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Sample records for scintillation time spectra

  1. Temporal power spectra of irradiance scintillation for infrared optical waves' propagation through marine atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Linyan

    2014-09-01

    Current theoretical temporal power spectra models of an optical wave have been developed for terrestrial environments. The interactions between humidity and temperature fluctuations in the marine atmospheric environments make the marine atmospheric turbulence particularly challenging, and the optical waves' propagation through marine turbulence exhibits a different behavior with respect to terrestrial propagation. In this paper, the temporal power spectra of irradiance scintillation under weak marine atmospheric turbulence, which is one of the key temporal statistics to describe the correlation of irradiance fluctuations at different time instances, is investigated in detail both analytically and numerically. Closed-form expressions for the temporal power spectra of irradiance scintillation are derived for infrared plane and spherical waves under weak marine atmospheric turbulence, and they consider physically the influences of finite turbulence inner and outer scales. The final results indicate that the marine atmospheric turbulence brings more effects on the irradiance scintillation than the terrestrial atmospheric turbulence.

  2. Ultra-fast timing with plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoischen, Robert [Department of Physics, Lund University, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Pietri, Stephane; Prokopowicz, Wawrzyniec; Schaffner, Henning; Gerl, Juergen; Wollersheim, Hans Juergen; Kurz, Nikolaus [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Rudolph, Dirk [Department of Physics, Lund University, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Fast timing detectors for time-of-flight measurements are essential identification tools for isotopes studied at fragment separators at major heavy-ion research facilities. While today's standard technique of utilizing a plastic scintillator read out by few photomultiplier tubes proofs to be efficient, it does not provide the required time resolution for future key experiments at, for example, the Super-FRS at FAIR. A common present-day approach is to use diamond detectors instead. While they do provide a better time resolution compared to scintillators, they are more difficult to use and far more expensive. Results from tests using a new design approach with standard materials will be presented. This leads to a much improved performance, but remains both cost-efficient, compact, and reliable. The design goals and how to accomplish them will be exemplified by the LYCCA (Lund-York-Cologne CAlorimeter) detector aiming for fast-beam experiments at HISPEC within NUSTAR.

  3. [Study of scintillating luminescence spectra of lead tungstate scintillation crystal doped with ions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, You-bao; Wu, Yu-rong; Zhang, Jian-xin; Yang, Pei-zhi; Xiao, Lin-rong; Yang, Hui

    2009-09-01

    The light yield of the as-grown PbWO4, annealed PbWO4 and BaF2:PbWO4 crystals were raised by utilizing our improved crystal growth instrument and technique. Their scintillating properties including transmittance, decay time and light yield were studied. Results reveal that the scintillating performances of the crystals were improved evidently by using the crystal annealing technique and the ions doping technique, especially the negative ions doping technique. The influence results of the two techniques are different. The ions doping technique raises their transmittance intensity in the whole measuring wavelength range. But the influence of annealing PbWO4 crystal on their transmittance is complicated. It improves its transmittance intensity at the wavelength above 360 nm, but weakens the transmittance intensity of the annealed PbWO4 crystal in the wavelength range from 320 to 360 nm. These phenomena should be related to the crystal defects which have absorption peaks in this wavelength range, especially for V(Pb)3+ defect which has characterized absorption peaks in this wavelength range. Also, the absorption of the defects influences the character of the decay time of these crystals. The big defect concentration relates to the short decay time. It should be mentioned that the ions doping technique reduces the defect content in the crystal, which is beneficial to the high transmittance intensity but induces slightly longer decay time than that of as-grown crystal and well annealed PbWO4 crystal. Also, the ions doping technique of the F- ion doped crystal leads to high light yield. The annealing technique and ions doping technique improve the light yield of crystals. The light yield of BaF2:PbWO4 reaches 65 p.e./MeV, which is near to the requirement of PET. The good result is related to the degeneration of the [WO4]2- tetrahedron induced by the F- occupying the O2- site in the crystal cell.

  4. Determination of the scintillator decay time by the autocorrelation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, V. A.; Morozova, N. V.

    2017-09-01

    An autocorrelation method is developed for determining the composition and decay time of scintillators. This method also allows studying the spatial distribution of nuclear radiation and controlling the amount of the dopants introduced in the scintillator. The decay time is measured from a few nanoseconds to microseconds. It is found out that the decay time increases in plastic scintillators with a wavelength shifter and a Gd doped.

  5. Parametrization of spectra of plasma bubble induced VHF satellite scintillations and its geophysical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Vijayakumar

    Full Text Available An important component of ionospheric plasma irregularity studies in the Indian low latitudes involves the study of the plasma bubbles which produce intense scintillations of the transionospheric satellite signals. Many such plasma bubble induced (PBI scintillation events were identified while recording 244 MHz signal from the geostationary satellite Fleetsat (73°E at Delhi (28.6°N, 77.2°E during March-April 1991. This type of scintillations represents changes in plasma processes. These scintillations are spectrally analyzed using an autoregressive (AR scheme, which is equivalent to maximum entropy method of spectrum analysis, amenable to extracting optimum spectral content from short data lengths (20 – 40 s. Each spectrum is assigned a level of detectability using the final prediction error (FPE derived from the optimum filter order required to resolve the spectrum. Lower detectability together with a higher order filter indicate a higher level of coherence for the plasma irregularities (discrete structures. Consistent patterns for these scintillations emerge from the present analysis as follows: (1 the initial and final phases of a scintillation patch display quasiperiodic oscillations. Their corresponding spectra show dominant (Gaussian shaped spectral features with detectability levels of –6 dB to –12 dB and requiring a higher order (>6 AR filter for their spectral resolution. These are most likely associated with discrete "filament-like" or "sheet-like" plasma structures that exist near the bubble walls. (2 Two main features of the scintillation spectra could be positively associated with the well-developed plasma bubble stage: (a spectra displaying a power-law process with a single component spectral slope between 1.6 to 3.0. Generally such spectra are resolved with a 2nd order filter and have a 1 dB to 6 dB of detectability. (b Spectra displaying a double slope, indicating an inner and an outer scale regime for the power

  6. Parametrization of spectra of plasma bubble induced VHF satellite scintillations and its geophysical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Vijayakumar

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available An important component of ionospheric plasma irregularity studies in the Indian low latitudes involves the study of the plasma bubbles which produce intense scintillations of the transionospheric satellite signals. Many such plasma bubble induced (PBI scintillation events were identified while recording 244 MHz signal from the geostationary satellite Fleetsat (73°E at Delhi (28.6°N, 77.2°E during March-April 1991. This type of scintillations represents changes in plasma processes. These scintillations are spectrally analyzed using an autoregressive (AR scheme, which is equivalent to maximum entropy method of spectrum analysis, amenable to extracting optimum spectral content from short data lengths (20 – 40 s. Each spectrum is assigned a level of detectability using the final prediction error (FPE derived from the optimum filter order required to resolve the spectrum. Lower detectability together with a higher order filter indicate a higher level of coherence for the plasma irregularities (discrete structures. Consistent patterns for these scintillations emerge from the present analysis as follows: (1 the initial and final phases of a scintillation patch display quasiperiodic oscillations. Their corresponding spectra show dominant (Gaussian shaped spectral features with detectability levels of –6 dB to –12 dB and requiring a higher order (>6 AR filter for their spectral resolution. These are most likely associated with discrete "filament-like" or "sheet-like" plasma structures that exist near the bubble walls. (2 Two main features of the scintillation spectra could be positively associated with the well-developed plasma bubble stage: (a spectra displaying a power-law process with a single component spectral slope between 1.6 to 3.0. Generally such spectra are resolved with a 2nd order filter and have a 1 dB to 6 dB of detectability. (b Spectra displaying a double slope, indicating an inner and an outer scale regime for the power

  7. Power spectra of ionospheric scintillations obtained from observations of Cygnus A on the radio telescope URAN-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panishko, S. K.; Litvinenko, O. A.; Kravetz, R. O.

    2006-10-01

    There are many records of Cygnus A passages through the direction pattern obtained on the radio telescope URAN-4 during 1998-2004. Most of these show fluctuations in the flux density caused by ionospheric scintillations. The power spectrum is an important characteristic of the stochastic process and such processes are the main reason for the nature of scintillations. In this paper, estimations of the power spectra of ionospheric scintillations are made from the observations of Cyg A on the radio telescope URAN-4. Examples of the spectra are presented for observations under different circumstances and for several scintillation activity levels.

  8. Calibration of the time response functions of a quenched plastic scintillator for neutron time of flight

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, J B; Peng, H S; Tang, C H; Zhang, B H; Ding, Y K; Chen, M; Chen, H S; Li, C G; Wen, T S; Yu, R Z

    2002-01-01

    The time response functions of an ultrafast quenched plastic scintillation detector used to measure neutron time of flight spectra were calibrated by utilizing cosmic rays and implosion neutrons from DT-filled capsules at the Shenguang II laser facility. These sources could be regarded as delta function pulses due to their much narrower time widths than those of the time response functions of the detection system. The results showed that the detector responses to DT neutrons and to cosmic rays were 1.18 and 0.96 ns FWHM, respectively.

  9. A coincidental timing model for the scintillating fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zugec, Petar, E-mail: pzugec@phy.hr [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka cesta 32, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-12-11

    A model describing the coincidental timing of scintillating fibers is developed. Fiber geometry, the rate of scintillation decay together with the mean number, spatial dispersion and attenuation of emitted photons are considered. For a specific selection of probability distributions and parameters involved, the entire coincidental timing distributions, corresponding FWHM values and the photon detection efficiencies are extracted. The significance of the number of photons from the scintillation process is specially emphasized. Additionally, the model is extended to include a triggering feature, experimentally realized by coupling fibers to any photon resolving device. Finally, the measurements of a coincidental timing distribution were performed, with an excellent agreement found between the experimental and predicted theoretical results.

  10. Timing and Spectroscopy Requirements for a Plastic Scintillating Fiber Bundle Time-of-Flight Neutron Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    the spinthariscope, which was first built in 1903 by Sir William Crookes. The spinthariscope featured a ZnS screen, which produced scintillations ...linearity, speed, density, transparency, and favorable costs to manufacture [1]. Over time scintillators have transformed from the ZnS of the early...TIMING AND SPECTROSCOPY REQUIREMENTS FOR A PLASTIC SCINTILLATING FIBER BUNDLE TIME-OF-FLIGHT NEUTRON SPECTROMETER THESIS Paul A. Clement, First

  11. SNO+ Liquid Scintillator Characterization: Timing, Quenching, and Energy Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Sullivan, E., E-mail: eosullivan@owl.phy.queensu.ca [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Stirling Hall, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Wan Chan Tseung, H.S., E-mail: hwan@uw.edu [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Tolich, N. [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); O' Keeffe, H.M.; Chen, M. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Stirling Hall, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-08-15

    This contribution describes laboratory measurements designed to investigate the optical properties of linear alkybenzene (LAB). Presented here is the measurement of the scintillation light timing profiles due to alpha and beta-particle excitation, the calculation of alpha/beta discrimination capability based on these timing distributions, and the investigation of electron energy scale.

  12. Timing performance of ZnO:Ga nanopowder composite scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turtos, Rosana M. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Gundacker, Stefan; Lucchini, Marco T.; Lecoq, Paul; Auffray, Etiennette [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Prochazkova, Lenka; Cuba, Vaclav [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Buresova, Hana [Nuvia a.s, Kralupy nad Vltavou (Czech Republic); Mrazek, Jan [Institute of Photonics and Electronics AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Nikl, Martin [Institute of Physics of the AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    The implementation of nanocrystal-based composite scintillators as a new generation of ultrafast particle detectors is explored using ZnO:Ga nanopowder. Samples are characterized with a spectral-time resolved photon counting system and pulsed X-rays, followed by coincidence time resolution (CTR) measurements under 511 keV gamma excitation. Results are comparable to CTR values obtained using bulk inorganic scintillators. Bringing the ZnO:Ga nanocrystal's timing performance to radiation detectors could pave the research path towards sub-20 ps time resolution as shown in this contribution. However, an efficiency boost when placing nanopowders in a transparent host constitutes the main challenge in order to benefit from sub-nanosecond recombination times. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Inorganic scintillator detectors for real-time verification during brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzscher, G.; Beddar, S.

    2017-05-01

    Widespread use of real-time dose measurement technology to verify brachytherapy (BT) treatments is currently limited because only few detectors exhibit the large dynamic range and signal intensities that is required to accurately report the data. Inorganic scintillator detectors (ISDs) are promising for real-time BT verification because they can exhibit large signal intensities. Luminescence properties of ISDs based on ruby, Y2O3:Eu and CsI:Tl were compared with BCF-60 plastic scintillators to determine their potential for BT verification. Measurements revealed that ISDs can exhibit signal intensities 1800 times larger than BCF-60 and that the Čerenkov and fluorescence light contamination is negligible. The favourable luminescence properties of ISDs opens the possibility to manufacture simplified detector systems that can lead to more widespread real-time verification during BT treatment deliveries.

  14. Timing performance of ZnO: Ga nanopowder composite scintillators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Turtos, R.M.; Gundacker, S.; Lucchini, M.T.; Procházková, L.; Čuba, V.; Burešová, H.; Mrázek, Jan; Nikl, Martin; Lecoq, P.; Auffray, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 11 (2016), s. 843-847 ISSN 1862-6254 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-09876S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 690599 - ASCIMAT Grant - others:COST(XE) TD1401 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanocrystals * coincidence time resolution * scintillators ZnO :Ga Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D) Impact factor: 3.032, year: 2016

  15. Can Transient Phenomena Help Improving Time Resolution in Scintillators?

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P; Vasiliev, A

    2014-01-01

    The time resolution of a scintillator-based detector is directly driven by the density of photoelectrons generated in the photodetector at the detection threshold. At the scintillator level it is related to the intrinsic light yield, the pulse shape (rise time and decay time) and the light transport from the gamma-ray conversion point to the photodetector. When aiming at 10 ps time resolution, fluctuations in the thermalization and relaxation time of hot electrons and holes generated by the interaction of ionization radiation with the crystal become important. These processes last for up to a few tens of ps and are followed by a complex trapping-detrapping process, Poole-Frenkel effect, Auger ionization of traps and electron-hole recombination, which can last for a few ns with very large fluctuations. This paper will review the different processes at work and evaluate if some of the transient phenomena taking place during the fast thermalization phase can be exploited to extract a time tag with a precision in...

  16. How Photonic Crystals Can Improve the Timing Resolution of Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P; Knapitsch, A

    2013-01-01

    Photonic crystals (PhCs) and quantum optics phenomena open interesting perspectives to enhance the light extraction from scintillating me dia with high refractive indices as demonstrated by our previous work. By doing so, they also in fl uence the timing resolution of scintillators by improving the photostatistics. The present cont ribution will demonstrate that they are actually doing much more. Indeed, photonic crystals, if properly designed, allow the extr action of fast light propagation modes in the crystal with higher efficiency, therefore contributing to increasing the density of photons in the early phase of the light pulse. This is of particular interest to tag events at future high-energy physics colliders, such as CLIC, with a bunch-crossing rate of 2 GHz, as well as for a new generation of time-of-flight positron emission tomographs (TOFPET) aiming at a coincidence timing resolution of 100 ps FWHM. At this level of precision, good control of the light propagation modes is crucial if we consid...

  17. Measurement of neutron energy spectra from 15 to 150 MeV using stacked liquid scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Buffler, A; Allie, M S; Binns, P J; Dangendorf, V; Langen, K M; Nolte, R; Schuhmacher, H

    2002-01-01

    A multiple liquid scintillator system for measuring the energy spectrum of a neutron beam in the range 15-150 MeV is described. Two or more slabs of NE213 scintillator (13x13x7 cm sup 3) are stacked behind one-another and only events in which a neutron interacts in the upstream scintillator are analysed. The system is designed to minimise the escape of forward recoil protons from the detecting media. Test measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of the detector response to quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams of energies 62.5 and 97.5 MeV are presented.

  18. Characterizing time decay of bibenzyl scintillator using time correlated single photon counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatarik, R.; Bernstein, L. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Carman, M. L.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Zaitseva, N. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Wiedeking, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, 7129 Somerset West (South Africa)

    2012-10-15

    The time decay of several scintillation materials has been measured using the time correlated single photon counting method and a new organic crystal with a highly suppressed delayed light has been identified. Results comparing the light decay of the bibenzyl crystal with a xylene based detector, which is currently installed at National Ignition Facility will be presented.

  19. Decay Time Measurement for Different Energy Depositions of Plastic Scintillator Fabricated by High Temperature Polymerization Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Yong-Kyun [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Plastic scintillators are based on organic fluorite. They have many advantages such as fast rise and decay time, high optical transmission, ease of manufacturing, low cost, and large available size. For these reasons they are widely used for particle identification. Also, protection of people against a variety of threats (such as nuclear, radiological, and explosive) represents a true challenge along with the continuing development of science and technology. The plastic scintillator is widely used in various devise, which serves for nuclear, photonics, quantum, and high-energy physics. The plastic scintillator is probably the most widely used organic detector, and polystyrene is one of the most widely used materials in the making of the plastic scintillator detector. Thus, a styrene monomer as a solvent was used to fabricate the plastic scintillator by using high temperature polymerization reaction, and then the emission wavelength and the decay times for different energy depositions were measured by using the fabricated plastic scintillator. A plastic scintillator was fabricated to measure decay time for different energy depositions using the high temperature polymerization. Emission wavelength was measured of 426.05 nm to confirm a scintillator property using the spectrophotometer. Four gamma-ray sources (Cs-137, Co-60, Na-22, and Ba-133) were used to evaluate effect for decay time of different energy depositions. The average decay time of the fabricated plastic scintillator was measured to approximately 4.72 ns slightly higher more than commercial plastic scintillator. In future, light output and linearity will be measured to evaluate other property compared with the commercial scintillator.

  20. Potential advantages of a cesium fluoride scintillator for a time-of-flight positron camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, R; Gresset, C; Vacher, J

    1980-02-01

    In order to improve the quality of positron tomographic imaging, a time-of-flight technique combined with a classical reconstruction method has been investigated. The decay time of NaI(Tl) and bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillators is too long for this application, and efficiency of the plastic scintillators is too low. Cesium fluoride appears to be a very promising detector material. This paper presents preliminary results obtained with a time-of-flight technique using CsF scintillators. The expected advantages were realized.

  1. Real-time Scintillation Monitoring in Alaska from a Longitudinal Chain of ASTRA's SM-211 GPS TEC and Scintillation Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, G.; Azeem, S. I.; Reynolds, A.; Santana, J.; Hampton, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Amplitude and phase scintillation can cause serious difficulties for GPS receivers. Intense scintillation can cause loss of lock. High latitude studies generally show that phase scintillation can be severe, but the amplitude scintillation tends to be small. The reason for this is not yet understood. Furthermore, the actual causes of the ionospheric irregularities that produce high latitude scintillation are not well understood. While the gradient drift instability is thought to be important in the F-region, there may be other structures present in either the E- or F-regions. The role of particle precipitation is also not well understood. Four of ASTRA's CASES GPS receivers were deployed in Alaska to demonstrate our ability to map scintillation in realtime, to provide space weather services to GPS users, and to initiate a detailed investigation of these effects. These dual-frequency GPS receivers measure total electron content (TEC) and scintillation. The scintillation monitors were deployed in a longitudinal chain at sites in Kaktovic, Fort Yukon, Poker Flat, and Gakona. Scintillation statistics show phase scintillations to be largest at Kaktovic and smallest at Gakona. We present GPS phase scintillation and auroral emission results from the Alaska chain to characterize the correspondence between scintillation and auroral features, and to investigate the role of high latitude auroral features in driving the phase scintillations. We will also present data showing how phase scintillation can cause other GPS receivers to lose lock. The data and results are particularly valuable because they illustrate some of the challenges of using GPS systems for positioning and navigation in an auroral region like Alaska. These challenges for snowplough drivers were recently highlighted, along with the CASES SM-211 space weather monitor, in a special video in which ASTRA and three other small businesses were presented with an entrepreneurial award from William Shatner (http://youtu.be/bIVKEQH_YPk).

  2. Time resolution measurements of scintillating counters for a new NA62 trigger charged hodoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodenko, S. A.; Khudyakov, A. A.; Mannelli, I.; Obraztsov, V. F.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Semenov, V. K.; Sugonyaev, V. P.

    2014-09-01

    The results of time resolution measurements on cosmic muons with MWPC chambers as a tracking system are presented. Two options of dual SiPM readout considered: direct light collection from opposite cut corners of the scintillator and light collection using two oppositely directed bundles of WLS fibers. Two types of SiPMs are used: S10985-050C and MicroFB-60035. The best result achived using mean-time between two SiPMs. For the direct readout from 134 × 107 × 20 mm3 scintillator time resolution σ = 300±10 ps and maximum signal arrival time spread ΔT = 1.6±0.2 ns. Using WLS fiber readout option with 265 × 107 × 30 mm3 scintillator tile signal arrival time spread ΔT = 150±50 ps and time resolution σ = 370±10 ps.

  3. BGO as a hybrid scintillator / Cherenkov radiator for cost-effective time-of-flight PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, S. E.; Schaart, D. R.

    2017-06-01

    Due to detector developments in the last decade, the time-of-flight (TOF) method is now commonly used to improve the quality of positron emission tomography (PET) images. Clinical TOF-PET systems based on L(Y)SO:Ce crystals and silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) with coincidence resolving times (CRT) between 325 ps and 400 ps FWHM have recently been developed. Before the introduction of L(Y)SO:Ce, BGO was used in many PET systems. In addition to a lower price, BGO offers a superior attenuation coefficient and a higher photoelectric fraction than L(Y)SO:Ce. However, BGO is generally considered an inferior TOF-PET scintillator. In recent years, TOF-PET detectors based on the Cherenkov effect have been proposed. However, the low Cherenkov photon yield in the order of  ˜10 photons per event complicates energy discrimination-a severe disadvantage in clinical PET. The optical characteristics of BGO, in particular its high transparency down to 310 nm and its high refractive index of  ˜2.15, are expected to make it a good Cherenkov radiator. Here, we study the feasibility of combining event timing based on Cherenkov emission with energy discrimination based on scintillation in BGO, as a potential approach towards a cost-effective TOF-PET detector. Rise time measurements were performed using a time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) setup implemented on a digital photon counter (DPC) array, revealing a prompt luminescent component likely to be due to Cherenkov emission. Coincidence timing measurements were performed using BGO crystals with a cross-section of 3 mm  ×  3 mm and five different lengths between 3 mm and 20 mm, coupled to DPC arrays. Non-Gaussian coincidence spectra with a FWHM of 200 ps were obtained with the 27 mm3 BGO cubes, while FWHM values as good as 330 ps were achieved with the 20 mm long crystals. The FWHM value was found to improve with decreasing temperature, while the FWTM value showed the opposite trend.

  4. Tests of a high resolution time of flight system based on long and narrow scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, E; Sun, W; Yamamoto, H

    1996-01-01

    We have tested a prototype time-of-flight system based on bulk scintillator block of dimensions 2.5 \\times 2.5 \\times 200 cm. Using a calibration scheme similar to the one used in actual collider experiments, we have achieved a resolution of 71 ps using Amperex XP2020/UR photomultipliers and 81 ps using proximity-focusing fine-mesh photomultipliers (Hamamatsu R2021). Results are also obtained for scintillating fiber blocks of the same dimensions. Good internal reflectivity of the bulk scintillator block resulted in resolutions superior to the fibre blocks. A single-photon pulsed laser system was used to study photomultipliers and the results were used in a Monte Carlo simulation of the system to study the critical elements that determine the resolution.

  5. Fast timing with plastic scintillators for in-beam heavy-ion spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoischen, R., E-mail: robert.hoischen@nuclear.lu.se [Department of Physics, Lund University, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Pietri, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Rudolph, D. [Department of Physics, Lund University, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Prokopowicz, W.; Schaffner, H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Emde, S. [Lehrstuhl fuer Operations Management, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Golubev, P. [Department of Physics, Lund University, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Wendt, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Kurz, N.; Wollersheim, H.J.; Gerl, J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-10-21

    The design, R and D, and testing of a new plastic-scintillator detector for Time-of-Flight measurements with relativistic heavy-ion beams are presented. A design approach using 32 independent precise timing measurements of the same physical event is followed. This is different from the conventional scheme, which aims at two or four high-precision measurements. A circular, 27 cm in diameter, BC-420 plastic-scintillator sheet is read-out by 32 photomultiplier tubes in order to achieve an intrinsic detector resolution on the order of 10 ps root mean square.

  6. Selective reconstruction of space-time spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, E. N.

    1985-12-01

    The relationship between the active component of mutual resistance and radiation patterns of arbitrary receive-transmit antennas is simplified on the basis of the reciprocity theorem. The simplification does not violate the identity of the relationship, and has a useful application to the correction of the near-field holograms of arbitrary sources with the aim of the selective reconstruction of the space-time spectra of homogeneous or inhomogeneous waves. The version of the relationship obtained can also be extended to acoustic antennas. Numerical simulation results are presented concerning the reconstruction of the radiation pattern of a half-wave dipole on the basis of near-field sounding in a cylindrical shielded chamber.

  7. Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glebov, V Yu; Forrest, C; Knauer, J P; Pruyne, A; Romanofsky, M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C; Caggiano, J A; Carman, M L; Clancy, T J; Hatarik, R; McNaney, J; Zaitseva, N P

    2012-10-01

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented.

  8. A method for measuring the formation times of light flashes in scintillator films

    CERN Document Server

    Astvatsaturov, R G; Harutunyan, V N; Eganov, V S

    1999-01-01

    A method is proposed to estimate experimentally the formation times of light flashes in different types of scintillators. For illustration of the method a series of measurements with three following types of polystyrene (PS)-based scintillator films has been conducted: PS+1% 4'-vinyl-3-hydroxyflavone (4V3HF); PS+2% para-terphenyl (PTP)+0.007%4, 4'-distyrylbiphenyl( DSBP); PS+1% hydroxyflavone (3HF). The values obtained for the delays of light flashes were respectively: (0.2+-0.14) ns, (0.6+-0.17) ns and (0.9+-0.18) ns.

  9. Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Caggiano, J. A.; Carman, M. L.; Clancy, T. J.; Hatarik, R.; McNaney, J.; Zaitseva, N. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented.

  10. Spectral windows analysis method for monitoring anthropogenic radionuclides in real-time environmental gamma-ray scintillation spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Elena; Casanovas, Ramon; Salvadó, Marçal

    2017-11-20

    This paper proposes an analysis methodology based on the spectral windows technique aimed for environmental real-time gamma-ray spectra obtained with scintillation detectors. The method permits to monitor activity concentrations of selected isotopes, such as anthropogenic radionuclides like 137Cs and 131I, by removing the Compton scattering plus other external contributions and resolving peak overlapping within any window. Activity concentrations are presented for 137Cs, 131I, 214Bi and 214Pb when applying the method to a monitor using a LaBr3(Ce) detector. The method avoids false-positive and false-negative results of anthropogenic radionuclides in presence of radiation from natural origin obtaining activity concentrations that correspond to those obtained by a Gaussian fitting commercial software. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  11. Technical note: Scintillations of the double star α Cru observed by GOMOS/Envisat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Gurvich

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss scintillation time-spectra of the double star α Cru, which were measured by the GOMOS/Envisat photometer. The components of α Cru are not resolved by the angular field of view of the detector. The double structure of the light source reveals itself in the modulation of the observed scintillation spectra; this modulation is caused by anisotropic irregularities of the stratospheric air density. We present a qualitative and quantitative explanation of the properties of the double-star scintillation spectra. Possibilities of using double star scintillations for studying atmospheric air density irregularities are also discussed in the paper.

  12. Timing Characterization of Helium-4 Fast Neutron Detector with EJ-309 Organic Liquid Scintillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yinong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the Helium-4 gas fast neutron scintillation detectors is being used in time-sensitive measurements, such time-of-flight and multiplicity counting. In this paper, a set of time aligned signals was acquired in a coincidence measurement using the Helium-4 gas detectors and EJ-309 liquid scintillators. The high-speed digitizer system is implanted with a trigger moving average window (MAW unit combing with its constant fraction discriminator (CFD feature. It can calculate a “time offset” to the timestamp value to get a higher resolution timestamp (up to 50 ps, which is better than the digitizer's time resolution (4 ns [1]. The digitized waveforms were saved to the computer hard drive and post processed with digital analysis code to determine the difference of their arrival times. The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM of the Gaussian fit was used as to examine the resolution. For the cascade decay of Cobalt-60 (1.17 and 1.33 MeV, the first version of the Helium-4 detector with two Hamamatsu R580 photomultipliers (PMT installed at either end of the cylindrical gas chamber (20 cm in length and 4.4 cm in diameter has a time resolution which is about 3.139 ns FWHM. With improved knowledge of the timing performance, the Helium-4 scintillation detectors are excellent for neutron energy spectrometry applications requiring high temporal and energy resolutions.

  13. Factors Influencing Time Resolution of Scintillators and Ways to Improve Them

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P; Brunner, S; Meyer, T; Auffray, E; Knapitsch, A; Jarron, P

    2010-01-01

    The renewal of interest in Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF-PET), as well as the necessity to precisely tag events in high energy physics (HEP) experiments at future colliders are pushing for an optimization of all factors affecting the time resolution of the whole acquisition chain comprising the crystal, the photo detector, and the electronics. The time resolution of a scintillator-based detection system is determined by the rate of photo electrons at the detection threshold, which depends on the time distribution of photons being converted in the photo detector. The possibility to achieve time resolution of about 100 ps Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) requires an optimization of the light production in the scintillator, the light transport and its transfer from the scintillator to the photo detector. In order to maximize the light yield, and in particular the density of photons in the first nanosecond, while minimizing the rise time and decay time, particular attention must be paid to the...

  14. MODELING TIME DISPERSION DUE TO OPTICAL PATH LENGTH DIFFERENCES IN SCINTILLATION DETECTORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, W W; Choong, W-S; Derenzo, S E

    2014-03-14

    We characterize the nature of the time dispersion in scintillation detectors caused by path length differences of the scintillation photons as they travel from their generation point to the photodetector. Using Monte Carlo simulation, we find that the initial portion of the distribution (which is the only portion that affects the timing resolution) can usually be modeled by an exponential decay. The peak amplitude and decay time depend both on the geometry of the crystal, the position within the crystal that the scintillation light originates from, and the surface finish. In a rectangular parallelpiped LSO crystal with 3 mm × 3 mm cross section and polished surfaces, the decay time ranges from 10 ps (for interactions 1 mm from the photodetector) up to 80 ps (for interactions 50 mm from the photodetector). Over that same range of distances, the peak amplitude ranges from 100% (defined as the peak amplitude for interactions 1 mm from the photodetector) down to 4% for interactions 50 mm from the photodetector. Higher values for the decay time are obtained for rough surfaces, but the exact value depends on the simulation details. Estimates for the decay time and peak amplitude can be made for different cross section sizes via simple scaling arguments.

  15. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Drakopoulos, Michael [Diamond Light Source, I12 Joint Engineering, Environmental, Processing (JEEP) Beamline, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Rack, Alexander [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Eakins, Daniel E., E-mail: d.eakins@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-24

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  16. Deuterated-xylene (xylene-d{sub 10}; EJ301D): A new, improved deuterated liquid scintillator for neutron energy measurements without time-of-flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becchetti, F.D.; Raymond, R.S.; Torres-Isea, R.O. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Di Fulvio, A.; Clarke, S.D.; Pozzi, S.A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Febbraro, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    In conjunction with Eljen Technology, Inc. (Sweetwater,TX) we have designed, constructed, and evaluated a 3 in. ×3 in. deuterated-xylene organic liquid scintillator (C{sub 8}D{sub 10}; EJ301D) as a fast neutron detector. Similar to deuterated benzene (C{sub 6}D{sub 6}; NE230, BC537, and EJ315) this scintillator can provide good pulse-shape discrimination between neutrons and gamma rays, has good timing characteristics, and can provide a light spectrum with peaks corresponding to discrete neutron energy groups up to ca. 20 MeV. Unlike benzene-based detectors, deuterated xylene is less volatile, less toxic, is not known to be carcinogenic, has a higher flashpoint, and hence is much safer for many applications. In addition EJ301D can provide slightly more light output and better PSD than deuterated-benzene scintillators. We show that, as with deuterated-benzene scintillators, the light-response spectra can be unfolded to provide useable neutron energy spectra without need for time-of-flight (ToF). An array of these detectors arranged at many angles close to a reaction target can be much more effective (×10 to ×100 or more) than an array of long-path ToF detectors which must utilize a narrowly-bunched and pulse-selected beam. As we demonstrate using a small Van de Graaff accelerator, measurements can thus be performed when a bunched and pulse-selected beam (as needed for time-of-flight) is not available.

  17. Investigation of organic liquid-scintillator optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Juergen; Feilitzsch, Franz von; Goeger-Neff, Marianne; Lewke, Timo; Meindl, Quirin; Oberauer, Lothar; Potzel, Walter; Todor, Sebastian; Wurm, Michael [Physik Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str., 85748 Garching (Germany); Marrodan Undagoitia, Teresa [Physik Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str., 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Institut, Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    The characterization of different organic liquid-scintillator mixtures is an important step towards the design of a large-scale detector such as LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy). Its physics goals, extending from particle and geological to astrophysical issues, set high demands on the optical properties of the liquid scintillator. Therefore, small-scale experiments are carried out in order to optimize the final scintillator mixture. PXE, LAB, and dodecane are under consideration as solvents. Setups for the determination of scintillator properties are presented, such as attenuation length, light yield, emission spectra, fluorescence decay times, and quenching factors. Furthermore, results are discussed.

  18. Fusion neutron energy spectra measured by time-of-flight spectrometers

    CERN Document Server

    Elevant, T

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of measured neutron energy spectra provides information on the central ion velocity distribution; e.g. ion temperature and fast ions induced by NBI- or ICR-heating and on impurity content in fusion grade plasmas. Two self-contained high-energy resolution time-of-flight neutron spectrometers have been used at the JET- and JT-60U tokamaks during DD-operation. In the spectrometers, each neutron undergoes (n, p) elastic scattering in two sets of hydrogen based scintillators. Elapsed time between the two scatter events is measured and the energy of the neutron is evaluated. Interpretation of acquired data together with results obtained from other diagnostics yields information on central plasma parameters. Deduced ion temperatures, fast ion fractional contributions during auxiliary NBI- and ICR-heating and impurity content is presented. In general, good agreement is obtained between neutron data and data from other diagnostics.

  19. Characteristics of Polar Cap Patches and Shear Flows Inferred from GPS Scintillation Spectra following the CME Impact on 22 January 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrano, C. S.; Basu, S.; MacKenzie, E.; Groves, K. M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Holmes, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Polar cap patches are localized enhancements in ionospheric density which originate from solar EUV ionization on the dayside, enter the polar cap at the dayside cusp, convect anti-sunward at km/s velocities, and then exit the polar cap near midnight to merge with sunward returning flow patterns. Plasma irregularities associated with patches are the leading cause of high-latitude scintillations at L-band, and fast shear flows near the dayside cusp are thought to be integral to patch formation. In this paper, we report on the characteristics of polar cap patches and fast flows inferred from the spectra of GPS scintillations recorded at Longyearbyen, Svalbard, following the CME impact on 22 January 2012. Following the CME impact, elevated GPS TEC values indicate the passage of patches through the cusp between 11-15 MLT, accompanied by significant GPS phase scintillations (σφ ~ 0.5 radians) but minimal amplitude scintillations (S4 theory. We apply this technique to investigate the noontime entrance of patches into the dayside cusp and the midnight exit of patches from the polar cap. The scan velocity increased from about 500-1000 m/s following the initial CME impact at ~6:00 UT, to sustained velocities between 1500-3000 m/s measured by GPS satellites whose ray paths intersected fast plasma flows near the cusp. In this sector, the phase spectral index (p) generally ranged between 2.4-2.8, with a tendency for somewhat larger values when the flow was faster. Weaker irregularities were detected in the outflow sector between 20-24 MLT, when p generally ranged from 2.6-3.0. The scan velocities measured in the outflow sector were slower, generally between 400-600 m/s. These velocity estimates compare favorably with ion drift measurements made by the DMSP satellites. Our analysis technique is automated and could potentially enable continuous monitoring of flow patterns in the polar cap using a relatively inexpensive GPS scintillation monitor. These measurements could then

  20. Time series with mixed spectra theory and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ta-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Time series with mixed spectra are characterized by hidden periodic components buried in random noise. Despite strong interest in the statistical and signal processing communities, no book offers a comprehensive and up-to-date treatment of the subject. Filling this void, Time Series with Mixed Spectra focuses on the methods and theory for the statistical analysis of time series with mixed spectra. It presents detailed theoretical and empirical analyses of important methods and algorithms. Using both simulated and real-world data to illustrate the analyses, the book discusses periodogram analys

  1. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E; Chapman, David J; White, Thomas G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits).

  2. Plastic scintillation detectors for precision Time-of-Flight measurements of relativistic heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Jian; Zhao, Jian-Wei; Sun, Bao-Hua; He, Liu-Chun; Lin, Wei-Ping; Liu, Chuan-Ye; Tanihata, Isao; Terashima, Satoru; Tian, Yi; Wang, Feng; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Guang-Xin; Zhang, Xue-Heng; Zhu, Li-Hua; Duan, Li-Min; Hu, Rong-Jiang; Liu, Zhong; Lu, Chen-Gui; Ren, Pei-Pei; Sheng, Li-Na; Sun, Zhi-Yu; Wang, Shi-Tao; Wang, Tao-Feng; Xu, Zhi-Guo; Zheng, Yong

    2017-06-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors for Time-of-Flight (TOF) measurements are almost essential for event-by-event identification of relativistic rare isotopes. In this work, a pair of plastic scintillation detectors of dimensions 50 × 50 × 3t mm3 and 80 × 100 × 3t mm3 have been set up at the External Target Facility (ETF), Institute of Modern Physics (IMP). Their time, energy and position responses are measured with the 18O primary beam at 400 MeV/nucleon. After off-line corrections for walk effect and position, the time resolutions of the two detectors are determined to be 27 ps (σ) and 36 ps (σ), respectively. Both detectors have nearly the same energy resolution of 3.1% (σ) and position resolution of about 3.4 mm (σ). The detectors have been used successfully in nuclear reaction cross section measurements, and will be be employed for upgrading the RIBLL2 beam line at IMP as well as for the high energy branch at HIAF. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475014,11235002) and National Key Research and Development Program (2016YFA0400500)

  3. Comparison of exit time moment spectra for extrinsic metric balls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurtado, Ana; Markvorsen, Steen; Palmer, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    We prove explicit upper and lower bounds for the $L^1$-moment spectra for the Brownian motion exit time from extrinsic metric balls of submanifolds $P^m$ in ambient Riemannian spaces $N^n$. We assume that $P$ and $N$ both have controlled radial curvatures (mean curvature and sectional curvature......, respectively) as viewed from a pole in $N$. The bounds for the exit moment spectra are given in terms of the corresponding spectra for geodesic metric balls in suitably warped product model spaces. The bounds are sharp in the sense that equalities are obtained in characteristic cases. As a corollary we also...... obtain new intrinsic comparison results for the exit time spectra for metric balls in the ambient manifolds $N^n$ themselves....

  4. Ionoluminescence analysis of glass scintillators and application to single-ion-hit real-time detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Akihito, E-mail: yokoyama.akihito@jaea.go.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Kada, Wataru [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Satoh, Takahiro; Koka, Masashi [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Shimada, Keisuke; Yokoata, Yuya; Miura, Kenta; Hanaizumi, Osamu [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, we propose and test a real-time detection system for single-ion hits using mega-electronvolt (MeV)-heavy ions. The system was constructed using G2000 and G9 glass scintillators, as well as an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera combined with an inverted microscope with a 10× objective lens. Commercially available G2000 and G9 glass scintillators, which have been reported to exhibit strong photoluminescence at 489, 543, 585, and 622 nm as a result of the Tb{sup 3+} f–f transition, were employed for highly accurate ionized particle detection. The EMCCD camera had a resolution of 512 × 512 pixels, each with a size of 16 μm × 16 μm, and a maximum linear gain of 8 × 10{sup 5} electrons. For 260-MeV Ne, 3 ion hits/s were detected by our system. The intensity of the ionoluminescence (IL) peak induced by the heavy ions was 140 times the noise intensity. In contrast, the luminous diameter at the full width at half maximum (FWHM) in both the horizontal and vertical directions was calculated to be approximately 4.5 μm. These results suggest that our detection system can accurately detect single-ion hits with a diameter of the order of 1 μm.

  5. The development of the SNO+ experiment: Scintillator timing, pulse shape discrimination, and sterile neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Erin

    The SNO+ experiment is a multi-purpose neutrino detector which is under construction in the SNOLAB facility in Sudbury, Ontario. SNO+ will search for neutrinoless double beta decay, and will measure low energy solar neutrinos. This thesis will describe three main development activities for the SNO+ experiment: the measurement of the timing parameters for the liquid scintillator cocktail, using those timing parameters to estimate the ability of SNO+ to discriminate alpha and beta events in the detector, and a sensitivity study that examines how solar neutrino data can constrain a light sterile neutrino model. Characterizing the timing parameters of the emission light due to charged-particle excitation in the scintillator is necessary for proper reconstruction of events in the detector. Using data obtained from a bench-top setup, the timing profile was modelled as three exponential components with distinct timing coefficients. Also investigated was the feasibility of using the timing profiles as a means to separate alpha and beta excitation events in the scintillator. The bench-top study suggested that using the peak-to-total method of analyzing the timing profiles could remove >99.9% of alpha events while retaining >99.9% of beta events. The timing parameters measured in the test set-up were then implemented in a Monte Carlo code which simulated the SNO+ detector conditions. The simulation results suggested that detector effects reduce the effectiveness of discriminating between alpha and beta events using the peak-to-total method. Using a more optimal method of analyzing the timing profile differences, specifically using a Gatti filter, improved the discrimination capability back to the levels determined in the bench-top setup. One of the physics goals of SNO+ is the first precision measurement of the pep solar neutrino ux at the level of about 5 % uncertainty. A study was performed to investigate how current solar neutrino data constrains the allowed parameters of

  6. The Real-Time Dose Measurement Scintillating Fiber Array for Brachytherapy Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynes, Lawrence

    2007-03-01

    Brachytherapy is a treatment modality that uses tiny radioactive sources (few mm in length) by delivering enough doses to kill cancer tumors or plaque build-up. The type of sources used in hospitals include both gamma and beta emitters. Presently, the technique suffers from not having a single detector with the capability of providing accurate dose distribution information within sub-mm accuracy. The current standard is based primarily on well chambers and film dosimetry. The Center for Advanced Medical Instrumentation (CAMI) at Hampton University is developing a Scintillating Fiber Based Beta Detector prototype in collaboration with the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) to address this problem. The device is composed of an array of 1x1 mm^2 scintillating fibers optically coupled to photo-multiplier tubes for photon-to-current conversion. A CAMAC LabView based data acquisition system is used for real time data collection and histogramming, data analysis. A set of data were collected at the nearby Bon Secours DePaul Medical Center using a GammaMed 12i HDR after-loader housing a 6.62 mCi Ir-192 source. Preliminary comparison between our device and film dosimetry will be discussed.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of nanocomposite scintillators for radiation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahi, Sunil Kumar

    Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) scintillators are commonly used for radiation detection. Inorganic single crystals are efficient and have better energy resolution compared to organic scintillators. However, inorganic single crystals are difficult to grow in large size and hence expensive. On the other hand, fast decay time and ease of fabrication makes organic scintillators attractive for many applications. However, poor energy resolution of organic scintillators limits its applications in gamma ray spectroscopy. The poor energy resolution is due to the low Z-value and low density of organic scintillator. The Z-value of organic plastic scintillator can be increase by loading nanoparticles in plastic matrix. It is expected that the increase in Z-value would result in improve energy resolution of nanocomposite scintillator. However, the loss of optical transparency due to nanoparticles loading is one of the major concerns of nanocomposite scintillators. In this dissertation, we used different methods to synthesize La xCe1-xF3 nanoparticles with high dispersion in polymer matrix. High nanoparticle dispersion is important to load high concentration of nanoparticles into polymer matrix without losing the transparency of the polymer matrix. The as synthesized nanoparticles are dispersed into monomers and polymerized using heat initiated bulk polymerization method. Nanoparticles are characterized using TEM, XRD, FTIR and TGA. The optical and scintillation properties of nanoparticles and nanocomposites are studied using spectroscopic techniques. The pulse height spectra obtained using nanocomposite fabricated by loading up to 30 wt% nanoparticles clearly show a photopeak for the 122 keV line of the Co-57 isotope. The generation of the photopeak is due to the enhanced photoelectric effect as a result of increased effective atomic number (Zeff) and density of nanocomposite scintillator. The pulse height spectra of Cs-137 gamma source show a full

  8. Lu1-xI3:Cex--A Scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy and time-of-flight PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kanai S [Newton, MA

    2009-03-17

    The present invention concerns very fast scintillator materials comprising lutetium iodide doped with Cerium Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x; LuI.sub.3:Ce). The LuI.sub.3 scintillator material has surprisingly good characteristics including high light output, high gamma ray stopping efficiency, fast response, low cost, good proportionality, and minimal afterglow that the material is useful for gamma ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, nuclear and high energy physics research, diffraction, non-destructive testing, nuclear treaty verification and safeguards, and geological exploration. The timing resolution of the scintillators of the present invention provide compositions capable of resolving the position of an annihilation event within a portion of a human body cross-section.

  9. Borexino A real time liquid scintillator detector for low energy solar neutrino study

    CERN Document Server

    Miramonti, L

    2002-01-01

    Borexino is a large unsegmented calorimeter featuring 300 tons of liquid scintillator, contained in a 8.5 meter nylon vessel, viewed by 2200 PMTs. The main goal of Borexino is the study, in real time, of low energy solar neutrinos, and in particular, the monoenergetic neutrinos coming from $^7Be$, which is one of the missing links on the solar neutrino problem. The achievement of high radiopurity level, in the order of $10^{-16} g/g$ of U/Th equivalent, necessary to the detection of the low energy component of the solar neutrino flux, was proved in the Borexino prototype: the Counting Test Facility. The detector is located underground in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in the center of Italy at 3500 meter water equivalent depth. In this paper the science and technology of Borexino are reviewed and its main capabilities are presented.

  10. Analytical calculation of the lower bound on timing resolution for PET scintillation detectors comprising high-aspect-ratio crystal elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Joshua W.; Vinke, Ruud; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-07-01

    Excellent timing resolution is required to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain available from the incorporation of time-of-flight (ToF) information in image reconstruction for positron emission tomography (PET). As the detector’s timing resolution improves, so does SNR, reconstructed image quality, and accuracy. This directly impacts the challenging detection and quantification tasks in the clinic. The recognition of these benefits has spurred efforts within the molecular imaging community to determine to what extent the timing resolution of scintillation detectors can be improved and develop near-term solutions for advancing ToF-PET. Presented in this work, is a method for calculating the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB) on timing resolution for scintillation detectors with long crystal elements, where the influence of the variation in optical path length of scintillation light on achievable timing resolution is non-negligible. The presented formalism incorporates an accurate, analytical probability density function (PDF) of optical transit time within the crystal to obtain a purely mathematical expression of the CRLB with high-aspect-ratio (HAR) scintillation detectors. This approach enables the statistical limit on timing resolution performance to be analytically expressed for clinically-relevant PET scintillation detectors without requiring Monte Carlo simulation-generated photon transport time distributions. The analytically calculated optical transport PDF was compared with detailed light transport simulations, and excellent agreement was found between the two. The coincidence timing resolution (CTR) between two 3× 3× 20 mm3 LYSO:Ce crystals coupled to analogue SiPMs was experimentally measured to be 162+/- 1 ps FWHM, approaching the analytically calculated lower bound within 6.5%.

  11. A scintillator-based online detector for the angularly resolved measurement of laser-accelerated proton spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzkes, J.; Kraft, S. D.; Sobiella, M.; Stiller, N.; Zeil, K.; Schramm, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Karsch, L.; Schuerer, M. [OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Pawelke, J.; Richter, C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    In recent years, a new generation of high repetition rate ({approx}10 Hz), high power ({approx}100 TW) laser systems has stimulated intense research on laser-driven sources for fast protons. Considering experimental instrumentation, this development requires online diagnostics for protons to be added to the established offline detection tools such as solid state track detectors or radiochromic films. In this article, we present the design and characterization of a scintillator-based online detector that gives access to the angularly resolved proton distribution along one spatial dimension and resolves 10 different proton energy ranges. Conceived as an online detector for key parameters in laser-proton acceleration, such as the maximum proton energy and the angular distribution, the detector features a spatial resolution of {approx}1.3 mm and a spectral resolution better than 1.5 MeV for a maximum proton energy above 12 MeV in the current design. Regarding its areas of application, we consider the detector a useful complement to radiochromic films and Thomson parabola spectrometers, capable to give immediate feedback on the experimental performance. The detector was characterized at an electrostatic Van de Graaff tandetron accelerator and tested in a laser-proton acceleration experiment, proving its suitability as a diagnostic device for laser-accelerated protons.

  12. Time-resolved plastic scintillator dosimetry in a dynamic thorax phantom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibolt, Patrik; Andersen, Claus E.; Ottosson, Wiviann

    2017-01-01

    in a lung. The phantom motion was controlled by a script in-house developed using LabVIEW (National Instruments) and synchronized with the in-house developed ME40 scintillator dosimetry system (DTU Nutech). The dose in the center of the tumor was measured, using a BCF-60 plastic scintillator detector (Saint...

  13. Time correlated measurements using plastic scintillators with neutron-photon pulse shape discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Norman E., IV

    nuclear and radiological material. Moreover, the production of 3He isotope as a byproduct of security programs was drastically decreased. This isotope shortage coupled with the disadvantages of relying on a detector that requires neutron moderation before the detection of fission neutrons, poses a significant challenge in supporting the existing detection systems and the development of future technologies. To address this problem, a reliable and accurate alternative technology to detect neutrons emitted in fissions must be developed. One such alternative technology that shows promise in this application is the use of scintillators based on solid state materials (plastics) which are sensitive to fast neutrons. However, plastic scintillators are also sensitive to photons. Hence, it is necessary to separate the neutron signals from the photon signals, using the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) analysis. The PSD is based on the comparison of the pulse shapes of digitized signal waveforms. This approach allows for the measurement of fast neutrons without the necessity of their moderation. Because the fission spectrum neutrons are mainly fast, methods employing fast neutron detection are applicable for the assay of fissile materials. In addition, the average time of scintillation of the plastic medium is much shorter than those of the gaseous counters, thus allowing scintillation detectors to be used in high count rate environments. Furthermore, the temporal information of the fast neutron detection using multiple sensors enables the time correlation analysis of the fission neutron multiplicity. The study of time correlation measurements of fast neutrons using the array of plastic scintillators is the basis of this work. The array of four plastic scintillator detectors equipped with the digital data acquisition and analysis system was developed. The digital PSD analysis of detector signals "on-the-fly" was implemented for the array. The time coincidence measurement technique

  14. Scintillation response of organic and inorganic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Papadopoulos, L M

    1999-01-01

    A method to evaluate the scintillation response of organic and inorganic scintillators to different heavy ionizing particles is suggested. A function describing the rate of the energy consumed as fluorescence emission is derived, i.e., the differential response with respect to time. This function is then integrated for each ion and scintillator (anthracene, stilbene and CsI(Tl)) to determine scintillation response. The resulting scintillation responses are compared to the previously reported measured responses. Agreement to within 2.5% is observed when these data are normalized to each other. In addition, conclusions regarding the quenching parameter kB dependence on the type of the particle and the computed values of kB for certain ions are included. (author)

  15. A comparison of BCF-12 organic scintillators and Al2O3:C crystals for real-time medical dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Andersen, Claus Erik; Lindvold, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Radioluminescence (RL) from aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) crystals and organic scintillators such as the blue-emitting BCF-12 can be used for precise real-time dose rate measurements during radiation therapy of cancer patients. Attaching the dosimeters to thin light-guiding fiber cables enables in vi...

  16. Real-Time Continuous Response Spectra Exceedance Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Frank; Harvey, Danny; Lindquist, Kent; Franke, Mathias

    2017-04-01

    A novel approach is presented for near real-time earthquake alarms for critical structures at distributed locations using real-time estimation of response spectra obtained from near free-field motions. Influential studies dating back to the 1980s identified spectral response acceleration as a key ground motion characteristic that correlates well with observed damage in structures. Thus, monitoring and reporting on exceedance of spectra-based thresholds are useful tools for assessing the potential for damage to facilities or multi-structure campuses based on input ground motions only. With as little as one strong-motion station per site, this scalable approach can provide rapid alarms on the damage status of remote towns, critical infrastructure (e.g., hospitals, schools) and points of interests (e.g., bridges) for a very large number of locations enabling better rapid decision making during critical and difficult immediate post-earthquake response actions. Real-time calculation of PSA exceedance and alarm dissemination are enabled with Bighorn, a module included in the Antelope software package that combines real-time spectral monitoring and alarm capabilities with a robust built-in web display server. Examples of response spectra from several M 5 events recorded by the ANZA seismic network in southern California will be presented.

  17. A Real-Time Scintillation Crystal Identification Method and Its FPGA Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, A. A.; Saleh, H. I.

    2014-10-01

    At the expense of increasing the complexity, Zernike Moment (ZM) was used in Crystal Identification (CI) to solve the parallax error with the highest identification performance among recent methods that are based on Digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms. In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners, the CI method must fulfill the real-time event rate processing that requires low complexity and fast algorithms. The main idea of this paper is the complexity reduction of the ZM-based CI method and using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier to comply with the rate of real-time PET scanners. To achieve this goal, 1-D form of ZM and fast computations of cascaded ZM and SVM stages are proposed to minimize the complexity while preserving the highest performance among compared methods. The proposed fast ZM-SVM CI method is implemented using both MATLAB and FPGA and verified by identification of 100 000 pulses of LSO-LuYAP scintillation crystals. The FPGA realization of the fast ZM-SVM CI method offers an identification rate of 90.6% at a rate of 6.2 Mevents/s using 16 samples per event which is sufficient for real time small animal PET scanners.

  18. Neutron generator burst timing measured using a pulse shape discrimination plastic scintillator with silicon photomultiplier readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, R. M.; Eberhardt, J. E.; Tickner, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    An EJ-299-34 plastic scintillator with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout was used to measure the fast neutron output of a pulsed Thermo-Fisher A-325 Deuterium-Tritium sealed tube neutron generator (STNG). The SiPM signals were handled by a prototype digital pulse processing system, based on a free-running analogue to digital converter feeding a digital signal processor (DSP). Pulse shape discrimination was used to distinguish between detected fast-neutrons and gammas. Pulse detection, timing, energy and shape were all processed by the DSP in real-time. The time-dependency of the neutron output of the STNG was measured for various pulsing schemes. The switch-on characteristics of the tube strongly depended on the operating settings, with the delay between pulse turn-on and the production of neutrons ranging between 13 μs to 74 μs for the tested pulse rates and duty cycles. This work will facilitate the optimization and modeling of apparatus that use the neutron generator's pulsing abilities.

  19. Fast neutron tomography with real-time pulse-shape discrimination in organic scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyce, Malcolm J., E-mail: m.joyce@lancaster.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster, Lancashire LA1 4YW (United Kingdom); Agar, Stewart [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster, Lancashire LA1 4YW (United Kingdom); Aspinall, Michael D. [Hybrid Instruments Ltd., Gordon Manley Building, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YW (United Kingdom); Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Colley, Edmund; Colling, Miriam; Dykes, Joseph; Kardasopoulos, Phoevos; Mitton, Katie [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster, Lancashire LA1 4YW (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-21

    A fast neutron tomography system based on the use of real-time pulse-shape discrimination in 7 organic liquid scintillation detectors is described. The system has been tested with a californium-252 source of dose rate 163 μSv/h at 1 m and neutron emission rate of 1.5×10{sup 7} per second into 4π and a maximum acquisition time of 2 h, to characterize two 100×100×100 mm{sup 3} concrete samples. The first of these was a solid sample and the second has a vertical, cylindrical void. The experimental data, supported by simulations with both Monte Carlo methods and MATLAB®, indicate that the presence of the internal cylindrical void, corners and inhomogeneities in the samples can be discerned. The potential for fast neutron assay of this type with the capability to probe hydrogenous features in large low-Z samples is discussed. Neutron tomography of bulk porous samples is achieved that combines effective penetration not possible with thermal neutrons in the absence of beam hardening.

  20. Timing resolution improvement using DOI information in a four-layer scintillation detector for TOF-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibuya, Kengo [jPET Project Team, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-0024 (Japan)], E-mail: shibuken@gakushikai.jp; Nishikido, Fumihiko [jPET Project Team, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-0024 (Japan); Tsuda, Tomoaki [Technology Research Laboratory, Shimadzu Corporation, Hikaridai 3-9-4, Seika-cho, Kyoto 619-0237 (Japan); Kobayashi, Tetsuya [Department of Medical System Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University, Yayoi 1-33, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Lam, Chihfung; Yamaya, Taiga; Yoshida, Eiji; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo [jPET Project Team, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-0024 (Japan)

    2008-08-11

    Depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors are considered to be advantageous for time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET) because they can correct timing errors arising in the scintillation crystals due to a propagation speed difference between annihilation radiation and scintillation photons. We experimentally measured this timing error, using our four-layer DOI encoding method. The upper layers exhibited the larger timing delays due to the longer path lengths after conversion from annihilation radiation into scintillation photons that traveled by zigzag paths at a speed decreased by a factor of the refractive index (n). The maximum timing delay between the uppermost and the lowermost layers was evaluated as 164 ps when n=1.47. A TOF error correction was demonstrated to improve the timing resolution of the four-layer DOI detector by 10.3%, which would increase the effective sensitivity of the scanner by about 12% comparison with a non-DOI TOF-PET scanner. This is the first step towards combining these two important fields in PET instrumentation, namely DOI and TOF, for the purpose of achieving a higher sensitivity as well as a more uniform spatial resolution.

  1. Luminescence rise time in self-activated PbWO4 and Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 scintillation crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Auffray, E; Augulis, R.; Borisevich, A.; Gulbinas, V.; Fedorov, A; Korjik, M; Lucchini, M T; Mechinsky, V; Nargelas, S; E. Songaila; Tamulaitis, G.; Vaitkevičius, A; Zazubovich, S.

    2016-01-01

    The time resolution of scintillation detectors of ionizing radiation is one of the key parameters sought for in the current and future high-energy physics experiments. This study is encouraged by the necessity to find novel detection methods enabling a sub-10-ps time resolution in scintillation detectors and is focused on the exploitation of fast luminescence rise front. Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques have been used to study ...

  2. Luminescence rise time in self-activated PbWO4 and Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 scintillation crystals

    CERN Document Server

    E. Auffray; A. Borisevich; V. Gulbinas; A. Fedorov; M. Korjik; M.T. Lucchini; V. Mechinsky; S. Nargelas; E. Songaila; G. Tamulaitis; A. Vaitkevičius; S. Zazubovich

    2016-01-01

    The time resolution of scintillation detectors of ionizing radiation is one of the key parameters sought for in the current and future high-energy physics experiments. This study is encouraged by the necessity to find novel detection methods enabling a sub-10-ps time resolution in scintillation detectors and is focused on the exploitation of fast luminescence rise front. Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques have been used to study two promising scintillators: self-activated lead tungstate (PWO, PbWO4) and Ce-doped gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (GAGG, Gd3Al2Ga3O12). A sub-picosecond PL rise time is observed in PWO, while longer processes in the PL response in GAGG:Ce are detected and studied. The mechanisms responsible for the PL rise time in self-activated and doped scintillators are under discussion.

  3. Study of SiPM custom arrays for scintillation light detection in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervi, T.; Babicz, M. E.; Bonesini, M.; Falcone, A.; Kose, U.; Nessi, M.; Menegolli, A.; Pietropaolo, F.; Raselli, G. L.; Rossella, M.; Torti, M.; Zani, A.

    2017-03-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) technique has been established as one of the most promising for the next generation of experiments dedicated to neutrino and rare-event physics. LAr-TPCs have the fundamental feature to be able to both collect the charge and the scintillation light produced after the passage of a ionizing particle inside the Argon volume. Scintillation light is traditionally detected by large surface Photo-Multiplier Tubes (PMTs) working at cryogenic temperature. Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPMs) are semiconductor-based devices with performances comparable to the PMT ones, but with very small active areas. For this reason we built a prototype array composed by SiPMs connected in different electrical configurations. We present results on preliminary tests made with four SiPMs, connected both in parallel and in series configurations, deployed into a 50 liters LAr-TPC exposed to cosmic rays at CERN.

  4. Investigation of luminescence and scintillation properties of a ZnS-Ag/{sup 6}LiF scintillator in the 7-295 K temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailik, V.B., E-mail: v.mikhailik@physics.ox.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Henry, S.; Horn, M.; Kraus, H.; Lynch, A.; Pipe, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnS-Ag/{sup 6}LiF where studied in the 7-295 K temperature range to evaluate the suitability of the scintillator for neutron detection at very low temperature (<1 K). It is shown that decrease of temperature has little effect upon principal luminescence and scintillation characteristics of ZnS-Ag: the changes of emission intensity are small for photoexcitation and negligible for excitation with {alpha}-particles. The recombination kinetics of the scintillation decay exhibits modest shortening of the fast decay time constant, from 4.52 to 3.35 {mu}s with cooling to 10 K. It is concluded that ZnS-Ag/{sup 6}LiF is a promising scintillator for cryogenic application. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Luminescence and scintillations of ZnS-Ag/6LiF neutron scintillator are studied over 7-295 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interpretation of excitation spectra is offered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scintillation properties exhibit little changes with cooling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnS-Ag/6LiF can be used as neutron scintillation detector at cryogenic temperatures.

  5. Mössbauer forward scattering: time-domain spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadykov, E. K., E-mail: esadykov@kpfu.ru; Yurichuk, A. A.; Gainov, R. R.; Vagizov, F. G. [Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The transmission of the Mössbauer radiation through an absorber being in the acoustic oscillation mode under forward scattering (FS) conditions has been analyzed. The modification of the existing models of the FS spectra (frequency and time) formation to the case of the arbitrary phase correlation of nuclear oscillations in the sample has been proposed. An adequate description of the time delayed experiments with the {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer resonance using the modulation of the single-photon wave packet by acoustic field has been obtained. One has been done in the frame of the Raman scattering of Mössbauer photons. The models extended this way can be used to control the degree of phase correlation of nuclear oscillations (or other processes) induced in the sample by external fields.

  6. Comparison between simplified load spectra in accordance with Germanische Lloyd guidelines, and load spectra derived from time domain simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, M. [Aerodyn Energiesysteme gmbH, Rendsburg (Germany)

    1996-09-01

    The Germanische Lloyd guideline allows calculations of load spectra in two fundamentally different ways. In the case of the so-called `simplified load spectra` the maximum amplitude of fluctuation of a load component is formed as {+-}75% of the average value of the purely aerodynamic loads of this component at rated wind conditions, together with an overlay of mass-related loads. The second method allowed in the GL guideline is the calculation of load spectra from simulation results in the time domain. For a number of average wind speeds the time-dependent characteristics of the load components are calculated taking account of the natural spatial turbulence of the wind. These are converted into load spectra using the rainflow method. In a parametric study the load spectra are calculated according to both methods and compared. The calculations are performed for turbines with rated powers of 100 kW to 2000 kW, with two and three blades, and also for stall-controlled and pitch-controlled turbines. The calculated load spectra are compared with each by means of 1 P fatigue equivalent load spectra. The influence of individual parameters is presented, as is the validity of the simplified load spectra. (au)

  7. Scintillation properties of acrylate based plastic scintillator by photoploymerization method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joo Il [Dept. of of Radiology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this study, we prepared and characterized a acrylate based UV-curable plastic scintillator. It was used co-polymers TMPTA, DHPA and Ultima GoldTM LLT organic scintillator. The emission spectrum of the plastic scintillator was located in the range of 380⁓520 nm, peaking at 423 nm. And the scintillator is more than 50% transparent in the range of 400⁓ 800 nm. The emission spectrum is well match to the quantum efficiency of photo-multiplier tube and the fast decay time of the scintillation is 12 ns, approximately. This scintillation material provides the possibility of combining 3D printing technology, and then the applications of the plastic scintillator may be expected in human dosimetry etc.

  8. Extracting Time-Resolved Information from Time-Integrated Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Grifoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS data are characterized by a strong dependence on the acquisition time after the onset of the laser plasma. However, time-resolved broadband spectrometers are expensive and often not suitable for being used in portable LIBS instruments. In this paper we will show how the analysis of a series of LIBS spectra, taken at different delays after the laser pulse, allows the recovery of time-resolved spectral information. The comparison of such spectra is presented for the analysis of an aluminium alloy. The plasma parameters (electron temperature and number density are evaluated, starting from the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra, respectively. The results are compared and discussed.

  9. Time series inversion of spectra from ground-based radiometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Christensen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Retrieving time series of atmospheric constituents from ground-based spectrometers often requires different temporal averaging depending on the altitude region in focus. This can lead to several datasets existing for one instrument, which complicates validation and comparisons between instruments. This paper puts forth a possible solution by incorporating the temporal domain into the maximum a posteriori (MAP retrieval algorithm. The state vector is increased to include measurements spanning a time period, and the temporal correlations between the true atmospheric states are explicitly specified in the a priori uncertainty matrix. This allows the MAP method to effectively select the best temporal smoothing for each altitude, removing the need for several datasets to cover different altitudes. The method is compared to traditional averaging of spectra using a simulated retrieval of water vapour in the mesosphere. The simulations show that the method offers a significant advantage compared to the traditional method, extending the sensitivity an additional 10 km upwards without reducing the temporal resolution at lower altitudes. The method is also tested on the Onsala Space Observatory (OSO water vapour microwave radiometer confirming the advantages found in the simulation. Additionally, it is shown how the method can interpolate data in time and provide diagnostic values to evaluate the interpolated data.

  10. Application of two-photon absorption in PWO scintillator for fast timing of interaction with ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auffray, E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Buganov, O. [Stepanov Institute of Physics, Minsk (Belarus); Korjik, M.; Fedorov, A. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarus State University, 11 Bobruiskaya, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Nargelas, S.; Tamulaitis, G. [Semiconductor Physics Department and Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Tikhomirov, S. [Stepanov Institute of Physics, Minsk (Belarus); Vaitkevičius, A., E-mail: augustas.vaitkevicius@ff.vu.lt [Semiconductor Physics Department and Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2015-12-21

    This work was aimed at searching for fast phenomena in scintillators in sub-10-ps range, a benchmark timing for the time response of radiation detectors in particle colliders. The pump-and-probe optical absorption technique with a tunable-wavelength parametric oscillator as the pump and a continuous-spectrum source as the probe beam was used to study lead tungstate PbWO{sub 4} (PWO) single crystals. It is shown that the rise time of the probe pulse absorption induced by the pump pulse is shorter than the pump pulse width of 200 fs. The approximately linear dependence of the probe absorption on the pump pulse energy density evidences that the induced absorption is caused by two-photon absorption involving one probe and one pump photon. We demonstrate that the intensity of the induced absorption at certain wavelengths is influenced by gamma irradiation, provided that an appropriate light polarization is selected. The application of the irradiation-sensitive nonlinearity for fast timing in radiation detectors is discussed. - Highlights: • Nonlinear transmittance with femtosecond rise time is observed in PWO scintillators. • The nonlinearity is caused by two-photon absorption of pump and probe photons. • Gamma irradiation imposes change in the nonlinearity for certain light polarization. • Application of the nonlinearity for fast timing in radiation detectors is feasible.

  11. Scintillation Counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Zane W.

    Scintillators find wide use in radiation detection as the detecting medium for gamma/X-rays, and charged and neutral particles. Since the first notice in 1895 by Roentgen of the production of light by X-rays on a barium platinocyanide screen, and Thomas Edison's work over the following 2 years resulting in the discovery of calcium tungstate as a superior fluoroscopy screen, much research and experimentation have been undertaken to discover and elucidate the properties of new scintillators. Scintillators with high density and high atomic number are prized for the detection of gamma rays above 1 MeV; lower atomic number, lower-density materials find use for detecting beta particles and heavy charged particles; hydrogenous scintillators find use in fast-neutron detection; and boron-, lithium-, and gadolinium-containing scintillators are used for slow-neutron detection. This chapter provides the practitioner with an overview of the general characteristics of scintillators, including the variation of probability of interaction with density and atomic number, the characteristics of the light pulse, a list and characteristics of commonly available scintillators and their approximate cost, and recommendations regarding the choice of material for a few specific applications. This chapter does not pretend to present an exhaustive list of scintillators and applications.

  12. A comprehensive & systematic study of coincidence time resolution and light yield using scintillators of different size, wrapping and doping

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, E.; Geraci, F.; Ghezzi, A.; Gundacker, S.; Hillemanns, H.; Jarron, P.; Meyer, T.; Paganoni, M.; Pauwels, K.; Pizzichemi, M.; Lecoq, P.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last years interest in using time-of-flight-based Positron Emission Tomography (TOF-PET) systems has significantly increased. High time resolution in such PET systems is a powerful tool to improve signal to noise ratio and therefore to allow smaller exposure rates for patients as well as faster image reconstruction. Improvement in coincidence time resolution (CTR) in PET systems to the level of 200ps FWHM requires the optimization of all parameters in the photon detection chain influencing the time resolution: crystal, photodetector and readout electronics. After reviewing the factors influencing the time resolution of scintillators, we will present in this paper the light yield and CTR obtained for different scintillator types (LSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce, LGSO:Ce, LSO:Ce:0.4Ca, LuAG:Ce, LuAG:Pr) with different cross-sections, lengths and reflectors. Whereas light yield measurements were made with a classical PMT, all CTR tests were performed with Hamamatsu-MPPCs or SiPMs S10931-050P. The CTR measurements were ...

  13. Ce{sup 3+}-doped crystalline garnet films - scintillation characterization using {alpha}-particle excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mares, Jiri A., E-mail: amares@fzu.c [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Prusa, Petr [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, Brehova 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Nikl, Martin; Nitsch, Karel; Beitlerova, Alena [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Kucera, Miroslav; Hanus, Martin [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Ke Karlovu 5, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Zorenko, Yurij [Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials, Department of Electronics, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, 107 Gen. Tarnavskogo Str. (Ukraine)

    2010-03-15

    Scintillating properties of Ce{sup 3+}-doped (Lu,Y) aluminum garnet single crystalline films (SCF) were investigated. Thin SCF films of thickness between 1 and 30 {mu}m were grown by a liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) method in various fluxes. The {alpha}-particle excitation (mainly 5.4857 MeV line of {sup 241}Am) of pulse height spectra is used to measure scintillation response of SCF, especially peak of those {alpha}-rays which are totally absorbed in the films. Detailed studies and evaluation of scintillation measurements of large sets of Ce{sup 3+}-doped SCF (Lu,Y) aluminum garnets showed that at present time (i) YAG:Ce SCF have comparable scintillation properties as YAG:Ce single crystals, especially their N{sub phels} photoelectron yields are the same while (ii) scintillation properties of LuAG:Ce SCF do not reach those of LuAG:Ce single crystal.

  14. Comparison of calculated spectra for the interaction of photons in a liquid scintillator. Example of Mn-54 835 keV emission

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cassette, P

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available methods require the calculation of the energy spectrum absorbed by the liquid scintillator. For radionuclides emitting X-rays or g-rays, when the energy is greater than a few tens of keV the Compton interaction is important and the absorption is not total...

  15. Design and characterization of a real time particle radiography system based on scintillating optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhitano, F.; Lo Presti, D.; Bonanno, D. L.; Bongiovanni, D. G.; Leonora, E.; Randazzo, N.; Reito, S.; Sipala, V.; Gallo, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fabrication and characterization of a charged particle imaging system composed of a tracker and a residual range detector (RRD) is described. The tracker is composed of four layers of scintillating fibers (SciFi), 500 μm side square section, arranged to form two planes orthogonal to each other. The fibers are coupled to two Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) arrays by means of a channel reduction system patented by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) (Presti, 2015) [1]. Sixty parallel layers of the same fibers used in the tracker compose the RRD. The various layers are optically coupled to a MPPC array by means of wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers. The sensitive area of the two detectors is 9×9 cm2. The results of the measurements, acquired by the prototypes with CATANA (Cirrone, 2008) [2] proton beam, and a comparison with the simulations of the detectors are presented.

  16. arXiv Application of large area SiPMs for the readout of a plastic scintillator based timing detector

    CERN Document Server

    Betancourt, C.; Brundler, R.; Dätwyler, A.; Favre, Y.; Gascon, D.; Gomez, S.; Korzenev, Alexander; Mermod, P.; Noah, E.; Serra, N.; Sgalaberna, D.; Storaci, B.

    2017-11-27

    In this study an array of eight 6 mm × 6 mm area SiPMs was coupled to the end of a long plastic scintillator counter which was exposed to a 2.5 GeV/c muon beam at the CERN PS. Timing characteristics of bars with dimensions 150 cm × 6 cm × 1 cm and 120 cm × 11 cm × 2.5 cm have been studied. An 8-channel SiPM anode readout ASIC (MUSIC R1) based on a novel low input impedance current conveyor has been used to read out and amplify SiPMs independently and sum the signals at the end. Prospects for applications in large-scale particle physics detectors with timing resolution below 100 ps are provided in light of the results.

  17. Inorganic-organic rubbery scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Gektin, A V; Pogorelova, N; Neicheva, S; Sysoeva, E; Gavrilyuk, V

    2002-01-01

    Spectral-kinetic luminescence properties of films, containing homogeneously dispersed scintillation particles of CsI, CsI:Tl, CsI:Na, and NaI:Tl in optically transparent organosiloxane matrix, are presented. Material is flexible and rubbery and in consequence the detectors of convenient shapes can be produced. It is found that luminescence spectra of the received films are identical whereas decay times are much shorter compared to the same ones of the corresponding single crystals. Layers with pure CsI demonstrate only the fast UV emission (307 nm, 10 ns) without blue microsecond afterglow typical for crystals. The films containing NaI:Tl are non-hygroscopic and preserve scintillation properties for a long time in humid atmosphere unlike single crystals. Organosiloxane layers with CsI:Tl particles provide high light output with good energy resolution for sup 5 sup 5 Fe, sup 1 sup 0 sup 9 Cd, sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am sources, and are capable of detecting both X-rays and alpha-, beta-particles.

  18. Performance evaluation of novel LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator geometries for fast-timing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedia, V., E-mail: mv.vedia@ucm.es [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Facultad de CC. Físicas, Universidad Complutense, CEI Moncloa, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Fraile, L.M. [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Facultad de CC. Físicas, Universidad Complutense, CEI Moncloa, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Mach, H. [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Facultad de CC. Físicas, Universidad Complutense, CEI Moncloa, 28040 Madrid (Spain); National Centre for Nuclear Research, Division for Nuclear Physics, BP1, Warsaw (Poland); Udías, J.M. [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Facultad de CC. Físicas, Universidad Complutense, CEI Moncloa, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-06-11

    We evaluate the performance of two LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) crystals that were produced with special geometries, aimed at enhancing the scintillation light collection and thus the time resolution. Their design was motivated by the construction of high-performance fast-timing arrays like the FAst TIMing array for DESPEC (FATIMA), which demands a high packing factor in addition to good time and energy resolutions. Energy resolution and efficiency were measured using standard calibration sources. Timing measurements were performed at {sup 60}Co and {sup 22}Na γ-energies against a fast BaF{sub 2} reference detector. The time resolution was optimized by the choice of the photomultiplier bias voltage and the fine tuning of the constant fraction discriminator parameters. Monte Carlo simulations using the Geant4 toolkit were performed in order to achieve a better understanding of how the new geometries affect the light transport and thus the performance of the crystals. It is found that the conical-shaped LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) crystals are optimal for fast-timing applications and for the construction of arrays such as FATIMA.

  19. Test beam studies of the light yield, time and coordinate resolutions of scintillator strips with WLS fibers and SiPM readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, Dmitri [Fermilab, Batavia IL (United States); Evdokimov, Valery [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation); Lukić, Strahinja; Ujić, Predrag [Vinča Institute, University of Belgrade (Serbia)

    2017-03-11

    Prototype scintilator+WLS strips with SiPM readout for large muon detection systems were tested in the muon beam of the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. Light yield of up to 137 photoelectrons per muon per strip has been observed , as well as time resolution of 330 ps and position resolution along the strip of 5.4 cm.

  20. Scintillator Measurements for SNO+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptanoglu, Tanner; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    SNO+ is a neutrino detector located 2km underground in the SNOLAB facility with the primary goal of searching for neutrinoless double beta decay. The detector will be filled with a liquid scintillator target primarily composed of linear alkyl benzene (LAB). As charged particles travel through the detector the LAB produces scintillation light which is detected by almost ten thousand PMTs. The LAB is loaded with Te130, an isotope known to undergo double beta decay. Additionally, the LAB is mixed with an additional fluor and wavelength shifter to improve the light output and shift the light to a wavelength regime in which the PMTs are maximally efficient. The precise scintillator optics drastically affect the ultimate sensitivity of SNO+. I will present work being done to measure the optical properties of the SNO+ scintillator cocktail. The measured properties are used as input to a scintillation model that allows us to extrapolate to the SNO+ scale and ultimately predict the sensitivity of the experiment. Additionally, I will present measurements done to characterize the R5912 PMT, a candidate PMT for the second phase of SNO+ that provides better light collection, improved charge resolution, and a narrower spread in timing.

  1. Development of new Polysiloxane Based Liquid Scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalla Palma, M.; Quaranta, A. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento,Via Sommarive, 9, 38123 Trento (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro,Viale dell' Universita, 2, 35020 Legnaro - Padova (Italy); Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro,Viale dell' Universita, 2, 35020 Legnaro - Padova (Italy); Carturan, S.; Collazuol, G.; Checchia, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro,Viale dell' Universita, 2, 35020 Legnaro - Padova (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova, Via Marzolo, 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Degerlier, M. [Department of Physics, Nevsehir Haci Bektas Veli University, Science and Art Faculty, 50300 Nevsehir (Turkey)

    2015-07-01

    In the last decade, attention toward neutron detection has been growing in the scientific community, driven by new requirements in different fields of application ranging from homeland security to medical and material analysis, from research physics, to nuclear energy production. So far neutron detection, with particular attention to fast neutrons, has been mainly based on organic liquid scintillators, owing to their good efficiency and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capability. Most of these liquids have however some main drawbacks given by toxicity, flammability, volatility and sensitivity to dissolved oxygen that limits the duration and the quality of their performances with worse handiness and increased costs. Phenyl-substituted polysiloxanes could address most of these issues, being characterized by low toxicity, low volatility and low flammability. Their optical properties can be tailored by changing the phenyl distribution and concentration thus allowing to increase the solubility of organic dyes, to modify the fluorescence spectra and to vary the refractive index of the medium. Furthermore, polysiloxanes have been recently exploited for the production of plastic scintillators with very good chemical and thermal stability and very good radiation hardness and the development of polysiloxane liquid scintillators could allow to combine these interesting properties with the supremacy of liquid scintillators as regarding PSD over plastics. For these reasons, the properties of several phenyl-substituted polysiloxane with different phenyl amounts and different viscosities have been investigated, with particular attention to the scintillation response and the pulse shape discrimination capability, and the results of the investigation are reported in this work. More in details, the scintillation light yield towards gamma rays ({sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs) of several polysiloxane liquids has been analyzed and compared with the light yield of a commercial non

  2. Halide Scintillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loef, E.V.D.

    2003-01-01

    Scintillators have been used for decades to make ionising radiation visible. Either by direct observation of the light flash produced by the material when it is exposed to radiation, or indirect by use of a photomultiplier tube or photodiode. Despite the enormous amount of commercially available

  3. The improved scintillation crystal lead tungstate scintillation for PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Youbao; WU, Rurong; Xiao, Linrong; Zhang, Jianxin; Yang, Peizhi; Yan, Hui

    2009-07-01

    As a valuable material for the detecting of γ-ray, PbWO4 and BaF2:PbWO4 crystals were grown by a novel multi-crucible temperature gradient system developed by ourselves. Utilizing a topical partial heating method, this system can form a topical partial high temperature in its hearth. Thus this system could melt raw materials in step by step as requirement. The advantage of this method is that there would be solid obstruct left on the melt in the procedure of the crystal growing up. The left obstruct could prevent the volatilization of the component in the melt. Hence it is helpful for the composition homogenization in the crystal. The system also offers a sustaining device for multi-crucibles and thus it can grow many crystals simultaneity. The optical properties and scintillation properties of the crystals were studied. The results reveal that the ions doping improves the scintillation properties of the crystal. The transmittance spectra show that the transmittance of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals are better than that of PbWO4 crystals. For the PbWO4 crystals, their absorption edge is at 325nm, and their maximum transmittance is 68%. For the BaF2:PbWO4 crystals, their absorption edge is at 325nm and their maximum transmittance is upto76%. The X-ray excited luminescence spectra shows that the luminescence peak is at 420nm for the samples of PbWO4 crystal while the peak is at 430nm for the samples of BaF2:PbWO4 crystal respectively. The luminescence intensity of the samples of BaF2:PbWO4 crystal is about two times than that of PbWO4 crystal. And their peak shape is different for the two kind of crystal. The light yield of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals is about 2.9 times than that of PbWO4 crystal Analyzing these scintillation properties, we find that the VPb 3+ and VO- defects do harm for the optical properties of the crystal. Ions doping method could reduce the defect concentration and improving its illumination performance of the crystal. Specially, the doped F- ions in O2- site can

  4. Characterization of fluor concentration and geometry in organic scintillators for in situ beta imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornai, M. P.; Hoffman, E. J.; MacDonald, L. R.; Levin, C. S.

    1996-12-01

    Development of a small area (1-2 cm/sup 2/) in situ beta imaging device includes optimization of the front end scintillation detector, which is fiber optically coupled to a remote photon detector. Thin plastic scintillation detectors, which are sensitive to charged particles, are the ideal detectors due to the low sensitivity to ambient gamma backgrounds. The light output of a new binary plastic scintillator was investigated with respect to increasing concentrations of the fluor (0.5-2.0% by weight) and varying thickness cylindrical configurations of the intended imaging detector. The fluor had an emission maximum increasing from 431 to 436 nm with increasing fluor concentration. The decay time(s) had two components (0.38 and 1.74 ns). There was an /spl sim/20% increase in light output with increasing fluor concentration, measured with both /sup 204/Tl betas and conversion electrons from /sup 207/Bi. The highest light output of this new scintillator was measured to be /spl sim/30% lower than BC404. Simulations predicted the 1.5 mm scintillator thickness at which light output and energy absorption for /spl sim/700 keV electrons (e.g., from /sup 204/Tl, /sup 18/F) were maximized, which corresponded with measurements. As beta continua are relatively featureless, energy calibration for the thin scintillators was investigated using Landau distributions, which appear as distinct peaks in the spectra. As the scintillators were made thinner, gamma backgrounds were shown to linearly decrease.

  5. Characterization of fluor concentration and geometry in organic scintillators for in situ beta imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornai, M.P.; Hoffman, E.J.; MacDonald, L.R.; Levin, C.S. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Development of a small area (1--2 cm{sup 2}) in situ beta imaging device includes optimization of the front end scintillation detector, which is fiber optically coupled to a remote photon detector. Thin plastic scintillation detectors, which are sensitive to charged particles, are the ideal detectors due to the low sensitivity to ambient gamma backgrounds. The light output of a new binary plastic scintillator was investigated with respect to increasing concentrations of the fluor (0.5--2.0% by weight) and varying thickness cylindrical configurations of the intended imaging detector. The fluor had an emission maximum increasing from 431 to 436 nm with increasing fluor concentration. The decay time(s) had two components (0.38 and 1.74 ns). There was an {approximately}20% increase in light output with increasing fluor concentration measured with both {sup 204}Tl betas and conversion electrons from {sup 207}Bi. The highest light output of this new scintillator was measured to be {approximately}30% lower than BC404. Simulations predicted the 1.5 mm scintillator thickness at which light output and energy absorption for {approximately}700 keV electrons (e.g., from {sup 204}Tl, {sup 18}F) were maximized, which corresponded with measurements. As beta continua are relatively featureless, energy calibration for the thin scintillators was investigated using Landau distributions, which appear as distinct peaks in the spectra. As the scintillators were made thinner, gamma backgrounds were shown to linearly decrease.

  6. PET camera performance design evaluation for BGO and BaF2 scintillators (non-time-of-flight).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, W H

    1988-03-01

    Bismuth germanate (BGO) and barium fluoride (BaF2) scintillators are presently used in positron emission tomegraphy (PET) cameras. This study evaluates the important PET performance parameters of image resolution, true sensitivity, scatter background, accidental background, and realistic maximum radioactivity in the field of view for both BGO and BaF2 in an identical non-time-of-flight, whole-body camera configuration. These performance parameters are evaluated for three phantoms simulating (a) the head, (b) whole-body cross-section and (c) heart/kidney. This study finds that the high stopping power of BGO yields higher sensitivity, higher resolution, less vignetting, better immunity from scattered gamma, and lower accident/true ratio at any dose level. The faster BaF2 timing acceptance window is traded off by its vulnerability to noncoincidental scatter-gamma which increases accidental coincidences. The BGO is found to be a better choice for non-time-of-flight systems especially with large objects which produce a lot of noncoincidental scatter-gammas. This study also found that the practical diminishing return maximum activity within the field-of-view is approximately 20-25 mCi for existing conventional cameras.

  7. Emergence and disappearance of microarcsecond structure in the scintillating quasar J1819+3845

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macquart, J.-P.; de Bruyn, A. G.

    2007-01-01

    The 4.8-GHz light curves of the scintillating intraday variable quasar J1819+3845 during 2004-2005 exhibit sharp structure, down to a time-scale of 15 min, that was absent from light curves taken prior to this period and from the 2006 light curves. Analysis of the light curve power spectra show that

  8. Measurement of intrinsic rise times for various L(Y)SO and LuAG scintillators with a general study of prompt photons to achieve 10 ps in TOF-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundacker, Stefan; Auffray, Etiennette; Pauwels, Kristof; Lecoq, Paul

    2016-04-07

    The coincidence time resolution (CTR) of scintillator based detectors commonly used in positron emission tomography is well known to be dependent on the scintillation decay time (τd) and the number of photons detected (n'), i.e. CTR proportional variant √τd/n'. However, it is still an open question to what extent the scintillation rise time (τr) and other fast or prompt photons, e.g. Cherenkov photons, at the beginning of the scintillation process influence the CTR. This paper presents measurements of the scintillation emission rate for different LSO type crystals, i.e. LSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce, LSO:Ce codoped Ca and LGSO:Ce. For the various LSO-type samples measured we find an average value of 70 ps for the scintillation rise time, although some crystals like LSO:Ce codoped Ca seem to have a much faster rise time in the order of 20 ps. Additional measurements for LuAG:Ce and LuAG:Pr show a rise time of 535 ps and 251 ps, respectively. For these crystals, prompt photons (Cherenkov) can be observed at the beginning of the scintillation event. Furthermore a significantly lower rise time value is observed when codoping with calcium. To quantitatively investigate the influence of the rise time to the time resolution we measured the CTR with the same L(Y)SO samples and compared the values to Monte Carlo simulations. Using the measured relative light yields, rise- and decay times of the scintillators we are able to quantitatively understand the measured CTRs in our simulations. Although the rise time is important to fully explain the CTR variation for the different samples tested we determined its influence on the CTR to be in the order of a few percent only. This result is surprising because, if only photonstatistics of the scintillation process is considered, the CTR would be proportional to the square root of the rise time. The unexpected small rise time influence on the CTR can be explained by the convolution of the scintillation rate with the single photon time

  9. Optimization of a Fast Neutron Scintillator for Real-Time Pulse Shape Discrimination in the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) Hodoscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, James T.; Thompson, Scott J.; Watson, Scott M.; Chichester, David L.

    2016-11-01

    We present a multi-channel, fast neutron/gamma ray detector array system that utilizes ZnS(Ag) scintillator detectors. The system employs field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) to do real-time all digital neutron/gamma ray discrimination with pulse height and time histograms to allow count rates in excess of 1,000,000 pulses per second per channel. The system detector number is scalable in blocks of 16 channels.

  10. Response Time-Shortened Zinc Oxide Scintillator for Accurate Single-Shot Synchronization of Extreme Ultraviolet Free-Electron Laser and Short-Pulse Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Toshihiko; Yamanoi, Kohei; Sakai, Kohei; Cadatal-Raduban, Marilou; Nakazato, Tomoharu; Sarukura, Nobuhiko; Kano, Masataka; Wakamiya, Akira; Ehrentraut, Dirk; Fukuda, Tsuguo; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Togashi, Tadashi; Matsubara, Shinichi; Tono, Kensuke; Higashiya, Atsushi; Yabashi, Makina; Kimura, Hiroaki; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2011-06-01

    We report an over one-order-of magnitude improvement in the response time of conventional hydrothermal method-grown zinc oxide (ZnO) scintillator by introducing additional quenching channels via intentional indium ion doping. A 3-ps fluorescence decay time constant is achieved, therefore making it the fastest scintillator operating below 100 nm to date. Using this indium-doped ZnO, relative jitter between extreme ultraviolet free electron laser (EUV-FEL) probe and optical pump pulses is evaluated to be less than 3 ps. Moreover, pulses from these sources can be synchronized with 3-ps accuracy through in-situ observation of relative time difference in single-shot base.

  11. Consistency of time dilation in temporal profiles and spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriss, J. P.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Bonnell, J. T.; Scargle, J. D.; Davis, S. P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pendleton, G.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.

    1995-01-01

    If gamma-ray bursters are at cosmological distances-a possibility suggested by their isotropic distribution and spatial inhomogeneity-then the temporal profiles and spectra of more distant sources will be time dilated compared to those of relatively nearby sources. Analyses of bright and dim Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) gamma-ray bursts yield a relative time-dilation factor of 2.3 on timescales of pulses and event durations. We redshift the spectra of time intervals near the intensity peaks of the bright sample on a trial grid and compare with spectra of the dim sample. A redshift factor of order two-with wide latitude permitted-brings the spectra of the two brightness groups into alignment. Thus there is coarse agreement with the time-dilation factor found in the temporal domain.

  12. BGO as a hybrid scintillator / Cherenkov radiator for cost-effective time-of-flight PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunner, S.E.K.; Schaart, D.R.

    2017-01-01

    Due to detector developments in the last decade, the time-of-flight (TOF) method is now commonly used to improve the quality of positron emission tomography (PET) images. Clinical TOF-PET systems based on L(Y)SO:Ce crystals and silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) with coincidence resolving times

  13. Development of a method for reconstruction of crowded NMR spectra from undersampled time-domain data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Takumi; Yoshiura, Chie; Matsumoto, Masahiko; Kofuku, Yutaka; Okude, Junya; Kondo, Keita; Shiraishi, Yutaro [The University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan); Takeuchi, Koh [Japan Science and Technology Agency, Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (Japan); Shimada, Ichio, E-mail: shimada@iw-nmr.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    NMR is a unique methodology for obtaining information about the conformational dynamics of proteins in heterogeneous biomolecular systems. In various NMR methods, such as transferred cross-saturation, relaxation dispersion, and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement experiments, fast determination of the signal intensity ratios in the NMR spectra with high accuracy is required for analyses of targets with low yields and stabilities. However, conventional methods for the reconstruction of spectra from undersampled time-domain data, such as linear prediction, spectroscopy with integration of frequency and time domain, and analysis of Fourier, and compressed sensing were not effective for the accurate determination of the signal intensity ratios of the crowded two-dimensional spectra of proteins. Here, we developed an NMR spectra reconstruction method, “conservation of experimental data in analysis of Fourier” (Co-ANAFOR), to reconstruct the crowded spectra from the undersampled time-domain data. The number of sampling points required for the transferred cross-saturation experiments between membrane proteins, photosystem I and cytochrome b{sub 6}f, and their ligand, plastocyanin, with Co-ANAFOR was half of that needed for linear prediction, and the peak height reduction ratios of the spectra reconstructed from truncated time-domain data by Co-ANAFOR were more accurate than those reconstructed from non-uniformly sampled data by compressed sensing.

  14. The Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in Calorimeters with Scintillator and with Gas Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Szalay, M

    2015-01-01

    The time structure of hadronic showers is characterized by apromptcomponent from relativistic particles and by late components predominantly connected to neutrons in the cascade.The sensitivity to this late component thus depends on the choice of the active medium for hadronic calorimeters.

  15. Optimizing timing resolution for TOF PET detectors based on monolithic scintillation crystals using fast photosensor arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinke, Ruud; Lohner, Herbert; Schaart, Dennis R.; van Dam, Herman T.; Seifert, Stefan; Beekman, Freek J.; Dendooven, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the time-of-flight (TOF) capability of a monolithic 20 rum x 20 mm x 12 mm LYSO crystal coupled to a Hamamatsu position-sensitive H8711-03 4x4 multi-anode photomultiplier tube. The x-, y-, and z-coordinates of the photoconversion location inside the crystal are determined using

  16. Properties of scintillator solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluornoy, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    This special report summarizes measurements of the spectroscopic and other properties of the solutes that were used in the preparation of several new liquid scintillators developed at EG and G/Energy Measurements/Santa Barbara Operations (the precursor to Bechtel Nevada/Special Technologies Laboratory) on the radiation-to-light converter program. The data on the individual compounds are presented in a form similar to that used by Prof. Isadore Berlman in his classic handbook of fluorescence spectra. The temporal properties and relative efficiencies of the new scintillators are presented in Table 1, and the efficiencies as a function of wavelength are presented graphically in Figure 1. In addition, there is a descriptive glossary of the abbreviations used herein. Figure 2 illustrates the basic structures of some of the compounds and of the four solvents reported in this summary. The emission spectra generally exhibit more structure than the absorption spectra, with the result that the peak emission wavelength for a given compound may lie several nm away from the wavelength, {lambda}{sub avg}, at the geometric center of the emission spectrum. Therefore, the author has chosen to list absorption peaks, {lambda}{sub max}, and emission {lambda}{sub avg} values in Figures 3--30, as being most illustrative of the differences between the compounds. The compounds, BHTP, BTPB, ADBT, and DPTPB were all developed on this program. P-terphenyl, PBD, and TPB are commercially available blue emitters. C-480 and the other longer-wavelength emitters are laser dyes available commercially from Exciton Corporation. 1 ref., 30 figs.

  17. submitter Measurement of intrinsic rise times for various L(Y)SO and LuAG scintillators with a general study of prompt photons to achieve 10 ps in TOF-PET

    CERN Document Server

    Gundacker, Stefan; Pauwels, Kristof; Lecoq, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The coincidence time resolution (CTR) of scintillator based detectors commonly used in positron emission tomography is well known to be dependent on the scintillation decay time (${{\\tau}_{d}}$ ) and the number of photons detected (${{n}^{\\prime}}$ ), i.e. $CTR\\propto \\sqrt{{{\\tau}_{d}}/{{n}^{\\prime}}}$ . However, it is still an open question to what extent the scintillation rise time (${{\\tau}_{r}}$ ) and other fast or prompt photons, e.g. Cherenkov photons, at the beginning of the scintillation process influence the CTR. This paper presents measurements of the scintillation emission rate for different LSO type crystals, i.e. LSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce, LSO:Ce codoped Ca and LGSO:Ce. For the various LSO-type samples measured we find an average value of 70 ps for the scintillation rise time, although some crystals like LSO:Ce codoped Ca seem to have a much faster rise time in the order of 20 ps. Additional measurements for LuAG:Ce and LuAG:Pr show a rise time of 535 ps and 251 ps, respectively. For these crystals, promp...

  18. Molecular origins of scintillation in organic scintillators (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Patrick; Mengesha, Wondwosen; Myllenbeck, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    Organic-based scintillators are indispensable materials for radiation detection owing to their high sensitivity to fast neutrons, low cost, and tailorable properties. There has been a recent resurgence of interest in organic scintillators due to exciting discoveries related to neutron discrimination and gamma-ray spectroscopy, which represent capabilities previously thought not possible in these materials. I will discuss our development of crystalline and polymer-based scintillators for these applications. Structure-property relationships related to intermolecular interactions and host-guest electronic exchange will be discussed in the context of energy-transfer pathways relevant to scintillation. An emphasis will be placed on the rational design of these materials, as guided by first principles and DFT calculations. Two related topics will be discussed: 1) Incorporation of organometallic triplet-harvesting additives to plastic scintillator matrices to confer a 'two-state' (singlet and triplet) luminescence signature to different types of ionizing radiation. This approach relies upon energetic and spatial overlap between the donor and acceptor excited states for efficient electronic exchange. Key considerations also include synthetic modification of the luminescence spectra and kinetics, as well as the addition of secondary additives to increase the recombination efficiency. 2) Design of organotin-containing plastic scintillators as a route towards gamma-ray spectroscopy. Organometallic compounds were selected on the basis of distance-dependent quenching relationships, phase compatibility with the polymer matrix, and the gamma-ray cross sections. This approach is guided by molecular modeling and radiation transport modeling to achieve the highest possible detection sensitivity luminescence intensity.

  19. SU-E-T-159: Sensitivity of in Line Real Time Scintillating Fiber Detectors for External Beam Treatment Verification and Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izaguirre, E W; Price, S G; Smajlovic, S; Yaddanapudi, S; Wooten, H; Mutic, S

    2012-06-01

    We studied the sensitivity of a novel transmission fiber scintillator array designed and built for in line treatment verification. The purpose of this project is to assess the capability of the fiber detector array technology to detect treatment errors in real time without false positives to enhance patient safety. We developed a linear scintillator array detector using radiation hard scintillating fibers and high speed parallel signal conditioning and data acquisition to monitor external beam treatment fluence in real time. The detector captures and resolves the time and amplitude of each linac pulse at each MLC segment. The detector has 60 fibers aligned to each MLC leaf and two output channels per fiber. The data is captured by a high speed parallel digitizer to determine the IMRT beam output delivered to a patient in real time. We evaluated the detector peak pulse linearity according to dose rate, MLC positioning, and beam energy. We analyzed the detector sensitivity, signal to noise ratio, and pulse distribution statistics to determine beam output and fluence in real time. We analyzed the response of the detector to 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams. The statistical analysis of the detected linac pulses indicates that a minimum of 20 pulses are required to evaluate MLC positioning and fluence with 3 mm and 3% resolution, respectively. During testing, no false positives were detected. Linearity with respect to output rate, MLC or jaw opening, and fluence is within 2%. Measured sensitivity and signal to noise ratio of a real time linear fiber array detector show that delivered beam fluence can be monitored every 55 msec, with no observed false positives during treatment to provide in vivo real time patient safety and beam monitoring. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Dynamics and energy spectra of aperiodic discrete-time quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Gullo, N.; Ambarish, C. V.; Busch, Th.; Dell'Anna, L.; Chandrashekar, C. M.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the role of different aperiodic sequences in the dynamics of single quantum particles in discrete space and time. For this we consider three aperiodic sequences, namely, the Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and Rudin-Shapiro sequences, as examples of tilings the diffraction spectra of which have pure point, singular continuous, and absolutely continuous support, respectively. Our interest is to understand how the order, intrinsically introduced by the deterministic rule used to generate the aperiodic sequences, is reflected in the dynamical properties of the quantum system. For this system we consider a single particle undergoing a discrete-time quantum walk (DTQW), where the aperiodic sequences are used to distribute the coin operations at different lattice positions (inhomogeneous DTQW) or by applying the same coin operation at all lattice sites at a given time but choosing different coin operation at each time step according to the chosen aperiodic sequence (time dependent DTQW). We study the energy spectra and the spreading of an initially localized wave packet for different cases, finding that in the case of Fibonacci and Thue-Morse tilings the system is superdiffusive, whereas in the Rudin-Shapiro case it is strongly subdiffusive. Trying to understand this behavior in terms of the energy spectra, we look at the survival amplitude as a function of time. By means of the echo we present strong evidence that, although the three orderings are very different as evidenced by their diffraction spectra, the energy spectra are all singular continuous except for the inhomogeneous DTQW with the Rudin-Shapiro sequence where it is discrete. This is in agreement with the observed strong localization both in real space and in the Hilbert space. Our paper is particularly interesting because quantum walks can be engineered in laboratories by means of ultracold gases or in optical waveguides, and therefore would be a perfect playground to study singular continuous energy

  1. Characteristics of plastic scintillators fabricated by a polymerization reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Yong Kyun [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Three plastic scintillators of 4.5 cm diameter and 2.5-cm length were fabricated for comparison with commercial plastic scintillators using polymerization of the styrene monomer 2.5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 1,4-bis benzene (POPOP). Their maximum emission wavelengths were determined at 426.06 nm, 426.06 nm, and 425.00 nm with a standard error of 0.2% using a Varian spectrophotometer (Agilent, Santa Clara, CA, USA). Compton edge spectra were measured using three gamma ray sources [i.e., cesium 137 ({sup 137}Cs), sodium 22 ({sup 22}Na), and cobalt 60 ({sup 60}Co)]. Energy was calibrated by analyzing the Compton edge spectra. The fabricated scintillators possessed more than 99.7% energy linearity. Light output was comparable to that of the BC-408 scintillator (Saint-Gobain, Paris, France). The fabricated scintillators showed a light output of approximately 59–64% of that of the BC-408 scintillator.

  2. Quasi-real-time photon pulse duration measurement by analysis of FEL radiation spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, Robin, E-mail: robin.engel@uni-oldenburg.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Institut für Laser und Optik, Hochschule Emden/Leer, University of Applied Sciences, Constantiaplatz 4, D-26723 Emden (Germany); Düsterer, Stefan; Brenner, Günter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Teubner, Ulrich [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Institut für Laser und Optik, Hochschule Emden/Leer, University of Applied Sciences, Constantiaplatz 4, D-26723 Emden (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    Considering the second-order spectral correlation function of SASE-FEL radiation allows a real-time observation of the photon pulse duration during spectra acquisition. For photon diagnostics at free-electron lasers (FELs), the determination of the photon pulse duration is an important challenge and a complex task. This is especially true for SASE FELs with strongly fluctuating pulse parameters. However, most techniques require an extensive experimental setup, data acquisition and evaluation time, limiting the usability in all-day operation. In contrast, the presented work uses an existing approach based on the analysis of statistical properties of measured SASE FEL spectra and implements it as a software tool, integrated in FLASH’s data acquisition system. This allows the calculation of the average pulse durations from a set of measured spectral distributions with only seconds of delay, whenever high-resolution spectra are recorded.

  3. A Review of Ionospheric Scintillation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshi, S

    This is a general review of the existing climatological models of ionospheric radio scintillation for high and equatorial latitudes. Trans-ionospheric communication of radio waves from transmitter to user is affected by the ionosphere which is highly variable and dynamic in both time and space. Scintillation is the term given to irregular amplitude and phase fluctuations of the received signals and related to the electron density irregularities in the ionosphere. Key sources of ionospheric irregularities are plasma instabilities; every irregularities model is based on the theory of radio wave propagation in random media. It is important to understand scintillation phenomena and the approach of different theories. Therefore, we have briefly discussed the theories that are used to interpret ionospheric scintillation data. The global morphology of ionospheric scintillation is also discussed briefly. The most important (in our opinion) analytical and physical models of scintillation are reviewed here.

  4. Role of hot electron transport in scintillators: A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Huihui [SZU-NUS Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Science and Technology, Key Lab. of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen Univ. (China); Li, Qi [Physical Sciences Division, IBM TJ Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Lu, Xinfu; Williams, R.T. [Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Qian, Yiyang [College of Engineering and Applied Science, Nanjing University (China); Wu, Yuntao [Scintillation Materials Research Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Despite recent intensive study on scintillators, several fundamental questions on scintillator properties are still unknown. In this work, we use ab-initio calculations to determine the energy dependent group velocity of the hot electrons from the electronic structures of several typical scintillators. Based on the calculated group velocities and optical phonon frequencies, a Monte-Carlo simulation of hot electron transport in scintillators is carried out to calculate the thermalization time and diffusion range in selected scintillators. Our simulations provide physical insights on a recent trend of improved proportionality and light yield from mixed halide scintillators. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Multi-station Scintillation Observations at Spitzbergen During the NASA Cusp Rocket Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, S.; Kuenzler, H.; Ning, P.; Basu, S.

    2003-12-01

    The plasma density irregularities and their turbulent motion in the cusp following the launch of the NASA Cusp Rocket on December 14, 2002, were studied by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) from ionospheric scintillation observations by using transmissions from a quasi-stationary satellite at 250 MHz and GPS at 1.5 GHz. The multi-instrumented rocket was launched from Ny Alesund at 11h 16m 48s and the rocket attained 300 km altitude after 2m 27s into the flight and reached its apogee at 760 km after 8m 8s. At this time the 300 km sub-ionospheric locations of UHF scintillation measurements from Ny Alesund (75 MLAT) and from Longyearbyen (74.1 MLAT) on Spitzbergen corresponded closely to the rocket flight path. Scintillations were in a quiescent phase earlier that day, becoming suddenly enhanced to saturation levels prior to 1100 UT and maintaining this increase up to 1250 UT. The rocket was launched during this active phase when a burst of GPS phase fluctuations was also observed. The most significant result was the broadening of the scintillation spectrum at 250 MHz that exceeded 2 Hz indicating at least a 5-fold increase in the turbulent motion of plasma density irregularities compared to that prior to the scintillation enhancement. The enhancement of scintillation was coincident with the enhanced plasma convection and radar backscatter recorded by the SuperDARN radars at Iceland and Finland. The increased spectral width of the backscatter return from these two radars indicating turbulent electric fields agreed very well with that obtained from the broadening of the power spectrum of scintillations. The rocket in-situ observations of electric field fluctuations and plasma density irregularities are being studied in relation to the magnitude of scintillations and their spectra.

  6. Apple II direct memory access interface to acquire neutron scattering time of flight spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilloco, F.; Ippoliti, A.; Sacchetti, F.

    1990-07-01

    A data acquisition system designed to acquire time of flight spectra in neutron scattering experiments is described. The system is completely hardware, so that even employing a relatively slow clock (1 MHz) it is adequate to work at 300 kHz with no loss of information.

  7. Rapid Anomaly Detection and Tracking via Compressive Time-Spectra Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-12

    0002AM Title: Rapid anomaly detection and tracking via compressive time- spectra measurement Contract performance period: 05 Nov 2013 - 04... ground truth signal broadening technique...and tracking has direct applications in lower- cost, higher- performance sensors particularly in the shortwave infrared where focal plane array

  8. Cherenkov and scintillation light separation in organic liquid scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, J.; Descamps, F. B.; Land, B. J.; Yeh, M.; Orebi Gann, G. D.

    2017-12-01

    The CHErenkov/Scintillation Separation experiment (CHESS) has been used to demonstrate the separation of Cherenkov and scintillation light in both linear alkylbenzene (LAB) and LAB with 2 g/L of PPO as a fluor (LAB/PPO). This is the first successful demonstration of Cherenkov light detection from the more challenging LAB/PPO cocktail and improves on previous results for LAB. A time resolution of 338± 12 ps FWHM results in an efficiency for identifying Cherenkov photons in LAB/PPO of 70 ± 3 % and 63± 8% for time- and charge-based separation, respectively, with scintillation contamination of 36± 5% and 38± 4%. LAB/PPO data is consistent with a rise time of τ _r=0.72± 0.33 ns.

  9. Mixture quantification using PLS in plastic scintillation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagan, H.; Tarancon, A.; Rauret, G. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, J.F., E-mail: jfgarcia@ub.ed [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-06-15

    This article reports the capability of plastic scintillation (PS) combined with multivariate calibration (Partial least squares; PLS) to detect and quantify alpha and beta emitters in mixtures. While several attempts have been made with this purpose in mind using liquid scintillation (LS), no attempt was done using PS that has the great advantage of not producing mixed waste after the measurements are performed. Following this objective, ternary mixtures of alpha and beta emitters ({sup 241}Am, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y) have been quantified. Procedure optimisation has evaluated the use of the net spectra or the sample spectra, the inclusion of different spectra obtained at different values of the Pulse Shape Analysis parameter and the application of the PLS1 or PLS2 algorithms. The conclusions show that the use of PS+PLS2 applied to the sample spectra, without the use of any pulse shape discrimination, allows quantification of the activities with relative errors less than 10% in most of the cases. This procedure not only allows quantification of mixtures but also reduces measurement time (no blanks are required) and the application of this procedure does not require detectors that include the pulse shape analysis parameter.

  10. Terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillation-based polymer optical fibre sensor for real time monitoring of radiation dose in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, E.; O'Keeffe, S.; Grattan, M.; Hounsell, A.; McCarthy, D.; Woulfe, P.; Cronin, J.; Mihai, L.; Sporea, D.; Santhanam, A.; Agazaryan, N.

    2014-05-01

    A PMMA based plastic optical fibre sensor for use in real time radiotherapy dosimetry is presented. The optical fibre tip is coated with a scintillation material, terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb), which fluoresces when exposed to ionising radiation (X-Ray). The emitted visible light signal penetrates the sensor optical fibre and propagates along the transmitting fibre at the end of which it is remotely monitored using a fluorescence spectrometer. The results demonstrate good repeatability, with a maximum percentage error of 0.5% and the response is independent of dose rate.

  11. submitter Preparation and luminescence properties of ZnO:Ga – polystyrene composite scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Burešová, Hana; Turtos, Rosana Martinez; Jarý, Vítězslav; Mihóková, Eva; Beitlerová, Alena; Pjatkan, Radek; Gundacker, Stefan; Auffray, Etiennette; Lecoq, Paul; Nikl, Martin; Čuba, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Highly luminescent ZnO:Ga-polystyrene composite (ZnO:Ga-PS) with ultrafast subnanosecond decay was prepared by homogeneous embedding the ZnO:Ga scintillating powder into the scintillating organic matrix. The powder was prepared by photo-induced precipitation with subsequent calcination in air and Ar/H2 atmospheres. The composite was subsequently prepared by mixing the ZnO:Ga powder into the polystyrene (10 wt% fraction of ZnO:Ga) and press compacted to the 1 mm thick pellet. Luminescent spectral and kinetic characteristics of ZnO:Ga were preserved. Radioluminescence spectra corresponded purely to the ZnO:Ga scintillating phase and emission of polystyrene at 300-350 nm was absent. These features suggest the presence of non-radiative energy transfer from polystyrene host towards the ZnO:Ga scintillating phase which is confirmed by the measurement of X-ray excited scintillation decay with picosecond time resolution. It shows an ultrafast rise time below the time resolution of the experiment (18 ps) and a single-...

  12. Development of Plastic Scintillation Detector of Low Energy Protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, J. K.; Lee, K. H.; Hwang, S. H.; Ko, S. K.; Park, S. H.; Kim, B. T. [Busan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Development of Plastic Scintillator with thickness of 200 {mu}m. Development of the HV supply and Divider with the maximum voltage of -1200V. Development of Control Program using BASIC Computer Language. Development of Changed Mode Program for Start, Stop, Data Display and Data Transfer using Button Switch. Development of Monitoring Program for Data Transfer and Display Spectra. Development of high-efficiency plastic scintillator. Development of the 12-bit Resolution circuit. Development of main control program. Data Transmission via TCP/IP. Measurement of Beta Spectrum using Plastic Scintillator Detector. Identification of Electrons, Protons and Deuterons using Plastic Scintillator Detectors. Design and Fabrication of the Mock-up mode.

  13. Scintillating fiber detector

    CERN Document Server

    Vozak, Matous

    2016-01-01

    NA61 is one of the physics experiments at CERN dedicated to study hadron states coming from interactions of SPS beams with various targets. To determine the position of a secondary beam, three proportional chambers are placed along the beamline. However, these chambers tend to have slow response. In order to obtain more precise time information, use of another detector is being considered. Fast response and compact size is making scintillation fiber (SciFi) with silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) read out a good candidate. This report is focused on analysing data from SciFi collected in a test beam at the beginning of July 2016.

  14. Modeling Optical Spectra of Large Organic Systems Using Real-Time Propagation of Semiempirical Effective Hamiltonians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Soumen [Department; Andersen, Amity [Environmental; Gagliardi, Laura [Department; Cramer, Christopher J. [Department; Govind, Niranjan [Environmental

    2017-08-16

    We present an implementation of a time-dependent semiempirical method (INDO/S) in NWChem using real-time (RT) propagation to address, in principle, the entire spectrum of valence electronic excitations. Adopting this model, we study the UV-visible spectra of medium-sized systems like P3B2, f-coronene, and in addition much larger systems like ubiquitin in the gas phase and the betanin chromophore in the presence of two explicit solvents (water and methanol). RT-INDO/S provides qualitatively and indeed often quantitatively accurate results when compared with RT- TDDFT or experimental spectra. While demonstrated here for INDO/S in particular, our implementation provides a framework for performing electron dynamics in large systems using semiempirical Hartree-Fock (HF) Hamiltonians in general.

  15. Production of the Large-area Plastic Scintillator for Beta-ray Detection using Epoxy Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Jong Soo; Choi, Yong Seok; Hong, Sang Bum; Seo, Bum Kyung; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Jong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, we prepared a plastic scintillator whose manufacturing process is simple and can be freely shaped. A thin plate of the plastic scintillator was manufactured using epoxy resin as a polymer. The plastic scintillator was made by mixing epoxy resin and organic scintillators under various conditions. The optimal mixture ratio to prepare the plastic scintillator was derived from the above results. Using the derived results, we made the large-area plastic scintillator which can quickly measure the contamination site and evaluated characteristics of the large-area plastic scintillator in the laboratory. A thin plate of a plastic scintillator with a simple preparation process can be freely shaped using epoxy resin and organic scintillators such as PPO and POPOP. PPO emits scintillation of light in the ultraviolet range, and POPOP is a wave shifter for moving the wavelength responsible for the PMT. The mixture ratio of PPO and POPOP was determined using their emission spectra. The optimal weight percentage of PPO and POPOP in an organic scintillator was determined to be 0.2 wt%:0.01 wt%. Based on the above results, the large-area plastic scintillator of the window size of a typical pancake-type αβ surface contamination counter was prepared. We want to evaluate the characteristics of the large-area plastic scintillator. However, there were the difficulties in evaluating characteristics of the large-area plastic scintillator. The cross-sectional area of the large-area plastic scintillator is significantly different to PMT.

  16. Studies on scintillating fiber response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albers, D. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bollmann, R.; Buesser, K.; Cloth, P.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Drueke, V.; Engelhardt, H.P.; Ernst, J.; Eversheim, P.D.; Filges, D.; Gasthuber, M.; Gebel, R.; Greiff, J.; Gross, A.; Gross-Hardt, R.; Heine, A.; Heider, S.; Hinterberger, F.; Igelbrink, M.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Langkau, R.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Mertler, G.; Metsch, B.; Mosel, F.; Mueller, M.; Muenstermann, M.; Paetz genannt Schieck, H.; Petry, H.R.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjess, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Ross, U.; Rossen, P. von; Scheid, H.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwandt, F.; Scobel, W.; Steeg, B.; Sterzenbach, G.; Trelle, H.J.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R. [Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany)]|[1. Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany)]|[Institut fuer Kernphysik, KFA, Juelich (Germany)]|[Institut fuer Theor. Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany)]|[Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Koeln, Koeln (Germany)

    1995-03-11

    Scintillating fibers of type Bicron BCF-12 with 2 x 2 mm{sup 2} cross section, up to 600 mm length, and PMMA cladding have been tested, in conjunction with the multi-channel photomultiplier Hamamatsu R 4760, with minimum ionizing electrons. The impact of cladding, extramural absorbers and/or wrapping on the light attenuation and photoelectron yield is studied in detail. Fibers have been circularly bent with radii of 171 mm and arranged in two layers to bundles forming granulated scintillator rings. Their performance in the EDDA experiment at COSY for detection of high energy protons revealed typically more than 9 (6) photoelectrons per fiber from bundles with (without) mirror on the rear side, guaranteeing detection efficiencies >99% and full compatibility with corresponding solid scintillator rings. The time resolution of 3.4 ns FWHM per fiber read out is essentially due to the R 4760. (orig.).

  17. Studies on scintillating fiber response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, D.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bollmann, R.; Büßer, K.; Cloth, P.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Drüke, V.; Engelhardt, H. P.; Ernst, J.; Eversheim, P. D.; Filges, D.; Gasthuber, M.; Gebel, R.; Greiff, J.; Groß, A.; Groß-Hardt, R.; Heine, A.; Heider, S.; Hinterberger, F.; Igelbrink, M.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Langkau, R.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Mertler, G.; Metsch, B.; Mosel, F.; Müller, M.; Münstermann, M.; Paetz gen. Schieck, H.; Petry, H. R.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjeß, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Roß, U.; von Rossen, P.; Scheid, H.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwandt, F.; Scobel, W.; Steeg, B.; Sterzenbach, G.; Trelle, H. J.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R.

    1996-02-01

    Scintillating fibers of type Bicron BCF-12 with 2 × 2 mm 2 cross section, up to 600 mm length, and PMMA cladding have been tested, in conjunction with the multi-channel photomultiplier Hamamatsu R 4760, with minimum ionizing electrons. The impact of cladding, extramural absorbers and/or wrapping on the light attenuation and photoelectron yield is studied in detail. Fibers have been circularly bent with radii of 171 mm and arranged in two layers to bundles forming granulated scintillator rings. Their performance in the EDDA experiment at COSY for detection of high energy protons revealed typically more than 9 (6) photoelectrons per fiber from bundles with (without) mirror on the rear side, guaranteeing detection efficiencies >99% and full compatibility with corresponding solid scintillator rings. The time resolution of 3.4 ns FWHM per fiber read out is essentially due to the R 4760.

  18. Simulation of Accurate Vibrationally Resolved Electronic Spectra: the Integrated Time-Dependent and Time-Independent Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiardi, Alberto; Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien

    2014-06-01

    Two parallel theories including Franck-Condon, Herzberg-Teller and Duschinsky (i.e., mode mixing) effects, allowing different approximations for the description of excited state PES have been developed in order to simulate realistic, asymmetric, electronic spectra line-shapes taking into account the vibrational structure: the so-called sum-over-states or time-independent (TI) method and the alternative time-dependent (TD) approach, which exploits the properties of the Fourier transform. The integrated TI-TD procedure included within a general purpose QM code [1,2], allows to compute one photon absorption, fluorescence, phosphorescence, electronic circular dichroism, circularly polarized luminescence and resonance Raman spectra. Combining both approaches, which use a single set of starting data, permits to profit from their respective advantages and minimize their respective limits: the time-dependent route automatically includes all vibrational states and, possibly, temperature effects, while the time-independent route allows to identify and assign single vibronic transitions. Interpretation, analysis and assignment of experimental spectra based on integrated TI-TD vibronic computations will be illustrated for challenging cases of medium-sized open-shell systems in the gas and condensed phases with inclusion of leading anharmonic effects. 1. V. Barone, A. Baiardi, M. Biczysko, J. Bloino, C. Cappelli, F. Lipparini Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys, 14, 12404, (2012) 2. A. Baiardi, V. Barone, J. Bloino J. Chem. Theory Comput., 9, 4097-4115 (2013)

  19. Neutron scintillators with high detection efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, T.; Katagiri, M. E-mail: kata@stsp2a0.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Tsutsui, N.; Imai, K.; Matsubayashi, M.; Sakasai, K

    2004-08-21

    We have developed three kinds of phosphor/neutron-converter scintillators aiming to increase the detection efficiency of the neutron imaging detectors. One is the ZnS:Ag/{sup 6}LiF (powder) scintillator, which contained {sup 6}LiF about twice in amount comparing to the commercial product (Bicron, BC-704) and painted in a sheet, and the 0.4-mm-thick scintillator sheet exhibited the detection efficiency of 43.5% for thermal neutrons. This value was improved {approx}1.5 times than that of BC-704. Another developed scintillator was a ZnS:Ag/{sup 10}B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (powder), which contained {sup 10}B as a neutron converter. The scintillator was fabricated by sintering up to the temperature of 500 or 600 deg. C, and it exhibited the detection efficiency of 30% for thermal neutrons. Moreover, we developed ZnS:Ag/{sup 10}B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass-scintillator, which was fabricated by increasing the amount of {sup 10}B{sub 2}O{sub 3} up to 70-90% of the constituents and by sintering the scintillator materials up to the temperature of 650 deg. C. The fabricated glass scintillators, which had a thickness of 0.9-1 mm, exhibited the detection efficiency of 20-40% for thermal neutrons.

  20. Characterization of GAGG:Ce scintillators with various Al-to-Ga ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibczynski, Pawel; Iwanowska-Hanke, Joanna; Moszyński, Marek; Swiderski, Lukasz; Szawłowski, Marek; Grodzicka, Martyna; Szczęśniak, Tomasz; Kamada, Kei; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2015-02-01

    We have studied the scintillation properties of cerium doped gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (GAGG:Ce) scintillators with various Al-to-Ga ratio. Having many advantages, like high density (6.63 g/cm3), high light output, fair energy resolution and quite fast decay time, the scintillators are an excellent solution for gamma rays detection. In this paper performance of the GAGG:1%Ce crystals with different Al-to-Ga ratios is presented. The study covered measurements of emission spectra, light output, energy resolution and non-proportionality for each crystal. It was observed that the light output of the recently obtainable crystals varies from 40,000 to 55,000 ph/MeV. Maximum emission wavelength of about 520 nm promotes silicon based photodetectors for use with these scintillators. The best energy resolution of 3.7% at 662 keV, measured with Hamamatsu S8664-1010 APD, was obtained for the sample with the minimum gallium content. This result is close to these obtained with the group of scintillators retaining very good energy resolution, like LaCl3 and CeBr3.

  1. SU-F-T-559: High-Resolution Scintillating Fiber Array for In-Vivo Real-Time SRS and SBRT Patient QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knewtson, T; Pokhrel, S [University of Missouri- Columbia, Columbia, MO (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Methodist LeBoneur Healthcare, Memphis, TN (United States); Loyalka, S [University of Missouri- Columbia, Columbia, MO (United States); Izaguirre, E [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Methodist LeBoneur Healthcare, Memphis, TN (United States); The West Cancer Center, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A high-resolution scintillating fiber detector was built for in-vivo real-time patient specific quality assurance (QA). The detector is designed for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to monitor treatment delivery and detect real-time deviations from planned dose to increase patient safety and treatment accuracy. Methods: The detector consists of two high-density scintillating fiber arrays layered to form an X-Y grid which can be attached to the accessory tray of a medical linac for SBRT and cone SRS treatment QA. Fiber arrays consist of 128 scintillating fibers embedded within a precision-machined, high-transmission polymer substrate with 0.8mm pitch. The fibers are coupled on both ends to high-sensitivity photodetectors and the output is recorded through a high-speed analog-to-digital converter to capture the linac pulse sequence as treatment delivery progresses. The detector has a software controlled 360 degree rotational system to capture angular beam projections for high-resolution beam profile reconstruction. Results: The detector was validated using SRS cone sizes from 6mm to 34mm and MLC defined field sizes from 5×5mm2 to 100×100mm2. The detector output response is linear with dose and is dose rate independent. Each field can be reconstructed accurately with a spatial resolution of 0.8mm and the current beam output is displayed every 50msec. Dosimetric errors of 1% with respect to the treatment plan can be identified and clinically significant deviations from the expected treatment can be displayed in real-time to alert the therapists. Conclusion: The high resolution detector is capable of reconstructing beam profiles in real-time with submillimeter resolution and 1% dose resolution. This system has the ability to project in-vivo both spatial and dosimetric errors during SBRT and SRS treatments when only a non-clinically significant fraction of the intended dose was delivered. The device has the potential to

  2. Analysis of L -shell line spectra with 50-ps time resolution from Mo X -pinch plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S B; Shlyaptseva, A S; Pikuz, S A; Shelkovenko, T A; Sinars, D B; Chandler, K M; Hammer, D A

    2004-08-01

    Mo wire X pinches typically emit several x-ray bursts from a bright spot near the crossing of the X -pinch wires. Streak camera images of L -shell line emission from Mo wire X pinches have been analyzed using a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) collisional-radiative atomic kinetics model, providing temperature and density profiles with approximately 50 ps time resolution over the approximately 350 ps x-ray bursts. In conjunction with nonspectroscopic measurements, the analysis is used to propose a picture of the dynamic evolution of the X -pinch plasma. The L -shell spectra from the first x-ray burst indicate an electron density near 10(22) cm(-3) and an electron temperature near 1 keV; subsequent x-ray bursts have L -shell spectra that indicate electron temperatures slightly above 1 keV and electron densities near 10(20) and 10(21) cm(-3). The size of the L -shell line-emitting region is estimated to be near 10 microm for the first x-ray burst and much larger for the later bursts. It is proposed that inner-shell excitation of low ionization stages of Mo in a microm -scale plasma region contributes to the observed radiation from the first micropinch, which typically emits a short burst of >3 keV radiation and has L -shell spectra characterized by broad spectral lines overlaying an intense continuum.

  3. Complex Dynamics of Equatorial Scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersanti, Mirko; Materassi, Massimo; Forte, Biagio; Cicone, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Radio power scintillation, namely highly irregular fluctuations of the power of trans-ionospheric GNSS signals, is the effect of ionospheric plasma turbulence. The scintillation patterns on radio signals crossing the medium inherit the ionospheric turbulence characteristics of inter-scale coupling, local randomness and large time variability. On this basis, the remote sensing of local features of the turbulent plasma is feasible by studying radio scintillation induced by the ionosphere. The distinctive character of intermittent turbulent media depends on the fluctuations on the space- and time-scale statistical properties of the medium. Hence, assessing how the signal fluctuation properties vary under different Helio-Geophysical conditions will help to understand the corresponding dynamics of the turbulent medium crossed by the signal. Data analysis tools, provided by complex system science, appear to be best fitting to study the response of a turbulent medium, as the Earth's equatorial ionosphere, to the non-linear forcing exerted by the Solar Wind (SW). In particular we used the Adaptive Local Iterative Filtering, the Wavelet analysis and the Information theory data analysis tool. We have analysed the radio scintillation and ionospheric fluctuation data at low latitude focusing on the time and space multi-scale variability and on the causal relationship between forcing factors from the SW environment and the ionospheric response.

  4. Measurement of Radiation Damage of Water-based Liquid Scintillator and Liquid Scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Bignell, Lindsey J; Hans, Sunej; Jaffe, David E; Rosero, Richard; Vigdor, Steven; Viren, Brett; Worcester, Elizabeth; Yeh, Minfang; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of $5\\%$ scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of $1.74 \\pm 0.55 \\%$ and $1.31 \\pm 0.59 \\%$ after $\\approx$ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Whilst some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical conte...

  5. On the time-averaging of ultrafine particle number size spectra in vehicular plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Yao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine vehicular particle (<100 nm number size distributions presented in the literature are mostly averages of long scan-time (~30 s or more spectra mainly due to the non-availability of commercial instruments that can measure particle distributions in the <10 nm to 100 nm range faster than 30 s even though individual researchers have built faster (1–2.5 s scanning instruments. With the introduction of the Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer (EEPS in 2004, high time-resolution (1 full 32-channel spectrum per second particle size distribution data become possible and allow atmospheric researchers to study the characteristics of ultrafine vehicular particles in rapidly and perhaps randomly varying high concentration environments such as roadside, on-road and tunnel. In this study, particle size distributions in these environments were found to vary as rapidly as one second frequently. This poses the question on the generality of using averages of long scan-time spectra for dynamic and/or mechanistic studies in rapidly and perhaps randomly varying high concentration environments. One-second EEPS data taken at roadside, on roads and in tunnels by a mobile platform are time-averaged to yield 5, 10, 30 and 120 s distributions to answer this question.

  6. Design and characterisation of a real time proton and carbon ion radiography system based on scintillating optical fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, D; Bonanno, D L; Longhitano, F; Bongiovanni, D G; Russo, G V; Leonora, E; Randazzo, N; Reito, S; Sipala, V; Gallo, G

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the design and characterization of a charged particle imaging system composed of a position sensitive detector and residual range detector. The position detector consists of two identical overlying and orthogonal planes each of which consists of two layers of pre-aligned and juxtaposed scintillating fibres. The 500μm square section fibres are optically coupled to two Silicon Photomultiplier arrays using a channel reduction system patented by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare. The residual range detector consists of sixty parallel layers of the same fibres used in the position detector each of which is optically coupled to a Silicon Photomultiplier array by wavelength shifting fibres. The sensitive area of the two detectors is 9×9cm(2). Characterising the position sensitive and the residual range detectors to reconstruct the radiography, is fundamental to validating the detectors' designs. The proton radiography of a calibrated target in imaging conditions is presented. The spatial resolution of the position sensitive detector is about 150μm and the range resolution is about 170μm. The performance of the prototypes were tested at CATANA proton therapy facility (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania) with energy up to 58MeV and rate of about 10(6) particles per second. The comparison between the simulations and measurements confirms the validity of this system. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Spectra of large time-lagged correlation matrices from random matrix theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Maciej A.; Tarnowski, Wojciech

    2017-06-01

    We analyze the spectral properties of large, time-lagged correlation matrices using the tools of random matrix theory. We compare predictions of the one-dimensional spectra, based on approaches already proposed in the literature. Employing the methods of free random variables and diagrammatic techniques, we solve a general random matrix problem, namely the spectrum of a matrix \\frac{1}{T}XA{{X}\\dagger} , where X is an N× T Gaussian random matrix and A is any T× T , not necessarily symmetric (Hermitian) matrix. Using this result, we study the spectral features of the large lagged correlation matrices as a function of the depth of the time-lag. We also analyze the properties of left and right eigenvector correlations for the time-lagged matrices. We positively verify our results by the numerical simulations.

  8. Study on the Characteristics of a Scintillator for Beta-ray Detection using Epoxy Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jong Soo; Choi, Yong Seok; Hong, Sang Bum; Seo, Bum Kyung; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Jong Won

    2017-09-01

    A thin plate of a plastic scintillator for detecting a beta-ray was developed. The plastic scintillator was made using epoxy resin and organic scintillators such as 2.5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 1,4-bis [5-phenyl-2-oxazole] benzene (POPOP). The mixture ratio of epoxy resin and the organic scintillators was determined using their absorbance, transmittance, emission spectra, and transparency. Their optimal weight percentage of PPO and POPOP in the organic scintillators was adjusted to 0.2 wt%:0.01 wt%. The prepared plastic scintillator was used to measure the standard source of Sr-90. The pulse height spectra and total counts of the prepared plastic scintillator were similar to a commercial plastic scintillator. Based on the above results, a large-area plastic scintillator was prepared for rapid investigation of a site contaminated with Sr-90. The prepared large-area plastic scintillator was evaluated for the characteristics in the laboratory. The evaluation results are expected to be usefully utilized in the development of a large-area plastic scintillation detector. The large-area plastic scintillation detector developed on the basis of the evaluation results is expected to be utilized to quickly measure the contamination of Sr-90 in the grounds used as a nuclear power facility.

  9. Measurement of 2 sup + sub 1 level lifetimes in sup 1 sup 6 sup 2 Yb and sup 1 sup 6 sup 2 Er by fast electronic scintillation timing

    CERN Document Server

    Caprio, M A; Casten, R F; Amro, H; Beausang, C W; Hecht, A A; Meyer, D A; Novak, J R; Ressler, J J; Zamfir, N V; Berant, Z; Barton, C J; Brenner, D S; Cooper, J R; Gill, R L; Guerdal, G; Hutter, C; Krücken, R; Pietralla, N; Regan, P H

    2003-01-01

    Lifetime measurements for the 2 sup + sub 1 levels of sup 1 sup 6 sup 2 Er and sup 1 sup 6 sup 2 Yb were obtained in beta sup + /epsilon decay at the Yale Moving Tape Collector by fast electronic scintillation timing of beta sup +gamma coincidences. (orig.)

  10. POLARIS: Portable Liquid Argon Imaging Scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yanyu; Kovacs, Benjamin; Kamp, Nicholas; Aidala, Christine; Polaris Team

    2017-09-01

    Liquefied noble gas detectors have become widely used in nuclear and particle physics, in particular for detecting neutrinos and in dark matter searches. However, their potential for neutron detection in low-energy nuclear physics has not yet been realized. The University of Michigan has been constructing a hybrid scintillating time projection chamber for detection of neutrons in the 200 keV 10 MeV range. The scintillation material is argon, and various dopants to improve detector efficiency are being explored. With collection of both scintillation light and ionization charge, improved energy resolution for neutrons is expected compared to existing measurement techniques.

  11. Optimizing ZnS/6LiF scintillators for wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, Lowell [ORNL; Funk, Loren L [ORNL; Hannan, Bruce W [ORNL; Hodges, Jason P [ORNL; Riedel, Richard A [ORNL; Wang, Cai-Lin [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we compare the performance of grooved and flat ZnS/6LiF scintillators in a wavelength shifting-fiber (WLSF) detector. Flat ZnS/6LiF scintillators with the thickness L=0.2-0.8 mm were characterized using photon counting and pulse-height analysis and compared to a grooved scintillator of approximately 0.8 mm thick. While a grooved scintillator considerably increases the apparent thickness of the scintillator to neutrons for a given coating thickness, we find that the flat scintillators perform better than the grooved scintillators in terms of both light yield and neutron detection efficiency. The flat 0.8-mm-thick scintillator has the highest light output, and it is 52% higher compared with a grooved scintillator of same thickness. The lower light output of the grooved scintillator as compared to the flat scintillator is consistent with the greater scintillator-WLSF separation and the much larger average emission angle of the grooved scintillator. We also find that the average light cone width, or photon travel-length as measured using time-of-flight powder diffraction of diamond and vanadium, decreases with increasing L in the range of L=0.6-0.8 mm. This result contrasts with the traditional Swank diffusion model for micro-composite scintillators, and could be explained by a decrease in photon diffusion-coefficient or an increase in micro-particle content in the flat scintillator matrix for the thicker scintillators.

  12. Forecasting scintillation activity and equatorial spread F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David N.; Redmon, Robert J.

    2017-03-01

    When transionospheric radio waves propagate through an irregular ionosphere with plasma depletions or "bubbles," they are subject to sporadic enhancement and fading, which is referred to as scintillation. Communication and navigation systems may be subject to these detrimental effects if the scintillation is strong enough. It is critical to have knowledge of the current ionospheric conditions so that system operators can distinguish between the natural radio environment and system-induced failures. In this paper we briefly describe the Forecasting Ionospheric Real-time Scintillation Tool UHF scintillation forecasting technique, which utilizes the observed characteristic parameter h'F from a ground-based, ionospheric sounder near the magnetic equator. The prereversal enhancement in vertical E × B drift velocity after sunset is the prime driver for creating plasma depletions and bubbles. In addition, there exists a "threshold" in the h'F value at 1930 LT, h'Fthr, such that, on any given evening, if h'F is significantly above h'Fthr, then scintillation activity is likely to occur, and if it is below h'Fthr, scintillation activity is unlikely to occur. We use this technique to explain the lack of scintillation activity prior to the Halloween storm in October 2003 in the Peruvian longitude sector. In addition, we have carried out a study which forecasts the occurrence or nonoccurrence of equatorial spread F (ESF), on a night-to-night basis, in five longitude sectors. The overall forecasting success is greater than 80% for each of the five longitude sectors.

  13. Accurate high-harmonic spectra from time-dependent two-particle reduced density matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lackner, Fabian; Sato, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Kenichi L; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The accurate description of the non-linear response of many-electron systems to strong-laser fields remains a major challenge. Methods that bypass the unfavorable exponential scaling with particle number are required to address larger systems. In this paper we present a fully three-dimensional implementation of the time-dependent two-particle reduced density matrix (TD-2RDM) method for many-electron atoms. We benchmark this approach by a comparison with multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) results for the harmonic spectra of beryllium and neon. We show that the TD-2RDM is very well-suited to describe the non-linear atomic response and to reveal the influence of electron-correlation effects.

  14. Reference-free, high-resolution measurement method of timing jitter spectra of optical frequency combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Dohyeon; Jeon, Chan-Gi; Shin, Junho; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Park, Sang Eon; Song, Youjian; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-01-01

    Timing jitter is one of the most important properties of femtosecond mode-locked lasers and optical frequency combs. Accurate measurement of timing jitter power spectral density (PSD) is a critical prerequisite for optimizing overall noise performance and further advancing comb applications both in the time and frequency domains. Commonly used jitter measurement methods require a reference mode-locked laser with timing jitter similar to or lower than that of the laser-under-test, which is a demanding requirement for many laser laboratories, and/or have limited measurement resolution. Here we show a high-resolution and reference-source-free measurement method of timing jitter spectra of optical frequency combs using an optical fibre delay line and optical carrier interference. The demonstrated method works well for both mode-locked oscillators and supercontinua, with 2 × 10-9 fs2/Hz (equivalent to -174 dBc/Hz at 10-GHz carrier frequency) measurement noise floor. The demonstrated method can serve as a simple and powerful characterization tool for timing jitter PSDs of various comb sources including mode-locked oscillators, supercontinua and recently emerging Kerr-frequency combs; the jitter measurement results enabled by our method will provide new insights for understanding and optimizing timing noise in such comb sources.

  15. An atomic orbital based real-time time-dependent density functional theory for computing electronic circular dichroism band spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goings, Joshua J; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-06-21

    One of the challenges of interpreting electronic circular dichroism (ECD) band spectra is that different states may have different rotatory strength signs, determined by their absolute configuration. If the states are closely spaced and opposite in sign, observed transitions may be washed out by nearby states, unlike absorption spectra where transitions are always positive additive. To accurately compute ECD bands, it is necessary to compute a large number of excited states, which may be prohibitively costly if one uses the linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework. Here we implement a real-time, atomic-orbital based TDDFT method for computing the entire ECD spectrum simultaneously. The method is advantageous for large systems with a high density of states. In contrast to previous implementations based on real-space grids, the method is variational, independent of nuclear orientation, and does not rely on pseudopotential approximations, making it suitable for computation of chiroptical properties well into the X-ray regime.

  16. Nonproportionality of inorganic scintillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khodyuk, I.V.

    2013-01-01

    A scintillator is a transparent material that emits a flash of light when it absorbs a ?-ray photon or an energetic particle. Scintillation crystals are widely used as spectroscopic detectors of ionizing radiation in nuclear science, space exploration, medical imaging, homeland security, etc. This

  17. Blind deconvolution of time-of-flight mass spectra from atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.J.S., E-mail: larsj@ifm.liu.se [Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping SE-581 83 (Sweden); Thuvander, M.; Stiller, K. [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Gothenburg, SE-412 96 (Sweden); Odén, M.; Hultman, L. [Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping SE-581 83 (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    A major source of uncertainty in compositional measurements in atom probe tomography stems from the uncertainties of assigning peaks or parts of peaks in the mass spectrum to their correct identities. In particular, peak overlap is a limiting factor, whereas an ideal mass spectrum would have peaks at their correct positions with zero broadening. Here, we report a method to deconvolute the experimental mass spectrum into such an ideal spectrum and a system function describing the peak broadening introduced by the field evaporation and detection of each ion. By making the assumption of a linear and time-invariant behavior, a system of equations is derived that describes the peak shape and peak intensities. The model is fitted to the observed spectrum by minimizing the squared residuals, regularized by the maximum entropy method. For synthetic data perfectly obeying the assumptions, the method recovered peak intensities to within ±0.33at%. The application of this model to experimental APT data is exemplified with Fe–Cr data. Knowledge of the peak shape opens up several new possibilities, not just for better overall compositional determination, but, e.g., for the estimation of errors of ranging due to peak overlap or peak separation constrained by isotope abundances. - Highlights: • A method for the deconvolution of atom probe mass spectra is proposed. • Applied to synthetic randomly generated spectra the accuracy was ±0.33 at. • Application of the method to an experimental Fe–Cr spectrum is demonstrated.

  18. Scintillation properties of μPD-grown Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9}:Pr (YAM:Pr) crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdowski, Winicjusz, E-mail: wind@fizyka.umk.pl [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Brylew, Kamil [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Malinowski, Michał [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Turczyński, Sebastian [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • YAM:Pr crystals do scintillate and as such deserve further interest. • Fast d–f luminescence of Pr{sup 3+} ions appears in X-ray excited spectra. • Two components (24 and 790 ns) constitute scintillation time profiles. - Abstract: Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9}:Pr (YAM:Pr) crystals have been grown by the micro-pulling-down method and their scintillation properties have been investigated. YAM:0.1%Pr displays a light yield of about 2000 ph/MeV and its scintillation time profile contains a prompt component with a decay time of 23.5 ns and a contribution of 20%. Radioluminescence spectra show both fast d–f and slow f–f praseodymium emissions. Low temperature glow curves are complex, consisting of discrete peaks and broad bands related to quasi-continuous trap distributions. Overall scintillation performance of YAM:Pr deteriorates with increasing praseodymium concentration.

  19. Ionospheric irregularities causing scintillation of GHz frequency radio signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernik, A. W.; Liu, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of the recently observed phenomenon of scintillation of satellite signals at GHz frequency range. Based on the scintillation data and results from in situ measurements, several ionospheric irregularity models with different power spectra are studied. Scintillation index is computed for the various models and compared with observed results. Both magnitude and frequency dependence of the scintillation index are investigated. It is found that a thick irregularity slab of the order of 200 km with an electron density fluctuation of about 20 per cent of its background value and with a nonmonotonic power spectrum may account for the maximum observed values of the scintillation index as well as its frequency dependence. Some future observations and measurements are suggested.

  20. Forward Multiplicity TOF Spectra and Timing Resolution Simulations for FMD-MCP

    CERN Document Server

    Tulina, T; CERN. Geneva; Zabrodin, E

    1997-01-01

    We present here model simulation studies of two factors relevant to the high timing resolution expected from the FMD-MCP at ALICE: (i) the physical TOF spectra of charged particles in Pb-Pb collisions integrated over the whole FMD-MCP disk for central and for minimum bias events and (ii) the performance of the passive summator Abstract: at the output of FMD-MCP, creating an analogous sum of all input signals. Results show that the rise time of the integrated TOF spectrum signal is about or smaller than 100 ps for all disks. This confirms the proposed application of high timing resolution detector. The noiseless passive summation of fast signals coming through N input channels gives the improvement of the timing resolution compared to that of the individual channel by a factor of about àN. Thus both studies point to the feasibility of the proposed applications of a fast detector with high timing performance and of the passive summation idea.

  1. High-efficiency organic glass scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Patrick L.; Carlson, Joseph S.

    2017-12-19

    A new family of neutron/gamma discriminating scintillators is disclosed that comprises stable organic glasses that may be melt-cast into transparent monoliths. These materials have been shown to provide light yields greater than solution-grown trans-stilbene crystals and efficient PSD capabilities when combined with 0.01 to 0.05% by weight of the total composition of a wavelength-shifting fluorophore. Photoluminescence measurements reveal fluorescence quantum yields that are 2 to 5 times greater than conventional plastic or liquid scintillator matrices, which accounts for the superior light yield of these glasses. The unique combination of high scintillation light-yields, efficient neutron/gamma PSD, and straightforward scale-up via melt-casting distinguishes the developed organic glasses from existing scintillators.

  2. Inflationary spectra from near $\\Omega$-deformed space-time transition point in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Long

    2016-01-01

    Anomaly-free perturbations of loop quantum cosmology with holonomy corrections reveal a $\\Omega$ -deformed space-time structure, $\\Omega:=1-2\\rho/\\rho_c$, where $\\Omega0$ means a Lorentz-like space. It would be reasonable to give the initial value at the space-time transition point, $\\rho=\\rho_c/2$, but we find it is impossible to define a Minkowski-like vacuum even for large $k$-modes at that time. However if we loose the condition and give the initial value near after $\\Omega=0$, e.g. $\\Omega\\simeq 0.2$, the vacuum state can be well defined and furthermore the slow roll approximation also works well in that region. Both scalar and tensor spectra are considered in the framework of loop quantum cosmology with holonomy corrections. We find that if the energy density is not too small compared with $\\rho_c/2$ when the considered $k$-mode crossing the horizon, effective theory can give a much smaller scalar power spectrum than classical theory and the spectrum of tensor perturbations could blue shift. But when co...

  3. Isotope Effects on Delayed Annihilation Time Spectra of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms in Low-Temperature Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Ketzer, B; Daniel, H; Von Egidy, T; Niestroj, A; Schmid, S; Schmid, W; Yamazaki, T; Sugai, I; Nakayoshi, K; Hayano, R S; Maas, F E; Torii, H A; Ishikawa, T; Tamura, H; Morita, N; Horváth, D; Eades, John; Widmann, E

    1996-01-01

    The delayed annihilation time spectra (DATS) of antiprotonic helium atoms have been studied in isotopically pure low temperature ^3He and ^4He gas at various densities. The DATS taken at 5.8~K and 400~mbar are very similar in shape except for i) a small difference in the time scale and ii) the presence of a distinct fast decay component in the case of ^3He. The ratio of overall trapping times (mean lifetimes against annihilation), R = T_{\\mathrm{trap}}(\\mbox{^{4}He})/T_{\\mathrm{trap}}(\\mbox{^{3}He}), has been determined to be 1.144 \\pm 0.009, which is in good agreement with a theoretical estimate yielding R = [(M^*(\\mbox{\\overline{\\mathrm{p}}}\\mbox{^{4}He})/ M^*(\\mbox{\\overline{ \\mathrm{p}}}\\mbox{^{3}He})]^2=1.14, where M^* denotes the reduced mass of the \\mbox{\\overline{\\mathrm{p}}}\\mbox{He^{++}}\\ system. The presence of a short-lived component with a lifetime of (0.154\\pm 0.007)\\ \\mbox{\\mus} in the case of \\mbox{^{3}He}\\ suggests that the \\mbox{\\overline{\\mathrm{p}}}\\mbox{^{3}He^{+}}\\ atom has a state of in...

  4. Polarized scintillator targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.

    2000-05-01

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as "live" polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  5. Polarized scintillator targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, B. van den E-mail: vandenbrandt@psi.ch; Bunyatova, E.I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S

    2000-05-21

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as 'live' polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  6. Simulation of Scintillating Fibres in Geant4

    CERN Document Server

    Deckenhoff, Mirco

    2014-01-01

    This technical note describes a scintillating fibre (SciFi) simulation using the GEANT4 toolkit. The simulation is designed to enable comprehensive studies accounting for many different aspects, $e.g$ geometry, emission spectra and radiation damages of the SciFi and matrices build from it in the context of the LHCb tracking detector upgrade. It is a further development of the simulation presented in 1.

  7. The energy spectra of anomalous oxygen at the time of two successive solar minima

    CERN Document Server

    Kondratyeva, M A; Tretyakova, S P; Zhuravlev, D A

    1999-01-01

    The energy spectra of anomalous oxygen have been determined from nuclear track detectors exposed aboard the Earth-orbiting satellites at altitudes ranging from approx 250-400 km in two consecutive solar minimum periods of 1986-1987 and 1994-1995 with opposite polarity of the solar magnetic field. A comparison of the spectra shows no contradiction to current drift models.

  8. Extreme Ultraviolet Spectra of Few-Times Ionized Tungsten for Divertor Plasma Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Clementson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The extreme ultraviolet (EUV emission from few-times ionized tungsten atoms has been experimentally studied at the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility. The ions were produced and confined during low-energy operations of the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap. By varying the electron-beam energy from around 30–300 eV, tungsten ions in charge states expected to be abundant in tokamak divertor plasmas were excited, and the resulting EUV emission was studied using a survey spectrometer covering 120–320 Å. It is found that the emission strongly depends on the excitation energy; below 150 eV, it is relatively simple, consisting of strong isolated lines from a few charge states, whereas at higher energies, it becomes very complex. For divertor plasmas with tungsten impurity ions, this emission should prove useful for diagnostics of tungsten flux rates and charge balance, as well as for radiative cooling of the divertor volume. Several lines in the 194–223 Å interval belonging to the spectra of five- and seven-times ionized tungsten (Tm-like W VI and Ho-like W VIII were also measured using a high-resolution spectrometer.

  9. Progress in Scintillating Polarized Targets for Spin Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Bunyatova, E. I.

    2003-06-01

    At PSI polarized scintillating targets have been operated in several particle physics experiments over extended periods of time. They proved to be very robust and reliable. Proton polarizations of more than 80%, and deuteron polarizations of 25% in fully deuterated polystyrene based scintillator have been reached in a vertical dilution refrigerator with optical access. New choices of materials and preparation procedures show potential for an improvement of the scintillation and polarization properties.

  10. Lead tungstate scintillation material

    CERN Document Server

    Annenkov, A N; Lecoq, P

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the results of a research programme on lead-tungstate (PWO) crystals performed by the CMS Collaboration at CERN, as well as by other groups who promoted the progress of the PWO scintillation crystal technology. Crystal properties, mass production technology, scintillation mechanism, origin of colouring, defects in crystal and radiation induced phenomena, light yield improvement and results of beam tests are described. (96 refs).

  11. Measuring the scintillation decay time for different energy deposited by γ-rays and neutrons in a Cs{sub 2}LiYCl{sub 6}:Ce{sup 3+} detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Xianfei, E-mail: wenxianfei@ufl.edu; Enqvist, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    In nuclear safeguards and homeland security applications, it is greatly beneficial to simultaneously detect γ-rays, thermal neutrons, and fast neutrons using a single detector with reasonable pulse shape discrimination capability, energy resolution comparable with or even better than NaI(Tl) detectors, and high detection efficiency. Cs{sub 2}LiYCl{sub 6}:Ce{sup 3+}(CLYC) scintillation detectors have been proven to be one promising candidate to meet these requirements. In this work, the decay time and fraction of each scintillation component for different energy deposition and incident particle type (γ-ray, thermal neutron, and fast neutron) were investigated based on fitting the PMT anode output with exponential functions. For γ-rays, four components were determined with ultrafast decay time of less than one nanosecond and slow time in the order of magnitude of microsecond. It was found that the dependence on the energy deposited by γ-rays of the fraction as well as the decay time of the three slow components was small. However, significant dependence was observed for the ultrafast component. Two or three components were determined for thermal neutrons and fast neutrons without observing a component with fast decay time. To verify the approach used it was first applied to scintillation pulses induced by γ-rays in a NaI(Tl) detector. The results were consistent with well-known data already published in the literature.

  12. Phase and coherence analysis of VHF scintillation over Christmas Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Shume

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This short paper presents phase and coherence data from the cross-wavelet transform applied on longitudinally separated very high frequency (VHF equatorial ionospheric scintillation observations over Christmas Island. The phase and coherence analyses were employed on a pair of scintillation observations, namely, the east-looking and west-looking VHF scintillation monitors at Christmas Island. Our analysis includes 3 years of peak season scintillation data from 2008, 2009 (low solar activity, and 2011 (moderate solar activity. In statistically significant and high spectral coherence regions of the cross-wavelet transform, scintillation observations from the east-looking monitor lead those from the west-looking monitor by about 20 to 60 (40 ± 20 min (most frequent lead times. Using several years (seasons and solar cycle of lead (or lag and coherence information of the cross-wavelet transform, we envisage construction of a probability model for forecasting scintillation in the nighttime equatorial ionosphere.

  13. Optical properties of organic semiconductor thin films. Static spectra and real-time growth studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemeyer, Ute

    2009-07-20

    The aim of this work was to establish the anisotropic dielectric function of organic thin films on silicon covered with native oxide and to study their optical properties during film growth. While the work focuses mainly on the optical properties of Diindenoperylene (DIP) films, also the optical response of Pentacene (PEN) films during growth is studied for comparison. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and differential reflectance spectroscopy are used to determine the dielectric function of the films ex-situ and in-situ, i.e. in air and in ultrahigh vacuum. Additionally, Raman- and fluorescence spectroscopy is utilized to characterize the DIP films serving also as a basis for spatially resolved optical measurements beyond the diffraction limit. Furthermore, X-ray reflectometry and atomic force microscopy are used to determine important structural and morphological film properties. The absorption spectrum of DIP in solution serves as a monomer reference. The observed vibronic progression of the HOMO-LUMO transition allows the determination of the Huang-Rhys parameter experimentally, which is a measure of the electronic vibrational coupling. The corresponding breathing modes are measured by Raman spectroscopy. The optical properties of DIP films on native oxide show significant differences compared to the monomer spectrum due to intermolecular interactions. First of all, the thin film spectra are highly anisotropic due to the structural order of the films. Furthermore the Frenkel exciton transfer is studied and the energy difference between Frenkel and charge transfer excitons is determined. Real-time measurements reveal optical differences between interfacial or surface molecules and bulk molecules that play an important role for device applications. They are not only performed for DIP films but also for PEN films. While for DIP films on glass the appearance of a new mode is visible, the spectra of PEN show a pronounced energy red-shift during growth. It is shown how the

  14. Buried plastic scintillator muon telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, F.; Medina-Tanco, G.A.; D'Olivo, J.C.; Paic, G.; Patino Salazar, M.E.; Nahmad-Achar, E.; Valdes Galicia, J.F.; Sandoval, A.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Salazar Ibarguen, H.; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, M.A.; Vergara Limon, S.; Villasenor, L.M.

    Muon telescopes can have several applications, ranging from astrophysical to solar-terrestrial interaction studies, and fundamental particle physics. We show the design parameters, characterization and end-to-end simulations of a detector composed by a set of three parallel dual-layer scintillator planes, buried at fix depths ranging from 0.30 m to 3 m. Each layer is 4 m2 and is composed by 50 rectangular pixels of 4cm x 2 m, oriented at a 90 deg angle with respect to its companion layer. The scintillators are MINOS extruded polystyrene strips with two Bicron wavelength shifting fibers mounted on machined grooves. Scintillation light is collected by multi-anode PMTs of 64 pixels, accommodating two fibers per pixel. The front-end electronics has a time resolution of 7.5 nsec. Any strip signal above threshold opens a GPS-tagged 2 micro-seconds data collection window. All data, including signal and background, are saved to hard disk. Separation of extensive air shower signals from secondary cosmic-ray background muons and electrons is done offline using the GPS-tagged threefold coincidence signal from surface water cerenkov detectors located nearby in a triangular array. Cosmic-ray showers above 6 PeV are selected. The data acquisition system is designed to keep both, background and signals from extensive air showers for a detailed offline data.

  15. Ionospheric scintillation in Brazil: Analyses and Effects on GNSS Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, D. B.; Souza, J. S.; Silva, H. D.

    2013-05-01

    Ionosphere has a great influence on GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) signals and its behavior depends on several variables: local time, geographic location, seasons and solar activity. Besides, there are ionospheric irregularities that also affect the GNSS signal propagation, as the ionospheric scintillation. The ionospheric scintillation can be described as a fast change in phase and amplitude of GNSS signal, caused by irregularities of electron density. Scintillation can degrade or cause the GNSS signal lost. Due to these described factors, one can say that the ionosphere can cause important effects on GNSS positioning. It can degrade the coordinate accuracy obtained by GNSS positioning methods. In this paper the goal is to evaluate the ionospheric effect, in special the ionospheric scintillation in different regions of Brazil, and its effects on GNSS Point Positioning. In order to evaluate the days where the scintillation was more significant it is used a database (http://200.145.185.118/cigala/index.php) from CIGALA (Concept for Ionospheric Scintillation Mitigation for Professional GNSS in Latin America) project (http://cigala.galileoic.org/). Using these data it is possible to obtain information about ionospheric scintillation in different GNSS stations in Brazil. It is possible to correlate the data according to time, season and other factors that can contribute to scintillation analysis. In 2013 must occur an intense solar activity, which can intensify the ionospheric effects, and consequently ionospheric scintillation, mainly in Brazil region, where the scintillation index is already intense. Preliminary evaluations, showed larger values of S4 (scintillation index) in Brazil. For example, in October 2012, it was obtained S4 values larger than 1 in several epochs. This causes severe effects in GNSS Positioning. In this paper, the results of GNSS positioning under ionosphere scintillation effects in different regions of Brazil will be presented.

  16. Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x-a scintillator for gamma-ray spectroscopy and time-of-flight pet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kanai S [Newton, MA

    2008-02-12

    The present invention includes very fast scintillator materials including lutetium iodide doped with Cerium (Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x; LuI.sub.3:Ce). The LuI.sub.3 scintillator material has surprisingly good characteristics including high light output, high gamma-ray stopping efficiency, fast response, low cost, good proportionality, and minimal afterglow that the material is useful for gamma-ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, nuclear and high energy physics research, diffraction, non-destructive testing, nuclear treaty verification and safeguards, and geological exploration.

  17. State of the art timing in TOF-PET detectors with LuAG, GAGG and L(Y)SO scintillators of various sizes coupled to FBK-SiPMs

    CERN Document Server

    Gundacker, S.; Auffray, E.; Ferri, A.; Gola, A.; Nemallapudi, M.V.; Paternoster, G.; Piemonte, C.; Lecoq, P.

    2016-01-01

    Time of flight (TOF) in positron emission tomography (PET) has experienced a revival of interest after its first introduction in the eighties. This is due to a significant progress in solid state photodetectors (SiPMs) and newly developed scintillators (LSO and its derivatives). Latest developments at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) lead to the NUV-HD SiPM with a very high photon detection efficiency of around 55%. Despite the large area of 4×4 mm2 it achieves a good single photon time resolution (SPTR) of 180±5ps FWHM. Coincidence time resolution (CTR) measurements using LSO:Ce codoped with Ca scintillators yield best values of 73±2ps FWHM for 2×2×3 mm3 and 117±3ps for 2×2×20 mm3 crystal sizes. Increasing the crystal cross-section from 2×2 mm2 to 3×3 mm2 a non negligible CTR deterioration of approximately 7ps FWHM is observed. Measurements with LSO:Ce codoped Ca and LYSO:Ce scintillators with various cross-sections (1×1 mm2 - 4×4 mm2) and lengths (3mm - 30mm) will be a basis for discussing on how ...

  18. Optical, scintillation and dosimeter properties of MgO translucent ceramic doped with Cr3+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takumi; Okada, Go; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated the photoluminescence (PL), scintillation and thermally-stimulated luminescence (TSL) dosimeter properties of MgO translucent ceramic doped with Cr3+ ion (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1%). The ceramic samples were synthesized by a Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique. The broad and sharp emission peaks appeared around 600-850 nm in all the samples. The PL decay time constants of all the samples were a few ms which were on the typical order of Cr3+ doped phosphors. As with the PL, the peak resulted from Cr3+ ion was detected in the scintillation spectra. The TSL glow curves showed the main peak around 140 °C. The TSL response was confirmed to be linear to the irradiation dose over the dose range from 0.1 to 1000 mGy.

  19. SCINTILLATION ARCS IN LOW-FREQUENCY OBSERVATIONS OF THE TIMING-ARRAY MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J0437–4715

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Ord, S. M.; Tremblay, S. E.; McSweeney, S. J.; Tingay, S. J. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia)

    2016-02-10

    Low-frequency observations of pulsars provide a powerful means for probing the microstructure in the turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). Here we report on high-resolution dynamic spectral analysis of our observations of the timing-array millisecond pulsar PSR J0437–4715 with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), enabled by our recently commissioned tied-array beam processing pipeline for voltage data recorded from the high time resolution mode of the MWA. A secondary spectral analysis reveals faint parabolic arcs akin to those seen in high-frequency observations of pulsars with the Green Bank and Arecibo telescopes. Data from Parkes observations at a higher frequency of 732 MHz reveal a similar parabolic feature with a curvature that scales approximately as the square of the observing wavelength (λ{sup 2}) to the MWA's frequency of 192 MHz. Our analysis suggests that scattering toward PSR J0437–4715 predominantly arises from a compact region about 115 pc from the Earth, which matches well with the expected location of the edge of the Local Bubble that envelopes the local Solar neighborhood. As well as demonstrating new and improved pulsar science capabilities of the MWA, our analysis underscores the potential of low-frequency pulsar observations for gaining valuable insights into the local ISM and for characterizing the ISM toward timing-array pulsars.

  20. Time and wavelength-resolved luminescence evaluation of several types of scintillators using streak camera system equipped with pulsed X-ray source

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Furuya, Y.; Yanagida, T.; Fujimoto, Y.; Yokota, Y.; Kamada, K.; Kawaguchi, N.; Ishizu, S.; Uchiyama, K.; Mori, K.; Kitano, K.; Nikl, Martin; Yoshikawa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 634, č. 1 (2011), s. 59-63 ISSN 0168-9002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : streak camera system * scintillator * pulsed X-ray source Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011

  1. GPS amplitude and phase scintillation associated with polar cap auroral forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandran, P. T.; Hamza, A. M.; Hosokawa, K.; Mezaoui, H.; Shiokawa, K.

    2017-11-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) signal amplitude and phase scintillation occurrence were observed in close association with polar cap auroral forms. Scintillation were present on most GPS ray paths irrespective of the ray path's location and orientation relative to arc alignment, motion and the direction of E × B drift. Spectra of amplitude and phase scintillation show similar power law behaviour with close to identical power law coefficients. The distribution of power law coefficients shows an average power law coefficient of ∼-2.3, which is different from the spectral characteristics of equatorial and low latitude scintillation.

  2. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Microfluidic scintillation detectors are devices of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles, developed within the EP-DT group at CERN. Most of the interest for such technology comes from the use of liquid scintillators, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to an increased radiation resistance. This feature, together with the high spatial resolution and low thickness deriving from the microfabrication techniques used to manufacture such devices, is desirable not only in instrumentation for high energy physics experiments but also in medical detectors such as beam monitors for hadron therapy.

  3. Polarized Scintillating Targets at Psi

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.

    2001-02-01

    Scintillating polarized targets are now routinely available: blocks of 18×18×5 mm scintillating organic polymer, doped with TEMPO, polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical 3He-4He dilution refrigerator. A 19 mm diameter plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat.

  4. Scintillator requirements for medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.

    1999-09-01

    Scintillating materials are used in a variety of medical imaging devices. This paper presents a description of four medical imaging modalities that make extensive use of scintillators: planar x-ray imaging, x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT), SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) and PET (positron emission tomography). The discussion concentrates on a description of the underlying physical principles by which the four modalities operate. The scintillator requirements for these systems are enumerated and the compromises that are made in order to maximize imaging performance utilizing existing scintillating materials are discussed, as is the potential for improving imaging performance by improving scintillator properties.

  5. Short organic carbon turnover time and narrow 14C age spectra in early Holocene wetland paleosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Lael; Rosenheim, Brad E.; Fernandez, Alvaro; Törnqvist, Torbjörn E.

    2017-01-01

    Paleosols contain information about the rates of soil organic carbon turnover when the soil was actively forming. However, this temporal information is often difficult to interpret without tight stratigraphic control on the age of the paleosol. Here we apply ramped pyrolysis/oxidation (Ramped PyrOx) 14C analyses to evaluate age spectra of transgressive early Holocene paleosols from the Mississippi Delta in southeastern Louisiana, USA. We find 14C age spectra from soil organic matter (SOM) in both paleosols and overlying basal peats that represent variability in age that is close to, or only slightly greater than, analytical uncertainty of 14C measurements, despite different sources of carbon with likely disparate ages. Such age spectra have not previously been observed in the sedimentary record. Here they indicate vigorous soil carbon turnover prior to burial, which homogenized 14C ages within SOM across the entire thermochemical spectrum. The weighted bulk 14C ages from Ramped PyrOx of paleosols and overlying peats are identical within analytical and process-associated uncertainty, and corroborate 14C ages from charcoal fragments and plant macrofossils from the overlying peat. The youngest ages from Ramped PyrOx age spectra may also potentially be applied as chronometers for stratigraphic burial ages. Our results suggest rapid turnover (≪300 years) of carbon in these soils relative to input of allochthonous carbon, indicating that the 14C age of different soil components is decoupled from thermochemical stability and instead reflects vigorous turnover processes. The concurrence of paleosol and peat 14C ages also suggests that pedogenic processes were linked with the development of coastal marshes, and that the priming effect potentially masked the signal of allochthonous carbon inputs during sea level rise.

  6. Using LEDs to stimulate the recovery of radiation damage to plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, J., E-mail: james-wetzel@uiowa.edu [The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Tiras, E. [The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Bilki, B. [The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Beykent University, Istanbul (Turkey); Onel, Y. [The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Winn, D. [Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT (United States)

    2017-03-15

    In this study, we consider using LEDs to stimulate the recovery of scintillators damaged from radiation in high radiation environments. We irradiated scintillating tiles of polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), Eljen brand EJ-260 (EJN), an overdoped EJ-260 (EJ2P), and a lab-produced elastomer scintillator (ES) composed of p-terphenyl (ptp) in epoxy. Two different high-dose irradiations took place, with PEN dosed to 100 kGy, and the others to 78 kGy. We found that the ‘blue’ scintillators (PEN and ES) recovered faster and maximally higher with LEDs than without. Conversely exposing the ‘green’ scintillators (EJ-260) to LED light had a nearly negligible effect on the recovery. We hypothesize that the ‘green’ scintillators require wavelengths that match their absorption and emission spectra for LED stimulated recovery.

  7. Fast neutron spectrometry with organic scintillators applied to magnetic fusion experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Kaschuck, Y A; Trykov, L A; Semenov, V P

    2002-01-01

    Neutron spectrometry with NE213 liquid scintillators is commonly used in thermonuclear fusion experiments to measure the 2.45 and 14.1 MeV neutron flux. We present the unfolded neutron spectrum, which was accumulated during several ohmic deuterium plasma discharges in the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade using a 2''x2'' NE213 scintillator. In this paper, we review the application of organic scintillator neutron spectrometers to tokamaks, focusing in particular on the comparison between NE213 and stilbene scintillators. Various aspects of the calibration technique and neutron spectra unfolding procedure are considered in the context of their application for fusion neutron spectrometry. Testing and calibration measurements have been carried out using D-D and D-T neutron generator facilities with both NE213 and stilbene scintillators. The main result from these measurements is that stilbene scintillator has better neutron energy resolution than NE213. Our stilbene detector could be used for the determination of the ion ...

  8. Measurements of prompt fission gamma-rays and neutrons with lanthanide halide scintillation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Oberstedt, A; Billnert, R; Borcea, R; Brys, T; Chaves, C; Gamboni, T; Geerts, W; Göök, A; Guerrero, C; Hambsch, F-J; Kis, Z; Martinez, T; Oberstedt, S; Szentmiklosi, L; Takács, K; Vivaldi, M

    2014-01-01

    Photons have been measured with lanthanide halide scintillation detectors in coincidence with fission fragments. Using the time-of-flight information, reactions from γ-rays and neutrons could easily be distinguished. In several experiments on $^{252}$Cf(sf), $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) and $^{241}$Pu(n$_{th}$,f) prompt fission γ-ray spectra characteristics were determined with high precision and the results are presented here. Moreover, a measured prompt fission neutron spectrum for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) is shown in order to demonstrate a new detection technique.

  9. Properties of the Ukrainian Polystyrene-Based Plastic Scintillator UPS 923A

    CERN Document Server

    Artikov, A M; Chirikov-Zorin, I E; Chokheli, D; Lyablin, M; Bellettini, G; Menzione, A; Tokar, S; Giokaris, N; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A

    2005-01-01

    The polystyrene-based scintillator UPS 923A was chosen for upgrading of the muon system for the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Properties of this scintillator such as light output, light attenuation, long-term stability and also timing characteristics of scintillator and wavelength shifting fibers were investigated. The method for the Bulk Attenuation Length measurements of the scintillator to its own light emitted was proposed. Comparative measurements of the characteristics of the UPS 923A and the polyvinyltoluene-based scintillator NE 114 were performed. It was found that natural aging of the NE 114 was two times faster than that of the UPS 923A.

  10. Wavelet-based analogous phase scintillation index for high latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A.; Tiwari, R.; Strangeways, H. J.; Dlay, S.; Johnsen, M. G.

    2015-08-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) performance at high latitudes can be severely affected by the ionospheric scintillation due to the presence of small-scale time-varying electron density irregularities. In this paper, an improved analogous phase scintillation index derived using the wavelet-transform-based filtering technique is presented to represent the effects of scintillation regionally at European high latitudes. The improved analogous phase index is then compared with the original analogous phase index and the phase scintillation index for performance comparison using 1 year of data from Trondheim, Norway (63.41°N, 10.4°E). This index provides samples at a 1 min rate using raw total electron content (TEC) data at 1 Hz for the prediction of phase scintillation compared to the scintillation monitoring receivers (such as NovAtel Global Navigation Satellite Systems Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitor receivers) which operate at 50 Hz rate and are thus rather computationally intensive. The estimation of phase scintillation effects using high sample rate data makes the improved analogous phase index a suitable candidate which can be used in regional geodetic dual-frequency-based GPS receivers to efficiently update the tracking loop parameters based on tracking jitter variance.

  11. Time dependence of energy spectra of brachytherapy sources and its impact on the half and the tenth value layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ning J; Chen, Zhe; Hearn, Robert A; Rodgers, Joseph J; Nath, Ravinder

    2009-11-01

    Several factors including radionuclide purity influence the photon energy spectra from sealed brachytherapy sources. The existence of impurities and trace elements in radioactive materials as well as the substrate and encapsulation may not only alter the spectrum at a given time but also cause change in the spectra as a function of time. The purpose of this study is to utilize a semiempirical formalism, which quantitatively incorporates this time dependence, to calculate and evaluate the shielding requirement impacts introduced by this time dependence for a 103Pd source. The formalism was used to calculate the NthVL thicknesses in lead for a 103Pd model 200 seed. Prior to 2005, the 103Pd in this source was purified to a level better than 0.006% of the total 103Pd activity, the key trace impurity consisting of 65Zn. Because 65Zn emits higher energy photons and has a much longer half-life of 244 days compared to 103Pd, its presence in 103Pd seeds led to a time dependence of the photon spectrum and other related physical quantities. This study focuses on the time dependence of the NthVL and the analysis of the corresponding shielding requirements. The results indicate that the first HVL and the first TVL in lead steadily increased with time for about 200 days and then reached a plateau. The increases at plateau were more than 1000 times compared to the corresponding values on the zeroth day. The second and third TVLs in lead reached their plateaus in about 100 and 60 days, respectively, and the increases were about 19 and 2.33 times the corresponding values on the zeroth day, respectively. All the TVLs demonstrated a similar time dependence pattern, with substantial increases and eventual approach to a plateau. The authors conclude that the time dependence of the emitted photon spectra from brachytherapy sources can introduce substantial variations in the values of the NthVL with time if certain impurities are present. The contribution of 65Zn to the dose rate

  12. Effects of atmospheric scintillation in Ka-band satellite communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgsmiller, Scott A.

    This research is motivated by the need to characterize the effects of atmospheric scintillation on Ka-band satellite communications. The builders of satellite communications systems are planning to utilize Ka-band in more than a dozen systems that have been proposed for launch in the next decade. The NASA ACTS (Advanced Communication Technology Satellite) program has provided a means to investigate the problems associated with Ka-band satellite transmissions. Experimental measurements have been conducted using a very small aperture terminal (VSAT) to evaluate the effects of scintillation on narrowband and wideband signals. The theoretical background of scintillation theory is presented, noting especially the additional performance degradation predicted for wideband Ka-band systems using VSATs. Experimental measurements of the amplitude and phase variations in received narrowband carrier signals were performed, using beacon signals transmitted by ACTS and carrier signals which are relayed through the satellite. Measured amplitude and phase spectra have been compared with theoretical models to establish the presence of scintillation. Measurements have also been performed on wideband spread spectrum signals which are relayed through ACTS to determine the bit-error rate degradation of the digital signal resulting from scintillation effects. The theory and measurements presented for the geostationary ACTS have then been applied to a low-earth orbiting satellite system, by extrapolating the effects of the moving propagation path on scintillation.

  13. Experimental evidence of infrared scintillation in crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Belogurov, S; Carugno, Giovanni; Conti, E; Iannuzzi, D; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa

    2000-01-01

    We present experimental results on infrared emission induced by protons in some solid-state samples. Infrared scintillation occurs in many crystals, with different yield values and time-response behaviours. A rough measurement of the emission wavelength of CsI(Tl) is also reported.

  14. Fluorescent compounds for plastic scintillation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla-Dalmau, A.; Bross, A.D.

    1994-04-01

    Several 2-(2{prime}-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, -benzoxazole, and -benzimidazole derivatives have been prepared. Transmittance, fluorescence, light yield, and decay time characteristics of these compounds have been studied in a polystyrene matrix and evaluated for use in plastic scintillation detectors. Radiation damage studies utilizing a {sup 60}C source have also been performed.

  15. Temperature quenching in LAB based liquid scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörensen, A.; Hans, S.; Junghans, A. R.; Krosigk, B. v.; Kögler, T.; Lozza, V.; Wagner, A.; Yeh, M.; Zuber, K.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of temperature changes on the light output of LAB based liquid scintillator is investigated in a range from -5 to 30°C with α -particles and electrons in a small scale setup. Two PMTs observe the scintillator liquid inside a cylindrically shaped aluminum cuvette that is heated or cooled and the temperature dependent PMT sensitivity is monitored and corrected. The α -emitting isotopes in dissolved radon gas and in natural Samarium (bound to a LAB solution) excite the liquid scintillator mixtures and changes in light output with temperature variation are observed by fitting light output spectra. Furthermore, also changes in light output by compton electrons, which are generated from external calibration γ -ray sources, is analysed with varying temperature. Assuming a linear behaviour, a combined negative temperature coefficient of {(-0.29 ± 0.01)}{ %/°}C is found. Considering hints for a particle type dependency, electrons show {(-0.17 ± 0.02)}{ %/°}C, whereas the temperature dependency seems stronger for α -particles, with {(-0.35 ± 0.03)}{ %/°}C. Due to a high sampling rate, a pulse shape analysis can be performed and shows an enhanced slow decay component at lower temperatures, pointing to reduced non-radiative triplet state de-excitations.

  16. Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Z W; Maya, L; Sloop, F V J

    2003-01-01

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon respons...

  17. Forecasting scintillations, the CNOFS satellite challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Beaujardiere, O.; Retterer, J.; Groves, K.; Burke, W.; Rich, F.; Basu, B.; Decker, D.; Jeong, L.

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes the science issues associated with the Communication / Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) Mission of the Air Force Research Laboratory. The primary purpose of C/NOFS is to forecast ionospheric irregularities that adversely impact communication and navigation systems. A satellite, scheduled for launch in January 2004 into a low inclination (13^o), elliptical (˜400 × 700 km) orbit, is the main component of the C/NOFS Mission. Complementary ground-based measurements are also part of the Mission. Difficulties in predicting the presence of scintillation-producing irregularities may be organized into three categories: (1) understand physical processes active in the background ionosphere and thermosphere, in order to nowcast and forecast the equatorial ionosphere; (2) identify mechanisms that trigger or quench the plasma irregularities; and (3) determine how irregularity spectra evolve. C/NOFS is the first satellite solely dedicated to forecasting ionospheric irregularities and radio wave scintillations. Its sensors will measure the following parameters: ambient and fluctuating electron densities; ion and electron temperatures; AC and DC electric fields; magnetic fields; neutral winds; ionospheric scintillations; and electron content along the lines of sight between the C/NOFS and GPS satellites. Forecasting will be based on both ground and space data. Significant international participation in pursuing C/NOFS science goals is desired and anticipated.

  18. Liquid-scintillation standardization of 123mTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coursey, B. M.; Golas, D. B.; Gray, D. H.; Hoppes, D. D.; Schima, F. J.

    1992-02-01

    A commercial liquid-scintillation system and calibrated germanium gamma-ray spectrometers were used to confirm the use of the 159-keV gamma ray of 123mTe as a primary efficiency calibrant for which the activity measurement is simple. The evaluated gamma-ray probability per decay is 0.840 ± 0.004. Liquid-scintillation spectra confirm that conversion electrons greater than 50 keV can be detected in at least 99.5% of the decays. The half-life was measured as 119.2 ± 0.1 days.

  19. Novel Scintillation Material - ZnO Transparent Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Rodnyi, P. A.; Chernenko, K. A.; Gorokhova, E. I.; Kozlovskii, S. S.; Khanin, V. M.; Khodyuk, I. V.

    2011-01-01

    ZnO-based scintillation ceramics for application in HENPA LENPA analyzers have been investigated. The following ceramic samples have been prepared: undoped ones (ZnO), an excess of zinc in stoichiometry (ZnO:Zn), doped with gallium (ZnO:Ga) and lithium (ZnO:Li). Optical transmission, x-ray excited emission, scintillation decay and pulse height spectra were measured and analyzed. Ceramics have reasonable transparency in visible range (up to 60% for 0.4 mm thickness) and energy resolution (14.9...

  20. Robust GPS carrier tracking under ionospheric scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, M.; Andreotti, M.; Aquino, M. H.; Dodson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Small scale irregularities present in the ionosphere can induce fast and unpredictable fluctuations of Radio Frequency (RF) signal phase and amplitude. This phenomenon, known as scintillation, can degrade the performance of a GPS receiver leading to cycle slips, increasing the tracking error and also producing a complete loss of lock. In the most severe scenarios, if the tracking of multiple satellites links is prevented, outages in the GPS service can also occur. In order to render a GPS receiver more robust under scintillation, particular attention should be dedicated to the design of the carrier tracking stage, that is the receiver's part most sensitive to these types of phenomenon. This paper exploits the reconfigurability and flexibility of a GPS software receiver to develop a tracking algorithm that is more robust under ionospheric scintillation. For this purpose, first of all, the scintillation level is monitored in real time. Indeed the carrier phase and the post correlation terms obtained by the PLL (Phase Locked Loop) are used to estimate phi60 and S4 [1], the scintillation indices traditionally used to quantify the level of phase and amplitude scintillations, as well as p and T, the spectral parameters of the fluctuations PSD. The effectiveness of the scintillation parameter computation is confirmed by comparing the values obtained by the software receiver and the ones provided by a commercial scintillation monitoring, i.e. the Septentrio PolarxS receiver [2]. Then the above scintillation parameters and the signal carrier to noise density are exploited to tune the carrier tracking algorithm. In case of very weak signals the FLL (Frequency Locked Loop) scheme is selected in order to maintain the signal lock. Otherwise an adaptive bandwidth Phase Locked Loop (PLL) scheme is adopted. The optimum bandwidth for the specific scintillation scenario is evaluated in real time by exploiting the Conker formula [1] for the tracking jitter estimation. The performance

  1. Co-doping effects on luminescence and scintillation properties of Ce doped Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, Kei, E-mail: kamada@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Tohoku University, New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Miyagi (Japan); C& A Corporation, T-Biz, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Miyagi (Japan); Nikl, Martin [Institute of Physics AS CR, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253 Prague (Czech Republic); Kurosawa, Shunsuke [Tohoku University, New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Miyagi (Japan); Tohoku University Institute for Material Reseach, 2-1-1 Katahira Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Miyagi (Japan); Beitlerova, Alena [Institute of Physics AS CR, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253 Prague (Czech Republic); Nagura, Aya [Tohoku University Institute for Material Reseach, 2-1-1 Katahira Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Miyagi (Japan); Shoji, Yasuhiro [C& A Corporation, T-Biz, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Miyagi (Japan); Tohoku University Institute for Material Reseach, 2-1-1 Katahira Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Miyagi (Japan); Pejchal, Jan [Tohoku University, New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Miyagi (Japan); Institute of Physics AS CR, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253 Prague (Czech Republic); Ohashi, Yuji [Tohoku University Institute for Material Reseach, 2-1-1 Katahira Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Miyagi (Japan); Yokota, Yuui [Tohoku University, New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Miyagi (Japan); Yoshikawa, Akira [Tohoku University, New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Miyagi (Japan); C& A Corporation, T-Biz, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Miyagi (Japan); Tohoku University Institute for Material Reseach, 2-1-1 Katahira Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Miyagi (Japan)

    2015-05-11

    The Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba 200 ppm co-doped Ce:Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} single crystals were prepared by micro pulling down method. Absorption and luminescence spectra were measured together with several other scintillation characteristics, namely the scintillation decay and light yield to reveal the effect of the co-doping. The scintillation decays were accelerated by both Mg and Ca co-dopants. The Mg co-doped samples showed the fastest decay and the highest light yield among the co-doped samples.

  2. GAGG:ce single crystalline films: New perspective scintillators for electron detection in SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Jan; Lalinský, Ondřej; Hanuš, Martin; Onderišinová, Zuzana; Kelar, Jakub; Kučera, Miroslav

    2016-04-01

    Single crystal scintillators are frequently used for electron detection in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We report gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (GAGG:Ce) single crystalline films as a new perspective scintillators for the SEM. For the first time, the epitaxial garnet films were used in a practical application: the GAGG:Ce scintillator was incorporated into a SEM scintillation electron detector and it showed improved image quality. In order to prove the GAGG:Ce quality accurately, the scintillation properties were examined using electron beam excitation and compared with frequently used scintillators in the SEM. The results demonstrate excellent emission efficiency of the GAGG:Ce single crystalline films together with their very fast scintillation decay useful for demanding SEM applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Scintillation and luminescence in transparent colorless single and polycrystalline bulk ceramic ZnS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S., E-mail: john.mccloy@wsu.edu [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, P.O. Box 642920, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, Washington State University, PO Box 641030, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Bliss, Mary; Miller, Brian; Wang, Zheming; Stave, Sean [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    ZnS:Ag is a well-known, extremely bright scintillator used in powder form for α-particle detection and, mixed with powdered LiF, for thermal neutron detection. Recently, we discovered some colorless and transparent commercial bulk single-crystal and polycrystalline (chemical vapor-deposited) ZnS forms that scintillate in response to α-particles. The scintillation light transmits through the sample thickness (millimeters), challenging the commonly held assumption that ZnS is opaque to its own scintillation light. Individual α-particle events were imaged in space and time using a charged-particle camera originally developed for medical imaging applications. Photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation show that scintillating bulk ZnS likely depends on different electronic defects than commercial ZnS powder scintillators. These defects, associated with copper and oxygen, are discussed in relation to PL results and extensive literature assessment. Commercial transparent ZnS is routinely produced by chemical vapor deposition to sizes larger than square meters, enabling potentially novel radiation detection applications requiring large, thick apertures. - Highlights: • Colorless transparent chemical vapor deposited ZnS shows α-particle scintillation. • Scintillation in CVD ZnS has been imaged spatially and temporally. • Scintillation light transmitted through 1 to 5 mm thick samples. • Photoluminescence data suggests origin of scintillation behavior. • Copper and oxygen impurities likely linked to scintillation in CVD ZnS.

  4. Measurement of the time sequence of Na2 spectra by using a boxcar averager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiwei; Wang, Qi L.; Ma, Zuguang

    1993-05-01

    A simple experimental method is proposed to measure the time sequence by using a Boxcar Averager, in which the time-resolved spectrum of every pulse is measured independently, and it is used on UV dye laser excited Na2 molecules.

  5. Multilinear analysis of Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectra of U(VI containing natural water samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Višňák Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural waters’ uranium level monitoring is of great importance for health and environmental protection. One possible detection method is the Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS, which offers the possibility to distinguish different uranium species. The analytical identification of aqueous uranium species in natural water samples is of distinct importance since individual species differ significantly in sorption properties and mobility in the environment. Samples originate from former uranium mine sites and have been provided by Wismut GmbH, Germany. They have been characterized by total elemental concentrations and TRLFS spectra. Uranium in the samples is supposed to be in form of uranyl(VI complexes mostly with carbonate (CO32− and bicarbonate (HCO3− and to lesser extend with sulphate (SO42− , arsenate (AsO43− , hydroxo (OH− , nitrate (NO3− and other ligands. Presence of alkaline earth metal dications (M = Ca2+ , Mg2+ , Sr2+ will cause most of uranyl to prefer ternary complex species, e.g. Mn(UO2(CO332n-4 (n ∊ {1; 2}. From species quenching the luminescence, Cl− and Fe2+ should be mentioned. Measurement has been done under cryogenic conditions to increase the luminescence signal. Data analysis has been based on Singular Value Decomposition and monoexponential fit of corresponding loadings (for separate TRLFS spectra, the “Factor analysis of Time Series” (FATS method and Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC, all data analysed simultaneously. From individual component spectra, excitation energies T00, uranyl symmetric mode vibrational frequencies ωgs and excitation driven U-Oyl bond elongation ΔR have been determined and compared with quasirelativistic (TDDFT/B3LYP theoretical predictions to cross -check experimental data interpretation.

  6. Multilinear analysis of Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectra of U(VI) containing natural water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Višňák, Jakub; Steudtner, Robin; Kassahun, Andrea; Hoth, Nils

    2017-09-01

    Natural waters' uranium level monitoring is of great importance for health and environmental protection. One possible detection method is the Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS), which offers the possibility to distinguish different uranium species. The analytical identification of aqueous uranium species in natural water samples is of distinct importance since individual species differ significantly in sorption properties and mobility in the environment. Samples originate from former uranium mine sites and have been provided by Wismut GmbH, Germany. They have been characterized by total elemental concentrations and TRLFS spectra. Uranium in the samples is supposed to be in form of uranyl(VI) complexes mostly with carbonate (CO32- ) and bicarbonate (HCO3- ) and to lesser extend with sulphate (SO42- ), arsenate (AsO43- ), hydroxo (OH- ), nitrate (NO3- ) and other ligands. Presence of alkaline earth metal dications (M = Ca2+ , Mg2+ , Sr2+ ) will cause most of uranyl to prefer ternary complex species, e.g. Mn(UO2)(CO3)32n-4 (n ɛ {1; 2}). From species quenching the luminescence, Cl- and Fe2+ should be mentioned. Measurement has been done under cryogenic conditions to increase the luminescence signal. Data analysis has been based on Singular Value Decomposition and monoexponential fit of corresponding loadings (for separate TRLFS spectra, the "Factor analysis of Time Series" (FATS) method) and Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC, all data analysed simultaneously). From individual component spectra, excitation energies T00, uranyl symmetric mode vibrational frequencies ωgs and excitation driven U-Oyl bond elongation ΔR have been determined and compared with quasirelativistic (TD)DFT/B3LYP theoretical predictions to cross -check experimental data interpretation. Note to the reader: Several errors have been produced in the initial version of this article. This new version published on 23 October 2017 contains all the corrections.

  7. Laser Beam Scintillation with Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, Larry C; Young, Cynthia

    2001-01-01

    Renewed interest in laser communication systems has sparked development of useful new analytic models. This book discusses optical scintillation and its impact on system performance in free-space optical communication and laser radar applications, with a detailed look at propagation phenomena and the role of scintillation on system behavior. Intended for practicing engineers, scientists, and students.

  8. Radiation-resistant composite scintillators based on GSO and GPS grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyarintsev, A.Yu. [Institute for Scintillation Materials, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 60 Nauki Avenue, 61001 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Galunov, N.Z. [Institute for Scintillation Materials, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 60 Nauki Avenue, 61001 Kharkiv (Ukraine); V.N. Karasin Kharkov National University, 4 Svobody Sq., 61022 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Gerasymov, Ia.V.; Karavaeva, N.L. [Institute for Scintillation Materials, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 60 Nauki Avenue, 61001 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Krech, A.V., E-mail: AntonKrech@gmail.com [Institute for Scintillation Materials, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 60 Nauki Avenue, 61001 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Levchuk, L.G.; Popov, V.F. [National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, 1 Akademicheskaya Str., 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Sidletskiy, O.Ts. [Institute for Scintillation Materials, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 60 Nauki Avenue, 61001 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Sorokin, P.V. [National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, 1 Akademicheskaya Str., 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Tarasenko, O.A. [Institute for Scintillation Materials, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 60 Nauki Avenue, 61001 Kharkiv (Ukraine)

    2017-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on the scintillation light output, optical transmittance, and luminescent spectra of composite scintillators based on grains of single crystals Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce (GSO) and Gd{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Ce (GPS) is studied. The dielectric gel Sylgard-184 is the base and the binder for the grains inside the composite scintillator. The paper presents and analyzes the results obtained for the scintillators exposed by 10 MeV electrons from the linear electron accelerator at room temperature. The exposure doses D≤250 Mrad. The dose rate is 0.2 or 1500 Mrad/h. The study has shown that the composite scintillators based on the grains of GSO and GPS are radiation-resistant over the range of the irradiation.

  9. Inorganic scintillators for detector systems physical principles and crystal engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, Paul; Korzhik, Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    This second edition features new chapters highlighting advances in our understanding of the behavior and properties of scintillators, and the discovery of new families of materials with light yield and excellent energy resolution very close to the theoretical limit. The book focuses on the discovery of next-generation scintillation materials and on a deeper understanding of fundamental processes. Such novel materials with high light yield as well as significant advances in crystal engineering offer exciting new perspectives. Most promising is the application of scintillators for precise time tagging of events, at the level of 100 ps or higher, heralding a new era in medical applications and particle physics. Since the discovery of the Higgs Boson with a clear signature in the lead tungstate scintillating blocks of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter detector, the current trend in particle physics is toward very high luminosity colliders, in which timing performance will ultimately be essential to mitigating...

  10. FDTD Modeling and Counteraction to Scintillation Effects in the lonosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-05

    AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2014-0101 AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2014-0101 FDTD MODELING AND COUNTERACTION TO SCINTILLATION EFFECTS IN THE IONOSPHERE Christos...DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 05-04-2014 2. REPORT TYPE Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 24 Feb 2012 – 23 Feb 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FDTD ...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This study investigated the Finite Difference Time Domain ( FDTD ) modeling of ionospheric scintillation

  11. Secondary scintillation in Ar-CF$_4$ mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Beschi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In order to build a optical time projection chamber that can be used as a tracking detector, it is necessary to study the scintillation proprieties of gases in order to optimize the light emission. A detailed study of the scintillation of Ar-CF$_4$ mixtures at different concentrations has been performed to study the light emission of the gas in a triple GEM detector.

  12. Detection of {sup 8}B solar neutrinos in liquid scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianni, A [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and INFN, I-67010 Assergi (Italy); Montanino, D [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Lecce and INFN, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Villante, F L [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Ferrara and INFN, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2006-05-15

    We show that liquid organic scintillator detectors (e. g., KamLAND and Borexino) can measure the {sup 8}B solar neutrino flux by means of the {nu}{sub e} charged current interaction with the {sup 13}C nuclei naturally contained in the scintillators. The neutrino events can be identified by exploiting the time and space coincidence with the subsequent decay of the produced {sup 13}N nuclei.

  13. Spectral characteristics of ionospheric scintillations of VHF radiosignal near magnetic zenith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, Roman; Globa, Mariia; Kushnarev, Dmitry; Medvedev, Andrey; Ratovsky, Konstantin

    2017-07-01

    We present the results of observing the Cygnus-A radio source scintillation in the Earth's ionosphere under quiet and disturbed geomagnetic conditions by using the Irkutsk incoherent scattering radar (IISR). The scintillation method applied for ionosphere testing at IISR confidently determines the Fresnel frequency and power cutoff, the spectral characteristics usually related to the velocities and spatial spectra of ionospheric plasma irregularities. We also use the IGRF magnetic field model to show the relation between the shape of discrete radio source scintillation spectra and the direction to the radio source with respect to the geomagnetic field. The S4 index increase within the magnetic zenith is observed to be conditioned by the scintillation spectrum widening. We also evaluate the zonal velocity of observed ionospheric irregularities as ∼10 m/sec assuming the irregularity height to be equal to the F2-layer maximum height in the ionosphere.

  14. First approach to radionuclide mixtures quantification by using plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarancon, A. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, J.F. [Departament de Pintura, Universitat de Barcelona, Pau Gargallo 4, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: jfgarcia@ub.edu; Rauret, G. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-05-08

    Recent studies have evaluated the capability of plastic scintillation (PS) as an alternative to liquid scintillation (LS) in radionuclide activity determination without mixed waste production. In order to complete the comparison, we now assess the extent to which PS can be used to quantify mixtures of radionuclides and the influence of the diameter of the plastic scintillation beads in detection efficiency. The results show that the detection efficiency decreases and the spectrum shrink to lower energies when the size of the plastic scintillation beads increases, and that the lower the energy of the beta particle, the greater the variation takes place. Similar behaviour has been observed for beta-gamma and alpha emitters. Two scenarios for the quantification of mixtures are considered, one including two radionuclides ({sup 14}C and {sup 60}Co) whose spectra do not overlap significantly, and the other including two radionuclides ({sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y), where the spectra of one the isotopes is totally overlapped by the other The calculation has been performed by using the conventional window selection procedure and a new approach in which the selected windows correspond to those with lower quantification errors. Relative errors obtained using the proposed approach (less than 10%) are lower than those of the conventional procedure, even when a radionuclide is completely overlapped, except for those samples with extreme activity ratios that were not included in the window optimization process.

  15. Classificaiton and Discrimination of Sources with Time-Varying Frequency and Spatial Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    time-frequency dis- tribution (SPTFD) matrix. This distribution, or matrix, serves as a general framework within which typical problems in array...8)pmnc COS(•t%,p ) C COS(ýr,’,p ) C CosOS (0" p) C CosOS (r, p(8 where h=hI +h 2 =Zp -z 1t, - d. The parameters h1 , h2 are, as shown in Fig. 1, the...approach allows one to control the probability of selecting false t-f locations and provides an appropriate framework for testing multiple locations

  16. Development of TOF-PET using Compton scattering by plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, M., E-mail: kuramoto@maxwell.kj.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Yamagata University, Kojirakawa 1-4-12, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Nakamori, T., E-mail: nakamori@maxwell.kj.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Yamagata University, Kojirakawa 1-4-12, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Kimura, S.; Gunji, S.; Takakura, M. [Yamagata University, Kojirakawa 1-4-12, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Kataoka, J. [Waseda University, Okubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2017-02-11

    We propose a time-of-flight (TOF) technique using plastic scintillators which have fast decay time of a few ns for positron emission tomography (PET). While the photoelectric absorption probability of the plastic for 511 keV gamma rays are extremely low due to its small density and effective atomic number, the cross section of Compton scattering is comparable to that of absorption by conventional inorganic scintillators. We thus propose TOF-PET using Compton scattering with plastic scintillators (Compton-PET), and performed fundamental experiments towards exploration of the Compton-PET capability. We demonstrated that the plastic scintillators achieved the better time resolution in comparison to LYSO(Ce) and GAGG(Ce) scintillators. In addition we evaluated the depth-of-interaction resolving capability with the plastic scintillators.

  17. GNSS-based Observations and Simulations of Spectral Scintillation Indices in the Arctic Ionosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durgonics, Tibor; Hoeg, Per; von Benzon, Hans-Henrik

    are exploring a set of indices derived from the power spectra of the signals. The observed corner frequency of the power spectrum is a function of the Fresnel radius and the drift speed of the irregularities, while the slope of the power spectrum is related to the Fresnel oscillations. We will demonstrate how...... scintillations, especially phase scintillations, are prominent. We will present observations acquired from a network of Greenlandic GNSS stations, including 2D amplitude and phase scintillation index maps for representative calm and storm periods. In addition to the traditional indices described above, we...

  18. Photonic Crystals: Enhancing the Light Output of Scintillation Based Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Knapitsch, Arno Richard

    A scintillator is a material which emits light when excited by ionizing radiation. Such materials are used in a diverse range of applications; From high energy particle physics experiments, X-ray security, to nuclear cameras or positron emission tomography. Future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments as well as next generation medical imaging applications are more and more pushing towards better scintillation characteristics. One of the problems in heavy scintillating materials is related to their high index of refraction. As a consequence, most of the scintillation light produced in the bulk material is trapped inside the crystal due to total internal reflection. The same problem also occurs with light emitting diodes (LEDs) and has for a long time been considered as a limiting factor for their overall efficiency. Recent developments in the area of nanophotonics were showing now that those limitations can be overcome by introducing a photonic crystal (PhC) slab at the outcoupling surface of the substrate. P...

  19. Application of the mixed time-averaging semiclassical initial value representation method to complex molecular spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Max; Grossmann, Frank; Ceotto, Michele

    2017-10-01

    The recently introduced mixed time-averaging semiclassical initial value representation of the molecular dynamics method for spectroscopic calculations [M. Buchholz, F. Grossmann, and M. Ceotto, J. Chem. Phys. 144, 094102 (2016)] is applied to systems with up to 61 dimensions, ruled by a condensed phase Caldeira-Leggett model potential. By calculating the ground state as well as the first few excited states of the system Morse oscillator, changes of both the harmonic frequency and the anharmonicity are determined. The method faithfully reproduces blueshift and redshift effects and the importance of the counter term, as previously suggested by other methods. Different from previous methods, the present semiclassical method does not take advantage of the specific form of the potential and it can represent a practical tool that opens the route to direct ab initio semiclassical simulation of condensed phase systems.

  20. A New Statistical Model of Electroencephalogram Noise Spectra for Real-Time Brain-Computer Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Alan; Atia, George K; Vosoughi, Azadeh; Berman, Stephen A

    2017-08-01

    A characteristic of neurological signal processing is high levels of noise from subcellular ion channels up to whole-brain processes. In this paper, we propose a new model of electroencephalogram (EEG) background periodograms, based on a family of functions which we call generalized van der Ziel-McWhorter (GVZM) power spectral densities (PSDs). To the best of our knowledge, the GVZM PSD function is the only EEG noise model that has relatively few parameters, matches recorded EEG PSD's with high accuracy from 0 to over 30 Hz, and has approximately 1/fθ behavior in the midfrequencies without infinities. We validate this model using three approaches. First, we show how GVZM PSDs can arise in a population of ion channels at maximum entropy equilibrium. Second, we present a class of mixed autoregressive models, which simulate brain background noise and whose periodograms are asymptotic to the GVZM PSD. Third, we present two real-time estimation algorithms for steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) frequencies, and analyze their performance statistically. In pairwise comparisons, the GVZM-based algorithms showed statistically significant accuracy improvement over two well-known and widely used SSVEP estimators. The GVZM noise model can be a useful and reliable technique for EEG signal processing. Understanding EEG noise is essential for EEG-based neurology and applications such as real-time brain-computer interfaces, which must make accurate control decisions from very short data epochs. The GVZM approach represents a successful new paradigm for understanding and managing this neurological noise.

  1. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatarik, R., E-mail: hatarik1@llnl.gov; Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Phillips, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Cerjan, C.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Mcnaney, J. M.; Munro, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Knauer, J. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-11-14

    Neutron time-of-flight diagnostics have long been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d + t → n + α (DT) and d + d → n + {sup 3}He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (T{sub ion}) and cold fuel areal density. We report on novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent T{sub ion}, and DSR. These methods invoke a single temperature, static fluid model to describe the neutron peaks from DD and DT reactions and a spline description of the DT spectrum to determine the DSR. Both measurements are performed using a forward modeling technique that includes corrections for line-of-sight attenuation and impulse response of the detection system. These methods produce typical uncertainties for DT T{sub ion} of 250 eV, 7% for DSR, and 9% for the DT neutron yield. For the DD values, the uncertainties are 290 eV for T{sub ion} and 10% for the neutron yield.

  2. Experiment to demonstrate separation of Cherenkov and scintillation signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, J.; Descamps, F. B.; Land, B. J.; Wallig, J.; Yeh, M.; Orebi Gann, G. D.

    2017-05-01

    The ability to separately identify the Cherenkov and scintillation light components produced in scintillating mediums holds the potential for a major breakthrough in neutrino detection technology, allowing development of a large, low-threshold, directional detector with a broad physics program. The CHESS (CHErenkov/Scintillation Separation) experiment employs an innovative detector design with an array of small, fast photomultiplier tubes and state-of-the-art electronics to demonstrate the reconstruction of a Cherenkov ring in a scintillating medium based on photon hit time and detected photoelectron density. This paper describes the physical properties and calibration of CHESS along with first results. The ability to reconstruct Cherenkov rings is demonstrated in a water target, and a time precision of 338 ±12 ps FWHM is achieved. Monte Carlo-based predictions for the ring imaging sensitivity with a liquid scintillator target predict an efficiency for identifying Cherenkov hits of 94 ±1 % and 81 ±1 % in pure linear alkyl benzene (LAB) and LAB loaded with 2 g/L of a fluor, PPO, respectively, with a scintillation contamination of 12 ±1 % and 26 ±1 % .

  3. Photoabsorption spectra of (Mo/W)@Au12Si60 clusters from time-dependent DFT calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-11-14

    The electronic structure and photoabsorption spectrum of encapsulated (Mo/W)@Au12Si60 clusters are theoretically investigated via static and time-dependent density functional theory. The photoabsorption spectrum is calculated both at the scalar relativistic and spin-orbit coupling levels. The encapsulated (Mo/W)@Au12 clusters interact with the Si and thus stabilize the Si60 cage. The spin-orbit coupling strongly affects the optical properties of (Mo/W)@Au12 clusters as it leads to a splitting of spectral lines together with an intensity redistribution, whereas the spectra of (Mo/W)@Au12Si60 clusters show hardly any difference. The nanoscale properties thus can be tuned by choosing the endohedral metal atom, while keeping the optical properties unaffected. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  4. GPS TEC, scintillation and cycle slips observed at high latitudes during solar minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Prikryl

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available High-latitude irregularities can impair the operation of GPS-based devices by causing fluctuations of GPS signal amplitude and phase, also known as scintillation. Severe scintillation events lead to losses of phase lock, which result in cycle slips. We have used data from the Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN to measure amplitude and phase scintillation from L1 GPS signals and total electron content (TEC from L1 and L2 GPS signals to study the relative role that various high-latitude irregularity generation mechanisms have in producing scintillation. In the first year of operation during the current solar minimum the amplitude scintillation has remained very low but events of strong phase scintillation have been observed. We have found, as expected, that auroral arc and substorm intensifications as well as cusp region dynamics are strong sources of phase scintillation and potential cycle slips. In addition, we have found clear seasonal and universal time dependencies of TEC and phase scintillation over the polar cap region. A comparison with radio instruments from the Canadian GeoSpace Monitoring (CGSM network strongly suggests that the polar cap scintillation and TEC variations are associated with polar cap patches which we therefore infer to be main contributors to scintillation-causing irregularities in the polar cap.

  5. Probing Cherenkov and Scintillation Light Separation for Next-Generation Neutrino Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, J.; Descamps, F. B.; Land, B. J.; Orebi Gann, G. D.; Wallig, J.; Yeh, M.

    2017-09-01

    The ability to separate Cherenkov and scintillation signals in liquid scintillator detectors would enable outstanding background rejection for next-generation neutrino experiments. Reconstruction of directional information, ring imaging, and sub-Cherenkov threshold detection all have the potential to substantially improve particle and event identification. The Cherenkov-Scintillation Separation (CHESS) experiment uses an array of small, fast photomultipliers (PMTs) and state-of-the-art electronics to demonstrate the reconstruction of a Cherenkov ring in a scintillation medium based on photon hit times and detected charge. This setup has been used to characterize the ability to detect Cherenkov light in a range of target media. We show results with pure organic scintillator (LAB) and the prospects with scintillators with a secondary fluor (LAB/PPO). There are future plans to deploy the newly developed water-based liquid scintillator, a medium with a higher Cherenkov/Scintillation light yield ratio than conventional pure liquid scintillators, enhancing the visibility of the less abundant Cherenkov light in the presence of scintillation light. These results can inform the development of future large-scale detectors, such as the proposed Theia experiment, or other large detectors at underground laboratories such as the far-site of the new Long Baseline Neutrino Facility at the Sanford Underground Research Facility. CHESS detector calibrations and commissioning will be discussed, and the latest results will be presented.

  6. Measurement and analysis of the Am241(n,γ) cross section with liquid scintillator detectors using time-of-flight spectroscopy at the n_TOF facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraval, K.; Gunsing, F.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Dressler, R.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gurusamy, P.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Kivel, N.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Losito, R.; Mallick, A.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondalaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Robles, M. S.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.; n TOF Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    The Am241(n,γ) cross section has been measured at the n_TOF facility at CERN using deuterated benzene liquid scintillators, commonly known as C6D6 detectors, and time-of-flight spectrometry. The results in the resolved resonance range bring new constraints to evaluations below 150 eV, and the energy upper limit was extended from 150 to 320 eV with a total of 172 new resonances not present in current evaluations. The thermal capture cross section was found to be σth=678±68 b, which is in good agreement with evaluations and most previous measurements. The capture cross section in the unresolved resonance region was extracted in the remaining energy range up to 150 keV, and found to be larger than current evaluations and previous measurements.

  7. Central Tracking Detector Based on Scintillating Fibres

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Scintillating fibres form a reasonable compromise for central tracking detectors in terms of price, resolution, response time, occupancy and heat production. \\\\ \\\\ New fluorescents with large Stokes shifts have been produced, capable of working without wavelength shifters. Coherent multibundles have been developed to achieve high packing fractions. Small segments of tracker shell have been assembled and beam tests have confirmed expectations on spatial resolution. An opto-electronic delay line has been designed to delay the track patterns and enable coincidences with a first level trigger. Replacement of the conventional phosphor screen anode with a Si pixel chip is achieved. This tube is called ISPA-tube and has already been operated in beam tests with a scintillating fibres tracker. \\\\ \\\\ The aim of the proposal is to improve hit densities for small diameter fibres by increasing the fraction of trapped light, by reducing absorption and reflection losses, by reflecting light at the free fibre end, and by inc...

  8. Induced radioactivity of a GSO scintillator by secondary fragments in carbon ion therapy and its effects on in-beam OpenPET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nitta, Munetaka; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Inadama, Naoko; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-07-07

    The accumulation of induced radioactivity within in-beam PET scanner scintillators is of concern for its long-term clinical usage in particle therapy. To estimate the effects on OpenPET which we are developing for in-beam PET based on GSOZ (Zi doped Gd2SiO5), we measured the induced radioactivity of GSO activated by secondary fragments in a water phantom irradiation by a (12)C beam with an energy of 290 MeV u(-1). Radioisotopes of Na, Ce, Eu, Gd, Nd, Pm and Tb including positron emitters were observed in the gamma ray spectra of the activated GSO with a high purity Ge detector and their absolute radioactivities were calculated. We used the Monte Carlo simulation platform, Geant4 in which the observed radioactivity was assigned to the scintillators of a precisely reproduced OpenPET and the single and coincidence rates immediately after one treatment and after one-year usage were estimated for the most severe conditions. Comparing the highest coincidence rate originating from the activated scintillators (background) and the expected coincidence rate from an imaging object (signal), we determined the expected signal-to-noise ratio to be more than 7 within 3 min and more than 10 within 1 min from the scan start time. We concluded the effects of scintillator activation and their accumulation on the OpenPET imaging were small and clinical long-term usage of the OpenPET was feasible.

  9. New scintillating crystals for PET scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2002-01-01

    Systematic R&D on basic mechanism in inorganic scintillators, initiated by the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN 10 years ago, has contributed not to a small amount, to the development of new materials for a new generation of medical imaging devices with increased resolution and sensitivity. The first important requirement for a scintillator to be used in medical imaging devices is the stopping power for the given energy range of X and gamma rays to be considered, and more precisely the conversion efficiency. A high light yield is also mandatory to improve the energy resolution, which is essentially limited by the photostatistics and the electronic noise at these energies. A short scintillation decay time allows to reduce the dead time and therefore to increase the limiting counting rate. When all these requirements are fulfilled the sensitivity and image contrast are increased for a given patient dose, or the dose can be reduced. Examples of new materials under development by the Crystal Clear Collabor...

  10. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalli, A.; Vo, D.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Tobin, S. J.; Trellue, H.; Vaccaro, S.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)-Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI-SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute 137Cs count rate and the 154Eu/137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs, 106Ru/137Cs, and 144Ce/137Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity's behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. The results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.

  11. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favalli, A., E-mail: afavalli@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vo, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grogan, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jansson, P. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Liljenfeldt, H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mozin, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Schwalbach, P. [European Commission, DG Energy, Euratom Safeguards Luxemburg, Luxemburg (Luxembourg); Sjöland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, Stockholm (Sweden); Tobin, S.J.; Trellue, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vaccaro, S. [European Commission, DG Energy, Euratom Safeguards Luxemburg, Luxemburg (Luxembourg)

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)–Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI–SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute {sup 137}Cs count rate and the {sup 154}Eu/{sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs, {sup 106}Ru/{sup 137}Cs, and {sup 144}Ce/{sup 137}Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity’s behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. The results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.

  12. Organic Scintillator Detector Response Simulations with DRiFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Madison Theresa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bates, Cameron Russell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mckigney, Edward Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rising, Michael Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pinilla, Maria Isabel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Solomon, Jr., Clell Jeffrey [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sood, Avneet [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-19

    Accurate detector modeling is a requirement to design systems in many non-proliferation scenarios; by determining a Detector’s Response Function (DRF) to incident radiation, it is possible characterize measurements of unknown sources. DRiFT is intended to post-process MCNP® output and create realistic detector spectra. Capabilities currently under development include the simulation of semiconductor, gas, and (as is discussed in this work) scintillator detector physics. Energy spectra and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) trends for incident photon and neutron radiation have been reproduced by DRiFT.

  13. Optical, scintillation and dosimeter properties of MgO:Tb translucent ceramics synthesized by the SPS method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Naoki; Kato, Takumi; Okada, Go; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2017-11-01

    MgO translucent ceramics doped with different concentrations of Tb (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5%) were prepared by the Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) method. Further, the optical, scintillation, dosimeter properties of were evaluated systematically. In the photoluminescence (PL) and scintillation spectra, sharp emission peaks due to the 4f-4f transitions of Tb3+ were observed. In the PL and scintillation decay curves, the decay time constants were a few ms which were on a typical order of the 4f-4f transitions of Tb3+. The thermally-stimulated luminescence (TSL) glow curves exhibited glow peaks around 80, 160 °C after X ray irradiation of 10 mGy. The intensity of TSL peak at 160 °C exhibited a linear response against X-ray dose over a dose range of 0.1-10 mGy. The optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) under 590 nm stimulation exhibited strong emissions due to Tb3+ around 385-550 nm after X-ray irradiation. As in TSL, the intensity of OSL peak showed a linear response to X-ray dose, and the dynamic range confirmed was 0.1-1000 mGy.

  14. Time evolution of endpoint energy of Bremsstrahlung spectra and ion production from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarvainen, Ollie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ropponen, Tommi [JYFL; Jones, Peter [JYFL; Kalvas, Taneli [JYFL

    2008-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) are used to produce high charge state heavy ion beams for the use of nuclear and materials science, for instance. The most powerful ECR ion sources today are superconducting. One of the problems with superconducting ECR ion sources is the use of high radio frequency (RF) power which results in bremsstrahlung radiation adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. In order to understand the electron heating process and timescales in the ECR plasma, time evolution measurement of ECR bremsstrahlung was carried out. In the measurements JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS was operated in a pulsed mode and bremsstrahlung data from several hundred RF pulses was recorded. Time evolution of ion production was also studied and compared to one of the electron heating theories. To analyze the measurement data at C++ program was developed. Endpoint energies of the bremsstrahlung spectra as a function of axial magnetic field strength, pressure and RF power are presented and ion production timescales obtained from the measurements are compared to bremsstrahlung emission timescales and one of the stochastic heating theories.

  15. Preparation and performance study of a novel liquid scintillator with mixed solvent as the matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhanlong; Zhu, Jiayi; Luo, Xuan; Xu, Yewei; Zhang, Qianfeng; Zhang, Xing; Bi, Yutie; Zhang, Lin

    2017-04-01

    A novel liquid scintillator with the mixed solvent as the matrix was prepared for obtaining a good comprehensive performance. In this ternary liquid scintillator, the combination of 20% pseudocumene (PC) and 80% linear-alkyl benzene (LAB) by volume was chosen as the mixed solvent, and 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 1,4-bis(2-Methylstyryl) benzene (bis-MSB) were as the primary fluor and wavelength shifter, respectively. The optimum prescription was obtained with regard to the light yield. Some characterizations based on the optimal formulation were conducted. The fluorescence emission spectra and wavelength-dependent optical attenuation length of the sample were measured by the fluorescence spectrophotometer and an UV-Vis spectrometer, respectively. The light yield was characterized by adopting the home-made optical platform device. The decay time was tested by adopting the time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) technique featured in high dynamic range of several orders of magnitude in light intensity. The experimental test results showed that the sample had a fairly good comprehensive performance.

  16. Preparation and performance study of a novel liquid scintillator with mixed solvent as the matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zhanlong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Joint Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology and Research Center of Laser Fusion, Mianyang 621010 (China); Zhu, Jiayi [Joint Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology and Research Center of Laser Fusion, Mianyang 621010 (China); Luo, Xuan, E-mail: luox76@gmail.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Xu, Yewei [School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Zhang, Qianfeng [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Joint Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology and Research Center of Laser Fusion, Mianyang 621010 (China); Zhang, Xing [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Bi, Yutie, E-mail: biyutie@sina.com [Joint Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology and Research Center of Laser Fusion, Mianyang 621010 (China); Zhang, Lin [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Joint Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology and Research Center of Laser Fusion, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2017-04-01

    A novel liquid scintillator with the mixed solvent as the matrix was prepared for obtaining a good comprehensive performance. In this ternary liquid scintillator, the combination of 20% pseudocumene (PC) and 80% linear-alkyl benzene (LAB) by volume was chosen as the mixed solvent, and 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 1,4-bis(2-Methylstyryl) benzene (bis-MSB) were as the primary fluor and wavelength shifter, respectively. The optimum prescription was obtained with regard to the light yield. Some characterizations based on the optimal formulation were conducted. The fluorescence emission spectra and wavelength-dependent optical attenuation length of the sample were measured by the fluorescence spectrophotometer and an UV–Vis spectrometer, respectively. The light yield was characterized by adopting the home-made optical platform device. The decay time was tested by adopting the time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) technique featured in high dynamic range of several orders of magnitude in light intensity. The experimental test results showed that the sample had a fairly good comprehensive performance.

  17. A comparison of CsI:Tl and GOS in a scintillator-CCD detector for nuclear medicine imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, S. L.; Jambi, L. K.; Lees, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    A number of portable gamma cameras for medical imaging use scintillator-CCD based detectors. This paper compares the performance of a scintillator-CCD based portable gamma camera with either a columnar CsI:Tl or a pixelated GOS scintillator installed. The CsI:Tl scintillator has a sensitivity of 40% at 140.5 keV compared to 54% with the GOS scintillator. The intrinsic spatial resolution of the pixelated GOS detector was 1.09 mm, over 4 times poorer than for CsI:Tl. Count rate capability was also found to be significantly lower when the GOS scintillator was used. The uniformity was comparable for both scintillators.

  18. Scintillator calorimeters for a future linear collider experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartbrich, Oskar

    2016-07-15

    This thesis presents the first analysis of a full calorimeter system based on the scintillator-SiPM technology. In the testbeam campaign at the Fermilab testbeam facility in May 2009, the combined scintillator-SiPM prototype calorimeter system consisting of the CALICE Scintillator Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ScECAL), the CALICE Analogue Hadronic Calorimeter (AHCAL) and the CALICE Tail Catcher and Muon Tracker (TCMT) were operated in particle beams of electrons, pions and muons in the energy range up to 32 GeV. The absorber material and sampling fraction of the ScECAL is different from the AHCAL and TCMT, which complicates the reconstruction of shower energies and potentially impacts the achievable energy resolution of showers extending through the whole calorimeter system. A clean selection of single particle events of a given particle type is obtained using the information from the beam instrumentation installed in the beam line and from the reconstruction of features of the shower topology to identify additional particles entering the detectors. The remaining contaminations are found to be small enough to not significantly bias the results. Possible selection biases on the energy response or resolution are found to be negligible in simulation studies. A detailed validation of the ScECAL model is performed with electromagnetic showers and interactions, ranging from the single cell spectra of MIP particles up to full electromagnetic shower profile and their response and resolution. Adapting the geometry of the ScECAL simulation model can reduce the observed discrepancies, however not within reasonable ranges of modification. The analysis of pion data recorded with the combined scintillator-SiPM system aims to extract the energy resolution for single, contained pion showers, both in comparison to different simulations and to the resolutions obtained from a similar setup without the ScECAL. In the ScECAL the longitudinal shower profile as a function of distance to

  19. New halide scintillators for gamma ray detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alekhin, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Scintillators are used for the detection of ionizing radiation. Despite decades of intensive search and numerous compounds discovered, there is still a need for materials with improved properties. Recently, several new scintillators with excellent light yield, energy resolution, and proportionality

  20. Radiopure Metal-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosero, Richard [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Yeh, Minfang [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    2015-03-18

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  1. Climatology of GPS phase scintillation at northern high latitudes for the period from 2008 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Prikryl

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Global positioning system scintillation and total electron content (TEC data have been collected by ten specialized GPS Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitors (GISTMs of the Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN. The phase scintillation index σΦ is obtained from the phase of the L1 signal sampled at 50 Hz. Maps of phase scintillation occurrence as a function of the altitude-adjusted corrected geomagnetic (AACGM latitude and magnetic local time (MLT are computed for the period from 2008 to 2013. Enhanced phase scintillation is collocated with regions that are known as ionospheric signatures of the coupling between the solar wind and magnetosphere. The phase scintillation mainly occurs on the dayside in the cusp where ionospheric irregularities convect at high speed, in the nightside auroral oval where energetic particle precipitation causes field-aligned irregularities with steep electron density gradients and in the polar cap where electron density patches that are formed from a tongue of ionization. Dependences of scintillation occurrence on season, solar and geomagnetic activity, and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF orientation are investigated. The auroral phase scintillation shows semiannual variation with equinoctial maxima known to be associated with auroras, while in the cusp and polar cap the scintillation occurrence is highest in the autumn and winter months and lowest in summer. With rising solar and geomagnetic activity from the solar minimum to solar maximum, yearly maps of mean phase scintillation occurrence show gradual increase and expansion of enhanced scintillation regions both poleward and equatorward from the statistical auroral oval. The dependence of scintillation occurrence on the IMF orientation is dominated by increased scintillation in the cusp, expanded auroral oval and at subauroral latitudes for strongly southward IMF. In the polar cap, the IMF BY polarity controls dawn–dusk asymmetries in

  2. Bright Semiconductor Scintillator for High Resolution X-Ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Gaysinskiy, Valeriy; Ovechkina, Olena E.; Miller, Stuart; Singh, Bipin; Guo, Liang; Irving, Thomas (IIT); (Rad. Monitoring)

    2011-08-16

    We report on a novel approach to produce oxygen-doped zinc telluride (ZnTe:O), a remarkable group II-VI semiconductor scintillator, fabricated in the columnar-structured or polycrystalline forms needed to fulfill the needs of many demanding X-ray and {gamma}-ray imaging applications. ZnTe:O has one of the highest conversion efficiencies among known scintillators, emission around 680 nm (which is ideally suited for CCD sensors), high density of 6.4 g/cm{sup 3}, fast decay time of {approx}1 {micro}s with negligible afterglow, and orders of magnitude higher radiation resistance compared to commonly used scintillators. These properties allow the use of ZnTe:O in numerous applications, including X-ray imaging, nuclear medicine (particularly SPECT), room temperature radioisotope identification, and homeland security. Additionally, ZnTe:O offers distinct advantages for synchrotron-based high resolution imaging due to the absence of atomic absorption edges in the low energy range, which otherwise reduce resolution due to secondary X-ray formations. We have fabricated films of ZnTe:O using a vapor deposition technique that allows large-area structured scintillator fabrication in a time- and cost-efficient manner, and evaluated its performance for small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at an Argonne National Laboratory synchrotron beamline. Details of the fabrication and characterization of the optical, scintillation and imaging properties of the ZnTe:O films are presented in this paper.

  3. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  4. Fracture-resistant lanthanide scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, F Patrick [Livermore, CA

    2011-01-04

    Lanthanide halide alloys have recently enabled scintillating gamma ray spectrometers comparable to room temperature semiconductors (<3% FWHM energy resolutions at 662 keV). However brittle fracture of these materials upon cooling hinders the growth of large volume crystals. Efforts to improve the strength through non-lanthanide alloy substitution, while preserving scintillation, have been demonstrated. Isovalent alloys having nominal compositions of comprising Al, Ga, Sc, Y, and In dopants as well as aliovalent alloys comprising Ca, Sr, Zr, Hf, Zn, and Pb dopants were prepared. All of these alloys exhibit bright fluorescence under UV excitation, with varying shifts in the spectral peaks and intensities relative to pure CeBr.sub.3. Further, these alloys scintillate when coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and exposed to .sup.137Cs gamma rays.

  5. Ionospheric precursors to scintillation activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S.J. Spencer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric scintillation is the rapid fluctuation of both phase and amplitude of trans-ionospheric radio waves due to small scale electron density irregularities in the ionosphere. Prediction of the occurrence of scintillation at L band frequencies is needed to mitigate the disruption of space-based communication and navigation systems. The purpose of this paper is to present a method of using tomographic inversions of the ionospheric electron density obtained from ground-based GPS data to infer the location and strength of the post-sunset plasma drift vortex. This vortex is related to the pre-reversal enhancement in the eastwards electric field which has been correlated to the subsequent occurrence of scintillation.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of electron thermalization in scintillator materials: Implications for scintillator nonproportionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange, Micah P.; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien

    2017-12-01

    The lack of reliable quantitative estimates of the length and time scales associated with hot electron thermalization after a gamma-ray induced energy cascade obscures the interplay of various microscopic processes controlling scintillator performance and hampers the search for improved detector materials. We apply a detailed microscopic kinetic Monte Carlo model of the creation and subsequent thermalization of hot electrons produced by gamma irradiation of six important scintillating crystals to determine the spatial extent of the cloud of excitations produced by gamma rays and the time required for the cloud to thermalize with the host lattice. The main ingredients of the model are ensembles of microscopic track structures produced upon gamma excitation (including the energy distribution of the excited carriers), numerical estimates of electron-phonon scattering rates, and a calculated particle dispersion to relate the speed and energy of excited carriers. All these ingredients are based on first-principles density functional theory calculations of the electronic and phonon band structures of the materials. The details of the Monte Carlo model are presented along with the results for thermalization time and distance distributions. These results are discussed in light of previous work. It is found that among the studied materials, calculated thermalization distances are positively correlated with measured nonproportionality. In the important class of halide scintillators, the particle dispersion is found to be more influential than the largest phonon energy in determining the thermalization distance.

  7. Toward an in Vivo Neurochemical Profile: Quantification of 18 Metabolites in Short-Echo-Time 1H NMR Spectra of the Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeuffer, Josef; Tkáč , Ivan; Provencher, Stephen W.; Gruetter, Rolf

    1999-11-01

    Localized in vivo1H NMR spectroscopy was performed with 2-ms echo time in the rat brain at 9.4 T. Frequency domain analysis with LCModel showed that the in vivo spectra can be explained by 18 metabolite model solution spectra and a highly structured background, which was attributed to resonances with fivefold shorter in vivo T1 than metabolites. The high spectral resolution (full width at half maximum approximately 0.025 ppm) and sensitivity (signal-to-noise ratio approximately 45 from a 63-μL volume, 512 scans) was used for the simultaneous measurement of the concentrations of metabolites previously difficult to quantify in 1H spectra. The strongly represented signals of N-acetylaspartate, glutamate, taurine, myo-inositol, creatine, phosphocreatine, glutamine, and lactate were quantified with Cramér-Rao lower bounds below 4%. Choline groups, phosphorylethanolamine, glucose, glutathione, γ-aminobutyric acid, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, and alanine were below 13%, whereas aspartate and scyllo-inositol were below 22%. Intra-assay variation was assessed from a time series of 3-min spectra, and the coefficient of variation was similar to the calculated Cramér-Rao lower bounds. Interassay variation was determined from 31 pooled spectra, and the coefficient of variation for total creatine was 7%. Tissue concentrations were found to be in very good agreement with neurochemical data from the literature.

  8. Composite scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Stephan, Andrew Curtis [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Suree S [Knoxville, TN; Wallace, Steven A [Knoxville, TN; Rondinone, Adam J [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-28

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator having enhanced transparency for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a material having optical transparency wherein said material comprises nano-sized objects having a size in at least one dimension that is less than the wavelength of light emitted by the composite scintillator wherein the composite scintillator is designed to have selected properties suitable for a particular application.

  9. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  10. Thin Scintillating Polarized Targets for Spin Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.

    2003-07-01

    At PSI polarized scintillating targets are available since 1996. Proton polarizations of more than 80%, and deuteron polarizations of 25% in polystyrene-based scintillators can be reached under optimum conditions in a vertical dilution refrigerator with optical access, suited for nuclear and particle physics experiments. New preparation procedures allow to provide very thin polarizable scintillating targets and widen the spectrum of conceivable experiments.

  11. Interpretation of monoclinic hafnia valence electron energy-loss spectra by time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, L.; Guedj, C.; Bernier, N.; Blaise, P.; Olevano, V.; Sottile, F.

    2016-04-01

    We present the valence electron energy-loss spectrum and the dielectric function of monoclinic hafnia (m -HfO2) obtained from time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) predictions and compared to energy-filtered spectroscopic imaging measurements in a high-resolution transmission-electron microscope. Fermi's golden rule density-functional theory (DFT) calculations can capture the qualitative features of the energy-loss spectrum, but we find that TDDFT, which accounts for local-field effects, provides nearly quantitative agreement with experiment. Using the DFT density of states and TDDFT dielectric functions, we characterize the excitations that result in the m -HfO2 energy-loss spectrum. The sole plasmon occurs between 13 and 16 eV, although the peaks ˜28 and above 40 eV are also due to collective excitations. We furthermore elaborate on the first-principles techniques used, their accuracy, and remaining discrepancies among spectra. More specifically, we assess the influence of Hf semicore electrons (5 p and 4 f ) on the energy-loss spectrum, and find that the inclusion of transitions from the 4 f band damps the energy-loss intensity in the region above 13 eV. We study the impact of many-body effects in a DFT framework using the adiabatic local-density approximation (ALDA) exchange-correlation kernel, as well as from a many-body perspective using "scissors operators" matched to an ab initio G W calculation to account for self-energy corrections. These results demonstrate some cancellation of errors between self-energy and excitonic effects, even for excitations from the Hf 4 f shell. We also simulate the dispersion with increasing momentum transfer for plasmon and collective excitation peaks.

  12. Regular cannabis and alcohol use is associated with resting-state time course power spectra in incarcerated adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Sandra; Rashid, Barnaly; Gopal, Shruti; Nyalakanti, Prashanth; Calhoun, Vince D; Kiehl, Kent A

    2017-09-01

    Cannabis and alcohol are believed to have widespread effects on the brain. Although adolescents are at increased risk for substance use, the adolescent brain may also be particularly vulnerable to the effects of drug exposure due to its rapid maturation. Here, we examined the association between cannabis and alcohol use duration and resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of male juvenile delinquents. The present sample was drawn from the Southwest Advanced Neuroimaging Cohort, Youth sample, and from a youth detention facility in Wisconsin. All participants were scanned at the maximum-security facilities using The Mind Research Network's 1.5T Avanto SQ Mobile MRI scanner. Information on cannabis and alcohol regular use duration was collected using self-report. Resting-state networks were computed using group independent component analysis in 201 participants. Associations with cannabis and alcohol use were assessed using Mancova analyses controlling for age, IQ, smoking and psychopathy scores in the complete case sample of 180 male juvenile delinquents. No associations between alcohol or cannabis use and network spatial maps were found. Longer cannabis use was associated with decreased low frequency power of the default mode network, the executive control networks (ECNs), and several sensory networks, and with decreased functional network connectivity. Duration of alcohol use was associated with decreased low frequency power of the right frontoparietal network, salience network, dorsal attention network, and several sensory networks. Our findings suggest that adolescent cannabis and alcohol use are associated with widespread differences in resting-state time course power spectra, which may persist even after abstinence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Separation of PbWO4 and BGO signals into Čerenkov and scintillation components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voena, C.; DREAM Collaboration

    2009-04-01

    We present results from beam tests performed in 2007 on PbWO4 and BGO crystals in the context of the DREAM project. Signals from high energy electrons and pions are analyzed and the possibility of separating the contributions from Čerenkov (C) and scintillation (S) light for individual events is investigated. Different methods exploiting the difference in timing, in the spectra and in the directionality of the two types of light have been developed to determine the contribution of the two components. In the BGO crystal, Čerenkov signals have been enhanced with the use of optical filters and the ratio Č/S is measured with good precision (~20-30% for energy deposits less than 1 GeV).

  14. Rapid interstellar scintillation of quasar PKS 1257-326

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bignall, Hayley E.; Jauncey, David L.; Lovell, James E. J.; Tzioumis, Anastasios K.; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna; Engvold, O

    2005-01-01

    PKS 1257-326 is one of three quasars known to show unusually large and rapid, intra-hour intensity variations, as a result of scintillation in the turbulent Galactic interstellar medium. We have measured time delays in the variability pattern arrival times at the VLA and the ATCA, as well as an

  15. Liquid Scintillation High Resolution Spectral Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A.

    2010-08-06

    The CIEMAT/NIST and the TDCR methods in liquid scintillation counting are based on the determination of the efficiency for total counting. This paper tries to expand these methods analysing the pulse-height spectrum of radionuclides. To reach this objective we have to generalize the equations used in the model and to analyse the influence of ionization and chemical quench in both spectra and counting efficiency. We present equations to study the influence of different photomultipliers response in systems with one, two or three photomultipliers. We study the effect of the electronic noise discriminator level in both spectra and counting efficiency. The described method permits one to study problems that up to now was not possible to approach, such as the high uncertainty in the standardization of pure beta-ray emitter with low energy when we apply the TDCR method, or the discrepancies in the standardization of some electron capture radionuclides, when the CIEMAT/NIST method is applied. (Author) 107 refs.

  16. Optical to ultraviolet spectra of sandwiches of benzene and transition metal atoms: Time dependent density functional theory and many-body calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Jose Ignacio; García Lastra, Juan Maria; Lopez, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    The optical spectra of sandwich clusters formed by transition metal atoms (titanium, vanadium, and chromium) intercalated between parallel benzene molecules have been studied by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and many-body perturbation theory. Sandwiches with different number...

  17. Radiation hardness of plastic scintillators for the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Jivan, Harshna; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector, is a hadronic calorimeter responsible for detecting hadrons as well as accommodating for the missing transverse energy that result from the p-p collisions within the LHC. Plastic scintillators form an integral component of this calorimeter due to their ability to undergo prompt fluorescence when exposed to ionising particles. The scintillators employed are specifically chosen for their properties of high optical transmission and fast rise and decay time which enables efficient data capture since fast signal pulses can be generated. The main draw-back of plastic scintillators however is their susceptibility to radiation damage. The damage caused by radiation exposure reduces the scintillation light yield and introduces an error into the time-of flight data acquired. During Run 1 of the LHC data taking period, plastic scintillators employed within the GAP region between the Tile Calorimeter’s central and extended barrels sustained a significant amount of damage. Wit...

  18. Synthesis and characterization of low-melting scintillating glass doped with organic activator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao Hong Sheng; Zhu Dong Mei; Wu Jing

    2000-01-01

    New colliders for high-energy physics studies require scintillators with short decay time, high density, good radiation hardness and low cost. It is possible to make glass scintillators that can meet these requirements by doping organic scintillating activators into an inorganic glass host. In this research, p-Terphenyl as the activator is doped into lead-tin-fluorophosphate glasses. There is no detectable change of the dopant on the densities and characteristic temperatures of the glass host. The hybrid scintillating glasses doped with p-TP possess 5 ns decay time and a broad fluorescence emission band, the peak of which is at about 545 nm. Although the light yields of the glasses are low, this research shows that it is possible to develop good hybrid scintillating glasses by doping organic activators into inorganic glass host.

  19. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esch, Ernst I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burgett, Eric A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; May, Iain [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taw, Felicia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tovesson, Fredrik K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on nanocomposite-based scintillators for gamma-ray detection indicates that this approach can be extended to load nanoparticles of fissionable material into a scintillating matrix, with up to three orders of magnitude higher loading than typical fission chambers. This will result in a rugged, cost-efficient detector with high efficiency, a short signal rise time, and the ability to be used in low neutron-flux environments. Initial efforts to utilize the luminescence of uranyl oxide to eliminate the need for wavelength-shifting dyes were unsuccessful. Excitation of uranyl compounds has been reported at wavelengths ranging from 266 nm to 532 nm. However, neither the 300 nm emission of toluene, nor the 350 nm emission of PPO, nor the 410 nm emission of POPOP resulted in significant excitation of and emission by uranyl oxide. As indicated by UV/visible spectroscopy, light emitted at these wavelengths was absorbed by the colored solution. {sup 235}U remains the most attractive candidate for a fissionable scintillator, due to its high fission cross-section and lack of a threshold fission energy, but all solutions containing molecular uranium compounds will be colored, most more highly than the U{sup 6+} compounds used here. Research is therefore continuing toward the fabrication of uranium nanoparticles, in which, due to Rayleigh scattering, the coloration should be less pronounced. The characterization of the thorium-loaded liquid scintillator and the fabrication of the 100 mL detectors for use at LANSCE demonstrated the feasibility of loading fissionable

  20. Scintillating Lustre Induced by Radial Fins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohske Takahashi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Radial lines of Ehrenstein patterns induce illusory scintillating lustre in gray disks inserted into the central gaps (scintillating-lustre effect. We report a novel variant of this illusion by replacing the radial lines with white and black radial fins. Both white and gray disks inserted into the central gaps were perceived as scintillating, if the ratio of the black/white fin width were balanced (ie, close to 1.0. Thus, the grayness of the central disk is not a prerequisite for the scintillation. However, the scintillation was drastically reduced when the ratio was imbalanced. Furthermore, the optimal ratio depended on the color of the center disks.

  1. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, R.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.

    2011-04-01

    We describe the R&D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O2, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed "natural" radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  2. Effect of Aspect Ratio on the Light Output of Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Pauwels, Kristof; Gundacker, S.; Knapitsch, A.; Lecoq, P.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the geometry of the scintillators is presented in this paper. We focus on the effect of narrowing down the section of crystals that have a given length. The light output of a set of crystals with very similar scintillating properties but different geometries measured with several coupling/wrapping configurations is provided. We observe that crystals shaped in thin rods have a lower light output as compared to bulk or sliced crystals. The effect of unpolishing the crystal faces is also investigated, and it is shown that highest light outputs are not necessarily obtained with crystals having all faces polished. Simulation results based on a realistic model of the crystal that implements light scattering on the crystal edges are in agreement with the experimental data. Fine-tuning of this model would allow us to further explore the details of light propagation in scintillators and would be highly valuable to fast timing detection and highly granular detectors.

  3. Bright and ultra-fast scintillation from a semiconductor?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derenzo, Stephen E., E-mail: sederenzo@lbl.gov; Bourret-Courshesne, Edith; Bizarri, Gregory; Canning, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor scintillators are worth studying because they include both the highest luminosities and shortest decay times of all known scintillators. Moreover, many semiconductors have the heaviest stable elements (Tl, Hg, Pb, and Bi) as a major constituent and a high ion pair yield that is proportional to the energy deposited. We review the scintillation properties of semiconductors activated by native defects, isoelectronic impurities, donors and acceptors with special emphasis on those that have exceptionally high luminosities (e.g. ZnO:Zn; ZnS:Ag, Cl; CdS:Ag, Cl) and those that have ultra-fast decay times (e.g. ZnO:Ga; CdS:In). We discuss underlying mechanisms that are consistent with these properties and the possibilities for achieving (1) 200,000 photons/MeV and 1% fwhm energy resolution for 662 keV gamma rays, (2) ultra-fast (ns) decay times and coincident resolving times of 30 ps fwhm for time-of-flight positron emission tomography, and (3) both a high luminosity and an ultra-fast decay time from the same scintillator at cryogenic temperatures.

  4. Bright and ultra-fast scintillation from a semiconductor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, Stephen E; Bourret-Courshesne, Edith; Bizarri, Gregory; Canning, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor scintillators are worth studying because they include both the highest luminosities and shortest decay times of all known scintillators. Moreover, many semiconductors have the heaviest stable elements (Tl, Hg, Pb, Bi) as a major constituent and a high ion pair yield that is proportional to the energy deposited. We review the scintillation properties of semiconductors activated by native defects, isoelectronic impurities, donors and acceptors with special emphasis on those that have exceptionally high luminosities (e.g. ZnO:Zn, ZnS:Ag,Cl, CdS:Ag,Cl) and those that have ultra-fast decay times (e.g. ZnO:Ga; CdS:In). We discuss underlying mechanisms that are consistent with these properties and the possibilities for achieving (1) 200,000 photons/MeV and 1% fwhm energy resolution for 662 keV gamma rays, (2) ultra-fast (ns) decay times and coincident resolving times of 30 ps fwhm for time-of-flight positron emission tomography, and (3) both a high luminosity and an ultra-fast decay time from the same scintillator at cryogenic temperatures.

  5. Novel scintillating material 2-(4-styrylphenylbenzoxazole for the fully digital and MRI compatible J-PET tomograph based on plastic scintillators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wieczorek

    Full Text Available A novel plastic scintillator is developed for the application in the digital positron emission tomography (PET. The novelty of the concept lies in application of the 2-(4-styrylphenylbenzoxazole as a wavelength shifter. The substance has not been used as scintillator dopant before. A dopant shifts the scintillation spectrum towards longer wavelengths making it more suitable for applications in scintillators of long strips geometry and light detection with digital silicon photomultipliers. These features open perspectives for the construction of the cost-effective and MRI-compatible PET scanner with the large field of view. In this article we present the synthesis method and characterize performance of the elaborated scintillator by determining its light emission spectrum, light emission efficiency, rising and decay time of the scintillation pulses and resulting timing resolution when applied in the positron emission tomography. The optimal concentration of the novel wavelength shifter was established by maximizing the light output and it was found to be 0.05 ‰ for cuboidal scintillator with dimensions of 14 mm x 14 mm x 20 mm.

  6. MILLISECOND PULSAR SCINTILLATION STUDIES WITH LOFAR: INITIAL RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald, Anne M.; Kondratiev, Vladislav I.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Stinebring, Daniel R., E-mail: archibald@astron.nl, E-mail: kondratiev@astron.nl, E-mail: hessels@astron.nl, E-mail: dan.stinebring@oberlin.edu [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990-AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands)

    2014-08-01

    High-precision timing of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) over years to decades is a promising technique for direct detection of gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies. Time-variable, multi-path scattering in the interstellar medium is a significant source of noise for this detector, particularly as timing precision approaches 10 ns or better for MSPs in the pulsar timing array. For many MSPs, the scattering delay above 1 GHz is at the limit of detectability; therefore, we study it at lower frequencies. Using the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) radio telescope, we have analyzed short (5-20 minutes) observations of 3 MSPs in order to estimate the scattering delay at 110-190 MHz, where the number of scintles is large and, hence, the statistical uncertainty in the scattering delay is small. We used cyclic spectroscopy, still relatively novel in radio astronomy, on baseband-sampled data to achieve unprecedented frequency resolution while retaining adequate pulse-phase resolution. We detected scintillation structure in the spectra of the MSPs PSR B1257+12, PSR J1810+1744, and PSR J2317+1439 with diffractive bandwidths of 6 ± 3, 2.0 ± 0.3, and ∼7 kHz, respectively, where the estimate for PSR J2317+1439 is reliable to about a factor of two. For the brightest of the three pulsars, PSR J1810+1744, we found that the diffractive bandwidth has a power-law behavior Δν{sub d}∝ν{sup α}, where ν is the observing frequency and α = 4.5 ± 0.5, consistent with a Kolmogorov inhomogeneity spectrum. We conclude that this technique holds promise for monitoring the scattering delay of MSPs with LOFAR and other high-sensitivity, low-frequency arrays like the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array.

  7. A scintillating fiber dosimeter for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartesaghi, G.; Conti, V.; Bolognini, D.; Grigioni, S.; Mascagna, V.; Prest, M.; Scazzi, S.; Mozzanica, A.; Cappelletti, P.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Monti, A.; Ostinelli, A.; Giannini, G.; Vallazza, E.

    2007-10-01

    Radiotherapy, together with chemotherapy and surgery, is one of the main methods applied in the fight against cancer; in order to increase the chances of a successful radiotherapy treatment the dose delivery to the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues has to be computed with high accuracy. Traditional dosimeters are accurate but single channel (ionization chambers and diodes) or non real-time (radiographic films) devices. At present there is no device water equivalent that can perform real-time and bidimensional measurements of a dose distribution. This article describes the development of a real-time dosimeter based on scintillating fibers for photon and electron beams; the fibers are made of polystyrene, that is water equivalent and thus tissue equivalent, allowing a direct dose calculation. Three prototypes (single and multichannel) have been assembled, consisting in small scintillators coupled to white fibers that carry the light to photomultiplier tubes. In this article the prototypes and the readout electronics are described, together with the results of the measurements with electron and photon beams with energy up to 20 MeV (produced by linear accelerators Varian Clinac 1800 and 2100CD).

  8. Spectra evolution over on-vine holding of Italia table grapes: prediction of maturity and discrimination for harvest times using a Vis-NIR hyperspectral device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Piazzolla

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of certain grape quality parameters (sugars, acidity, and pH-value is essential for the determination of the optimum harvest time. Non-destructive analytical techniques, including near infrared (NIR spectroscopy, can be valid alternatives to traditional analytical methods for the determination of maturity indexes, enabling the possibility of on-field applications. This work aims to study the reliability to monitor spectra changes related with ripening of table grapes and to select optimal wavelengths for the discrimination of bunches from different harvests, in addition to the prediction of total soluble solids, pH, titratable acidity, phenols and antioxidant activity of table grapes. Grapes were harvested four times from the same plants at day 0 (I HT, and after 11 (II HT, 27 (III HT and 48 (IV HT days. Spectra were acquired from the images obtained using a spectral scanner Vis-NIR (ver 1.4.; DV Srl, Padova, Italy, with a detector in the region between 400-1000 nm principal component analysis was used to remove outliers followed by spectra pre-treatment. The best prediction model was achieved for soluble solids with the regression coefficient values of 0.91 for calibration and 0.88 for validation followed by titratable acidity (0.71 and 0.78 and antioxidant activity (0.68 and 0.62. In addition an excellent correlation was observed between spectra and days before harvest (R2 of 0.98 for calibration and prediction models indicating that is possible to relate spectra changes with ripening, leading also to the effective discrimination of the fruits from the different harvest times. The results showed that this technique may be a valid support to select the optimal harvest time also based on the prediction of the maturity related constituents.

  9. Evaluations of the new LiF-scintillator and optional brightness enhancement films for neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iikura, H., E-mail: Iikura.hiroshi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki (Japan); Tsutsui, N. [Chichibu Fuji Co., Ltd., Ogano, Chichibu, Saitama 368-0193 (Japan); Nakamura, T.; Katagiri, M.; Kureta, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki (Japan); Kubo, J. [Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0126 (Japan); Matsubayashi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2011-09-21

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has developed the neutron scintillator jointly with Chichibu Fuji Co., Ltd. In this study, we evaluated the new ZnS(Ag):Al/{sup 6}Li scintillator developed for neutron imaging. It was confirmed that the brightness increased by about double while maintaining equal performance for the spatial resolution as compared with a conventional scintillator. High frame-rate imaging using a high-speed video camera system and this new scintillator made it possible to image beyond 10 000 frames per second while still having enough brightness. This technique allowed us to obtain a high-frame-rate visualization of oil flow in a running car engine. Furthermore, we devised a technique to increase the light intensity of reception for a camera by adding brightness enhancement films on the output surface of the scintillator. It was confirmed that the spatial resolution degraded more than double, but the brightness increased by about three times.

  10. Evaluations of the new LiF-scintillator and optional brightness enhancement films for neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iikura, H.; Tsutsui, N.; Nakamura, T.; Katagiri, M.; Kureta, M.; Kubo, J.; Matsubayashi, M.

    2011-09-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has developed the neutron scintillator jointly with Chichibu Fuji Co., Ltd. In this study, we evaluated the new ZnS(Ag):Al/ 6Li scintillator developed for neutron imaging. It was confirmed that the brightness increased by about double while maintaining equal performance for the spatial resolution as compared with a conventional scintillator. High frame-rate imaging using a high-speed video camera system and this new scintillator made it possible to image beyond 10 000 frames per second while still having enough brightness. This technique allowed us to obtain a high-frame-rate visualization of oil flow in a running car engine. Furthermore, we devised a technique to increase the light intensity of reception for a camera by adding brightness enhancement films on the output surface of the scintillator. It was confirmed that the spatial resolution degraded more than double, but the brightness increased by about three times.

  11. Scintillation properties of solution-grown trans-stilbene single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitseva, Natalia, E-mail: zaitseva1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Glenn, Andrew; Carman, Leslie; Paul Martinez, H.; Hatarik, Robert [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Klapper, Helmut [Institut für Kristallographie, Jägerstraße 17-19, D-52066 Aachen (Germany); Payne, Stephen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The scintillation properties of trans-stilbene crystals grown for the first time by application of the solution growth technique to the scale of 10 cm are reported. Measurements of the scintillation light output, pulse shape discrimination, and neutron detection efficiency were made with sets of crystals cut as 50 cm diameter cylinders of different lengths from 0.3 to 10 cm. Comparison to liquid scintillators and traditional melt-grown stilbene showed that at increasing sizes new solution-grown crystals exhibit better scintillation performance that makes them promising for use in large scale neutron detectors. Results are discussed in relation to structural imperfections attributed to different methods of growth. - Highlights: • 10-cm-scale trans-stilbene single crystals grown from organic solutions. • Crystals have high optical quality required for fast neutron detection. • Scintillation performance superior to liquids and melt-grown stilbene demonstrated.

  12. Determining the spectra of radiation belt electron losses: Fitting DEMETER electron flux observations for typical and storm times

    OpenAIRE

    Whittaker, Ian C.; Gamble, Rory J.; Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Sauvaud, Jean-André

    2013-01-01

    The energy spectra of energetic electron precipitation from the radiation belts are studied in order to improve our understanding of the influence of radiation belt processes. The Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) microsatellite electron flux instrument is comparatively unusual in that it has very high energy resolution (128 channels with 17.9 keV widths in normal survey mode), which lends itself to this type of spectral analysis. Here electr...

  13. Progress in the development of LuAlO3 based scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Belsky, A; Lecoq, P; Dujardin, C; Garnier, N; Canibano, H; Pédrini, C; Petrosian, A

    2000-01-01

    LuAlO3:Ce3+ (LuAP) and LuxY1-xAlO3:Ce3+ (LuYAP) crystals are the promote scintillation materials for Positron Emission Tomography. Actual study of these scintillators develops in the tree directions: (i) growth of large size LuAP crystals with stable properties, (ii) relationship between composition of LuYAP crystals and scintillation properties, and (iii) scintillation mechanisms in lutetium compounds. After improving of growth conditions a large size samples (length greater than 40 mm) have been prepared. Crystals show a good correlation between growth parameters, light yield and transmission spectra. We performed a series of samples with calibrated size (2x2x10 mm3) and compare the light yield with a standard BGO and LSO samples. Mixed crystals with composition of 0.6 less than x less than 0.8 show a significant increase of light yield. We suggest that the short order clusterisation in mixed crystals may by playing an important role in governing the scintillation efficiency. In order to clarify the scintil...

  14. Pointing Calorimeter for Measuring K0L -> π 0ν barν Decay and Development of Extruded Scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, Douglas; Ives, Joss; Amaudruz, Pierre; Davydov, Yuri; Henderson, Robert; Khan, Naimat; Lim, Chapman; Miller, Andrew; Numao, Toshio; Sher, Aleksey; Wong, David

    2006-04-01

    A sampling calorimeter based on plastic scintillator-drift chamber sandwiches was designed to measure the angles, positions, energies, and times of medium energy photons with good resolution and high efficiency. Techniques for manufacturing extruded plastic scintillators with multiple holes for wave length shifting fibers have been developed. Light output comparable to commercial scintillator and good dimensional tolerances have been achieved for 8 mm × 70 mm × 2.5 m planks which can be glued into large sheets.

  15. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmeier, M.; Bauer, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bissel, T.; Bollmann, R.; Busch, M.; Buesser, K.; Colberg, T.; Demiroers, L.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Engelhardt, H.P.; Eversheim, P.D.; Felden, O.; Gebel, R.; Glende, M.; Greiff, J.; Gross, A.; Gross-Hardt, R.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Jonas, E.; Krause, H.; Lahr, U.; Langkau, R.; Lindemann, T.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuck, T.; Meinerzhagen, A.; Naehle, O.; Pfuff, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjess, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Rossen, P. von; Sanz, B.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwarz, V.; Scobel, W.; Thomas, S.; Trelle, H.J.; Weise, E.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R

    1999-07-21

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. {<=}{theta}{<=}72 deg. and 0 deg. {<=}phi (cursive,open) Greek{<=}360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  16. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    CERN Document Server

    Altmeier, M; Bisplinghoff, J; Bissel, T; Bollmann, R; Busch, M; Büsser, K; Colberg, T; Demiroers, L; Diehl, O; Dohrmann, F; Engelhardt, H P; Eversheim, P D; Felden, O; Gebel, R; Glende, M; Greiff, J; Gross, A; Gross-Hardt, R; Hinterberger, F; Jahn, R; Jeske, M; Jonas, E; Krause, H; Lahr, U; Langkau, R; Lindemann, T; Lindlein, J; Maier, R; Maschuw, R; Mayer-Kuckuck, T; Meinerzhagen, A; Naehle, O; Pfuff, M; Prasuhn, D; Rohdjess, H; Rosendaal, D; Von Rossen, P; Sanz, B; Schirm, N; Schulz-Rojahn, M; Schwarz, V; Scobel, W; Thomas, S; Trelle, H J; Weise, E; Wellinghausen, A; Wiedmann, W; Woller, K; Ziegler, R

    1999-01-01

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. <= THETA<=72 deg. and 0 deg. <=phi (cursive,open) Greek<=360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  17. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmeier, M.; Bauer, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bissel, T.; Bollmann, R.; Busch, M.; Büßer, K.; Colberg, T.; Demirörs, L.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Engelhardt, H. P.; Eversheim, P. D.; Felden, O.; Gebel, R.; Glende, M.; Greiff, J.; Groß, A.; Groß-Hardt, R.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Jonas, E.; Krause, H.; Lahr, U.; Langkau, R.; Lindemann, T.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuck, T.; Meinerzhagen, A.; Nähle, O.; Pfuff, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjeß, H.; Rosendaal, D.; von Rossen, P.; Sanz, B.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwarz, V.; Scobel, W.; Thomas, S.; Trelle, H. J.; Weise, E.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R.; EDDA Collaboration

    1999-07-01

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9°⩽ Θ⩽72° and 0°⩽ ϕ⩽360° in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes.

  18. A novel segmented-scintillator antineutrino detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Y.; Amhis, Y.; Arnold, L.; Ban, G.; Beaumont, W.; Bongrand, M.; Boursette, D.; Buhour, J. M.; Castle, B. C.; Clark, K.; Coupé, B.; Cucoanes, A. S.; Cussans, D.; De Roeck, A.; D'Hondt, J.; Durand, D.; Fallot, M.; Fresneau, S.; Ghys, L.; Giot, L.; Guillon, B.; Guilloux, G.; Ihantola, S.; Janssen, X.; Kalcheva, S.; Kalousis, L. N.; Koonen, E.; Labare, M.; Lehaut, G.; Mermans, J.; Michiels, I.; Moortgat, C.; Newbold, D.; Park, J.; Petridis, K.; Piñera, I.; Pommery, G.; Popescu, L.; Pronost, G.; Rademacker, J.; Reynolds, A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Ryder, N.; Saunders, D.; Shitov, Yu. A.; Schune, M.-H.; Scovell, P. R.; Simard, L.; Vacheret, A.; Van Dyck, S.; Van Mulders, P.; van Remortel, N.; Vercaemer, S.; Waldron, A.; Weber, A.; Yermia, F.

    2017-04-01

    The next generation of very-short-baseline reactor experiments will require compact detectors operating at surface level and close to a nuclear reactor. This paper presents a new detector concept based on a composite solid scintillator technology. The detector target uses cubes of polyvinyltoluene interleaved with 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) phosphor screens to detect the products of the inverse beta decay reaction. A multi-tonne detector system built from these individual cells can provide precise localisation of scintillation signals, making efficient use of the detector volume. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that a neutron capture efficiency of over 70 % is achievable with a sufficient number of 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) screens per cube and that an appropriate segmentation enables a measurement of the positron energy which is not limited by γ-ray leakage. First measurements of a single cell indicate that a very good neutron-gamma discrimination and high neutron detection efficiency can be obtained with adequate triggering techniques. The light yield from positron signals has been measured, showing that an energy resolution of 14%/√E(MeV) is achievable with high uniformity. A preliminary neutrino signal analysis has been developed, using selection criteria for pulse shape, energy, time structure and energy spatial distribution and showing that an antineutrino efficiency of 40% can be achieved. It also shows that the fine segmentation of the detector can be used to significantly decrease both correlated and accidental backgrounds.

  19. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esch, Ernst I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Leif O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couture, Aaron J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mckigney, Edward A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Del Sesto, Rico E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilbertson, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reifarth, Rene [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  20. Inequality spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-03-01

    Inequality indices are widely applied in economics and in the social sciences as quantitative measures of the socioeconomic inequality of human societies. The application of inequality indices extends to size-distributions at large, where these indices can be used as general gauges of statistical heterogeneity. Moreover, as inequality indices are plentiful, arrays of such indices facilitate high-detail quantification of statistical heterogeneity. In this paper we elevate from arrays of inequality indices to inequality spectra: continuums of inequality indices that are parameterized by a single control parameter. We present a general methodology of constructing Lorenz-based inequality spectra, apply the general methodology to establish four sets of inequality spectra, investigate the properties of these sets, and show how these sets generalize known inequality gauges such as: the Gini index, the extended Gini index, the Rényi index, and hill curves.

  1. Comparative study of n-gamma discrimination with liquid scintillation detectors of different size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela G, A.; Policroniades R, R.; Moreno B, E.; Murillo O, G. [Laboratorio del Acelerador Tandem, ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Chavez L, E.; Ortiz S, M.E.; Huerta H, A. [IFUNAM, A.P. 20-364, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    A study concerning the neutron-gamma (n- {gamma}) pulse shape discrimination (PSD) properties of a set of three cylindrical cells filled with NE-213 and BC501A liquid scintillators, is reported in this paper. The study is intended to choose a PSD technique in order to handle neutron detector arrays with large volume of scintillation liquid, which will be used in the measurement of the neutron decay spectra coming up from nuclear states far from stability for some neutron rich nuclei. (Author)

  2. Holes: Ionospheric Scintillation, GPS and Imputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    by Klobuchar [Parkinson et al., 1996]. 2.3.2 Definition, Characteristics and Models. The situation for scintillation, sadly, is not so simple.Groves...and J. A. Klobuchar (2003), Ionospheric scintillation effects on single and dual frequency gps positioning, in Proceedings of ION GPS/GNSS 2003... Klobuchar (1996), Commercial ionospheric scintillation monitoring receiver development and test results, in Proceedings of the 52nd Annual Meeting of the

  3. Advances in Yield Calibration of Scintillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haas, J.T.M.; Dorenbos, P.

    2008-01-01

    By means of a photomultiplier tube, a Si-photodiode, and a Si-avalanche photodiode, the absolute scintillation yield of recently developed LaBr3:Ce, LaCl3:Ce, and (Lu Y)2SiO5:Ce scintillators and traditional Lu2SiO5:Ce, Bi4Ge3O12, NaI:Tl CsI:Tl, and CsI:Na scintillators were determined. These are

  4. Designing an optimally proportional inorganic scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai, E-mail: jai.singh@cdu.edu.au [School of Engineering and IT, B-Purple-12, Faculty of EHSE, Charles Darwin University, NT 0909 (Australia); Koblov, Alexander [School of Engineering and IT, B-Purple-12, Faculty of EHSE, Charles Darwin University, NT 0909 (Australia)

    2012-09-01

    The nonproportionality observed in the light yield of inorganic scintillators is studied theoretically as a function of the rates of bimolecular and Auger quenching processes occurring within the electron track initiated by a gamma- or X-ray photon incident on a scintillator. Assuming a cylindrical track, the influence of the track radius and concentration of excitations created within the track on the scintillator light yield is also studied. Analysing the calculated light yield a guideline for inventing an optimally proportional scintillator with optimal energy resolution is presented.

  5. Random wave fields and scintillated beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available fields . Artificial vortex fields CSIR National Laser Centre – p.2/29 Scintillated optical beams When an optical beam propagates through a turbulent atmosphere, the index variations cause random phase modulations that lead to distortions of the optical... beam. CSIR National Laser Centre – p.3/29 Weak scintillation If the scintillation is weak the resulting phase function of the optical beam is still continuous. Such a weakly scintillated beam can be corrected by an adaptive optical system. CSIR National...

  6. High-symmetry organic scintillator systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Patrick L.

    2017-09-05

    An ionizing radiation detector or scintillator system includes a scintillating material comprising an organic crystalline compound selected to generate photons in response to the passage of ionizing radiation. The organic compound has a crystalline symmetry of higher order than monoclinic, for example an orthorhombic, trigonal, tetragonal, hexagonal, or cubic symmetry. A photodetector is optically coupled to the scintillating material, and configured to generate electronic signals having pulse shapes based on the photons generated in the scintillating material. A discriminator is coupled to the photon detector, and configured to discriminate between neutrons and gamma rays in the ionizing radiation based on the pulse shapes of the output signals.

  7. High-symmetry organic scintillator systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Patrick L.

    2018-02-06

    An ionizing radiation detector or scintillator system includes a scintillating material comprising an organic crystalline compound selected to generate photons in response to the passage of ionizing radiation. The organic compound has a crystalline symmetry of higher order than monoclinic, for example an orthorhombic, trigonal, tetragonal, hexagonal, or cubic symmetry. A photodetector is optically coupled to the scintillating material, and configured to generate electronic signals having pulse shapes based on the photons generated in the scintillating material. A discriminator is coupled to the photon detector, and configured to discriminate between neutrons and gamma rays in the ionizing radiation based on the pulse shapes of the output signals.

  8. Intrinsic scintillators: TlMgCl3 and TlCaI3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawrami, R.; Ariesanti, E.; Wei, H.; Finkelstein, J.; Glodo, J.; Shah, K. S.

    2017-10-01

    Two intrinsic scintillators TlMgCl3 and TlCaI3 with excellent energy resolution and fast scintillation decay are presented. Crack-free transparent crystals were successfully grown by the Bridgman method. The scintillation light yields of TlMgCl3 and TlCaI3 are approximately 30,600 ph/MeV and 42,200 ph/MeV, respectively. Their energy resolutions at 662 keV are 3.7% for TlMgCl3 and 6.2% for TlCaI3. The scintillation decay times of TlMgCl3 are 46 ns, 166 ns, and 449 ns. The scintillation decay times of TlCaI3 are 62 ns, 200 ns, and 1.44 μs. Under X-ray irradiation, the emission of TlMgCl3 is between 300 nm and 540 nm with the peak at 409 nm. TlCaI3 has a broad emission band between 300 nm and 750 nm. Due to their excellent scintillation properties, these two scintillators can be developed for gamma-ray detection. Additionally, TlMgCl3 is non-hygroscopic.

  9. GPS phase scintillation and proxy index at high latitudes during a moderate geomagnetic storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Prikryl

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The amplitude and phase scintillation indices are customarily obtained by specialised GPS Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitors (GISTMs from L1 signal recorded at the rate of 50 Hz. The scintillation indices S4 and σΦ are stored in real time from an array of high-rate scintillation receivers of the Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN. Ionospheric phase scintillation was observed at high latitudes during a moderate geomagnetic storm (Dst = −61 nT that was caused by a moderate solar wind plasma stream compounded with the impact of two coronal mass ejections. The most intense phase scintillation (σΦ ~ 1 rad occurred in the cusp and the polar cap where it was co-located with a strong ionospheric convection, an extended tongue of ionisation and dense polar cap patches that were observed with ionosondes and HF radars. At sub-auroral latitudes, a sub-auroral polarisation stream that was observed by mid-latitude radars was associated with weak scintillation (defined arbitrarily as σΦ Φ > 0.1 rad and DPR > 2 mm s−1, both mapped as a function of magnetic latitude and magnetic local time, are very similar.

  10. Equatorial scintillations in relation to the development of ionization anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S.; Paul, A.; Dasgupta, A.

    2006-07-01

    The irregularities in the electron density distribution of the ionosphere over the equatorial region frequently disrupt space-based communication and navigation links by causing severe amplitude and phase scintillations of signals. Development of a specification and forecast system for scintillations is needed in view of the increased reliance on space-based communication and navigation systems, which are vulnerable to ionospheric scintillations. It has been suggested in recent years that a developed equatorial anomaly in the afternoon hours, with a steep gradient of the F-region ionization or Total Electron Content (TEC) in the region between the crest and the trough, may be taken as a precursor to scintillations on transionospheric links. Latitudinal gradient of TEC measured using Faraday Rotation technique from LEO NOAA 12/14 transmissions during the afternoon hours at Calcutta shows a highly significant association with L-band scintillations recorded on the INMARSAT link, also from Calcutta, during the equinoxes, August through October 2000, and February through April 2001. style="line-height: 20px;"> The daytime equatorial electrojet is believed to control the development of the equatorial anomaly and plays a crucial role in the subsequent development of F-region irregularities in the post-sunset hours. The diurnal maximum and integrated value (integrated from the time of onset of plasma influx to off-equatorial latitudes till local sunset) of the strength of the electrojet in the Indian longitude sector shows a significant association with post-sunset L-band scintillations recorded at Calcutta during the two equinoxes mentioned earlier. style="line-height: 20px;"> Generation of equatorial irregularities over the magnetic equator in the post-sunset hours is intimately related to the variation of the height of the F-layer around sunset. Ionosonde data from Kodaikanal, a station situated close to the magnetic equator, has been utilized to calculate the vertical

  11. Equatorial scintillations in relation to the development of ionization anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ray

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The irregularities in the electron density distribution of the ionosphere over the equatorial region frequently disrupt space-based communication and navigation links by causing severe amplitude and phase scintillations of signals. Development of a specification and forecast system for scintillations is needed in view of the increased reliance on space-based communication and navigation systems, which are vulnerable to ionospheric scintillations. It has been suggested in recent years that a developed equatorial anomaly in the afternoon hours, with a steep gradient of the F-region ionization or Total Electron Content (TEC in the region between the crest and the trough, may be taken as a precursor to scintillations on transionospheric links. Latitudinal gradient of TEC measured using Faraday Rotation technique from LEO NOAA 12/14 transmissions during the afternoon hours at Calcutta shows a highly significant association with L-band scintillations recorded on the INMARSAT link, also from Calcutta, during the equinoxes, August through October 2000, and February through April 2001. The daytime equatorial electrojet is believed to control the development of the equatorial anomaly and plays a crucial role in the subsequent development of F-region irregularities in the post-sunset hours. The diurnal maximum and integrated value (integrated from the time of onset of plasma influx to off-equatorial latitudes till local sunset of the strength of the electrojet in the Indian longitude sector shows a significant association with post-sunset L-band scintillations recorded at Calcutta during the two equinoxes mentioned earlier. Generation of equatorial irregularities over the magnetic equator in the post-sunset hours is intimately related to the variation of the height of the F-layer around sunset. Ionosonde data from Kodaikanal, a station situated close to the magnetic equator, has been utilized to calculate the vertical drift of the F-layer over the

  12. Affected by Interstellar Scintillation?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bright γ-ray sources are detected, of which 104 are blazars (Abdo et al. 2009). Blazars are either flat-spectrum radio quasars or BL Lacerate objects, and they are extremely variable at all wavelengths on time-scales ranging from less than an hour to many years. Such violent behaviour in blazars is attributed to relativistic jets.

  13. Time-resolved emission spectra of 4-dimethylamino-4‧-cyano-stilbene and resveratrol in high viscosity solvents and silica matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiak, Małgorzata; Grobelna, Beata; Synak, Anna; Bojarski, Piotr; Kubicki, Aleksander A.

    2013-11-01

    Time-resolved emission spectra of 4-dimethylamino-4‧-cyano-stilbene (DMACS) and 3,5,4‧-trihydroxy-stilbene (resveratrol, RSV) in propylene glycol and in rigid silica xerogel matrix at 23 °C were studied. For the polar molecule DMACS in propylene glycol, a 66 nm shift of maximum wavelength of emission spectra was observed within 1 ns after excitation, and most of the shift occurred during the first 200 ps. For resveratrol in propylene glycol no such a shift was observed. The rigid silica environment eliminates some deactivation pathways and stabilizes spectroscopic properties of both molecules. Spectral properties of nonpolar and high dipole moment molecules in viscous liquids and rigid environments are compared. Results are explained on the basis of intramolecular processes and solute-solvent relaxation, as well.

  14. Time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of photoexcited triplet states of electron-donor-acceptor complexes in frozen solution: Methylated benzenes and chlorinated phthalic anhydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Hisao; Minami, Masashi; I'Haya, Yasumasa J.

    1994-09-01

    Phthalic anhydride (PA) and chlorinated PAs in frozen methyl substituted benzenes provided the time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) spectra of the electron-donor-acceptor (EDA) complexes. The chlorine substitution of PA reduced the zero-field splitting parameters, D, due to the contribution of the spin-orbit interaction caused by heavy atoms such as chlorine. The increase of the number of methyl group on benzene, which apparently reduced the ionization potential, worked to decrease the D value of the EDA complex. The charge-transfer (CT) ratios were measured more exactly by the absolute value of (Delta m(sub s)) = 1 transition of the triplet states. The major axes of these systems were also safely presumed. The sign of the 100% charge transferred EDA complex was found negative because of the CT ratio plots and the spin-polarization pattern of the TREPR spectra.

  15. Full-spectrum analysis of natural gamma-ray spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Peter; Limburg, J; de Meijer, RJ

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a new system to measure natural gamma -radiation in situ will be presented. This system combines a high-efficiency EGO scintillation detector with full-spectrum data analysis (FSA). This technique uses the (nearly) full spectral shape and the so-called 'standard spectra' to calculate

  16. Assessment of mode-mixing and Herzberg-Teller effects on two-photon absorption and resonance hyper-Raman spectra from a time-dependent approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, HuiLi; Zhao, Yi; Liang, WanZhen

    2014-03-07

    A time-dependent approach is presented to simulate the two-photon absorption (TPA) and resonance hyper-Raman scattering (RHRS) spectra including Duschinsky rotation (mode-mixing) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) vibronic coupling effects. The computational obstacles for the excited-state geometries, vibrational frequencies, and nuclear derivatives of transition dipole moments, which enter the expressions of TPA and RHRS cross sections, are further overcome by the recently developed analytical excited-state energy derivative approaches in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory. The excited-state potential curvatures are evaluated at different levels of approximation to inspect the effects of frequency differences, mode-mixing and HT on TPA and RHRS spectra. Two types of molecules, one with high symmetry (formaldehyde, p-difluorobenzene, and benzotrifluoride) and the other with non-centrosymmetry (cis-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone in the deprotonated anion state (HDBI(-))), are used as test systems. The calculated results reveal that it is crucial to adopt the exact excited-state potential curvatures in the calculations of TPA and RHRS spectra even for the high-symmetric molecules, and that the vertical gradient approximation leads to a large deviation. Furthermore, it is found that the HT contribution is evident in the TPA and RHRS spectra of HDBI(-) although its one- and two-photon transitions are strongly allowed, and its effect results in an obvious blueshift of the TPA maximum with respect to the one-photon absorption maximum. With the HT and solvent effects getting involved, the simulated blueshift of 1291 cm(-1) agrees well with the experimental measurement.

  17. A helium gas scintillator active target for photoreaction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Jebali, Ramsey; Annand, John R.M.; Buchanan, Emma; Gardner, Simon; Hamilton, David J.; Livingston, Kenneth; McGeorge, John C.; MacGregor, Ian J.D.; MacRae, Roderick; Reiter, Andreas J.H.; Rosner, Guenther; Sokhan, Daria; Strandberg, Bruno [University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Adler, Jan-Olof; Fissum, Kevin; Schroeder, Bent [University of Lund, Department of Physics, Lund (Sweden); Akkurt, Iskender [Sueleyman Demirel University, Fen-Edebiyat Faculty, Isparta (Turkey); Brudvik, Jason; Hansen, Kurt; Isaksson, Lennart; Lundin, Magnus [MAX IV Laboratory, PO Box 118, Lund (Sweden); Middleton, Duncan G. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Kepler Centre for Astro and Particle Physics, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Sjoegren, Johan [University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); MAX IV Laboratory, PO Box 118, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-10-15

    A multi-cell He gas scintillator active target, designed for the measurement of photoreaction cross sections, is described. The target has four main chambers, giving an overall thickness of 0.103 g/cm{sup 3} at an operating pressure of 2 MPa. Scintillations are read out by photomultiplier tubes and the addition of small amounts of N{sub 2} to the He, to shift the scintillation emission from UV to visible, is discussed. First results of measurements at the MAX IV Laboratory tagged-photon facility show that the target has a timing resolution of around 1 ns and can cope well with a high-flux photon beam. The determination of reaction cross sections from target yields relies on a Monte Carlo simulation, which considers scintillation light transport, photodisintegration processes in {sup 4}He, background photon interactions in target windows and interactions of the reaction-product particles in the gas and target container. The predictions of this simulation are compared to the measured target response. (orig.)

  18. New prototype scintillator detector for the Tibet ASγ experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Gou, Q.-B.; Cai, H.; Chen, T.-L.; Danzengluobu; Feng, C.-F.; Feng, Y.-L.; Feng, Z.-Y.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X.-J.; Guo, Y.-Q.; Guo, Y.-Y.; Hou, Y.-Y.; Hu, H.-B.; Jin, C.; Li, H.-J.; Liu, C.; Liu, M.-Y.; Qian, X.-L.; Tian, Z.; Wang, Z.; Xue, L.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Zhang, Xi-Ying

    2017-11-01

    The hybrid Tibet AS array was successfully constructed in 2014. It has 4500 m2 underground water Cherenkov pools used as the muon detector (MD) and 789 scintillator detectors covering 36900 m2 as the surface array. At 100 TeV, cosmic-ray background events can be rejected by approximately 99.99%, according to the full Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for γ-ray observations. In order to use the muon detector efficiently, we propose to extend the surface array area to 72900 m2 by adding 120 scintillator detectors around the current array to increase the effective detection area. A new prototype scintillator detector is developed via optimizing the detector geometry and its optical surface, by selecting the reflective material and adopting dynode readout. {This detector can meet our physics requirements with a positional non-uniformity of the output charge within 10% (with reference to the center of the scintillator), time resolution FWHM of ~2.2 ns, and dynamic range from 1 to 500 minimum ionization particles}.

  19. New advanced in alpha spectrometry by liquid scintillation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, W.J.; Case, G.N.

    1979-01-01

    Although the ability to count alpha particles by liquid scintillation methods has been long recognized, limited use has been made of the method because of problems of high background and alpha energy identification. In recent years some new developments in methods of introducing the alpha-emitting nuclide to the scintillator, in detector construction, and in electronics for processing the energy analog and time analog signals from the detector have allowed significant alleviation of the problems of alpha spectrometry by liquid scintillation. Energy resolutions of 200 to 300 keV full peak width at half maximum and background counts of < 0.01 counts/min with rejection with rejection of > 99% of all beta plus gamma interference is now possible. Alpha liquid scintillation spectrometry is now suitable for a wide range of applications, from the accurate quantitative determination of relatively large amounts of known nuclides in laboratory-generated samples to the detection and identification of very small, subpicocurie amounts of alpha emitters in environmental-type samples. Suitable nuclide separation procedures, sample preparation methods, and instrument configurations are available for a variety of analyses.

  20. Investigation of linear accelerator pulse delivery using fast organic scintillator measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Andersen, Claus Erik; Lindvold, Lars René

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-coupled organic plastic scintillators present an attractive method for time-resolved dose measurements during radiotherapy. Most organic scintillators exhibit a fast response, making it possible to use them to measure individual high-energy X-ray pulses from a medical linear accelerator....... This can be used in complex treatment procedures such as gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)1, where the advantage of dose rate measurements of high temporal resolution is highly emphasized. We report on development of a fast data acquisition scintillator-based system as well as measurements...

  1. A Multi-Constellation Multi-Frequency GNSS Software Receiver Design for Ionosphere Scintillation Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Senlin

    2012-01-01

    Ionospheric scintillations can cause significant amplitude and/or phase fluctuations of GNSS signals. This work presents analysis results of scintillation effects on the new GPS L5 signal based on data collected using a real-time scintillation monitoring and data collection system at HAARP, Alaska. The data collection setup includes a custom narrow band front end that collects GPS L1, L2 IF samples and two reconfigurable USRP2 based RF front ends to collect wideband GPS L5 and GLONASS L1 and ...

  2. Fission-fragment detector for DANCE based on thin scintillating films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusev, G.; Roman, A. R.; Daum, J. K.; Springs, R. K.; Bond, E. M.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing 4 π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillation photons were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U (n , f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flight spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described.

  3. LiCaAlF sub 6 :Ce crystal: a new scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Gektin, A V; Neicheva, S; Gavrilyuk, V; Bensalah, A; Fukuda, T; Shimamura, K

    2002-01-01

    Scintillation properties of LiCaAlF sub 6 :Ce crystal, well known as the effective UV laser material, is reported. Ce sup 3 sup + emission at 286-305 nm with a single exponential decay time of 35 ns provides a scintillation pulse. Radiation damage in pure and Ce-doped crystals is studied. In contrast to the majority of fluoride crystals, cerium is responsible for the ultradeep traps formation revealing thermostimulated luminescence. Overlapping of color center absorption and Ce sup 3 sup + ion emission bands limits the scintillation efficiency of LiCaAlF sub 6 :Ce at high radiation doses.

  4. Accelerated Aging Test for Plastic Scintillator Gamma Ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-05-12

    Polyvinyl toluene (PVT) and polystyrene (PS), collectively referred to as “plastic scintillator,” are synthetic polymer materials used to detect gamma radiation, and are commonly used in instrumentation. Recent studies have revealed that plastic scintillator undergoes an environmentally related material degradation that adversely affects performance under certain conditions and histories. A significant decrease in gamma ray sensitivity has been seen in some detectors in systems as they age. The degradation of sensitivity of plastic scintillator over time is due to a variety of factors, and the term “aging” is used to encompass all factors. Some plastic scintillator samples show no aging effects (no significant change in sensitivity over more than 10 years), while others show severe aging (significant change in sensitivity in less than 5 years). Aging effects arise from weather (variations in heat and humidity), chemical exposure, mechanical stress, light exposure, and loss of volatile components. The damage produced by these various causes can be cumulative, causing observable damage to increase over time. Damage may be reversible up to some point, but becomes permanent under some conditions. It has been demonstrated that exposure of plastic scintillator in an environmental chamber to 30 days of high temperature and humidity (90% relative humidity and 55°C) followed by a single cycle to cold temperature (-30°C) will produce severe fogging in all PVT samples. This thermal cycle will be referred to as the “Accelerated Aging Test.” This document describes the procedure for performing this Accelerated Aging Test.

  5. Investigations on imaging properties of inorganic scintillation screens under irradiation with high energetic heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieberwirth, Alice

    2016-09-15

    scintillation record was used to examine the material stability under long time application. Here, the light yield Y of the targets was nearly constant or decreased only in the range of 10-15 %, relative to the initial value. For the targets with single crystal characteristic (P46, YAG:Ce), Y even increased slightly and than saturated, offering an enhanced mobility of charge carriers under irradiation. The emission spectra were reproduced continuously and the beam profiles showed good accordance to the reference methods. Within all performed beam times, the targets offered a great stability. Non-linear characteristics, e.g. due to quenching during irradiation at high beam intensities, were not observed. The light yield Y showed a decreasing tendency as function of calculated electronic energy loss dE/dx. The characteristics of the calculated beam profiles, as well as the recorded emission spectra did not change significantly. So a material degradation in the investigated materials was not verified. This observation is confirmed by the performed material characterization measurements. The need of target replacement, e.g. due to damage, did not occur and was thus not performed during the complete investigations. As material for future beam diagnostics of FAIR cerium-doped Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} single crystal with a thickness in the range of 300 μm is recommended in cross-points between different storage sections, due to the stable imaging properties for high energy ion beams, even under long-time irradiation. For beam alignment to experimental and research areas, common Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr is recommended due to the cost advantage.

  6. Liquid scintillator composition optimization for use in ultra-high energy cosmic ray detector systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beznosko Dmitriy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Horizon-T (HT detector system and the currently under R&D HT-KZ detector system are designed for the detection of Extensive Air Showers (EAS with energies above ∼1016 eV (∼1017 eV for HT-KZ. The main challenges in both detector systems are the fast time resolutions needed for studying the temporary structure of EAS, and the extremely wide dynamic range needed to study the spatial distribution of charged particles in EAS disks. In order to detect the low-density of charged particles far from the EAS axis, a large-area detector is needed. Liquid scintillator with low cost would be a possible solution for such a detector, including the recently developed safe and low-cost water-based liquid scintillators. Liquid organic scintillators give a fast and high light yield (LY for charged particle detection. It is similar to plastic scintillator in properties but is cost effective for large volumes. With liquid scintillator, one can create detection volumes that are symmetric and yet retain high LY detection. Different wavelength shifters affect the scintillation light by changing the output spectrum into the best detection region. Results of the latest studies of the components optimization in the liquid scintillator formulae are presented.

  7. Liquid scintillator composition optimization for use in ultra-high energy cosmic ray detector systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beznosko, Dmitriy; Batyrkhanov, Ayan; Iakovlev, Alexander; Yelshibekov, Khalykbek

    2017-06-01

    The Horizon-T (HT) detector system and the currently under R&D HT-KZ detector system are designed for the detection of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) with energies above ˜1016 eV (˜1017 eV for HT-KZ). The main challenges in both detector systems are the fast time resolutions needed for studying the temporary structure of EAS, and the extremely wide dynamic range needed to study the spatial distribution of charged particles in EAS disks. In order to detect the low-density of charged particles far from the EAS axis, a large-area detector is needed. Liquid scintillator with low cost would be a possible solution for such a detector, including the recently developed safe and low-cost water-based liquid scintillators. Liquid organic scintillators give a fast and high light yield (LY) for charged particle detection. It is similar to plastic scintillator in properties but is cost effective for large volumes. With liquid scintillator, one can create detection volumes that are symmetric and yet retain high LY detection. Different wavelength shifters affect the scintillation light by changing the output spectrum into the best detection region. Results of the latest studies of the components optimization in the liquid scintillator formulae are presented.

  8. The First Tests of a Large-Area Light Detector Equipped with Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Scintillating Bolometers for the LUMINEU Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, D.; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Hassel, C.; Hengstler, D.; Kempf, S.; Loidl, M.; Navick, X. F.; Rodrigues, M.

    2016-08-01

    Future rare-event searches using scintillating crystals need very low background levels for high sensitivity; however, unresolved pile-up can limit this. We present the design and fabrication of large-area photon detectors based on metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), optimized for fast rise times to resolve close pile-up. The first prototypes have been characterized using Fe-55 X-rays and ZnMoO4 crystal scintillation light. A fast intrinsic rise time of 25-30 \\upmu s has been measured and has been compared to the 250 \\upmu s scintillation light pulse rise time constant. The difference indicates that the scintillation process limits the light pulse rise time. The fast rise time allows for a reduction of background due to close pile-up events as well as the study of the inherent crystal scintillation process. MMC-based photon detectors are shown to be a promising tool for scintillating crystal based rare event searches.

  9. Fabrication and scintillation characteristics of CsI:Tl scintillator for X-ray imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Ju; Kim, Kyong Woo [NanoFocusRay, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Duk; Cho, Gyu Seong; Kim, Jong Yul [Korea Advanced Tnstitute of Science Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The scintillator absorb X-ray and emit visible light. Thallium-doped cesium iodide(CsI:Tl) scintillator have been widely used in X-ray imaging system for medical and industrial because of high scintillation efficiency and proper emission wavelength (550nm) highly matching silicon-based photo-sensor. In this study, Scintillation film was fabricated by using a thermal evaporation method. CsI:Tl films according to fabrication condition such as different doped Tl concentrations, heat treatment temperature, chamber vacuum pressure, deposition thickness and substrate structure onto a glass. Fabricated CsI:Tl scintillators were observed using scanning electron microscopy(SEM), and scintillation characteristics were evaluated such as wavelength, light output of CsI:Tl scintillators were obtained by an X-ray measurement system.

  10. Photodetectors for scintillator proportionality measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States)], E-mail: wwmoses@lbl.gov; Choong, Woon-Seng [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Hull, Giulia; Payne, Steve; Cherepy, Nerine; Valentine, John D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2009-10-21

    We evaluate photodetectors for use in a Compton Coincidence apparatus designed for measuring scintillator proportionality. There are many requirements placed on the photodetector in these systems, including active area, linearity, and the ability to accurately measure low light levels (which implies high quantum efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio). Through a combination of measurement and Monte Carlo simulation, we evaluate a number of potential photodetectors, especially photomultiplier tubes and hybrid photodetectors. Of these, we find that the most promising devices available are photomultiplier tubes with high ({approx}50%) quantum efficiency, although hybrid photodetectors with high quantum efficiency would be preferable.

  11. Pulsar scintillation patterns and strangelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-García, M. Ángeles, E-mail: mperezga@usal.es [Department of Fundamental Physics and IUFFyM, University of Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Silk, Joseph, E-mail: silk@iap.fr [Institut d' Astrophysique, UMR 7095, CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98bis Blvd Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore MD 21218 (United States); Beecroft Institute of Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Pen, Ue-Li, E-mail: pen@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 0N M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2013-12-18

    We propose that interstellar extreme scattering events, usually observed as pulsar scintillations, may be caused by a coherent agent rather than the usually assumed turbulence of H{sub 2} clouds. We find that the penetration of a flux of ionizing, positively charged strangelets or quark nuggets into a dense interstellar hydrogen cloud may produce ionization trails. Depending on the specific nature and energy of the incoming droplets, diffusive propagation or even capture in the cloud are possible. As a result, enhanced electron densities may form and constitute a lens-like scattering screen for radio pulsars and possibly for quasars.

  12. Warhead verification as inverse problem: Applications of neutron spectrum unfolding from organic-scintillator measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, Chris C.; Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Febbraro, Michael; Becchetti, F. D. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2016-08-14

    Verification of future warhead-dismantlement treaties will require detection of certain warhead attributes without the disclosure of sensitive design information, and this presents an unusual measurement challenge. Neutron spectroscopy—commonly eschewed as an ill-posed inverse problem—may hold special advantages for warhead verification by virtue of its insensitivity to certain neutron-source parameters like plutonium isotopics. In this article, we investigate the usefulness of unfolded neutron spectra obtained from organic-scintillator data for verifying a particular treaty-relevant warhead attribute: the presence of high-explosive and neutron-reflecting materials. Toward this end, several improvements on current unfolding capabilities are demonstrated: deuterated detectors are shown to have superior response-matrix condition to that of standard hydrogen-base scintintillators; a novel data-discretization scheme is proposed which removes important detector nonlinearities; and a technique is described for re-parameterizing the unfolding problem in order to constrain the parameter space of solutions sought, sidestepping the inverse problem altogether. These improvements are demonstrated with trial measurements and verified using accelerator-based time-of-flight calculation of reference spectra. Then, a demonstration is presented in which the elemental compositions of low-Z neutron-attenuating materials are estimated to within 10%. These techniques could have direct application in verifying the presence of high-explosive materials in a neutron-emitting test item, as well as other for treaty verification challenges.

  13. Optical readout for imaging neutron scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Richards, Roger K.; Maxey, L. Curt; Cooper, Ronald G.; Holcomb, David E.

    2002-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be the most important new neutron scattering facility in the United States. Neutron scattering instruments for the SNS will require large area detectors with fast response (LiF/ZnS(Ag) scintillator screen coupled to a wavelength-shifting fiber optic readout array. A 25 x 25 cm prototype detector is currently under development. Initial tests at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source at the Argonne National Laboratory have demonstrated good imaging properties coupled with very low gamma ray sensitivity. The response time of this detector is approximately 1 microsecond. Details of the design and test results of the detector will be presented.

  14. Supernova Neutrino Detection With Liquid Scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianni, Aldo, E-mail: aldo.ianni@lngs.infn.it [I.N.F.N. Gran Sasso Laboratory, S.S. 17bis, 67100, Assergi (Italy)

    2011-08-10

    Core collapse supernovae are a remarkable source of neutrinos. These neutrinos can also be detected by means of massive liquid scintillators located underground. Observations of supernova neutrinos can shed light on the explosion mechanism and on neutrino properties. In this paper we review the detection channels for neutrinos in liquid scintillators. We consider present and future experiments for supernova neutrino searches.

  15. Epoxy resins produce improved plastic scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, F. W.

    1967-01-01

    Plastic scintillator produced by the substitution of epoxy resins for the commonly used polystyrene is easy to cast, stable at room temperature, and has the desirable properties of a thermoset or cross-linked system. Such scintillators can be immersed directly in strong solvents, an advantage in many chemical and biological experiments.

  16. Study of polystyrene scintillators-WLS fiber elements and scintillating tile-WLS prototypes for New CHOD detector of CERN NA-62 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Semenov, Vitaliy; Gorin, Aleksandr; Khudyakov, Aleksey; Rykalin, Vladimir; Yushchenko, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    We measured the light output and the time resolution of few sets comprised of polystyrene scintillator and wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers as readout. The samples of different thickness (7-30 mm) have been made in the shape of bricks and plates with the areas of 25×80, 108×134 and 108×268 of mm2. In addition to samples of “ordinary” scintillator with additions of 2% p- Terphenyl + 0.05% POPOP, the rapid ultraviolet scintillator with single 2% additive PBD was tested. For the light collection WLS-fibers BCF92, Y11 and scintillation fiber SCSF-78M as reemitting were checked. The fibers were glued into the grooves on the front surface of scintillators. As the photo detectors silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) produced by CPTA (Russia) and SensL (Ireland) were used. It is shown that the dependence of light output on the thickness of scintillator is nonlinear and close to the square root function, which is also confirmed by the calculations carried out by Monte Carlo. The measured value of a light output make...

  17. NEXT GENERATION NEUTRON SCINTILLATORS BASED ON SEMICONDUCTOR NANOSTRUCTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai-Lin Wang

    2008-06-30

    The results reported here successfully demonstrate the technical feasibility of ZnS QDs/{sup 6}LiF/polymer composites as thermal neutron scintillators. PartTec has obtained stable ZnS QDs with a quantum yield of 17% induced by UV light, and light pulse decay lifetimes of 10-30 ns induced by both UV and neutrons. These lifetime values are much shorter than those of commercial ZnS microparticle and {sup 6}Li-glass scintillators. Clear pulse height peaks induced by neutron irradiation were seen for PartTec's ZnS nanocomposites. By adjusting the concentrations, particle size and degree of dispersion of ZnS QD/{sup 6}LiF in a PVA matrix, the light absorption and light yield of films at 420-440 nm can be optimized. PartTec's novel scintillators will replace traditional {sup 6}Li-glass and ZnS/{sup 6}LiF:Ag scintillators if the PL quantum yield can be improved above 30%, and/or increase the transparency of present nanoscintillators. Time and resources inhibited PartTec's total success in Phase I. For example, bulk doping preparations of ZnS QDs with Ag{sup +}, Eu{sup 3+} or Ce{sup 3+} QDs was impractical given those constraints, nor did they permit PartTec to measure systematically the change of PL decay lifetimes in different samples. PartTec will pursue these studies in the current proposal, as well as develop a better capping and dopant along with developing brighter and faster ZnS QD scintillators.

  18. Metal-loaded liquid scintillators for neutrino experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Minfang; Williamson, Yuping; Hahn, Richard L.

    2008-11-01

    After the first direct observation of neutrino flavor transformations at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, future planned neutrino experiments are focusing on the understanding of the neutrino oscillation mechanism by determining key neutrino parameters, such as the mass differences and mass hierarchy, the mixing angles, and the possibility of CP violation. Organic liquid scintillators (LS) have been the detection medium of choice for neutrinos since the early discovery experiment of Reines and Cowan. For the delayed neutron-capture signal following antineutrino capture, the advantages of adding a metallic element to the LS (to form M-LS) are significant. Chemically, there are challenges to adding inorganic salts of metal directly to the LS. Key aspects of the metal-loaded LS for neutrino detection are (a) long-term chemical stability, (b) high optical transparency, (c) high photon production by the LS, and (d) ultra-low impurity content, mainly of natural radioactive contaminants, such as U, Th, Ra, and Rn. The BNL Neutrino & Nuclear Chemistry group has a long history of neutrino research since Ray Davis's pioneering Homestake experiment. The group has developed new chemical techniques of loading metals, such as In, Yb, Gd, Nd, and currently Li and other low-Z elements, in organic liquid scintillator that can be used for low-energy solar neutrino, reactor antineutrino, terrestrial antineutrino or double-beta decay experiments. Metals at different concentrations in a series of liquid scintillators have been studied systematically at BNL. We have successfully prepared many metal-doped scintillators, with long attenuation lengths (10-15 m) and high light yields. These have been stable for long period of time since synthesis (>2 years for Gd-LS and Nd-LS, and >3 years for In-LS), a crucial characteristic in experiments that are planned to run for at least 3 years. Our chemical-doping technologies and the performance of different organometallic liquid scintillators for

  19. Response function study of a scintillator detector of NaI(Tl); Estudo da funcao resposta de um detector cintilador de NaI(Tl)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, Marcelo Barros; Costa, Alessandro Martins da, E-mail: amcosta@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica

    2014-07-01

    In measurements of gamma rays with Nai (Tl) scintillator, the detectors output data are pulse height spectra, that corresponding to distorted information about the radiation source due to various errors associated with the crystal scintillation process and electronics associated, instead of power spectra photons. Pulse height spectra are related to the real power spectra by means of scintillator detector response function NaI (Tl). In this work, the response function for a cylindrical crystal of Nal (Tl) of 7,62 x 7,62 cm (diameter x length) was studied, by Monte Carlo method, using the EGSnrc tool to model the transport of radiation, combined with experimental measurements. An inverse response matrix, even with the energy of the square root, which transforms the pulse height spectrum of photon energy spectrum was obtained. The results of this transformation of pulse height spectrum for photon energy spectrum is presented, showing that the methodology employed in this study is suitable.

  20. Brightness and uniformity measurements of plastic scintillator tiles at the CERN H2 test beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.

    2017-09-25

    We study the light output, light collection efficiency and signal timing of a variety of organic scintillators that are being considered for the upgrade of the hadronic calorimeter of the CMS detector. The experimental data are collected at the H2 test-beam area at CERN, using a 150 GeV muon beam. In particular, we investigate the usage of over-doped and green-emitting plastic scintillator, two solutions that have not been extensively considered. We present a study of the energy distribution in plastic-scintillator tiles, the hit efficiency as a function of the hit position, and a study of the signal timing for blue and green scintillators.

  1. SCALP: Scintillating ionization chamber for ALPha particle production in neutron induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhaut, B.; Durand, D.; Lecolley, F. R.; Ledoux, X.; Lehaut, G.; Manduci, L.; Mary, P.

    2017-09-01

    The SCALP collaboration has the ambition to build a scintillating ionization chamber in order to study and measure the cross section of the α-particle production in neutron induced reactions. More specifically on 16O and 19F targets. Using the deposited energy (ionization) and the time of flight measurement (scintillation) with a great accuracy, all the nuclear reaction taking part on this project will be identify.

  2. Optically read out GEM-based TPC operation and preliminary scintillation studies

    CERN Document Server

    Galgoczi, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this project was to realise the reconstruction of tracks in an optically read out GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) based Time Projection Chamber (TPC). Secondary goal was to initialise a series of systematic studies on the scintillation of particles in Ar/CF4 (80-20%) mixture. Track reconstruction is needed for primary scintillation studies as only tracks fully contained can be considered. A vetoing and trigerring logic was built for the TPC from NIM modules.

  3. Computation of ESR spectra from the time evolution of the magnetization: Comparison of autocorrelation and Wiener-Khinchin-relation-based methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, Hiroki; De Raedt, Hans; Bertaina, Sylvain; Miyashita, Seiji

    2015-12-01

    The calculation of finite temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra for concrete specified crystal configurations is a very important issue in the study of quantum spin systems. Although direct evaluation of the Kubo formula by means of numerical diagonalization yields exact results, memory and CPU time restrictions limit the applicability of this approach to small system sizes. Methods based on the time evolution of a single pure quantum state can be used to study larger systems. One such method exploits the property that the expectation value of the autocorrelation function obtained for a few samples of so-called thermal typical states yields a good estimate of the thermal equilibrium value. In this paper, we propose a new method based on a Wiener-Khinchin-like theorem for quantum system. By comparison with exact diagonalization results, it is shown that both methods yield correct results. As the Wiener-Khinchin-based method involves sampling over thermal typical states, we study the statistical properties of the sampling distribution. Effects due to finite observation time are investigated and found to differ for the two methods but it is also found that, for both methods, the effects vanish as the system size increases. We present ESR spectra of the one-dimensional XXZ Heisenberg chain of up to 28 spins and discuss the dependence of separation of double peaks on the chain length.

  4. Spectroscopic neutron detection using composite scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, I.; Foster, A.; Kukharev, V.; Mayer, M.; Meddeb, A.; Nattress, J.; Ounaies, Z.; Trivelpiece, C.

    2016-09-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM), especially highly enriched uranium, is exceptionally difficult to detect without the use of active interrogation (AI). We are investigating the potential use of low-dose active interrogation to realize simultaneous high-contrast imaging and photofission of SNM using energetic gamma-rays produced by low-energy nuclear reactions, such as 11B(d,nγ)12C and 12C(p,p‧)12C. Neutrons produced via fission are one reliable signature of the presence of SNM and are usually identified by their unique timing characteristics, such as the delayed neutron die-away. Fast neutron spectroscopy may provide additional useful discriminating characteristics for SNM detection. Spectroscopic measurements can be conducted by recoil-based or thermalization and capture-gated detectors; the latter may offer unique advantages since they facilitate low-statistics and event-by-event neutron energy measurements without spectrum unfolding. We describe the results of the development and characterization of a new type of capture-gated spectroscopic neutron detector based on a composite of scintillating polyvinyltoluene and lithium-doped scintillating glass in the form of millimeter-thick rods. The detector achieves >108 neutron-gamma discrimination resulting from its geometric properties and material selection. The design facilitates simultaneous pulse shape and pulse height discrimination, despite the fact that no materials intrinsically capable of pulse shape discrimination have been used to construct the detector. Accurate single-event measurements of neutron energy may be possible even when the energy is relatively low, such as with delayed fission neutrons. Simulation and preliminary measurements using the new composite detector are described, including those conducted using radioisotope sources and the low-dose active interrogation system based on low-energy nuclear reactions.

  5. Application of Time-Dependent Density Functional and Natural Bond Orbital Theories to the UV-vis Absorption Spectra of Some Phenolic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Svetlana; Tošović, Jelena

    2015-09-03

    The UV-vis properties of 22 natural phenolic compounds, comprising anthraquinones, neoflavonoids, and flavonoids were systematically examined. The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) approach in combination with the B3LYP, B3LYP-D2, B3P86, and M06-2X functionals was used to simulate the UV-vis spectra of the investigated compounds. It was shown that all methods exhibit very good (B3LYP slightly better) performance in reproducing the examined UV-vis spectra. However, the shapes of the Kohn-Sham molecular orbitals (MOs) involved in electronic transitions were misleading in constructing the MO correlation diagrams. To provide better understanding of redistribution of electron density upon excitation, the natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was applied. Bearing in mind the spatial and energetic separations, as well as the character of the π bonding, lone pair, and π* antibonding natural localized molecular orbitals (NLMOs), the "NLMO clusters" were constructed. NLMO cluster should be understood as a part of a molecule characterized with distinguished electron density. It was shown that all absorption bands including all electronic transitions need to be inspected to fully understand the UV-vis spectrum of a certain compound, and, thus, to learn more about its UV-vis light absorption. Our investigation showed that the TDDFT and NBO theories are complementary, as the results from the two approaches can be combined to interpret the UV-vis spectra. Agreement between the predictions of the TDDFT approach and those based on the NLMO clusters is excellent in the case of major electronic transitions and long wavelengths. It should be emphasized that the approach for investigation of UV-vis light absorption based on the NLMO clusters is applied for the first time.

  6. The Borexino experiment liquid scintillator purification and containment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalnoki-Veress, F; Galbiati, C; Goretti, A; Ianni, A; Pocar, A [Princeton University, Physics Department, Jadwin Hall, 08544, Princeton (NJ) (United States); Calaprice, F, E-mail: frankc@princeton.edu

    2008-07-15

    Borexino is a large volume, real-time, liquid scintillator detector located at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy. The principal objective of the detector is to measure mono energetic (862 keV) {sup 7}Be neutrinos from the sun present with a count rate of several tens of events per day. Measurement at this level requires an extremely low internal background due to natural radioactivity present in the detector components. In this paper the techniques used by Borexino to purify the scintillator and to build the nylon containment vessels are described. The unprecedented high radiopurity reached by Borexino permitted for the first time the realtime detection of {sup 7}Be neutrinos from the sun.

  7. Ce3+ activated LaBr3?xIx : High-light-yield and fast-response mixed halide scintillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birowosuto, M.D.; Dorenbos, P.; Krämer, K.W.; Güdel, H.U.

    2008-01-01

    Here, we report the scintillation properties of LaBr3?xIx:5%Ce3+ with four different compositions of x, i.e., x = 0.75, 1.5, 2, and 2.25. Radioluminescence spectra reveal a shift of the emission wavelength with the LaBr3 to LaI3 ratio. LaBr1.5I1.5:5%Ce3+ shows the highest scintillation light yield

  8. How to observe {sup 8}B solar neutrinos in liquid scintillator detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianni, A. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and INFN, I-67010 Assergi (Italy); Montanino, D. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Lecce and INFN, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)]. E-mail: daniele.montanino@unile.it; Villante, F.L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Ferrara and INFN, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2005-10-27

    We show that liquid organic scintillator detectors (e.g., KamLAND and Borexino) can measure the {sup 8}B solar neutrino flux by means of the {nu}{sub e} charged current interaction with the {sup 13}C nuclei naturally contained in the scintillators. The neutrino events can be identified by exploiting the time and space coincidence with the subsequent decay of the produced {sup 13}N nuclei. We perform a detailed analysis of the background in KamLAND, Borexino and in a possible liquid scintillator detector at SNOlab, showing that the {sup 8}B solar neutrino signal can be extracted with a reasonable uncertainty in a few years of data taking. KamLAND should be able to extract about 18 solar neutrino events from the already collected data. Prospects for gigantic scintillator detectors (such as LENA) are also studied.

  9. Time-Dependent Approach to Resonance Raman Spectra Including Duschinsky Rotation and Herzberg-Teller Effects: Formalism and Its Realistic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huili; Liu, Jie; Liang, WanZhen

    2012-11-13

    Efficient quantum dynamical and electronic structure approaches are presented to calculate resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) with inclusion of Herzberg-Teller (HT) contribution and mode-mixing (Duschinsky) effect. In the dynamical method, an analytical expression for RRS in the time domain is proposed to avoid summation over the large number of intermediate vibrational states. In the electronic structure calculations, the analytic energy-derivative approaches for the excited states within the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), developed by us, are adopted to overcome the computational bottleneck of excited-state gradient and Hessian calculations. In addition, an analytic calculation to the geometrical derivatives of the transition dipole moment, entering the HT term, is also adopted. The proposed approaches are implemented to calculate RR spectra of a few of conjugated systems, phenoxyl radical, 2-thiopyridone in water solution, and free-base porphyrin. The calculated RR spectra show the evident HT effect in those π-conjugated systems, and their relative intensities are consistent with experimental measurements.

  10. Scintillation particle detection based on microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, A; Renaud, P; Gorini, B; Trivino, N Vico; Jiguet, S; Vandelli, W; Haguenauer, M

    2010-01-01

    A novel type of particle detector based on scintillation, with precise spatial resolution and high radiation hardness, is being studied. It consists of a single microfluidic channel filled with a liquid scintillator and is designed to define an array of scintillating waveguides each independently coupled to a photodetector. Prototype detectors built using an SU-8 epoxy resin have been tested with electrons from a radioactive source. The experimental results show a light yield compatible with the theoretical expectations and confirm the validity of the approach. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Advanced plastic scintillators for fast neutron discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Patrick L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Anstey, Mitchell [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Doty, F. Patrick [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Mengesha, Wondwosen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The present work addresses the need for solid-state, fast neutron discriminating scintillators that possess higher light yields and faster decay kinetics than existing organic scintillators. These respective attributes are of critical importance for improving the gamma-rejection capabilities and increasing the neutron discrimination performance under high-rate conditions. Two key applications that will benefit from these improvements include large-volume passive detection scenarios as well as active interrogation search for special nuclear materials. Molecular design principles were employed throughout this work, resulting in synthetically tailored materials that possess the targeted scintillation properties.

  12. Capture-gated Spectroscopic Measurements of Monoenergetic Neutrons with a Composite Scintillation Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nattress, Jason; Mayer, M.; Foster, A.; Barhoumi Meddeb, A.; Trivelpiece, C.; Ounaies, Z.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-04-01

    Abstract—We report on the measurements of Monoenergetic neutrons from DD and DT fusion reactions by use of the capture gating method in a heterogeneous plastic-glass composite scintillation detector. The cylindrical detector is 5.08 cm in diameter and 5.05 cm in height and was fabricated using 1-mm diameter Li-doped glass rods(GS20) and scintillating polyvinyl toluene (EJ-290). Different scintillation decay constants are used to identify energy depositions in two materials constituting the composite scintillator. Geant4 simulations of the neutron thermalization and capture process were conducted, finding a mean capture time of approximately 2.6 ms for both DD and DT neutrons. A capture gating time acceptance window based on simulation results was used to identify the neutron thermalization pulses. The total scintillation light yield produced in neutron thermalization was measured and found to show consistency on event-by-event basis despite the variety of neutron thermalization histories prior to capture. The ratio of light yields from thermalization of 14.1 MeV and 2.45 MeV neutrons in the EJ-290 scintillator was determined to be 14.6, and the light output from 2.45 MeV neutrons was also correlated to its electron equivalent, obtaining a value of 0.58*0.05 MeVee.

  13. Tailored pump-probe transient spectroscopy with time-dependent density-functional theory: controlling absorption spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkenhorst, Jessica; De Giovannini, Umberto; Castro, Alberto; Rubio, Angel

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in laser technology allow us to follow electronic motion at its natural time-scale with ultra-fast time resolution, leading the way towards attosecond physics experiments of extreme precision. In this work, we assess the use of tailored pumps in order to enhance (or reduce) some given features of the probe absorption (for example, absorption in the visible range of otherwise transparent samples). This type of manipulation of the system response could be helpful for its full characterization, since it would allow us to visualize transitions that are dark when using unshaped pulses. In order to investigate these possibilities, we perform first a theoretical analysis of the non-equilibrium response function in this context, aided by one simple numerical model of the hydrogen atom. Then, we proceed to investigate the feasibility of using time-dependent density-functional theory as a means to implement, theoretically, this absorption-optimization idea, for more complex atoms or molecules. We conclude that the proposed idea could in principle be brought to the laboratory: tailored pump pulses can excite systems into light-absorbing states. However, we also highlight the severe numerical and theoretical difficulties posed by the problem: large-scale non-equilibrium quantum dynamics are cumbersome, even with TDDFT, and the shortcomings of state-of-the-art TDDFT functionals may still be serious for these out-of-equilibrium situations.

  14. Performance evaluation of two SiPMs arrays coupled to pixelated scintillations for PET/MR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiou, Maria [Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Athens (Greece); Szczesniak, Tomasz; Grodzicka, Martyna [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), Swierk (Poland); Fysikopoulos, Eleftherios; Loudos, George [Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2015-05-18

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the behavior of the new generation of SensL SiPM arrays, ArrayB and ArrayM, for PET/MR applications. The evaluation of the SiPMs performance underwent with pixelated GaGG and BGO scintillators with 2x2x5 mm{sup 3} pixel size and various coupling schemes for 511keV and 662keV energies. To acquire raw images, we used a symmetric resistive voltage division network and the 4x4 SiPMs anodes reduced to 2X and 2Y position signals. A FPGA Spartan 6 LX150T was used for triggering and digital processing of the pulses acquired using free running ADCs. The first step of our work was optimization of the bias voltage of the two SiPM arrays. The optimal bias voltage is a tradeoff between high photon detection efficiency and low excess noise factor. The SiPMs were coupled to homogeneous 16x16x10 mm{sup 3} CsITl scintillator and irradiated with {sup 137}Cs source. The energy resolution calculated in overvoltages between 26.5V and 30.5V for ArrayB and between 28.3V and 31.3V for ArrayM. The bias voltage with the best energy resolution was used for the evaluation of the SiPMs. The clear visualization of the GaGG and BGO crystal elements is expressed quantitatively by the mean peak-valley ratio of a horizontal profile in the raw images. The best optical coupling for the BGO was 2 mm thick glass. In the case of the GaGG 1 mm thick glass was adequate. The mean energy resolution of the GaGG scintillator is about two times better than the BGO for both type of SiPMs, after applying correction for their non-linear response. The low light output of the BGO scintillator in comparison with the GaGG as well as different emission spectra and the different PDE of the two types of SiPMs explain the differences in the behavior of the tested SiPMs arrays.

  15. Luminescence properties of B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–GeO{sub 2}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} scintillating glass doped with rare-earth and transition-metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin-Yuan, E-mail: sxy5306@126.com [Department of Physics, Jinggangshan University, Ji’an 343009 (China); Jiang, Da-Guo; Wang, Wen-Feng; Cao, Chun-Yan; Li, Yu-Nong; Zhen, Guo-Tai [Department of Physics, Jinggangshan University, Ji’an 343009 (China); Wang, Hong; Yang, Xin-Xin; Chen, Hao-Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Jun [Key Laboratory of Transparent Opto-functional Inorganic Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhao, Jing-Tai, E-mail: jtzhao@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Transparent Opto-functional Inorganic Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2013-07-11

    Novel B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–GeO{sub 2}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} ternary scintillating glasses doped with 1 mol% rare-earth and transition-metal activators were synthesized by melt-quenching method. Their transmittance, photoluminescence (PL) and X-ray excited luminescence (XEL) spectra were investigated. The results suggest that a high content of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} is of significance for designing dense glass with density of 6.0 g/cm{sup 3}. And energy transfer from Gd{sup 3+} to the incorporated activators can be realized in the borogermanate glasses. The emission position and decay time can be efficiently tuned by incorporating various kinds of activators. All results imply the developed borogermanate scintillating glass is potential for scintillating fields. -- Highlights: • Glass-forming region of B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–GeO{sub 2}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} ternary system are determined. • Radioluminescence response from transition-metal doped B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–GeO{sub 2}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses. • Radioluminescence response from rare-earth doped B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–GeO{sub 2}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses. • Emission peak position and decay time can be tuneable by incorporating various activators.

  16. Neutron induced radiation damage of plastic scintillators for the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdhluli, J. E.; Jivan, H.; Erasmus, R.; Davydov, Yu I.; Baranov, V.; Mthembu, S.; Mellado, B.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Solovyanov, O.; Sandrock, C.; Peter, G.; Tlou, S.; Khanye, N.; Tjale, B.

    2017-07-01

    With the prediction that the plastic scintillators in the gap region of the Tile Calorimeter will sustain a significantly large amount of radiation damage during the HL-LHC run time, the current plastic scintillators will need to be replaced during the phase 2 upgrade in 2018. The scintillators in the gap region were exposed to a radiation environment of up to 10 kGy/year during the first run of data taking and with the luminosity being increased by a factor of 10, the radiation environment will be extremely harsh. We report on the radiation damage to the optical properties of plastic scintillators following irradiation using a neutron beam of the IBR-2 pulsed reactor in Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna. A comparison is drawn between polyvinyl toluene based commercial scintillators EJ200, EJ208 and EJ260 as well as polystyrene based scintillator from Kharkov. The samples were subjected to irradiation with high energy neutrons and a flux density range of 1 × 106-7.7 × 106. Light transmission, Raman spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and light yield testing was performed to characterize the damage induced in the samples. Preliminary results from the tests done indicate a minute change in the optical properties of the scintillators with further studies underway to gain a better understanding of the interaction between neutrons with plastic scintillators.

  17. Energy spectra of helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and iron from 1990 through 2010 at daily averaged time resolution: A new product and implications derived therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manweiler, J. W.; Patterson, J. D.; Armstrong, T. P.

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of a survey of energy spectra of protons, helium, carbon, oxygen, and iron for the rising phase of the current solar cycle through 1 July 2011 derived from the Advanced Composition Explorer EPAM and for the entire Ulysses mission spanning from late 1990 to mission-end in mid-2009 using two parameter composition aperture pulse height analyzer measurements for energies of about .3 to 10 MeV/nucleon. Examples will be shown of typical events as well as long term quiet interplanetary fluxes. This data set has been posted on the Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory and is available at Fundamental Technologies website (www.ftecs.com). We will describe the calibration procedures and comparisons with other observations at different spatial locations and energies. We have created daily-averaged 12-point energy spectra for helium, carbon, oxygen, neon, silicon, and iron. The data are in clear-text, comma separated ASCII files that can easily be ingested into most visualization software, custom code, or spreadsheet program. Each year's data file contains within its header a description of the various bins for the different ion species including upper and lower energy thresholds and the geometric factor for the C and D detectors at the base of the CA60 telescope on HISCALE. Each data record contains the year, the day of year, the duty cycle corrected accumulation time, and the number of counts for the day and flux for each of 12 energy channels for each of the six ion species. Having the raw counts for each day permits users to create averages over any number of days desired. One can easily create an average spectra for an event or CIR that is several days in duration. For periods in which the fluency is low, having the raw counts and the energy thresholds also permits one to integrate in energy as well and easily render six or four-point energy spectra when counts are low enough to pose statistical problems. We present several examples of situations

  18. Dosimetry in clinical static magnetic fields using plastic scintillation detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefanowicz, S.; Latzel, H.; Lindvold, Lars René

    2013-01-01

    To further improve the accuracy of dose delivery to the patient, several projects are pursuing the integration of linear accelerators with magnetic resonance imaging systems. Generally, this is conceived as the next generation of image-guided radiotherapy. For technical and physical reason it is......, however, not clear yet how dosimetry will be conducted as standard methods and might not be easily transferred to systems with clinical magnetic fields. For dosimetry in MRI accelerators, we have tested plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) coupled to optical fibers. They are suitable for real-time and in......-vivo dosimetry in radiation treatments and diagnostics and could be, being all-optical, promising candidates for this application. To study the basic feasibility of using PSDs with organic scintillators in magnetic fields, we measured the response of these dosimeters in presence of magnetic fields up to 1 T...

  19. Spectroscopic Investigations with Dual Neutron-Gamma Scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, P.; Brown, T.; Doucet, E.; Lister, C. J.; Morse, C.; Rogers, A. M.; Wilson, G. L.; Devlin, M.; Fotiades, N.; Gomez, J. A.; Mosby, S.

    2017-09-01

    The spectroscopic capabilities of 7Li-enriched Cs27LiYCl6 (C7LYC) dual neutron-gamma scintillators are being tested in diverse application arenas to exploit the excellent pulse-shape discrimination together with the unprecedented pulse height resolution ( 10%) for fast neutrons in the accelerator at the UMass Lowell Radiation Laboratory. Tests of waveform digitizers with different sampling rates are also being performed. A key goal is to evaluate whether the low intrinsic efficiency of C7LYC for fast neutrons compared to traditional neutron detectors, such as liquid scintillators, can be effectively offset by the gain in solid angle obtained by positioning the detectors much closer to the target, since the typical long time-of-flight arms for energy resolution are not necessary. Supported by the NNSA Stewardship Science Academic Alliance Program under Grant DE-NA0002932.

  20. THE VERY YOUNG TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2013dy: DISCOVERY, AND STRONG CARBON ABSORPTION IN EARLY-TIME SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, WeiKang; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Nugent, Peter E.; Graham, Melissa; Kelly, Patrick L.; Fox, Ori D.; Shivvers, Isaac; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Li, Weidong [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Howie Marion, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Kasen, Daniel [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Wang, Xiaofeng [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Valenti, Stefano; Howell, D. Andrew [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Ciabattari, Fabrizio [Monte Agliale Observatory, Borgo a Mozzano, Lucca, I-55023 Italy (Italy); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Balam, Dave [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Hsiao, Eric [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Sand, David, E-mail: zwk@astro.berkeley.edu [Physics Department, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); and others

    2013-11-20

    The Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2013dy in NGC 7250 (d ≈ 13.7 Mpc) was discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search. Combined with a prediscovery detection by the Italian Supernova Search Project, we are able to constrain the first-light time of SN 2013dy to be only 0.10 ± 0.05 days (2.4 ± 1.2 hr) before the first detection. This makes SN 2013dy the earliest known detection of an SN Ia. We infer an upper limit on the radius of the progenitor star of R {sub 0} ≲ 0.25 R {sub ☉}, consistent with that of a white dwarf. The light curve exhibits a broken power law with exponents of 0.88 and then 1.80. A spectrum taken 1.63 days after first light reveals a C II absorption line comparable in strength to Si II. This is the strongest C II feature ever detected in a normal SN Ia, suggesting that the progenitor star had significant unburned material. The C II line in SN 2013dy weakens rapidly and is undetected in a spectrum 7 days later, indicating that C II is detectable for only a very short time in some SNe Ia. SN 2013dy reached a B-band maximum of M{sub B} = –18.72 ± 0.03 mag ∼17.7 days after first light.

  1. Galactic cosmic-ray energy spectra and expected solar events at the time of future space missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimani, C; Fabi, M [Dipartimento MFI, Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , Urbino (Italy); Araujo, H M; Shaul, D N A; Sumner, T J; Wass, P [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Lobo, A; Mateos, I, E-mail: catia.grimani@uniurb.it [Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-05-07

    Galactic cosmic-rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) affect observations on board long-lived space missions. We developed a parameterization of proton and helium fluxes for various levels of solar modulation during opposite polarity periods. In addition to long-term variations (decades), short-term fluctuations (minutes to days) were considered as well. In particular, we focused on data from experiments carrying magnetic spectrometers in space. The shortest GCR variations we were able to study are of the order of hours. We point out that GCR variations and fluctuations are strongly energy dependent. The detector charging onboard space experiments is also energy dependent. The measurements of energy differential fluxes and their variations are needed in order to evaluate properly the performance of future space missions. We present here the projections for the GCR fluxes and solar events at the time of LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) Pathfinder (LISA-PF).

  2. GEM scintillation readout with avalanche photodiodes

    CERN Document Server

    Conceição, A S; Fernandes, L M P; Monteiro, C M B; Coelho, L C C; Azevedo, C D R; Veloso, J F C A; Lopesac, J A M; dos Santosa, J M F

    2007-01-01

    The use of the scintillation produced in the charge avalanches in GEM holes as signal amplification and readout is investigated for xenon. A VUV-sensitive avalanche photodiode has been used as photosensor. Detector gains of about 4 × 104 are achieved in scintillation readout mode, for GEM voltages of 490 V and for a photosensor gain of 150. Those gains are more than one order of magnitude larger than what is obtained using charge readout. In addition, the energy resolutions achieved with the scintillation readout are lower than those achieved with charge readout. The GEM scintillation yield in xenon was measured as a function of GEM voltage, presenting values that are about a half of those achieved for the charge yield, and reach about 730 photons per primary electron at GEM voltages of 490 V.

  3. CALICE scintillator hadron calorimeter prototype commissioning and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . J CVACH. Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2,. 182 21 Prague, Czech Republic. E-mail: cvach@fzu.cz. Abstract. First experience with construction and positron beam tests of a scintillator.

  4. Polysulfone as a scintillation material without doped fluorescent molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hidehito, E-mail: hidehito@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, 2, Asashiro-Nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kitamura, Hisashi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Sato, Nobuhiro; Kanayama, Masaya [Kyoto University, 2, Asashiro-Nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki [Kobe University, 1-1, Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Takahashi, Sentaro [Kyoto University, 2, Asashiro-Nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2015-10-11

    Scintillation materials made from un-doped aromatic ring polymers can be potentially used for radiation detection. Here we demonstrate that Polysulfone (PSU) works without doped fluorescent guest molecules, and thus broadens the choices available for radiation detection. The transparent PSU substrate (1.24 g/cm{sup 3}) significantly absorbs short-wavelength light below approximately 350 nm. Visible light absorption colours the substrate slightly yellow, and indigo blue fluorescence is emitted. The fluorescence maximum occurs at the intersection of the 340-nm excitation and 380-nm emission spectra; thus the emission is partially absorbed by the substrate. An effective refractive index of 1.70 is derived based on the wavelength dependence of the refractive indices and the emission spectrum. A peak caused by 976-keV internal-conversion electrons from a {sup 207}Bi radioactive source appears in the light yield distribution. The light yield is equivalent to that of poly (phenyl sulfone), which has a similar structure. Overall, un-doped PSU could be a component substrate in polymer blends and be used as an educational tool in radiation detection. - Highlights: • Polysulfone (PSU) is a scintillation material that does not require doping. • PSU is slightly yellow. • Indigo blue light with 380-nm emission maximum is emitted. • An effective refractive index of 1.70 was derived. • A peak caused by mono-energetic internal-conversion electrons appears in the light yield distribution.

  5. Scintillation and luminescence in transparent colorless single and polycrystalline bulk ceramic ZnS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S.; Bliss, Mary; Miller, Brian W.; Wang, Zheming; Stave, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    ZnS:Ag is a well-known extremely bright scintillator used in powder form for α-particle detection and, mixed with powdered LiF, for thermal neutron detection. Recently, we discovered some commercial bulk colorless and transparent, single-crystal and polycrystalline (chemical vapor-deposited) ZnS forms that scintillate in response to α-particles. The scintillation light transmits through the sample thickness (mm), challenging the commonly held assumption that ZnS is opaque to its own scintillation light. Individual α-particle events were imaged in space and time using a charged-particle camera originally developed for medical imaging applications. Photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation show that scintillating bulk ZnS likely depends on different electronic defects than commercial ZnS powder scintillators. These defects, associated with copper and oxygen, are discussed in relation to PL results and extensive literature assessment. Commercial transparent ZnS is routinely produced by chemical vapor deposition to sizes larger than square meters, enabling potentially novel radiation detection applications requiring large, thick apertures.

  6. Spectrometric characteristics of polystyrene scintillation films

    CERN Document Server

    Astvatsaturov, A R; Gavalyan, V B; Gavalyan, V G

    1999-01-01

    The spectrometric characteristics of five types of polystyrene scintillation films with thicknesses of 10, 30, 50 and 80 mu m and of analogous 250 mu m thick plates irradiated with sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 Pu and sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra sources of alpha-particles have been studied. The prospects of utilization of scintillation films as radiators for detection of heavy charged particles and measurement of their energy was experimentally shown.

  7. A new technique for infrared scintillation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiossi, F., E-mail: federico.chiossi@studenti.unipd.it [Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, University of Padua, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Brylew, K. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Borghesani, A.F. [CNISM Unit and Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia, University of Padua, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Braggio, C.; Carugno, G. [Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, University of Padua, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Drozdowski, W. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Guarise, M. [Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, University of Padua, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2017-05-21

    We propose a new technique to measure the infrared scintillation light yield of rare earth doped crystals by comparing it to near UV–visible scintillation of a calibrated Pr:(Lu{sub 0.75}Y{sub 0.25}){sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} sample. As an example, we apply this technique to provide the light yield in visible and infrared range up to 1700 nm of this crystal.

  8. Theoretical Time Dependent Thermal Neutron Spectra and Reaction Rates in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, S.N.

    1966-04-15

    The early theoretical and experimental time dependent neutron thermalization studies were limited to the study of the transient spectrum in the diffusion period. The recent experimental measurements of the time dependent thermal neutron spectra and reaction rates, for a number of moderators, have generated considerable interest in the study of the time dependent Boltzmann equation. In this paper we present detailed results for the time dependent spectra and the reaction rates for resonance detectors using several scattering models of H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O. This study has been undertaken in order to interpret the integral time dependent neutron thermalization experiments in liquid moderators which have been performed at the AB Atomenergi. The proton gas and the deuteron gas models are inadequate to explain the measured reaction rates in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O. The bound models of Nelkin for H{sub 2}O and of Butler for D{sub 2}O give much better agreement with the experimental results than the gas models. Nevertheless, some disagreement between theoretical and experimental results still persists. This study also indicates that the bound model of Butler and the effective mass 3. 6 gas model of Brown and St. John give almost identical reaction rates. It is also surprising to note that the calculated reaction rate for Cd for the Butler model appears to be in better agreement with the experimental results of D{sub 2}O than of the Nelkin model with H{sub 2}O experiments. The present reaction rate studies are sensitive enough so as to distinguish between the gas model and the bound model of a moderator. However, to investigate the details of a scattering law (such as the effect of the hindered rotations in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O and the weights of different dynamical modes) with the help of these studies would require further theoretical as well as experimental investigations. Theoretical results can be further improved by improving the source for thermal neutrons, the

  9. Time dependent density functional study of the absorption spectra of 1,3-benzoxazole and three substituted benzoxazole in gas phase and liquid phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasquilla, Rafael J; Neira, Oscar L, E-mail: rjcarrasquilla@yahoo.com [Grupo de Espectroscopia Optica y Laser, Universidad Popular del Cesar, Valledupar (Colombia)

    2011-01-01

    Time dependent density functional (TD-DFT) calculations were performed on 1,3-benzoxazole and substituted benzoxazoles using the B3LYP functional and the 6-31+G(d) basis sets. The geometry of the S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} singlet ground and excited states were optimized in gas phase, toluene and methanol using B3LYP/6-31+G(d) y CIS/6-31+G(d) methods, respectively, and the vertical {pi} {yields} {pi}{sup *} absorption largest wavelength transitions were determined. Several global molecular descriptors were considered such as the hardness, chemical potential, electronegativity and the dipole moment for each molecule and was determined the influence that has, about the values of these descriptors, the alteration of the main molecular chain of an initial structure (1,3 not substituted Benzoxazole). Generally, the predicted spectra are in agreement with the experimental data.

  10. X-ray detection capabilities of plastic scintillators incorporated with hafnium oxide nanoparticles surface-modified with phenyl propionic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyama, Fumiyuki; Noguchi, Takio; Koshimizu, Masanori; Kishimoto, Shunji; Haruki, Rie; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Aida, Tsutomu; Takami, Seiichi; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Asai, Keisuke

    2018-01-01

    We synthesized plastic scintillators incorporated with HfO2 nanoparticles as detectors for X-ray synchrotron radiation. Nanoparticles with sizes of less than 10 nm were synthesized with the subcritical hydrothermal method. The detection efficiency of high-energy X-ray photons improved by up to 3.3 times because of the addition of the nanoparticles. Nanosecond time resolution was successfully achieved for all the scintillators. These results indicate that this method is applicable for the preparation of plastic scintillators to detect X-ray synchrotron radiation.

  11. The magnetized steel and scintillator calorimeters of the MINOS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael, : D.G.

    2008-05-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment uses an accelerator-produced neutrino beam to perform precision measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters in the 'atmospheric neutrino' sector associated with muon neutrino disappearance. This long-baseline experiment measures neutrino interactions in Fermilab's NuMI neutrino beam with a near detector at Fermilab and again 735 km downstream with a far detector in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. The two detectors are magnetized steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. They are designed to be as similar as possible in order to ensure that differences in detector response have minimal impact on the comparisons of event rates, energy spectra and topologies that are essential to MINOS measurements of oscillation parameters. The design, construction, calibration and performance of the far and near detectors are described in this paper.

  12. Solution growth and scintillation properties of 9-phenylcarbazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loef, Edgar V.; Markosyan, Gary; Shirwadkar, Urmila; McClish, Mickel; Shah, Kanai S.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we report on the crystal growth and characterization of 9-phenylcarbazole (PCz). Crystals of PCz were obtained by the solution growth technique. Several organic solvents were investigated including heptane, cyclohexane, toluene, xylene, methanol, ethanol, and acetone. The largest crystals of the highest quality were grown from acetone. Radioluminescence spectra of pure PCz crystals exhibit a broad emission band peaking at 381 nm. Adding a small amount of an impurity (dopant) shifts the emission wavelength to 446 nm which is a better match to standard bialkali photomultiplier tubes. Single crystals of pure PCz have low light yields (typically cut-off energy. As far as we are aware, doped PCz is one of the brightest organic single crystal scintillators in existence and is a very promising organic neutron detector for a multitude of applications including homeland security, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear physics, and non-destructive testing.

  13. URANIUM DETECTION USING SMALL SCINTILLATORS IN A MARITIME ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, K; Donna Beals, D; Ken Odell, K

    2006-05-12

    The performance of several commercially available portable radiation spectrometers containing small NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors has been studied at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). These hand-held radioisotope identifiers are used by field personnel to detect and identify the illegal transport of uranium as a deterrent to undeclared nuclear proliferation or nuclear terrorism. The detection of uranium in a variety of chemical forms and isotopic enrichments presents some unique challenges in the maritime environment. This study was conducted using a variety of shielded and unshielded uranium sources in a simulated maritime environment. The results include estimates of the detection sensitivity for various isotopic enrichments and configurations using the manufacturer's spectral analysis firmware. More sophisticated methods for analyzing the spectra off-line are also evaluated to determine the detection limits and enrichment sensitivities from the field measurements.

  14. Digital silicon photomultiplier readout of a new fast and bright scintillation crystal (Ce:GFAG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong-Seok [Department of Bio-convergence Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Leem, Hyun-Tae [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yamamoto, Seiichi [Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi@sogang.ac.kr [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kamada, Kei [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); C& A corporation, Sendai (Japan); Yoshikawa, Akira [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); C& A corporation, Sendai (Japan); Institute for Material Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Park, Sang-Geon [Department of Electrical & Electronics, Silla University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Jung-Yeol, E-mail: jungyeol@korea.ac.kr [Department of Bio-convergence Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); School of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-01

    A new Gadolinium Fine Aluminum Gallate (Ce:GFAG) scintillation crystal with both high energy resolution and fast timing properties has successfully been grown. Compared to Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12} (Ce:GAGG), this new inorganic scintillation crystal has a high luminosity similar to and a faster decay time. In this paper, we report on the timing and energy performance results of the new GFAG scintillation crystal read out with digital silicon photomultipliers (dSiPM) for positron emission tomography (PET) application. The best coincidence resolving time (FWHM) of polished 3×3×5 mm{sup 3} crystals was 223±6 ps for GFAG crystals compared to 396±28 ps for GAGG crystals and 131±3 ps for LYSO crystals respectively. An energy resolution (511 keV peak of Na-22) of 10.9±0.2% was attained with GFAG coupled to dSiPM after correcting for saturation effect, compared to 9.5±0.3% for Ce:GAGG crystals and 11.9±0.4% for LYSO crystals respectively. It is expected that this new scintillator may be competitive in terms of overall properties such as energy resolution, timing resolution and growing (raw material) cost, compared to existing scintillators for positron emission tomography (PET).

  15. Basic performance of Mg co-doped new scintillator used for TOF-DOI-PET systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Takahiro, E-mail: kobayashi.takahiro@a.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Daiyukai General Hospital (Japan); Yamamoto, Seiichi; Okumura, Satoshi [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Yeom, Jung Yeol [School of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kamada, Kei; Yoshikawa, Akira [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University (Japan)

    2017-01-11

    Phoswich depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors utilizing multiple scintillators with different decay time are a useful device for developing a high spatial resolution, high sensitivity PET scanner. However, in order to apply pulse shape discrimination (PSD), there are not many combinations of scintillators for which phoswich technique can be implemented. Ce doped Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 12} (GFAG) is a recently developed scintillator with a fast decay time. This scintillator is similar to Ce doped Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12} (GAGG), which is a promising scintillator for PET detector with high light yield. By stacking these scintillators, it may be possible to realize a high spatial resolution and high timing resolution phoswich DOI detector. Such phoswich DOI detector may be applied to time-of-flight (TOF) systems with high timing performance. Therefore, in this study, we tested the basic performance of the new scintillator –GFAG for use in a TOF phoswich detector. The measured decay time of a GFAG element of 2.9 mmx2.9 mmx10 mm in dimension, which was optically coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT), was faster (66 ns) than that of same sized GAGG (103 ns). The energy resolution of the GFAG element was 5.7% FWHM which was slightly worse than that of GAGG with 4.9% FWHM for 662 keV gamma photons without saturation correction. Then we assembled the GFAG and the GAGG crystals in the depth direction to form a 20 mm long phoswich element (GFAG/GAGG). By pulse shape analysis, the two types of scintillators were clearly resolved. Measured timing resolution of a pair of opposing GFAG/GAGG phoswich scintillator coupled to Silicon Photomultipliers (Si-PM) was good with coincidence resolving time of 466 ps FWHM. These results indicate that the GFAG combined with GAGG can be a candidate for TOF-DOI-PET systems.

  16. Conference on Engineering of Scintillation Materials and Radiation Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Gektin, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    This volume provides a broad overview of the latest achievements in scintillator development, from theory to applications, and aiming for a deeper understanding of fundamental processes, as well as the discovery and availability of components for the production of new generations of scintillation materials. It includes papers on the microtheory of scintillation and the initial phase of luminescence development, applications of the various materials, and development and characterization of ionizing radiation detection equipment. The book also touches upon the increased demand for cryogenic scintillators, the renaissance of  garnet materials for scintillator applications, nano-structuring in scintillator development, development and applications for security, and exploration of hydrocarbons and ecological monitoring.

  17. Simultaneous in-situ real-time measurements of X-ray reflectivity and optical spectra of organic semiconductor thin film during growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokai, Takuya; Gerlach, Alexander; Hinderhofer, Alexander; Frank, Christian; Heinemeyer, Ute; Schreiber, Frank [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The relation between optical and structural properties of organic semiconductors in thin films is crucial for their fundamental understanding as well as their application in electronic devices. Here we present first results of simultaneous in-situ real-time measurements of X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and differential reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) of perfluorinated copper phthalocyanine (F{sub 16}CuPc) thin films grown on SiO{sub 2}/Si wafers. Using DRS we determine the optical absorption spectra of the thin films starting from monolayer coverage whereas real-time XRR provides structural information about the film growth. After a rapid decrease of the reflectivity in the monolayer regime we observe intensity oscillations in time at constant q{sub z} with a strong damping. By calibrating film thickness d(t), we found oscillation period of 1.45 nm at 1/2q Bragg, which correspond to the lattice spacing of standing F{sub 16}CuPc molecules. This behaviour is characteristic for layer-growth with a finite roughness. In the monolayer regime the DRS signal shows a broad absorption peak at {proportional_to}2.0 eV, while for coverages of more than one monolayer an additional and relatively sharp peak appears at {proportional_to}1.6 eV. These results indicate that the film structure in the monolayer regime is different from the layer-growth regime.

  18. Vibrational Spectra of β″-Type BEDT-TTF Salts: Relationship between Conducting Property, Time-Averaged Site Charge and Inter-Molecular Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yamamoto

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the conducting behavior and the degree of charge fluctuation in the β″-type BEDT-TTF salts is reviewed from the standpoints of vibrational spectroscopy and crystal structure. A group of β″-type ET salts demonstrates the best model compounds for achieving the above relationship because the two-dimensional structure is simple and great diversity in conducting behavior is realized under ambient pressure. After describing the requirement for the model compound, the methodology for analyzing the results of the vibrational spectra is presented. Vibrational spectroscopy provides the time-averaged molecular charge, the charge distribution in the two-dimensional layer, and the inter-molecular interactions, etc. The experimental results applied to 2/3-filled and 3/4-filled β″-type ET salts are reported. These experimental results suggest that the conducting property, the difference in the time-averaged molecular charges between the ionic and neutral-like sites, the alternation in the inter-molecular distances and the energy levels in the charge distributions are relevant to one another. The difference in the time-averaged molecular charges, ∆ρ, is a useful criterion for indicating conducting behavior. All superconductors presented in this review are characterized as small but finite ∆ρ.

  19. Comparative evaluation of single crystal scintillators under x-ray imaging conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valais, I G; David, S; Michail, C [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, 265 00 Patras (Greece); Nomicos, C D [Department of Electronics, Technological Educational Institution of Athens, Ag. Spyridonos, Egaleo, 122 10 Athens (Greece); Panayiotakis, G S; Kandarakis, I S [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institution of Athens, Ag. Spyridonos, Egaleo, 122 10 Athens (Greece)], E-mail: kandarakis@teiath.gr

    2009-06-15

    The present study is a comparative investigation of the luminescence properties of (Lu,Y){sub 2}SiO{sub 5}: Ce (LYSO: Ce), YAlO{sub 3}: Ce (YAP: Ce), Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}: Ce (GSO: Ce) and (Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12}) BGO single crystal scintillators under x-ray excitation. Results will be of value in designing dual modality tomographic systems (PET/CT, SPECT/CT) based on a common scintillator crystal. All scintillating crystals have dimensions of 10 x 10 x 10 cm{sup 3} are non-hygroscopic exhibiting high radiation absorption efficiency in the energy range used in medical imaging applications. The comparative investigation was performed by determining the x-ray luminescence efficiency (emitted light flux over incident x-ray energy flux) in the range of x-ray energies employed in: (i) general x-ray imaging (40-140 kV, using a W/Al x-ray spectrum) and (ii) x-ray mammography imaging (22-49 kV, using a Mo/Mo x-ray spectrum). Additionally, light emission spectra of crystals at various x-ray energies were measured, in order to determine the intrinsic conversion efficiency and the spectral compatibility to optical photon detectors incorporated in medical imaging systems. The light emission performance of LYSO:Ce scintillator studied was found very high for x-ray imaging.

  20. The Borexino Solar Neutrino Experiment: Scintillator purification and surface contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Michael

    The Borexino Solar Neutrino Experiment will observe the monoenergetic (862 keV) 7Be neutrinos, produced in the solar reaction 7Be+e- →7 Li+nue. These neutrinos are the second most abundant species of solar neutrinos, with an expected flux at earth of 5 x 109/cm2/s. Using nu - e scattering in an aromatic liquid scintillator, Borexino will make the first real time measurement of the solar neutrino flux at energies less than 1 MeV. In addition to checking Standard Solar Model and neutrino oscillation predictions at low energies, Borexino will test the MSW vacuum-matter transition, luminosity constraint, and non-standard theories such as mass varying neutrinos. The Borexino detector will also be sensitive to supernova neutrinos, geoneutrinos, reactor neutrinos, and pep solar neutrinos. The pep measurement will tightly constrain the primary pp solar neutrino flux whose energy is below the Borexino threshold. With an expected rate of 35 events per day from solar 7Be neutrinos, the maximum tolerable background rate is one count per day. Removal of radioactive isotopes from the liquid scintillator is essential for the experiment's success and will be achieved with purification techniques including filtration, distillation, water extraction, nitrogen stripping, and silica gel adsorption. Results from small-scale purification efficiency tests are presented. Water extraction showed moderate but inadequate removal of 210Po which is a dominant background. Distillation reduced 210Po by a factor of more than 500. Online purification involves cycling over 300 m3 of scintillator from the detector though the purification plants. Flow patterns within the detector that influence the purification efficiency were determined with numerical simulations. Poor flow in the prototype Counting Test Facility showed effectively stagnant volumes within the detector. These are not present in the larger Borexino detector. Surface contamination in Borexino arises primarily from contact with

  1. GPS Observations of Plasma Bubbles and Scintillations over Equatorial Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrano, C. S.; Valladares, C. E.; Semala, G. K.; Bridgwood, C. T.; Adeniyi, J.; Amaeshi, L. L.; Damtie, B.; D'Ujanga Mutonyi, F.; Ndeda, J. D.; Baki, P.; Obrou, O. K.; Okere, B.; Tsidu, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    Sponsored in part by the International Heliophysical Year (IHY) program, Boston College, Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), and several universities in Africa have collaborated to deploy a network of GPS receivers throughout equatorial Africa, a region which has been largely devoid of ground-based ionospheric monitoring instruments. High date-rate GPS receivers capable of measuring Total Electron Content (TEC) and GPS scintillations were installed at Abidjan, Ivory Coast (5.3°N, 4.0°W, dip 3.5°S); Addis Ababa (9.0°N, 38.8°E, dip 0.1°N ); Bahir Dar, Ethiopia (26.1°N, 50.6°E, dip 20.1°N); Cape Verde (16.6°S, 22.9°W, dip 4.9°N); Ilorin, Nigeria (8.4°S, 4.7°E, dip 1.9°S); Kampala, Uganda (0.3°S, 32.6°E, dip 9.2°S); Lagos, Nigeria (6.5°N, 3.4°E, dip 3.1°S); Nairobi, Kenya (1.3°S, 36.8°W, dip 10.7°S); Nsukka, Nigeria (6.8°S, 7.4°W, dip 3.0°S); and Zanzibar, Tanzania (6.2°S, 39.2°E, dip 15.9°S). In this paper we report on the longitudinal, local time and seasonal occurrence of plasma bubbles and L band scintillations over equatorial Africa in 2009 and 2010, as a first step toward establishing the climatology of ionospheric irregularities over Africa. The scintillation intensity is obtained by measuring the standard deviation of normalized GPS signal power. The plasma bubbles are detected using an automated technique, whereby the GPS TEC is detrended to remove the diurnal variation and excursions exceeding a particular threshold are extracted for further analysis. A harmonic analysis (FFT) of these extracted events is performed to exclude wavelike features indicative of gravity waves or traveling ionospheric disturbances, and the remaining events are identified as plasma bubbles. Our findings suggest that the occurrence of plasma bubbles and L band scintillations over Africa are well correlated, but that some discrepancies in their morphologies are evident. While plasma bubbles and scintillations are generally observed during equinoctial

  2. Effect of solar and magnetic activity on VHF scintillations near the equatorial anomaly crest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Singh

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The VHF amplitude scintillation recorded during the period January 1991 to December 1993 in the declining phase of a solar cycle and April 1998 to December 1999 in the ascending phase of the next solar cycle at Varanasi (geogr. lat.=25.3°, long.=83.0°, dip=37°N have been analyzed to study the behavior of ionospheric irregularities during active solar periods and magnetic storms. It is shown that irregularities occur at arbitrary times and may last for <30min. A rise in solar activity increases scintillations during winter (November-February and near equinoxes (March-April; September-October, whereas it depresses the scintillations during the summer (May-July. In general, the role of magnetic activity is to suppress scintillations in the pre-midnight period and to increase it in the post-midnight period during equinox and winter seasons, whilst during summer months the effect is reversed. The pre-midnight scintillation is sometimes observed when the main phase of Dst corresponds to the pre-midnight period. The annual variation shows suppression of scintillations on disturbed days, both during pre-midnight and post-midnight period, which becomes more effective during years of high solar activity. It is observed that for magnetic storms for which the recovery phase starts post-midnight, the probability of occurrence of irregularities is enhanced during this time. If the magnetic storm occurred during daytime, then the probability of occurrence of scintillations during the night hours is decreased. The penetration of magnetospheric electric fields to the magnetic equator affects the evolution of low-latitude irregularities. A delayed disturbance dynamo electric field also affects the development of irregularities.

  3. Addendum to: Modelling duality between bound and resonant meson spectra by means of free quantum motions on the de Sitter space-time dS4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchbach, M.; Compean, C. B.

    2017-04-01

    In the article under discussion the analysis of the spectra of the unflavored mesons lead us to some intriguing insights into the possible geometry of space-time outside the causal Minkowski light cone and into the nature of strong interactions. In applying the potential theory concept of geometrization of interactions, we showed that the meson masses are best described by a confining potential composed by the centrifugal barrier on the three-dimensional spherical space, S3, and of a charge-dipole potential constructed from the Green function to the S3 Laplacian. The dipole potential emerged in view of the fact that S3 does not support single-charges without violation of the Gauss theorem and the superposition principle, thus providing a natural stage for the description of the general phenomenon of confined charge-neutral systems. However, in the original article we did not relate the charge-dipoles on S3 to the color neutral mesons, and did not express the magnitude of the confining dipole potential in terms of the strong coupling αS and the number of colors, Nc, the subject of the addendum. To the amount S3 can be thought of as the unique closed space-like geodesic of a four-dimensional de Sitter space-time, dS4, we hypothesized the space-like region outside the causal Einsteinian light cone (it describes virtual processes, among them interactions) as the (1+4)-dimensional subspace of the conformal (2+4) space-time, foliated with dS4 hyperboloids, and in this way assumed relevance of dS4 special relativity for strong interaction processes. The potential designed in this way predicted meson spectra of conformal degeneracy patterns, and in accord with the experimental observations. We now extract the αs values in the infrared from data on meson masses. The results obtained are compatible with the αs estimates provided by other approaches.

  4. Addendum to: Modelling duality between bound and resonant meson spectra by means of free quantum motions on the de Sitter space-time dS{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchbach, M. [Instituto de Fisica, UASLP, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Compean, C.B. [Instituto Tecnologico de San Luis Potosi, Soledad de Graciano Sanchez (Mexico)

    2017-04-15

    In the article under discussion the analysis of the spectra of the unflavored mesons lead us to some intriguing insights into the possible geometry of space-time outside the causal Minkowski light cone and into the nature of strong interactions. In applying the potential theory concept of geometrization of interactions, we showed that the meson masses are best described by a confining potential composed by the centrifugal barrier on the three-dimensional spherical space, S{sup 3}, and of a charge-dipole potential constructed from the Green function to the S{sup 3} Laplacian. The dipole potential emerged in view of the fact that S{sup 3} does not support single-charges without violation of the Gauss theorem and the superposition principle, thus providing a natural stage for the description of the general phenomenon of confined charge-neutral systems. However, in the original article we did not relate the charge-dipoles on S{sup 3} to the color neutral mesons, and did not express the magnitude of the confining dipole potential in terms of the strong coupling α{sub S} and the number of colors, N{sub c}, the subject of the addendum. To the amount S{sup 3} can be thought of as the unique closed space-like geodesic of a four-dimensional de Sitter space-time, dS{sub 4}, we hypothesized the space-like region outside the causal Einsteinian light cone (it describes virtual processes, among them interactions) as the (1+4)-dimensional subspace of the conformal (2+4) space-time, foliated with dS{sub 4} special relativity for strong interaction processes. The potential designed in this way predicted meson spectra of conformal degeneracy patterns, and in accord with the experimental observations. We now extract the α{sub s} values in the infrared from data on meson masses. The results obtained are compatible with the α{sub s} estimates provided by other approaches. (orig.)

  5. Low-latitude scintillation occurrences around the equatorial anomaly crest over Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Abadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated low-latitude ionospheric scintillation in Indonesia using two GPS receivers installed at Bandung (107.6° E, 6.9° S; magnetic latitude 17.5° S and Pontianak (109.3° E, 0.02° S; magnetic latitude 8.9° S. This study aimed to characterise climatological and directional ionospheric scintillation occurrences, which are useful not only for the physics of ionospheric irregularities but also for practical use in GNSS (global navigation satellite system-based navigation. We used the deployed instrument's amplitude scintillation (S4 index data from 2009, 2010, and 2011; the yearly SSN (sunspot-smoothed numbers were 3.1, 16.5, and 55.9, respectively. In summary, (1 scintillation occurrences in the post-sunset period (18:00–01:00 LT during equinox months (plasma bubble season at the two sites can be ascribed to the plasma bubble; (2 using directional analyses of the two sites, we found that the distribution of scintillation occurrences is generally concentrated between the two sites, indicating the average location of the EIA (equatorial ionisation anomaly crest; (3 scintillation occurrence enhancements for the two sites in field-aligned directions are herein reported for the first time by ground-based observation in a low-latitude region; (4 distribution of scintillation occurrences at Pontianak are concentrated in the southern sky, especially in the southwest direction, which is very likely associated with the plasma bubble tilted westward with increasing latitude; and (5 scintillation occurrence in the post-midnight period in the non-plasma-bubble season is the most intriguing variable occurring between the two sites (i.e. post-midnight scintillations are observed more at Bandung than Pontianak. Most of the post-midnight scintillations observed at Bandung are concentrated in the northern sky, with low elevation angles. This might be due to the amplitude of irregularities in certain directions, which may be effectively enhanced by

  6. Optimization of screening for radioactivity in urine by liquid scintillation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanks, Sonoya Toyoko; Reese, Robert P.; Preston, Rose T. (Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-08-01

    Numerous events have or could have resulted in the inadvertent uptake of radionuclides by fairly large populations. Should a population receive an uptake, valuable information could be obtained by using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) techniques to quickly screen urine from a sample of the affected population. This study investigates such LSC parameters as discrimination, quench, volume, and count time to yield guidelines for analyzing urine in an emergency situation. Through analyzing variations of the volume and their relationships to the minimum detectable activity (MDA), the optimum ratio of sample size to scintillating chemical cocktail was found to be 1:3. Using this optimum volume size, the alpha MDA varied from 2100 pCi/L for a 30-second count time to 35 pCi/L for a 1000-minute count time. The typical count time used by the Sandia National Laboratories Radiation Protection Sample Diagnostics program is 30 minutes, which yields an alpha MDA of 200 pCi/L. Because MDA is inversely proportional to the square root of the count time, count time can be reduced in an emergency situation to achieve the desired MDA or response time. Note that approximately 25% of the response time is used to prepare the samples and complete the associated paperwork. It was also found that if the nuclide of interest is an unknown, pregenerated discriminator settings and efficiency calibrations can be used to produce an activity value within a factor of two, which is acceptable for a screening method.

  7. Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2011-01-01

    Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons in 'Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Subsection '3.1.1 Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons' of Section '3.1 Charged Particle Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.1.1 Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons 3.1.1.1 Basic detector principles and scintillator requirements 3.1.1.1.1 Interaction of ionizing radiation with scintillator material 3.1.1.1.2 Important scint...

  8. Measurement of neutron spectra in a silicon filtered neutron beam using stilbene detectors at the LVR-15 research reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košťál, Michal; Šoltés, Jaroslav; Viererbl, Ladislav; Matěj, Zdeněk; Cvachovec, František; Rypar, Vojtěch; Losa, Evžen

    2017-10-01

    A well-defined neutron spectrum is an essential tool for calibration and tests of spectrometry and dosimetry detectors, and evaluation methods for spectra processing. Many of the nowadays used neutron standards are calibrated against a fission spectrum which has a rather smooth energy dependence. In recent time, at the LVR-15 research reactor in Rez, an alternative approach was tested for the needs of fast neutron spectrometry detector calibration. This process comprises detector tests in a neutron beam, filtered by one meter of single-crystalline silicon, which contains several significant peaks in the fast neutron energy range. Tests in such neutron field can possibly reveal specific problems in the deconvolution matrix of the detection system, which may stay hidden in fields with a smooth structure and can provide a tool for a proper energy calibration. Test with several stilbene scintillator crystals in two different beam configurations supplemented by Monte-Carlo transport calculations have been carried out. The results have shown a high level of agreement between the experimental data and simulation, proving thus the accuracy of used deconvolution matrix. The chosen approach can, thus, provide a well-defined neutron reference field with a peaked structure for further tests of spectra evaluation methods and scintillation detector energy calibration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A large-scale low-background liquid scintillation detector: the counting test facility at Gran Sasso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimonti, G.; Arpesella, C.; Bacchiocchi, G.; Balata, M.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bonetti, S.; Brigatti, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F. P.; Cavaletti, R.; Cecchet, G.; Chen, M.; Darnton, N.; Debari, A.; Deutsch, M.; Elisei, F.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Galbiati, C.; Garagiola, A.; Gatti, F.; Giammarchi, M. G.; Giugni, D.; Goldbrunner, T.; Golubchikov, A.; Goretti, A.; Grabar, S.; Hagner, T.; Hartmann, F.; von Hentig, R.; Heusser, G.; Ianni, A.; Jochum, J.; Johnson, M.; Laubenstein, M.; Loeser, F.; Lombardi, P.; Magni, S.; Malvezzi, S.; Manno, I.; Manuzio, G.; Masetti, F.; Mazzucato, U.; Meroni, E.; Neff, M.; Nisi, S.; Nostro, A.; Oberauer, L.; Perotti, A.; Preda, A.; Raghavan, P.; Raghavan, R. S.; Ranucci, G.; Resconi, E.; Ruscitti, P.; Scardaoni, R.; Schoenert, S.; Smirnov, O.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Ullucci, P.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Vitale, S.; Zaimidoroga, O.

    1998-02-01

    A 4.8 m3 unsegmented liquid scintillation detector at the underground Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso has shown the feasibility of multi-ton low-background detectors operating to energies as low as 250 keV. Detector construction and the handling of large volumes of liquid scintillator to minimize the background are described. The scintillator, 1.5 g PPO/L-pseudocumene, is held in a flexible nylon vessel shielded by 1000 t of purified water. The active detector volume is viewed by 100 photomultipliers, which measure time and charge for each event, from which energy, position and pulse shape are deduced. On-line purification of the scintillator by water extraction, vacuum distillation and nitrogen stripping removed radioactive impurities. Upper limits were established of < 10-7 Bq/kg-scintillator for events with energies 250 keV < E < 800 keV, and < 10-9 Bq/kg-scintillator due to the decay products of uranium and thorium. The isotopic abundance of 14C/12C in the scintillator was shown to be approximately 10-18 by extending the energy window of the detector to 25-250 keV. The 14C abundance and uranium and thorium levels in the CTF are compatible with the Borexino Solar Neutrino Experiment.

  10. Isotopic response with small scintillator based gamma-ray spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Norman W [Sparks, NV; Goulding, Frederick S [Lafayette, CA; Asztalos, Stephen J [Oakland, CA

    2012-01-24

    The intrinsic background of a gamma ray spectrometer is significantly reduced by surrounding the scintillator with a second scintillator. This second (external) scintillator surrounds the first scintillator and has an opening of approximately the same diameter as the smaller central scintillator in the forward direction. The second scintillator is selected to have a higher atomic number, and thus has a larger probability for a Compton scattering interaction than within the inner region. Scattering events that are essentially simultaneous in coincidence to the first and second scintillators, from an electronics perspective, are precluded electronically from the data stream. Thus, only gamma-rays that are wholly contained in the smaller central scintillator are used for analytic purposes.

  11. Measurement of α-particle quenching in LAB based scintillator in independent small-scale experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krosigk, B. von [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Chen, M.; Liu, X.; Wright, A. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Hans, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Bronx Community College, Bronx, NY (United States); Junghans, A.R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Koegler, T. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kraus, C. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON (Canada); Kuckert, L. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Nolte, R. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); O' Keeffe, H.M. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Lancaster University, Physics Department, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Tseung, H.W.C. [University of Washington, Department of Physics, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, Seattle, WA (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rochester, MN (United States); Wilson, J.R. [Queen Mary, University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom); Yeh, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Zuber, K. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    The α-particle light response of liquid scintillators based on linear alkylbenzene (LAB) has been measured with three different experimental approaches. In the first approach, α-particles were produced in the scintillator via {sup 12}C(n,α){sup 9}Be reactions. In the second approach, the scintillator was loaded with 2 % of {sup nat}Sm providing an α-emitter, {sup 147}Sm, as an internal source. In the third approach, a scintillator flask was deployed into the water-filled SNO+ detector and the radioactive contaminants {sup 222}Rn, {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po provided the α-particle signal. The behavior of the observed α-particle light outputs are in agreement with each case successfully described by Birks' law. The resulting Birks parameter kB ranges from (0.0066 ± 0.0016) to (0.0076 ± 0.0003) cm/MeV. In the first approach, the α-particle light response was measured simultaneously with the light response of recoil protons produced via neutron- proton elastic scattering. This enabled a first time a direct comparison of kB describing the proton and the α-particle response of LAB based scintillator. The observed kB values describing the two light response functions deviate by more than 5σ. The presented results are valuable for all current and future detectors, using LAB based scintillator as target, since they depend on an accurate knowledge of the scintillator response to different particles. (orig.)

  12. Hybrid scintillators for x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Clifford; Rairden, Richard L.; Betz, Robert A.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this effort is to improve x-ray absorption and light production while maintaining high spatial resolution in x-ray imaging phosphor screens. Our current target is to improve screen absorption efficiency and screen brightness by factors of 2 or greater over existing screens that have 10-1p/mm resolution. In this program, commercial phosphor screens are combined with highly absorbing, high-resolution scintillating fiber-optic (SFO) face plates to provide a hybrid sensor that exhibits superior spatial resolution, x-ray absorption, and brightness values over the phosphor material alone. These characteristics of hybrid scintillators can be adjusted to meet specific x-ray imaging requirements over a wide range of x-ray energy. This paper discusses the design, fabrication, and testing of a new series of hybrid scintillators.

  13. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Maoddi, Pietro; Mapelli, Alessandro

    This thesis deals with the development and study of microfluidic scintillation detectors, a technology of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles. Most of the interest for such devices comes from the use of a liquid scintillator, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to increased radiation resistance. A first part of the thesis focuses on the work performed in terms of design and modelling studies of novel prototype devices, hinting to new possibilities and applications. In this framework, the simulations performed to validate selected designs and the main technological choices made in view of their fabrication are addressed. The second part of this thesis deals with the microfabrication of several prototype devices. Two different materials were studied for the manufacturing of microfluidic scintillation detectors, namely the SU-8 photosensitive epoxy and monocrystalline silicon. For what concerns the former, an original fabrication appro...

  14. Scintillation light from cosmic-ray muons in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittington, Denver Wade [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Physics Dept.; Mufson, S. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Astronomy Dept.; Howard, B. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Physics Dept.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a physically-motivated model. Both models find tT = 1:52 ms for the decay time constant of the Ar 2 triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the “early” light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value 0.3 found by dark matter and double b-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  15. Latitudinal extension of low-latitude scintillations measured with a network of GPS receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Valladares

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A latitudinal-distributed network of GPS receivers has been operating within Colombia, Peru and Chile with sufficient latitudinal span to measure the absolute total electron content (TEC at both crests of the equatorial anomaly. The network also provides the latitudinal extension of GPS scintillations and TEC depletions. The GPS-based information has been supplemented with density profiles collected with the Jicamarca digisonde and JULIA power maps to investigate the background conditions of the nighttime ionosphere that prevail during the formation and the persistence of plasma depletions. This paper presents case-study events in which the latitudinal extension of GPS scintillations, the maximum latitude of TEC depletion detections, and the altitude extension of radar plumes are correlated with the location and extension of the equatorial anomaly. Then it shows the combined statistics of GPS scintillations, TEC depletions, TEC latitudinal profiles, and bottomside density profiles collected between September 2001 and June 2002. It is demonstrated that multiple sights of TEC depletions from different stations can be used to estimate the drift of the background plasma, the tilt of the plasma plumes, and in some cases even the approximate time and location of the depletion onset. This study corroborates the fact that TEC depletions and radar plumes coincide with intense levels of GPS scintillations. Bottomside radar traces do not seem to be associated with GPS scintillations. It is demonstrated that scintillations/depletions can occur when the TEC latitude profiles are symmetric, asymmetric or highly asymmetric; this is during the absence of one crest. Comparison of the location of the northern crest of the equatorial anomaly and the maximum latitude of scintillations reveals that for 90% of the days, scintillations are confined within the boundaries of the 50% decay limit of the anomaly crests. The crests of the anomaly are the regions where the

  16. Method to analyze spectra and set alerts on environmental gamma spectrometry measurements in real time; Metodo para analizar espectros y establecer alertas tempranas en medidas de espectrometria gamma ambiental en tiempo real

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto, E.; Salvado, M.; Casanova, R.

    2013-07-01

    This work describes a method of analysis to extract information radiation from gamma spectra obtained during short time intervals. Therefore, method allows to carry out an analysis of data in real time, which in turn, ensures that an early warning system can be established. (Author)

  17. Bayesian model-emulation of stochastic gravitational-wave spectra for probes of the final-parsec problem with pulsar-timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephen; Simon, Joseph; Sampson, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The final parsec of supermassive black-hole binary evolution is subject to the complex interplay of stellar loss-cone scattering, circumbinary disk accretion, and gravitational-wave emission, with binary eccentricity affected by all of these. The strain spectrum of gravitational-waves in the pulsar-timing band thus encodes rich information about the binary population's response to these various environmental mechanisms. Current spectral models have heretofore followed basic analytic prescriptions, and attempt to investigate these final-parsec mechanisms in an indirect fashion. Here we describe a new technique to directly probe the environmental properties of supermassive black-hole binaries through ``Bayesian model-emulation''. We perform black-hole binary population synthesis simulations at a restricted set of environmental parameter combinations, compute the strain spectra from these, then train a Gaussian process to learn the shape of spectrum at any point in parameter space. We describe this technique, demonstrate its efficacy with a program of simulated datasets, then illustrate its power by directly constraining final-parsec physics in a Bayesian analysis of the NANOGrav 5-year dataset. The technique is fast, flexible, and robust.

  18. LaCl{sub 3}:Ce scintillator for Gamma ray detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, K.S.; Glodo, J.; Klugerman, M.; Cirignano, L.; Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Weber, M.J.

    2002-05-25

    In this paper, we report on a relatively new cerium doped scintillator - LaCl3 for gamma ray spectroscopy. Crystals of this scintillator have been grown using Bridgman method. This material when doped with 10 percent cerium has high light output ({approx} 50,000 photons/MeV) and fast principal decay time constant ({approx}20 ns). Furthermore, it shows excellent energy resolution for gamma ray detection. For example, energy resolution as low as 3.2 percent (FWHM) has been achieved with 662 keV photons (137Cs source) at room temperature. Also high timing resolution (264 ps - FWHM) has been recorded with LaCl3-PMT and BaF2-PMT detectors operating in coincidence using 511 keV positron annihilation gamma ray pairs. Details of crystal growth, scintillation properties, and variation of these properties with cerium concentration are also reported.

  19. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, T. [Fermilab; Escobar, C. O. [Campinas State U.; Lippincott, W. H. [Fermilab; Rubinov, P. [Fermilab

    2016-03-03

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 $\\mu$m < $\\lambda$; < 1.5$\\mu$m). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  20. Evaluation of various planar gaseous detectors with Cs1 photocathodes for the detection of primary scintillation light from noble gases

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Carlson, Per J; Iacobaeus, C; Francke, T; Pavlopoulos, N; Pietropaoplo, F; Sokolova, T; Picchi, P

    2003-01-01

    Noble gases and liquids are excellent scintillators and this opens a unique opportunity to directly detect the primary scintillation light produced in these media by photons or particles. This signal can be used for several purposes, for example as a start signal for TPCs or for particle's identification. Usually photomultipliers (PMs) are used for the detection of the scintillation light. In our previous work we have demonstrated that costly PMs could be replaced by gaseous detectors with CsI photocathodes. Such detectors have the same quantum efficiency as the best PMs but at the same time are cheap, simple and have high position and time resolutions. The aim of this work is to evaluate various planar type gaseous detectors with CsI photocathodes in order to choose the best one for the detection of the primary scintillation light from noble gases and liquids. (10 refs).

  1. Brightness and uniformity measurements of plastic scintillator tiles at the CERN H2 test beam arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00165402; Sirunyan, A.M.; Tumasyan, A.; Litomin, A.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Alves, G.A.; Aldá Júnior, W.L.; Hensel, C.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W.L.; Tonelli Manganote, E.J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Kveton, A.; Tomsa, J.; Adamov, G.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Campbell, A.; Costanza, F.; Gunnellini, P.; Lobanov, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Muhl, C.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M.; Saxena, P.; Hegde, V.; Kothekar, K.; Pandey, S.; Sharma, S.; Beri, S.B.; Bhawandeep, B.; Chawla, R.; Kalsi, A.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Walia, G.; Bhattacharya, S.; Ghosh, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Sharan, M.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Das, P.; Guchait, M.; Jain, S.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Patil, M.; Sarkar, T.; Juodagalvis, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Ershov, Y.; Golutvin, I.; Malakhov, A.; Moisenz, P.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Chadeeva, M.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Popova, E.; Rusinov, V.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Karneyeu, A.; Krasnikov, N.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Toms, M.; Zhokin, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kaminskiy, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Terkulov, A.; Bitioukov, S.; Elumakhov, D.; Kalinin, A.; Krychkine, V.; Mandrik, P.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Troshin, S.; Volkov, A.; Sekmen, S.; Medvedeva, T.; Rumerio, P.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, N.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z.S.; Dölek, F.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E.E.; Kara, O.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Işik, C.; Kiminsu, U.; Oglakci, M.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Turkcapar, S.; Zorbakir, I.S.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Murat Guler, A.; Ocalan, K.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Atakisi, I.O.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Koseyan, O.K.; Ozcelik, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Tekten, S.; Yetkin, E.A.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Boyarintsev, A.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Popov, V.; Sorokin, P.; Flacher, H.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Buccilli, A.; Cooper, S.I.; Henderson, C.; West, C.; Arcaro, D.; Gastler, D.; Hazen, E.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Wu, S.; Zou, D.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Kwok, K.H.M.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Yu, D.R.; Gary, J.W.; Ghiasi Shirazi, S.M.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O.R.; Wei, H.; Bhandari, R.; Heller, R.; Stuart, D.; Yoo, J.H.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Lawhorn, J.M.; Nguyen, T.; Spiropulu, M.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Apresyan, A.; Apyan, A.; Banerjee, S.; Chlebana, F.; Freeman, J.; Green, D.; Hare, D.; Hirschauer, J.; Joshi, U.; Lincoln, D.; Los, S.; Pedro, K.; Spalding, W.J.; Strobbe, N.; Tkaczyk, S.; Whitbeck, A.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Bertoldi, M.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Kolberg, T.; Baarmand, M.M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Debbins, P.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R.P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Miller, M.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Schmidt, I.; Snyder, C.; Southwick, D.; Tiras, E.; Yi, K.; Al-bataineh, A.; Bowen, J.; Castle, J.; McBrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Wang, Q.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L.K.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calderon, J.D.; Eno, S.C.; Feng, Y.B.; Ferraioli, C.; Grassi, T.; N.J.Hadley, G-Y Jeng; Kellogg, R.G.; Kunkle, J.; Mignerey, A.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y.H.; Skuja, A.; Yang, Z.S.; Yao, Y.; Brandt, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; Hu, M.; Klute, M.; Niu, X.; Chatterjee, R.M.; Evans, A.; Frahm, E.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Heering, A.; Karmgard, D.J.; Musienko, Y.; Ruchti, R.; Wayne, M.; Benaglia, A.D.; Mei, K.; Tully, C.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K.H.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Agapitos, A.; Amouzegar, M.; Chou, J.P.; Hughes, E.; Saka, H.; Sheffield, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dudero, P.R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S.W.; Libeiro, T.; Mengke, T.; Muthumuni, S.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Goadhouse, S.; Hirosky, R.; Wang, Y.

    We study the light output, light collection efficiency and signal timing of a variety of organic scintillators that are being considered for the upgrade of the hadronic calorimeter of the CMS detector. The experimental data are collected at the H2 test-beam area at CERN, using a 150 GeV muon beam. In particular, we investigate the usage of over-doped and green-emitting plastic scintillator, two solutions that have not been extensively considered. We present a study of the energy distribution in plastic-scintillator tiles, the hit efficiency as a function of the hit position, and a study of the signal timing for blue and green scintillators.

  2. Upconverting nanoparticles for optimizing scintillator based detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kross, Brian; McKisson, John E; McKisson, John; Weisenberger, Andrew; Xi, Wenze; Zom, Carl

    2013-09-17

    An upconverting device for a scintillation detection system is provided. The detection system comprises a scintillator material, a sensor, a light transmission path between the scintillator material and the sensor, and a plurality of upconverting nanoparticles particles positioned in the light transmission path.

  3. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scintillation (gamma) camera. 892.1100 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1100 Scintillation (gamma) camera. (a) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in...

  4. Spectroscopic study of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene for liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xiang, E-mail: xiangzhou@whu.edu.cn [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, 430072, Wuhan (China); Liu, Qian, E-mail: liuqian@ucas.ac.cn [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049, Beijing (China); Han, Junbo [Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074, Wuhan (China); Zhang, Zhenyu [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, 430072, Wuhan (China); Zhang, Xuan; Ding, Yayun [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049, Beijing (China); Zheng, Yangheng [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049, Beijing (China); Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun; Wang, Yifang [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049, Beijing (China)

    2015-11-21

    We have set up a light scattering spectrometer to study the depolarization of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene. The scattering spectra show that the depolarized part of light scattering is due to Rayleigh scattering. The additional depolarized Rayleigh scattering can make the effective transparency of linear alkylbenzene much better than expected. Therefore, sufficient scintillation photons can transmit through large liquid scintillator detector, such as that of the JUNO experiment. Our study is crucial to achieving an unprecedented energy resolution of 3 %/√(E(MeV)) required for the JUNO experiment to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The spectroscopic method can also be used to examine the depolarization of other organic solvents used in neutrino experiments.

  5. Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials FY 2013 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Xie, YuLong; Wu, Dangxin; Prange, Micah P.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Campbell, Luke W.; Wang, Zhiguo

    2013-10-01

    This annual report presents work carried out during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials” (Project number: PL13-SciDriScintMat-PD05) and led by Dr. Fei Gao. This project is divided into three tasks, namely (1) Ab initio calculations of electronic properties, electronic response functions and secondary particle spectra; (2) Intrinsic response properties, theoretical light yield, and microscopic description of ionization tracks; and (3) Kinetics and efficiency of scintillation: nonlinearity, intrinsic energy resolution, and pulse shape discrimination. Detailed information on the findings and insights obtained in each of these three tasks are provided in this report. Additionally, papers published this fiscal year or currently in review are included in Appendix together with presentations given this fiscal year.

  6. FLUKA studies of hadron-irradiated scintillating crystals for calorimetry at the High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Quittnat, Milena Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    Calorimetry at the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will be performed in a harsh radiation environment with high hadron fluences. The upgraded CMS electromagnetic calorimeter design and suitable scintillating materials are a focus of current research. In this paper, first results using the Monte Carlo simulation program FLUKA are compared to measurements performed with proton-irradiated LYSO, YSO and cerium fluoride crystals. Based on these results, an extrapolation to the behavior of an electromagnetic sampling calorimeter, using one of the inorganic scintillators above as an active medium, is performed for the upgraded CMS experiment at the HL-LHC. Characteristic parameters such as the induced ambient dose, fluence spectra for different particle types and the residual nuclei are studied, and the suitability of these materials for a future calorimeter is surveyed. Particular attention is given to the creation of isotopes in an LYSO-tungsten calorimeter that might contribute a prohibitive background to the measu...

  7. High-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, C J; Radha, P B; Glebov, V Yu; Goncharov, V N; Knauer, J P; Pruyne, A; Romanofsky, M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C; Casey, D T; Gatu-Johnson, M; Gardner, S

    2012-10-01

    The areal density (ρR) of cryogenic DT implosions on Omega is inferred by measuring the spectrum of neutrons that elastically scatter off the dense deuterium (D) and tritium (T) fuel. Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) techniques are used to measure the energy spectrum with high resolution. High signal-to-background data has been recorded on cryogenic DT implosions using a well-collimated 13.4-m line of sight and an nTOF detector with an advanced liquid scintillator compound. An innovative method to analyze the elastically scattered neutron spectra was developed using well-known cross sections of the DT nuclear reactions. The estimated areal densities are consistent with alternative ρR measurements and 1-D simulations.

  8. Tests of Scintillator+WLS Strips for Muon System at Future Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, Dmitri [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Evdokimov, Valery [Inst. for High Energy Physics (IHEP), Protvino (Russian Federation); Lukić, Strahinja [Univ. of Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-10-11

    Prototype scintilator+WLS strips with SiPM readout for muon system at future colliders were tested for light yield, time resolution and position resolution. Depending on the configuration, light yield of up to 36 photoelectrons per muon per SiPM has been achieved, as well as time resolution of 0.5 ns and position resolution of ~ 7 cm.

  9. A mathematical formalism for hyperspectral, multipoint plastic scintillation detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, Louis; Therriault-Proulx, François; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-11-07

    The aim of this paper is to generalize and extend the mathematical formalism used with plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs). By doing so, we show the feasibility of multi-point PSD. The new formalism is based on the sole hypothesis that a PSD optical signal is a linear superposition of spectra. Two calibration scenarios were developed. Both involve solving a linear equation of the form Y = XB, but the process and input data depend on the information available on the detector system. Simulations were carried out to validate both scenarios and demonstrate the advantages of the new formalism. In this paper, we prove the following results. (1) Multi-point PSDs are feasible. Simulations have shown that six different spectra could be resolved accurately even in the presence of up to 10% Gaussian noise. (2) The new formalism leads to more precise PSD measurements. (3) By using the condition number of the measurement matrix, the ideal sets of calibration measurements can be identified. (4) By using principal component analysis it was possible to identify the best set of wavelength filters. We have shown through numerical simulations that multi-point detectors are feasible. This has potential for applications such as in vivo dose verification. Furthermore, our new formalism can be used to improve the robustness and ease of use of PSDs.

  10. The IFIN-HH triple coincidence liquid scintillation counter

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Razdolescu, AC

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available rubidium oscillator. The rubidium clock allows the traceability of the measurement to time units. 5. The RC POLATOM TDCR system The RC POLATOM TDCR system (Chylin´ski et al., 2003) is very similar to that of the LNHB. It consists of a detection head... for the 3 PM liquid scintillation counter. Nucl. Instrum. Methods A312, 95–99. Chylin´ski, A., Broda, R., Radoszewski, T., 2003. The national standard unit of radionuclide activity and the related standards in Poland. Nukleonika 48 (1), 51–55. Meyer, B...

  11. Scintillating fibre detector for the Mu3e experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravar, S.; Corrodi, S.; Damyanova, A.; Grab, C.; Gredig, R.; Papa, A.; Rutar, G.

    2017-07-01

    Mu3e is a dedicated experiment to search for the rare lepton flavour violating decay μ+ → e+e-e+. Its ultimate goal is to find or exclude this process with a sensitivity of one in 1016 muon decays. This constitutes four orders of magnitude improvement with respect to the current state-of-the art. A thin multi-layer scintillating fibre detector consisting of 250μm fibres read out on both sides with silicon photomultiplier arrays provides an excellent time measurement with σconcept, including the dedicated readout chip MuTRiG, is presented.

  12. The Seeding tracking algorithm for a scintillating detector at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Amhis, Y; De Cian, M; Nikodem, T; Polci, F

    2014-01-01

    The project of the LHCb upgraded detector foreseens the presence of a Scintillating Fiber Tracker (SciFi). This note describes the algorithm used for reconstructing standalone tracks in the SciFi, called $Seeding$. This algorithm is crucial for reconstructing tracks generated by long lived particles such as $K^0_s$. The main performances on simulated samples for running conditions expected in future data taking after the upgrade, namely a luminosity larger than $\\mathcal{L} = 2 \\times 10^{33} cm^{-2}s^{1}$, are also discussed.

  13. Light propagation in a large volume liquid scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Alimonti, G; Balata, M; Bellini, G; Benziger, J; Bonetti, S; Caccianiga, B; Cadonati, L; Calaprice, F P; Cecchet, G; Chen, M; Darnton, N; De Bari, A; Deutsch, M; Elisei, F; Feilitzsch, F V; Galbiati, C; Gatti, F; Giammarchi, M G; Giugni, D; Goldbrunner, T; Golubchikov, A; Goretti, A; Hagner, T; Hartmann, F X; Hentig, R V; Heusser, G; Ianni, A; Johnson, M; Laubenstein, M; Lombardi, P; Magni, S; Malvezzi, S; Maneira, J; Manno, I; Manuzio, G; Masetti, F; Mazzucato, U; Meroni, E; Neff, M; Oberauer, L; Perotti, A; Raghavan, R S; Ranucci, G; Resconi, E; Salvo, C; Scardaoni, R; Schönert, S; Smirnov, O; Tartaglia, R; Testera, G; Vogelaar, R B; Vitale, S; Zaimidoroga, O A

    2000-01-01

    The fluorescence light propagation in a large volume detector based on organic liquid scintillators is discussed. In particular, the effects of the fluor radiative transport and solvent Rayleigh scattering are emphasized. These processes have been modelled by a ray-tracing Monte Carlo method and have been experimentally investigated in the Borexino prototype which was a 4.3 ton, 4 pi sensitive detector. The comparison between the model prediction and the experimental data shows a satisfactory agreement indicating that the main aspects of these processes are well understood. Some features of the experimental time response of the detector are still under study.

  14. Light propagation in a large volume liquid scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alimonti, G.; Arpesella, C.; Balata, M.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bonetti, S.; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.P.; Cecchet, G.; Chen, M.; Darnton, N.; De Bari, A.; Deutsch, M.; Elisei, F.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Galbiati, C.; Gatti, F.; Giammarchi, M.G.; Giugni, D.; Goldbrunner, T.; Golubchikov, A.; Goretti, A.; Hagner, T.; Hartmann, F.X.; Hentig, R. von; Heusser, G.; Ianni, A.; Johnson, M.; Laubenstein, M.; Lombardi, P.; Magni, S.; Malvezzi, S.; Maneira, J.; Manno, I.; Manuzio, G.; Masetti, F.; Mazzucato, U.; Meroni, E.; Neff, M.; Oberauer, L.; Perotti, A.; Raghavan, R.S.; Ranucci, G.; Resconi, E.; Salvo, C.; Scardaoni, R.; Schoenert, S.; Smirnov, O.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G. E-mail: testera@ge.infn.it; Vogelaar, R.B.; Vitale, S.; Zaimidoroga, O

    2000-02-01

    The fluorescence light propagation in a large volume detector based on organic liquid scintillators is discussed. In particular, the effects of the fluor radiative transport and solvent Rayleigh scattering are emphasized. These processes have been modelled by a ray-tracing Monte Carlo method and have been experimentally investigated in the Borexino prototype which was a 4.3 ton, 4{pi} sensitive detector. The comparison between the model prediction and the experimental data shows a satisfactory agreement indicating that the main aspects of these processes are well understood. Some features of the experimental time response of the detector are still under study.

  15. A method for scintillation characterization using geodetic receivers operating at 1 Hz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, J. M.; Aragon-Angel, A.; Sanz, J.; González-Casado, G.; Rovira-Garcia, A.

    2017-11-01

    Ionospheric scintillation produces strong disruptive effects on global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signals, ranging from degrading performances to rendering these signals useless for accurate navigation. The current paper presents a novel approach to detect scintillation on the GNSS signals based on its effect on the ionospheric-free combination of carrier phases, i.e. the standard combination of measurements used in precise point positioning (PPP). The method is implemented using actual data, thereby having both its feasibility and its usefulness assessed at the same time. The results identify the main effects of scintillation, which consist of an increased level of noise in the ionospheric-free combination of measurements and the introduction of cycle-slips into the signals. Also discussed is how mis-detected cycle-slips contaminate the rate of change of the total electron content index (ROTI) values, which is especially important for low-latitude receivers. By considering the effect of single jumps in the individual frequencies, the proposed method is able to isolate, over the combined signal, the frequency experiencing the cycle-slip. Moreover, because of the use of the ionospheric-free combination, the method captures the diffractive nature of the scintillation phenomena that, in the end, is the relevant effect on PPP. Finally, a new scintillation index is introduced that is associated with the degradation of the performance in navigation.

  16. Photonic crystals: A novel approach to enhance the light output of scintillation based detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Knapitsch, A; Leclercq, J L; Letartre, X; Auffray, E; Fabjan, C W

    2011-01-01

    Future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments as well as next generation medical imaging applications are more and more pushing towards better scintillation characteristics. One of the problems in heavy scintillating materials is related to their high electronic density, resulting in a large index of refraction. As a consequence, most of the scintillation light produced in the bulk material is trapped inside the crystal due to total internal reflection. The same problem also occurs with light emitting diodes (LEDs) and has for a long time been considered as a limiting factor for their overall efficiency. Recent studies have shown that those limits can be overcome by means of light scattering effects of photonic crystals (PhCs). In our simulations we could show light yield improvements between 90\\% and 110\\% when applying PhC structures to different scintillator materials. To evaluate the results, a PhC modified scintillator was produced in cooperation with the NIL (Nanotechnology Institute of Lyon). By using s...

  17. Development of SCINFUL-CG code to calculate response functions of scintillators in various shapes used for neutron measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Akira; Kim, Eunjoo; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-10-01

    A Monte Carlo code SCINFUL has been utilized for calculating response functions of organic scintillators for high-energy neutron spectroscopy. However, the applicability of SCINFUL is limited to the calculations for cylindrical NE213 and NE110 scintillators. In the present study, SCINFUL-CG was developed by introducing a geometry specifying function and high-energy neutron cross section data into SCINFUL. The geometry package MARS-CG, the extended version of the CG (Combinatorial Geometry), was programmed into SCINFUL-CG to express various geometries of detectors. Neutron spectra in the regions specified by the CG can be evaluated by the track length estimator. The cross section data of silicon, oxygen and aluminum for neutron transport calculation were incorporated up to 100 MeV using the data of LA150 library. Validity of SCINFUL-CG was examined by comparing calculated results with those by SCINFUL and MCNP and experimental data measured using high-energy neutron fields. SCINFUL-CG can be used for the calculations of the response functions and neutron spectra in the organic scintillators in various shapes. The computer code will be applicable to the designs of high-energy neutron spectrometers and neutron monitors using the organic scintillators. The present report describes the new features of SCINFUL-CG and explains how to use the code. (author)

  18. Calculations and measurements of the scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio of liquid scintillators for use in proton radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, W Scott; Robertson, Daniel; Beddar, Sam

    2015-03-11

    Liquid scintillators are a promising detector for high-resolution three-dimensional proton therapy dosimetry. Because the scintillator comprises both the active volume of the detector and the phantom material, an ideal scintillator will exhibit water equivalence in its radiological properties. One of the most fundamental of these is the scintillator's stopping power. The objective of this study was to compare calculations and measurements of scintillator-to-water stopping power ratios to evaluate the suitability of the liquid scintillators BC-531 and OptiPhase HiSafe 3 for proton dosimetry. We also measured the relative scintillation output of the two scintillators. Both calculations and measurements show that the linear stopping power of OptiPhase is significantly closer to water than that of BC-531. BC-531 has a somewhat higher scintillation output. OptiPhase can be mixed with water at high concentrations, which further improves its scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio. However, this causes the solution to become cloudy, which has a negative impact on the scintillation output and spatial resolution of the detector. OptiPhase is preferred over BC-531 for proton dosimetry because its density and scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio are more water equivalent.

  19. The SNO+ Scintillator Purification Plant and Projected Sensitivity to Solar Neutrinos in the Pure Scintillator Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershing, Teal; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The SNO+ detector is a neutrino and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment utilizing the renovated SNO detector. In the second phase of operation, the SNO+ detector will contain 780 tons of organic liquid scintillator composed of 2 g/L 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). In this phase, SNO+ will strive to detect solar neutrinos in the sub-MeV range, including CNO production neutrinos and pp production neutrinos. To achieve the necessary detector sensitivity, a four-part scintillator purification plant has been constructed in SNOLAB for the removal of ionic and radioactive impurities. We present an overview of the SNO+ scintillator purification plant stages, including distillation, water extraction, gas stripping, and metal scavenger columns. We also give the projected SNO+ sensitivities to various solar-produced neutrinos based on the scintillator plant's projected purification efficiency.

  20. SU-8 microfluidic device for scintillating particle detection

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, A; Haguenauer, M; Jiguet, S; Vico Triviño, N; Renaud, P

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the study of a novel scintillation detector based on standard microfabrication techniques. It consists of a fine pitch array of hollow waveguides filled with a liquid scintillator and optically coupled to photodetectors. The detector has been fabricated by patterning the SU-8 photoresist on silicon wafers. Experimental studies have been performed by exciting the liquid scintillator contained in the SU-8 waveguides with electrons. The scintillation light produced was read out by an external photodetector. The results obtained with this set-up demonstrate the concept of microfluidic scintillation detection and are very encouraging for future developments.

  1. Modelling duality between bound and resonant meson spectra by means of free quantum motions on the de Sitter space-time dS{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchbach, M. [UASLP, Instituto de Fisica, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Compean, C.B. [Instituto Tecnologico de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2016-07-15

    The real parts of the complex squared energies defined by the resonance poles of the transfer matrix of the Poeschl-Teller barrier, are shown to equal the squared energies of the levels bound within the trigonometric Scarf well potential. By transforming these potentials into parts of the Laplacians describing free quantum motions on the mutually orthogonal open-time-like hyperbolic-, and closed-space-like spherical geodesics on the conformally invariant de Sitter space-time, dS{sub 4}, the conformal symmetries of these interactions are revealed. On dS{sub 4} the potentials under consideration naturally relate to interactions within colorless two-body systems and to cusped Wilson loops. In effect, with the aid of the dS{sub 4} space-time as unifying geometry, a conformal symmetry based bijective correspondence (duality) between bound and resonant meson spectra is established at the quantum mechanics level and related to confinement understood as color charge neutrality. The correspondence allows to link the interpretation of mesons as resonance poles of a scattering matrix with their complementary description as states bound by an instantaneous quark interaction and to introduce a conformal symmetry based classification scheme of mesons. As examples representative of such a duality we organize in good agreement with data 71 of the reported light flavor mesons with masses below ∝ 2350 MeV into four conformal families of particles placed on linear f{sub 0}, π, η, and a{sub 0} resonance trajectories, plotted on the l/M plane. Upon extending the sec{sup 2} χ by a properly constructed conformal color dipole potential, shaped after a tangent function, we predict the masses of 12 ''missing'' mesons. We furthermore notice that the f{sub 0} and π trajectories can be viewed as chiral partners, same as the η and a{sub 0} trajectories, an indication that chiral symmetry for mesons is likely to be realized in terms of parity doubled conformal

  2. Infrared scintillation in gases, liquids and crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belogurov, S.; Bressi, G; Carugno, G.; Conti, E; Iannuzzi, D; Meneguzzo, AT

    2000-01-01

    We report about experimental evidences of infrared scintillation in gaseous, liquid and crystal samples. We firstly studied noble gases at room temperature and near atmospheric pressure in the wavelength range between 0.7 and 1.81 mum. Ar gas emits infrared photons when irradiated by a proton beam.

  3. Scintillating fibre (SciFi) tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Caraban Gonzalez, Noemi

    2017-01-01

    128 modules – containing 11 000 km of scintillating fibres – will make up the new SciFi tracker, which will replace the outer and inner trackers of the LHCb detector as part of the experiment’s major upgrade during Long Shutdown 2 (LS2)

  4. Progress in studying scintillator proportionality: Phenomenological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizarri, Gregory; Cherepy, Nerine; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Moses, William; Payne, Sephen; Singh, Jai; Valentine, John; Vasilev, Andrey; Williams, Richard

    2009-04-30

    We present a model to describe the origin of non-proportional dependence of scintillator light yield on the energy of an ionizing particle. The non-proportionality is discussed in terms of energy relaxation channels and their linear and non-linear dependences on the deposited energy. In this approach, the scintillation response is described as a function of the deposited energy deposition and the kinetic rates of each relaxation channel. This mathematical framework allows both a qualitative interpretation and a quantitative fitting representation of scintillation non-proportionality response as function of kinetic rates. This method was successfully applied to thallium doped sodium iodide measured with SLYNCI, a new facility using the Compton coincidence technique. Finally, attention is given to the physical meaning of the dominant relaxation channels, and to the potential causes responsible for the scintillation non-proportionality. We find that thallium doped sodium iodide behaves as if non-proportionality is due to competition between radiative recombinations and non-radiative Auger processes.

  5. The E835 scintillating fiber tracking detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrogiani, M.; Baldini, W.; Bettoni, D.; Bonora, G.; Bonsi, D.; Calabrese, R.; Carassiti, V.; Chiozzi, S.; Frabetti, S.; Luppi, E.; Milano, L.; Rossetto, L.; Stancari, G. [Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Bombonati, M.; Mussa, R. [Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, 60510, Batavia (United States); Gasteyer, T.; Rivetta, C.; Wheelwright, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, 60510, Batavia (United States)

    1998-02-01

    This paper describes the scintillating fiber tracking detector designed and built for the Fermilab experiment E835. This detector uses visible light photon counters (VLPC) readout system and is in use at the anti p accumulator ring at Fermilab. A description of the components of the detector and preliminary results of its performances are given. (orig.). 7 refs.

  6. Discrimination methods between neutron and gamma rays for boron loaded plastic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Normand, S; Haan, S; Louvel, M

    2002-01-01

    Boron loaded plastic scintillators exhibit interesting properties for neutron detection in nuclear waste management and especially in investigating the amount of fissile materials when enclosed in waste containers. Combining a high thermal neutron efficiency and a low mean neutron lifetime, they are suitable in neutron multiplicity counting. However, due to their high sensitivity to gamma rays, pulse shape discrimination methods need to be developed in order to optimize the passive neutron assay measurement. From the knowledge of their physical properties, it is possible to separate the three kinds of particles that have interacted in the boron loaded plastic scintillator (gamma, fast neutron and thermal neutron). For this purpose, we have developed and compared the two well known discrimination methods (zero crossing and charge comparison) applied for the first time to boron loaded plastic scintillator. The setup for the zero crossing discrimination method and the charge comparison methods is thoroughly expl...

  7. Investigation of linear accelerator pulse delivery using fast organic scintillator measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beierholm, A.R., E-mail: anders.beierholm@risoe.d [Radiation Research Department, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Andersen, C.E.; Lindvold, L.R. [Radiation Research Department, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Aznar, M.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2010-03-15

    Fiber-coupled organic plastic scintillators present an attractive method for time-resolved dose measurements during radiotherapy. Most organic scintillators exhibit a fast response, making it possible to use them to measure individual high-energy X-ray pulses from a medical linear accelerator. This can be used in complex treatment procedures such as gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), where the advantage of dose rate measurements of high temporal resolution is highly emphasized. We report on development of a fast data acquisition scintillator-based system as well as measurements performed on Varian medical linear accelerators, delivering 6 MV X-ray beams. The dose delivery per radiation pulse was found to agree with expectations within roughly 1%, although minor discrepancies and transients were evident in the measurements.

  8. Measurement of Stratospheric Chromatic Scintillation with the AMON-RA Balloonborne Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Dalaudier, Francis; Hauchecorne, Alain; Robert, Claude; Lemaire, Thierry; Pirre, Michel; Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    2001-08-01

    The balloonborne instrument AMON (which is a French acronym for Absorption par les Minoritaires Ozone et NOx ) has been modified to record chromatic scintillation during stellar occultation by the Earth s atmosphere. A 14-channel spectrophotometer with a sampling rate of 10 Hz was added, and the modified instrument, AMON-RA, performed successful measurements of the setting star Alnilam during the third European Stratospheric Experiment on Ozone (THESEO) project. Unambiguous records of the chromatic scintillation were obtained, to our knowledge for the first time from above the atmosphere, and some of its basic properties are reported. The properties of atmospheric structures that are responsible for this chromatic scintillation were found to be consistent with those of previous monochromatic measurements performed from space. A maximum chromatic delay of 2.5 s was observed for widely different wavelengths.

  9. Pattern recognition in spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebran, M.; Paletou, F.

    2017-06-01

    We present a new automated procedure that simultaneously derives the effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g, metallicity [Fe/H], and equatorial projected rotational velocity ve sin i for stars. The procedure is inspired by the well-known PCA-based inversion of spectropolarimetric full-Stokes solar data, which was used both for Zeeman and Hanle effects. The efficiency and accuracy of this procedure have been proven for FGK, A, and late type dwarf stars of K and M spectral types. Learning databases are generated from the Elodie stellar spectra library using observed spectra for which fundamental parameters were already evaluated or with synthetic data. The synthetic spectra are calculated using ATLAS9 model atmospheres. This technique helped us to detect many peculiar stars such as Am, Ap, HgMn, SiEuCr and binaries. This fast and efficient technique could be used every time a pattern recognition is needed. One important application is the understanding of the physical properties of planetary surfaces by comparing aboard instrument data to synthetic ones.

  10. Nonproportional response of LaBr3:Ce and LaCl3:Ce scintillators to synchrotron x-ray irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khodyuk, I.V.; Dorenbos, P.

    2010-01-01

    The nonproportional scintillation response of LaBr3 doped with 5% Ce3+ and of LaCl3 doped with 10% Ce3+ was measured using highly monochromatic synchrotron irradiation. To estimate the photon response, pulse height spectra at many finely spaced energy values between 9 and 100 keV were measured. The

  11. Non-Carbon Dyes For Platic Scintillators- Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teprovich, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gaillard, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Sexton, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Ward, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Velten, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-19

    Scintillation based detectors are desirable for many radiation detection applications (portal and border monitoring, safeguards verification, contamination detection and monitoring). The development of next generation scintillators will require improved detection sensitivity for weak gamma ray sources, and fast and thermal neutron quantification. Radiation detection of gamma and neutron sources can be accomplished with organic scintillators, however, the single crystals are difficult to grow for large area detectors and subject to cracking. Alternatives to single crystal organic scintillators are plastic scintillators (PS) which offer the ability to be shaped and scaled up to produce large sized detectors. PS is also more robust than the typical organic scintillator and are ideally suited for deployment in harsh real-world environments. PS contain a mixture of dyes to down-convert incident radiation into visible light that can be detected by a PMT. This project will evaluate the potential use of nano-carbon dyes in plastic scintillators.

  12. Tl2LaCl5:Ce, high performance scintillator for gamma-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawrami, R.; Ariesanti, E.; Wei, H.; Finkelstein, J.; Glodo, J.; Shah, K. S.

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports on a new Ce-doped Tl-based scintillator, Tl2LaCl5 (TLC), for gamma-ray detection. 10 mm diameter crystals have been successfully grown using the vertical Bridgman method. The emission peak of TLC is detected at 383 nm under X-ray excitation. The light yield of TLC is 76,000 ph/MeV. The samples show excellent energy resolution of 3.4% (FWHM) at 662 keV. The non-proportionality is less than 1%, from 32 keV to 1275 keV. The major scintillation decay time is 36 ns.

  13. Study of 4 inorganic scintillating crystals for an operative gamma probe in radioguided surgery

    CERN Document Server

    Salvador, S

    2007-01-01

    In case of lymphatic cancers, the sentinel lymph node technique is performed using a gamma probe for intraoperative radioguided surgery. The inorganic scintillating crystal gamma probe developed at IPHC was equipped with 4 fast decay time inorganic scintillators: YAP, LYSO, LaCl3 and LaBr3. Energy resolutions are compared experimentally with single photon radioisotopes for small crystal cylinders (4 mm diameter, 12 mm length). The 6.1% measured energy resolution at 511 keV demonstrates the great advantage to use the high photon yield LaBr3 crystal for detection of γ-ray coming from positron annihilation using β+ radiomarked molecules.

  14. Photoelectron Yields of Scintillation Counters with Embedded Wavelength-Shifting Fibers Read Out With Silicon Photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artikov, Akram; et al.

    2017-09-19

    Photoelectron yields of extruded scintillation counters with titanium dioxide coating and embedded wavelength shifting fibers read out by silicon photomultipliers have been measured at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility using 120\\,GeV protons. The yields were measured as a function of transverse, longitudinal, and angular positions for a variety of scintillator compositions and reflective coating mixtures, fiber diameters, and photosensor sizes. Timing performance was also studied. These studies were carried out by the Cosmic Ray Veto Group of the Mu2e collaboration as part of their R\\&D program.

  15. A study on multifrequency scintillations near the EIA crest of the Indian zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, S. K.; Chatterjee, S.; Jana, Debasis

    2017-10-01

    Occurrence features of ionospheric scintillations at S band (2492.028 MHz) are reported for the first time. The same have been explored in the context of scintillations at VHF (250.650 MHz) and L5 (1176.45 MHz) bands. Observations were carried out during the period April-December, 2015 at Raja Peary Mohan College Centre (RPMC: 22.66° N, 88.4° E), located near the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) crest of the Indian longitude zone. Mostly weak (irregularities in the low latitude region.

  16. Study of 4 inorganic scintillating crystals for an operative gamma probe in radioguided surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, S.; Guyonnet, J.-L.

    2007-08-01

    In case of lymphatic cancers, the sentinel lymph node technique is performed using a gamma probe for intraoperative radioguided surgery. The inorganic scintillating crystal gamma probe developed at IPHC was equipped with 4 fast decay time inorganic scintillators: YAP, LYSO, LaCl3 and LaBr3. Energy resolutions are compared experimentally with single photon radioisotopes for small crystal cylinders (4 mm diameter, 12 mm length). The 6.1% measured energy resolution at 511 keV demonstrates the great advantage to use the high photon yield LaBr3 crystal for detection of γ-ray coming from positron annihilation using β+ radiomarked molecules.

  17. Acquiring beam data for a flattening-filter free linear accelerator using organic scintillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Behrens, C.F.; Hoffmann, L.

    2013-01-01

    Fibre-coupled organic scintillators have been proven a credible alternative to clinically implemented methods for radiotherapy dosimetry, primarily due to their water equivalence and good spatial resolution. Furthermore, the fast response of the scintillators can be exploited to perform time......-resolved dosimetry on a highly detailed level. In this study, we present beam data for a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator, which is capable of delivering flattening-filter free (FFF1) clinical X-ray beams. The beam data have been acquired using an in-house developed dosimetry system based on fibre-coupled organic...

  18. Development of ZnO:Ga as an Ultrafast Scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.; Derenzo, S.E.; Weber, M.J.

    2008-12-10

    We report on several methods for synthesizing the ultra-fast scintillator ZnO(Ga), and measurements of the resulting products. This material has characteristics that make it an excellent alpha detector for tagging the time and direction of individual neutrons produced by t-d and d-d neutron generators (associated particle imaging). The intensity and decay time are strongly dependent on the method used for dopant incorporation. We compare samples made by diffusion of Ga metal to samples made by solid state reaction between ZnO and Ga2O3 followed by reduction in hydrogen. The latter is much more successful and has a pure, strong near-band-edge fluorescence and an ultra-fast decay time of the x-ray-excited luminescence. The luminescence increases dramatically as the temperature is reduced to 10K. We also present results of an alternate low-temperature synthesis that produces luminescent particles with a more uniform size distribution. We examine possible mechanisms for the bright near-band-edge scintillation and favor the explanation that it is due to the recombination of Ga3+ donor electrons with ionization holes trapped on H+ ion acceptors.

  19. Fission neutron spectra measurements at LANSCE - status and plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Noda, Shusaku [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Ronald O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Donnell, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, Matt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chatillon, Audrey [CEA-FRANCE; Granier, Thierry [CEA-FRANCE; Taieb, Julien [CEA-FRANCE; Laurent, Benoit [CEA-FRANCE; Belier, Gilbert [CEA-FRANCE; Becker, John A [LLNL; Wu, Ching - Yen [LLNL

    2009-01-01

    A program to measure fission neutron spectra from neutron-induced fission of actinides is underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in a collaboration among the CEA laboratory at Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spallation source of fast neutrons at LANSCE is used to provide incident neutron energies from less than 1 MeV to 100 MeV or higher. The fission events take place in a gas-ionization fission chamber, and the time of flight from the neutron source to that chamber gives the energy of the incident neutron. Outgoing neutrons are detected by an array of organic liquid scintillator neutron detectors, and their energies are deduced from the time of flight from the fission chamber to the neutron detector. Measurements have been made of the fission neutrons from fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. The range of outgoing energies measured so far is from 1 MeV to approximately 8 MeV. These partial spectra and average fission neutron energies are compared with evaluated data and with models of fission neutron emission. Results to date will be presented and a discussion of uncertainties will be given in this presentation. Future plans are to make significant improvements in the fission chambers, neutron detectors, signal processing, data acquisition and the experimental environment to provide high fidelity data including mea urements of fission neutrons below 1 MeV and improvements in the data above 8 MeV.

  20. An analysis on the mid-latitude scintillation and coherence frequency bandwidth using transionospheric VHF signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juang, Zhen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roussel-dupre, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    An analysis was perfonned on the mid-latitude scintillation and coherence frequency bandwidth (Fcoh) using transionospheric VHF signal data. The data include 1062 events spanning from November 1997 to June 2002. Each event records FORTE satellite received VHF signals from LAPP located at Los Alamos, New Mexico. Fcohs were derived to study scintillation characteristics on diurnal and seasonal variations, as well as changes due to solar and geomagnetic activities. Comparisons to the VHFIUHF coherence frequency bandwidth studies previously reported at equatorial and mid-latitude regions are made using a 4th power frequency dependence relationship. Furthennore, a wideband ionospheric scintillation model, WBMOD, was used to estimate Fcohs and compared with our VHF Fcoh values. Our analysis indicates mid-latitude scintillation characteristics that are not previously revealed. At the VHF bottom frequency range (3035 MHz), distinguished smaller Fcohs are found in time period from sunset to midnight, in wann season from May to August, and in low solar activity years. The effects of geomagnetic storm activity on Fcoh are characterized by a sudden transition at a Kp index of 50-60. Comparisons with median Fcohs estimated from other studies validated our VHF Fcohs for daytime while an order of magnitude larger Fcohs are found for nighttime, implying a time-dependent issue in applying the 4th order power relationship. Furthermore, comparisons with WBMOD-estimated Fcohs indicated generally matched median scintillation level estimates while differences do exist for those events undergoing high geomagnetic stonn activity which may imply underestimates of scintillation level by the WBMOD in the mid-latitude regions.

  1. Preparations for the Advanced Scintillator Compton Telescope (ASCOT) balloon flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, T.; Bloser, P. F.; Legere, J. S.; Bancroft, C. M.; McConnell, M. L.; Ryan, J. M.; Wright, A. M.

    2017-08-01

    We describe our ongoing work to develop a new medium-energy gamma-ray Compton telescope using advanced scintillator materials combined with silicon photomultiplier readouts and fly it on a scientific balloon. There is a need in high-energy astronomy for a medium-energy gamma-ray mission covering the energy range from approximately 0.4 - 20 MeV to follow the success of the COMPTEL instrument on CGRO. We believe that directly building on the legacy of COMPTEL, using relatively robust, low-cost, off-the-shelf technologies, is the most promising path for such a mission. Fortunately, high-performance scintillators, such as Cerium Bromide (CeBr3) and p-terphenyl, and compact readout devices, such as silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), are already commercially available and capable of meeting this need. We are now constructing an Advanced Scintillator Compton Telescope (ASCOT) with SiPM readout, with the goal of imaging the Crab Nebula at MeV energies from a high-altitude balloon flight. We expect a 4-sigma detection at 1 MeV in a single transit. We present calibration results of the detector modules, and updated simulations of the balloon instrument sensitivity. If successful, this project will demonstrate that the energy, timing, and position resolution of this technology are sufficient to achieve an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity in the medium-energy gamma-ray band, were it to be applied to a 1 cubic meter instrument on a long-duration balloon or Explorer platform.

  2. Developing Detectors for Scintillation Light in Liquid Argon for DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Bruce [Fermilab

    2016-12-22

    The Deep Underground Neutrino experiment will conduct a broad program of physics research by studying a beam of neutrinos from Fermilab, atmospheric neutrinos, neutrinos from potential supernovae, and potential nucleon decay events. In pursuit of these studies, the experiment will deploy four 10kt fiducial mass liquid argon time projection chambers underground in Lead, South Dakota. Liquid argon time projection chambers allow high-resolution tracking and energy measurements. A precise timing signal is needed to provide the necessary time stamp to localize events in the drift direction. As liquid argon is a natural scintillator, a photon detection system will be deployed to provide such a signal, especially for non-beam events. In the baseline design for the single-phase time projection chamber, the detectors are contained within the anode plane assemblies. The design of two prototypes utilizing wavelength shifters and light guides are presented, and aspects of the research and development program are discussed.

  3. The light-yield response of a NE-213 liquid-scintillator detector measured using 2–6 MeV tagged neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherzinger, J. [Division of Nuclear Physics, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Detector Group, European Spallation Source ERIC, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Al Jebali, R.; Annand, J.R.M. [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Fissum, K.G., E-mail: kevin.fissum@nuclear.lu.se [Division of Nuclear Physics, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Detector Group, European Spallation Source ERIC, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Hall-Wilton, R. [Detector Group, European Spallation Source ERIC, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Mid-Sweden University, SE-851 70 Sundsvall (Sweden); Kanaki, K. [Detector Group, European Spallation Source ERIC, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Lundin, M. [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Nilsson, B. [Detector Group, European Spallation Source ERIC, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Perrey, H. [Division of Nuclear Physics, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Detector Group, European Spallation Source ERIC, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Rosborg, A. [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Svensson, H. [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Sweflo Engineering, SE-275 63 Blentarp (Sweden)

    2016-12-21

    The response of a NE-213 liquid-scintillator detector has been measured using tagged neutrons from 2 to 6 MeV originating from an Am/Be neutron source. The neutron energies were determined using the time-of-flight technique. Pulse-shape discrimination was employed to discern between gamma-rays and neutrons. The behavior of both the fast (35 ns) and the combined fast and slow (475 ns) components of the neutron scintillation-light pulses were studied. Three different prescriptions were used to relate the neutron maximum energy-transfer edges to the corresponding recoil-proton scintillation-light yields, and the results were compared to simulations. The overall normalizations of parametrizations which predict the fast or total light yield of the scintillation pulses were also tested. Our results agree with both existing data and existing parametrizations. We observe a clear sensitivity to the portion and length of the neutron scintillation-light pulse considered.

  4. Performance of the Commercial PP/ZnS:Cu and PP/ZnS:Ag Scintillation Screens for Fast Neutron Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata G. Makowska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fast neutron imaging has a great potential as a nondestructive technique for testing large objects. The main factor limiting applications of this technique is detection technology, offering relatively poor spatial resolution of images and low detection efficiency, which results in very long exposure times. Therefore, research on development of scintillators for fast neutron imaging is of high importance. A comparison of the light output, gamma radiation sensitivity and spatial resolution of commercially available scintillator screens composed of PP/ZnS:Cu and PP/ZnS:Ag of different thicknesses are presented. The scintillators were provided by RC Tritec AG company and the test performed at the NECTAR facility located at the FRM II nuclear research reactor. It was shown that light output increases and the spatial resolution decreases with the scintillator thickness. Both compositions of the scintillating material provide similar light output, while the gamma sensitivity of PP/ZnS:Cu is significantly higher as compared to PP/ZnS:Ag-based scintillators. Moreover, we report which factors should be considered when choosing a scintillator and what are the limitations of the investigated types of scintillators.

  5. Wave fluxes of equatorial Kelvin waves and QBO zonal wind forcing derived from SABER and ECMWF temperature space-time spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ern

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO of the zonal mean zonal wind is a dynamical phenomenon of the tropical middle atmosphere. Influences of the QBO can even be found at mid and high latitudes. It is widely accepted that the phase descent of alternating tropical easterlies and westerlies is driven by atmospheric waves of both global scale (equatorial wave modes like Kelvin, equatorial Rossby, Rossby-gravity, or inertia-gravity waves, as well as mesoscale gravity waves. However, the relative distribution of the different types of waves to the forcing of the QBO winds is highly uncertain. This is the case because until recently there were no high resolution long-term global measurements in the stratosphere. In our study we estimate Kelvin wave momentum flux and the contribution of zonal wind forcing by Kelvin waves based on space-time spectra determined from both Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER temperature measurements as well as temperatures from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF operational analyses. Peak values of total Kelvin wave zonal wind forcing found are about 0.2 m/s/day. There is good agreement between SABER and ECMWF results. Altitude-time cross sections are shown and the results are compared to the total wave forcing required to balance the background atmosphere. Sometimes Kelvin wave forcing is sufficient to explain almost the whole total wave forcing required for the momentum balance during the transition from QBO easterly to westerly winds. This is especially the case during the periods of strong westerly wind shear when the zonal wind is between −20 and 10 m/s at the equator in the altitude range 20 to 35 km. During other parts of the phases of strong westerly wind shear, however, the contribution of Kelvin waves can be comparably low and the missing wave forcing, which is often attributed to mesoscale gravity waves or intermediate scale waves, can be the by far

  6. Liquid argon scintillation light studies in LArIAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryczynski, Pawel [Fermilab

    2016-10-12

    The LArIAT experiment is using its Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) in the second run of data-taking at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. The goal of the experiment is to study the response of LArTPCs to charged particles of energies relevant for planned neutrino experiments. In addition, it will help to develop and evaluate the performance of the simulation, analysis, and reconstruction software used in other LAr neutrino experiments. Particles from a tertiary beam detected by LArIAT (mainly protons, pions and muons) are identified using a set of beamline detectors, including Wire Chambers, Time of Flight counters and Cherenkov counters, as well as a simplified sampling detector used to detect muons. In its effort towards augmenting LArTPC technology for other neutrino experiments, LArIAT also takes advantage of the scintillating capabilities of LAr and is testing the possibility of using the light signal to help reconstruct calorimetric information and particle ID. In this report, we present results from these studies of the scintillation light signal to evaluate detector performance and calorimetry.

  7. Liquid argon scintillation light studies in LArIAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryczynski, Pawel; LArIAT Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The LArIAT experiment is using its Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) in the second run of data-taking at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. The goal of the experiment is to study the response of LArTPCs to charged particles of energies relevant for planned neutrino experiments. In addition, it will help to develop and evaluate the performance of the simulation, analysis, and reconstruction software used in other LAr neutrino experiments. Particles from a tertiary beam detected by LArIAT (mainly protons, pions and muons) are identified using a set of beamline detectors, including Wire Chambers, Time of Flight counters and Cherenkov counters, as well as a simplified sampling detector used to detect muons. In its effort towards augmenting LArTPC technology for other neutrino experiments, LArIAT also takes advantage of the scintillating capabilities of LAr and is testing the possibility of using the light signal to help reconstruct calorimetric information and particle ID. In this report, we present results from these studies of the scintillation light signal to evaluate detector performance and calorimetry.

  8. Assessment of scintillation proxy maps for a scintillation study during geomagnetically quiet and disturbed conditions over Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabayo, Emirant B.; Jurua, Edward; Cilliers, Pierre J.

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this paper is demonstrate the validity and usefulness of scintillation proxies derived from IGS data, through its comparison with data from dedicated scintillation monitors and its application to GNSS scintillation patterns. The paper presents scintillation patterns developed by using data from the dedicated scintillation monitors of the scintillation network decision aid (SCINDA) network, and proxy maps derived from IGS GPS data for 2011 and 2012 over low latitude stations in Uganda. The amplitude and phase scintillation indicies (S4 and σΦ) were obtained from the Novatel GSV4004B ionospheric scintillation and total electron content (TEC) monitor managed by SCINDA at Makerere (0.340N, 32.570E). The corresponding IGS GPS proxy data were obtained from the receivers at Entebbe (0.040N, 32.440E) and Mbarara (0.600S, 30.740E). The derived amplitude (S4p) and phase (sDPR) scintillation proxy maps were compared with maps of S4 and σΦ during geomagnetic storms (moderate and strong) and geomagnetically quiet conditions. The scintillation patterns using S4 and σΦ and their respective proxies revealed similar diurnal and seasonal patterns of strong scintillation occurrence. The peaks of scintillation occurrence with mean values in the range 0.3 irregularities over Uganda irrespective of the geomagnetic conditions. Therefore, the amplitude and phase scintillation proxies presented here can be used to fill gaps in low-latitude data where there are no data available from dedicated scintillation receivers, irrespective of the geomagnetic conditions.

  9. Neutron energy spectra of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf, Am-Be source and of the D(d,n) sup 3 He reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Sang Tae Park

    2003-01-01

    The neutron energy spectrum of the following sources were measured using a fast neutron spectrometer with the NE-213 liquid scintillator: sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf, Am-Be and D(d,n) sup 3 He reaction from a 3 MeV Pelletron accelerator in Tokyo Institute of Technology. The measured proton recoil pulse height data of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf, Am-Be and D(d,n) sup 3 He were unfolded using the mathematical program to obtain the neutron energy spectrum. The sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf and Am-Be neutron energy spectra were measured and the results obtained showed a good agreement with the spectra usually published in the literature. The neutron energy spectrum from D(d,n) sup 3 He was measured and the results obtained also showed a good agreement with the calculation by time of flight (TOF) methods. (author)

  10. New semiconductor scintillators ZnSe(Te,O) and integrated radiation detectors based thereon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryzhikov, [No Value; Starzhinskiy, N; Gal'chinetskii, L; Gashin, P; Kozin, D; Danshin, E

    Data are presented on properties of a new type of scintillator based on isovalently doped crystals of zinc selenide. Depending upon concentration of activating dopants Te and O, the wavelength of the luminescence maximum is 590-640 nm, response time is 1-50 mus, and afterglow level after 5 ms is not

  11. Applications in radiation therapy of a scintillating screen viewed by a CCD camera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, J.M.; Boon, S.N.; van Luijk, P.

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) dosimetry system has been designed for position-sensitive dose-measurement applications in modem radiation therapy. The system consists of a scintillating screen (Gd2O2S:Tb), observed by a low-noise CCD camera with a long integration time. The system allows reliable and

  12. Detection of Extensive Cosmic Air Showers by Small Scintillation Detectors with Wavelength-Shifting Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiola, Salvatore; La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco; Riggi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    A set of three small scintillation detectors was employed to measure correlated events due to the passage of cosmic muons originating from extensive air showers. The coincidence rate between (any) two detectors was extracted as a function of their relative distance. The difference between the arrival times in three non-aligned detectors was used…

  13. Computation of ESR spectra from the time evolution of the magnetization : Comparison of autocorrelation and Wiener-Khinchin-relation-based methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikeuchi, Hiroki; De Raedt, Hans; Bertaina, Sylvain; Miyashita, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The calculation of finite temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra for concrete specified crystal configurations is a very important issue in the study of quantum spin systems. Although direct evaluation of the Kubo formula by means of numerical diagonalization yields exact results, memory

  14. Nonproportionality of Scintillator Detectors: Theory and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, Stephen; Cherepy, Nerine; Hull, Giulia; Valentine, John; Moses, William; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2009-08-17

    On the basis of nonproportionality data obtained for several scintillators, we have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the light yield versus electron energy. The theory of Onsager was adapted to explain how the carriers form excitons or sequentially arrive at the activators to promote the ion to an excited state, and the theory of Birks was employed to allow for exciton-exciton annihilation. We then developed a second theory to deduce the degradation in resolution that results from nonproportionality by evoking Landau fluctuations, which are essentially variations in the deposited energy density that occur as the high energy electron travels along its trajectory. In general there is good agreement with the data, in terms of fitting the nonproportionality curves and reproducing the literature values of nonproportionality's contribution to the scintillator resolution. With the resurgence of interest in developing scintillator detectors that have good energy resolution, an improved understanding of nonproportionality has become a crucial matter since it presents the fundamental limit to the achievable resolution. In order to hasten an improved understanding of scintillator nonproportionality, we have constructed an instrument referred to as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light Yield Nonproportionality Compton Instrument). This is a second-generation instrument to the original device developed by Valentine and coworkers, wherein several new principles of operation have served to increase the data rate by an order of magnitude as discussed in detail in References. In the present article, the focus is on a theory to describe the measured electron response, which is the light yield as a function of the electron energy. To do this, we account for transport of carriers and excitons, in terms of how they transfer their energy to the activators with competition from nonradiative decay pathways. This work builds on the original work of Murray and coworkers

  15. Neutron spectroscopy with scintillation detectors using wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Jessica

    The purpose of this research was to study neutron spectroscopy using the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator. This scintillator material provided a novel means of detection for fast neutrons, without the disadvantages of traditional liquid scintillation materials. EJ-299-33A provided a more durable option to these materials, making it less likely to be damaged during handling. Unlike liquid scintillators, this plastic scintillator was manufactured from a non-toxic material, making it safer to use, as well as easier to design detectors. The material was also manufactured with inherent pulse shape discrimination abilities, making it suitable for use in neutron detection. The neutron spectral unfolding technique was developed in two stages. Initial detector response function modeling was carried out through the use of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The response functions were developed for a monoenergetic neutron flux. Wavelets were then applied to smooth the response function. The spectral unfolding technique was applied through polynomial fitting and optimization techniques in MATLAB. Verification of the unfolding technique was carried out through the use of experimentally determined response functions. These were measured on the neutron source based on the Van de Graff accelerator at the University of Kentucky. This machine provided a range of monoenergetic neutron beams between 0.1 MeV and 24 MeV, making it possible to measure the set of response functions of the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator detector to neutrons of specific energies. The response of a plutonium-beryllium (PuBe) source was measured using the source available at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The neutron spectrum reconstruction was carried out using the experimentally measured response functions. Experimental data was collected in the list mode of the waveform digitizer. Post processing of this data focused on the pulse shape discrimination analysis of the recorded response functions to remove the

  16. Practical use of a plastic scintillator for quality assurance of electron beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogo, Katsunori; Tatsuno, Yuya; Tsuneda, Masato; Aono, Yuki; Mochizuki, Daiki; Fujisawa, Yoshiki; Matsushita, Akihiro; Ishigami, Minoru; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2017-06-01

    Quality assurance (QA) of clinical electron beams is essential for performing accurate and safe radiation therapy. However, with advances in radiation therapy, QA has become increasingly labor-intensive and time-consuming. In this paper, we propose a tissue-equivalent plastic scintillator for quick and easy QA of clinical electron beams. The proposed tool comprises a plastic scintillator plate and a charge-coupled device camera that enable the scintillation light by electron beams to be recorded with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. Further, the Cerenkov image is directly subtracted from the scintillation image to discriminate Cerenkov emissions and accurately measure the dose profiles of electron beams with high spatial resolution. Compared with conventional methods, discrepancies in the depth profile improved from 7% to 2% in the buildup region via subtractive corrections. Further, the output brightness showed good linearity with dose, good reproducibility (deviations below 1%), and dose rate independence (within 0.5%). The depth of 50% dose measured with the tool, an index of electron beam quality, was within  ±0.5 mm of that obtained with an ionization chamber. Lateral brightness profiles agreed with the lateral dose profiles to within 4% and no significant improvement was obtained using Cerenkov corrections. Field size agreed to within 0.5 mm with those obtained with ionization chamber. For clinical QA of electron boost treatment, a disk scintillator that mimics the shape of a patient’s breast is applied. The brightness distribution and dose, calculated using a treatment planning system, was generally acceptable for clinical use, except in limited zones. Overall, the proposed plastic scintillator plate tool efficiently performs QA for electron beam therapy and enables simultaneous verification of output constancy, beam quality, depth, and lateral dose profiles during monthly QAs at lower doses of irradiation (small monitor units, MUs).

  17. A study of possibility to design a fast neutron spectrometer based on the organic scintillator with surrounding materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avdić Senada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the design of a novel spectrometer of fast neutrons in nuclear safeguards applications based on the liquid organic scintillator EJ-309 with materials of different thickness surrounding the detector. The investigation was performed on the simulated data obtained by the MCNPX-PoliMi numerical code based on the Monte Carlo method. Among the various materials (polyethylene, iron, aluminum, and graphite investigated as layers around the scintillator, polyethylene and iron have shown the most promising characteristics for evaluation of fast neutron energy spectra. The simulated pulse height distributions were summed up for each energy bin in the neutron energy range between 1 MeV and 15 MeV in order to obtain better counting statistics. The unfolded results for monoenergetic neutron sources obtained by a first order of Tikhonov regularization and non-linear neural network show very good agreement with the reference data while the evaluated spectra of neutron sources continuous in energy follow the trend of the reference spectra. The possible advantages of a novel spectrometer include a less number of input data for processing and a less sensitivity to the noise compared to the scintillation detector without surrounding materials.

  18. A Minor Modification of Leading Edge Discriminator Circuitry with a Delay Line for Baseline Restoration of Scintillation Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, N

    2003-05-27

    Multi-channel neutron time-of-flight detector arrays LaNSA, T-ion, Medusa, and Mandala, have been used for neutron spectroscopy in inertial confinement fusion experiments. These multi-channel neutron detector arrays consist of many identical scintillation detectors (842 {approx} 1024 channel), data acquisition electronics (discriminators, time-to digital converters, and controller). Each detector element is operated in neutron counting mode. Time-of-flight of individual detected neutrons are recorded by time to digital converters. The energy of each detected neutrons is determined from its time-of-flight. The accurate time measurement ({Delta}t {approx} 0.5 ns) and straightforward statistical features of the data obtained with these systems provides good integrity and reliability. The elements detector used in these systems are organic scintillators coupled with photo multiplier tubes. A scintillation detector operated in particle-counting mode requires finite recovery time after each detection event. The recovery time is determined by the time responses of scintillators, photo multiplier tubes, and the dead times of following discriminators and time-to digital converters. The harsh gamma ray background environment of fast ignitor experiments requires detectors that have fast recovery times. In high intensity laser experiments (I > 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}), strong gamma ray bursts are produced by relativistic laser plasma interactions. Prior to the neutron signal, these strong gamma ray bursts hit the detectors and interfere with the detection of following neutron signals. In these situations, the recovery time of the system after preceding gamma ray bursts is determined mainly by the base line shift of the PMT signal (due to slower decay components of scintillators ''after glow''). Discriminators cannot detect following signal pulses until the proceeding burst decays below its threshold voltage. The base line shift caused by the after glow

  19. Quantum chemical calculation of electron ionization mass spectra for general organic and inorganic molecules† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: GFN-xTB calculated potential energy surfaces for example coordinates. Additional calculated mass spectra. Computational timing statistics. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc00601b Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ásgeirsson, Vilhjálmur; Bauer, Christoph A.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a fully stand-alone version of the Quantum Chemistry Electron Ionization Mass Spectra (QCEIMS) program [S. Grimme, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2013, 52, 6306] allowing efficient simulations for molecules composed of elements with atomic numbers up to Z = 86. The recently developed extended tight-binding semi-empirical method GFN-xTB has been combined with QCEIMS, thereby eliminating dependencies on third-party electronic structure software. Furthermore, for reasonable calculations of ionization potentials, as required by the method, a second tight-binding variant, IPEA-xTB, is introduced here. This novel combination of methods allows the automatic, fast and reasonably accurate computation of electron ionization mass spectra for structurally different molecules across the periodic table. In order to validate and inspect the transferability of the method, we perform large-scale simulations for some representative organic, organometallic, and main-group inorganic systems. Theoretical spectra for 23 molecules are compared directly to experimental data taken from standard databases. For the first time, realistic quantum chemistry based EI-MS for organometallic systems like ferrocene or copper(ii)acetylacetonate are presented. Compared to previously used semiempirical methods, GFN-xTB is faster, more robust, and yields overall higher quality spectra. The partially analysed theoretical reaction and fragmentation mechanisms are chemically reasonable and reveal in unprecedented detail the extreme complexity of high energy gas phase ion chemistry including complicated rearrangement reactions prior to dissociation. PMID:28959412

  20. First Results of the Dispersion Analysis of the Interplanetary Scintillations at Decameter Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkovich, I. S.; Konovalenko, O. O.; Kalinichenko, N. N.; Olyak, M. R.; Gridin, A. A.; Bubnov, I. N.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Lecacheux, A.; Rucker, H. O.

    2007-12-01

    The potentialities of the dispersion analysis in investigating the interplanetary scintillations registered in the two points (UTR-2 and URAN-2) are discussed. The joint analysis of the frequency dependence of the velocity of their cross-spectrum harmonics and their power spectra allows to determine the main parameters of the interplanetary plasma along the line of sight. If the multi-layer model of the medium is used, the thicknesses of the layers, their densities, velocities, as well as indices of the spatial spectrum and the inner scales of the turbulence can be obtained.

  1. Assessment of GPS Multifrequency Signal Characteristics During Periods of Ionospheric Scintillations from an Anomaly Crest Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, S.; Paul, K. S.; Paul, A.

    2017-09-01

    Multifrequency GPS transmissions have provided the opportunity for testing the applicability of the principle of frequency diversity for scintillation mitigation. Published results addressing this issue with quantified estimates are not available in literature, at least from the anomaly crest location of the Indian longitude sector. Multifrequency scattering within the same L band is often the attributed cause behind simultaneous decorrelated signal fluctuations. The present paper aims to provide proportion of time during scintillation patches that decorrelations are found across GPS L1, L2, and L5 frequencies associated with high S4, corresponding high values of scattering coefficients, and large receiver position deviations thereby seriously compromising the performance of satellite-based navigation system. Results from the anomaly crest station at Calcutta indicate maximum 40% of scintillation time during February-April 2014 and 33% during August-October 2014 that the signals are decorrelated. It is important to note that it is only during these time intervals that the principle of frequency diversity could be applied for scintillation mitigation.

  2. Development of a thin scintillation films fission-fragment detector and a novel neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusev, G.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Daum, J. K.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Roman, A. R.; Springs, R. K.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-08-01

    Investigation of prompt fission and neutron-capture Υ rays from fissile actinide samples at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) requires use of a fission-fragment detector to provide a trigger or a veto signal. A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillations were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U(n,f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flight spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described. A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the same type of scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements with it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  3. Response of Inorganic Scintillators to Neutrons of 3 and 15 MeV Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Lucchini, M; Pizzichemi, M; Chipaux, R; Jacquot, F; Mazue, H; Wolff, H; Lecoq, P; Auffray, E

    2014-01-01

    In the perspective of the development of future high energy physics experiments, homogeneous calorimeters based on inorganic scintillators can be considered for the detection of hadrons (e.g., calorimeter based on dual-readout technique). Although of high importance in the high energy physics framework as well as for homeland security applications, the response of these inorganic scintillators to neutrons has been only scarcely investigated. This paper presents results obtained using five common scintillating crystals (of size around 2x2x2 cm 3), namely lead tungstate (PbWO4), bismuth germanate (BGO), cerium fluoride (CeF3), Ce-doped lutetium-yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO:Ce) and lutetium aluminum garnet (LuAG:Ce) in a pulsed flux of almost mono-energetic (similar to 3 MeV and similar to 15 MeV) neutrons provided by the Van de Graff accelerator SAMES of CEA Valduc. Energy spectra have been recorded, calibrated and compared with Geant4 simulations computed with different physics models. The neutron detection eff...

  4. Emission properties of Ce-doped alkaline earth borate glasses for scintillator applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torimoto, Aya; Masai, Hirokazu; Okada, Go; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the photoluminescence (PL) and X-ray-induced luminescence properties of 0.1 mol% Ce-doped MO-B2O3 (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba) glasses. We also determine the Ce3+/(Ce3++Ce4+) ratio by X-ray absorption near-edge structure analyses. The emission intensities of PL, X-ray scintillation, and thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) depend on the host glass composition. The order of the PL intensity from highest to lowest is as follows: Ca-substituted glass, Ba-substituted glass, and Sr-substituted glass. Our results suggest that the optical absorption edge and quantum yield (QY) are influenced by the local coordination state of Ce3+, which, in turn, is likely to be affected by the optical basicity. The order of the X-ray scintillation intensity from highest to lowest is reverse of that of the PL intensity. This is probably because the interaction probability of X-rays with matter depends on the effective atomic number of the material and the effective atomic number has a stronger influence on the scintillation intensity than does the QY. Though the TSL glow curves reveal that the density and energy depth of the trap sites depend on the substituted alkaline earth oxides, we are unable to correlate the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra with the TSL results. Therefore, it is considered that the ESR active sites are not responsible for the TSL in these systems.

  5. The study of inorganic scintillating materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudkin, G. N.; Kuznetsov, S. I.; Padalko, V. N.; Syrtanov, M. S.

    2017-05-01

    The procedure for measuring the temporal characteristics and light output of inorganic scintillating materials excited by β-, γ-, and α-particles from radioactive sources is described. Results of measurements of characteristics are presented for ∼30 scintillating compounds including cerium-doped yttrium silicate and scandium borate; europium-doped strontium phosphate; cerium-doped strontium silicate, calcium silicate and magnesium calcium silicate, etc. Upon β- and γ-excitation, cerium-doped scandium borate gives the highest light output with a fluorescent lifetime of 40 ± 4 ns. The highest light output for α-excitation was from cerium-doped yttrium aluminum perovskite, with a fluorescent lifetime of 29 ± 3 ns.

  6. Transparent Ceramic Scintillator Fabrication, Properties and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherepy, N J; Kuntz, J D; Roberts, J J; Hurst, T A; Drury, O B; Sanner, R D; Tillotson, T M; Payne, S A

    2008-08-24

    Transparent ceramics offer an alternative to single crystals for scintillator applications such as gamma ray spectroscopy and radiography. We have developed a versatile, scaleable fabrication method, using Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) to produce feedstock which is readily converted into phase-pure transparent ceramics. We measure integral light yields in excess of 80,000 Ph/MeV with Cerium-doped Garnets, and excellent optical quality. Avalanche photodiode readout of Garnets provides resolution near 6%. For radiography applications, Lutetium Oxide offers a high performance metric and is formable by ceramics processing. Scatter in transparent ceramics due to secondary phases is the principal limitation to optical quality, and afterglow issues that affect the scintillation performance are presently being addressed.

  7. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  8. Plastic scintillator detector for pulsed flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplun, A. A.; Taraskin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A neutron detector, providing charged particle detection capability, has been designed. The main purpose of the detector is to measure pulsed fluxes of both charged particles and neutrons during scientific experiments. The detector consists of commonly used neutron-sensitive ZnS(Ag) / 6LiF scintillator screens wrapping a layer of polystyrene based scintillator (BC-454, EJ-254 or equivalent boron loaded plastic). This type of detector design is able to log a spatial distribution of events and may be scaled to any size. Different variations of the design were considered and modelled in specialized toolkits. The article presents a review of the detector design features as well as simulation results.

  9. Measurement of the hadronic interaction inside the plastic scintillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ramazani-moghaddam-Arani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available  Scintillation detectors are widely used in the experimental setup for the detection of charged particles. These detectors are able to measure the energy and time-of-flight of the charged particles. Also, they can be used to identify the detected particle. The probability of hadronic interaction between the detected particle and the nuclei of the scintillator atoms is one important issue that must be considered in the analysis of the detectors output. The hadronic interaction causes particles the deposit only a part of their energy inside the detector. In this case, particle will appear in the tail of energy spectrum and is mixed with the background events. Therefore, the measured cross section, which is calculated using the number of particles that deposit their full energy in the detector will be underestimated and one should correct the cross section for the lost events. The percentage of incident particles for which the hadronic interaction occurs is determined by different methods. In this paper, using two different methods, Monte-Carlo simulation and experimental data for several different channels in the proton-deuteron and deuteron-deuteron scattering at intermediate energy are introduced. The obtained results from the two methods are consistent with each other.

  10. Development of pixelated scintillator-based compact radio-TLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Sang June; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Jong Guk [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The radio-TLC system generally shows as a graph of counting gamma radioactivity, emitting by radiopharmaceutical including a specific radioisotope. it makes guarantee quantitative accuracy and reproducibility for chemically stability and change of a targeting radiopharmaceutical. In present the radio-TLC produced by a few companies use a gas-filled proportional counter with high cost, and it has limitations of both gas diffusion and ion density. Recently, Ce:GAGG has been developed and presented as promising scintillators for PET and SPECT due to high density, high light yield (- 46,000-51,000 photon/MeV), and fast decay time. We have adapted GAGG scintillation crystal array to radio-TLC detector. We developed the GAGG crystal array based radio-TLC RT-102. The RT-102 has several advantages such as the compact size, the no-gas usage, and the lower cost in comparison with commercial radio-TLC scanner. In order to verify the performance of RT-102, we compared RT-102 with AR-2000. We scanned and compared Tc-99m and F-18 solution spotted samples in the same conditions. The ROI counts ratio and position detecting performances of RT-102 are approximately same with AR-2000. The results indicate the RT-102 has enough resolution and sensitivity to be used in the measurement of radiochemical purity test in radio-TLC devices.

  11. Scintillator developments for high energy physics and medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2000-01-01

    Scintillating crystals have been for a long time developed as a basic component in particle detectors with a strong spin-off in the field of medical imaging. A typical example is BGO, which has become the main component of PET scanners since the large effort made by the L3 experiment at CERN to develop low cost production methods for this crystal. Systematic R&D on basic mechanism in inorganic scintillators, initiated by the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN 10 years ago, has contributed not to a small amount, to the development of new materials for high energy physics and for a new generation of medical imaging devices with increased resolution and sensitivity. The examples of the lead tungstate crystal for the CMS experiment at CERN (high energy physics) as well as of new materials under development for medical imaging will be described with an emphasis on the mutual benefit both fields can extract from a common R&D effort. (14 refs).

  12. A new hybrid photomultiplier tube as detector for scintillating crystals

    CERN Document Server

    De Notaristefani, F; Vittori, F

    2002-01-01

    In this work, we have attentively studied the performance of a new hybrid photomultiplier tube (HPMT) as detector for photons from scintillating crystals. The HPMT is equipped with a YAP window in order to improve light collection and increase measured light response from scintillating crystals. Several measurements have been performed on BGO, LSO, CsI(Tl) and NaI(Tl) planar crystals having three different surface treatments as well as on YAP : Ce and CsI(Tl) matrices. Such crystals have been coupled to two HPMTs, one equipped with a YAP window (Y-HPMT) and the other with a conventional quartz window (Q-HPMT). Measurements on crystals coupled to the Y-HPMT have shown a consistent improvement of the light response, thanks to the presence of the YAP window. Indeed, the light response measured with the Y-HPMT was on average equal to 1.5, 2.1 and 2.6 times that obtained with the Q-HPMT for planar crystals with white painted (diffusive), fine ground and polished rear surfaces, respectively. With regards to crystal...

  13. A nonimaging scintillation probe to measure penile hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckier, L S; Korupolu, G R; Gladshteyn, M; Sattenberg, R; Goldstein, R; Ricciardi, R; Goodwin, P; Melman, A; Blaufox, M D

    1995-12-01

    We have developed a penile nonimaging scintillation (PNIS) probe consisting of a plastic well-type scintillation crystal interfaced to a portable computer and acquisition board. This report describes the design of the PNIS probe, performance characteristics, mode of usage and illustrative results which demonstrate its capabilities. With the PNIS probe, penile blood-pool studies were performed in nine patients utilizing 3.7 MBq (100 microCi) autologous 99mTc-labeled red blood cells (RBCs). Venous blood standards were assayed to enable conversion of the count rate to volummetric measurements. Washin of peripherally administered 99mTc-RBCs was mathematically analyzed to estimate penile blood volume and cavernosal flow rate in the flaccid state. The rate of change of penile blood volume after intracavernosal vasodilators was used to generate measures of stimulated flow. A major advantage of this device over the gamma-camera is a 3300-fold increase in count rate sensitivity, which allows for markedly improved temporal resolution while significantly reducing the radiopharmaceutical dosage. Additionally, the PNIS probe is portable, economical and is not dependent on operator-defined regions of interest. Count rate sensitivity is relatively constant within the bore, with the exception of the proximal region adjacent to the opening, where geometric efficiency is reduced. The PNIS probe is an effective device for measuring penile activity in radionuclide studies, allowing for acquisition of time-activity curves of the penis during flaccid washin of peripherally labeled red blood cells and after pharmacologic stimulation to induce erection.

  14. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward; Mckigney, Edward Allen; Gilbertson, Robert David

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  15. A novel segmented-scintillator antineutrino detector

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu, Y.; Amhis, Y.; Arnold, L; Ban, G.; Beaumont, W.; Bongrand, M.; Boursette, D.; Buhour, J. M.; Castle, B.C.; Clark, K.; Coupé, B; Cucoanes, A.S.; Cussans, D; De Roeck, A.; D'Hondt, J.

    2017-01-01

    The next generation of very-short-baseline reactor experiments will require compact detectors operating at surface level and close to a nuclear reactor. This paper presents a new detector concept based on a composite solid scintillator technology. The detector target uses cubes of polyvinyltoluene interleaved with 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) phosphor screens to detect the products of the inverse beta decay reaction. A multi-tonne detector system built from these individual cells can provide precise localisa...

  16. A novel segmented-scintillator antineutrino detector

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu, Y.; Amhis, Y.; Arnold, L; Ban, G.; Beaumont, W.; Bongrand, M.; Boursette, D.; Buhour, J. M.; Castle, B.C.; Clark, K.; Coupé, B; Cucoanes, A.S.; Cussans, D; De Roeck, A.; D'Hondt, J.

    2017-01-01

    The next generation of very-short-baseline reactor experiments will require compact detectors operating at surface level and close to a nuclear reactor. This paper presents a new detector concept based on a composite solid scintillator technology. The detector target uses cubes of polyvinyltoluene interleaved with (6)LiF:ZnS(Ag) phosphor screens to detect the products of the inverse beta decay reaction. A multi-tonne detector system built from these individual cells can provide precise locali...

  17. Improved Neutron Scintillators Based on Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis Friesel, PhD

    2008-06-30

    The development work conducted in this SBIR has so far not supported the premise that using nano-particles in LiFZnS:Ag foils improves their transparency to 420 (or other frequency) light. This conclusion is based solely on the light absorption properties of LiFZnS foils fabricated from nano- and from micro-particles. Furthermore, even for the case of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} foils, the transmission of 420 nm light gained by using nano-particles all but disappears as the foil thickness is increased beyond about 0.2 mm, a practical scintillator thickness. This was not immediately apparent from the preliminary study since no foils thicker than about 0.04 mm were produced. Initially it was believed that the failure to see an improvement by using nano-particles for the LiFZnS foils was caused by the clumping of the particles in Toluene due to the polarity of the ZnS particles. However, we found, much to our surprise, that nano-particle ZnS alone in polystyrene, and in Epoxy, had worse light transmission properties than the micro-particle foils for equivalent thickness and density foils. The neutron detection measurements, while disappointing, are attributable to our inability to procure or fabricate Bulk Doped ZnS nanoparticles. The cause for the failure of nano-particles to improve the scintillation light, and hence improved neutron detection efficiency, is a fundamental one of light scattering within the scintillator. A consequence of PartTec's documentation of this is that several concepts for the fabrication of improved {sup 6}LiFZnS scintillators were formulated that will be the subject of a future SBIR submission.

  18. Low current charge normalization with scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plompen, A. J. M.; Munnik, F.; Wätjen, U.

    1996-04-01

    The use of ZnS(Ag) and YAG(Ce) scintillators for charge normalization at low currents (> 15 pA) was demonstrated with current gains of 2 × 10 3 using a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and up to 10 with a photodiode (PD). An accuracy of a few percent, sufficient for ion beam applications, was obtained. The potential of the method and its use for microprobe applications is discussed.

  19. Barium halide nanocrystals in fluorozirconate based glass ceramics for scintillation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selling, J.

    2007-07-01

    Europium (Eu)-activated barium halide nanocrystals in fluorozirconate based glass ceramics represent a promising class of Xray scintillators. The scintillation in these glass ceramics is mainly caused by the emission of divalent Eu incorporated in hexagonal BaCl{sub 2} nanocrystals which are formed in the glass matrix upon appropriate annealing. Experiments with cerium (Ce)-activated fluorozironate glass ceramics showed that Ce is an interesting alternative. In order to get a better understanding of the scintillation mechanism in Eu- or Ce-activated barium halide nanocrystals, an investigation of the processes in the corresponding bulk material is essential. The objective of this thesis is the investigation of undoped, Eu-, and Ce-doped barium halides by X-ray excited luminescence (XL), pulse height, and scintillation decay spectra. That will help to figure out which of these crystals has the most promising scintillation properties and would be the best nanoparticles for the glass ceramics. Furthermore, alternative dopants like samarium (Sm) and manganese (Mn) were also investigated. Besides the above-mentioned optical investigation electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Moessbauer measurements were carried out in order to complete the picture of Eu-doped barium halides. The EPR data of Eu-doped BaI{sub 2} is anticipated to yield more information about the crystal field and crystal structure that will help to understand the charge carrier process during the scintillation process. The main focus of the Moessbauer investigations was set on the Eu-doped fluorochlorozirconate glass ceramics. The results of this investigation should help to improve the glass ceramics. The Eu{sup 2+}/Eu{sup 3+} ratio in the glass ceramics should be determined and optimize favor of the Eu{sup 2+}. We also want to distinguish between Eu{sup 2+} in the glass matrix and Eu{sup 2+} in the nanocrystals. For a better understanding of Moessbauer spectroscopy on Eu also measurements on Eu in a

  20. Scintillation counter with MRS APD light readout

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00061314; Malkevich, D.; Martemyanov, A.; Ryabinin, M.; Smirnitsky, A.; Voloshin, K.; Bondarenko, G.; Golovin, V.; Grigoriev, E.

    2005-01-01

    START, a high-efficiency and low-noise scintillation detector for ionizing particles, was developed for the purpose of creating a high-granular system for triggering cosmic muons. Scintillation light in START is detected by MRS APDs (Avalanche Photo-Diodes with Metal-Resistance-Semiconductor structure), operated in the Geiger mode, which have 1 mm^2 sensitive areas. START is assembled from a 15 x 15 x 1 cm^3 scintillating plastic plate, two MRS APDs and two pieces of wavelength-shifting optical fiber stacked in circular coils inside the plastic. The front-end electronic card is mounted directly on the detector. Tests with START have confirmed its operational consistency, over 99% efficiency of MIP registration and good homogeneity. START demonstrates a low intrinsic noise of about 10^{-2} Hz. If these detectors are to be mass-produced, the cost of a mosaic array of STARTs is estimated at a moderate level of 2-3 kUSD/m^2.

  1. Chloride, bromide and iodide scintillators with europium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravleva, Mariya; Yang, Kan

    2016-09-27

    A halide scintillator material is disclosed where the halide may comprise chloride, bromide or iodide. The material is single-crystalline and has a composition of the general formula ABX.sub.3 where A is an alkali, B is an alkali earth and X is a halide which general composition was investigated. In particular, crystals of the formula ACa.sub.1-yEu.sub.yI.sub.3 where A=K, Rb and Cs were formed as well as crystals of the formula CsA.sub.1-yEu.sub.yX.sub.3 (where A=Ca, Sr, Ba, or a combination thereof and X=Cl, Br or I or a combination thereof) with divalent Europium doping where 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, and more particularly Eu doping has been studied at one to ten mol %. The disclosed scintillator materials are suitable for making scintillation detectors used in applications such as medical imaging and homeland security.

  2. SPECTRA. September 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    low-Earth-orbit- ing space objects. The ANDE project is also advancing miniaturization of sensor technologies that are pivotal for multi-point...solar wind outflow. Determination of the processes that generate and drive the solar wind will provide a fundamental advance in our...Observatory containing NRL’s Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment 19 5 8 7limited edition NRL FEATURES 1993 NRL’s Polar Ozone and

  3. B-Loaded Plastic Scintillator on the Base of Polystyrene

    CERN Document Server

    Brudanin, V B; Nemchenok, I B; Smolnikov, A A

    2000-01-01

    A method to produce polystyrene-based plastic scintillators with boron concentration from 0.38 to 5.0% of boron have been developed. o-Carborane was used as B-containing additive. The results of investigations of the optical, spectral and scintillation characteristics are presented and discussed. It is shown that 5% B-loaded scintillator has a light output as much as 70% relative to the unloaded one. High efficiency for thermal neutron registration achieved for produced samples makes it possible to use such scintillators in complex neutron high sensitive spectrometers. Measured level of radioactive contamination in this scintillation materials is good enough for using the B-loaded scintillators in the proposed large scale neutrino experiments.

  4. Scintillation measurements at Bahir Dar during the high solar activity phase of solar cycle 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriegel, Martin; Jakowski, Norbert; Berdermann, Jens; Sato, Hiroatsu [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Neustrelitz (Germany). Inst. of Communications and Navigation; Mersha, Mogese Wassaie [Bahir Dar Univ. (Ethiopia). Washera Geospace and Radar Science Lab.

    2017-04-01

    Small-scale ionospheric disturbances may cause severe radio scintillations of signals transmitted from global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs). Consequently, smallscale plasma irregularities may heavily degrade the performance of current GNSSs such as GPS, GLONASS or Galileo. This paper presents analysis results obtained primarily from two high-rate GNSS receiver stations designed and operated by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in cooperation with Bahir Dar University (BDU) at 11.6 N, 37.4 E. Both receivers collect raw data sampled at up to 50 Hz, from which characteristic scintillation parameters such as the S4 index are deduced. This paper gives a first overview of the measurement setup and the observed scintillation events over Bahir Dar in 2015. Both stations are located close to one another and aligned in an east-west, direction which allows us to estimate the zonal drift velocity and spatial dimension of equatorial ionospheric plasma irregularities. Therefore, the lag times of moving electron density irregularities and scintillation patterns are derived by applying cross-correlation analysis to high-rate measurements of the slant total electron content (sTEC) along radio links between a GPS satellite and both receivers and to the associated signal power, respectively. Finally, the drift velocity is derived from the estimated lag time, taking into account the geometric constellation of both receiving antennas and the observed GPS satellites.

  5. Scintillation measurements at Bahir Dar during the high solar activity phase of solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Martin; Jakowski, Norbert; Berdermann, Jens; Sato, Hiroatsu; Wassaie Mersha, Mogese

    2017-01-01

    Small-scale ionospheric disturbances may cause severe radio scintillations of signals transmitted from global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs). Consequently, small-scale plasma irregularities may heavily degrade the performance of current GNSSs such as GPS, GLONASS or Galileo. This paper presents analysis results obtained primarily from two high-rate GNSS receiver stations designed and operated by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in cooperation with Bahir Dar University (BDU) at 11.6° N, 37.4° E. Both receivers collect raw data sampled at up to 50 Hz, from which characteristic scintillation parameters such as the S4 index are deduced. This paper gives a first overview of the measurement set-up and the observed scintillation events over Bahir Dar in 2015. Both stations are located close to one another and aligned in an east-west, direction which allows us to estimate the zonal drift velocity and spatial dimension of equatorial ionospheric plasma irregularities. Therefore, the lag times of moving electron density irregularities and scintillation patterns are derived by applying cross-correlation analysis to high-rate measurements of the slant total electron content (sTEC) along radio links between a GPS satellite and both receivers and to the associated signal power, respectively. Finally, the drift velocity is derived from the estimated lag time, taking into account the geometric constellation of both receiving antennas and the observed GPS satellites.

  6. Neutron spectroscopy by thermalization light yield measurement in a composite heterogeneous scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, T.; Nattress, J.; Mayer, Michael F.; Lin, M-W; Jovanovic, Igor

    2016-12-11

    An exothermic neutron capture reaction can be used to uniquely identify neutrons in particle detectors. With the use of a capture-gated coincidence technique, the sequence of scatter events that lead to neutron thermalization prior to the neutron capture can also be used to measure neutron energy. We report on the measurement of thermalization light yield via a time-of-flight technique in a polyvinyl toluene-based scintillator EJ-290 within a heterogeneous composite detector that also includes 6Li-doped glass scintillator. The thermalization light output exhibits a strong correlation with neutron energy because of the preference for near-complete energy deposition prior to the 6Li(n,t)4He neutron capture reaction. The nonproportionality of the light yield from nuclear recoils contributes to the observed broadening of the distribution of thermalization light output. The nonproportional dependence of the scintillation light output in the EJ-290 scintillator as a function of proton recoil energy has been characterized in the range of 0.3–14.1 MeV via the Birks parametrization through a combination of time-of-flight measurement and previously conducted measurements with Monoenergetic neutron sources.

  7. Neutron spectroscopy by thermalization light yield measurement in a composite heterogeneous scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, T., E-mail: tan.shi0122@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Nattress, J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Mayer, M. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Lin, M.-W. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Jovanovic, I. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-12-11

    An exothermic neutron capture reaction can be used to uniquely identify neutrons in particle detectors. With the use of a capture-gated coincidence technique, the sequence of scatter events that lead to neutron thermalization prior to the neutron capture can also be used to measure neutron energy. We report on the measurement of thermalization light yield via a time-of-flight technique in a polyvinyl toluene-based scintillator EJ-290 within a heterogeneous composite detector that also includes {sup 6}Li-doped glass scintillator. The thermalization light output exhibits a strong correlation with neutron energy because of the preference for near-complete energy deposition prior to the {sup 6}Li(n,t){sup 4}He neutron capture reaction. The nonproportionality of the light yield from nuclear recoils contributes to the observed broadening of the distribution of thermalization light output. The nonproportional dependence of the scintillation light output in the EJ-290 scintillator as a function of proton recoil energy has been characterized in the range of 0.3–14.1 MeV via the Birks parametrization through a combination of time-of-flight measurement and previously conducted measurements with monoenergetic neutron sources.

  8. Neutron spectroscopy by thermalization light yield measurement in a composite heterogeneous scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, T.; Nattress, J.; Mayer, M.; Lin, M.-W.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-12-01

    An exothermic neutron capture reaction can be used to uniquely identify neutrons in particle detectors. With the use of a capture-gated coincidence technique, the sequence of scatter events that lead to neutron thermalization prior to the neutron capture can also be used to measure neutron energy. We report on the measurement of thermalization light yield via a time-of-flight technique in a polyvinyl toluene-based scintillator EJ-290 within a heterogeneous composite detector that also includes 6Li-doped glass scintillator. The thermalization light output exhibits a strong correlation with neutron energy because of the preference for near-complete energy deposition prior to the 6Li(n,t)4He neutron capture reaction. The nonproportionality of the light yield from nuclear recoils contributes to the observed broadening of the distribution of thermalization light output. The nonproportional dependence of the scintillation light output in the EJ-290 scintillator as a function of proton recoil energy has been characterized in the range of 0.3-14.1 MeV via the Birks parametrization through a combination of time-of-flight measurement and previously conducted measurements with monoenergetic neutron sources.

  9. A wearable sensor based on CLYC scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Benjamin S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Myjak, Mitchell J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zalavadia, Mital A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smart, John E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Willett, Jesse A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Landgren, Peter C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Greulich, Christopher R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    We developed a wearable radiation sensor using Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) for simultaneous gamma-ray and neutron detection. The system includes two ø2.5×2.5 cm3 crystals coupled to small, metal-body photomultiplier tubes. A custom, low-power electronics base digitizes the output signal at three time points and enables both pulse height and pulse shape discrimination of neutrons and gamma-rays. Data, including spectra, can be transferred via a wired or wireless connection. The total gamma-ray and neutron counts, anomaly detection metrics, and identified isotopes are displayed on a small screen on the device. Users may leave the system in unattended mode to collect long-dwell energy spectra. The prototype system has overall dimensions of 13×7.5×18 cm3 and weight of 1.3 kg, not including the protective pouch, and runs on six AA alkaline batteries for 29 hours with a 1% wireless transmission duty cycle and 41 hours with the wireless turned off . In this paper, we summarize the system design and present characterization results from the detector modules. The energy resolution is about 6.5% full width at half maximum at 662 keV due to the small photomultiplier tube selected, and the linearity and pulse shape discrimination performance are very good.

  10. Optimization of ultra-cold neutron scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novopoltsev, M. I.; Pokotilovskii, Yu. N.

    1980-05-01

    The results are presented of the optimization of scintillation detectors of ultra-cold neutrons relative to the thickness of scintillator ZnS(Ag) and radiator LiOH. The method is stated and results are reported of measurements of the energy dependence of the efficiency of UCN detectors. The detector with a rotating scintillator is described. It has a high and constant efficiency over the whole UCN energy range.

  11. Performance of Large Neutron Detectors Containing Lithium-Gadolinium-Borate Scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaughter, David M.; Stuart, Cory R.; Klaass, R. Fred; Merrill, David B. [MSI/Photogenics Division, Orem, Utah (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a neutron counter, spectrometer, and dosimeter that is compact, efficient, and accurate. A self-contained neutron detection instrument has wide applications in health physics, scientific research, and programs to detect, monitor, and control strategic nuclear materials (SNM). The 1.3 liter detector head for this instrument is a composite detector with an organic scintillator containing uniformly distributed {sup 6}Li{sub 6}{sup nat}Gd{sup 10}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}:Ce (LGB:Ce) microcrystals. The plastic scintillator acts to slow impinging neutrons and emits light proportional to the energy lost by the neutrons as they moderate in the detector body. Moderating neutrons that have slowed sufficiently capture in one of the Lithium-6, Boron-10, or Gadolinium-157 atoms in the LGB:Ce scintillator, which then releases the capture energy in a characteristic cerium emission pulse. The measured captured pulses indicate the presence of neutrons. When a scintillating fluor is present in the plastic, the light pulse resulting from the neutron moderating in the plastic is paired with the LGB:Ce capture pulse to identify the energy of the neutron. About 2% of the impinging neutrons lose all of their energy in a single collision with the detector. There is a linear relationship between the pulse areas of this group of neutrons and energy. The other 98% of neutrons have a wide range of collision histories within the detector body. When these neutrons are 'binned' into energy groups, each group contains a distribution of pulse areas. This data was used to assist in the unfolding of the neutron spectra. The unfolded spectra were then validated with known spectra, at both neutron emitting isotopes and fission/accelerator facilities. Having validated spectra, the dose equivalent and dose rate are determined by applying standard, regulatory damage coefficients to the measured neutron counts for each energy bin of the spectra. Testing

  12. Bridgman growth and scintillation properties of calcium tungstate single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenhai; Jiang, Linwen; Chen, Yaping; Chen, Peng; Chen, Hongbing; Mao, Rihua

    2017-12-01

    CaWO4 single crystal with large size was grown by Bridgman method. The results of transmission spectra show that the transmittance of CaWO4 crystal reaches 79-85% in 320-800 nm wavelength range. The refraction index is near 1.80 in visible and infrared region. CaWO4 crystal shows a broad emission band centered at 424 nm under X-ray excitation and centered at 416 nm under ultraviolet (λex = 280 nm) excitation. The decay kinetics of CaWO4 single crystal shows double-exponential decay with fast decay constant τ1 = 5.4 μs and slow decay constant τ2 = 177.1 μs. The energy resolution of CaWO4 crystal was found to be 31.6% in the net peak of 545.9 channel. Meanwhile, the absolute output is at the lever of 19,000 ± 1000 photons/MeV. The results indicate the scintillator of CaWO4 single crystal has great potential in the applications of high-energy physics and nuclear physics due to its high light output and great energy resolution.

  13. Optics general-purpose scintillator light response simulation code

    CERN Document Server

    Frlez, E; Pocanic, D

    2001-01-01

    We present the program optics that simulates the light response of an arbitrarily shaped scintillation particle detector. Predicted light responses of pure CsI polygonal detectors, plastic scintillator staves, cylindrical plastic target scintillators and a Plexiglas light-distribution plate are illustrated. We demonstrate how different bulk and surface optical properties of a scintillator lead to specific volume and temporal light collection probability distributions. High-statistics optics simulations are calibrated against the detector responses measured in a custom-made cosmic muon tomography apparatus. The presented code can also be used to track particles intersecting complex geometrical objects.

  14. Ionospheric scintilations over the polish LOFAR station PL610

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pożoga, Mariusz; Rothkaehl, Hanna; Matyjasiak, Barbara; Grzesiak, Marcin; Przepiórka, Dorota

    2017-04-01

    Using polish station PL610 of international LOFAR interferometer we present here observations of ionospheric scintillation over station. Scintillation phenomenon occurs as a result of variations in the refractive index of the medium through which waves are traveling. In particular Earth's ionosphere is strongly variable medium where high density gradients occure. Scintillation measurements may be successfully used to study the irregular structure of the ionosphere. The LOFAR telescope operates at frequencies from 10 to 240 MHz thus provides good opportunity to broad-band study of ionospheric irregularities. During the local mode periods four strong radio sources (LOFAR bright A-team sources) were observed in order to measure ionospheric scintillations.

  15. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  16. A step toward CNO solar neutrino detection in liquid scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villante, F.L., E-mail: villante@lngs.infn.it [Universita dell' Aquila, Dipartimento di Fisica, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Ianni, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Lombardi, F. [Universita dell' Aquila, Dipartimento di Fisica, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Pagliaroli, G.; Vissani, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy)

    2011-07-11

    The detection of CNO solar neutrinos in ultrapure liquid scintillator detectors is limited by the background produced by bismuth-210 nuclei that undergo {beta}-decay to polonium-210 with a lifetime of {approx}7 days. Polonium-210 nuclei are unstable and decay with a lifetime equal to {approx}200 days emitting {alpha} particles that can be also detected. In this Letter, we show that the Bi-210 background can be determined by looking at the time evolution of {alpha}-decay rate of Po-210, provided that {alpha} particle detection efficiency is stable over the data acquisition period and external sources of Po-210 are negligible. A sufficient accuracy can be obtained in a relatively short time. As an example, if the initial Po-210 event rate is {approx}2000 cpd/100 ton or lower, a Borexino-like detector could start discerning CNO neutrino signal from Bi-210 background in {Delta}t{approx}1 yr.

  17. The Borexino Solar Neutrino Experiment And Its Scintillator Containment Vessel

    CERN Document Server

    Cadonati, L

    2001-01-01

    Thirty years ago, the first solar neutrino detector proved fusion reactions power the Sun. However, the total rate detected in this and all subsequent solar neutrino experiments is consistently two to three times lower than predicted by the Standard Solar Model. Current experiments seek to explain this “solar neutrino puzzle” through non-standard particle properties, like neutrino mass and flavor mixing, within the context of the MSW theory. The detection of the monoenergetic 7Be solar neutrino is the missing clue for the solution of the solar neutrino problem; this constitutes the main physics goal of Borexino, a real- time, high-statistics solar neutrino detector located under the Gran Sasso mountain, in Italy. In the first part of this thesis, I present a Monte Carlo study of the expected performance of Borexino, with simulations of the neutrino rate, the external y background and the α/β/γ activity in the scintillator. The Standard Solar Model predicts a so...

  18. Separation of Interplanetary and Ionospheric Scintillations of Cosmic Sources at Decameter Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinichenko, N. N.; Falkovich, I. S.; Konovalenko, O. O.; Brazhenko, A. I.

    2013-09-01

    The influence of Earth's ionosphere on statistic characteristics, of compact space sources scintillations (cross-correlation, function of scintillations at two frequencies, cross-correlation, function of scintillations at two radio telescopes, power spectrum, of scintillations, probability density function of scintillations), has been experimentally estimated at decameter wavelength. A new method for selection of interplanetary scintillations, from experimental data obtained with the URAN system, radio telescopes has been developed.

  19. Rapid determination of gross alpha/beta activity in milk using liquid scintilation counter technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sas Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid determination of gross alpha and beta emitters in milk by liquid scintillation counter is discussed. This method is based on direct addition of different types of milk into scintillation cocktail and therefore it is very promising for fast determination of alpha/beta activity due to direct alpha and beta separation, measurement in close 4p geometry and without sample treatment. The selected group of radionuclides was chosen with the respect to military significance, radio-toxicity, and possibility of potential misuse. As model radionuclides 241Am, 239Pu, and 90Sr were selected. The Liquid Scintilation Counter Hidex 300 SL equipped with triple-double-coincidence-ratio technique was used for sample measurement. The aim of the work was focused on comparison of different cocktails produced by Hidex and Perkin Elmer, choosing the best cocktail based on our measurement results and adjustment of its appropriate volume. Furthermore, the optimization of ratio between the volume of scintillation cocktail and the volume of urine was investigated with the respect to the model radionuclides. According to the obtained results, the efficiency for alpha emitters was greater than 85% and for beta, greater than 95%. The obtained results allowed this method to be used for rapid determination of gross alpha/beta activity in cases where time is an essence, such as first responders or mass-scale samples, where ordinary means suffer from lack of capacity or simply collapse under the onslaught.

  20. Ionospheric scintillation detection based on GPS observations, a case study over Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhkhiz Miandehi, Sahar; Alizadeh Elizei, M. Mahdi; Schuh, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) which is used extensively for various purposes such as navigation, surveying, remote sensing and telecommunication, is strongly affected by the earth's upper atmosphere, the ionosphere. Ionosphere is a highly variable region with complex physical characteristics in which the density of free electrons are large enough to have considerable effects on signals' propagation travelling through this dispersive medium. As GPS signals travel through the ionosphere, they may experience rapid amplitude fluctuations or unexpected phase changes. This is referred to as ionospheric scintillation. Ionospheric scintillation which is caused by small scale irregularities in the electron density, is one of the dominant propagation disturbances at radio frequency signals. These irregularities severely affect the accuracy and reliability of GPS measurements. Therefore it is necessary to investigate ionospheric scintillation and its effects on GPS observations. The focus of this paper is to detect ionospheric scintillations over Iran's region, during different periods of solar activity and to investigate these effects on GPS observations in more detail. Furthermore the effects of these irregularities on regional modeling of ionosphere over Iran is also investigated. The results show that effectiveness of this phenomenon depends on geographic location, local time and global geomagnetic storm index (kp index). The required data for this investigation are ground based measurements of permanent GPS stations over Iran, established by the National Cartographic Center of Iran (NCC).

  1. A segmented scintillator-lead photon calorimeter using a double wavelength shifter optical readout system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fent, J.; Fessler, H.; Freund, P.; Gebauer, H. J.; Polakos, P.; Pretzl, K. P.; Schouten, T.; Seyboth, P.; Seyerlein, J.

    1984-09-01

    The construction and performance of a prototype scintillator lead photon calorimeter using a double wavelength shifter optical readout is described. The calorimeter is divided into 4 individual cells, each consisting of 44 layers of 3 mm lead plus 1 cm thick scintillator. The edges of each scintillator plate are covered by acrylic bars doped with a wavelength shifting material. The light produced in each scintillator plate is first converted in these bars and then converted a second time in a set of acrylic rods, which run longitudinally through the calorimeter along the corners of each calorimeter cell. A photomultiplier is attached to each of these rods at the back end of the calorimeter. The energy resolution obtained with incident electrons in the energy range of 2-30 GeV is σ/ E = 0.12/√ E. The uniformity of response across the front face of each cell was measured. Showers within each cell can be localised with an accuracy of better than σ = 7 mm.

  2. Scintillating Screens Based on the Single Crystalline Films of Multicomponent Garnets: New Achievements and Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorenko, Yuriy; Gorbenko, Vitalii; Zorenko, Tetiana; Paprocki, Kazimierz; Nikl, Martin; Mares, Jiri A.; Bilski, Pawel; Twardak, Anna; Sidletskiy, Oleg; Gerasymov, Iaroslav; Grinyov, Boris; Fedorov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    The paper is dedicated to development of the novel scintillating screens based on single crystalline films (SCF) of Ce doped Lu3 - xTbxAl5 - yGayO12 multicomponent garnets at x = 2 - 3 and y = 0 - 2.5 onto Y3Al5O12 (YAG) and Gd3Al2.5Ga2.5O12 (GAGG) substrates using the liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) method. We report the optimized content and high scintillation figure of merit of SCF of these garnets grown by the LPE method with using PbO based flux. Namely, the Tb3Al2.5Ga2.5O12:Ce SCFs possess the highest values of light yield (LY) compared to all earlier investigated SCF samples, with their LY exceeding by 2.35 and 1.15 times the LY values for YAG:Ce and LuAG:Ce SCF scintillators, respectively. The SCFs of the mentioned compounds show very lower thermoluminescence in the above room temperature range and relatively fast scintillation decay.

  3. Small-area fiber-coupled scintillation camera for imaging beta-ray distributions intraoperatively

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, L. R.; Tornai, Martin P.; Levin, C. S.; Park, J.; Atac, Muzaffer; Cline, David B.; Hoffman, Eric G.

    1995-09-01

    A small area, imaging, scintillation probe is being developed for locating small amounts of radio-labeled malignant tissue during surgery. Preliminary in brain surgery, avoiding the removal of excess tissue is a priority. It is possible to locate the main body of a brain tumor both before and during surgery, but once the bulk of the tumor is excised the identification of residual malignant tissue is difficult. A probe that covers an area of 1-2 cm(superscript 2) with an intrinsic resolution of 1-2 mm could locate small tumor masses that pose a threat of recurrence of the disease, and prevent removal of healthy tissue. A pre-operative injection of tumor seeking, beta emitting radiopharmaceutical (e.g. (superscript 18)fluorodeoxyuridine-FDUR-) will label the tumor. The limited range of beta-rays ensures proximity upon successful detection. Plastic scintillators are used for beta detection, and visible light photon counters (VLPCs) detect the scintillation light. For maneuverability in and around the surgical cavity, the scintillators are coupled to the VLPCs via 2 m of optical fiber. An imaging device can cover the tissue bed in a time compatible with surgery, as opposed to a single element detector on the order of 1-2 mm in size with comparable resolution. An imager also distinguishes high background rates (such as from annihilation gammas in FDUR) and concentrations of activity.

  4. Interstellar scintillations of PSR B1919+21: space-ground interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishov, V. I.; Smirnova, T. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Andrianov, A. S.; Popov, M. V.; Rudnitskiy, A. G.; Soglasnov, V. A.

    2017-07-01

    We carried out observations of pulsar PSR B1919+21 at 324 MHz to study the distribution of interstellar plasma in the direction of this pulsar. We used the RadioAstron (RA) space radio telescope, together with two ground telescopes: Westerbork (WB) and Green Bank (GB). The maximum baseline projection for the space-ground interferometer was about 60 000 km. We show that interstellar scintillation of this pulsar consists of two components: diffractive scintillations from inhomogeneities in a layer of turbulent plasma at a distance z1 = 440 pc from the observer or homogeneously distributed scattering material to the pulsar; and weak scintillations from a screen located near the observer at z2 = 0.14 ± 0.05 pc. Furthermore, in the direction to the pulsar we detected a prism that deflects radiation, leading to a shift in observed source position. We show that the influence of the ionosphere can be ignored for the space-ground baseline. Analysis of the spatial coherence function for the space-ground baseline (RA-GB) yielded a scattering angle in the observer plane of θscat = 0.7 mas. An analysis of the time-frequency correlation function for weak scintillations yielded an angle of refraction in the direction to the pulsar θref, 0 = 110 ms and a distance to the prism zprism ≤ 2 pc.

  5. HF produced ionospheric electron density irregularities diagnosed by UHF radio star scintillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, A.; Gordon, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Three observations of radio star intensity fluctuations at UHF are reported for HF ionospheric modification experiments carried out at the Arecibo Observatory. Two observations at 430 MHz and one at 1400 MHz suggest that the the thin phase screen theory is a good approximation to the observed power spectra. It is noted, however, that the theory has to be extended to include antenna filtering. This type of filtering is important for UHF radio star scintillations since the antenna usually has a narrow beamwidth. HF power densities of less than 37 microwatts/sq m incident on the ionosphere give rise to electron density irregularities larger than 13% of the ambient density (at 260 km) having scale sizes of approximately 510 m perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. The irregularities are found to form within 20-25 s after the HF power is turned on. The drift velocities of the irregularities can be estimated from the observed power spectra.

  6. Anisotropy of small-scale stratospheric irregularities retrieved from scintillations of a double star α-Cru observed by GOMOS/ENVISAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss estimating anisotropy of air density irregularities (ratio of characteristic horizontal and vertical scales from satellite observations of bi-chromatic scintillations of a double star whose components are not resolved by the detector. The analysis is based on fitting experimental auto- and cross-spectra of scintillations by those computed using the 3-D spectral model of atmospheric irregularities consisting of anisotropic and isotropic components. Application of the developed method to the scintillation measurements of the double star α-Cru by GOMOS (Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars fast photometers results in estimates of anisotropy coefficient of ~15–20 at altitudes 30–38 km, as well as other parameters of atmospheric irregularities. The obtained estimates of the anisotropy coefficient correspond to small-scale irregularities, close to the buoyancy scale.

  7. Ruby-based inorganic scintillation detectors for 192Ir brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Beddar, Sam

    2016-11-01

    We tested the potential of ruby inorganic scintillation detectors (ISDs) for use in brachytherapy and investigated various unwanted luminescence properties that may compromise their accuracy. The ISDs were composed of a ruby crystal coupled to a poly(methyl methacrylate) fiber-optic cable and a charge-coupled device camera. The ISD also included a long-pass filter that was sandwiched between the ruby crystal and the fiber-optic cable. The long-pass filter prevented the Cerenkov and fluorescence background light (stem signal) induced in the fiber-optic cable from striking the ruby crystal, which generates unwanted photoluminescence rather than the desired radioluminescence. The relative contributions of the radioluminescence signal and the stem signal were quantified by exposing the ruby detectors to a high-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The photoluminescence signal was quantified by irradiating the fiber-optic cable with the detector volume shielded. Other experiments addressed time-dependent luminescence properties and compared the ISDs to commonly used organic scintillator detectors (BCF-12, BCF-60). When the brachytherapy source dwelled 0.5 cm away from the fiber-optic cable, the unwanted photoluminescence was reduced from  >5% to  5% within 10 s from the onset of irradiation and after the source had retracted. The ruby-based ISDs generated signals of up to 20 times that of BCF-12-based detectors. The study presents solutions to unwanted luminescence properties of ruby-based ISDs for high-dose-rate brachytherapy. An optic filter should be sandwiched between the ruby crystal and the fiber-optic cable to suppress the photoluminescence. Furthermore, we recommend avoiding ruby crystals that exhibit significant time-dependent luminescence.

  8. Cerium doped lanthanum halides: fast scintillators for medical imaging; Halogenures de lanthane dopes cerium des scintillateurs rapides pour l'imagerie medicale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selles, O

    2006-12-15

    This work is dedicated to two recently discovered scintillating crystals: cerium doped lanthanum halides (LaCl{sub 3}:Ce{sup 3+} and LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup 3+}).These scintillators exhibit interesting properties for gamma detection, more particularly in the field of medical imaging: a short decay time, a high light yield and an excellent energy resolution. The strong hygroscopicity of these materials requires adapting the usual experimental methods for determining physico-chemical properties. Once determined, these can be used for the development of the industrial manufacturing process of the crystals. A proper comprehension of the scintillation mechanism and of the effect of defects within the material lead to new possible ways for optimizing the scintillator performance. Therefore, different techniques are used (EPR, radioluminescence, laser excitation, thermally stimulated luminescence). Alongside Ce{sup 3+} ions, self-trapped excitons are involved in the scintillation mechanism. Their nature and their role are detailed. The knowledge of the different processes involved in the scintillation mechanism leads to the prediction of the effect of temperature and doping level on the performance of the scintillator. A mechanism is proposed to explain the thermally stimulated luminescence processes that cause slow components in the light emission and a loss of light yield. Eventually the study of afterglow reveals a charge transfer to deep traps involved in the high temperature thermally stimulated luminescence. (author)

  9. Inorganic scintillation detectors based on Eu-activated phosphors for 192Ir brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Beddar, Sam

    2017-06-01

    The availability of real-time treatment verification during high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is currently limited. Therefore, we studied the luminescence properties of the widely commercially available scintillators using the inorganic materials Eu-activated phosphors Y2O3:Eu, YVO4:Eu, Y2O2S:Eu, and Gd2O2S:Eu to determine whether they could be used to accurately and precisely verify HDR brachytherapy doses in real time. The suitability for HDR brachytherapy of inorganic scintillation detectors (ISDs) based on the 4 Eu-activated phosphors in powder form was determined based on experiments with a 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source. The scintillation intensities of the phosphors were 16-134 times greater than that of the commonly used organic plastic scintillator BCF-12. High signal intensities were achieved with an optimized packing density of the phosphor mixture and with a shortened fiber-optic cable. The influence of contaminating Cerenkov and fluorescence light induced in the fiber-optic cable (stem signal) was adequately suppressed by inserting between the fiber-optic cable and the photodetector a 25 nm band-pass filter centered at the emission peak. The spurious photoluminescence signal induced by the stem signal was suppressed by placing a long-pass filter between the scintillation detector volume and the fiber-optic cable. The time-dependent luminescence properties of the phosphors were quantified by measuring the non-constant scintillation during irradiation and the afterglow after the brachytherapy source had retracted. We demonstrated that a mixture of Y2O3:Eu and YVO4:Eu suppressed the time-dependence of the ISDs and that the time-dependence of Y2O2S:Eu and Gd2O2S:Eu introduced large measurement inaccuracies. We conclude that ISDs based on a mixture of Y2O3:Eu and YVO4:Eu are promising candidates for accurate and precise real-time verification technology for HDR BT that is cost effective and straightforward to manufacture. Widespread dissemination of this

  10. High density scintillating glass proton imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, C. J.; Goranson, K.; Turney, A.; Xie, Q.; Tillman, I. J.; Thune, Z. L.; Dong, A.; Pritchett, D.; McInally, W.; Potter, A.; Wang, D.; Akgun, U.

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, proton therapy has achieved remarkable precision in delivering doses to cancerous cells while avoiding healthy tissue. However, in order to utilize this high precision treatment, greater accuracy in patient positioning is needed. An accepted approximate uncertainty of +/-3% exists in the current practice of proton therapy due to conversions between x-ray and proton stopping power. The use of protons in imaging would eliminate this source of error and lessen the radiation exposure of the patient. To this end, this study focuses on developing a novel proton-imaging detector built with high-density glass scintillator. The model described herein contains a compact homogeneous proton calorimeter composed of scintillating, high density glass as the active medium. The unique geometry of this detector allows for the measurement of both the position and residual energy of protons, eliminating the need for a separate set of position trackers in the system. Average position and energy of a pencil beam of 106 protons is used to reconstruct the image rather than by analyzing individual proton data. Simplicity and efficiency were major objectives in this model in order to present an imaging technique that is compact, cost-effective, and precise, as well as practical for a clinical setting with pencil-beam scanning proton therapy equipment. In this work, the development of novel high-density glass scintillator and the unique conceptual design of the imager are discussed; a proof-of-principle Monte Carlo simulation study is performed; preliminary two-dimensional images reconstructed from the Geant4 simulation are presented.

  11. Scintillating Fibre Calorimetry at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Good electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry will play a central role in an LHC detector. The lead/scintillating fibre calorimeter technique provides a fast signal response well matched to the LHC rate requirements. It can be made to give equal response for electrons and hadrons (compensation) with good electromagnetic and hadronic energy resolutions.\\\\ \\\\ The aim of this R&D proposal is to study in detail the aspects that are relevant for application of this type of calorimeter in an LHC environment, including its integration in a larger system of detectors, e.g.~projective geometry, radiation hardness, light detection, calibration and stability monitoring, electron/hadron separation.....

  12. AA, beam stopper with scintillator screen

    CERN Document Server

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    An insertable steel-plate beam stopper was located after nearly a full turn downstream of the injection point. It was fitted with a scintillator screen, a thin plate of Cr-doped alumina, imprinted with a grid and reference points. The screen was illuminated through a window and observed with a highly sensitive TV camera plus image intensifier. This allowed observation of beam position and size of a proton test beam and of the beam from the target, which consisted not only of antiprotons but contained as well electrons, pions and muons of the same momentum.

  13. Scintillation {gamma} spectrography. Physical principles. Apparatus. Operation; Spectrographie {gamma} a scintillations. Principes physiques. Appareillage. Utilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julliot, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    The scintillation detector forms the main part of the instrument used, the electronic unit presenting the results produced. After a brief description of the process of {gamma} photon absorption in the material, the particular case of NaI (T1), the scintillator used, is examined. The intensity of the scintillation caused by {gamma} ray absorption and the characteristics of the photomultiplier play a determining part in the energy resolution of the instrument. For the {gamma} recording spectrograph, we show to what extent the technique for using the electronic unit can modify the results. A detailed description is given of the activity measurement of a {gamma}-emitting radioelement by the spectrographic method. (author) [French] Dans l'appareillage utilise, le detecteur a scintillations constitue la piece maitresse, l'ensemble electronique presente les resultats issus du detecteur. Apres avoir brievement decrit le processus d'absorption des photons {gamma} dans la matiere, nous examinons le cas particulier du NaI(T1), le scintillateur utilise. L'intensite de la scintillation provoque par l'absorption des rayons {gamma} et les caracteristiques du photomultiplicateur jouent un role determinant dans la resolution en energie de l'appareil. Pour le spectrographe {gamma} enregistreur, nous indiquons dans quelle mesure la technique d'utilisation de l'ensemble electronique peut modifier les resultats. La-mesure de l'activite d'un radioelement emetteur {gamma} par spectrographie fait l'objet d'une description detaillee. (auteur)

  14. Measuring Directionality in Double-Beta Decay and Neutrino Interactions with Kiloton-Scale Scintillation Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Aberle, C.; Elagin, A.; Frisch, H. J.; Wetstein, M.; Winslow, L.

    2013-01-01

    Large liquid-scintillator-based detectors have proven to be exceptionally effective for low energy neutrino measurements due to their good energy resolution and scalability to large volumes. The addition of directional information using Cherenkov light and fast timing would enhance the scientific reach of these detectors, especially for searches for neutrino-less double-beta decay. In this paper, we develop a technique for extracting particle direction using the difference in arrival times fo...

  15. Systematic studies of small scintillators for new sampling calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mirror film, teflon, white paint, black tape, gold, aluminum and white paint+teflon. The pulse height dependence on position, length and thickness of the 3M reflective mirror film and teflon wrapped scintillators are measured. Results show that the 3M radiant mirror film-wrapped scintillator has the greatest light yield with an ...

  16. Systematic studies of small scintillators for new sampling calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The wrapped scintillator that gives the best light yield is determined by comparing the measured pulse height of each 10 × 40 × 2 mm strip scintillator covered with 3M reflective mirror film, teflon, white paint, black tape, gold, aluminum and white paint+teflon. The pulse height dependence on position, length and thickness of ...

  17. Temperature dependent scintillation properties of pure LaCl3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bizarri, G.; Dorenbos, P.

    2009-01-01

    The scintillation yield, scintillation decay, and x-ray excited emission of pure LaCl3 was studied as a function of temperature between 80 and 600 K. Two broad band emissions centered around 325 nm and 400 nm were identified and correlated to emissions from two localized exciton states named STE1

  18. Performance evaluation of GPS receiver under equatorial scintillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison de Oliveira Moraes

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Equatorial scintillation is a phenomenon that occurs daily in the equatorial region after the sunset and affects radio signals that propagate through the ionosphere. Depending on the temporal and spatial situation, equatorial scintillation can represent a problem in the availability and precision of the Global Positioning System (GPS. This work is concerned with evaluating the impact of equatorial scintillation on the performance of GPS receivers. First, the morphology and statistical model of equatorial scintillation is briefly presented. A numerical model that generates synthetic scintillation data to simulate the effects of equatorial scintillation is presented. An overview of the main theoretical principles on GPS receivers is presented. The analytical models that describe the effects of scintillation at receiver level are presented and compared with numerical simulations using a radio software receiver and synthetic data. The results achieved by simulation agreed quite well with those predicted by the analytical models. The only exception is for links with extreme levels of scintillation and when weak signals are received.

  19. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Yuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Izaki, Kenji; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio

    2014-11-01

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM

  20. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, Yuki [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Muramatsu 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Yamamoto, Seiichi [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Izaki, Kenji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Muramatsu 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)

    2014-11-11

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM.

  1. Extraction of Doppler Scintillation from Deep Space Probe Tracking Data

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Zenichi; Toriyama, Gaku; Hirosawa, Haruto; 山本, 善一; 鳥山, 学; 廣澤, 春任

    1990-01-01

    Doppler frequencies of deep space probe tracking signalsfluctuate randomly when solar wind passes across ray-pathes of the radio waves. In this paper we present a method to extract Doppler scintillations from deep space probe tracking signals by applying filterings. We discuss the Doppler scintillations extracted from the tracking data of "SAKIGAKE" and "SUISEI".

  2. Spectra of stable sonoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Stephen D.

    1992-12-01

    The continuous emission of picosecond pulses of light has been observed to originate from a bubble trapped at the pressure antinode of a resonant sound field in water and in water/glycerin mixtures. The spectra of this light in several solutions has been measured with a scanning monochrometer/photomultiplier detector system. The spectra are broadband and show strong emission in the UV region. A comparison of this measurement to two other independently produced spectra is made. The spectra are also modeled by a blackbody radiation distribution to determine an effective blackbody temperature and a size is deduced as if Sonoluminescence were characterized by blackbody radiation.

  3. ECAL Timing Performance

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is made of about 75000 scintillating lead tungstate crystals arranged in a barrel and two endcaps. The scintillation light is read out by avalanche photodiodes in the barrel and vacuum phototriodes in the endcaps, at which point the scintillation pulse is amplified and sampled at 40 MHz by the on-detector electronics. The fast signal from the crystal scintillation enables energy as well as timing measurements from the data collected in proton-proton collisions with high energy electrons and photons. The stability of the timing measurement required to maintain the energy resolution is on the order of 1ns. The single-channel time resolution of ECAL measured at beam tests for high energy showers is better than 100 ps. The timing resolution achieved with the data collected in proton-proton collisions at the LHC is presented.

  4. SU-E-J-164: Verification of Commercial Respiratory Tracking System Using Scintillation Screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of the tracking system is critical for the result of four-dimensional radiation therapy. The objective of this study is to propose the method of verifying the accuracy of respiratory tracking system. The scintillation screen and the light marker between the transparent acrylic plates were designed to move according to the prerecorded respiratory organ motion of volunteers. A vertical circle photon beam with 3 cm diameters from the cyberknife unit was planned to track the motion of the scintillation screen with the plates. In dark room, the CCD camera outside of the phantom captured the scintillation from the screen and the light marker in 30 frames per second when the photon beam was incident. The pictures were captured by the CCD camera were analyzed frame by frame, and the discrepancy between the scintillating circle on the scintillation screen and the light marker depending on the time was measured. The discrepancy of the motions of the delivered photon beam and the light marker was analyzed. In the preliminary study, the maximum discrepancy was measured less than 1.5 mm in normal breathing pattern as the manufacturer specified it. As the speed of the motion was increased, the discrepancy between the position of the beam and internal marker increased. However, the error was clinically acceptable. The further study will be performed for the irregular respiratory motion patterns. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (20110004848). © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. Analysis of Ionospheric Scintillation Characteristics in Sub-Antarctica Region with GNSS Data at Macquarie Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Jinling

    2017-01-12

    Ionospheric scintillation has a great impact on radio propagation and electronic system performance, thus is extensively studied currently. The influence of scintillation on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) is particularly evident, making GNSS an effective medium to study characteristics of scintillation. Ionospheric scintillation varies greatly in relation with temporal and spatial distribution. In this paper, both temporal and spatial characteristics of scintillation are investigated based on Macquarie Island's GNSS scintillation data collected from 2011 to 2015. Experiments demonstrate that occurrence rates of amplitude scintillation have a close relationship with solar activity, while phase scintillation is more likely to be generated by geomagnetic activity. In addition, scintillation distribution behaviors related to elevation and azimuth angles are statistically analyzed for both amplitude and phase scintillation. The proposed work is valuable for a deeper understanding of theoretical mechanisms of ionospheric scintillation in this region, and provides a reference for GNSS applications in certain regions around sub-Antarctica.

  6. Optimization of light collection from crystal scintillators for cryogenic experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danevich, F.A., E-mail: danevich@kinr.kiev.ua [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine); Kobychev, R.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine); National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, 03056 Kyiv (Ukraine); Kobychev, V.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine); Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kraus, H. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Mikhailik, V.B. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science Campus, Didcot, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Mokina, V.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2014-04-21

    High light collection efficiency is an important requirement in any application of scintillation detectors. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility for improving this parameter in cryogenic scintillation bolometers, which can be considered as promising detectors in experiments investigating neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter. Energy resolutions and relative pulse amplitudes of scintillation detectors using ZnWO{sub 4} scintillation crystals of different shapes (cylinder ∅ 20×20 mm and hexagonal prism with diagonal 20 mm and height 20 mm), reflector materials and shapes, optical contact and surface properties (polished and diffused) were measured at room temperature. Propagation of optical photons in these experimental conditions was simulated using Geant4 and ZEMAX codes. The results of the simulations are found to be in good agreement with each other and with direct measurements of the crystals. This could be applied to optimize the geometry of scintillation detectors used in the cryogenic experiments.

  7. Evaluation of various planar gaseous detectors with CsI photocathodes for the detection of primary scintillation light from noble gases

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Carlson, P J; Francke, T; Iacobaeus, C; Pavlopoulos, P; Pietropaolo, F; Sokolova, T

    2003-01-01

    Noble gases and liquids are excellent scintillators and this opens a unique opportunity to directly detect the primary scintillation light produced in these media by photons or particles. This signal can be used for several purposes, for example as a start signal for TPCs or for particles identification. Usually photomultipliers (PMs) are used for the detection of the scintillation light. In our previous work we have demonstrated that costly PMs could be replaced by gaseous detectors with CsI photocathodes . Such detectors have the same quantum efficiency as the best PMs but at the same time are cheap, simple and have high position and time resolutions. The aim of this work is to evaluate various planar type gaseous detectors with CsI photocahodes in order to choose the best one for the detection of the primary scintillation light from noble gases and liquids.

  8. A comparative study via Monte Carlo simulation of new inorganic scintillator Cs2HfCl6 for applications in nuclear medicine, security and defense, and astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Henry; Raby, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Cs2HfCl6 (CHC) is one of the most promising recently discovered new inorganic single crystal scintillator that has high light output, non-hygroscopic, no self-activity, having energy resolution significantly better than NaI(Tl), even approaching that of LaBr3 yet can also potentially be at a much lower cost than LaBr3. This study attempts to use Monte Carlo simulation to examine the great potential offered by this new scintillator. CHC's detector performance is compared via simulation with that of 4 typical existing scintillators of the same size and same PMT readout. Two halide-scintillators: NaI(Tl) and LaBr3 and two oxide-scintillators: GSO and LSO were used in this simulation to compare their 122 keV and 511 keV gamma responses with that of CHC with both spectroscopy application and imaging applications in mind. Initial simulation results are very promising and consistent with reported experimental measurements. Beside detector energy resolution, image-quality measurement parameters commonly used to characterize imaging detectors as in nuclear medicine such as Light Response Function (LRF) which goes in parallel with spatial resolution and simulated position spectra will also be presented and discussed.

  9. Optical properties in the visible luminescence of SiO2:B2O3:CaO:GdF3 glass scintillators containing CeF3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. M.; Kim, H. J.; Karki, Sujita; Kaewkhao, J.; Damdee, B.; Kothan, S.; Kaewjaeng, S.

    2017-12-01

    CeF3-doped silicaborate-calcium-gadolinium glass scintillators, with the formula 10SiO2:(55-x)B2O3:10CaO:25GdF3:xCeF3, were fabricated by the melt-quenching technique. The doping concentration of the CeF3 was from 0.00 mol% to 0.20 mol%. The optical properties of the CeF3 doped glass scintillators were studied by using various radiation sources. The transition state of the CeF3-doped glass scintillators studied by using the absorption and photo-luminescence spectrum results. The X-ray, photo, proton and laser-induced luminescence spectra were also studied to understand the luminescence mechanism under various conditions. To understand the temperature dependence, the laser-induced luminescence and the decay component of the CeF3-doped glass scintillator were studied while the temperature was varied from 300 K to 10 K. The emission wavelength spectrum showed from 350 nm to 55 nm under various radiation sources. Also the CeF3-doped glass scintillator have one decay component as 34 ns at room temperature.

  10. Effects of hadron irradiation on scintillating fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atac, M. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Buchanan, C.; Chrisman, D.; Cline, D.; Kolonko, J.; Kubic, J.; Park, J. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Baumbaugh, A.; Binkley, M.; Bross, A.D.; Finley, D.; Elias, J.; Foster, G.W.; Kephart, R.; Kephart, R.; Kim, C.; Park, H.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Rivetta, C.; Tkaczyk, S.; Wagner, R. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Chung, M.; Goldberg, H.; Jeskik, R.; Margulies, S.; Mendez, H.; Solomon, J.; Vaca, F. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)); Kelley, C. (Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences, Boston, MA (United States)); Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Biswas, N.; Cason, N.; Jacques, J.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M.; Kenney, V.; LoSecco, J.; Ruchti, R.; Shephard, W.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Marchant, J.; Mountain, R.J. (Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)); Davis, D.; Vandergriff, D. (O

    1993-08-01

    Trackers based on scintillating-fiber technology are being considered by the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration at SSC and the D[phi] collaboration at Fermilab. An important issue is the effect of the radiation existing in the detector cores on fiber properties. Most studies of radiation damage in scintillators have irradiated small bulk samples rather than fibers, and have used X-rays, [sup 60]Co gammas, or electron beams, often at accelerated rates. The authors have irradiated some 600 fibers in the Fermilab Tevatron C[phi] area, thereby obtaining a hadronic irradiation at realistic rates. Four-meter-long samples of ten Bicron polystyrene-based fiber types, maintained in air, dry nitrogen, argon, and vacuum atmospheres within stainless-steel tubes, were irradiated for seven weeks at various distances from the accelerator beam pipes. Maximum doses, measured by thermoluminescence detectors, were about 80 Krad. Fiber properties, particularly light yield and attenuation length, have been measured over a one-year period. A description of the work together with the results is presented. At the doses achieved, corresponding to a few years of actual fiber-tracking detector operation, little degradation is observed. In addition, recovery after several days' exposure to air has been noted. Properties of unirradiated samples kept in darkness show no changes after one year.

  11. Global and Seasonal Scintillation Morphology in the Equatorial Region Derived from ROCSAT-1 In-situ Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Hung Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The global/seasonal distributions of the scintillation occurrence rate are obtained from the in-situ density measurement of the ROCSAT-1 using a modified procedure reported by Wernik et al. (2007. A least-squares curve fitting in the optimal trust region is used to obtain the spectral slope for the density irregularity structure and the outer scale of the scintillation. The distribution of the S4 index for the weak scintillation (S4 < 0.3 is almost identical to that of the equatorial irregularity distribution reported in the literature. However, as the scintillation becomes stronger (0.3 < S4 < 0.6, the latitudinal distribution moves to the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA region. In addition, the distributions of the outer scale values that are useful for the study of the physical evolution of the irregularity structure are also obtained. The occurrence distribution of scintillation activity with several parameters such as dip-latitude, longitude, local time, solar activity, and geomagnetic activity during different seasons are presented and discussed in this paper.

  12. Development of SiPM-based scintillator tile detectors for a multi-layer fast neutron tracker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubek J.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We are developing thin tile scintillator detectors with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM readout for use in a multi-layer fast-neutron tracker. The tracker is based on interleaved Timepix and plastic scintillator layers. The thin 15 × 15 × 2 mm plastic scintillators require suitable optical readout in order to detect and measure the energy lost by energetic protons that have been recoiled by fast neutrons. Our first prototype used dual SiPMs, coupled to opposite edges of the scintillator tile using light-guides. An alternative readout geometry was designed in an effort to increase the fraction of scintillation light detected by the SiPMs. The new prototype uses a larger SiPM array to cover the entire top face of the tile. This paper details the comparative performance of the two prototype designs. A deuterium-tritium (DT fast-neutron source was used to compare the relative light collection efficiency of the two designs. A collimated UV light source was scanned across the detector face to map the uniformity. The new prototype was found to have 9.5 times better light collection efficiency over the original design. Both prototypes exhibit spatial non-uniformity in their response. Methods of correcting this non-uniformity are discussed.

  13. Comparing the response of PSD-capable plastic scintillator to standard liquid scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Gwon, Chul; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a test campaign to characterize the response of the recently developed plastic scintillator with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capabilities (EJ-299-33). PSD is a property exhibited by certain types of scintillating material in which incident stimuli (fast neutrons or γ rays) can be separated by exploiting differences in the scintillation light pulse tail. Detector geometries used were: a 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm cube and a 10-cm diameter×10-cm long cylinder. EJ-301 and EJ-309 liquid scintillators with well-known responses were also tested. The work was conducted at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Van De Graaff accelerator. The facility accelerated protons on a thin Li target to yield quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction (Q-value: -1.644 MeV). Collimated fast neutrons were obtained by placing detectors behind a neutron spectrometer. Rotating the spectrometer, and thus changing the neutron energy, allowed us to achieve 0.5-3.2 MeV neutrons in 200-300 keV steps. Data were acquired through a flash analog-to-digital converter (ADC) capable of performing digital PSD measurements. By using the PSD technique to separate the neutron events from unwanted γ background, we constructed a pulse height spectrum at each energy. Obtaining a relationship of the relative light output versus energy allowed us to construct the response function for the EJ-299-33 and liquid scintillator. The EJ-299-33 response in terms of electron equivalent energy (Ee.e.) vs. proton equivalent energy (Ep.e.), how it compared with the standard xylene-based EJ-301 (or, NE-213/BC-501 A equivalent) and EJ-309 liquid scintillator response, and how the EJ-301 and EJ-309 compared, are presented. We find that the EJ-299-33 demonstrated a lower light output by up to 40% for environment affected the detector response. We find relatively good agreement between our results and the modeling; however, the observed response could not be fully accounted for due to

  14. Organic Scintillation Detectors for Spectroscopic Radiation Portal Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paff, Marc Gerrit

    Thousands of radiation portal monitors have been deployed worldwide to detect and deter the smuggling of nuclear and radiological materials that could be used in nefarious acts. Radiation portal monitors are often installed at bottlenecks where large amounts of people or goods must traverse. Examples of use include scanning cargo containers at shipping ports, vehicles at border crossings, and people at high profile functions and events. Traditional radiation portal monitors contain separate detectors for passively measuring neutron and gamma ray count rates. 3He tubes embedded in polyethylene and slabs of plastic scintillators are the most common detector materials used in radiation portal monitors. The radiation portal monitor alarm mechanism relies on measuring radiation count rates above user defined alarm thresholds. These alarm thresholds are set above natural background count rates. Minimizing false alarms caused by natural background and maximizing sensitivity to weakly emitting threat sources must be balanced when setting these alarm thresholds. Current radiation portal monitor designs suffer from frequent nuisance radiation alarms. These radiation nuisance alarms are most frequently caused by shipments of large quantities of naturally occurring radioactive material containing cargo, like kitty litter, as well as by humans who have recently undergone a nuclear medicine procedure, particularly 99mTc treatments. Current radiation portal monitors typically lack spectroscopic capabilities, so nuisance alarms must be screened out in time-intensive secondary inspections with handheld radiation detectors. Radiation portal monitors using organic liquid scintillation detectors were designed, built, and tested. A number of algorithms were developed to perform on-the-fly radionuclide identification of single and combination radiation sources moving past the portal monitor at speeds up to 2.2 m/s. The portal monitor designs were tested extensively with a variety of

  15. Scalability, Scintillation Readout and Charge Drift in a Kilogram Scale Solid Xenon Particle Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J. [Fermilab; Cease, H. [Fermilab; Jaskierny, W. F. [Fermilab; Markley, D. [Fermilab; Pahlka, R. B. [Fermilab; Balakishiyeva, D. [Florida U.; Saab, T. [Florida U.; Filipenko, M. [Erlangen - Nuremberg U., ECAP

    2014-10-23

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  16. Liquid Argon Scintillation Detection Utilizing Wavelength-Shifting Plates and Light Guides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, B. [Indiana U.

    2018-02-06

    In DUNE, the event timing provided by the detection of the relatively prompt scintillation photons will improve spatial resolution in the drift direction of the time-projection chamber (TPC) and is especially useful for non-beam physics topics such as supernova neutrinos and nucleon decay. The baseline design for the first 10kt single phase TPC fits the photon detector system in the natural gap between the wire planes of adjacent TPC volumes. A prototype photon detector design utilizes wavelength-shifter coated plates to convert the vacuum ultraviolet scintillation light to the optical and commercially-produced wavelength-shifting light guides to trap some of this light and transport it to an array of silicon photomultipliers at the end. This system and the testing performed to characterize the system and determine the efficiency are discussed.

  17. Scintillator performance at low dose rates and low temperatures for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ricci-Tam, Francesca

    2018-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will integrate 10 times more luminosity than the LHC, posing significant challenges for radiation tolerance, especially for forward calorimetry, and highlights the issue for future colliders. As part of its HL-LHC upgrade program, the CMS collaboration is designing a High Granularity Calorimeter to replace the existing endcap calorimeters. The upgrade includes both electromagnetic and hadronic components, with the latter using a mixture of silicon sensors (in the highest radiation regions at high pseudorapidity) and scintillator as its active components. The scintillator will nevertheless receive large doses accumulated at low dose rates, and will have to operate at low temperature - around -30 degrees Celsius. We discuss measurements of scintillator radiation tolerance, from in-situ measurements from the current CMS endcap calorimeters, and from measurements at low temperature and low dose-rate at gamma sources in the laboratory.

  18. An empirical model of L-band scintillation S4 index constructed by using FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Ping; Bilitza, Dieter; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Caton, Ronald; Chang, Loren C.; Yeh, Wen-Hao

    2017-09-01

    Modern society relies heavily on the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) technology for applications such as satellite communication, navigation, and positioning on the ground and/or aviation in the troposphere/stratosphere. However, ionospheric scintillations can severely impact GNSS systems and their related applications. In this study, a global empirical ionospheric scintillation model is constructed with S4-index data obtained by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) satellites during 2007-2014 (hereafter referred to as the F3CGS4 model). This model describes the S4-index as a function of local time, day of year, dip-latitude, and solar activity using the index PF10.7. The model reproduces the F3/C S4-index observations well, and yields good agreement with ground-based reception of satellite signals. This confirms that the constructed model can be used to forecast global L-band scintillations on the ground and in the near surface atmosphere.

  19. A comparative study of ionospheric irregularity drift velocity derived from a GNSS receiver array and Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar measurements during high-latitude ionospheric scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Morton, Yu T.

    2017-06-01

    The conventional ionospheric scintillation-based, spaced-receiver technique uses Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signal intensity measurements. It is not suitable, however, for high-latitude regions where phase scintillations occur much more often than amplitude scintillations. This paper demonstrates that GNSS signal carrier phase scintillations observed from a spaced-receiver array can be used to infer horizontal ionospheric drift velocities via time domain correlation. Drift velocities measured by the colocated Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar are cross compared against the estimated results from the GNSS receiver array. A comparative study is conducted based on two case studies on 20 and 31 December 2015, both accompanied by intense geomagnetic storms. Overall, the comparison results show statistical agreement between the GNSS receiver array estimation and incoherent scatter radar measurements.

  20. Multiparameter gas scintillation and ionization counter for heavy-ion detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manduchi, C.; Russo-Manduchi, M.T.; Segato, G.F. (Padua Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padua (Italy))

    1982-10-15

    A heavy-ion detector system is described for investigations on the nuclear fission process. It consists of two gridded, split anode ionization chambers for simultaneous, correlated measurements of various parameters of complementary fragments such as energy and angular distribution. Energy loss signals are used to discriminate the fission fragments from light elements. Timing adequate for fast coincidence (resolution <= 500 ps) is achieved by utilizing the chamber gas as a scintillation gas.