03-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is frequently associated with other autoimmune diseases, including systemic sclerosis (SSc). In the last years many efforts have been dedicated to the research of widely accepted criteria for the early diagnosis of SSc. Since studies on the prevalence of early SSc in PBC patients are lacking, our aim was to investigate its hitherto unknown prevalence in a large cohort of PBC patients. We studied 80 PBC patients and 72 patients with other chronic liver diseases. Diagnostic workup included research into signs of connective tissue disease, determination of autoantibody profile, and examination of capillary abnormalities through nailfold videocapillaroscopy. Ten PBC patients (12.5%) satisfied diagnostic criteria for early SSc and 5 (6.3%) had definite SSc. None of the patients in the control group were diagnosed either with early or definite SSc. No differences were observed in terms of aminotransferases, alkaline phosphatase, and liver function tests between PBC patients with and without associated SSc. Early SSc is significantly frequent in PBC patients. The detection of early SSc in PBC patients may lead to a prompt treatment of its complications, preventing inabilities and preserving the chance of liver transplantation.

  10. European Dermatology Forum S1-guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of sclerosing diseases of the skin, Part 1: localized scleroderma, systemic sclerosis and overlap syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobler, R; Moinzadeh, P; Hunzelmann, N; Kreuter, A; Cozzio, A; Mouthon, L; Cutolo, M; Rongioletti, F; Denton, C P; Rudnicka, L; Frasin, L A; Smith, V; Gabrielli, A; Aberer, E; Bagot, M; Bali, G; Bouaziz, J; Braae Olesen, A; Foeldvari, I; Frances, C; Jalili, A; Just, U; Kähäri, V; Kárpáti, S; Kofoed, K; Krasowska, D; Olszewska, M; Orteu, C; Panelius, J; Parodi, A; Petit, A; Quaglino, P; Ranki, A; Sanchez Schmidt, J M; Seneschal, J; Skrok, A; Sticherling, M; Sunderkötter, C; Taieb, A; Tanew, A; Wolf, P; Worm, M; Wutte, N J; Krieg, T

    2017-09-01

    The term 'sclerosing diseases of the skin' comprises specific dermatological entities, which have fibrotic changes of the skin in common. These diseases mostly manifest in different clinical subtypes according to cutaneous and extracutaneous involvement and can sometimes be difficult to distinguish from each other. The present guideline focuses on characteristic clinical and histopathological features, diagnostic scores and the serum autoantibodies most useful for differential diagnosis. In addition, current strategies in the first- and advanced-line therapy of sclerosing skin diseases are addressed in detail. Part 1 of this guideline provides clinicians with an overview of the diagnosis and treatment of localized scleroderma (morphea), and systemic sclerosis including overlap syndromes of systemic sclerosis with diseases of the rheumatological spectrum. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  11. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-06

    May 6, 2014 ... facilitate and support articulation between the ECT mid-level worker qualification and the professional B EMC degree. Methods. The researchers used an exploratory, sequential mixed-method design, which is characterised by a qualitative phase of research followed by a quantitative phase. This design is ...

  12. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    supports medical education and research at institutions in 12 ... (CBE). CapacityPlus, led by IntraHealth International, is the USAID-funded ... acquire public health, clinical, and/or research skills, usually through applied learning in a .... If students were evaluated, indicate the type of student (i.e. medical, dental, nursing, etc.) ...

  13. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-01-24

    Jan 24, 2017 ... and the specific rotavirus VP4 (P-types) and VP7 (G-types) determined. Results: The .... Centre for Virus Research (CVR) of the Kenya Medical Research. Institute (KEMRI) ... rotavirus dsRNA was run on 10% polyacrylamide resolving gels using a large format .... What is known about this topic. •. Rotavirus is ...

  14. Antibodies against human cytomegalovirus late protein UL94 in the pathogenesis of scleroderma-like skin lesions in chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastano, Rocco; Dell'Agnola, Chiara; Bason, Caterina; Gigli, Federica; Rabascio, Cristina; Puccetti, Antonio; Tinazzi, Elisa; Cetto, Gianluigi; Peccatori, Fedro; Martinelli, Giovanni; Lunardi, Claudio

    2012-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) infection and its reactivation correlate both with the increased risk and with the worsening of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Because scleroderma-like skin lesions can occur in chronic GVHD (cGVHD) in allogeneic stem-cell transplant (HCT) patients and hCMV is relevant in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc), we evaluated the possible pathogenetic link between hCMV and skin cGVHD. Plasma from 18 HCT patients was tested for anti-UL94 and/or anti-NAG-2 antibodies, identified in SSc patients, by direct ELISA assays. Both donors and recipients were anti-hCMV IgG positive, without autoimmune diseases. Patients' purified anti-UL94 and anti-NAG-2 IgG binding to human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) and fibroblasts was performed by FACS analysis and ELISA test. HUVECs apoptosis and fibroblasts proliferation induced by patients' anti-NAG-2 antibodies were measured by DNA fragmentation and cell viability, respectively. About 11/18 patients developed cGVHD and all of them showed skin involvement, ranging from diffuse SSc-like lesions to limited erythema. Eight of eleven cGVHD patients were positive for anti-UL94 and/or anti-NAG-2 antibodies. Remarkably, 4/5 patients who developed diffuse or limited SSc-like lesions had antibodies directed against both UL94 and NAG-2; their anti-NAG-2 IgG-bound HUVECs and fibroblasts induce both endothelial cell apoptosis and fibroblasts proliferation, similar to that induced by purified anti-UL94 and anti-NAG-2 antibodies obtained from SSc patients. In conclusion, our data suggest a pathogenetic link between hCMV infection and scleroderma-like skin cGVHD in HCT patients through a mechanism of molecular mimicry between UL94 viral protein and NAG-2 molecule, as observed in patients with SSc.

  15. The Japanese Histologic Classification and T-score in the Oxford Classification system could predict renal outcome in Japanese IgA nephropathy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaihan, Ahmad Baseer; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Katsuno, Takayuki; Kato, Sawako; Imaizumi, Takahiro; Ozeki, Takaya; Hishida, Manabu; Nagata, Takanobu; Ando, Masahiko; Tsuboi, Naotake; Maruyama, Shoichi

    2017-12-01

    The Oxford Classification is utilized globally, but has not been fully validated. In this study, we conducted a comparative analysis between the Oxford Classification and Japanese Histologic Classification (JHC) to predict renal outcome in Japanese patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN). A retrospective cohort study including 86 adult IgAN patients was conducted. The Oxford Classification and the JHC were evaluated by 7 independent specialists. The JHC, MEST score in the Oxford Classification, and crescents were analyzed in association with renal outcome, defined as a 50% increase in serum creatinine. In multivariate analysis without the JHC, only the T score was significantly associated with renal outcome. While, a significant association was revealed only in the JHC on multivariate analysis with JHC. The JHC and T score in the Oxford Classification were associated with renal outcome among Japanese patients with IgAN. Superiority of the JHC as a predictive index should be validated with larger study population and cohort studies in different ethnicities.

  16. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-10-25

    Oct 25, 2017 ... stigma and superstition are known to lead to frequent presentation .... The limited documented research on challenges to help-seeking behaviour for cancer ..... to touch your breast [16] that breast self-examination may cause.

  17. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-10-02

    Oct 2, 2015 ... thought to prevent infection, but recent research has proven otherwise. In addition ... One patient had ophthalmalgia and was exposed to. Kaiy for one year and ... migraine, ear infections, tuberculosis, bone fractures, epilepsy,.

  18. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-07-12

    Jul 12, 2016 ... multiple risk factors provides support for multiple-behavior interventions as ... consumption) with smoking therefore needs further research. As such this study .... restaurants, in bars, and on a statewide basis. They preferred to.

  19. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mini-clinical-evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) is a way of assessing the clinical ... Ethical approval for this study was obtained from the Medical Health. Research ..... mini-CEX assessment and feedback session, the greater the likelihood of.

  20. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-04-14

    Apr 14, 2016 ... Qualitative data, content analysis approach was used. Results: Overall 422 .... Study design: A mixed method cross-sectional design using both quantitative and qualitative research methods as described by. Hanson et al [33] ...