WorldWideScience

Sample records for scientific activity addressing

  1. Addressing submarine geohazards through scientific drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerlenghi, A.

    2009-04-01

    Natural submarine geohazards (earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, volcanic island flank collapses) are geological phenomena originating at or below the seafloor leading to a situation of risk for off-shore and on-shore structures and the coastal population. Addressing submarine geohazards means understanding their spatial and temporal variability, the pre-conditioning factors, their triggers, and the physical processes that control their evolution. Such scientific endeavour is nowadays considered by a large sector of the international scientific community as an obligation in order to contribute to the mitigation of the potentially destructive societal effects of submarine geohazards. The study of submarine geohazards requires a multi-disciplinary scientific approach: geohazards must be studied through their geological record; active processes must be monitored; geohazard evolution must be modelled. Ultimately, the information must be used for the assessment of vulnerability, risk analysis, and development of mitigation strategies. In contrast with the terrestrial environment, the oceanic environment is rather hostile to widespread and fast application of high-resolution remote sensing techniques, accessibility for visual inspection, sampling and installation of monitoring stations. Scientific Drilling through the IODP (including the related pre site-survey investigations, sampling, logging and in situ measurements capability, and as a platform for deployment of long term observatories at the surface and down-hole) can be viewed as the centre of gravity of an international, coordinated, multi-disciplinary scientific approach to address submarine geohazards. The IODP Initial Science Plan expiring in 2013 does not address openly geohazards among the program scientific objectives. Hazards are referred to mainly in relation to earthquakes and initiatives towards the understanding of seismogenesis. Notably, the only drilling initiative presently under way is the

  2. Trends in scientific activity addressing transmissible spongiform encephalopathies: a bibliometric study covering the period 1973–2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iribarren-Maestro Isabel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to analyse the trends in scientific research on transmissible spongiform encephalopathies by applying bibliometric tools to the scientific literature published between 1973 and 2002. Methods The data for the study were obtained from Medline database, in order to determine the volume of scientific output in the above period, the countries involved, the type of document and the trends in the subject matters addressed. The period 1973–2002 was divided in three sub-periods. Results We observed a significant growth in scientific production. The percentage of increase is 871.7 from 1973 to 2002. This is more evident since 1991 and particularly in the 1996–2001 period. The countries found to have the highest output were the United States, the United Kingdom, Japan, France and Germany. The evolution in the subject matters was almost constant in the three sub-periods in which the study was divided. In the first and second sub-periods, the subject matters of greatest interest were more general, i.e Nervous system or Nervous system diseases, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Scrapie, and Chemicals and Drugs, but in the last sub-period, some changes were observed because the Prion-related matters had the greatest presence. Collaboration among authors is small from 1973 to 1992, but increases notably in the third sub-period, and also the number of authors and clusters formed. Some of the authors, like Gajdusek or Prusiner, appear in the whole period. Conclusion The study reveals a very high increase in scientific production. It is related also with the beginnings of research on bovine spongiform encephalopathy and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, with the establishment of progressive collaboration relationships and a reflection of public health concerns about this problem.

  3. Addressing contrasting cognitive models in scientific collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diviacco, P.

    2012-04-01

    If the social aspects of scientific communities and their internal dynamics is starting to be recognized and acknowledged in the everyday lives of scientists, it is rather difficult for them to find tools that could support their activities consistently with this perspective. Issues span from gathering researchers to mutual awareness, from information sharing to building meaning, with the last one being particularly critical in research fields as the geo-sciences, that deal with the reconstruction of unique, often non-reproducible, and contingent processes. Reasoning here is, in fact, mainly abductive, allowing multiple and concurrent explanations for the same phenomenon to coexist. Scientists bias one hypothesis over another not only on strictly logical but also on sociological motivations. Following a vision, scientists tend to evolve and isolate themselves from other scientists creating communities characterized by different cognitive models, so that after some time these become incompatible and scientists stop understanding each other. We address these problems as a communication issue so that the classic distinction into three levels (syntactic, semantic and pragmatic) can be used. At the syntactic level, we highlight non-technical obstacles that condition interoperability and data availability and transparency. At the semantic level, possible incompatibilities of cognitive models are particularly evident, so that using ontologies, cross-domain reconciliation should be applied. This is a very difficult task to perform since the projection of knowledge by scientists, in the designated community, is political and thus can create a lot of tension. The strategy we propose to overcome these issues pertains to pragmatics, in the sense that it is intended to acknowledge the cultural and personal factors each partner brings into the collaboration and is based on the idea that meaning should remain a flexible and contingent representation of possibly divergent views

  4. Content addressable memories in scientific instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotto, I. de; Golinelli, S.

    1975-01-01

    The content-addressable-memory feature of a new system designed in these laboratories for non-destructive testing of nuclear reactor pressure vessels based on acoustic emission analysis is presented. The content addressable memory is divided into two parts: the first selects the most frequent events among incoming ones (FES: Frequent Event Selection memory), the second stores the frequent events singled out (FEM: Frequent Event Memory). The statistical behaviour of FES is analyzed, and experimental results are compared with theoretical ones; the model presented proved to be a useful tool in dimensioning the instrument store capacity. (Auth.)

  5. Nanomedicines: addressing the scientific and regulatory gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkle, Sally; McNeil, Scott E; Mühlebach, Stefan; Bawa, Raj; Borchard, Gerrit; Barenholz, Yechezkel Chezy; Tamarkin, Lawrence; Desai, Neil

    2014-04-01

    Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to the discipline of medicine: the use of nanoscale materials for the diagnosis, monitoring, control, prevention, and treatment of disease. Nanomedicine holds tremendous promise to revolutionize medicine across disciplines and specialties, but this promise has yet to be fully realized. Beyond the typical complications associated with drug development, the fundamentally different and novel physical and chemical properties of some nanomaterials compared to materials on a larger scale (i.e., their bulk counterparts) can create a unique set of opportunities as well as safety concerns, which have only begun to be explored. As the research community continues to investigate nanomedicines, their efficacy, and the associated safety issues, it is critical to work to close the scientific and regulatory gaps to assure that nanomedicine drives the next generation of biomedical innovation. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Scientific foundations of addressing risk in complex and dynamic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotan, T.O.; Storseth, F.; Albrechtsen, E.

    2011-01-01

    Development, deployment and application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and digital infrastructure continue with unabated intensity in the petroleum-related activity on the Norwegian shelf. This development towards what is denoted Integrated Operations (IO) creates new ways of organizing work, new work processes and increased automation, e.g. closer collaboration offshore-onshore, cooperation across organizational and geographical borders. This creates new challenges for managing risk. Although there are different versions of IO today, we argue that it is possible to identify and study generic properties within such IO manifestations. The current paper focus on the potential complexity of IO in the generic sense, and some scientific implications in terms of addressing risk. The paper uses the century-old metaphor of 'wildness in wait' to engage the wide field of complexity theory in a productive way to address systemic properties of risk. The paper further uses the Cynefin sensemaking framework in order to identify and address the crucial distinction between directed (resultant) and un-directed (emergent) order. The paper finally discusses the importance of seeing risk assessment as a social knowledge practice.

  7. Addressing scientific literacy through content area reading and processes of scientific inquiry: What teachers report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Susan J.

    The purpose of this study was to interpret the experiences of secondary science teachers in Florida as they address the scientific literacy of their students through teaching content reading strategies and student inquiry skills. Knowledge of the successful integration of content reading and inquiry skills by experienced classroom teachers would be useful to many educators as they plan instruction to achieve challenging state and national standards for reading as well as science. The problem was investigated using grounded theory methodology. Open-ended questions were asked in three focus groups and six individual interviews that included teachers from various Florida school districts. The constant comparative approach was used to analyze the data. Initial codes were collapsed into categories to determine the conceptual relationships among the data. From this, the five core categories were determined to be Influencers, Issues, Perceptions, Class Routines, and Future Needs. These relate to the central phenomenon, Instructional Modifications, because teachers often described pragmatic and philosophical changes in their teaching as they deliberated to meet state standards in both reading and science. Although Florida's secondary science teachers have been asked to incorporate content reading strategies into their science instruction for the past several years, there was limited evidence of using these strategies to further student understanding of scientific processes. Most teachers saw little connection between reading and inquiry, other than the fact that students must know how to read to follow directions in the lab. Scientific literacy, when it was addressed by teachers, was approached mainly through class discussions, not reading. Teachers realized that students cannot learn secondary science content unless they read science text with comprehension; therefore the focus of reading instruction was on learning science content, not scientific literacy or student

  8. Scientific activities 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The scientific activities and achievements of the Nuclear Research Center Democritus for the year 1979 are presented in the form of a list of 78 projects giving title, objectives, commencement year, responsible of each project, developed activities and the pertaining lists of publications. The 15 chapters of this work cover the activities of the main Divisions of the Democritus NRC: Electronics, Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Health Physics, Reactor, Radioisotopes, Environmental Radioactivity, Soil Science, Computer Center, Uranium Exploration, Medical Service, Technological Applications and Training. (T.A.)

  9. Addressing Unconscious Bias: Steps toward an Inclusive Scientific Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Abigail

    2011-01-01

    In this talk I will outline the nature of unconscious bias, as it operates to exclude or marginalize some participants in the scientific community. I will show how bias results from non-conscious expectations about certain groups of people, including scientists and astronomers. I will outline scientific research in psychology, sociology and economics that has identified the impact these expectations have on interpersonal judgments that are at the heart of assessment of individuals' qualifications. This research helps us understand not only how bias operates within a single instance of evaluation, but how evaluation bias can accumulate over a career if not checked, creating an appearance of confirmation of biased expectations. Some research has focused on how best to interrupt and mitigate unconscious bias, and many institutions--including the University of Michigan--have identified strategic interventions at key points of institutional decision-making (particularly hiring, annual review, and promotion) that can make a difference. The NSF ADVANCE Institutional Transformation program encouraged institutions to draw on the social science literature to create experimental approaches to addressing unconscious bias. I will outline four approaches to intervention that have arisen through the ADVANCE program: (1) systematic education that increases awareness among decisionmakers of how evaluation bias operates; (2) development of practices that mitigate the operation of bias even when it is out of conscious awareness; (3) creation of institutional policies that routinize and sanction these practices; and (4) holding leaders accountable for these implementation of these new practices and policies. Although I will focus on ways to address unconscious bias within scientific institutions (colleges and universities, laboratories and research centers, etc.), I will close by considering how scientific organizations can address unconscious bias and contribute to creating an

  10. Addressing big data challenges for scientific data infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demchenko, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Grosso, P.; Wibisono, A.; de Laat, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges that are imposed by Big Data Science on the modern and future Scientific Data Infrastructure (SDI). The paper refers to different scientific communities to define requirements on data management, access control and security. The paper introduces the Scientific

  11. Results of SSTC NRS Scientific and Technical Activities for 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.; Valyigun, N.P.; Vorobej, I.I.; Kornijevska, O.S.

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes results of SSTC NRS scientific activities for 2014 in basic areas of activities. In particular, it addresses the development of nuclear regulatory control system, reviews, scientific and technical support to the SNRIU oversight function, research ampersand development and analytical efforts as well as scientific information and international activity. First-priority areas for SSTC NRS for the nearest years are identified

  12. Addressing big data issues in Scientific Data Infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demchenko, Y.; Membrey, P.; Grosso, P.; de Laat, C.; Smari, W.W.; Fox, G.C.

    2013-01-01

    Big Data are becoming a new technology focus both in science and in industry. This paper discusses the challenges that are imposed by Big Data on the modern and future Scientific Data Infrastructure (SDI). The paper discusses a nature and definition of Big Data that include such features as Volume,

  13. Scientific activities 1977 and 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The scientific activities and achievements of the Nuclear Research Center Democritus for the years 1977 and 1978 are presented in the form of a list of 79 projects giving title, objectives, commencement year, responsible of each project and the pertaining lists of publications. The 14 chapters of this work cover the activities of the main Divisions of the Democritus NRC: Exploration of Radioactive Minerals, Computer Center, Environmental Radioactivity, Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Soil Science, Electronics, Reactor, Health Physics, Radioisotopes, Technological Applications and Medical Service. (T.A.)

  14. ERINDA Scientific Results: Transnational Access Activities and Scientific Visits

    CERN Document Server

    Hambsch, Franz-Josef

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the Transnational Access Activities and Scientific visits within the FP7 project ERINDA (European Research Infrastructures for Nuclear Data). It highlights the fact that nearly 3200 data - taking hours for external users were made available in the partner installations and 104 man weeks for scientific visits to par tner institutes. This is much more than the 2500 beam hours and 80 weeks promised in the Description of Work of the project.

  15. Activities to Address Challenges in Digital Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Lund , Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Part 3: Structures and Networks; International audience; Based on a literature review, this paper identifies four socio-technical challenges relating to innovation actor’s interactions in digital innovation. Furthermore, the paper explores how these challenges can be addressed. The challenges are investigated in a case study of digital innovation. The study is based on a two year long research and development project where an e-newspaper concept and a demonstrator based on e-paper technology ...

  16. Addresses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — Point features representing locations of all street addresses in Orange County, NC including Chapel Hill, NC. Data maintained by Orange County, the Town of Chapel...

  17. Scientific activities in and about Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Ebbe Krogh; Pedersen, Asger Dalsgaard

    2018-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation and analysis of opportunities, strengths and challenges of scientific activities involving Greenland as a research area or research object relative to other Arctic areas.......This report presents the results of an investigation and analysis of opportunities, strengths and challenges of scientific activities involving Greenland as a research area or research object relative to other Arctic areas....

  18. Annual report scientific activities 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    This report summarizes the activities at TRIUMF for the year 1999. The science program at ISAC started in earnest and several preliminary results were achieved. The TRIUMF collaboration with CERN on the provision of a Canadian contribution to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) continues to be a major success. The parity experiment achieved a final result for its measurement of the longitudinal polarization asymmetry in elastic p-p scattering at 221 MeV, and charge asymmetry breaking experiment collected all of its data. The condensed matter program using the technique of uSR continues to have a very large appetite for beam and pursues a varied menu of science. The life science activities at TRIUMF are dominated by the PET group which collaborates with the Neurodegenerative Disorders Centre at the UBC Hospital

  19. Annual report scientific activities 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-04-01

    This report summarizes the activities at TRIUMF for the year 1992. Three major achievements cited in this report are experiments by a group of Columbia University scientists who elucidated the superconducting properties of 60C (''Buckyballs''), a second work led by the University of Toronto that used the radioactive nitrogen to solve some long-standing puzzles about how all the heavy elements of our universe are generated from protons and alpha particles in the dying moments of a collapsing star, and the TRIUMF PET program in which new strides have been taken through brain imaging, in understanding Parkinson's disease.

  20. The MEMOLED: Active addressing with passive driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asadi, K.; Blom, P.W.M.; Leeuw, D.M. de

    2011-01-01

    Passive or active matrix driving schemes in large displays are prone to high power consumption and cost, respectively. For signage applications such as large out-door displays with low refresh rates there is as yet no technological solution. Here the MEMOLED solution, an organic light-emitting diode

  1. The MEMOLED : Active Addressing with Passive Driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asadi, Kamal; Blom, Paul W. M.; de Leeuw, Dago M.

    2011-01-01

    Passive or active matrix driving schemes in large displays are prone to high power consumption and cost, respectively. For signage applications such as large outdoor displays with low refresh rates there is as yet no technological solution. Here the MEMOLED solution, an organic light-emitting diode

  2. Scientific activities 1980 Nuclear Research Center ''Democritos''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The scientific activities and achievements of the Nuclear Research Center Democritos for the year 1980 are presented in the form of a list of 76 projects giving title, objectives, responsible of each project, developed activities and the pertaining lists of publications. The 16 chapters of this work cover the activities of the main Divisions of the Democritos NRC: Electronics, Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Health Physics, Reactor, Scientific Directorate, Radioisotopes, Environmental Radioactivity, Soil Science, Computer Center, Uranium Exploration, Medical Service, Technological Applications, Radioimmunoassay and Training. (N.C.)

  3. The Success Criteria of Scientific Pedagogic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Ovchinnikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problem of scientific pedagogic activity assessment of the higher school academic staff. The existing options of quality estimation are listed along with their deficiencies; the most acceptable in the authors’ opinion being the systematic approach. The latter allows considering almost every aspect of scientific-pedagogic activity. On that ground, the authors recommend the following success estimation criteria: gnostic, projecting, communicative, informational, and organizational. The criteria of work satisfaction and its results are taken into consideration as additional ones. The indicators of each criterion are given demonstrating that the as- sessment can be both internal (subjective and external (objective, denoted in the normative acts. The problem of complex and just quality assessment of scientific- pedagogic activity is quite relevant as it affects the academic staff motivation. The authors believe that the research findings can improve the objectivity of teachers’ work assessment and give way to differentiated approaches to their motivation and stimulation. 

  4. CORRELATION BETWEEN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND SCIENTIFIC ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia Shust

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The article is dedicated to the analysis of legal nature and peculiarities of optimal correlation between the notions of intellectual property and scientific activity. Nowadays intellectual property as institution goes through the period of establishment in Ukraine. As the Soviet system of civil law was based on recognition and regulation of authors’ rights for the authors of scientific works, discoveries, inventions and innovation proposals as the ones having mainly relative, i.e. legally mandatory, but not absolute character.  Getting started to define the notion of intellectual property and intellectual property right in the system of interaction with scientific activity, it is important to say that such notion as “intellectual property” still needs enhancement. Its imperfection is due to the fact that this kind of property implies being formed by intellectual efforts of the author of scientific work, but legally it is processed with the help of documents that guarantee property right. Methods. General scientific method, philosophical method, specially-legal method of scientific research, system analysis method. Results: It is important to emphasize that not every result of scientific or creative work can become the object of intellectual property right, but the one that corresponds with law. Any scientific work falls within the purview of law if it corresponds with law demands. Scientific and technical results obtain legal protection only in case of appropriate qualification established by specific agency of State administration and issuement of law-enforcement document being limited by the territory of Ukraine. Protection of rights on the territory of other countries is realized only on the basis of correspondent international conventions and treaties. Discussion: Advanced modern countries realized the meaning and importance of usage and proper protection of creative and scientific work results known as

  5. Possible Role of Green Chemistry in Addressing Environmenal Plastic Debris: Scientific, Economic and Policy Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayha, K. M.

    2016-02-01

    Plastics have revolutionized modern life, replacing other raw materials in a vast array of products, due to their ease in molding and shaping, as well as superior recalcitrance to wearing and aging. However, this functional benefit makes plastic one of the most problematic pollutants, since they accumulate as environmental debris for decades and possibly for centuries. Rightfully so, programs addressing plastic debris typically involve efforts to reduce consumption, reuse plastic products and recycle them when usefulness is complete. However, some of these options can be problematic for certain applications, as well as in countries that lack efficient municipal solid waste or recycling facilities. The principles of Green Chemistry were developed to help scientists design chemical products that reduce or eliminate the use or generation of hazardous substances. These principles have also been applied to developing sustainable or greener polymers for use in consumer plastics. For instance, the EPA's Green Chemistry Program awards the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards each year, with a large percentage of awards having gone to developments in greener polymers. Many of these advancements involve the development of sustainable bio-based, more degradable or more recyclable polymers that deliver significant environmental benefits. This presentation is meant to address what role the development of truly greener polymers might have in addressing environmental plastic debris in parallel with efforts to reduce, reuse and recycle. The intention is to evaluate the issues posed by traditional polymer types, address the ultimate goals of alternative polymer development and evaluate research on current alternative polymer technologies, in order to objectively assess their usefulness in addressing environmental plastic debris accumulation. In addition, the scientific, policy and market issues that may be impeding accurate development, evaluation and implementation of

  6. Painting the world REDD: addressing scientific barriers to monitoring emissions from tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, Gregory P.

    2011-06-01

    trading table, and at these state-level geographic scales, the science and technology are proving to be the most robust and accurate. Scientific innovation, combined with appropriate up-scaling from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, will likely prove most effective in bringing REDD+ to fruition. References Asner G P 2009 Tropical forest carbon assessment: integrating satellite and airborne mapping approaches Environ. Res. Lett. 4 034009 Herold M 2009 An assessment of national forest monitoring capabilities in tropical non-Annex I countries: Recommendations for capacity building (Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena and GOFC-GOLD Land Cover Project Office) (available at: http://unfccc.int/files/methods_science/redd/country_specific_information/application/pdf/redd_nat_capacity_report_herold_july09_publ.pdf) Parker C, Mitchell A, Trivedi M and Mardas N 2008 The little REDD book: a guide to governmental and non-governmental proposals for reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation (GlobalCanopy Programme) (available at: http://www.globalcanopy.org/materials/little-redd-book) Pelletier J, Ramankutty N and Potvin C 2011 Diagnosing the uncertainty and detectability of emission reductions for REDD+ under current capabilities: an example for Panama Environ. Res. Lett. 6 024005 UNFCCC 2009 Methodological guidance for activities relating to reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation and the role of conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancements of forest carbon stocks in developing countries United National Framework Convention on Climate Change Decision 4/CP.15 (available at: http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2009/cop15/eng/11a01.pdf#page=11)

  7. Methodological imperfection and formalizations in scientific activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetlichny, G.

    1987-01-01

    Any mathematical formalization of scientific activity allows for imperfections in the methodology that is formalized. These can be of three types, dirty, rotten, and dammed. Restricting mathematical attention to those methods that cannot be construed to be imperfect drastically reduces the class of objects that must be analyzed, and related all other objects to these more regular ones. Examples are drawn from empirical logic

  8. Institutional projects in Educational Scientific activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Ovidio Calzadilla Pérez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Criteria are dealt, in particular, about the conceptual connotation and practice of the institutional project or the school as a particular type of educative project, because it is a developing, participative and sustainable way for the generation of the Educational and Scientific Activity aimed at the search of quality and excelence in the Cuban pedagogical context nowadays. The considerations stat ed have been lived by the authors through the “Centro Consultor para la Estimulación del Talento Verbal” Project performance in the Provincial Elementary School of Referente “Dalquis Sánchez Pupo”, in Holguin province.

  9. Science Teachers' Use of Mass Media to Address Socio-Scientific and Sustainability Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterman, Michelle L.; Sadler, Troy D.; Brown, Julie

    2012-01-01

    The currency, relevancy and changing nature of science makes it a natural topic of focus for mass media outlets. Science teachers and students can capitalize on this wealth of scientific information to explore socio-scientific and sustainability issues; however, without a lens on how those media are created and how representations of science are…

  10. Culture X: addressing barriers to physical activity in Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Emma Marie; Auvaa, Leveti; Conway, Brooke A

    2017-08-01

    There is an urgent need to address the epidemic rates of non-communicable diseases globally, and the Pacific Island region is of particular concern. Increasing physical activity participation plays an important role in reducing some of the key risk factors for non-communicable diseases including obesity and being overweight. In order to address low levels of physical activity, it is essential to understand the key barriers and facilitating factors experienced by specific population groups. The purpose of this study is to investigate key facilitating factors for participation in a dance aerobic initiative, Culture X, developed in the Pacific Island country, Samoa. The study further aims to understand ways in which the programme assists participants in addressing barriers to physical activity. Face-to-face interviews running from 10 to 20 min were conducted with 28 Culture X participants in order to gain a deep understanding of participants' personal perspectives with regard to barriers and facilitating factors to physical activity. Findings suggest the inclusion of key cultural components (including, traditional dance moves and music, prayer, community orientation and family inclusiveness) were integral for supporting ongoing participation in Culture X. These components further assisted participants in addressing important personal and social barriers to physical activity (including lack of motivation and enjoyment, lack of confidence, time management, family and social commitments and lack of support). This study highlights creative ways that health promotion in the Pacific Island region can encourage physical activity and informs health promotion literature regarding the importance of placing local culture at the heart of behaviour change initiatives. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Incorporation of Socio-scientific Content into Active Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, D. B.; Lewis, J. E.; Anderson, K.; Latch, D.; Sutheimer, S.; Webster, G.; Moog, R.

    2014-12-01

    Active learning has gained increasing support as an effective pedagogical technique to improve student learning. One way to promote active learning in the classroom is the use of in-class activities in place of lecturing. As part of an NSF-funded project, a set of in-class activities have been created that use climate change topics to teach chemistry content. These activities use the Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) methodology. In this pedagogical approach a set of models and a series of critical thinking questions are used to guide students through the introduction to or application of course content. Students complete the activities in their groups, with the faculty member as a facilitator of learning. Through assigned group roles and intentionally designed activity structure, process skills, such as teamwork, communication, and information processing, are developed during completion of the activity. Each of these climate change activities contains a socio-scientific component, e.g., social, ethical and economic data. In one activity, greenhouse gases are used to explain the concept of dipole moment. Data about natural and anthropogenic production rates, global warming potential and atmospheric lifetimes for a list of greenhouse gases are presented. The students are asked to identify which greenhouse gas they would regulate, with a corresponding explanation for their choice. They are also asked to identify the disadvantages of regulating the gas they chose in the previous question. In another activity, where carbon sequestration is used to demonstrate the utility of a phase diagram, students use economic and environmental data to choose the best location for sequestration. Too often discussions about climate change (both in and outside the classroom) consist of purely emotional responses. These activities force students to use data to support their arguments and hypothesize about what other data could be used in the corresponding discussion to

  12. Progression in Ethical Reasoning When Addressing Socio-scientific Issues in Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Birgitta

    2014-11-01

    This article reports on the outcomes of an intervention in a Swedish school in which the author, a teacher-researcher, sought to develop students' (14-15 years old) ethical reasoning in science through the use of peer discussions about socio-scientific issues. Prior to the student discussions various prompts were used to highlight different aspects of the issues. In addition, students were given time to search for further information themselves. Analysis of students' written arguments, from the beginning of the intervention and afterwards, suggests that many students seem to be moving away from their use of everyday language towards using scientific concepts in their arguments. In addition, they moved from considering cloning and 'designer babies' solely in terms of the present to considering them in terms of the future. Furthermore, the students started to approach the issues in additional ways using not only consequentialism but also the approaches of virtue ethics, and rights and duties. Students' progression in ethical reasoning could be related to the characteristics of the interactions in peer discussions as students who critically and constructively argued with each other's ideas, and challenged each other's claims, made progress in more aspects of ethical reasoning than students merely using cumulative talk. As such, the work provides valuable indications for the importance of introducing peer discussions and debates about SSIs in connection to biotechnology into the teaching of science in schools.

  13. Keynote address: the scientific basis of the present and future practice of clinical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    At mid-century radiotherapy was more an art than a science, but is presently based on radiobiological parameters and cell kinetics. This close interaction between basic scientific principles and clinical practice has been made possible because one can correlate quantitatively doses of irradiation with observed responses. First, a short historical review will be made because it gives a perspective for the understanding both of progress made and prevailing misconceptions. The important radiobiological parameters and cell kinetics will then be discussed in some detail to demonstrate that they should be thoroughly understood in their relationship to radiotherapy. The overall treatment planning must be based on the clinical applications of the main radiobiological parameters. The combined treatment with surgery, either pre- or postoperatively, and multiple daily fractionations will be used as examples. The teaching of radiobiology should be considerably expanded, not only for its own scientific merit but also to show how it applies to clinical situations. This should be reflected in the expansion of the board examination

  14. Addressing the regulatory and scientific challenges in multiple sclerosis--a statement from the EU regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabanov, Pavel; Haas, Manuel; Elferink, Andre; Bakchine, Serge; Broich, Karl

    2014-09-01

    Improving and facilitating the process of making new drugs available to patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) requires cooperation among the regulators and other stakeholders. This cooperation will also positively contribute towards developing guidelines of the highest quality in medical, regulatory and scientific aspects. This would be beneficial both in areas that require further guideline development, but also in fields where existing guidance should be adapted to take into account evolution in science. Considering the input from all stakeholders, the European Medicines Agency confirmed its intention to update the relevant guideline and apply a flexible approach towards new drug development strategies in MS. This article is the first official position from the EU regulators, presenting the main changes to be expected in the guidance document. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Health needs and public health functions addressed in scientific publications in Francophone sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benie-Bi, J; Cambon, L; Grimaud, O; Kivits, J; Alla, F

    2013-09-01

    To describe the reporting of public health research in Francophone sub-Saharan Africa (FSA). A bibliometric research study of scientific public health publications in FSA, which includes 24 countries and approximately 260 million people. Two researchers analysed original articles published in 2007 in the medical or social sciences fields and indexed in Scopus. At least one co-author of articles had to be based in FSA. The analysis focused on research field, public health function (WHO classification), FSA country author's affiliation, language, journal type and global burden of disease (WHO classification). Of 1047 articles retrieved by the search, 212 were from the public health field. The number of articles per country varied from 0 to 36. Public health functions examined were health service research (24.5%), health monitoring (27.4%), prevention (15%) and legislation (0.5%). The distribution of health needs described in the articles was close to that of the WHO data for Africa for 2004: infectious and parasitic diseases (70% vs 54%), maternal and perinatal conditions (15% vs 17%), non-communicable diseases (15.6% vs 21%), and injuries (0.5% vs 8%). The areas reported in published articles from sub-Saharan Africa reflect the health needs distribution in Africa; however, the number of publications is low, particularly for prevention. In light of the current focus on evidence-based public health, this study questions whether the international scientific community adequately considers the expertise and perspectives of African researchers and professionals. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Recent NRC research activities addressing valve and pump issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, D.L.

    1996-12-01

    The mission of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is to ensure the safe design, construction, and operation of commercial nuclear power plants and other facilities in the U.S.A. One of the main roles that the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) plays in achieving the NRC mission is to plan, recommend, and implement research programs that address safety and technical issues deemed important by the NRC. The results of the research activities provide the bases for developing NRC positions or decisions on these issues. Also, RES performs confirmatory research for developing the basis to evaluate industry responses and positions on various regulatory requirements. This presentation summarizes some recent RES supported research activities that have addressed safety and technical issues related to valves and pumps. These activities include the efforts on determining valve and motor-operator responses under dynamic loads and pressure locking events, evaluation of monitoring equipment, and methods for detecting and trending aging of check valves and pumps. The role that RES is expected to play in future years to fulfill the NRC mission is also discussed.

  17. Addressing Emerging Risks: Scientific and Regulatory Challenges Associated with Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy R. Dugas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Airborne fine and ultrafine particulate matter (PM are often generated through widely-used thermal processes such as the combustion of fuels or the thermal decomposition of waste. Residents near Superfund sites are exposed to PM through the inhalation of windblown dust, ingestion of soil and sediments, and inhalation of emissions from the on-site thermal treatment of contaminated soils. Epidemiological evidence supports a link between exposure to airborne PM and an increased risk of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. It is well-known that during combustion processes, incomplete combustion can lead to the production of organic pollutants that can adsorb to the surface of PM. Recent studies have demonstrated that their interaction with metal centers can lead to the generation of a surface stabilized metal-radical complex capable of redox cycling to produce ROS. Moreover, these free radicals can persist in the environment, hence their designation as Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFR. EPFR has been demonstrated in both ambient air PM2.5 (diameter < 2.5 µm and in PM from a variety of combustion sources. Thus, low-temperature, thermal treatment of soils can potentially increase the concentration of EPFR in areas in and around Superfund sites. In this review, we will outline the evidence to date supporting EPFR formation and its environmental significance. Furthermore, we will address the lack of methodologies for specifically addressing its risk assessment and challenges associated with regulating this new, emerging contaminant.

  18. Guide for health professionals addressing oral care for individuals in oncological treatment based on scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Caroline Gomes; Medeiros-Filho, João Batista; Ferreira, Meire Coelho

    2018-02-22

    Oncological treatment can cause changes in the oral cavity compromising oral functions. The aim of the study was, based on a systematic review, to draft a guide directed at the team of health professionals involved in the oral care of oncological patients. A systematic search of the literature was performed for articles published between 2000 and April 2017. Searches were made of electronic databases and hand search. The inclusion criteria were systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and RCTs published in English, involving pediatric and adult oncological patients and focused on the prevention and treatment of oral complications as well as studies addressing the maintenance of oral health. Among the 1237 studies identified, 129 were pre-selected and 54 were selected to form the basis for the clinical guide. The studies analyzed stress the need for oral assessments as well as preventive and curative actions prior to oncological treatment. To minimize the severity of oral problems, the studies emphasize daily oral care, the treatment of xerostomia with saliva substitute and hydration, and low-level laser therapy, nystatin, acyclovir, respectively, for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis, oral candidiasis, and infection by herpes simplex virus. Thus, the guide produced addresses oral assessments and professional and home care before, during, and after oncological treatment. The guide drafted has the function of assisting health professionals involved in the oral care of patients with cancer, enabling the prevention or treatment of oral complications stemming from oncological treatment.

  19. Scientifically defensible fish conservation and recovery plans: Addressing diffuse threats and developing rigorous adaptive management plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas-Hebner, Kathleen G.; Schreck, Carl B.; Hughes, Robert M.; Yeakley, Alan; Molina, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the importance of addressing diffuse threats to long-term species and habitat viability in fish conservation and recovery planning. In the Pacific Northwest, USA, salmonid management plans have typically focused on degraded freshwater habitat, dams, fish passage, harvest rates, and hatchery releases. However, such plans inadequately address threats related to human population and economic growth, intra- and interspecific competition, and changes in climate, ocean, and estuarine conditions. Based on reviews conducted on eight conservation and/or recovery plans, we found that though threats resulting from such changes are difficult to model and/or predict, they are especially important for wide-ranging diadromous species. Adaptive management is also a critical but often inadequately constructed component of those plans. Adaptive management should be designed to respond to evolving knowledge about the fish and their supporting ecosystems; if done properly, it should help improve conservation efforts by decreasing uncertainty regarding known and diffuse threats. We conclude with a general call for environmental managers and planners to reinvigorate the adaptive management process in future management plans, including more explicitly identifying critical uncertainties, implementing monitoring programs to reduce those uncertainties, and explicitly stating what management actions will occur when pre-identified trigger points are reached.

  20. Using Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) Practices to Address Scientific Misunderstandings Around Complex Environmental Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrin, M.; Kenna, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    The new NGSS provide an important opportunity for scientists to develop curriculum that links the practice of science to research-based data in order to improve understanding in areas of science that are both complex and confusing. Our curriculum focuses in particular on the fate and transport of anthropogenic radionuclides. Radioactivity, both naturally occurring and anthropogenic, is highly debated and largely misunderstood, and for large sections of the population is a source of scientific misunderstanding. Developed as part of the international GEOTRACES project which focuses on identifying ocean processes and quantifying fluxes that control the distributions of selected trace elements and isotopes in the ocean, and on establishing the sensitivity of these distributions to changing environmental conditions, the curriculum topic fits nicely into the applied focus of NGSS with both environmental and topical relevance. Our curriculum design focuses on small group discussion driven by questions, yet unlike more traditional curriculum pieces these are not questions posed to the students, rather they are questions posed by the students to facilitate their deeper understanding. Our curriculum design challenges the traditional question/answer memorization approach to instruction as we strive to develop an educational approach that supports the practice of science as well as the NGSS Cross Cutting Concepts and the Science & Engineering Practices. Our goal is for students to develop a methodology they can employ when faced with a complex scientific issue. Through background readings and team discussions they identify what type of information is important for them to know and where to find a reliable source for that information. Framing their discovery around key questions such as "What type of radioactive decay are we dealing with?", "What is the potential half-life of the isotope?", and "What are the pathways of transport of radioactivity?" allows students to evaluate a

  1. Software support for students engaging in scientific activity and scientific controversy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli-Sforza, Violetta; Weiner, Arlene W.; Lesgold, Alan M.

    Computer environments could support students in engaging in cognitive activities that are essential to scientific practice and to the understanding of the nature of scientific knowledge, but that are difficult to manage in science classrooms. The authors describe a design for a computer-based environment to assist students in conducting dialectical activities of constructing, comparing, and evaluating arguments for competing scientific theories. Their choice of activities and their design respond to educators' and theorists' criticisms of current science curricula. They give detailed specifications of portions of the environment.

  2. How can present and future satellite missions support scientific studies that address ocean acidification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Joseph; Vandemark, Douglas; Jonsson, Bror; Balch, William; Chakraborty, Sumit; Lohrenz, Steven; Chapron, Bertrand; Hales, Burke; Mannino, Antonio; Mathis, Jeremy T.; Reul, Nicolas; Signorini, Sergio; Wanninkhof, Rik; Yates, Kimberly K.

    2016-01-01

    Space-based observations offer unique capabilities for studying spatial and temporal dynamics of the upper ocean inorganic carbon cycle and, in turn, supporting research tied to ocean acidification (OA). Satellite sensors measuring sea surface temperature, color, salinity, wind, waves, currents, and sea level enable a fuller understanding of a range of physical, chemical, and biological phenomena that drive regional OA dynamics as well as the potentially varied impacts of carbon cycle change on a broad range of ecosystems. Here, we update and expand on previous work that addresses the benefits of space-based assets for OA and carbonate system studies. Carbonate chemistry and the key processes controlling surface ocean OA variability are reviewed. Synthesis of present satellite data streams and their utility in this arena are discussed, as are opportunities on the horizon for using new satellite sensors with increased spectral, temporal, and/or spatial resolution. We outline applications that include the ability to track the biochemically dynamic nature of water masses, to map coral reefs at higher resolution, to discern functional phytoplankton groups and their relationships to acid perturbations, and to track processes that contribute to acid variation near the land-ocean interface.

  3. Scientific literature addressing detection of monosialoganglioside: A 10-year bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanli; Li, Miaojing; Liu, Zhijun; Xi, Aiping; Zhao, Chaoxian; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2012-04-05

    The study was undertaken to explore a bibliometric approach to quantitatively assess the research on detection of monosialoganglioside from 2002 to 2011. A bibliometric analysis based on the publications on Web of Science was performed using key words such as "monosialoganglioside", "colloidal gold", "high performance liquid chromatography" and "detection". (1) Research articles on the detection of monosialoganglioside; (2) researches on human and animal fundamentals, clinical trials and case reports; (3) article types: article, review, proceedings paper, note, letter, editorial material, discussion, book chapter; (4) Publication year: 2002-2011. (1) unrelated articles; (2) type of articles: correction; (3) articles from following databases: all databases related to social science and arts & humanities in Web of Science were excluded. (1) distribution of subject areas; (2) number of publications annually; (3) document type and language of publications; (4) distribution of institutions; (5) distribution of output in journals; (6) the number of countries in which the article is published; (7) top cited paper. Overall population stands at 1 880 research articles addressing detection of monosialoganglioside in Web of Science during the study period. Articles (1 599) were the most frequently used document type comprising 85.05%, followed by meeting abstracts, reviews and proceedings papers. The distribution of subject categories showed that monosialoganglioside research covered both clinical and basic science research. The USA, Japan, and Italy were the three most productive countries, and the publication numbers in the USA were highest with 559 papers. The University of Milan, Nagoya University, and Kinki University are the most productive institutions regarding detection of monosialoganglioside. In 559 articles published by Americans, Medical College of Georgia ranked the first with 30 articles, followed by University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (28

  4. Validation as a Pragmatic, Scientific Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    This response to the comments contains three main sections, each addressing a subset of the comments. In the first section, I will respond to the comments by Brennan, Haertel, and Moss. All of these comments suggest ways in which my presentation could be extended or improved; I generally agree with their suggestions, so my response to their…

  5. International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste: Scientific activities in 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    The document contains three parts. Part I is a review of the Scientific activities in 1988 with a statistical digest. Part II describes the scientific programme in Fundamental physics, Condensed matter, Atomic and molecular physics, Mathematics, Physics and energy, Physics and environment, Physics of the living state, Applied physics, Adriatico research conferences. Part III lists the publications issued in 1988. Tabs

  6. Scientific Opinion addressing the state of the science on risk assessment of plant protection products for in-soil organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    EFSA PPR Panel (EFSA Panel on Plant Protection Products and their Residues); Ockleford, Colin; Adriaanse, Paulien

    2017-01-01

    Following a request from EFSA, the Panel on Plant Protection Products and their Residues developed an opinion on the science behind the risk assessment of plant protection products for in-soil organisms. The current risk assessment scheme is reviewed, taking into account new regulatory frameworks...... exposure routes for in-soil organisms and the potential direct and indirect effects is proposed. In order to address species recovery and long-term impacts of PPPs, the use of population models is also proposed....... and scientific developments. Proposals are made for specific protection goals for in-soil organisms being key drivers for relevant ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes such as nutrient cycling, soil structure, pest control and biodiversity. Considering the time-scales and biological processes related...

  7. Addressing security issues related to virtual institute distributed activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stytz, Martin R.; Banks, Sheila B.

    2008-03-01

    One issue confounding the development and experimentation of distributed modeling and simulation environments is the inability of the project team to identify and collaborate with resources, both human and technical, from outside the United States. This limitation is especially significant within the human behavior representation area where areas such as cultural effects research and joint command team behavior modeling require the participation of various cultural and national representatives. To address this limitation, as well as other human behavior representation research issues, NATO Research and Technology Organization initiated a project to develop a NATO virtual institute that enables more effective and more collaborative research into human behavior representation. However, in building and operating a virtual institute one of the chief concerns must be the cyber security of the institute. Because the institute "exists" in cyberspace, all of its activities are susceptible to cyberattacks, subterfuge, denial of service and all of the vulnerabilities that networked computers must face. In our opinion, for the concept of virtual institutes to be successful and useful, their operations and services must be protected from the threats in the cyber environment. A key to developing the required protection is the development and promulgation of standards for cyber security. In this paper, we discuss the types of cyber standards that are required, how new internet technologies can be exploited and can benefit the promulgation, development, maintenance, and robustness of the standards. This paper is organized as follows. Section One introduces the concept of the virtual institutes, the expected benefits, and the motivation for our research and for research in this area. Section Two presents background material and a discussion of topics related to VIs, uman behavior and cultural modeling, and network-centric warfare. Section Three contains a discussion of the

  8. International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste Scientific activities in 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The document contains three parts. Part 1 is a general review of the scientific activities of the Centre in 1991, including a statistical digest. Part II presents the scientific programme of the Centre in the following fields: Fundamental Physics, Condensed Matter Physics, Mathematics, Physics and Energy, Physics and Environment, Applied Physics, Adriatico Research Conferences, as well as other aspects of the Centre activities in 1991. Part III lists the publications issued in 1991. Tabs

  9. International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste: Scientific activities in 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The document contains three parts. Part I is a general review of the scientific activities in 1989 including a statistical digest. Part II describes the scientific programme in Fundamental Physics, Condensed Matter Physics, Mathematics, Physics and Energy, Physics and Environment, Applied Physics, Physics of the Space, Adriatico Research Conferences and other aspects of the Centre activities. Part III lists the publications issued in 1989. Tabs

  10. International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste. Scientific activities in 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The document contains three parts: Part I is a general review of the scientific activities of the Centre in 1990, including a statistical digest. Part II describes the scientific programme of the Centre in the following fields: Fundamental physics, condensed nuclear physics, mathematics, physics and energy, physics and environment, physics of the living state, applied physics Adriatico research conferences and other aspects of the Centre activities. Part III lists the publications issued in 1990

  11. International Centre for Theoretical Physics: scientific activities in 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    A review of the scientific activities of the Centre, including workshops, research, and training-for-research is presented. The scientific program consists of seven main fields, Physics and Energy, Fundamental Physics, Physics and Technology, Physics of the Living State, Physics of the Environment, Physics and Development, and Mathematics. In addition to a brief description of each workshop, symposium, college, and meeting, tables summarizing the participation at ICTP activities are given. A list of preprints and internal reports issued in 1984 is included

  12. International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste. Scientific activities in 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This publication gives a comprehensive overview of the scientific activities during 1994 of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste. In particular, it gives (i) a summary of these activities accompanied by statistical data (comparison with 1993, participation by geographical area, breakdown by field of activity, activities held at and outside the ICTP, and participation by activity); (ii) an overview of the scientific programme (fundamental physics, condensed matter physics, mathematics, physics and energy, physics and the environment, physics of the living state, applied physics, diploma courses, and other research) while listing long-term visitors, networks of associate members and federal institutes, training and research at Italian laboratories, external activities, science, the high technology and development programme, the books and equipment programme, award; (iii) a list of publications, and (iv) a list of scientific support services.

  13. International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste. Scientific activities in 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    This publication gives a comprehensive overview of the scientific activities during 1994 of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste. In particular, it gives (i) a summary of these activities accompanied by statistical data (comparison with 1993, participation by geographical area, breakdown by field of activity, activities held at and outside the ICTP, and participation by activity); (ii) an overview of the scientific programme (fundamental physics, condensed matter physics, mathematics, physics and energy, physics and the environment, physics of the living state, applied physics, diploma courses, and other research) while listing long-term visitors, networks of associate members and federal institutes, training and research at Italian laboratories, external activities, science, the high technology and development programme, the books and equipment programme, award; (iii) a list of publications, and (iv) a list of scientific support services

  14. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K. (eds.)

    1992-04-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California's Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

  15. TRIUMF annual report scientific activities 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    By the best indicators 1987 was a good year for TRIUMF and its science. Although the number of employed staff and the funding was exactly the same as for 1986 there was growth in the number of experiments performed, the number of users participating in experiments, the number of new proposals for experiments, the delivery of beam to experiments, the number of papers published, the length of this annual report and, probably, the number of members of the public who toured TRIUMF and the coverage of TRIUMF's program by the various media. Most of the brief accounts of research progress in this report speak for themselves. The various activities of TRIUMF, as described in this report, are intended to convey how the project fulfills its national purpose. This purpose has evolved. Although the purpose does not appear to be concisely articulated anywhere it probably includes all of the following: 1) to serve as a high-profile laboratory in fundamental subatomic science constituting Canada's contribution to the world network of large accelerator facilities and aiming to achieve, in this field, the highest international standards of excellence; 2) to provide, in subatomic physics, a program of national significance easily accessible to scientists from across the nation; 3) to attract people and ideas of the highest quality from abroad; 4) to offer substantial opportunities to graduate student training; and 5) to act as a catalyst for high technology enterprises with appropriate technology transfer programs

  16. Institute of Nuclear Physics, mission and scientific research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoto, J.; Zaganjori, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) was established in 1971 as a scientific research institution with main goal basic scientific knowledge transmission and transfer the new methods and technologies of nuclear physics to the different economy fields. The organizational structure and main research areas of the Institute are described. The effects of the long transition period of the Albanian society and economy on the Institution activity are also presented

  17. International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, scientific activities in 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    The document contains three parts. Part I is a programme overview of 1992 including a description of scientific activities and statistics about participation by geographic areas and by activities. Part II presents the scientific programme in the following fields: fundamental physics, condensed matter physics, mathematics, physics related to the energy problems, physics and the environment, physics of the living state (of matter), and applied physics. Conferences and other activities by the centre are also listed. Part III lists the publications issued in 1992. 5 tabs

  18. Empirical Evidence or Intuition? An Activity Involving the Scientific Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overway, Ken

    2007-01-01

    Students need to have basic understanding of scientific method during their introductory science classes and for this purpose an activity was devised which involved a game based on famous Monty Hall game problem. This particular activity allowed students to banish or confirm their intuition based on empirical evidence.

  19. Promoting Physical Activity: Addressing Barriers and Moving Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beighle, Aaron; Morrow, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The barriers that keep individuals from adopting and maintaining active lifestyles are very complex. Strategies for overcoming these barriers and to incentivize and assist inactive individuals to benefit from physical activity are necessary. In addition, it is important to examine the impact of public policy on active living. As youth physical…

  20. Information-Psychological Security and Near-Scientific Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Afonin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the new version of the “Information Security Doctrine of the Russian Federation (adopted in December 2016, in information security agenda its information-psychological component was selected for further study. Attention is drawn to the need to ensure the information-psychological security of certain categories of citizens, social groups and society in general, taking into account a differentiated approach to assessing threats that arise in the course of their life. The article briefly considers the science rank among the forms of the human activities and notes that when involving in science-based and science-applied activities the near-scientific activity, which is often briefly referred to as pseudoscience, shows up as one of the threats.The article presents main forms to show of the near-scientific (pseudoscientific activity, namely parascience, quasi-science, pseudoscience, and monetary scientism.Drawing on the example of one of the near-scientific activity products, called "psychotronic weapon", the article clearly shows the emergence and evolution of this pseudoscientific product, the attempts of its implementation in practice, and the subsequent negative consequences of these attempts for society.Taking into account the survivability of the near-scientific activity, it is proposed to include lectures in the curricula of technical universities to introduce threats from pseudoscience to graduates of higher educational institutions who may face them both in their employment activity and in everyday life.

  1. Addressing the dynamics of science in curricular reform for scientific literacy: Towards authentic science education in the case of genomics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijck, van M.W.

    2010-01-01

    Science education reform must anticipate the scientific literacy required by the next generation of citizens. Particularly, this counts for rapidly emerging and evolving scientific disciplines such as genomics. Taking this discipline as a case, such anticipation is becoming increasingly problematic

  2. COMPLEMENTARY EFFECTS IN ACTIVIZATION OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES IN THE INFORMATION SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zhylinska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes new methodological approaches in the study of development problems of scientific and technical activities in the information society. The essence and economic nature of development scientific and technical activities' from the standpoint of methodological collectivism are disclosed, a new phenomenon intensification of development scientific and technical activities by forming the global networks of scientific and technical knowledge users that provides sharing of the burden of transformation and transaction costs as generation as well as economic implementation of research and technical knowledge across the globe are showed. This study outlines the complementary effects in intensify development of scientific and technological activities components: research and development (RD, training of scientific personnel, provision of scientific and technical services, which generates of world market's complementary goods, being world market of educational services of scientific and technical information, industrial properties, high technology products, venture capital investments and stock market.

  3. International Centre for Theoretical Physics: Scientific activities in 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    A review of the scientific activities of the Centre in 1986, including workshops, research and training-for-research is presented. The scientific program consists of eight main fields: Physics and Energy, Fundamental Physics, Physics of Condensed Matter, Applied Physics, Mathematics, Physics of the Environment and of National Resources, Physics of the Living State, Physics and Development. In addition to a brief description of each workshop, symposium, college and meeting, tables summarizing the participation of ICTP activities are given. A list of preprints and internal reports issued in 1986 is included

  4. International Centre for Theoretical Physics. Scientific activities in 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    A review of the scientific activities of the ICTP Trieste in 1987, including workshops, research and training for research is presented. The scientific program consists of eight main fields: fundamental physics, condensed matter, atomic and molecular physics, mathematics, physics and energy, physics and environment, applied physics and high technology, physics and development. In addition to a brief description of each workshop, symposium, college, meeting and activity or project sponsored by ICTP, a list of preprints and internal reports issued in 1987 is included. Tabs

  5. International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste. Scientific activities in 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The annual report of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics from Trieste for 1993 contains four parts. Part I gives statistical data on the main activities of the Centre. Part II presents the scientific programme structured as follows: Fundamental physics, Condensed matter physics, Mathematics, Physics and energy, Physics and environment, Physics of the living state, Applied physics, Adriatico Research Conferences, Diploma Course, Laboratories, Long-term visitors, Network of Associate Members and Federal Institutes, Training and research at italian laboratories, External Activities, Science, High Technology and Development Programme, Meeting hosted, Awards. Part III lists the publications issued in 1993. Part IV presents the scientific support services. Tabs

  6. International Centre for Theoretical Physics. Scientific activities in 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-08-01

    A review of the scientific activities of the Centre, including workshops, research, and training-for-research is presented. The scientific program consists of ten main fields, Physics and Energy, Fundamental Physics, Physics of Condensed Matter, Applied Physics, Physics of the Living State, Physics of the Environment, Mathematics, Physics Teaching, Experimental Physics Training, and Physics and Development. In addition to a brief description of each workshop, symposium, college, and meeting, tables summarizing the participation at ICTP activities are given. A list of preprints and internal reports issued in 1985 is included

  7. Clinical research in dermatology: resources and activities associated with a higher scientific productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Leyva, Alejandro; Descalzo, Miguel A; García-Doval, Ignacio

    2018-03-06

    Clinical research papers and their derived metrics can be useful to assess the scientific production of medical and research centers. Diverse factors are probably associated to differences in scientific production. But there are scarce studies analyzing them. Resources are limited and have to be distributed efficiently. The objective of this study is to explore what resources and activities are potentially associated with a higher scientific productivity. A bibliometric study was performed to obtain information about scientific productivity. Papers included had to meet criteria to be considered clinical research in dermatology, additionally had to be published between the years 2005-2014, had to be included in Pubmed or Embase and had to include a Spanish center of dermatology as the correspondence address. Information about research resources and activities of the year 2015 was gathered by means of an online survey sent to the authors identified in the bibliometric study. The search strategy returned 8617 papers and only 1104 of them (12.81%) met the inclusion criteria. 63 out of 113 centers responded to the survey (55.75%). Factors associated with a higher scientific productivity were: the size of the resident program, the amount of time specifically dedicated to research, a lower clinical workload, and the number of clinical trials performed in the last year. We have demonstrated that some factors are associated with a higher scientific productivity. Residency program, more research staff, clinical workload redistribution and research motivation/initiatives are key strategies that could improve scientific productivity of a center.

  8. Educational activities for the diffusion of scientific culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlet, Roger

    2015-08-01

    Considering there is a divorce between science and culture, we suggest activities such as trails of mathematical/astronomical knowledge and vision of scientific teaching and education, that are aiming ata global, citizen dialogue, at reviving a truly human culture integrating science, and at answering all kinds of obscurantism/fundamentalism.

  9. Features of optical modeling in educational and scientific activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article discusses the functionality of existing software for the modeling, analysis and optimization of lighting systems and optical elements, through which the stage of their design can be automated completely. The use of these programs is shown using the example of scientific work and the educational activity of ...

  10. Nanodiamonds as Carriers for Address Delivery of Biologically Active Substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petunin AI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surface of detonation nanodiamonds was functionalized for the covalent attachment of immunoglobulin, and simultaneously bovine serum albumin and Rabbit Anti-Mouse Antibody. The nanodiamond-IgGI125 and RAM-nanodiamond-BSAI125 complexes are stable in blood serum and the immobilized proteins retain their biological activity. It was shown that the RAM-nanodiamond-BSAI125 complex is able to bind to the target antigen immobilized on the Sepharose 6B matrix through antibody–antigen interaction. The idea can be extended to use nanodiamonds as carriers for delivery of bioactive substances (i.e., drugs to various targets in vivo.

  11. Shared scientific thinking in everyday parent-child activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Kevin; Callanan, Maureen A.; Jipson, Jennifer L.; Galco, Jodi; Topping, Karen; Shrager, Jeff

    2001-11-01

    Current accounts of the development of scientific reasoning focus on individual children's ability to coordinate the collection and evaluation of evidence with the creation of theories to explain the evidence. This observational study of parent-child interactions in a children's museum demonstrated that parents shape and support children's scientific thinking in everyday, nonobligatory activity. When children engaged an exhibit with parents, their exploration of evidence was observed to be longer, broader, and more focused on relevant comparisons than children who engaged the exhibit without their parents. Parents were observed to talk to children about how to select and encode appropriate evidence and how to make direct comparisons between the most informative kinds of evidence. Parents also sometimes assumed the role of explainer by casting children's experience in causal terms, connecting the experience to prior knowledge, or introducing abstract principles. We discuss these findings with respect to two dimensions of children's scientific thinking: developments in evidence collection and developments in theory construction.

  12. Actively addressed single pixel full-colour plasmonic display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Daniel; Frank, Russell; Wu, Shin-Tson; Chanda, Debashis

    2017-05-01

    Dynamic, colour-changing surfaces have many applications including displays, wearables and active camouflage. Plasmonic nanostructures can fill this role by having the advantages of ultra-small pixels, high reflectivity and post-fabrication tuning through control of the surrounding media. However, previous reports of post-fabrication tuning have yet to cover a full red-green-blue (RGB) colour basis set with a single nanostructure of singular dimensions. Here, we report a method which greatly advances this tuning and demonstrates a liquid crystal-plasmonic system that covers the full RGB colour basis set, only as a function of voltage. This is accomplished through a surface morphology-induced, polarization-dependent plasmonic resonance and a combination of bulk and surface liquid crystal effects that manifest at different voltages. We further demonstrate the system's compatibility with existing LCD technology by integrating it with a commercially available thin-film-transistor array. The imprinted surface interfaces readily with computers to display images as well as video.

  13. International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste. Scientific activities in 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The annual report of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics from Trieste for 1995 contains three parts. Part 1 includes statistical data on the main activities of the Centre. Part 2 presents the scientific programme in various fields (Physics of Condensed Matter, Physics of High and Intermediate Energies, Mathematics, Physics and Energy, Physics of the Environment, Physics of Living State, Applied Physics and Miscellaneous) as well as other activities such as diploma course, long-term scientific visitors, associate members and federation arrangements, training and research at Italian laboratories, external activities, books and equipment donation programme, awards, and meetings hosted. Part 3 lists the publications issued in 1995 and gives information about the library of the Centre. 6 tabs

  14. International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste. Scientific activities in 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The annual report of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics from Trieste for 1995 contains three parts. Part 1 includes statistical data on the main activities of the Centre. Part 2 presents the scientific programme in various fields (Physics of Condensed Matter, Physics of High and Intermediate Energies, Mathematics, Physics and Energy, Physics of the Environment, Physics of Living State, Applied Physics and Miscellaneous) as well as other activities such as diploma course, long-term scientific visitors, associate members and federation arrangements, training and research at Italian laboratories, external activities, books and equipment donation programme, awards, and meetings hosted. Part 3 lists the publications issued in 1995 and gives information about the library of the Centre. 6 tabs.

  15. Strategies to Address Common Challenges When Teaching in an Active Learning Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Christina I.; Gorman, Kristen S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides practical strategies for addressing common challenges that arise for teachers in active learning classrooms. Our strategies come from instructors with experience teaching in these environments.

  16. International Centre for Theoretical Physics. Scientific activities in 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    The Centre's scientific programme for 1980 falling under five main fields, i.e. Physics and Energy, Physics and Technology, Physics and Frontiers of Knowledge, Applicable Mathematics and Planning Models, and Physics of the Environment and of Natural Resources, is briefly discussed. Participation in the research and training-for-research activities of the ICTP during 1980 and the stable resources for the period 1970 to 1981 are shown in tables. A detailed ''post-spectus'' of the seminars, meetings, and courses which the centre organized in 1980 is given. A list of titles of the preprints and internal reports produced during the year is also given for each area of activity

  17. Progress report on scientific and technological activities: 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    An overview of research and development activities of the Constituyentes Atomic Center, National Atomic Energy Commission (Argentine), during the period January-December 1996 is presented. The research and development activities are reported under the following headings: Fuel Elements; Non Destructive and Structural Test; Physics; Materials; Chemistry; Radiobiology Nuclear Reactors; Institute of Technology; Quality Management; Technical Assistance to Industry (SATI); Computer and Communication Services Center; Nuclear Power Stations Support Group. List of publications by the scientific staff of the Atomic Center is provided. The list includes paper published in journals, papers presented in conferences, symposia, etc., and technical reports

  18. Progress report on scientific and technological activities: 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    An overview of research and development activities of the Constituyentes Atomic Center, National Atomic Energy Commission (Argentine), during the period January-December 1995 is presented. The research and development activities are reported under the following headings: Fuel Elements; Non Destructive and Structural Test; Physics; Materials; Chemistry; Radiobiology Nuclear Reactors; Institute of Technology; Quality Management; Technical Assistance to Industry (SATI); Computer and Communication Services Center; Nuclear Power Stations Support Group. List of publications by the scientific staff of the Atomic Center is provided. The list includes paper published in journals, papers presented in conferences, symposia, etc., and technical reports

  19. Jesuit scientific activity in the overseas missions, 1540-1773.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Steven J

    2005-03-01

    Within the context of national traditions in colonial science, the scientific activities of Jesuit missionaries present us with a unique combination of challenges. The multinational membership of the Society of Jesus gave its missionaries access to virtually every Portuguese, Spanish, and French colony. The Society was thus compelled to engage an astonishingly diverse array of cultural and natural environments, and that diversity of contexts is reflected in the range and the complexity of Jesuit scientific practices. Underlying that complexity, however, was what I see as a unique combination of institutional structures; namely, European colleges, overseas mission stations, and the regular circulation of personnel and information. With this institutional framework as a backdrop, I briefly trace what I see as the most salient themes emerging from recent studies of Jesuit overseas science: (1) the Societys ability to use scientific expertise to its advantage amid the complex web of dependencies upon which it missionary activities rested; (2) the ability of its missionaries to become intimate with a wide range of cultures and to appropriate natural knowledge held by indigenous peoples, especially in the fields of material medica and geography; and (3) the different ways Jesuits used published accounts of "remote nature" (i.e., natural histories of overseas colonies) to advance their corporate and religious causes.

  20. Recent activities on the scientific ballooning in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisimura, J.; Hirosawa, H.

    1984-01-01

    Scientific ballooning is Japan has been organized by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, and about 15 balloons have been launched each year from Sanriku Balloon Center that belongs to this Institute. The balloon center is located in the northern part of Japan. The observations cover the field of X-ray, gamma-ray, infrared astronomy, cosmic rays, and atmospheric science. Systems of lon duration flights such as 'Boomerang Balloons', and fine attitude control systems were developed and widely applied to the scientific observations. International collaborative works were performed in Australia and Indonesia last year. Some details of these activities are reported and possible future collaborations with Braziian balloon group are also discussed. (Author) [pt

  1. Technology performance evaluation of scientific and educational activities of scientific-pedagogical staff in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bechvaya Maria, R.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a performance assessment tool research and teaching staff on the basis of a rating system that allows for the analysis of the results of key personnel of the higher school for criteria and determine the size of incentive payments. The rating model wage researchers and teachers bases on strengthening the incentive function of wages, aimed at personalization of scientific and educational activities of employees, which in modern conditions is the most relevant for use. The functions of stimulation, such as economic, moral and social are considered. The analysis methodologies for assessing university in the world and national rankings on the basis of which formed a system of indicators for assessing the activities of academic staff of higher education is represented. The necessity of development of an information system through which it is possible to carry out comprehensive analysis, that is to monitor the number of registered employees, to determine the share indices in the total ranking, to conduct the ranking points received by employees by industry and science in the context of structural units. The proposed information system is one element of technology assessment of effectiveness of the academic staff designed to evaluate the effectiveness of their activities and incentives, allows the analysis of criteria, based on which can be applied informed management decisions regarding the development of social and labor relations in the highest school.

  2. Scientific and engineering aspects of the Active Phase Separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klipping, G.

    1986-01-01

    The development of the Active Phase Separator (APS), which was initiated by the rather extreme demands for the GIRL (German Infrared Laboratory) mission, is reviewed. As a final result the APS model V is presented, which is suitable for space qualification and can be considered not only as a universal phase separator but also as a multifunctional component for space cooling systems, allowing a simplification of the valve plan. Besides discussing the scientific results obtained with annular flow channels and presentation of performance tests with the APS, the status of the actual IR telescopes IRAS, (Infra Red Astronomy Sattelite), GIRL, and ISO (Infrared Space Observatory) is summarized

  3. 77 FR 43345 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Sponsor's Notice of Change of Address, Form I-865...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ...-0076] Agency Information Collection Activities: Sponsor's Notice of Change of Address, Form I-865...: Sponsor's Notice of Change of Address. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable component of the.... During this 60-day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form I-865. Should USCIS decide...

  4. Scientific Opinion addressing the state of the science on risk assessment of plant protection products for non-target arthropods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    EFSA PPR Panel (EFSA Panel on Plant Protection Products and their Residues); Topping, Christopher John

    2015-01-01

    scheme is reviewed, taking into consideration recent workshops and progress in science. Proposals are made for specific protection goals which aim to protect important ecosystem services such as food web support, pest control and biodiversity. In order to address recovery and source–sink population...... dynamics, conducting a landscape-level risk assessment is suggested. A new risk assessment scheme is suggested which integrates modelling approaches. The main exposure routes for non-target arthropods are identified and proposals are made on how to integrate them in the risk assessment. The appropriateness...

  5. CISTI'S Activities in Support of Scientific Data Management in Canada 2008-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Zborowski

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In the Canadian research environment, it is difficult for researchers to effectively discover, access, and use data sets, except for those that are the most well known. Several recent reports have discussed the issues around "lost" data sets: those which are intended to be shared but cannot be identified and utilized effectively because of insufficient associated metadata. Both problems are approaching critical levels in Canada and internationally, a situation that is unacceptable because these data sets are often generated as a result of public funding. Solutions may involve providing support and training for researchers on how they can best collect and manage their data sets or developing gateways to scientific data sets. NRC-CISTI is the largest comprehensive source of scientific, technical, and medical information in North America, with a mandate to serve as Canada's national science library. Through its publishing arm, NRC Research Press, it is also Canada's foremost scientific publisher. NRC-CISTI is an organization with demonstrated expertise in metadata management, which, until recently, focused primarily on library and publishing contexts. However in November 2007, it formally committed to expand its agenda to address the management of scientific research data and the related critical needs of the research community. This paper presents NRC-CISTI's activities in this area. NRC-CISTI has begun by hosting forums in which the critical players (including the granting agencies mapped out targets and approaches. It has strengthened its own internal expertise regarding metadata and management of scientific data sets. Finally, NRC-CISTI is developing a gateway Web site which will provide access to Canadian scientific data sets and related metadata, tools, educational resources, and other informative and collaborative tools urgently needed by Canadian and international researchers. NRC-CISTI is the sponsoring body for the Canadian National

  6. SCIENTIFIC AND INNOVATION ACTIVITIES OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION: THE ESSENCE AND INTERACTION OF THE COMPONENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Meniailo, Viktorija

    2017-01-01

    One of the main directions of state policy in education is the development of scientific and innovation activities at institutions of higher education. It imposes on them additional features related to the inclusion of scientific activities in universities united innovative process for the creating and practical application of new knowledge. The purpose of the article is to establish the relationship between scientific and innovation activities and clarify the essence of scientific and innova...

  7. Didactical-Scientific Modeling: integrating experimental activities and the process of scientific modeling in the teaching of Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Albuquerque Heidemann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The dissociated way with which the theory and practice are often treated in Physics teaching contributes to students' difficulties in using scientific knowledge to represent real events, which are not idealized situations as the events presented in most textbook problems. Considering that the process of scientific modeling is of fundamental importance for students to learn Science, about Science and how to do Science, Brandão, Araujo and Veit, supported by Vergnaud's Theory of Conceptual Fields and by Bunge's concept of scientific modeling, propose a theoretical-methodological framework for modeling in Physics Education named Didactical-Scientific Modeling (DSM. The authors defend the thesis that it is possible to consider the process of scientific modeling as a conceptual field underlying the specific conceptual fields of Physics. They elucidate knowledge associated to the facing of problems that involve the use, exploration and validation of didactical versions of scientific models. However, the goal of this framework is not to explain how the concepts related to empirical testability are connected to scientific modeling concepts. In order to fill this gap, we present in this article an expansion of this theoretical-methodological framework based on Bunge's concepts on contrasting scientific ideas. In this regard, we insert experimental work concepts in the conceptual field associated to the process of didactical-scientific modeling. Lastly, we exemplify its use in order to support the design and execution of experimental activities focused on the scientific-didactical process, and we also discuss some implications for future research in Physics Education.

  8. Self-Evaluation of the Scientific Activity of a Higher Educational Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayevnyeva Olena V.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the problem of self-evaluation of the scientific activity of a higher educational institution (HEI as a component of its overall ranking evaluation. On the basis of a potentially effective approach to studying this problem, there proposed a system of indicators for evaluating the scientific activity of a HEI, which makes it possible to determine the potential of its scientific activity in terms of staff and resource provision, and the efficiency — in terms of quality of the training of scientific staff (students, graduate students, young scientists, etc., financial results of scientific activity and publication activity. To obtain an integral ranking score of the scientific activity of a HEI, the use of the taxonomic method is justified, the necessity of applying weight coefficients of the significance of primary indicators is determined. The approbation of the approach was carried out on the basis of the data of S. Kuznets KhNEU for the period of 2013-2016, which made it possible to obtain not only point estimates of the integral indicator of the scientific activity of an HEI but also determine the trends in its changes and identify their reasons. The proposed approach to the self-evaluation of the scientific activity of a HEI allows its administration to develop effective management solutions to increase the level of scientific activity of its scientific and pedagogical, and scientific staff, which will provide additional competitive advantages in the national and world educational space.

  9. Searching for a Common Ground--A Literature Review of Empirical Research on Scientific Inquiry Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnebeck, Silke; Bernholt, Sascha; Ropohl, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of scientific inquiry in science education, researchers and educators disagree considerably regarding what features define this instructional approach. While a large body of literature addresses theoretical considerations, numerous empirical studies investigate scientific inquiry on quite different levels of detail and also…

  10. Traversing myths and mountains: addressing socioeconomic inequities in the promotion of nutrition and physical activity behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Kylie

    2015-11-14

    In developed countries, individuals experiencing socioeconomic disadvantage - whether a low education level, low income, low-status occupation, or living in a socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhood - are less likely than those more advantaged to engage in eating and physical activity behaviours conducive to optimal health. These socioeconomic inequities in nutrition and physical activity (and some sedentary) behaviours are graded, persistent, and evident across multiple populations and studies. They are concerning in that they mirror socioeconomic inequities in obesity and in health outcomes. Yet there remains a dearth of evidence of the most effective means of addressing these inequities. People experiencing disadvantage face multiple challenges to healthy behaviours that can appear insurmountable. With increasing recognition of the role of underlying structural and societal factors as determinants of nutrition and physical activity behaviours and inequities in these behaviours, and the limited success of behaviour change approaches in addressing these inequities, we might wonder whether there remains a role for behavioural scientists to tackle these challenges. This debate piece argues that behavioural scientists can play an important role in addressing socioeconomic inequities in nutrition, physical activity and sedentary behaviours, and that this will involve challenging myths and taking on new perspectives. There are successful models for doing so from which we can learn. Addressing socioeconomic inequities in eating, physical activity and sedentary behaviours is challenging. However, successful examples demonstrate that overcoming such challenges is possible, and provide guidance for doing so. Given the disproportionate burden of ill health carried by people experiencing socioeconomic disadvantage, all our nutrition and physical activity interventions, programs and policies should be designed to reach and positively impact these individuals at greatest

  11. A framework to evaluate proposals for scientific activities in wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Landres

    2010-01-01

    Every year, the four Federal wilderness management agencies - U.S. DOI Bureau of Land Management, Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, and the USDA Forest Service - receive hundreds of proposals to conduct scientific studies within wilderness. There is no consistent and comprehensive framework for evaluating such proposals that accounts for the unique...

  12. Opening address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ianko, L.

    1993-01-01

    This short talk was the opening remarks to the attendees at this conference, presented by the Scientific Secretary, IWG-LMNPP, of the IAEA. This meeting is an effort to aid research on problems related to the general area of nuclear plant aging and life management. In particular it addresses fracture properties of reactor materials and components, both as installed, and at end of service condition. A major concern is relating measurements made on laboratory samples to properties displayed by actual reactor components

  13. Analysis According to Certain Variables of Scientific Literacy among Gifted Students That Participate in Scientific Activities at Science and Art Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömek, Emre; Yagiz, Dursun; Kurt, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze scientific literacy levels relevant to science and technology classes among gifted students that participate in scientific activities at science and art centers. This study investigated whether there was a significant difference in scientific literacy levels among gifted students according to the areas of…

  14. Popularization activities for young children of the scientific activity in the field of environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gires, Auguste; Le Gueut, Marie-Agathe; Schertzer, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Research projects now rely on various pillars which include of course high level science and equipments, and also communication, outreach and educational activities. This paper focuses on education for young children and present activities that aim at helping them (and their parents!) to grasp some of the complex underlying scientific issues in the field of environment. More generally it helps children to get familiarized with science and scientists, with the hope of enhancing scientific culture and promoting careers in this field. The activities which are part of the popularization effort of the NEW Interreg IV RainGain project (www.raingain.eu) : - Experiments led in classrooms of kinder garden to design and test a disdrometer made of a plate and flour or oil to observe the diversity of rain drop sizes. It simply consists in putting a bit (roughly 1 mm depth) of flour or oil in a plate. The features of the devices based either flour or oil were first studied inside with artificial drops. Then it was tested outside under actual rain. - The writing of scientific book with and for children aged 8-9 years with the help of the editor of the collection. The process leading to the final book is splat in three main successive steps: (i) A 1.5 h interactive session with the researcher and a class of 8-9 year children. They are simply given the general topic of the book few hours before and ask all the questions they have on it and get some answers; (ii) The researcher writes a book in which all the questions raised by children are answered (at least partially). The scientific elements should be inserted in a lively story with few characters. The story should be more than a simple dialogue; a genuine fiction should take place and come first so that children do not even notice they are understanding and learning; (iii) Once children have read the book, there is a second session to get some feedback and possibly edit the manuscript (altering a character, adding some

  15. 7 CFR 3400.21 - Scientific peer review for research activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scientific peer review for research activities. 3400... STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM Peer and Merit Review Arranged by Grantees § 3400.21 Scientific peer review for research...

  16. POST-LAUNCHING MONITORING ACTIVITIES FOR NEW TRANSACTIONAL BANKING PRODUCTS ADDRESSED TO SMES (CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuca Simona-Mihaela

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The current paper has the aim to provide guidelines for post-launching monitoring activities and steps related to new transactional banking products addressed to SMEs. While the pre-launching activities have the purpose of accurately defining the objectives, assumptions and estimations, the purpose of the post-launching plan is to identify: if the final objectives of a product launching have been met, on one hand, to analyze results in the sense of identifying an efficient action plan in order to overcome the lack of results (if case, but most important, to identify opportunities for optimizing the products and for communicating properly the value proposition. This paper also presents schemes for monitoring the results from a business case and for motivating the sales force, as an essential step in increasing the sales. Therefore, alternatives of incentive campaigns are presented, as sustainable campaigns with to purpose to achieve an expected success rate. As an additional support guideline for the sales force, some scenarios and post-sales actions are presented, together with an example of portfolio analysis considering potential per client. Considering the methods and details presented in the current paper, one can identify the importance and find out how to monitor the results after launching a new transactional product addressed to SMEs, can understand and design an incentive scheme and also define actions to be taken in order to increase revenues from a newly launched transactional product.

  17. A Service Delivery Model for Addressing Activity and Social Participation Needs of People Living with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayle Restall

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational therapy can contribute to the health and well-being of people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV who are experiencing health consequences of living long term with this disease. However, there are no comprehensive rehabilitation service delivery models to guide this emerging area of practice. The purpose of this study was to obtain critical feedback about a service delivery model to address the activity and social participation needs of people living with HIV. Method: We developed a service delivery model from a synthesis of the literature. Using a qualitative research design, we conducted individual and focus group interviews with 35 informants from diverse backgrounds and involvement in HIV-related research, service provision, and policymaking to provide critical feedback about the model. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using inductive qualitative methods. Results: The informants identified the strengths and limitations of the model and supports and barriers to its implementation. They highlighted the importance of principle-based services, increasing resources for service navigation, building capacity of rehabilitation services to address the needs of people with HIV, and increasing research and program evaluation targeted to achieving activity and social participation outcomes. Conclusions: The model provides a framework for occupational therapists to design and evaluate services for this population.

  18. International Centre for Theoretical Physics. Scientific Activities in 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    The main activities and results of the ICTP during 1983 are reported, according to the following programme components: Physics and energy (Plasma physics; Non-conventional energy; Nuclear physics); Fundamental physics (Elementary particles and fundamental theory); Physics of the living state (Medical physics; Applications of physics to medicine and biology); Physics and technology (Condensed matter physics and related; Atomic, molecular and laser physics; Physics of communications); Mathematics (Applicable mathematics); Physics of the environment and of natural resources (Soil physics; Geophysics); other fields

  19. International Centre for Theoretical Physics: scientific activities in 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    Research and training-for-research were carried out in the following areas: physics and energy (nuclear physics, solar energy), physics and frontiers of knowledge (elementary particles and fundamental theory), physics of the living state, physics and technology (condensed matter physics), applicable mathematics and planning models (applicable mathematics, mathematical ecology), physics of the environment and of natural resources (geomagnetism, ionospheric and magnetospheric physics, atmospheric physics), and physics and development. Activities included both research at the Centre and a number of workshops and symposia. The subjects treated are briefly summarized, and references to preprints and internal reports are given

  20. Set of Activities Addressed for Elementary School Students: Cells and the Genetic Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. Miranda

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The time lag between the progresses in the area of molecular biology reached in the last years and the schools science curricula  can be reduced through  initiatives of the university  regarding  the dissemina- tion of sciences. Inside of this context, one of the major objectives of the CBME has been the scientific education  and  dissemination on Molecular  Biosciences.  Among the  strategies organized  to promote the dissemination of this area, the Scientific Dissemination Coordination of CBME developed a set of playful activities  for students from public and private  elementary schools (7th  and 8th grades.  As a first step science teachers were interviewed  in order to indicate  which topics related  to molecular bio- sciences they  usually  include in their curricula  planning.  The approach  considered  in the elaboration of the set of activities  was the construction of knowledge of the concepts related  to topics as cell types, their  structures and  organelles,  and  the  importance of the  nucleus and  DNA. The set was offered to170 students. Students from private  schools were evaluated by their  performance  through  the classes, which were registered  by the  notes  of the  instructors.  Students from public  schools were evaluated through  questionnaires containing  basic  concepts  on the  theme  applied  before (pre-test and  after (post-test the set of activities  in order to measure,  respectively,  the previous and acquired knowledge. The  programming accomplished  at  the  public  school was partially modified  due  to  the  absence  of a laboratory, microscopes  and  a room  of computers, without, however,  to  alter  the  objectives  and content of the  activities.   The  comparative analysis  of the  pre- and  post-tests revealed  that, in this latter, there  was an increase of the average percentage  of correct  answers and an

  1. Assessing the impact participation in science journalism activities has on scientific literacy among high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Cathy

    As part of the National Science Foundation Science Literacy through Science Journalism (SciJourn) research and development initiative (http://www.scijourn.org ; Polman, Saul, Newman, and Farrar, 2008) a quasi-experimental design was used to investigate what impact incorporating science journalism activities had on students' scientific literacy. Over the course of a school year students participated in a variety of activities culminating in the production of science news articles for Scijourner, a regional print and online high school science news magazine. Participating teachers and SciJourn team members collaboratively developed activities focused on five aspects of scientific literacy: placing information into context, recognizing relevance, evaluating factual accuracy, use of multiple credible sources and information seeking processes. This study details the development process for the Scientific Literacy Assessment (SLA) including validity and reliability studies, evaluates student scientific literacy using the SLA, examines student SLA responses to provide a description of high school students' scientific literacy, and outlines implications of the findings in relation to the National Research Council's A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas (2012) and classroom science teaching practices. Scientifically literate adults acting as experts in the assessment development phase informed the creation of a scoring guide that was used to analyze student responses. Experts tended to draw on both their understanding of science concepts and life experiences to formulate answers; paying close attention to scientific factual inaccuracies, sources of information, how new information fit into their view of science and society as well as targeted strategies for information seeking. Novices (i.e., students), in contrast, tended to ignore factual inaccuracies, showed little understanding about source credibility and suggested

  2. Opening Address

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my great honor and pleasure to present an opening address of the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3). On the behalf of the organizing committee, I certainly welcome all your visits to KGU Kannai Media Center belonging to Kanto Gakuin University, and stay in Yokohama. In particular, to whom come from abroad more than 17 countries, I would appreciate your participations after long long trips from your homeland to Yokohama. The first international workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics", called SOTANCP, was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008, and the second one was held in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. Then the third workshop is now held in Yokohama. In this period, we had the traditional 10th cluster conference in Debrecen, Hungary, in 2012. Thus we have the traditional cluster conference and SOTANCP, one after another, every two years. This obviously shows our field of nuclear cluster physics is very active and flourishing. It is for the first time in about 10 years to hold the international workshop on nuclear cluster physics in Japan, because the last cluster conference held in Japan was in Nara in 2003, about 10 years ago. The president in Nara conference was Prof. K. Ikeda, and the chairpersons were Prof. H. Horiuchi and Prof. I. Tanihata. I think, quite a lot of persons in this room had participated at the Nara conference. Since then, about ten years passed. So, this workshop has profound significance for our Japanese colleagues. The subjects of this workshop are to discuss "the state of the art in nuclear cluster physics" and also discuss the prospect of this field. In a couple of years, we saw significant progresses of this field both in theory and in experiment, which have brought better and new understandings on the clustering aspects in stable and unstable nuclei. I think, the concept of clustering has been more important than ever. This is true also in the

  3. Outside the Classroom and beyond Psychology: A Citation Analysis of the Scientific Influence of Teaching Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomcho, Thomas J.; Foels, Rob; Walter, Mark I.; Yerkes, Kyle; Brady, Brittany; Erdman, Molly; Dantoni, Lindsay; Venables, Megan; Manry, Allison

    2015-01-01

    A primary objective for researchers who publish teaching activities and methods in the "Teaching of Psychology" (ToP) is to inform best practices in classroom teaching. Beyond the learning effect in the classroom, these ToP teaching activity and method articles may also have a "scientific" effect that heretofore researchers…

  4. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory waste management technology development activities. Summary progress report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.J.

    1980-10-01

    Summary reports on the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy-sponsored waste management technology development projects at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory describe progress for calendar year 1979. Activities in airborne, low-level, and transuranic waste management areas are discussed. Work progress on waste assay, treatment, disposal, and environmental monitoring is reviewed

  5. The Rationalization of Educational Development: Scientific Activity among International Nongovernmental Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Educational development organizations and related global movements emerged and expanded during the twentieth century. Today, most activities in the educational development field are characterized by a scientific outlook that schooling can be transformed using measurable and generalizable knowledge, and most of its leaders believe that experts can…

  6. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory waste management technology development activities. Summary progress report, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.J. (comp.)

    1980-10-01

    Summary reports on the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy-sponsored waste management technology development projects at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory describe progress for calendar year 1979. Activities in airborne, low-level, and transuranic waste management areas are discussed. Work progress on waste assay, treatment, disposal, and environmental monitoring is reviewed.

  7. Objects prompt authentic scientific activities among learners in a museum programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Marianne; Simony, Leonora; Lindow, Bent Erik Kramer

    2016-01-01

    Although the scientific disciplines conduct practical work in different ways, all consider practical work as the essential way of connecting objects and phenomena with ideas and the abstract. Accordingly, practical work is regarded as central to science education as well. We investigate a practical......, object-based palaeontology programme at a natural history museum to identify how palaeontological objects prompt scientific activity among upper secondary school students. We first construct a theoretical framework based on an analysis of the programme’s palaeontological content. From this, we build our...

  8. Outline of scientific and research activities of the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loncar, G.

    1982-01-01

    A survey is presented of scientific and research activities carried out in the departments of the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering of the Czech Technical University in Prague. The first section lists the principal results achieved in the course of the 6th Five-Year Plan in Physical Electronics, Solid State Engineering, Materials Structure and Properties, Nuclear Physics, Theory and Technology of Nuclear Reactors, Dosimetry and Application of Ionizing Radiation and Nuclear Chemistry. The second part gives a summary of scientific and research work carried out in the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering in the 7th Five-Year Plan in all branches of science represented. The Faculty's achievements in international scientific cooperation are assessed. (author)

  9. The Formation of Methodical Approach to Estimation of Scientific-Research, Scientific-Technical, and Innovative Activity of Institutions of Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yermachenko Volodymyr Ye.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at developing a methodical approach to the construction of an innovative system of estimation of research, scientific, technical, and innovative activities of higher education institutions (HEI on the basis of elaborate structured system of indicators. The proposed methodical approach contains five stages, the research discloses the content of each of them. Based on the results of a comparative analysis of international and national systems of HEI-rating, as well as the usage of economic and mathematical instrumentarium, a list of indicators for estimating their scientific activities in terms of the selected factors and directions of estimation was formed and substantiated. An approach to formation of cluster aggregates of HEI by the criterion of their scientific performance has been suggested. Proposals on formation of a HEI-rating within the limits of the allocated homogeneous groups by means of the system of integral indicators were developed. Prospects for further scientific researches in this direction imply formation of directions of development of managerial decisions in accordance with the obtained results of rating, which will be directed on strengthening and search for new ways of development of scientific activity of HEI, increase of its level of competitiveness and image, and also strengthening of its contribution to the solution of actual problems of economy and society.

  10. Scientific activity of the spanish liberal exiles in the United Kingdom, 1823-1833

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valera Candel, Manuel

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1823, after the squashing of Riego and the restoration of the absolutism of Fernando VII, most of the Spanish liberals went to England, where they carried out different scientific and technical activities. Among the émigrés there was reputed scientists, like Bauzá, Lagasca o Seoane, that in London were able to continue with their scientific activities. Other émigrés carried out an important activity of diffusion of scientific and technical advances through papers and notes that appeared in different magazines of general character published in the Spanish language; of special interest was El Museo Universal de Ciencias y Artes, directed and edited by J. J. Mora, and dedicated entirely to the scientific and technical divulgation. There was, likewise, another activity related to the scientific education, the «scientific catechisms», brief textbooks on mathematics, geography, chemistry, natural sciences, etc., directed towards elementary teaching and aimed to Latino American people, published by Ackermann. In the present work, we offer a comprehensive description of thes  activities.

    En 1823, tras el aplastamiento de Riego y la reinstauración del absolutismo fernandino, se produjo un exilio masivo de liberales hacia el Reino Unido, donde realizaron diversas actividades relacionadas con la ciencia y la técnica. Entre los liberales exiliados había reputados científicos, como Mariano Lagasca, Felipe Bauzá o Mateo Seoane, que en Londres pudieron proseguir con sus actividades científicas. Otros emigrados realizaron una importante labor de difusión de los adelantos científicos y técnicos a través de las diferentes revistas editadas en lengua española; entre ellas
    destacó El Museo Universal de Ciencias y Artes, dirigida y redactada por J. J. de Mora, dedicada íntegramente a la divulgación científico-técnica. Hubo, finalmente, otra actividad relacionada con la educación científica, la elaboración de los

  11. Education Technologies in Addressing the Problem of Forming the Socially Active Individual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Irina N.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to the analysis of technological support of the educational process in solving the problem of forming the socially active individual. The authors studied the value of the category "social activity" and analyzed educational technologies that have an impact on its formation. The obtained results gave the possibility…

  12. Application of quality assurance to scientific activities at Westinghouse Hanford Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delvin, W.L.; Farwick, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The application of quality assurance to scientific activities has been an ongoing subject of review, discussion, interpretation, and evaluation within the nuclear community for the past several years. This paper provides a discussion on the natures of science and quality assurance and presents suggestions for integrating the two successfully. The paper shows how those actions were used at the Westinghouse Hanford Company to successfully apply quality assurance to experimental studies and materials testing and evaluation activities that supported a major project. An important factor in developing and implementing the quality assurance program was the close working relationship that existed between the assigned quality engineers and the scientists. The quality engineers, who had had working experience in the scientific disciplines involved, were able to bridge across from the scientists to the more traditional quality assurance personnel who had overall responsibility for the project's quality assurance program

  13. Results of the activities of the Scientific and Technical Coordination Council for Radiation Technique and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sille, A K [Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow

    1977-03-01

    It is reported on the activities of the Scientific and Technical Coordination Council for Radiation Technique and Technology (STCC-RTT) of the CMEA Permanent Commission for the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy according to the programme 1971 to 1975. The STCC-RTT is concerned with technical applications such as radiation sterilization, food irradiation, radiation-induced chemical processes etc. The main tasks which have to be solved within the period from 1976 to 1980 are outlined.

  14. Progress report on scientific and technological activities: 1995; Informe de actividades cientificas y tecnologicas: 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    An overview of research and development activities of the Constituyentes Atomic Center, National Atomic Energy Commission (Argentine), during the period January-December 1995 is presented. The research and development activities are reported under the following headings: Fuel Elements; Non Destructive and Structural Test; Physics; Materials; Chemistry; Radiobiology Nuclear Reactors; Institute of Technology; Quality Management; Technical Assistance to Industry (SATI); Computer and Communication Services Center; Nuclear Power Stations Support Group. List of publications by the scientific staff of the Atomic Center is provided. The list includes paper published in journals, papers presented in conferences, symposia, etc., and technical reports.

  15. Progress report on scientific and technological activities: 1996; Informe de actividades cientificas y tecnologicas: 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    An overview of research and development activities of the Constituyentes Atomic Center, National Atomic Energy Commission (Argentine), during the period January-December 1996 is presented. The research and development activities are reported under the following headings: Fuel Elements; Non Destructive and Structural Test; Physics; Materials; Chemistry; Radiobiology Nuclear Reactors; Institute of Technology; Quality Management; Technical Assistance to Industry (SATI); Computer and Communication Services Center; Nuclear Power Stations Support Group. List of publications by the scientific staff of the Atomic Center is provided. The list includes paper published in journals, papers presented in conferences, symposia, etc., and technical reports.

  16. ISSUES IN ACHIEVING TARGETED FUNDING FOR LEADING SCIENTISTS AND SCIENTIFIC COMMUNITIES USING INDEXES OF PUBLICATION ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Kurakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase the competitiveness of the Russian scientific-technological complex in the global environment, it is planned to increase competition through State funding, spent on research and development. This will allow the focus of investment resources on the most perspective ideas and projects of the most efficient scientists, communities and organisations. The article suggests that we will witness the widening of competitive forms of funding against the simultaneous and gradual cuts in the share of financing through State contracts.One of the key criteria for evaluating the competency of team leaders and research applicants for State funding are measuring those who have «achieved high scientific results in concrete field of science», as a scientometric indicator, characterising their publication activity and citation rating.The article provides evidence showing that evaluation of individual scientists and whole scientific communities based on their publication activity indicators and impact is limited and challenges the ability for targeted funding and transparency in the selection process for executive projects.

  17. EXPERIENCE OF USING «OPEN JOURNAL SYSTEMS» SOFTWARE PLATFORM FOR INFORMATION SUPPORT OF SCIENTIFIC AND EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg M. Spirin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the foreign and domestic experience of using the Open Journal Systems (OJS software platform for informational support of scientific and educational activities, in particular: a as a means of publicizing and disseminating the results of scientific research; b for creating and maintaining repositories of libraries of higher educational establishments; c for developing the scientific and educational space of an educational establishments; d as a cloud-based service for the preservation and access to scientific resources; e for information support in organization of student training; and f for deployment of student journals. As a result of the analysis of scientific periodicals of Ukraine in the field of psychological and pedagogical sciences, the scientific journals on the basis of Open Journal Systems are identified. The experience of support the electronic scientific journal «Information Technologies and Learning Tools» (http://journal.iitta.gov.ua is presented separately.

  18. Active steps for diabetes: a community-campus partnership addressing frailty and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariser, Gina; Hager, Kathy; Gillette, Patricia; Golemboski, Karen; Jackson, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of Active Steps for Diabetes (ASD), a self-management education (DSME) program for aging adults with diabetes and frailty, on blood glucose control (A1C) and level of frailty of participants. Fifty females (62.2 ± 10.1 years old) with type 2 diabetes and frailty completed the program; 16 used a walking aid. Outcome measures included A1C and the modified Physical Performance Test (mPPT). Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare outcomes before and after the program and between participants who did and did not use a walking aid. ASD was effective in reducing A1C and frailty in participants who did and did not use a walking aid. The reduction in A1C was similar for the 2 groups. The reduction in frailty was greater for the group that used a walking aid. Physical activity, a keystone for blood glucose control, is difficult for older adults who are frail. ASD provides a model for DSME that may reduce frailty of participants and increase their capacity for physical activity.

  19. Physical activity of pregnant women in the light of scientific research - a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sass

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physical activity during pregnancy is very important due to health benefits for women and fetus. Undoubtedly, physical activity should be adapted to the current psychophysical abilities of pregnant women. During that time, the physical effort should be taken by appropriate intensity, also the forms of physical activity should be general aimed in current pregnancy state. Undoubtedly the simplest form of physical activity for pregnant women is walk, as well as swimming, gymnastics, yoga and pilates. Exercises should have wide impact on her body and muscles. The aim of the study is to identify the physical activity of pregnant women in available scientific publications. Further goal is the assessment of the knowledge about the physical activity of pregnant women based on the current review of the literature. Research Methods: The following databases and scientific browsers were used and tracked for the purpose of the research objective: Pub Med, Retina Medical Search, Medline Plus, Europe PMC, POPLINE, Google Scholar. During searching for a results the keywords phrases were written in English: physical activity in pregnancy, pregnancy exercises, fitness, yoga, pilates, swimming and pelvic floor exercises during pregnancy. Conclusions: The current researches among the population of pregnant women are methodologically differentiated and not coherent in the subject. The implication of unexplored issues about pregnant women is the differentiation in directions of researches about the physical activity of pregnant women. It seems that is important to design and program an prospective research by using objective techniques to explore the pregnant women’s behavior, lifestyle and physical activity.

  20. Developing an intervention to address physical activity barriers for African-American women in the deep south (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekmezi, Dori; Marcus, Bess; Meneses, Karen; Baskin, Monica L; Ard, Jamy D; Martin, Michelle Y; Adams, Natasia; Robinson, Cody; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2013-05-01

    To address high rates of inactivity and related chronic diseases among African-American women. Eleven focus groups on physical activity barriers for African-American women in the deep south (USA) were conducted (n = 56). Feedback guided an intervention development process. The resulting Home-Based Individually Tailored Physical Activity Print intervention was vetted with the target population in a 1-month, single arm, pre-post test demonstration trial (n = 10). Retention was high (90%). Intent-to-treat analyses indicated increases in motivational readiness for physical activity (70% of sample) and physical activity (7-day Physical Activity Recall) from baseline (mean: 89.5 min/week, standard deviation: 61.17) to 1 month (mean: 155 min/week, standard deviation: 100.86). Small improvements in fitness (6-Min Walk Test), weight and psychosocial process measures were also found. Preliminary findings show promise and call for future randomized controlled trials with larger samples to determine efficacy. Such low-cost, high-reach approaches to promoting physical activity have great potential for addressing health disparities and benefiting public health.

  1. THE MANAGEMENT OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY OF ENTERPRISES: SCIENTIFIC AND ECONOMIC ANALYTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksym Hodiashchev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the paper is to comprehensively study and analyse theoretical aspects of management of business activity of enterprises, revealing their main disadvantages and differences. The research methods will allow developing a categorical apparatus for the management of business activity of enterprises. Methodology. The research is based on the analysis of scientific works of domestic and foreign scientists and economists concerning business activity as an economic category and its management, approaches and directions of such management. Results of the research are showed that management of business activity covers various areas of activity of enterprises. Such areas can be production, financial, innovative, social, environmental etc. In the process of analysing economic literature, it is determined that most scholars focus on two main aspects of managing business activity: socioeconomic management and management of the efficiency of economic activity. It is determined that each aspect of management of business activity is characterized by appropriate methods of conducting. Among methods of socio-economic management of the enterprise are followed: material and moral stimulation of personnel; social regulation; economic calculation; balance method; method of financing; price regulation; lending. Considered also psychological and organizational-administrative methods for the management of business activity. The second aspect of management of business activity aimed at managing the efficiency of economic activity is characterized by the achievement of the necessary discursive effect that is the direct satisfaction of the owners of enterprises. The article also substantiates the importance of studying tools of managerial influence on the business activity of enterprises, which in the process of research are divided into five main groups: economic, ecological, financial, psychological, and management audit. Practical implications. Modern

  2. "Fair Play": A Videogame Designed to Address Implicit Race Bias Through Active Perspective Taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Belinda; Kaatz, Anna; Chu, Sarah; Ramirez, Dennis; Samson-Samuel, Clem; Carnes, Molly

    2014-12-01

    Having diverse faculty in academic health centers will help diversify the healthcare workforce and reduce health disparities. Implicit race bias is one factor that contributes to the underrepresentation of Black faculty. We designed the videogame "Fair Play" in which players assume the role of a Black graduate student named Jamal Davis. As Jamal, players experience subtle race bias while completing "quests" to obtain a science degree. We hypothesized that participants randomly assigned to play the game would have greater empathy for Jamal and lower implicit race bias than participants randomized to read narrative text describing Jamal's experience. University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate students were recruited via e-mail and randomly assigned to play "Fair Play" or read narrative text through an online link. Upon completion, participants took an Implicit Association Test to measure implicit bias and answered survey questions assessing empathy toward Jamal and awareness of bias. As hypothesized, gameplayers showed the least implicit bias but only when they also showed high empathy for Jamal (P=0.013). Gameplayers did not show greater empathy than text readers, and women in the text condition reported the greatest empathy for Jamal (P=0.008). However, high empathy only predicted lower levels of implicit bias among those who actively took Jamal's perspective through gameplay (P=0.014). A videogame in which players experience subtle race bias as a Black graduate student has the potential to reduce implicit bias, possibly because of a game's ability to foster empathy through active perspective taking.

  3. Making rainfall features fun: scientific activities for teaching children aged 5-12 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gires, Auguste; Muller, Catherine L.; le Gueut, Marie-Agathe; Schertzer, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Research projects now rely on an array of different channels to increase impact, including high-level scientific output, tools, and equipment, but also communication, outreach, and educational activities. This paper focuses on education for children aged 5-12 years and presents activities that aim to help them (and their teachers) grasp some of the complex underlying issues in environmental science. More generally, it helps children to become familiarized with science and scientists, with the aim to enhance scientific culture and promote careers in this field. The activities developed are focused on rainfall: (a) designing and using a disdrometer to observe the variety of drop sizes; (b) careful recording of successive dry and rainy days and reproducing patterns using a simple model based on fractal random multiplicative cascades; and (c) collaboratively writing a children's book about rainfall. These activities are discussed in the context of current state-of-the-art pedagogical practices and goals set by project funders, especially in a European Union framework.

  4. Scientific millenarianism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    Today, for the first time, scientific concerns are seriously being addressed that span future times--hundreds, even thousands, or more years in the future. One is witnessing what the author calls scientific millenarianism. Are such concerns for the distant future exercises in futility, or are they real issues that, to the everlasting gratitude of future generations, this generation has identified, warned about and even suggested how to cope with in the distant future? Can the four potential catastrophes--bolide impact, CO 2 warming, radioactive wastes and thermonuclear war--be avoided by technical fixes, institutional responses, religion, or by doing nothing? These are the questions addressed in this paper

  5. Counselling low-back-pain patients in secondary healthcare: a randomised trial addressing experienced workplace barriers and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Lone Donbæk; Maribo, Thomas; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Madsen, Finn Hjorth; Gonge, Bigitte; Christensen, Michael; Frost, Poul

    2012-01-01

    To assess if counselling by an occupational physician (OP) addressing experienced workplace barriers and physical activity integrated as a part of low-back pain (LBP) outpatient treatment influences pain, function and sick leave. Randomised controlled trial in the secondary healthcare sector with 3 months' follow-up. The participants were LBP patients who, independently of sick-leave status, expressed concerns about the ability to maintain their current job. Patients referred for surgery were excluded. The intervention consisted of two counselling sessions conducted by an OP addressing both workplace barriers and leisure-time physical activity. A workplace visit was performed if required. Pain, function and duration of sick leave due to LBP were primary outcomes. A reduction in bodily pain and improvement in physical function both measured by the 36-item short-form health survey questionnaire in favour of the intervention group was found. The change in pain score was found to be clinically relevant. The risk of sick leave for at least 8 weeks due to LBP was significantly reduced in the intervention group. Two secondary outcomes, Fear Avoidance Beliefs about physical activity and maximum oxygen uptake, supported compliance and adherence to the part of the intervention focusing on enhanced physical activity. Two short counselling sessions by an OP combining advice on meeting workplace barriers and enhancing physical activity had a substantial effect on important prognostic factors for LBP patients with moderate to severe symptoms diagnosed in outpatient rheumatological clinics. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN13071157.

  6. Toward a pro-active scientific advice on global volcanic activity within the multi-hazard framework of the EU Aristotle project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsotti, Sara; Duncan, Melanie; Loughlin, Susan; Gísladóttir, Bryndis; Roberts, Matthew; Karlsdóttir, Sigrún; Scollo, Simona; Salerno, Giuseppe; Corsaro, Rosa Anna; Charalampakis, Marinos; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos

    2017-04-01

    challenges in delivering pro-active scientific advice to ARISTOTLE, in addition to the main challenge of working within a multi-hazard framework. Here we present our methods for analysis and advice, along with the challenges we face, and hope to stimulate interesting discussion and receive constructive feedback, as well as explore how the global community can address the demand for scientific advice at the international level. The role of international networks and collaboration is clear; as is the critical role of volcano observatories, which are embedded in local communities and connected to the international community. We aim to enhance our approaches through the Global Volcano Model network (including IAVCEI, WOVO, GVP and VHub) and directly with volcano observatories, VAACs and civil protection agencies.

  7. Proposed Activities to Address Regulatory Gaps and Challenges for Licensing Advanced Reactors Using Seismic Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Justin Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kammerer, Annie M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Whittaker, Andrew S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Over the last decade, particularly since implementation of the certified design regulatory approaches outlined in 10 CFR 52, “Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants,” interest has been increasing in the use of seismic isolation (SI) technology to support seismic safety in nuclear facilities. In 2009, the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated research activities to develop new guidance targeted at isolated facilities because SI is being considered for nuclear power plants in the U.S. One product of that research, which was developed around a risk-informed regulatory approach, is a draft NRC NUREG series (NUREG/CR) report that investigates and discusses considerations for use of SI in otherwise traditionally founded large light water reactors (LWRs). A coordinated effort led to new provisions for SI of LWRs in the American Society of Civil Engineers standard ASCE/SEI 4-16, “Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures.” The risk-informed design philosophy that underpinned development of the technical basis for these documents led to a set of proposed performance objectives and acceptance criteria intended to serve as the foundation for future NRC guidance on the use of SI and related technology. Although the guidance provided in the draft SI NUREG/CR report and ASCE/SEI 4 16 provides a sound basis for further development of nuclear power plant designs incorporating SI, these initial documents were focused on surface-founded or near-surface-founded LWRs and were, necessarily, limited in scope. For example, there is limited information in both the draft NUREG/CR report and ASCE/SEI 4-16 related to nonlinear analysis of soil-structure systems for deeply-embedded reactors, the isolation of components, and the use of vertical isolation systems. Also not included in the draft SI NUREG/CR report are special considerations for licensing of isolated facilities using the certified design approach in 10 CFR

  8. Proposed Activities to Address Regulatory Gaps and Challenges for Licensing Advanced Reactors Using Seismic Isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, Justin Leigh; Kammerer, Annie M.; Whittaker, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, particularly since implementation of the certified design regulatory approaches outlined in 10 CFR 52, 'Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants,' interest has been increasing in the use of seismic isolation (SI) technology to support seismic safety in nuclear facilities. In 2009, the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated research activities to develop new guidance targeted at isolated facilities because SI is being considered for nuclear power plants in the U.S. One product of that research, which was developed around a risk-informed regulatory approach, is a draft NRC NUREG series (NUREG/CR) report that investigates and discusses considerations for use of SI in otherwise traditionally founded large light water reactors (LWRs). A coordinated effort led to new provisions for SI of LWRs in the American Society of Civil Engineers standard ASCE/SEI 4-16, 'Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures.' The risk-informed design philosophy that underpinned development of the technical basis for these documents led to a set of proposed performance objectives and acceptance criteria intended to serve as the foundation for future NRC guidance on the use of SI and related technology. Although the guidance provided in the draft SI NUREG/CR report and ASCE/SEI 4 16 provides a sound basis for further development of nuclear power plant designs incorporating SI, these initial documents were focused on surface-founded or near-surface-founded LWRs and were, necessarily, limited in scope. For example, there is limited information in both the draft NUREG/CR report and ASCE/SEI 4-16 related to nonlinear analysis of soil-structure systems for deeply-embedded reactors, the isolation of components, and the use of vertical isolation systems. Also not included in the draft SI NUREG/CR report are special considerations for licensing of isolated facilities using the certified design

  9. Opening address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boening, K.

    2003-01-01

    The program of this 9th Meeting of the International Group on Research Reactors IGORR includes are quite a number of fascinating new research reactor projects in France, Germany, Russia, Canada, China, Thailand, and in Australia. In addition to the session about New Facilities there are interesting sessions on the Upgrades and on the Optimization of Operation and Utilization of existing research reactors, on Secondary Neutron Sources, on Neutron Scattering applications, and on the aspects of Safety, Licensing and Decommissioning. Two particular projects of new research reactors are mentioned specially: the TRR-II project in Taiwan, has unfortunately been terminated last year because of a change to anti-nuclear of the ruling parties in the government - and the new FRM-II in Munich, Germany, which will hopefully survive such a political change and receive its green light for nuclear start up in the very near future. The charter of IGORR and its objectives are part of this address: The International Group on Research Reactors IGORR was formed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience among those institutions and individuals who are actively working to design, build, and promote new research reactors or to make significant upgrades to existing facilities. The main IGORR objectives are to promote contacts between its members, to identify and discuss problems of common interest, to distribute newsletters about once or twice every year and to organize meetings about once every one-and-a-half years

  10. Brazilian academic search filter: application to the scientific literature on physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Valero, Javier; Ferreira, Marcos Santos; Castiel, Luis David; Wanden-Berghe, Carmina; Guilam, Maria Cristina Rodrigues

    2010-10-01

    To develop a search filter in order to retrieve scientific publications on physical activity from Brazilian academic institutions. The academic search filter consisted of the descriptor "exercise" associated through the term AND, to the names of the respective academic institutions, which were connected by the term OR. The MEDLINE search was performed with PubMed on 11/16/2008. The institutions were selected according to the classification from the Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES) for interuniversity agreements. A total of 407 references were retrieved, corresponding to about 0.9% of all articles about physical activity and 0.5% of the Brazilian academic publications indexed in MEDLINE on the search date. When compared with the manual search undertaken, the search filter (descriptor + institutional filter) showed a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 100%. The institutional search filter showed high sensitivity and specificity, and is applicable to other areas of knowledge in health sciences. It is desirable that every Brazilian academic institution establish its "standard name/brand" in order to efficiently retrieve their scientific literature.

  11. Recommended approaches to the scientific evaluation of ecotoxicological hazards and risks of endocrine-active substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthiessen, Peter; Ankley, Gerald T; Biever, Ronald C; Bjerregaard, Poul; Borgert, Christopher; Brugger, Kristin; Blankinship, Amy; Chambers, Janice; Coady, Katherine K; Constantine, Lisa; Dang, Zhichao; Denslow, Nancy D; Dreier, David A; Dungey, Steve; Gray, L Earl; Gross, Melanie; Guiney, Patrick D; Hecker, Markus; Holbech, Henrik; Iguchi, Taisen; Kadlec, Sarah; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Kawashima, Yukio; Kloas, Werner; Krueger, Henry; Kumar, Anu; Lagadic, Laurent; Leopold, Annegaaike; Levine, Steven L; Maack, Gerd; Marty, Sue; Meador, James; Mihaich, Ellen; Odum, Jenny; Ortego, Lisa; Parrott, Joanne; Pickford, Daniel; Roberts, Mike; Schaefers, Christoph; Schwarz, Tamar; Solomon, Keith; Verslycke, Tim; Weltje, Lennart; Wheeler, James R; Williams, Mike; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Yamazaki, Kunihiko

    2017-03-01

    A SETAC Pellston Workshop ® "Environmental Hazard and Risk Assessment Approaches for Endocrine-Active Substances (EHRA)" was held in February 2016 in Pensacola, Florida, USA. The primary objective of the workshop was to provide advice, based on current scientific understanding, to regulators and policy makers; the aim being to make considered, informed decisions on whether to select an ecotoxicological hazard- or a risk-based approach for regulating a given endocrine-disrupting substance (EDS) under review. The workshop additionally considered recent developments in the identification of EDS. Case studies were undertaken on 6 endocrine-active substances (EAS-not necessarily proven EDS, but substances known to interact directly with the endocrine system) that are representative of a range of perturbations of the endocrine system and considered to be data rich in relevant information at multiple biological levels of organization for 1 or more ecologically relevant taxa. The substances selected were 17α-ethinylestradiol, perchlorate, propiconazole, 17β-trenbolone, tributyltin, and vinclozolin. The 6 case studies were not comprehensive safety evaluations but provided foundations for clarifying key issues and procedures that should be considered when assessing the ecotoxicological hazards and risks of EAS and EDS. The workshop also highlighted areas of scientific uncertainty, and made specific recommendations for research and methods-development to resolve some of the identified issues. The present paper provides broad guidance for scientists in regulatory authorities, industry, and academia on issues likely to arise during the ecotoxicological hazard and risk assessment of EAS and EDS. The primary conclusion of this paper, and of the SETAC Pellston Workshop on which it is based, is that if data on environmental exposure, effects on sensitive species and life-stages, delayed effects, and effects at low concentrations are robust, initiating environmental risk

  12. Recommended approaches to the scientific evaluation of ecotoxicological hazards and risks of endocrine-active substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthiessen, Peter; Ankley, Gerald T.; Biever, Ronald C.; Bjerregaard, Poul; Borgert, Christopher; Brugger, Kristin; Blankinship, Amy; Chambers, Janice; Coady, Katherine K.; Constantine, Lisa; Dang, Zhichao; Denslow, Nancy D.; Dreier, David; Dungey, Steve; Gray, L. Earl; Gross, Melanie; Guiney, Patrick D.; Hecker, Markus; Holbech, Henrik; Iguchi, Taisen; Kadlec, Sarah; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Kawashima, Yukio; Kloas, Werner; Krueger, Henry; Kumar, Anu; Lagadic, Laurent; Leopold, Annegaaike; Levine, Steven L.; Maack, Gerd; Marty, Sue; Meador, James P.; Mihaich, Ellen; Odum, Jenny; Ortego, Lisa; Parrott, Joanne L.; Pickford, Daniel; Roberts, Mike; Schaefers, Christoph; Schwarz, Tamar; Solomon, Keith; Verslycke, Tim; Weltje, Lennart; Wheeler, James R.; Williams, Mike; Wolf, Jeffery C.; Yamazaki, Kunihiko

    2017-01-01

    A SETAC Pellston Workshop® “Environmental Hazard and Risk Assessment Approaches for Endocrine-Active Substances (EHRA)” was held in February 2016 in Pensacola, Florida, USA. The primary objective of the workshop was to provide advice, based on current scientific understanding, to regulators and policy makers; the aim being to make considered, informed decisions on whether to select an ecotoxicological hazard- or a risk-based approach for regulating a given endocrine-disrupting substance (EDS) under review. The workshop additionally considered recent developments in the identification of EDS. Case studies were undertaken on 6 endocrine-active substances (EAS—not necessarily proven EDS, but substances known to interact directly with the endocrine system) that are representative of a range of perturbations of the endocrine system and considered to be data rich in relevant information at multiple biological levels of organization for 1 or more ecologically relevant taxa. The substances selected were 17α-ethinylestradiol, perchlorate, propiconazole, 17β-trenbolone, tributyltin, and vinclozolin. The 6 case studies were not comprehensive safety evaluations but provided foundations for clarifying key issues and procedures that should be considered when assessing the ecotoxicological hazards and risks of EAS and EDS. The workshop also highlighted areas of scientific uncertainty, and made specific recommendations for research and methods-development to resolve some of the identified issues. The present paper provides broad guidance for scientists in regulatory authorities, industry, and academia on issues likely to arise during the ecotoxicological hazard and risk assessment of EAS and EDS. The primary conclusion of this paper, and of the SETAC Pellston Workshop on which it is based, is that if data on environmental exposure, effects on sensitive species and life-stages, delayed effects, and effects at low concentrations are robust, initiating environmental risk

  13. MICROSCOPE mission: drag-free and attitude control system expertise activities toward the scientific team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavault, Stéphanie; Prieur, Pascal; Liénart, Thomas; Robert, Alain; Guidotti, Pierre-Yves

    2018-04-01

    Microscope is a CNES-ESA-ONERA-CNRS-OCA-DLR-ZARM mission dedicated to the test of the Equivalence Principle with an improved accuracy of 10-15. The 300 kg drag-free microsatellite was launched on April 25th 2016 into a 710 km dawndusk sun-synchronous orbit for a 2-year mission. To comply with stringent requirements, the drag-free and attitude control system (DFACS) involves the scientific accelerometer as main sensor and a set of 8 cold gas proportional thrusters. Once in mission mode, within the CNES drag-free expertise center (CECT) the DFACS team provides several services to the system and to the scientific mission center: cold gas monitoring and management, `Attitude' ancillary data, DFACS expertise ancillary data. For this purpose, expertise tools have been implemented in the CECT, using the flexibility and efficiency of Matlab™ utilities. This paper presents the role of the CECT within the mission and details the expertise activities of the DFACS team illustrated with some typical in flight results.

  14. [Modern directions of scientific and practical research of the policy of active and healthy longevity: experience and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeva, E Yu

    Modern terminology on active and healthy aging used in scientific and project activities is discussed. There have been analyzed the WHO conception on active aging, which has no precise universally agreed definition, its main determinants. The directions of scientific expertise in the major European projects INNOVAGE - assessment of potentially profitable social innovations relating to the welfare and quality of life and health in old age; MOPACT - the interference between the demographic development and the main dimensions of economic and social contribution of older persons is defined. The approach to implement the policy of active and healthy longevity as a valuable asset of the modern society is underlined.

  15. Spatial distribution of scientific activities: An exploratory analysis of Brazil, 2000–10

    OpenAIRE

    Tulio Chiarini; Vanessa Parreiras Oliveira; Fabio Chaves do Couto e Silva Neto

    2014-01-01

    The literature analyzing the spatial distribution of scientific and technological production in Brazil identifies differences in the regional distribution of scientific and technological resources. In this paper, we contribute to this discussion, by analyzing the dynamics of the production of new scientific knowledge in the states that contributed the most to national scientific production in the period 2000–10: Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Minas Gerais and Rio Grande do Sul, also known as the ...

  16. Recommended approaches to the scientific evaluation of ecotoxicological hazards and risks of endocrine-active substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Peter; Ankley, Gerald T.; Biever, Ronald C

    2017-01-01

    A SETAC Pellston Workshop(®) "Environmental Hazard and Risk Assessment Approaches for Endocrine-Active Substances (EHRA)" was held in February 2016 in Pensacola, Florida, USA. The primary objective of the workshop was to provide advice, based on current scientific understanding, to regulators...... and policy makers; the aim being to make considered, informed decisions on whether to select an ecotoxicological hazard- or a risk-based approach for regulating a given endocrine-disrupting substance (EDS) under review. The workshop additionally considered recent developments in the identification of EDS...... at multiple biological levels of organization for 1 or more ecologically relevant taxa. The substances selected were 17α-ethinylestradiol, perchlorate, propiconazole, 17β-trenbolone, tributyltin, and vinclozolin. The 6 case studies were not comprehensive safety evaluations but provided foundations...

  17. Luncheon address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdeswell, E.

    1991-01-01

    Public policy responses to climate change are discussed from a global viewpoint. The public policy issue is one of unprecedented scope and complexity, and concerns the interaction of two vast and complex systems: the physical planetary system, and the human economic system. Decision making is required in the face of uncertainty, and scientific knowledge is lagging behind policy issues. Continuing world development is going to drastically change the balance of global population, trade, and economic power. Environmental quality performance requirements should be set with a great deal of attention paid to how they will affect the process of innovation, and must encourage demand for emerging technologies, products and services. Effective solutions can come only from effective international agreement. Governments, citizens and industry must become partners in action, and improved education and communication is required. Science, public policy and social consensus must converge, as climate change is not merely a scientific or technical problem, but is also a social and political problem

  18. Welcome Address

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiku, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, It is an honor for me to present my welcome address in the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3), as the president of Kanto Gakuin University. Particularly to those from abroad more than 17 countries, I am very grateful for your participation after long long trips from your home to Yokohama. On the behalf of the Kanto Gakuin University, we certainly welcome your visit to our university and stay in Yokohama. First I would like to introduce Kanto Gakuin University briefly. Kanto Gakuin University, which is called KGU, traces its roots back to the Yokohama Baptist Seminary founded in 1884 in Yamate, Yokohama. The seminary's founder was Albert Arnold Bennett, alumnus of Brown University, who came to Japan from the United States to establish a theological seminary for cultivating and training Japanese missionaries. Now KGU is a major member of the Kanto Gakuin School Corporation, which is composed of two kindergartens, two primary schools, two junior high schools, two senior high schools as well as KGU. In this university, we have eight faculties with graduate school including Humanities, Economics, Law, Sciences and Engineering, Architecture and Environmental Design, Human and Environmental Studies, Nursing, and Law School. Over eleven thousands students are currently learning in our university. By the way, my major is the geotechnical engineering, and I belong to the faculty of Sciences and Engineering in my university. Prof. T. Yamada, here, is my colleague in the same faculty. I know that the nuclear physics is one of the most active academic fields in the world. In fact, about half of the participants, namely, more than 50 scientists, come from abroad in this conference. Moreover, I know that the nuclear physics is related to not only the other fundamental physics such as the elementary particle physics and astrophysics but also chemistry, medical sciences, medical cares, and radiation metrology

  19. Convocation address.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, M S

    1998-07-01

    This address delivered to the 40th convocation of the International Institute for Population Sciences in India in 1998 opens by noting that a shortage of jobs for youth is India's most urgent problem but that the problems that attend the increasing numbers of elderly also require serious attention. The address then notes that the Earth's population is growing at an unsustainable rate while economic inequities among countries are increasing, so that, while intellectual property is becoming the most important asset in developed countries, nutritional anemia among pregnant women causes their offspring to be unable to achieve their full intellectual potential from birth. Next, the address uses a discussion of the 18th-century work on population of the Marquis de Condorcet and of Thomas Malthus to lead into a consideration of estimated increased needs of countries like India and China to import food grains in the near future. Next, the progress of demographic transition in Indian states is covered and applied to Mahbub ul Haq's measure of human deprivation developed for and applied to the region of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, and the Maldives). The address continues by reiterating some of the major recommendations forwarded by a government of India committee charged in 1995 with drafting a national population policy. Finally, the address suggests specific actions that could be important components of the Hunger-Free India Programme and concludes that all success rests on the successful implementation of appropriate population policies.

  20. Counselling low-back-pain patients in secondary healthcare: a randomised trial addressing experienced workplace barriers and physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone Donbæk; Maribo, Thomas; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess if counselling by an occupational physician (OP) addressing experienced workplace barriers and physical activity integrated as a part of low-back pain (LBP) outpatient treatment influences pain, function and sick leave. METHODS: Randomised controlled trial in the secondary...... healthcare sector with 3 months' follow-up. The participants were LBP patients who, independently of sick-leave status, expressed concerns about the ability to maintain their current job. Patients referred for surgery were excluded. The intervention consisted of two counselling sessions conducted by an OP......-form health survey questionnaire in favour of the intervention group was found. The change in pain score was found to be clinically relevant. The risk of sick leave for at least 8 weeks due to LBP was significantly reduced in the intervention group. Two secondary outcomes, Fear Avoidance Beliefs about...

  1. The Small Helm Project: an academic activity addressing international corruption for undergraduate civil engineering and construction management students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzley, Steven E

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents an academic project that addresses the issue of international corruption in the engineering and construction industry, in a manner that effectively incorporates several learning experiences. The major objectives of the project are to provide the students a learning activity that will 1) make a meaningful contribution within the disciplines being studied; 2) teach by experience a significant principle that can be valuable in numerous situations during an individual's career, and 3) engage the minds, experiences, and enthusiasm of the participants in a real ethical challenge that is prevalent in all of their chosen professional fields. The paper describes the full details of the project, the actual implementation of it during Winter Semester 2005, the experiences gained during the initial trial, and the modifications and improvements incorporated for future implementation.

  2. inaugral address

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While political reorientation and economic redress were of immediate concern, ... South African context, where widespread changes have been proposed for education at all ... education at school and other levels and needs to be addressed so as to ..... the major national curriculum intervention in environmental education.

  3. Overview of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency scientific activities on the nuclear fuel cycle - 5301

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornet, S.; Chauvin, N.

    2015-01-01

    As part of its role in encouraging international collaboration, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency is coordinating a series of projects related to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) Working Party on Scientific Issues of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (WPFC) comprises five different expert groups covering scientific aspects of the fuel cycle from front to back-end. Ongoing projects include fuel cycle scenarios, fuels, materials, physics and chemical separations. Members of the expert groups cooperate to share recent research advancements at an international level and help identify gaps and needs in the field. Current activities focus on current and advanced nuclear systems in particular the challenges associated with the adoption of new materials and fuels such as for example cladding materials, fuels containing minor actinides, or the use of liquid metal as coolants. The Expert Group on Innovative Fuels has recently prepared a report on MA bearing fuels looking at different type of fuels and examining the technical issues associated with their fabrication, characterization, irradiation performance, and design and safety criteria. Experts of the group on Heavy Liquid Metal (HLM) technologies are compiling and editing the second version of the LBE (Lead Bismuth Eutectic) Handbook to include new experimental data. The Expert Group on Advanced Fuel Cycle Scenarios has undertaken a study to evaluate the effects of uncertainties of input parameters on the outcomes of fuel scenario studies to provide guidance on which uncertainties are more significant. At the back-end of the fuel cycle, separation technologies (aqueous and pyrochemical) are being assessed by the Expert Group on Fuel recycling Chemistry. (authors)

  4. The main activities and scientific collaboration possibilities at Ankara Nuclear research and training center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yucel, H.; Turhan, S.; Zararsiz, A.; Oksuz, B.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Founded in 1964, Ankara Nuclear Research and Training Center (ANRTC) conducts and facilitates the scientific activities including training (summer practice, MSc and Ph D studies in physics and chemistry, IAEA fellowship programs etc.), research and other studies in nuclear and related fields. As it's a part of main duties, ANRTC has analysis on the variety of samples, and radiation protection services commercially, for radiation workers in state, public and private sectors. Research, development and application projects implemented in this Center have mostly been supported by State Planning Organization (SPO) and Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA). In addition to the projects there are on going collaborative studies with some national Universities and International Atomic Energy Agency. The main activities carried out in ANRTC can be summarized as: studies on experimental nuclear physics, application of nuclear techniques such as XRF, XRD, Gamma, Alpha, etc. for environmental pollutants, archaeological and geological dating, elemental and crystal structural analyses, studies on the detection of irradiated foodstuff by ESR, development of accident dosimeters to be used in the case of a nuclear or radiological accident, and radiation matter interaction studies. In near future, for young scientists, there will be new collaboration possibilities related to accelerator-based applications, especially the new production methods of radioisotopes and their radiopharmaceuticals by using a cyclotron when our 30 MeV p / 15MeV d cyclotron facility project is underway

  5. Geographic Information Technologies as an outreach activity in geo-scientific education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maman, Shimrit; Isaacson, Sivan; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, a decline in the rates of examinees in the academic track that were entitled to an enhanced matriculation certificate in scientific-technological education was reported in Israel. To confront this problem the Earth and Planetary Image Facility (EPIF) at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev fosters interdisciplinary exploration through educational programs that make use of the facility and its equipment and enable the empowerment of the community by understanding and appreciating science and technology. This is achieved by using Geographic Information Technologies (GIT) such as remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for geo-physical sciences in activities that combine theoretical background with hands-on activities. Monitoring Earth from space by satellites, digital atlases and virtual-based positioning applications are examples for fusion of spatial information (geographic) and technology that the activity is based on. GIT opens a new chapter and a recent history of Cartography starting from the collection of spatial data to its presentation and analysis. GIS have replaced the use of classical atlas books and offer a variety of Web-based applications that provide maps and display up-to-date imagery. The purpose of this workshop is to expose teachers and students to GITs which are applicable in every classroom. The activity imparts free geographic information systems that exist in cyberspace and accessible to single users as the Israeli national GIS and Google earth, which are based on a spatial data and long term local and global satellite imagery coverage. In this paper, our "Think global-Map Local" activity is presented. The activity uses GIS and change detection technologies as means to encourage students to explore environmental issues both around the globe and close to their surroundings. The students detect changes by comparing multi temporal images of a chosen site and learn how to map the alterations and produce change

  6. Research on pre-scientific concept of light in children's cognitive activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Zhigao; Yu, Yang; Yan, Dan; Yang, Shulin

    2017-08-01

    Based on the theory of Ausubel's meaningful learning and cognitive characteristic of childens pre-scientific concept, two students of Huang Gang Middle School have been interviewed continuously about cognition of interaction between light and matter. Comprehension degree of childens pre-scientific concept about interaction between light and matter has been deeply understood, formation of strategy of childens pre-scientific concept has been discussed. Several influence factors related to formation of childens pre-scientific concept have been analyzed, such as sex, family environment, and learning experience of kindergarten and primary school.

  7. Convocation address.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, R

    1996-07-01

    By means of this graduation address at the International Institute for Population Sciences (IIPS) in Bombay, the Chancellor of Urdu University voiced his concerns about overpopulation in India. During the speaker's tenure as Health Minister of Maharashtra, he implemented a sterilization incentive program that resulted in the state's having the best family planning (FP) statistics in India for almost 10 years. The incentive program, however, was misused by overenthusiastic officials in other states, with the result that the FP program was renamed the Family Welfare Programme. Population is growing in India because of improvements in health care, but the population education necessary to change fertility will require more time than the seriousness of the population problem allows. In the longterm, poverty and illiteracy must be addressed to control population. In the meanwhile, the graduate program at the IIPS should be expanded to include an undergraduate program, marriage age laws should be enforced, and misconceptions about religious objections to FP must be addressed. India can not afford to use the measures forwarded by developed countries to control population growth. India must integrate population control efforts with the provision of health care because if population continues to grow in the face of reduced infant mortality and longer life expectancy, future generations will be forced to live in a state of poverty and economic degradation.

  8. Financial and Economic Support for the Activity and Publication Openness of Workers in the Scientific Sphere: Management Doctrine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpinsky Borys A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is both in the system identification of the financial and economic features of supporting the scientific sphere and in the development of a management doctrine to increase the efficiency of activity of scientific workers in the global scientific space by combining publication openness, motivational levers, business and consumer interests based on foreign experience and strategiology of development in the realities of Ukraine. It is determined that the publication openness of a particular scientist depends on the scientific openness of publications in national print media, which are not always transparent for the global scientific space. The advantages and disadvantages of using scientometric databases as to editions that ensure the openness of scientific research results in terms of financial possibilities are considered. There singled out the managerial preference of the Information and analytical system “Bibliometrics of the Ukrainian Science”, which allows creating a bibliometric profile of a particular scientist through the environment of Google Scholar and improve the “visibility” ensuring both the improvement of his/her competitiveness and increase in the financial and economic support. There considered administrative advantages of associative complexes, similar to the Ivy League universities in America, and for the first time from the perspective of the strategiology of development there synthesized an approach regarding the creation of the given organizational structure, where the most famous classical universities would be concentrated, in Ukraine. The advantage and perspectivity of the proposed measures is the system formation of the management doctrine of financial and economic support for the scientific sphere, the optimization of using the scientific potential of the territory and ensuring its correspondence to the needs of consumers and business, the activization of publication openness and efficiency

  9. An approach to development of ontological knowledge base in the field of scientific and research activity in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtazina, M. Sh; Avdeenko, T. V.

    2018-05-01

    The state of art and the progress in application of semantic technologies in the field of scientific and research activity have been analyzed. Even elementary empirical comparison has shown that the semantic search engines are superior in all respects to conventional search technologies. However, semantic information technologies are insufficiently used in the field of scientific and research activity in Russia. In present paper an approach to construction of ontological model of knowledge base is proposed. The ontological model is based on the upper-level ontology and the RDF mechanism for linking several domain ontologies. The ontological model is implemented in the Protégé environment.

  10. NASA GSFC Science Communication Working Group: Addressing Barriers to Scientist and Engineer Participation in Education and Public Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, L.; Hsu, B. C.; Campbell, B. A.; Hess, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Science Communication Working Group (SCWG) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been in existence since late 2007. The SCWG is comprised of education and public outreach (E/PO) professionals, public affairs specialists, scientists, and engineers. The goals of the SCWG are to identify barriers to scientist and engineer engagement in E/PO activities and to enable those scientists and engineers who wish to contribute to E/PO to be able to do so. SCWG members have held meetings with scientists and engineers across GSFC to determine barriers to their involvement in E/PO. During these meetings, SCWG members presented examples of successful, ongoing E/PO projects, encouraged active research scientists and engineers to talk about their own E/PO efforts and what worked for them, discussed the E/PO working environment, discussed opportunities for getting involved in E/PO (particularly in high-impact efforts that do not take much time), handed out booklets on effective E/PO, and asked scientists and engineers what they need to engage in E/PO. The identified barriers were consistent among scientists in GSFC's four science divisions (Earth science, planetary science, heliophysics, and astrophysics). Common barriers included 1) lack of time, 2) lack of funding support, 3) lack of value placed on doing E/PO by supervisors, 4) lack of training on doing appropriate/effective E/PO for different audiences, 5) lack of awareness and information about opportunities, 6) lack of understanding of what E/PO really is, and 7) level of effort required to do E/PO. Engineers reported similar issues, but the issues of time and funding support were more pronounced due to their highly structured work day and environment. Since the barriers were identified, the SCWG has taken a number of steps to address and rectify them. Steps have included holding various events to introduce scientists and engineers to E/PO staff and opportunities including an E/PO Open House, brown bag seminars on

  11. Keynote address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses various aspects of the bases underlying the nuclear third party liability regime, and also analyses the distinction between danger and risk and the manner in which damage caused by flood, mass unemployment (economic damage mainly) and certain diseases is dealt with in the absence of liability provisions similar to those applicable to nuclear incidents. It also is suggested that the State because of its duty under the Basic Law to ensure adequate energy supplies, should be co-responsible for liability questions along with the nuclear operator. (NEA) [fr

  12. Inaugural address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, A.N.

    1994-01-01

    Along with the R and D activities related to technology upgradation in the existing reactors, considerable efforts are being expended in various units of Department of Atomic Energy for the development of advanced technologies to meet the future requirements of Indian nuclear power programme. The two major activities in this thrust area are development of technologies related to the 500 MWe PHWRs and fast breeder reactors. An overview of the activities in some of the thrust areas is given. (author)

  13. AHA Scientific Statement Population Approaches to Improve Diet, Physical Activity, and Smoking Habits A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Afshin, Ashkan; Benowitz, Neal L.; Bittner, Vera; Daniels, Stephen R.; Franch, Harold A.; Jacobs, David R.; Kraus, William E.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.; Krummel, Debra A.; Popkin, Barry M.; Whitsel, Laurie P.; Zakai, Neil A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Poor lifestyle, including suboptimal diet, physical inactivity, and tobacco use are leading causes of preventable diseases globally. Although even modest population shifts in risk substantially alter health outcomes, the optimal population-level approaches to improve lifestyle are not well established. Methods and Results For this American Heart Association Scientific Statement, the writing group systematically reviewed and graded the current scientific evidence for effective population approaches to improve dietary habits, increase physical activity, and reduce tobacco use. Strategies were considered in 6 broad domains: (1) media and education campaigns; (2) labeling and consumer information; (3) taxation, subsidies, and other economic incentives; (4) school and workplace approaches; (5) local environmental changes; and (6) direct restrictions and mandates. The writing group also reviewed the potential contributions of healthcare systems and surveillance systems to behavior change efforts. Several specific population interventions that achieved a Class I or IIa recommendation with grade A or B evidence were identified, providing a set of specific evidence-based strategies that deserve close attention and prioritization for wider implementation. Effective interventions included specific approaches in all 6 domains evaluated for improving diet, increasing activity, and reducing tobacco use. The writing group also identified several specific interventions in each of these domains for which current evidence was less robust, as well as other inconsistencies and evidence gaps, informing the need for further rigorous and interdisciplinary approaches to evaluate population programs and policies. Conclusions This systematic review identified and graded the evidence for a range of population-based strategies to promote lifestyle change. The findings provide a framework for policy makers, advocacy groups, researchers, clinicians, communities, and other

  14. Keynote address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClellan, S.

    1991-01-01

    Activities in Alberta relating to research on the impact of climate change on the Great Plains are reviewed. Alberta has been active in trying to understand climate, and trying to change it. These activities have included the provision of significant irrigation capabilities in southern Alberta, and many years of research into the possibility of weather modification for precipitation enhancement and hail suppression. Organizations in Alberta active in the area of climate include the Alberta Climatological Association, the Climate Advisory Committee, the Alberta Research Council, the provincial departments Alberta Environment and Alberta Forestry, Lands and Wildlife, and the Department of Agriculture. It is widely recognized that crop production on the Great Plains is dependent on water, and climate is one of the greatest sources of risk facing agriculture in Alberta

  15. The Cross-Correlation Analysis of Indicators of the Scientific-Innovation and Educational Activity of the Regions of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuravka Andrey V.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at exploring the cross-correlation dependency between the 11 selected indicators of the scientific-innovation and educational activity of the regions of Ukraine over the past years using the standard features of the MS Excel software. The calculated values of the pairwise coefficients of Pearson correlation changed from 0,66 to 1. The worst-case correlation coefficient, which changed from 0,7 to 0,8, was observed only with the number of students at the beginning of the academic year 2015/16. The article provides seven selected equations of linear regression and their graphs, with the latter equation corresponding to the worst correlation coefficient between the number of students and doctoral candidates (R = 0,6574. The first five equations of linear regression conform to correlations between financing the costs for completing scientific and scientific-technical works by the regions of Ukraine and various indicators of the scientific-educational potential of personnel. In all five cases, there was a high correlation dependency. As result of the study, fairly high correlation relationships among all indicators have been obtained. Prospect for further research is accounting for a larger number of indicators of the scientific-innovation and educational activity of the regions of Ukraine.

  16. Scientific and Technological Information Activity in China (White Paper on Science and Technology : No.1, 1986.5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Translated By Joho Kanri Editorial Committee

    This is a translation of Chapter 4 : Information Systems of Volume 5 : Environment and Resources in the first number of White Paper on Science and Technology edited in May 1986 by State Scientific and Technological Commission (SSTC). Scientific and technological information activity in China has progressed by keeping close cooperation among the Institute for Scientific and Technological Information in China (ISTIC) as a core organization, 33 information institutes under the control of each ministrial commission of The State Council and 35 information institutes of the local governments and cities. As a result of having promoted the information activities along with the guiding principle decided by the 5th National Conference on Scientific and Technological Information in July 1980, information business could be made a great contribution to political decision, national projects and economy stressing plan, technology introduction, etc. The Scientific and Technological Information Bureau of SSTC as a coordinating body proposed the following subjects as an important item for promoting future information business in China: standardization of abstract journals, bringing up of investigators and researchers, production of data bases and consolidation of international online retrieval services, step by step introduction of a charging system for information service, etc.

  17. Aerosol-Radiation-Cloud Interactions in the South-East Atlantic: Future Suborbital Activities to Address Knowledge Gaps in Satellite and Model Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, Jens; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Haywood, J.; Piketh, S.; Formenti, P.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Shinozuka, Y.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Southern Africa produces almost a third of the Earth's biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles. Particles lofted into the mid-troposphere are transported westward over the South-East (SE) Atlantic, home to one of the three permanent subtropical stratocumulus (Sc) cloud decks in the world. The SE Atlantic stratocumulus deck interacts with the dense layers of BB aerosols that initially overlay the cloud deck, but later subside and may mix into the clouds. These interactions include adjustments to aerosol-induced solar heating and microphysical effects, and their global representation in climate models remains one of the largest uncertainties in estimates of future climate. Hence, new observations over the SE Atlantic have significant implications for global climate change scenarios. Our understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions in the SE Atlantic is hindered both by the lack of knowledge on aerosol and cloud properties, as well as the lack of knowledge about detailed physical processes involved. Most notably, we are missing knowledge on the absorptive and cloud nucleating properties of aerosols, including their vertical distribution relative to clouds, on the locations and degree of aerosol mixing into clouds, on the processes that govern cloud property adjustments, and on the importance of aerosol effects on clouds relative to co-varying synoptic scale meteorology. We discuss the current knowledge of aerosol and cloud property distributions based on satellite observations and sparse suborbital sampling. Recent efforts to make full use of A-Train aerosol sensor synergies will be highlighted. We describe planned field campaigns in the region to address the existing knowledge gaps. Specifically, we describe the scientific objectives and implementation of the five synergistic, international research activities aimed at providing some of the key aerosol and cloud properties and a process-level understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions over the SE Atlantic: NASA

  18. Article Title: Physical activity in adolescents. Is there scientific evidence of how physical exercise affects sleep in the adolescent population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Reverter-Masia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Insomnia is a very common pediatric condition that causes a serious impact on psychophysical performance. The present paper, based on the scientific literature, aims to analyze some questions about how physical activity affects sleep in the adolescent population. Finally, some general and useful recommendations are established for professionals working in this population group.

  19. [Scientific and practical activity of the Department of Muscle Biochemistry of the Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of NAS of Ukraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynogradova, R P; Danilova, V M; Yurasova, S P

    2017-01-01

    The article focuses on scientific and practical activity of the Department of Muscle Biochemistry of the Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of NAS of Ukraine in the context of its foundation and development. Main findings and practical achievements in the area of muscle biochemistry are summarized and discussed.

  20. Scientific Research Activity of Students Pre-Service Teachers of Sciences at University: The Aspects of Understanding, Situation and Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamanauskas, Vincentas; Augiene, Dalia

    2017-01-01

    The development of student abilities of scientific research activity (SRA) in the process of studies appears as a highly important area. In the course of studies, students not only increase their general competencies, acquire professional abilities and skills but also learn to conduct research. This does not mean that all students will build their…

  1. [Evaluation of scientific activity from the view point of medical librarians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasas, L; Hercsel, I

    2000-08-13

    The authors try to sum up briefly the rather complex topic of scientometry, with special regards to medical science. They discuss the role of medical librarians in the preparation of an analysis on scientific publications of individuals and/or institutions, because these can be considered as a measure of the scientific output. In a separate part the authors give a critical review of the tools and methods of bibliometrics, delineate the main problems of them. They discuss the Hungarian practice of scientometry and present some examples. For comparison they describe some examples from abroad as well. As a conclusion, the authors emphasise the importance of the presence of Hungarian publications in international scientific periodicals, at the same time the necessity of objective home measuring of the scientific output as well.

  2. Keynote address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farlinger, W.

    1997-01-01

    In this second keynote address of the conference Mr. Farlinger, Chairman of Ontario Hydro, attempted to respond to some of the criticisms levelled at the Corporation in the course of the Macdonald Committee process. He appeared to be particularly vexed by the criticism of IPPSO, saying that in effect, they are' beating up on their only customer', at a time when Hydro is being pulled in several different directions, and was facing pressure from jurisdictional dispute with municipal utilities, (MEUs). Nevertheless, he agreed with the need for restructuring. He defended Hydro by saying that the Macdonald Report in fact represented a vindication of the position Ontario Hydro had taken, particularly on such issues as open competition, customer choice, rationalization of the distribution system, and termination of Hydro's monopoly position. At the same time, he objected to the Report's assertion that dismantling the generation system into smaller units would be in the best interest of the people of Ontario. He suggested that there would be several large US utility companies willing and able to fill the vacuum if there was no large company with its head office in Ontario to stake its claim to the provincial market

  3. Annual Report on Scientific Activities in 1997 of Department of Physics and Nuclear Techniques, Academy of Mining and Metallurgy, Cracow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolny, J.; Olszynska, E.

    1998-01-01

    The Annual Report 1997 is the review of scientific activities of the Department of Nuclear Physics and Techniques (DNPT) of the Academy of Mining and Metallurgy, Cracow. The studies connected with: radiometric analysis, nuclear electronics, solid state physics, elementary particle and detectors, medical physics, physics of environment, theoretical physics, nuclear geophysics, energetic problems, industrial radiometry and tracer techniques have been broadly presented. The fill list of works being published and presented at scientific conferences in 1997 by the staff of DNPT are also included

  4. Addressing key concepts in physical geography through interactive learning activities in an online geo-ICT environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Gert; Steegen, An; Martens, Lotte

    2016-04-01

    The increasing number of geospatial datasets and free online geo-ICT tools offers new opportunities for education in Earth Sciences. Geospatial technology indeed provides an environment through which interactive learning can be introduced in Earth Sciences curricula. However, the effectiveness of such e-learning approaches in terms of learning outcomes has rarely been addressed. Here, we present our experience with the implementation of digital interactive learning activities within an introductory Physical Geography course attended by 90 undergraduate students in Geography, Geology, Biology and Archaeology. Two traditional lectures were replaced by interactive sessions (each 2 h) in a flexible classroom where students had to work both in team and individually in order to explore some key concepts through the integrated use of geospatial data within Google EarthTM. A first interactive lesson dealt with the classification of river systems and aimed to examine the conditions under which rivers tend to meander or to develop a braided pattern. Students were required to collect properties of rivers (river channel pattern, channel slope, climate, discharge, lithology, vegetation, etc). All these data are available on a global scale and have been added as separate map layers in Google EarthTM. Each student collected data for at least two rivers and added this information to a Google Drive Spreadsheet accessible to the entire group. This resulted in a database of more than one hundred rivers spread over various environments worldwide. In a second phase small groups of students discussed the potential relationships between river channel pattern and its controlling factors. Afterwards, the findings of each discussion group were presented to the entire audience. The same set-up was followed in a second interactive session to explore spatial variations in ecosystem properties such as net primary production and soil carbon content. The qualitative evaluation of both interactive

  5. Keynote address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    DOE biomass R ampersand D programs have the potential to provide America with both plentiful, clean-burning domestic transportation fuels and cost-competitive industrial and utility fuels, benefiting energy security in the United States. Biofuels developed under our programs will also help improve air quality, reduce greenhouse gases, reduce the large daily quantities of waste we produce, and revitalize rural America. These research motivations have been documented in the National Energy Strategy. DOE looks forward to expanding its biofuels research program and to forging a partnership with private sector for cost-shared commercialization of new fuels and vehicle technologies. Many alternative fuels (e.g., ethanol, methanol, compressed natural gas, propane, or electricity) are candidates for gaining market share. Indeed, there may be significant regional variation in the future fuel mix. Alcohol fuels from biomass, particularly ethanol, have the potential to make a major contribution. Currently, ethanol in the United States is almost entirely made from corn; and the limitations of that process are well known (e.g., costly feedstock, end product requiring subsidy to be competitive, use of fossil fuels in renewable feedstock production and processing, and potential adverse impact of corn ethanol production on the price of food). To address these concerns, the DOE biofuels program is pursuing an ambitious research program to develop the technologies needed to convert these crops into alternative transportation fuels, primarily cellulose-based ethanol and methanol. Program R ampersand D has reduced the estimated cost per gallon of cellulose-based ethanol from $3.60 in 1980 to the current $1.35, with a program goal of $0.60 by the year 2000. DOE is also investigating the thermochemical conversion of biomass to methanol. The program goal is to achieve commercial production of methanol (like ethanol) at the gasoline equivalent of $0.90 per gallon by the year 2000. 4 figs

  6. Opening Address

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovini, L.

    1994-01-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen To quote Mr Jean Terrien: "Physics must be one step ahead of metrology". A long-serving Director of the BIPM, he said these words when visiting the IMGC in 1970 as a member of the scientific board of our Institute. At that time it was still an open question whether the IMGC should start research work on the absolute measurement of silicon lattice spacing. Mr Terrien underlined the revolutionary character of x-ray interferometry and, eventually, he caused the balance needle to lean towards the ... right direction. Mr Terrien correctly foresaw that, like Michelson's interferometer of 1880, x-ray interferometry could have a prominent place in today's science and technology. And while, in the first case, after more than a century we can see instruments based on electromagnetic wave interaction within every one's reach in laboratories and, sometimes, in workshops, in the second case, twenty-five years since the first development of an x-ray interferometer we can witness its role in nanometrology. Today and tomorrow we meet to discuss how to go beyond the sixth decimal place in the value of the Avogadro constant. We are aware that the quest for this achievement requires the cooperation of scientists with complementary capabilities. I am sure that the present workshop is a very good opportunity to present and discuss results and to improve and extend existing cooperation. The new adjustment of fundamental constants envisaged by the CODATA Task Group is redoubling scientists' efforts to produce competitive values of NA. The results of the measurements of the silicon lattice spacing in terms of an optical wavelength, which were available for the 1986 adjustment, combined with the determination of silicon molar volume, demonstrate how such an NA determination produces a consistent set of other constants and opens the way to a possible redefinition of the kilogram. We shall see in these two days how far we have progressed along this road. For us at the

  7. [Participation of one children hospital residents in scientific and training activities of Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, María Carolina; Domínguez, Paula Alejandra; Martins, Andrea Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    The Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría, SAP (Argentine Society of Pediatrics) offers courses and scientific activities for pediatricians and residents. We evaluated the participation of Pedro de Elizalde Hospital residents in the scientific and training activities of SAP and assessed the trend of participation throughout the residency; 107 residents were surveyed; 48% were members, and the participation increased significantly throughout the residence (p <0.01). None of the surveyed residents were part of any association; 84% did not know the "Pediatricians in Training Group"; 49% participated in continued training programs, with a growing tendency to participation through-out the residency (p <0.01); 80% considered that the SAP is a friendly entity. We concluded that participation of residents in the SAP is scarce during the first two years of training, and that it shows a growth in the senior residents' group. Encouraging the interest of first and second year residents in the activities is necessary.

  8. Welcome address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donowaki, Mitsuro

    1992-01-01

    Recent dramatic changes in the international environment had great influence on the process of arms control and disarmament. The need for improving and strengthening the Non-proliferation Treaty proposed examination of the possibility to activate special inspection mechanism of IAEA. With regard to the nuclear tests ban, the US and Russia have already brought into effect the threshold test-ban Treaty and the peaceful nuclear explosions Treaty. Within these circumstances it is inevitable to stress the importance of solving regional disputes and conflicts in South-East Asia which is strongly supported by Japan which hosted this meeting

  9. Scientific meetings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    One of the main aims of the IAEA is to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information and one of the main ways of doing this is to convene international scientific meetings. They range from large international conferences bringing together several hundred scientists, smaller symposia attended by an average of 150 to 250 participants and seminars designed to instruct rather than inform, to smaller panels and study groups of 10 to 30 experts brought together to advise on a particular programme or to develop a set of regulations. The topics of these meetings cover every part of the Agency's activities and form a backbone of many of its programmes. (author)

  10. [Scientific bases for the development of functional meat products with combined biological activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanca, V; Rodríguez, E; Señoráns, J; Reglero, G

    2006-01-01

    The scientific evidences on the relationship between food and health have given place to a new food market of rapid growth in the last years: the market of the functional food. Though the interest of maintaining or improving the state of health by means of the consumption of traditional food with bioactive ingredients added is undoubtedly high, the Spanish population, increasingly formed and informed, is unwilling to consume functional food, until these possess a scientific rigorous base. This article presents a review of the scientific bases that support the development of functional meat products with balanced ratio omega-6/omega-3 and a combination of synergic antioxidants, among them an extract of rosemary obtained by means of extraction with supercritical CO2.

  11. An annotated bibliography of scientific literature on research and management activities conducted in Coram Experimental Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilana Abrahamson; Katie Lyon

    2012-01-01

    The Coram Experimental Forest represents western larch-mixed conifer forests of the Northern Rockies. Western larch research was centered at Coram Experimental Forest (CEF) to provide a scientific basis to regenerate and grow this important and valuable species. For example, the long-term silvicultural studies installed at CEF are allowing researchers and managers to...

  12. Living with Contradictions: Complementing Activity Theory with the Notion of "Installed Base" to Address the Historical Dimension of Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igira, Faraja; Aanestad, Margunn

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the historical dimension of the relation between information systems innovation and organizational transformation. We analyse findings from a study of ongoing transformations in the healthcare sector in Zanzibar, Tanzania. The process is described with a particular focus on instances where some contradictions in the old…

  13. Goals, tasks and aspects of activity of Ukrainian State Scientific and Technical Center on Nuclear and Radiation Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovbasenko, Yu.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of SSTC NRS activities is scientific, technical, analytical and expert support to the Nuclear Regulatory Department as a State Nuclear and Radiation Safety Regulatory Authority.The main tasks are: 1. Development and improvement of normative and legal framework in the field of nuclear power use in Ukraine; 2. Expert support in making regulatory decisions; 3. Research and development work on improvement engineering and operational safety of nuclear power facilities in Ukraine. The organizational structure of SSTC NRS is also given

  14. The scientific activities of CERN and budget estimates for the years 2003-2010 - preliminary orientations

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary orientations for the Long-Term Plan 2003-2010. It focuses on choices in the scientific programme, savings, organisational measures and financial scenarios to deal with the cost increase of the LHC project. The paper is presented for discussion. The outcome of this discussion, as well as the observations and recommendations of the External Review Committee, which started its work while this paper was in preparation, will be taken into account for the plan which the Management is preparing for June 2002.

  15. The scientific activities of CERN and budget estimates for the years 2003-2010 - Preliminary orientations

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary orientations for the Long-Term Plan 2003-2010. It focuses on choices in the scientific programme, savings, organisational measures and financial scenarios to deal with the cost increase of the LHC project. The paper is presented for discussion. The outcome of this discussion, as well as the observations and recommendations of the External Review Committee, which started its work while this paper was in preparation, will be taken into account for the plan which the Management is preparing for June 2002.

  16. High work ability in the scientific activity of older and experienced academics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjuhan, Ulo; Taidre, Erika

    2012-01-01

    At present the health of people in theirs 60s is the same as in theirs 50s around fifty years ago. Using older academics is a topical problem for universities in remaining efficient. Data regarding academics' scientific productivity at universities were collected and questionnaires compiled in the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration of Tallinn University of Technology in Estonia. Studies showed that the productivity of academics at university increases as they grow older (into their 60s). These academics are valuable to the university. The choice of academics should be made according to the candidates' knowledge and ability to work.

  17. Synthesis of the scientific activity. Resolution of compressible Navier-Stokes equations for steady supersonic and transonic regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angrand, F.

    1990-10-01

    In this HDR (Accreditation to Supervise Researches) report, the author gives an overview of his activities in the field of numerical methods, notably in the field of fluid mechanics and aeronautics. He more particularly addresses the resolution of Euler equations of gas dynamics in transonic and supersonic regimes (equations, centered and off-centered flow calculation, case of one-dimensional and non linear systems), the extension of this work to Navier-Stokes equations (equations, grid adaptation), the study of resolution methods and cost optimisation (Runge-Kutta method, implicit schemes, multi-grid approach). He also addresses the case of hypersonic flows behind a base

  18. Longitudinal active living research to address physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour in children in transition from preadolescence to adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhajarine, Nazeem; Katapally, Tarun R; Fuller, Daniel; Stanley, Kevin G; Rainham, Daniel

    2015-05-17

    Children can be highly active and highly sedentary on the same day! For instance, a child can spend a couple of hours playing sports, and then spend the rest of the day in front of a screen. A focus on examining both physical activity and sedentary behaviour throughout the day and in all seasons in a year is necessary to generate comprehensive evidence to curb childhood obesity. To achieve this, we need to understand where within a city are children active or sedentary in all seasons. This active living study based in Saskatoon, Canada, aims to understand the role played by modifiable urban built environments in mitigating, or exacerbating, seasonal effects on children's physical activity and sedentary behaviour in a population of children in transition from preadolescence to adolescence. Designed as an observational, longitudinal investigation this study will recruit 800 Canadian children 10-14 years of age. Data will be obtained from children representing all socioeconomic categories within all types of neighbourhoods built in a range of urban designs. Built environment characteristics will be measured using previously validated neighbourhood audit and observational tools. Neighbourhood level socioeconomic variables customized to Saskatoon neighbourhoods from 2011 Statistics Canada's National Household Survey will be used to control for neighbourhood social environment. The validated Smart Cities Healthy Kids questionnaire will be administered to capture children's behaviour and perception of a range of factors that influence their activity, household (including family socioeconomic factors), parental, peer and neighbourhood influence on independent mobility. The outcome measures, different intensities of physical activity and sedentary behaviour, will be collected using global positioning system equipped accelerometers in all four seasons. Each accelerometry cycle will be matched with weather data obtained from Environment Canada. Extensive weather data will be

  19. The Financial-Organizational Foundations of Assessment and Comparison of Scientific-Publication Activity of the Employees of Scientific Sphere in Terms of the Paradigm of the Public-Creative Patriotism of Nation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpinsky Borys A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at allocating both the specific features of financing the scientific sphere of Ukraine in the current period of transformation and the reform of sectors of the national economy, as well as the development of financial-organizational foundations of assessment and comparison of scientific-publication activity of the employees through conformity of the occupied position, proceeding from the paradigm of public-creative patriotism of nation. It has been proved that, in its fundamental essence, the paradigm of public-creative patriotism of nation is manifested and materialized through the physical participation of every citizen in formation of the own state, and is most fully implemented in the simultaneous interaction of individual dominants of such a patriotism: qualitative and quantitative (tax. A characteristic manifestation of such a patriotism in the scientific sphere is the increase of productivity of scholars on the basis of scientific-publication activity, which was for the first time suggested to be assessed on the basis of the Hirsch index for employees in view of the hold position with the relevant rating. The financial-organizational foundations of assessment and comparison of the public-creative patriotism of both the scientific and the teaching staff, allowing to increase potential of scientific sphere of the State in the context of basics of behavioral economics, have been substantiated.

  20. Local expansion in circulatory death kidney transplant activity improves wait-listed outcomes and addresses inequities of access to transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Mirshekar-Syahkal, Bahar; Summers, Dominic; Bradbury, Lisa L; Aly, Mohamed; Bardsley, Victoria; Berry, Miriam; Norris, Joseph M; Torpey, Nick; Clatworthy, Menna Ruth; Bradley, J Andrew; Pettigrew, Gavin John

    2016-01-01

    In the UK, circulatory death (DCD) kidney transplant activity has increased rapidly, but marked regional variation persists. We report how increased DCD kidney transplant activity influenced wait-listed outcomes for a single centre. Between 2002/03 and 2011/12, 430 (54%) DCD and 361 (46%) DBD kidney-only transplants were performed in the Cambridge Transplant Centre, with a higher proportion of DCD donors fulfilling expanded criteria status (41% DCD vs 32% DBD; $\\small \\textit{P}$=0.01). Compa...

  1. Designing laboratory activities in elementary school oriented to scientific approach for teachers SD-Kreatif Bojonegoro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwikoranto; Surasmi, W. A.; Suparto, A.; Tresnaningsih, S.; Sambada, D.; Setyowati, T.; Faqih, A.; Setiani, R.

    2018-03-01

    Important science lessons are introduced to elementary school students through inquiry. This training is important to do because one key determinant of succesful laboratory activities is teachers. This course aims to enable teachers to design an inquiry-based Laboratory Activity and be able to apply it in the classroom. The training was conducted at SD-Kreatif Bojonegoro by Modeling, Design Laboratory activities and Implementing. The results of Laboratory Activities designed to trace the seven aspects that can support the development of inquiry skills in either category. The teacher's response in this activity is positive. The conclusion of this training can improve the ability of teachers in designing and implementing laboratory activities of Science and then expected to positively affect the frequency of science laboratory activities. Usually teachers use learning by using this Laboratory Activity, it will be affected on the pattern of inquiry behavior to the students as well so that will achieve the expected goals. Teachers are expected to continue for other topics, even for other similarly characterized subjects. This habitation is important so that the teacher's skill in making Laboratory Activity continues to be well honed and useful for the students.

  2. 20 CFR 641.335 - How should the Governor address the coordination of SCSEP services with activities funded under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM The State Senior Employment Services Coordination Plan § 641.335 How... Agencies on Aging in the State and the State and Local Boards established under title I of WIA. (OAA sec... State Plan must describe the steps being taken to ensure that the SCSEP is an active partner in each One...

  3. The Activities and Impact of State Programs to Address Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer, 2011–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina F. Trivers

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC, at the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, released a three-year funding opportunity announcement (FOA for a competitive, non-research cooperative agreement. The agreement enhanced the capacities of state health departments to promote the application of best practices for evidence-based breast cancer genomics through education, surveillance, and policy activities. The FOA required that applicants focus on activities related to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC. The DCPC funded three states: Georgia, Michigan, and Oregon. Georgia was a first-time recipient of cancer genomics funding, whereas Michigan and Oregon had long standing activities in cancer genomics and had received CDC funding in the past. By the end of the funding period, each state had well-functioning and impactful state-based programs in breast cancer genomics. This article highlights the impact of a few key state activities by using CDC’s Science Impact Framework. There were challenges to implementing public health genomics programs, including the need to develop relevant partnerships, the highly technical nature of the subject matter, a lack of genetic services in certain areas, and the difficulty in funding genetic services. Georgia, Michigan, and Oregon have served as models for others interested in initiating or expanding cancer genomics programs, and they helped to determine what works well for promoting and integrating public health genomics into existing systems.

  4. Writing Activities Embedded in Bioscience Laboratory Courses to Change Students' Attitudes and Enhance Their Scientific Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Susan E.; Woods, Kyra J.; Tonissen, Kathryn F.

    2011-01-01

    We introduced writing activities into a project style third year undergraduate biomolecular science laboratory to assist the students to produce a final report in the form of a journal article. To encourage writing while the experimental work was proceeding, the embedded writing activities required ongoing analysis of experimental data. After…

  5. Learning effects of active involvement of secondary school students in scientific research within the Sparkling Science project "FlussAu:WOW!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Michaela; Zitek, Andreas; Scheikl, Sigrid; Heidenreich, Andrea; Kurz, Roman; Schrittwieser, Martin; Muhar, Susanne

    2014-05-01

    ://www.dynalearn.eu) to capture and simulate qualitative causal relationships across disciplines and scales. In "FlussAu:WOW!" students work in groups of two and are guided to think about processes and interactions of hydrological, biological, ecological, spatial and societal elements within a river catchment. They can develop their own causal models and scenarios (e.g., hydrological changes in river run off due to landscape changes in the upper catchment) but also can compare their conceptions to expert models that will be provided. As main benefit, the models help students to reflect their own conceptions in the light of scientific knowledge but also scientists learn about the viewpoints and conceptions young students might have from their environment. The comparison of pre- and post-tests conducted within the "FlussAu:WOW!" project showed that students increased significantly their factual knowledge on different processes in river systems during the first year. Questions regarding functions, processes and elements of riverine landscapes were answered more extensively. This can be ascribed to students` active involvement in scientific research. However, the causal understanding still showed room for improvement, which will be tackled during the next qualitative modelling exercises. Summarizing, involvement of secondary school students in research projects is an effective means to increase scientific literacy when active participation with reflective integration are combined. Ensuring that young people are proficient in system knowledge and understanding makes it more likely that environmental and sustainable considerations are soundly addressed in the future.

  6. [Scientific activity of the University Urological Department in Budapest after WWII (1946-1956)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romics, I; Romics, M

    2016-04-01

    The authors studied the publications written by the staff of the University Department of Urology in Budapest, Hungary between 1946 and 1956. The collection was contributed on the occasion of Professor Babics's 10-year-long chairmanship. Over a period of 10 years, 214 papers were published by 15 urologists, including 3 books and 3 PhD theses; 16 papers were published in German, 22 in English, 2 in French, and 1 in Italian. The most frequent topic of the papers (26) was basic science (e.g., ureter motility, lymph circulation, intrarenal pressure condition). Other papers dealt with nephrology, artificial kidneys, TURP, and nephron-sparing renal surgery. Some articles examined various types of malignant tumors and benign prostatic hyperplasia, while 17 publications focused on the topic of andrology. Tuberculosis was also discussed by the authors. Despite political isolation, the communist dictatorship, poverty, the lack of health equipment, physicians educated before WWII with their work morality and hard work managed to perform contemporary clinical and basic scientific research.

  7. Participation in the scientific activities of the Waves in Space Plasma (WISP) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Yakov L.; Grossi, Mario D.

    1994-01-01

    This is the Final Report for Contract NAG5-1925, that consisted of experiment design, for possible use by the space science mission called WISP (Waves in Space Plasma). This mission is under study by the Canadian Space Agency and by NASA. Two WISP configurations are contemplated, under the name of BICEPS: one is called BOLAS, and the other WISPRS. Both these configurations are meant to perform bistatic sounding of the ionosphere, at a height close to F(sub 2) H(sub max) (about 350 Km), with a pair of satellites, either tethered or in free flight. Investigation A (with Y.L. Alpert as P.I.) addresses the subject of parametric decay effects, expected to arise in a magnetoplasma under the influence of high-intensity HF fields. Criteria were formulated that could be used in searching for parametric instabilities and of electric fields in the ionosphere and magnetosphere, by in-situ satellites, such as the BICEPS Pair. Investigation B (with M.D.Grossi as P.I.) addressed the bistatic measurement, by the BICEPS pair,of ionospheric features, such as large-scale and small-scale disturbances, travelling ionospheric disturbances, electron density irregularities, spread-F phenomena, etc. These measurements by BICEPS could be correlated with the waveform distortion and degradation experienced by microwave links from geosynchronous height to ground, such as the ACTS satellite, expected to radiate pulses as short as 1 nanosecond in the band 20 to 30 GHz. These links are transionospheric and propagate e.m. waves in the volume of the ionosphere where BICEPS operates. It will be possible, therefore, to correlate the two classes of measurements, and learn the causative mechanisms that are responsible for the time-spread and frequency-spread nature of communications waveforms at microwave, in geosynchronous height to ground paths.

  8. Activity-Centered Domain Characterization for Problem-Driven Scientific Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marai, G Elisabeta

    2018-01-01

    Although visualization design models exist in the literature in the form of higher-level methodological frameworks, these models do not present a clear methodological prescription for the domain characterization step. This work presents a framework and end-to-end model for requirements engineering in problem-driven visualization application design. The framework and model are based on the activity-centered design paradigm, which is an enhancement of human-centered design. The proposed activity-centered approach focuses on user tasks and activities, and allows an explicit link between the requirements engineering process with the abstraction stage-and its evaluation-of existing, higher-level visualization design models. In a departure from existing visualization design models, the resulting model: assigns value to a visualization based on user activities; ranks user tasks before the user data; partitions requirements in activity-related capabilities and nonfunctional characteristics and constraints; and explicitly incorporates the user workflows into the requirements process. A further merit of this model is its explicit integration of functional specifications, a concept this work adapts from the software engineering literature, into the visualization design nested model. A quantitative evaluation using two sets of interdisciplinary projects supports the merits of the activity-centered model. The result is a practical roadmap to the domain characterization step of visualization design for problem-driven data visualization. Following this domain characterization model can help remove a number of pitfalls that have been identified multiple times in the visualization design literature.

  9. Scientific activity and working hours of physicians in university hospitals: results from the Innsbruck and Salzburg physician lifestyle assessment (TISPLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Bernhard; Colvin, Hans Peter; Rieder, Josef

    2009-01-01

    Controllable lifestyle has become an important factor influencing career decision-making among physicians. In academic medicine, doctors are required to combine both patient care and research in their daily routine. Insufficient release of clinicians for research during contracted work hours may lead to increased weekly working hours in academic medical centers and deter medical graduates from academia. We tested for an association between numbers of scientific publications and an increased hourly workload among physicians. This was a cross-sectional online survey among all salaried physicians working in the university hospitals of Innsbruck and Salzburg, Austria. The main outcome measures were the self-reported total number of scientific papers published in peer-reviewed medical journals over the past two years and self-reported working hours. Of 590 returned surveys, 393 were fully completed and included in the study. The sample was stratified into three groups according to scientific output in the past two years: Group A, >/= 6 publications; Group B, 1-5 publications; Group C, no publications. Men were more likely than women to have a scientific publication: in Group A there was a male predominance of 75%, whereas in Group C only 48% were men (P = 0.0034). A total of 59% (n = 232) of all participants had not published a scientific article in the past two years (Group C) and worked a mean of 58.3 +/- 12 h/week. Physicians in Group B (n = 113) had published 2.4 +/- 1.4 papers and worked 62.8 +/- 12.9 h/week; those in Group A (n = 48) had published 11.5 +/- 6.6 papers and worked 73 +/- 13.1 h/week (P work time but for 60% of overtime hours, reflecting the fact that research was mainly performed during overtime. Research activity among clinicians in academic medical centers is associated with significantly increased overtime hours. Measures need to be taken to allow medical graduates an academic career at reasonable impairment of personal lifestyle.

  10. Guide to the assessment of physical activity: Clinical and research applications: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strath, Scott J; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Ekelund, Ulf; Freedson, Patty S; Gary, Rebecca A; Richardson, Caroline R; Smith, Derek T; Swartz, Ann M

    2013-11-12

    The deleterious health consequences of physical inactivity are vast, and they are of paramount clinical and research importance. Risk identification, benchmarks, efficacy, and evaluation of physical activity behavior change initiatives for clinicians and researchers all require a clear understanding of how to assess physical activity. In the present report, we have provided a clear rationale for the importance of assessing physical activity levels, and we have documented key concepts in understanding the different dimensions, domains, and terminology associated with physical activity measurement. The assessment methods presented allow for a greater understanding of the vast number of options available to clinicians and researchers when trying to assess physical activity levels in their patients or participants. The primary outcome desired is the main determining factor in the choice of physical activity assessment method. In combination with issues of feasibility/practicality, the availability of resources, and administration considerations, the desired outcome guides the choice of an appropriate assessment tool. The decision matrix, along with the accompanying tables, provides a mechanism for this selection that takes all of these factors into account. Clearly, the assessment method adopted and implemented will vary depending on circumstances, because there is no single best instrument appropriate for every situation. In summary, physical activity assessment should be considered a vital health measure that is tracked regularly over time. All other major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and smoking) are assessed routinely. Physical activity status should also be assessed regularly. Multiple physical activity assessment methods provide reasonably accurate outcome measures, with choices dependent on setting-specific resources and constraints. The present scientific statement provides a guide to

  11. Scientific and technological activity in the National Institute of Nuclear Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar A, L.; Monroy G, F.; Morales R, P.; Romero H, S.

    2008-01-01

    The present book was published on the occasion of the 50 years of the existence of the Institute, from its creation in 1956 like National Commission of Nuclear Energy to 1979 that arises like National Institute of Nuclear Research. The objective of this publication is the one to leave a writing testimony of all the activities that are realized in the National Institute of Nuclear Research and an accessible language within the diverse subjects boarded. Referring subjects to the activities of nuclear physics, radiochemistry, research and development of materials, dosimetry, plasma physics, production of radiopharmaceuticals, tissue sterilization by radiation, food irradiation and other included. (Author)

  12. Scientific Skateboarding and Mathematical Music: Edutainment That Actively Engages Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, William; Lesser, Lawrence M.

    2013-01-01

    Edutainment has recently been a major growing area of education, showing great promise to motivate students with relevant activities. The authors are among innovators who have developed cutting-edge fusions of popular culture and STEM concepts to engage and to motivate middle school students, using vehicles such as music/song and skateboarding.…

  13. Recommended approaches to the scientific evaluation of ecotoxicological hazards and risks of endocrine‐active substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    A SETAC Pellston Workshop™ ?‘Environmental Hazard and Risk Assessment Approaches for Endocrine-Active Substances (EHRA)’ was held from 31st January to 5th February 2016 in Pensacola, Florida, USA. The primary aim of the workshop was to provide objective advice, based on current s...

  14. Effectiveness of universal parental support interventions addressing children's dietary habits, physical activity and bodyweight: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, Manzur; Sundblom, Elinor; Elinder, Liselotte Schäfer

    2015-08-01

    The evidence regarding effectiveness of parental support interventions targeting children's health behaviours is weak. We aimed to review: 1) effectiveness of universal parental support interventions to promote dietary habits, physical activity (PA) or prevent overweight and obesity among children 2-18years and 2) effectiveness in relation to family socio-economic position. Thirty five studies from 1990 to 2013 were identified from major databases. Quality was assessed by four criteria accounting for selection and attrition bias, fidelity to intervention, and outcome measurement methodology, categorizing studies as strong, moderate or weak. Four intervention types were identified: face-to-face counselling, group education, information sent home, and telephone counselling. Face-to-face or telephone counselling was effective in changing children's diet, while there was only weak evidence for improvement in PA. Sending home information was not effective. Concerning body weight, group education seemed more promising than counselling. Intervention effectiveness was generally higher in younger compared to older children. In groups with low socio-economic position, group-based approaches appeared promising. In the future efforts should be made to improve reporting of intervention content, include a power calculation for the main outcome, the use of high quality outcome assessment methodology, and a follow-up period of at least 6months. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Scientific instruments, scientific progress and the cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, David; Faust, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Philosophers speak of science in terms of theory and experiment, yet when they speak of the progress of scientific knowledge they speak in terms of theory alone. In this article it is claimed that scientific knowledge consists of, among other things, scientific instruments and instrumental techniques and not simply of some kind of justified beliefs. It is argued that one aspect of scientific progress can be characterized relatively straightforwardly - the accumulation of new scientific instruments. The development of the cyclotron is taken to illustrate this point. Eight different activities which promoted the successful completion of the cyclotron are recognised. The importance is in the machine rather than the experiments which could be run on it and the focus is on how the cyclotron came into being, not how it was subsequently used. The completed instrument is seen as a useful unit of scientific progress in its own right. (UK)

  16. Scientific feedback from high heat flux actively cooled PFCs development, realization and first results in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosman, A.; Bayetti, P.; Brosset, C.; Bucalossi, J.; Cordier, J.J.; Durocher, A.; Escourbiac, F.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Guilhem, D.; Gunn, J.; Loarer, T.; Lipa, M.; Mitteau, R.; Pegourie, B.; Reichle, R.; Schlosser, J.; Tsitrone, E.; Vallet, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    The implementation of actively cooled high heat flux plasma facing components (PFCs) are one of the major ingredients required for operating the Tore Supra tokamak with very long pulses. A pioneering activity has been developed in this field from the very beginning of the device operation that is today culminating with the routine operation of an actively cooled toroidal pumped limiter (TPL) capable to sustain up to 10 MW.m -2 of nominal convected heat flux. A technical feedback is given from the whole development up to the industrialization and focuses on a number of critical issues, such as bonding technology analysis, manufacture processes, repair processes, destructive and non destructive testing. The actual experience in Tore Supra allows to address the question of D retention on carbon walls. Redeposition on surfaces without plasma flux is suspected to cause the final 'burial' of about the injected gas during long discharges. (authors)

  17. Scientific feedback from high heat flux actively cooled PFCs development, realization and first results in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosman, A.; Bayetti, P.; Brosset, C.; Bucalossi, J.; Cordier, J.J.; Durocher, A.; Escourbiac, F.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Guilhem, D.; Gunn, J.; Loarer, T.; Lipa, M.; Mitteau, R.; Pegourie, B.; Reichle, R.; Schlosser, J.; Tsitrone, E.; Vallet, J.C

    2004-07-01

    The implementation of actively cooled high heat flux plasma facing components (PFCs) are one of the major ingredients required for operating the Tore Supra tokamak with very long pulses. A pioneering activity has been developed in this field from the very beginning of the device operation that is today culminating with the routine operation of an actively cooled toroidal pumped limiter (TPL) capable to sustain up to 10 MW.m{sup -2} of nominal convected heat flux. A technical feedback is given from the whole development up to the industrialization and focuses on a number of critical issues, such as bonding technology analysis, manufacture processes, repair processes, destructive and non destructive testing. The actual experience in Tore Supra allows to address the question of D retention on carbon walls. Redeposition on surfaces without plasma flux is suspected to cause the final 'burial' of about the injected gas during long discharges. (authors)

  18. Report by the scientific secretary on major IAEA activities during 1989-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossilov, A.

    1992-01-01

    Major IAEA activities in the field of nuclear power plant control and instrumentation in 1989-1991 are described: IAEA/OECD/NEA International Symposium on ''Balancing Automation and Human Action in Nuclear Power Plants'', Munich, Germany, 9-13 July 1990; specialists meetings; cooperation with OECD/NEA; a Review Report on ''Control Rooms and Man-Machine Interface in Nuclear Power Plants''; Advisory Group Meeting on ''The Balance Between Automation and Human Actions in NPP Operation''; use of simulators for training and maintaining competence; the guidelines for control room design; operator support systems in NPPs

  19. Scientific Grid activities and PKI deployment in the Cybermedia Center, Osaka University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Toyokazu; Teranishi, Yuuichi; Nozaki, Kazunori; Kato, Seiichi; Shimojo, Shinji; Peltier, Steven T; Lin, Abel; Molina, Tomas; Yang, George; Lee, David; Ellisman, Mark; Naito, Sei; Koike, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Shuichi; Yoshida, Kiyokazu; Mori, Hirotaro

    2005-10-01

    The Cybermedia Center (CMC), Osaka University, is a research institution that offers knowledge and technology resources obtained from advanced researches in the areas of large-scale computation, information and communication, multimedia content and education. Currently, CMC is involved in Japanese national Grid projects such as JGN II (Japan Gigabit Network), NAREGI and BioGrid. Not limited to Japan, CMC also actively takes part in international activities such as PRAGMA. In these projects and international collaborations, CMC has developed a Grid system that allows scientists to perform their analysis by remote-controlling the world's largest ultra-high voltage electron microscope located in Osaka University. In another undertaking, CMC has assumed a leadership role in BioGrid by sharing its experiences and knowledge on the system development for the area of biology. In this paper, we will give an overview of the BioGrid project and introduce the progress of the Telescience unit, which collaborates with the Telescience Project led by the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research (NCMIR). Furthermore, CMC collaborates with seven Computing Centers in Japan, NAREGI and National Institute of Informatics to deploy PKI base authentication infrastructure. The current status of this project and future collaboration with Grid Projects will be delineated in this paper.

  20. Recommending scientific organization by employees as the example of their prosumer activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Izabela Baruk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article the problems related to recommending the employer by employees are presented. It is described as the example of employees’ prosumption activity. Transmitting their opinions about the organization as the employer they become the co-creators its image which is one of the key non-material marketing values. The article has theoretical-empirical character. In the theoretical part the essence of prosumption is presented. The special attention is paid to fact that in the literature this appearance is linked with consumption products not with personnel activity. In the empirical part the results of the field researches on recommending employer and its relation determinants are presented. The statistical analysis in the form of correspondence analysis method has been used to these results. It allows to estimate the dependences between analysed variables, to define the power of identified dependences, to show their character, to sort the relation determinants of recommending in the hierarchical system etc. All of the analysed dependences are significant in the statistically meaning. The stronger dependence exists in the case of vertical relation variable in the comparison to the dependence between recommending employer and horizontal relation variable. Of course each of type of organizational relations should be supported by employer because it influences on employees’ identifying with the organization which is the key determinant of the column variable.

  1. Development of Neutron Activation Analysis for Scientific Interpretation on Cultural Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gyu Ho; Kim, Na Young; Ko, Min Chung; Kim, Min Ji; Cho, Su Mi; Kang, Ji Eun [Kongju National University, Gongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    This research is tried to set up the application of neutron activation analysis and to evaluate the historical information about ceramics materials at production kilns for the standardized technology of NAA. This project is measured the 112 samples from Jijong-dong, Daejeon and 4 production kiln sites in Kyongsangdo by using NAA and XRF and classified as types and production site by PCA and applied of factor analysis, discruminant analysis and cluster analysis. As the results, we know that it is classified as pottery and roof tile as measured 11 elements and that it is not classified major and trace elements as the production kiln sites because raw materials is 2nd clay. At last, it is investigated the comparative evaluation of raw material as production kiln sites by cluster analysis as the basis of the data of NA

  2. Medicinal significance, pharmacological activities, and analytical aspects of solasodine: A concise report of current scientific literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanika Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkaloids are well known phytoconstituents for their diverse pharmacological properties. Alkaloids are found in all plant parts like roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits and seeds. Solasodine occurs as an aglycone part of glycoalkloids, which is a nitrogen analogue to sapogenins. Solanaceae family comprises of a number of plants with variety of natural products of medicinal significance mainly steroidal lactones, glycosides, alkaloids and flavanoids. It is a steroidal alkaloid based on a C27 cholestane skeleton. Literature survey reveals that solasodine has diuretic, anticancer, antifungal, cardiotonic, antispermatogenetic, antiandrogenic, immunomodulatory, antipyretic and various effects on central nervous system. Isolation and quantitative determination was achieved by several analytical techniques. Present review highlights the pharmacological activity of solasodine, with its analytical and tissue culture techniques, which may be helpful to the researchers to develop new molecules for the treatment of various disorders in the future.

  3. PASSION FOR INVESTIGATION, PASSION FOR TEACHING; Importance of the scientific notion in the academic activity Interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    interviewed by Roberto Polanco

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available As an introduction:To ask for someone’s experience turns out to be always a reasonable option, not for coping or merely imitate, but rather to compare, to look for similarities, differences, references or profitable suggestions for the development of an own critical thought. To entrust only the own experience; can result in a baneful imprisonment, a harmful exercise of simple auto reference. To get to know how others have approached similar issues to those that we ask ourselves can become a valuable and even essential learning experience to look at our problems from a new angle, stimulating new questions and challenges, concretely in the field of the university activity. Such it is the aim of this space that assembles the thought of 3 important references in the field of the science and of the psychobiology. We can only be grateful for the generosity of these presented authors, not only for their time, but for the concrete testimony of collaboration with this space, especially to Mario Bunge whose suggestions gave form to this interview.

  4. KEY TENDENCIES IN SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL (INNOVATIVE ACTIVITIES OF RUSSIAN INDUSTRIAL COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Dobrova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article off ers the analysis of expenditures on technological innovation in Russia and abroad. The author outlines the main reasons of the low level of technological development of Russian industrial companies. A number of organizational and economic measures to create conditions for technological development of the Russian economy are considered. In recent years, there was an essential increase in output of innovative products, works and services that coincided with the increased ratio of volumes of technological innovations to their costs. However, the expected decrease of this ratio in the coming years may cause slower growth of volumes of innovative production that requires drastic measures, especially aimed at restricting key factors impeding innovative activities. These factors include lack of own funds, high cost of innovations, lack of fi nancial support from the state, high economic risk and low innovative potential of the organization.

  5. Scientific Considerations for Future Spectroscopic Measurements from Space of Activity on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution UV and X-ray spectroscopy are important to understanding the origin and evolution of magnetic energy release in the solar atmosphere, as well as the subsequent evolution of heated plasma and accelerated particles. Electromagnetic radiation is observed from plasma heated to temperatures ranging from about 10 k K to above 10 MK, from accelerated electrons emitting photons primarily at X-ray energies, and from ions emitting in gamma rays. These observations require space-based instruments sensitive to emissions at wavelengths shorter than the near UV. This article reviews some recent observations with emphasis on solar eruptive events, the models that describe them, and the measurements they indicate are needed for substantial progress in the future. Specific examples are discussed demonstrating that imaging spectroscopy with a cadence of seconds or better is needed to follow, understand, and predict the evolution of solar activity. Critical to substantial progress is the combination of a judicious choice of UV, EUV, and soft X-ray imaging spectroscopy sensitive to the evolution of this thermal plasma combined with hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy sensitive to suprathermal electrons. The major challenge will be to conceive instruments that, within the bounds of possible technologies and funding, have the flexibility and field of view to obtain spectroscopic observations where and when events occur while providing an optimum balance of dynamic range, spectral resolution and range, and spatial resolution.

  6. SALTON SEA SCIENTIFIC DRILLING PROJECT: SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, J.H.; Elders, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project, was spudded on 24 October 1985, and reached a total depth of 10,564 ft. (3. 2 km) on 17 March 1986. There followed a period of logging, a flow test, and downhole scientific measurements. The scientific goals were integrated smoothly with the engineering and economic objectives of the program and the ideal of 'science driving the drill' in continental scientific drilling projects was achieved in large measure. The principal scientific goals of the project were to study the physical and chemical processes involved in an active, magmatically driven hydrothermal system. To facilitate these studies, high priority was attached to four areas of sample and data collection, namely: (1) core and cuttings, (2) formation fluids, (3) geophysical logging, and (4) downhole physical measurements, particularly temperatures and pressures.

  7. Low-power priority Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder data-driven readout for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for tracker system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, P.; Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chalmet, P. L.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Gao, C.; Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A.; Kofarago, M.; Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.; Lattuca, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Marras, D.; Mager, M.; Martinengo, P.; Mazza, G.; Mugnier, H.; Musa, L.; Puggioni, C.; Rousset, J.; Reidt, F.; Riedler, P.; Snoeys, W.; Siddhanta, S.; Usai, G.; van Hoorne, J. W.; Yi, J.

    2015-06-01

    Active Pixel Sensors used in High Energy Particle Physics require low power consumption to reduce the detector material budget, low integration time to reduce the possibilities of pile-up and fast readout to improve the detector data capability. To satisfy these requirements, a novel Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder (AERD) asynchronous circuit for a fast readout of a pixel matrix has been developed. The AERD data-driven readout architecture operates the address encoding and reset decoding based on an arbitration tree, and allows us to readout only the hit pixels. Compared to the traditional readout structure of the rolling shutter scheme in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), AERD can achieve a low readout time and a low power consumption especially for low hit occupancies. The readout is controlled at the chip periphery with a signal synchronous with the clock, allows a good digital and analogue signal separation in the matrix and a reduction of the power consumption. The AERD circuit has been implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor (CIS) process with full complementary CMOS logic in the pixel. It works at 10 MHz with a matrix height of 15 mm. The energy consumed to read out one pixel is around 72 pJ. A scheme to boost the readout speed to 40 MHz is also discussed. The sensor chip equipped with AERD has been produced and characterised. Test results including electrical beam measurement are presented.

  8. Low-power priority Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder data-driven readout for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for tracker system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, P.; Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chalmet, P.L.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Gao, C.; Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A.; Kofarago, M.; Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.; Lattuca, A.; Marin Tobon, C.A.; Marras, D.; Mager, M.; Martinengo, P.; Mazza, G.

    2015-01-01

    Active Pixel Sensors used in High Energy Particle Physics require low power consumption to reduce the detector material budget, low integration time to reduce the possibilities of pile-up and fast readout to improve the detector data capability. To satisfy these requirements, a novel Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder (AERD) asynchronous circuit for a fast readout of a pixel matrix has been developed. The AERD data-driven readout architecture operates the address encoding and reset decoding based on an arbitration tree, and allows us to readout only the hit pixels. Compared to the traditional readout structure of the rolling shutter scheme in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), AERD can achieve a low readout time and a low power consumption especially for low hit occupancies. The readout is controlled at the chip periphery with a signal synchronous with the clock, allows a good digital and analogue signal separation in the matrix and a reduction of the power consumption. The AERD circuit has been implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor (CIS) process with full complementary CMOS logic in the pixel. It works at 10 MHz with a matrix height of 15 mm. The energy consumed to read out one pixel is around 72 pJ. A scheme to boost the readout speed to 40 MHz is also discussed. The sensor chip equipped with AERD has been produced and characterised. Test results including electrical beam measurement are presented

  9. Low-power priority Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder data-driven readout for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for tracker system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, P., E-mail: yangping0710@126.com [Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Chalmet, P.L. [MIND, Archamps (France); Chanlek, N. [Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima (Thailand); Collu, A. [University of Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); INFN (Italy); Gao, C. [Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Kofarago, M. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); University of Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Kim, D. [Dongguk and Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lattuca, A. [University of Torino, Torino (Italy); INFN (Italy); Marin Tobon, C.A. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marras, D. [University of Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); INFN (Italy); Mager, M.; Martinengo, P. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Mazza, G. [University of Torino, Torino (Italy); INFN (Italy); and others

    2015-06-11

    Active Pixel Sensors used in High Energy Particle Physics require low power consumption to reduce the detector material budget, low integration time to reduce the possibilities of pile-up and fast readout to improve the detector data capability. To satisfy these requirements, a novel Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder (AERD) asynchronous circuit for a fast readout of a pixel matrix has been developed. The AERD data-driven readout architecture operates the address encoding and reset decoding based on an arbitration tree, and allows us to readout only the hit pixels. Compared to the traditional readout structure of the rolling shutter scheme in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), AERD can achieve a low readout time and a low power consumption especially for low hit occupancies. The readout is controlled at the chip periphery with a signal synchronous with the clock, allows a good digital and analogue signal separation in the matrix and a reduction of the power consumption. The AERD circuit has been implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor (CIS) process with full complementary CMOS logic in the pixel. It works at 10 MHz with a matrix height of 15 mm. The energy consumed to read out one pixel is around 72 pJ. A scheme to boost the readout speed to 40 MHz is also discussed. The sensor chip equipped with AERD has been produced and characterised. Test results including electrical beam measurement are presented.

  10. Beyond usage: understanding the use of electronic journals on the basis of information activity analysis. Electronic journals, Use studies, Information activity, Scientific communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annaïg Mahé

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, which reports the second part of a two-part study of the use of electronic journals by researchers in two French research institutions, we attempt to explain the integration of the use of electronic journals in the scientists' information habits, going beyond usage analysis. First, we describe how the development of electronic journals use follows a three-phase innovation process - research-development, first uses, and technical acculturation. Then, we attempt to find more significant explanatory factors, and emphasis is placed on the wider context of information activity. Three main information activity types are outlined - marginal, parallel, and integrated. Each of these types corresponds to a particular attitude towards scientific information and to different levels of electronic journal use.

  11. Activities of Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimety/Brazil as Technical and Scientific Support Organization on Occupational Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, F.C.A.; Ferreira, P.R.; Matta, L.E.C.; Peres, M.A.L.; Godoy, J.M.; Alencar, M.A.V.; Carlos, M.T.; Souza-Santos, D.; Leocadio, J.C.; Oliveira, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    There are, in Brazil, about 126,000 workers registered on National Dose Registry System (SRD/IRD) as occupationally exposed. They work on 4,000 radioactive installations, 20 nuclear fuel cycle installations and with 90,000 x-ray diagnostic devices. There are two main Regulatory Authorities to license and control these installations on nuclear and radioactive areas, and another Regulatory Authority that is responsible for safety and health protection of workers on their labour activities. Belonging to structure of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN-Brazil) there is an Institute dedicated to radiation protection, dosimetry and metrology of ionizing radiation, that is the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD). This paper presents two main IRD activities related to occupational radiation protection that can be seen as example of technical and scientific support to Regulatory Authorities: the Radiation Overexposure Analysis that is performed by the Radiation Overexposure Analysis Group (GADE) and the Approval of Individual Monitoring Services and Calibration Laboratory of Equipment used in Radiation Protection that is performed by the Committee for the Evaluation of Essay and Calibration Services (CASEC). (author)

  12. Selected international efforts to address climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, M.; Christ, R. [Atmosphere Unit, United Nations Environment Programme UNEP, Nairobi (Kenya)

    1995-12-31

    Over the past two decades, concern about human-induced climate change has become an increasingly important item on the environmental and political agenda. The signing of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the adoption of Agenda 21 at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 provided international organizations and the nations of the world with a new focus for climate-related activities. Although there remains considerable scientific uncertainty about the extent, magnitude, and rate of climate change and the impacts of such change, actions to address climate change have been initiated both internationally and nationally. Major international activities include the World Climate Programme, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. and the United Nations Environment Program me. 16 refs.

  13. Active learning-based information structure analysis of full scientific articles and two applications for biomedical literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yufan; Silins, Ilona; Stenius, Ulla; Korhonen, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Techniques that are capable of automatically analyzing the information structure of scientific articles could be highly useful for improving information access to biomedical literature. However, most existing approaches rely on supervised machine learning (ML) and substantial labeled data that are expensive to develop and apply to different sub-fields of biomedicine. Recent research shows that minimal supervision is sufficient for fairly accurate information structure analysis of biomedical abstracts. However, is it realistic for full articles given their high linguistic and informational complexity? We introduce and release a novel corpus of 50 biomedical articles annotated according to the Argumentative Zoning (AZ) scheme, and investigate active learning with one of the most widely used ML models-Support Vector Machines (SVM)-on this corpus. Additionally, we introduce two novel applications that use AZ to support real-life literature review in biomedicine via question answering and summarization. We show that active learning with SVM trained on 500 labeled sentences (6% of the corpus) performs surprisingly well with the accuracy of 82%, just 2% lower than fully supervised learning. In our question answering task, biomedical researchers find relevant information significantly faster from AZ-annotated than unannotated articles. In the summarization task, sentences extracted from particular zones are significantly more similar to gold standard summaries than those extracted from particular sections of full articles. These results demonstrate that active learning of full articles' information structure is indeed realistic and the accuracy is high enough to support real-life literature review in biomedicine. The annotated corpus, our AZ classifier and the two novel applications are available at http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/yg244/12bioinfo.html

  14. EFSA's scientific activities and achievements on the risk assessment of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) during its first decade of existence: looking back and ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, Yann; Aguilera, Jaime; Diveki, Zoltán; Gomes, Ana; Liu, Yi; Paoletti, Claudia; du Jardin, Patrick; Herman, Lieve; Perry, Joe N; Waigmann, Elisabeth

    2014-02-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and derived food and feed products are subject to a risk analysis and regulatory approval before they can enter the market in the European Union (EU). In this risk analysis process, the role of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which was created in 2002 in response to multiple food crises, is to independently assess and provide scientific advice to risk managers on any possible risks that the use of GMOs may pose to human and animal health and the environment. EFSA's scientific advice is elaborated by its GMO Panel with the scientific support of several working groups and EFSA's GMO Unit. This review presents EFSA's scientific activities and highlights its achievements on the risk assessment of GMOs for the first 10 years of its existence. Since 2002, EFSA has issued 69 scientific opinions on genetically modified (GM) plant market registration applications, of which 62 for import and processing for food and feed uses, six for cultivation and one for the use of pollen (as or in food), and 19 scientific opinions on applications for marketing products made with GM microorganisms. Several guidelines for the risk assessment of GM plants, GM microorganisms and GM animals, as well as on specific issues such as post-market environmental monitoring (PMEM) were elaborated. EFSA also provided scientific advice upon request of the European Commission on safeguard clause and emergency measures invoked by EU Member States, annual PMEM reports, the potential risks of new biotechnology-based plant breeding techniques, evaluations of previously assessed GMOs in the light of new scientific publications, and the use of antibiotic resistance marker genes in GM plants. Future challenges relevant to the risk assessment of GMOs are discussed. EFSA's risk assessments of GMO applications ensure that data are analysed and presented in a way that facilitates scientifically sound decisions that protect human and animal health and the environment.

  15. Allegheny County Addressing Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains address points which represent physical address locations assigned by the Allegheny County addressing authority. Data is updated by County...

  16. Allegheny County Address Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains address points which represent physical address locations assigned by the Allegheny County addressing authority. Data is updated by County...

  17. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES IN PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITY OF SCIENTIFIC AND EDUCATIONAL PERSONNEL IN THE SPHERE OF POST DIPLOMA MILITARY MEDECINE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan F. Honcharenko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the place and the role of information and communication technologies in the scientific and pedagogical activity of pedagogical personnel in the sphere of post diploma military medicine education. The results of the questionnaire for the above mentioned personnel are presented in the article. There are emphasized and generalized the problems of information and communication competence formation of scientific and educational personnel in the sphere of post diploma military medicine using ICT in their teaching activities in the process of post-diploma education.

  18. PRESIDENT’S ADDRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Kubínová

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dear colleagues, Let me wish you and our Image Analysis & Stereology Journal all the best in 2016. It is great honour for me to be in charge of the International Society for Stereology (ISS. I would like to thank Eric Pirard for all his tremendous work and effort he has put into ISS activities in past years, together with all members of the ISS Board. I am glad Eric is willing to help me with ISS as „Immediate Past President“. I also rely on close collaboration with Ida Eržen and Marko Kreft, the Editors-in-Chief of Image Analysis & Stereology (IAS, IAS Editorial Board and future ISS Board. I appreciate long-term cooperation between the Image Analysis & Stereology Journal and the International Society for Stereology and I am looking forward to broaden our relationships in the future. As a President of ISS I plan to evoke new activities which would help to make ISS vivid and useful to scientific community. We are planning new courses on stereology, image analysis and related topics run in cooperation with ISS with reduced fee for ISS members, competion for the best PhD thesis using stereology and/or image analysis, ISS history mapping, etc. I welcome your further suggestions and comments. I would like to cordially invite you to become members of the International Society for Stereology (http://stereologysociety.org/membership.html and to take part in new activities organized by ISS, such as:Special Session „3D Image Analysis and Stereology in Fluorescence Microscopy“ at ISBI 2016 (in Prague, see http://biomedicalimaging.org/2016/?page_id=768.Round table discussion on „Stereology and 3D image analysis in microscopy“ to be held at the 16th European Microscopy Congress in Lyon (EMC 2016, see http://www.emc2016.fr/en/scientific-programme/special/stereology.It is my intention to involve young people and fresh ideas in the activities of ISS and in further improvement of IAS. Please contact me at lucie

  19. A non-pharmacologic approach to address challenging behaviors of Veterans with dementia: description of the tailored activity program-VA randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, Laura N; Mann, William C; Vogel, W Bruce; Arthur, Paul B

    2013-09-23

    Behavioral symptoms accompanying dementia are associated with increased health care costs, reduced quality of life and daily functioning, heightened family caregiver burden, and nursing home placement. Standard care typically involves pharmacologic agents, but these are, at best, modestly effective, carry serious risks, including mortality, and do not address behavioral symptoms families consider most distressful and which may prompt nursing home placement. Given dementia's devastating effects and the absence of an imminent cure, the Veterans Administration has supported the development and testing of new approaches to manage challenging behaviors at home. The Tailored Activity Program - Veterans Administration is a Phase III efficacy trial designed to reduce behavioral symptoms in Veterans with dementia living with their caregivers in the community. The study uses a randomized two-group parallel design with 160 diverse Veterans and caregivers. The experimental group receives a transformative patient-centric intervention designed to reduce the burden of behavioral symptoms in Veterans with dementia. An occupational therapist conducts an assessment to identify a Veteran's preserved capabilities, deficit areas, previous roles, habits, and interests to develop activities tailored to the Veteran. Family caregivers are then trained to incorporate activities into daily care. The attention-control group receives bi-monthly telephone contact where education on topics relevant to dementia is provided to caregivers. Key outcomes include reduced frequency and severity of behavioral symptoms using the 12-item Neuropsychiatric Inventory (primary endpoint), reduced caregiver burden, enhanced skill acquisition, efficacy using activities, and time spent providing care at 4 months; and long-term effects (8 months) on the Veteran's quality of life and frequency and severity of behavioral symptoms, and caregiver use of activities. The programs' impact of Veterans Administration cost

  20. Synthesizing Nanomaterials for Energy Applications: Probing Activity as a Function of Composition, Morphology and Purity to Address Key Issues Associated with Fuel Cells and Li-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scofield, Megan Elaine

    With the growing need to find alternative clean energy sources to fossil fuels, research into developing efficient fuel cells and batteries stands at the forefront of this grand effort. However, before mass commercialization, fundamental key issues need to be addressed. For example, fuel cells are subject to high catalyst costs and poor durability of the underlying carbon support. As a way to alleviate these issues, we have synthesized ultrathin one-dimensional (1D) alloy nanowires to probe the effect of composition, purity, and one-dimensionality upon the observed overall activity, performance, and durability. In terms of chemical composition, crystalline ultrathin PtM alloy nanowires (NWs) ('M' = Fe, Co, Ru, Cu, and Au) were generated and subsequently evaluated for the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR). Additionally, ternary-based catalysts were synthesized (PtRuFe) in order to analyze how chemical composition influences CO tolerance as well as methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR) activities. In both cases, we utilized a sustainably mild, ambient wet-synthesis method for the fabrication of chemically pure and crystalline systems in order to fabricate ultrathin, homogeneous alloy NWs. Moreover, in these studies, our NW systems exhibit favorable synergistic electronic effects with respect to controls. To address another fundamental issue associated with the durability of fuel cells, we have synthesized various metal oxide and perovskite materials of different sizes and chemical compositions as supports for Pt nanoparticles (NPs). Specifically, we have demonstrated favorable metal support interactions between the Pt NPs and the SrRuO3 NP supports, which lead to increased MOR activity as compared with not only the other metal oxide supports tested but also the commercial Pt NP/C standard. In terms of Li-ion batteries, LiFePO4 materials have become increasingly popular as a cathode material due to the many benefits they possess

  1. Science Engagement Through Hands-On Activities that Promote Scientific Thinking and Generate Excitement and Awareness of NASA Assets, Missions, and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P. V.; Foxworth, S.; Miller, R.; Runco, S.; Luckey, M. K.; Maudlin, E.

    2018-01-01

    The public with hands-on activities that infuse content related to NASA assets, missions, and science and reflect authentic scientific practices promotes understanding and generates excitement about NASA science, research, and exploration. These types of activities expose our next generation of explorers to science they may be inspired to pursue as a future STEM career and expose people of all ages to unique, exciting, and authentic aspects of NASA exploration. The activities discussed here (Blue Marble Matches, Lunar Geologist Practice, Let's Discover New Frontiers, Target Asteroid, and Meteorite Bingo) have been developed by Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Science Engagement Specialists in conjunction with ARES Scientists at the NASA Johnson Space Center. Activities are designed to be usable across a variety of educational environments (formal and informal) and reflect authentic scientific content and practices.

  2. Mainstream Issues of Education and Public Awareness of Space Activities and Sciences among universities and Scientific Institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balbir

    This paper is an effort to study and analyze several constraints and issues of space technology and education that organizations other than governmental organizations face in awareness program. In recent years, advancements in technologies have made it possible for Volunteer and Technical Communities, non-government organizations, private agencies and academic research institutions to provide increasing support to space education management and emphasis on response efforts. Important cornerstones of this effort and support are the possibility to access and take advantage of satellite imagery as well as the use of other space-based technologies such as telecommunications satellites and global navigation satellite systems included in main curriculum plus the implementation of programs for use of high class sophisticated technologies used by industries to the students and researchers of non-space faring nations. The authors recognize the importance of such new methodologies for education and public Awareness. This paper demonstrates many hurdles universities and scientific institutions face including lack of access in terms of financial and technical resources for better support. A new model for coordinated private sector partnership in response to space sciences and education has been discussed. In depth analysis and techniques need to connect these pioneering communities with the space industry as well as the space governmental agencies, with special emphasis on financial constraints. The paper mandates its role to promote the use of space-based information; its established networks bringing together national institutions responsible for these space based activities, as well as other end users, and space solution experts; and its technical foundation, particularly in the area of information technologies. To help building a tighter cooperation and further understanding among all these communities, paper delivers an intensive report and solutions for future

  3. Scientific Misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodstein, David

    2002-01-01

    Explores scientific fraud, asserting that while few scientists actually falsify results, the field has become so competitive that many are misbehaving in other ways; an example would be unreasonable criticism by anonymous peer reviewers. (EV)

  4. Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics at AGU - The Establishment and Evolution of an Ethics Program at a Large Scientific Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaden, Michael; Leinen, Margaret; McEntee, Christine; Townsend, Randy; Williams, Billy

    2016-04-01

    The American Geophysical Union, a scientific society of 62,000 members worldwide, has established a set of scientific integrity and professional ethics guidelines for the actions of its members, for the governance of the union in its internal activities, and for the operations and participation in its publications and scientific meetings. This presentation will provide an overview of the Ethics program at AGU, highlighting the reasons for its establishment, the process of dealing ethical breaches, the number and types of cases considered, how AGU helps educate its members on Ethics issues, and the rapidly evolving efforts at AGU to address issues related to the emerging field of GeoEthics. The presentation will also cover the most recent AGU Ethics program focus on the role for AGU and other scientific societies in addressing sexual harassment, and AGU's work to provide additional program strength in this area.

  5. A warning to the Brazilian Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology community about the importance of scientific and clinical activities in primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beber, Bárbara Costa; Brandão, Lenisa; Chaves, Márcia Lorena Fagundes

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to warn the Brazilian Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology scientific community about the importance and necessity of scientific and clinical activities regarding Primary Progressive Aphasia. This warning is based on a systematic literature review of the scientific production on Primary Progressive Aphasia, from which nine Brazilian articles were selected. It was observed that there is an obvious lack of studies on the subject, as all the retrieved articles were published in medical journals and much of it consisted of small samples; only two articles described the effectiveness of speech-language therapy in patients with Primary Progressive Aphasia. A perspective for the future in the area and characteristics of Speech-Language Therapy for Primary Progressive Aphasia are discussed. As a conclusion, it is evident the need for greater action by Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology on Primary Progressive Aphasia.

  6. License Address List

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Address list generated from National Saltwater Angler Registry. Used in conjunction with an address-based sample as per survey design.

  7. Reach Address Database (RAD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Reach Address Database (RAD) stores the reach address of each Water Program feature that has been linked to the underlying surface water features (streams,...

  8. Analysis of psychosocial factors influencing the distribution and projection of Spanish scientific activity: report of the initial qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GESCIT (Grup d'Estudis Socials de la Ciència i la Tecnologia

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In this first phase of a longer study, we identify a number of psycho-social factors which are affecting science in Spain: attitudes, stereotypes, prejudices, values, beliefs, and attribution processes. We also examine how these factors might help or hinder Spanish science's greater impact in the international scientific community. This study falls within the framework of the Social Psychology of Science, the main principle of which is to explain scientific work by appeal to psycho-social variables and processes. We use qualitative methods to analyse a wide sample of material gleaned from the Spanish scientific community, and report on those elements that construct and perpetuate the perceptions, images and representations of current Spanish science research.

  9. Exploring the potential of using stories about diverse scientists and reflective activities to enrich primary students' images of scientists and scientific work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkawy, Azza

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the potential of using stories about diverse scientists to broaden primary students' images of scientists and scientific work. Stories featuring scientists from diverse socio-cultural backgrounds (i.e., physical ability, gender, ethnicity) were presented to 11 grade one students over a 15 -week period. My analysis of pre-and post audio-taped interview transcripts, draw-a-scientist-tests (Chambers 1983), participant observations and student work suggest that the stories about scientists and follow-up reflective activities provided resources for students that helped them: (a) acquire images of scientists from less dominant socio-cultural backgrounds; (b) enrich their views of scientific work from predominantly hands-on/activity-oriented views to ones that includes cognitive and positive affective dimensions. One of the limitations of using stories as a tool to extend students' thinking about science is highlighted in a case study of a student who expresses resistance to some of the counter-stereotypic images presented in the stories. I also present two additional case studies that illustrate how shifts in student' views of the nature of scientific work can change their interest in future participation in scientific work.

  10. The Scientific Competitiveness of Nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Giulio; Gabrielli, Andrea; Sylos Labini, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We use citation data of scientific articles produced by individual nations in different scientific domains to determine the structure and efficiency of national research systems. We characterize the scientific fitness of each nation-that is, the competitiveness of its research system-and the complexity of each scientific domain by means of a non-linear iterative algorithm able to assess quantitatively the advantage of scientific diversification. We find that technological leading nations, beyond having the largest production of scientific papers and the largest number of citations, do not specialize in a few scientific domains. Rather, they diversify as much as possible their research system. On the other side, less developed nations are competitive only in scientific domains where also many other nations are present. Diversification thus represents the key element that correlates with scientific and technological competitiveness. A remarkable implication of this structure of the scientific competition is that the scientific domains playing the role of "markers" of national scientific competitiveness are those not necessarily of high technological requirements, but rather addressing the most "sophisticated" needs of the society.

  11. Scientific communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Kobylarek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article tackles the problem of models of communication in science. The formal division of communication processes into oral and written does not resolve the problem of attitude. The author defines successful communication as a win-win game, based on the respect and equality of the partners, regardless of their position in the world of science. The core characteristics of the process of scientific communication are indicated , such as openness, fairness, support, and creation. The task of creating the right atmosphere for science communication belongs to moderators, who should not allow privilege and differentiation of position to affect scientific communication processes.

  12. Design control and scientific investigations: Is there any linkage?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, R.R.

    1995-01-01

    The quality assurance requirements that apply to the effort to achieve safe transportation, storage, and disposal of high-level nuclear waste specify that ''design control'' be applied to design activities. That effort also involves extensive scientific investigation activities to, among other things, develop information that may be used in engineering design activities. Individuals who are charged with the implementation of such quality assurance requirements have come to a variety of conclusions about whether there is any firm linkage between design control and the conduct of scientific investigations. This paper contends that there is a reasonable and necessary linkage between ''design control'' and scientific activities, though not a connection that has traditionally been made and not one addressed in the QA standards for radioactive waste management programs

  13. 50 CFR 600.512 - Scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scientific research. 600.512 Section 600... research. (a) Scientific research activity. Persons planning to conduct scientific research activities on board a scientific research vessel in the EEZ that may be confused with fishing are encouraged to submit...

  14. The Method of Relative Evaluations in the Analysis of the Innovation and Scientific-Technical Activity in the National Innovation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melnyk Alexander G.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article suggests the methodical approach to calculation of the system of analytical indicators for complex analysis of the innovation and scientific-technical activity by defining indexes such as: implementarity of technologies; institutional fullness of the national innovation system (NIS; high technology grade of the industry branches and sectors of the NIS. Fundamentals on the interpretation of these indicators in determining the status of institutional and technological structures, as well as the investment ability of technologies in the NIS, have been formulated. An evaluation of status of the innovation and scientific-technical activity in the industry and in the sector of scientific organizations of Ukraine was carried out on the example of practical application of the methodical approach to the analysis of statistical data. A simulation of the calculation index of implementarity of technologies in terms of the hypothesis of a 10 x magnification of the number of patents for inventions was completed. The author’s own interpretation of values of the calculated indicators has been proposed.

  15. Addressing Ozone Layer Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Access information on EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion through regulations, collaborations with stakeholders, international treaties, partnerships with the private sector, and enforcement actions under Title VI of the Clean Air Act.

  16. The differential impact of scientific quality, bibliometric factors, and social media activity on the influence of systematic reviews and meta-analyses about psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, Juan; Aguilar-Luque, Macarena; Gómez-Garcia, Francisco; Alcalde Mellado, Patricia; Gay-Mimbrera, Jesus; Carmona-Fernandez, Pedro J; Maestre-López, Beatriz; Sanz-Cabanillas, Juan Luís; Hernández Romero, José Luís; González-Padilla, Marcelino; Vélez García-Nieto, Antonio; Isla-Tejera, Beatriz

    2018-01-01

    Researchers are increasingly using on line social networks to promote their work. Some authors have suggested that measuring social media activity can predict the impact of a primary study (i.e., whether or not an article will be highly cited). However, the influence of variables such as scientific quality, research disclosures, and journal characteristics on systematic reviews and meta-analyses has not yet been assessed. The present study aims to describe the effect of complex interactions between bibliometric factors and social media activity on the impact of systematic reviews and meta-analyses about psoriasis (PROSPERO 2016: CRD42016053181). Methodological quality was assessed using the Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool. Altmetrics, which consider Twitter, Facebook, and Google+ mention counts as well as Mendeley and SCOPUS readers, and corresponding article citation counts from Google Scholar were obtained for each article. Metadata and journal-related bibliometric indices were also obtained. One-hundred and sixty-four reviews with available altmetrics information were included in the final multifactorial analysis, which showed that social media and impact factor have less effect than Mendeley and SCOPUS readers on the number of cites that appear in Google Scholar. Although a journal's impact factor predicted the number of tweets (OR, 1.202; 95% CI, 1.087-1.049), the years of publication and the number of Mendeley readers predicted the number of citations in Google Scholar (OR, 1.033; 95% CI, 1.018-1.329). Finally, methodological quality was related neither with bibliometric influence nor social media activity for systematic reviews. In conclusion, there seems to be a lack of connectivity between scientific quality, social media activity, and article usage, thus predicting scientific success based on these variables may be inappropriate in the particular case of systematic reviews.

  17. The differential impact of scientific quality, bibliometric factors, and social media activity on the influence of systematic reviews and meta-analyses about psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Garcia, Francisco; Alcalde Mellado, Patricia; Gay-Mimbrera, Jesus; Carmona-Fernandez, Pedro J.; Maestre-López, Beatriz; Sanz-Cabanillas, Juan Luís; Hernández Romero, José Luís; González-Padilla, Marcelino; Vélez García-Nieto, Antonio; Isla-Tejera, Beatriz

    2018-01-01

    Researchers are increasingly using on line social networks to promote their work. Some authors have suggested that measuring social media activity can predict the impact of a primary study (i.e., whether or not an article will be highly cited). However, the influence of variables such as scientific quality, research disclosures, and journal characteristics on systematic reviews and meta-analyses has not yet been assessed. The present study aims to describe the effect of complex interactions between bibliometric factors and social media activity on the impact of systematic reviews and meta-analyses about psoriasis (PROSPERO 2016: CRD42016053181). Methodological quality was assessed using the Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool. Altmetrics, which consider Twitter, Facebook, and Google+ mention counts as well as Mendeley and SCOPUS readers, and corresponding article citation counts from Google Scholar were obtained for each article. Metadata and journal-related bibliometric indices were also obtained. One-hundred and sixty-four reviews with available altmetrics information were included in the final multifactorial analysis, which showed that social media and impact factor have less effect than Mendeley and SCOPUS readers on the number of cites that appear in Google Scholar. Although a journal’s impact factor predicted the number of tweets (OR, 1.202; 95% CI, 1.087–1.049), the years of publication and the number of Mendeley readers predicted the number of citations in Google Scholar (OR, 1.033; 95% CI, 1.018–1.329). Finally, methodological quality was related neither with bibliometric influence nor social media activity for systematic reviews. In conclusion, there seems to be a lack of connectivity between scientific quality, social media activity, and article usage, thus predicting scientific success based on these variables may be inappropriate in the particular case of systematic reviews. PMID:29377889

  18. The Tobacco Industry’s Abuse of Scientific Evidence and Activities to Recruit Scientists During Tobacco Litigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungkyu Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available South Korea’s state health insurer, the National Health Insurance Service (NHIS, is in the process of a compensation suit against tobacco industry. The tobacco companies have habitually endeavored to ensure favorable outcomes in litigation by misusing scientific evidence or recruiting scientists to support its interests. This study analyzed strategies that tobacco companies have used during the NHIS litigation, which has been receiving world-wide attention. To understand the litigation strategies of tobacco companies, the present study reviewed the existing literature and carried out content analysis of petitions, preparatory documents, and supporting evidence submitted to the court by the NHIS and the tobacco companies during the suit. Tobacco companies misrepresented the World Health Organization (WHO report’s argument and misused scientific evidence, and removed the word “deadly” from the title of the citation. Tobacco companies submitted the research results of scientists who had worked as a consultant for the tobacco industry as evidence. Such litigation strategies employed by the tobacco companies internationally were applied similarly in Korean lawsuits. Results of tobacco litigation have a huge influence on tobacco control policies. For desirable outcomes of the suits, healthcare professionals need to pay a great deal of attention to the enormous volume of written opinions and supporting evidence that tobacco companies submit. They also need to face the fact that the companies engage in recruitment of scientists. Healthcare professionals should refuse to partner with tobacco industry, as recommended by Article 5.3 of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

  19. Addressing the nuclear misconception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    There is a perception, fostered and encouraged by the anti-nuclear groups, that the nuclear industry generates large quantities of waste with no idea how to deal with it, that it is unsafe, uneconomic, and environmentally damaging. The task is to change these perceptions, by demonstrating that the industry is not a problem in itself, but in fact provides solutions to problems. This paper, while primarily concerned with waste, addresses all of these issues as each has a bearing on the perception of the industry and therefore must be considered when addressing the issue of waste. The paper concludes that evidence exists to support the industry view, but that the mission of the industry should be to change the perception of the industry, by influencing and working together with its stake holders to address their concerns, rather than merely presenting more and more facts. (author)

  20. Scientific annual report 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a report on scientific research at DESY in 1972. The activities in the field of electron-nucleon scattering, photoproduction and synchrotron radiation get a special mention. It is also reported on the work on the double storage ring as well as on the extension to the synchrotron. (WL/LN) [de

  1. Scientific Report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-09-01

    This annual scientific report gives an concise overview of research and development activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2007. The report discusses progress and main achievements in the following areas: reactor safety, radioactive waste and clean-up, radiation protection, the BR2 reactor, nuclear research and society, managing nuclear knowledge and fusion research

  2. Report of scientific results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The findings of R+D activities of the HMI radiation chemistry department in the fields of pulsed radiolysis, reaction kinematics, insulators and plastics are presented as well as the scientific publications and lectures of HMI staff and visitors including theoretical contributions, theses and dissertations, and conference papers. (HK) [de

  3. Scientific Report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-04-01

    The annual scientific report gives an overview of the R and D activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2001. The report discusses progress and main achievements in four principal areas: Radiation Protection, Radioactive Waste and Clean-up, Reactor Safety and the BR2 Reactor

  4. Scientific Report 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-04-15

    The annual scientific report gives a summary overview of the research and development activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2005. The report discusses progress and main achievements in the following areas: reactor safety, radioactive waste and clean-up, radiation protection, the BR2 reactor, nuclear research and society, managing nuclear knowledge and fusion research.

  5. Scientific Report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    The annual scientific report gives a summary overview of the research and development activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2004. The report discusses progress and main achievements in the following areas: reactor safety, radioactive waste and clean-up, radiation protection, the BR2 reactor, nuclear research and society, managing nuclear knowledge and fusion research

  6. Scientific Report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-04-01

    The annual scientific report gives a summary overview of the research and development activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2004. The report discusses progress and main achievements in the following areas: reactor safety, radioactive waste and clean-up, radiation protection, the BR2 reactor, nuclear research and society, managing nuclear knowledge and fusion research.

  7. Scientific Report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    The annual scientific report gives an overview of the R and D activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2001. The report discusses progress and main achievements in four principal areas: Radiation Protection, Radioactive Waste and Clean-up, Reactor Safety and the BR2 Reactor.

  8. Scientific Report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-09-15

    The annual scientific report gives a summary overview of the research and development activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2006. The report discusses progress and main achievements in the following areas: reactor safety, radioactive waste and clean-up, radiation protection, the BR2 reactor, nuclear research and society, managing nuclear knowledge and fusion research.

  9. Scientific Report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-09-01

    The annual scientific report gives a summary overview of the research and development activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2006. The report discusses progress and main achievements in the following areas: reactor safety, radioactive waste and clean-up, radiation protection, the BR2 reactor, nuclear research and society, managing nuclear knowledge and fusion research

  10. Scientific Report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-01-01

    The annual scientific report gives an overview of the R and D activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2003. The report discusses progress and main achievements in the following areas: reactor safety, radioactive waste and clean-up, radiation protection, the BR2 reactor, nuclear research and society, managing nuclear knowledge, and fusion research.

  11. Scientific Report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    The annual scientific report gives a summary overview of the research and development activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2005. The report discusses progress and main achievements in the following areas: reactor safety, radioactive waste and clean-up, radiation protection, the BR2 reactor, nuclear research and society, managing nuclear knowledge and fusion research

  12. Scientific Report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The annual scientific report gives an overview of the R and D activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2003. The report discusses progress and main achievements in the following areas: reactor safety, radioactive waste and clean-up, radiation protection, the BR2 reactor, nuclear research and society, managing nuclear knowledge, and fusion research

  13. 1995 Scientific Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This annual scientific report of SCK-CEN presents a comprehensive coverage and research activities in the filed of (a) waste and site restoration (b) reactor safety and radiation protection (c) operation of BR2 Materials Testing Reactor and (d) services provided by the center (analysis for characterization of waste packages, nuclear measurements, low-level radioactivity measurements).

  14. 2003 Scientific Technological Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado Cuba, A.; Gayoso Caballero, C.; Robles Nique, A.; Olivera Lescano, P.

    2004-08-01

    This annual scientific-technological report provides an overview of research and development activities at Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN) during the period from 1 january to 31 december, 2003. This report includes 54 papers divided in 9 subject matters: physics and nuclear chemistry, nuclear engineering, materials science, radiochemistry, industrial applications, medical applications, environmental applications, protection and radiological safety, and management aspects

  15. SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL OF PROFESSOR N. I. VERKHOGLIADOVA, DOCTOR OF ECONOMICS SCIENCE «ECONOMICS AND MANAGEMENT OF ENTIRPRICE ACTIVITIES, FUNCTIONING OF ECONOMICS SYSTEM ON BRANCH AND INTERBRAN CH AND REGIONAL LEVELS»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KONONOVA O. Ye.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available It is presented a historical sketch of the formation and development of scientific school of economics and management in the region construction industry today. The basic directions of research activities and scientific achievements of the department are described, where this school is based.

  16. Scientific computing

    CERN Document Server

    Trangenstein, John A

    2017-01-01

    This is the third of three volumes providing a comprehensive presentation of the fundamentals of scientific computing. This volume discusses topics that depend more on calculus than linear algebra, in order to prepare the reader for solving differential equations. This book and its companions show how to determine the quality of computational results, and how to measure the relative efficiency of competing methods. Readers learn how to determine the maximum attainable accuracy of algorithms, and how to select the best method for computing problems. This book also discusses programming in several languages, including C++, Fortran and MATLAB. There are 90 examples, 200 exercises, 36 algorithms, 40 interactive JavaScript programs, 91 references to software programs and 1 case study. Topics are introduced with goals, literature references and links to public software. There are descriptions of the current algorithms in GSLIB and MATLAB. This book could be used for a second course in numerical methods, for either ...

  17. Presidential address: distinction or extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Barry D

    2008-10-01

    Despite its continuing scientific successes in imaging, radiology as a specialty is faced with a very difficult and competitive environment. Nonradiologists are more and more interested in vertically integrating imaging into their practices, while teleradiology and picture archiving and communication systems are resulting in the greater isolation of radiologists. Commoditization is a realistic and devastating threat to the survival and professionalism of the specialty. To remain viable as a specialty, radiologists must elevate their practice by subspecializing, becoming more involved with clinical care, and actively interacting with patients and referring clinicians. Distinction will prevent extinction.

  18. Addressing Sexual Harassment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ellie L.; Ashbaker, Betty Y.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses ways on how to address the problem of sexual harassment in schools. Sexual harassment--simply defined as any unwanted and unwelcome sexual behavior--is a sensitive topic. Merely providing students, parents, and staff members with information about the school's sexual harassment policy is insufficient; schools must take…

  19. Global scientific production in the field of knee arthroplasty: A cross-sectional survey of research activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Li, Lingxia; Cheng, Cai; Tian, Hua; Li, Yang; Zhao, Minwei

    2017-06-01

    Objective To determine the quantity and quality of articles in the field of knee arthroplasty worldwide and elucidate the characteristics of global scientific production. Methods Web of Science was used to identify articles in the field of knee arthroplasty from 2011 to 2015. The total number of papers, number of papers per capita, total number of citations, and mean number of citations were collected. Results In total, 11,590 papers were identified. The number of publications significantly increased from 2011 to 2015. Most originated from North America, East Asia, and West Europe. Most (88.51%) were from high-income countries, 11.48% were from middle-income countries, and only 0.01% were from lower-income countries. The United States had the most articles and total citations. Sweden had the highest mean citations, followed by Denmark and Canada. However, when adjusted by population size, Denmark had the most articles per million population, followed by Switzerland and the Netherlands. Conclusions The number of knee arthroplasty publications has rapidly increased in recent years. The United States is the most prolific, but some European countries are more productive relative to their population.

  20. MAIN STAGES SCIENTIFIC AND PRODUCTION MASTERING THE TERRITORY AVERAGE URAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Bochko

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Questions of the shaping Average Ural, as industrial territory, on base her scientific study and production mastering are considered in the article. It is shown that studies of Ural resources and particularities of the vital activity of its population were concerned by Russian and foreign scientist in XVIII-XIX centuries. It is noted that in XX century there was a transition to systematic organizing-economic study of production power, society and natures of Average Ural. More attention addressed on new problems of region and on needs of their scientific solving.

  1. NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Horace G.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1988, the Scientific Visualization Studio(SVS) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has produced scientific visualizations of NASA s scientific research and remote sensing data for public outreach. These visualizations take the form of images, animations, and end-to-end systems and have been used in many venues: from the network news to science programs such as NOVA, from museum exhibits at the Smithsonian to White House briefings. This presentation will give an overview of the major activities and accomplishments of the SVS, and some of the most interesting projects and systems developed at the SVS will be described. Particular emphasis will be given to the practices and procedures by which the SVS creates visualizations, from the hardware and software used to the structures and collaborations by which products are designed, developed, and delivered to customers. The web-based archival and delivery system for SVS visualizations at svs.gsfc.nasa.gov will also be described.

  2. Industry's demand for the BESSY synchrotron radiation (SR): approaches towards interlinking basic scientific research activities and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierhals, R.; Schmoch, U.; Nick, D.; Pilorget, L.; Ritschel, C.; Walter, G.H.

    1994-08-01

    In Germany, industry's demand for synchrotron radiation (SR) is very limited, due to the current macroeconomic situation and the corporate strategy of potential SR users in industry. This is in contrast to the conditions in the USA (and Japan), where industrial enterprises more readily invest in and run their own long-term basic research projects for exploration of potential commercial applications according to their demands, with research goals pursued there and in Germany overlapping to a large extent. It cannot be expected that demand for SR from industry in Germany will ever come up to the level seen in the USA. In Germany, non-university research institutes are most likely to become an important group of potential users of SR. Substantially boosting the demand for SR from industry will need a change of macroeconomic framework conditions affecting the corporate strategy to the effect that industry will more strongly commit itself to and take up responsibility for application-oriented fundamental research and the corresponding technology transfer. This can be achieved by a policy providing both for institutional means and financial incentives. As to near-market, strategic technological developments, establishment of structures allowing direct cooperation of science and technology, for instance in the form of joint ventures, or underwriting agreements and corresponding supervisory boards, seem to be promising. As to basic-research-oriented promotion of research, a technology screening might lead to the selection of technology-relevant research goals, and corresponding financial support from a special fund. Such incentives for cooperative action by technology, science and the government will create novel types of research-industry interfaces in Germany between ''historical'' spheres of autonomy of research of industry and the scientific community. (orig.) [de

  3. Dating of rock art and the effect of human activity on vegetation: The complementary use of archaeological and scientific methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelle, Kari Loe; Lødøen, Trond Klungseth

    2017-07-01

    One of the main aims of Scandinavian rock art research in recent years has been to identify the culture or society responsible for the imagery. This is of mutual importance, as studies of material culture can shed light on the rock art, while the iconography can be used to understand the contemporary material remains. A major challenge however, has been to determine the exact age of the images, as there are no direct dating materials. In order to overcome this challenge archaeological excavations and palynological analyses have been carried out at Vingen in Western Norway, one of Scandinavia's largest rock art areas. The archaeological and palynological data achieved, as well as loss-on-ignition are independent means for the dating of human activity. Since these methods provided similar results, an indirect connection to the rock art production activity may be inferred. Dates from archaeological contexts indicate a peak of activity between 6900 and 6300 cal. BP, with a potential start 7350 cal. BP and a culmination 6100 cal. BP. Palynological data from three different types of basins have documented forest disturbance in the same time period. Local vegetation reconstructions using the Landscape Reconstruction Algorithm has proved useful to identify anthropogenic-induced land cover changes in the Mesolithic period and a marked reforestation at the transition to the Neolithic period. The applied methods have helped to considerably improve our understanding of past activity and the environment, and demonstrates the potential of archaeological excavations and palynological studies for dating of rock art.

  4. Protection of the environment address book. 2. rev. and enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, B.

    1991-01-01

    This manual contains an extensive collection of non-commercial addresses relating to the protection of the environment: The collection includes the government-controlled, communal, scientific associations and groups, regional initiative groups, educational and advisory instances and foundations. When referring to scientific institutes, their main points of activity are given; referring to ecological educational instances, information on their programs is given. For the first time we are also given a list of environment protection authorities, divisions, coordination bureaus which have been set up in communities and big cities and the communal information and advisory programs. (orig.) [de

  5. International Scientific and Technical Organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez-Lagos Rogla, R.

    2003-01-01

    The nuclear scientific and technical world is well aware of the EURATOM and IAEA activities but usually other international scientific and technical organisations relevant for their ordinary work are unknown. In this article three international organisations are described briefly, the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). International Union of Pure and Applied chemistry (IUPAC) and the international council of Science (ICSU). (Author)

  6. Joint activities with IAEA on uploading of scientific papers from Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan into the EXFOR database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenzhebayev, N.; Kurmangalieva, V.; Takibayev, N.; Otsuka, N.; )

    2014-01-01

    More than a year passed since Kazakhstan joined the international network of nuclear reactions data centers (NRDC). A Central Asian centre for nuclear reactions (CANRDB, Central Asia Nuclear Reaction Database) has been established at al-Farabi Kazakh National University, and a group of experts there is actively working on expansion of the database, further development of the specialized software, and fostering partnership with international nuclear physicists. There are also on-going activities aimed on training, searching of the published nuclear data obtained earlier by scientists from Central Asia to incorporate their results in the database. The main objective of CA-NRDB is the development and formation in Kazakhstan of open and user-friendly database on nuclear reactions with further incorporation of this database in the international network of nuclear databases under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We note that such a database is created in the entire Central Asian region for the first time

  7. Promoting healthy eating, active play and sustainability consciousness in early childhood curricula, addressing the Ben10™ problem: a randomised control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouteris, Helen; Edwards, Susan; Rutherford, Leonie; Cutter-MacKenzie, Amy; Huang, Terry; O'Connor, Amanda

    2014-06-03

    This paper details the research protocol for a study funded by the Australian Research Council. An integrated approach towards helping young children respond to the significant pressures of '360 degree marketing' on their food choices, levels of active play, and sustainability consciousness via the early childhood curriculum is lacking. The overall goal of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of curriculum interventions that educators design when using a pedagogical communication strategy on children's knowledge about healthy eating, active play and the sustainability consequences of their toy food and toy selections. This cluster-randomised trial will be conducted with 300, 4 to 5 year-old children attending pre-school. Early childhood educators will develop a curriculum intervention using a pedagogical communication strategy that integrates content knowledge about healthy eating, active play and sustainability consciousness and deliver this to their pre-school class. Children will be interviewed about their knowledge of healthy eating, active play and the sustainability consequences of their food and toy selections. Parents will complete an Eating and Physical Activity Questionnaire rating their children's food preferences, digital media viewing and physical activity habits. All measures will be administered at baseline, the end of the intervention and 6 months post intervention. Informed consent will be obtained from all parents and the pre-school classes will be allocated randomly to the intervention or wait-list control group. This study is the first to utilise an integrated pedagogical communication strategy developed specifically for early childhood educators focusing on children's healthy eating, active play, and sustainability consciousness. The significance of the early childhood period, for young children's learning about healthy eating, active play and sustainability, is now unquestioned. The specific teaching and learning practices used by early

  8. The International Science and Technology Center: Scope of activities and scientific projects in the field of nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepatsky, Alexander B.

    2002-01-01

    The review of the ISTC (The International Science and Technology Center) Programs and activities including Science Project Program, Partner Program, Seminar Program and others is presented. Project funding by technology area, by funding Parties, by CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States) States etc. is demonstrated with emphasis on projects in the field of nuclear data. The ISTC opportunities for international cooperation in the fields of nuclear data measurements, calculation, evaluation and dissemination are discussed. (author)

  9. Scientific Reporting: Raising the Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeroy, Kenneth R.; Garney, Whitney; Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Grant, Sean

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on a presentation that was made at the 2014 annual meeting of the editorial board of "Health Education & Behavior." The article addresses critical issues related to standards of scientific reporting in journals, including concerns about external and internal validity and reporting bias. It reviews current…

  10. Reports by the Parliamentary Office for scientific and technological assessment. Wednesday, March 30, 2011. 2010 activity report - Hearing of the Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) college

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    Members of the French Parliament and representatives of the French nuclear safety authority (ASN) discuss the content of the ASN 2010 activity report, the missions and responsibilities of the ASN in the different fields of exploitation of radioactive materials: nuclear energy and medical care. As far as nuclear energy is concerned, the representatives of the ASN evoke the decennial inspection of the French nuclear reactors, the control of the EPR construction, activities related to fuel cycle, the issue of waste management. As far as medical care is concerned, they address activities in the medical sector, the evolution of the number of events, and the commitment of the ASN in regulation elaboration. These issues are discussed with the members of Parliament

  11. In-Situ Radiological Surveys to Address Nuclear Criticality Safety Requirements During Remediation Activities at the Shallow Land Disposal Area, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania - 12268

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Phillip; Mihalo, Mark; Eberlin, John; Lambert, Mike [Cabrera Services (United States); Matthews, Brian [Nuclear Safety Associates (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Cabrera Services Inc. (CABRERA) is the remedial contractor for the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) Site in Armstrong County Pennsylvania, a United States (US) Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) contract. The remediation is being completed under the USACE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) which was established to identify, investigate, and clean up or control sites previously used by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). As part of the management of the FUSRAP, the USACE is overseeing investigation and remediation of radiological contamination at the SLDA Site in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 US Code (USC), Section 9601 et. seq, as amended and, the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Section 300.430(f) (2). The objective of this project is to clean up radioactive waste at SLDA. The radioactive waste contains special nuclear material (SNM), primarily U-235, in 10 burial trenches, Cabrera duties include processing, packaging and transporting the waste to an offsite disposal facility in accordance with the selected remedial alternative as defined in the Final Record of Decision (USACE, 2007). Of particular importance during the remediation is the need to address nuclear criticality safety (NCS) controls for the safe exhumation and management of waste containing fissile materials. The partnership between Cabrera Services, Inc. and Measutronics Corporation led to the development of a valuable survey tool and operating procedure that are essential components of the SLDA Criticality Safety and Material Control and Accountability programs. Using proven existing technologies in the design and manufacture of the Mobile Survey Cart, the continued deployment of the Cart will allow for an efficient and reliable

  12. Quantitative transporter proteomics by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry: addressing methodologic issues of plasma membrane isolation and expression-activity relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vineet; Prasad, Bhagwat; Patilea, Gabriela; Gupta, Anshul; Salphati, Laurent; Evers, Raymond; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Unadkat, Jashvant D

    2015-02-01

    To predict transporter-mediated drug disposition using physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, one approach is to measure transport activity and relate it to protein expression levels in cell lines (overexpressing the transporter) and then scale these to via in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE). This approach makes two major assumptions. First, that the expression of the transporter is predominantly in the plasma membrane. Second, that there is a linear correlation between expression level and activity of the transporter protein. The present study was conducted to test these two assumptions. We evaluated two commercially available kits that claimed to separate plasma membrane from other cell membranes. The Qiagen Qproteome kit yielded very little protein in the fraction purported to be the plasma membrane. The Abcam Phase Separation kit enriched the plasma membrane but did not separate it from other intracellular membranes. For the Abcam method, the expression level of organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1/2B1 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) proteins in all subcellular fractions isolated from cells or human liver tissue tracked that of Na⁺-K⁺ ATPase. Assuming that Na⁺-K⁺ ATPase is predominantly located in the plasma membrane, these data suggest that the transporters measured are also primarily located in the plasma membrane. Using short hairpin RNA, we created clones of cell lines with varying degrees of OATP1B1 or BCRP expression level. In these clones, transport activity of OATP1B1 or BCRP was highly correlated with protein expression level (r² > 0.9). These data support the use of transporter expression level data and activity data from transporter overexpressing cell lines for IVIVE of transporter-mediated disposition of drugs. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. Short and long-term lifestyle coaching approaches used to address diverse participant barriers to weight loss and physical activity adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Elizabeth M; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Delahanty, Linda M; Mele, Lisa; Hoskin, Mary A; Edelstein, Sharon L

    2014-02-12

    Individual barriers to weight loss and physical activity goals in the Diabetes Prevention Program, a randomized trial with 3.2 years average treatment duration, have not been previously reported. Evaluating barriers and the lifestyle coaching approaches used to improve adherence in a large, diverse participant cohort can inform dissemination efforts. Lifestyle coaches documented barriers and approaches after each session (mean session attendance = 50.3 ± 21.8). Subjects were 1076 intensive lifestyle participants (mean age = 50.6 years; mean BMI = 33.9 kg/m²; 68% female, 48% non-Caucasian). Barriers and approaches used to improve adherence were ranked by the percentage of the cohort for whom they applied. Barrier groupings were also analyzed in relation to baseline demographic characteristics. Top weight loss barriers reported were problems with self-monitoring (58%); social cues (58%); holidays (54%); low activity (48%); and internal cues (thought/mood) (44%). Top activity barriers were holidays (51%); time management (50%); internal cues (30%); illness (29%), and motivation (26%). The percentage of the cohort having any type of barrier increased over the long-term intervention period. A majority of the weight loss barriers were significantly associated with younger age, greater obesity, and non-Caucasian race/ethnicity (p-values vary). Physical activity barriers, particularly thought and mood cues, social cues and time management, physical injury or illness and access/weather, were most significantly associated with being female and obese (p  90% long term) and regularly reviewed self-monitoring skills. More costly approaches were used infrequently during the first 16 sessions (≤10%) but increased over 3.2 years. Behavioral problem solving approaches have short and long term dissemination potential for many kinds of participant barriers. Given minimal resources, increased attention to training lifestyle coaches in the consistent use of these

  14. Addressing the fundamental issues in reliability evaluation of passive safety of AP1000 for a comparison with active safety of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim Muhammad; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Yang Ming

    2013-01-01

    Passive safety systems adopted in advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), such as AP1000 and EPR, should attain higher reliability than the existing active safety systems of the conventional PWR. The objective of this study is to discuss the fundamental issues relating to the reliability evaluation of AP1000 passive safety systems for a comparison with the active safety systems of conventional PWR, based on several aspects. First, comparisons between conventional PWR and AP1000 are made from the both aspects of safety design and cost reduction. The main differences between these PWR plants exist in the configurations of safety systems: AP1000 employs the passive safety system while reducing the number of active systems. Second, the safety of AP1000 is discussed from the aspect of severe accident prevention in the event of large break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Third, detailed fundamental issues on reliability evaluation of AP1000 passive safety systems are discussed qualitatively by using single loop models of safety systems of both PWRs plants. Lastly, methodology to conduct quantitative estimation of dynamic reliability for AP1000 passive safety systems in LOCA condition is discussed, in order to evaluate the reliability of AP1000 in future by a success-path-based reliability analysis method (i.e., GO-FLOW). (author)

  15. EPA scientific integrity policy draft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its draft scientific integrity policy on 5 August. The draft policy addresses scientific ethical standards, communications with the public, the use of advisory committees and peer review, and professional development. The draft policy was developed by an ad hoc group of EPA senior staff and scientists in response to a December 2010 memorandum on scientific integrity from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. The agency is accepting public comments on the draft through 6 September; comments should be sent to osa.staff@epa.gov. For more information, see http://www.epa.gov/stpc/pdfs/draft-scientific-integrity-policy-aug2011.pdf.

  16. Scientific impact: opportunity and necessity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marlene Z; Alexander, Gregory L; Wyman, Jean F; Fahrenwald, Nancy L; Porock, Davina; Wurzbach, Mary E; Rawl, Susan M; Conn, Vicki S

    2010-08-01

    Recent National Institutes of Health changes have focused attention on the potential scientific impact of research projects. Research with the excellent potential to change subsequent science or health care practice may have high scientific impact. Only rigorous studies that address highly significant problems can generate change. Studies with high impact may stimulate new research approaches by changing understanding of a phenomenon, informing theory development, or creating new research methods that allow a field of science to move forward. Research with high impact can transition health care to more effective and efficient approaches. Studies with high impact may propel new policy developments. Research with high scientific impact typically has both immediate and sustained influence on the field of study. The article includes ideas to articulate potential scientific impact in grant applications as well as possible dissemination strategies to enlarge the impact of completed projects.

  17. Scientific Technological Report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayoso C, C.; Cuya G, T.; Robles N, A.; Prado C, A.

    2003-07-01

    This annual scientific-technological report provides an overview of research and development activities at Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN) during the period from 1 january to 31 december, 2002. This report includes 58 papers divided in 10 subject matters: physics and nuclear chemistry, nuclear engineering, materials, industrial applications, biological applications, medical applications, environmental applications, protection and radiological safety, nuclear safety, and management aspects

  18. National nuclear scientific program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Matausek, M.V.; Neskovic, N.

    2001-01-01

    National scientific program of the Vinca Institute Nuclear Reactors And Radioactive Waste comprises research and development in the following fields: application of energy of nuclear fission, application of neutron beams, analyses of nuclear safety and radiation protection. In the first phase preparatory activities, conceptual design and design of certain processes and facilities should be accomplished. In the second phase realization of the projects is expected. (author)

  19. Scientific evaluation at the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This report presents a statement of the scientific and technical activity of the French atomic energy commission (CEA) for the year 1998. This evaluation is made by external and independent experts and requires some specific dispositions for the nuclear protection and safety institute (IPSN) and for the direction of military applications (DAM). The report is divided into 5 parts dealing successively with: part 1 - the CEA, a public research organization (civil nuclear research, technology research and transfers, defence activities); the scientific and technical evaluation at the CEA (general framework, evaluation of the IPSN and DAM); part 2 - the scientific and technical councils (directions of fuel cycle, of nuclear reactors, and of advanced technologies); part 3 - the scientific councils (directions of matter and of life sciences); the nuclear protection and safety institute; the direction of military applications; part 4 - the corresponding members of the evaluation; part 5 - the list of scientific and technical councils and members. (J.S.)

  20. First keynote address - biological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The author describes the interplay of physical research and the practice of radiation protection. There are both analogies in and differences between the problems of health protection from radiation and chemical pollutants. In formulating research objectives for synfuel technologies, it is important to take what lessons there are to be learned from the radiation experience. The regulation of the exposure of persons to radiation probably rests on a firmer scientific basis than does the regulation of exposure to many toxic chemicals. Some things in radiation protection - in both applied work and in research - should help to guide in approaching chemicals. The second section of this paper gives a brief description of the practice of radiation protection. The next section mentions some fundamental deficiencies that exist in radiation protection. Some physical research avenues illustrate how such deficiencies are being addressed as part of an integrated radiation research program. In the fourth section the author focuses on chemical pollutants, drawing some lessons from the radiation experience

  1. ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORKS AS A TOOL FOR THE PROMOTION OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH: A RESOURCE SCIENTIFICALLY FEW EXPLORED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arían Ramón Aladro Gonzalvo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the great impact  that are exerting the networks in society, it is crucial to know the features that distinguish online social networks bringing together users interested in receiving information and resources to improve or maintain the body in shape. This article aims to comment on the limited research interested in studying the features and particularities of online communities that provide information, advice and support in the execution, performance and promotion of the health and fitness activities. Particularly, it underline about the necessity to know of networks structure, user profiles and peer-to-peer interaction, sort of membership, mechanisms of communication, representation of the body image and patterns of association. Likewise, the size of the support networks, telepresence, technology acceptance and perceived risk on the network. Besides, we recommend exploring two Fitness-related online social networks. Finally, it makes known the recurring problems in the analysis in order to characterize psychosocial and communicative aspects of users in the virtual environment.

  2. Enter your email-address: how German internet users manage their email addresses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Utz, S.

    2004-01-01

    Writing E-mail is the most popular Internet activity. Meanwhile, many people have more than one E-mail address. The question how people manage their E-mail addresses, more specifically, whether they use them deliberately for different purposes, is the central question of this paper. E-mail addresses

  3. Scientific Crossbreeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Rolf

    This thesis presents an alternative approach to the analysis of interdisciplinarity. One of the basic reasons for developing an alternative method for evaluation of interdisciplinary activities is that epistemic issues are insufficiently dealt with in the existing literature on the topic. To deve......This thesis presents an alternative approach to the analysis of interdisciplinarity. One of the basic reasons for developing an alternative method for evaluation of interdisciplinary activities is that epistemic issues are insufficiently dealt with in the existing literature on the topic...... of the consequences of representing interdisciplinarity in this way, are the two main contributions offered by this thesis. The treatment of these topics proceed in the following steps: In chapter 1, I introduce the general enterprise and define central concepts. In chapter 2, I provide an in-depth analysis...... as the contemporary status of schizophrenia research, psychiatry, and psychopathology. The result of applying the method for assessment developed in this thesis is quite interesting, I believe. Finally, in chapter 9, I sum up the entire thesis and discuss the consequences of viewing interdisciplinarity...

  4. Rock strength measurements on Archaean basement granitoids recovered from scientific drilling in the active Koyna seismogenic zone, western India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Deepjyoti; Akkiraju, Vyasulu V.; Misra, Surajit; Roy, Sukanta; Singh, Santosh K.; Sinha, Amalendu; Gupta, Harsh; Bansal, B. K.; Nayak, Shailesh

    2017-08-01

    Reservoir triggered earthquakes have been occurring in the Koyna area, western India for the past five decades. Triaxial tests carried out on 181 core samples of Archaean granitoids underlying the Deccan Traps provide valuable constraints on rock strength properties in the Koyna seismogenic zone for the first time. The data include measurements on granite gneiss, granite, migmatitic gneiss and mylonitised granite gneiss obtained from boreholes KBH-3, KBH-4A, KBH-5 and KBH-7 located in the western and eastern margins of the seismic zone. Salient results are as follows. (i) Increase of rock strength with increasing confining pressure allow determination of the linearized failure envelopes from which the cohesive strength and angle of internal friction are calculated. (ii) Variable differential stresses at different depths are the manifestations of deformation partitioning in close association of fault zone(s) or localized fracture zones. (iii) Fractures controlled by naturally developed weak planes such as cleavage and fabric directly affect the rock strength properties, but the majority of failure planes developed during triaxial tests is not consistent with the orientations of pre-existing weak planes. The failure planes may, therefore, represent other planes of weakness induced by ongoing seismic activity. (iv) Stress-strain curves confirm that axial deformation is controlled by the varying intensity of pre-existing shear in the granitoids, viz., mylonite, granite gneiss and migmatitic gneiss. (v) Frequent occurrences of low magnitude earthquakes may be attributed to low and variable rock strength of the granitoids, which, in turn, is modified by successive seismic events.

  5. Conceiving, Writing and Publishing a Scientific Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Christina Suciu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available I consider that the second edition of the book “Conceiving, Writing and Publishing a Scientific Paper. An approach in the context of economic research” is a work of high scientific standing, excellently documented, addressed to knowledgeable readers but also to the new generations of PhD students and researchers interested in attaining the highest academic and scientific performances in the field of Economics. From my point of view, both editions of the book are highly useful for the academic environment. I especially appreciate the authors’ efforts to improve and expand the second edition. This fact is due to the changes occurred in the evolution of scientometric indicators, to the feedback received from readers, but also as the result of the desire to include multiple networks and platforms that take into account professional and institutional profiles, such as to facilitate the researchers’ dissemination of their results obtained in the scientific research activity. The authors benefit on an unanimous recognition and are highly appreciated., fact proven for example by the ten existing reviews of the book’s first edition, published in journals indexed in Web of Science, Scopus and other international databases. I am mostly impressed by the authors’ permanent concern to improve their book’s scientific content. The first edition was awarded the distinction “The Best Book in the Field of Economics” published in 2016 in Romania by the Association of Romanian Economic Faculties, but also by The Association of Cultural-Educational Cooperation from Suceava (ACCES prize in 2016

  6. Assessing what to address in science communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruine de Bruin, Wändi; Bostrom, Ann

    2013-08-20

    As members of a democratic society, individuals face complex decisions about whether to support climate change mitigation, vaccinations, genetically modified food, nanotechnology, geoengineering, and so on. To inform people's decisions and public debate, scientific experts at government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and other organizations aim to provide understandable and scientifically accurate communication materials. Such communications aim to improve people's understanding of the decision-relevant issues, and if needed, promote behavior change. Unfortunately, existing communications sometimes fail when scientific experts lack information about what people need to know to make more informed decisions or what wording people use to describe relevant concepts. We provide an introduction for scientific experts about how to use mental models research with intended audience members to inform their communication efforts. Specifically, we describe how to conduct interviews to characterize people's decision-relevant beliefs or mental models of the topic under consideration, identify gaps and misconceptions in their knowledge, and reveal their preferred wording. We also describe methods for designing follow-up surveys with larger samples to examine the prevalence of beliefs as well as the relationships of beliefs with behaviors. Finally, we discuss how findings from these interviews and surveys can be used to design communications that effectively address gaps and misconceptions in people's mental models in wording that they understand. We present applications to different scientific domains, showing that this approach leads to communications that improve recipients' understanding and ability to make informed decisions.

  7. Annual scientific report 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billiau, R.; Bobin, K.; Michiels, G.; Proost, J.

    1975-01-01

    The main activities of SCK/CEN during 1974 are reported in individual summaries. Fields of research are the following: sodium cooled fast reactors, gas cooled reactors, light water reactors, applied nuclear research (including waste disposal, safeguards and fusion research), basic and exploratory research (including materials science, nuclear physics and radiobiology). The BR2 Materials testing reactor and associated facilities are described. The technical and administrative support activities are also presented. A list of publications issued by the SCK/CEN Scientific staff is given

  8. Annual scientific report 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billiau, R.; Bobin, K.; Michiels, G.; Proost, J.

    1976-01-01

    The main activities of SCK/CEN during 1975 are reported in individual summaries. Field of research are the following: sodium cooled fast reactors, gas cooled reactors, light water reactors, applied nuclear research (including waste disposal, safeguards and fusion research), basic and exploratory research (including materials science, nuclear physics and radiobiology). The BR2 Materials testing reactor and associated facilities are described. The technical and administrative support activities are also presented. A list of publications issued by the SCK/CEN Scientific staff is given

  9. EEASA 2003 Keynote Address

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003 Environmental Education Association of Southern Africa .... Early in 1997, the Earth Charter Commission was formed to give oversight to the drafting ..... Paulo, Brazil have implemented the Earth Charter in educational activities and .... the Earth Charter, in Filho,W.L. (Ed.), Teaching for sustainability in higher education.

  10. Effects of Scaffolds and Scientific Reasoning Ability on Web-Based Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui-Ling; Weng, Hsiao-Lan; She, Hsiao-Ching

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how background knowledge, scientific reasoning ability, and various scaffolding forms influenced students' science knowledge and scientific inquiry achievements. The students participated in an online scientific inquiry program involving such activities as generating scientific questions and drawing evidence-based conclusions,…

  11. Speech and scientific paper. A rhetorical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Carmona Sandoval

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay attempts to show that the ancient rhetorical theory has explanatory capabilities to understand and learn to write modern texts and to analyze them in order to understand their communication skills, as in the scientific article, one of the most prestigious forms on scientific communication. It starts with the notion of discourse in the field of scientific communication and then address the rhetorical dimension of the paper.

  12. Scientific publishing: some food for thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Bo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Scientific publishing, here to be considered in a broader sense, as publishing of both specialised scientific journals and science popularisation works addressed to a wider audience, has been sailing for some years on troubled waters. To gather some possible food for thought is the purpose of this brief article.

  13. Extracting Core Claims from Scientific Articles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Tom; Kuhn, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    The number of scientific articles has grown rapidly over the years and there are no signs that this growth will slow down in the near future. Because of this, it becomes increasingly difficult to keep up with the latest developments in a scientific field. To address this problem, we present here an

  14. Counting addressing method: Command addressable element and extinguishing module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Jovan D.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The specific requirements that appear in addressable fire detection and alarm systems and the shortcomings of the existing addressing methods were discussed. A new method of addressing of detectors was proposed. The basic principles of addressing and responding of a called element are stated. Extinguishing module is specific subsystem in classic fire detection and alarm systems. Appearing of addressable fire detection and alarm systems didn't caused essential change in the concept of extinguishing module because of long calling period of such systems. Addressable fire security system based on counting addressing method reaches high calling rates and enables integrating of the extinguishing module in addressable system. Solutions for command addressable element and integrated extinguishing module are given in this paper. The counting addressing method was developed for specific requirements in fire detection and alarm systems, yet its speed and reliability justifies its use in the acquisition of data on slowly variable parameters under industrial conditions. .

  15. 1997 Scientific Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govaerts, P.

    1998-01-01

    The 1997 Scientific Report of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN describes progress achieved in nuclear safety, radioactive waste management, radiation protection and safeguards. In the field of nuclear research, the main projects concern the behaviour of high-burnup and MOX fuel, the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels, the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of reactor internals, and irradiation effects on materials of fusion reactors. In the field of radioactive waste management, progress in the following domains is reported: the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel in a clay formation, the decommissioning of nuclear installations, the study of alternative waste-processing techniques. For radiation protection and safeguards, the main activities reported on are in the field of site and environmental restoration, emergency planning and response and scientific support to national and international programmes

  16. The role of scientific institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The topic that was requested to address at this Nea seminar is the role (i.e., what is expected to be done) by institutions (i.e., organisations for the promotion of a public object) of a scientific nature (assisted by expert knowledge), with regard to a better integration of radiation protection in modern society. The scientific radiation protection institutions at an international level are the I.C.R.P. (non governmental), UNSCEAR (governmental) and the IAEA, acting together as an international forum. They are the focus of this paper. (N.C.)

  17. Think Scientifically: Science Hidden in a Storybook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Norden, W. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory's Think Scientifically (TS) program links literacy and science in the elementary classroom through an engaging storybook format and hands-on, inquiry based activities. TS consists of three illustrated storybooks, each addressing a different solar science concept. Accompanying each book is a hands-on science lesson plan that emphasizes the concepts addressed in the book, as well as math, reading, and language arts activities. Written by teachers, the books are designed to be extremely user-friendly and easy to implement in classroom instruction. The objectives of the program are: (1) to increase time spent on science in elementary school classrooms, (2) to assist educators in implementing hands-on science activities that reinforce concepts from the book, (3) to increase teacher capacity and comfort in teaching solar concepts, (4) to increase student awareness and interest in solar topics, especially students in under-served and under-represented communities. Our program meets these objectives through the National Science Standards-based content delivered in each story, the activities provided in the books, and the accompanying training that teachers are offered through the program.; ;

  18. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the active substances, sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate coated with sodium carbonate and sodium silicate, bentonite, sodium chloride, sodium carbonate for use in active food contact materials

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF)

    2013-01-01

    This scientific opinion of the Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the powder mixture of the active substances sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate coated with sodium carbonate and sodium silicate (FCM substance No 1009), bentonite (CAS No 1302-78-9, FCM No 393), sodium chloride (CAS No 7647-14-5, FCM No 985), sodium carbonate (CAS No 497-19-8, FCM No 1008) which are intended to be used as combined oxygen generator and carbon...

  19. Annual report, scientific activities, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    Against the background of a highly successful and productive period of operation of the cyclotron, both the Federal-Provincial Project Definition Study for the KAON Factory and the construction of the 30 MeV Ebco cyclotron moved on. In addition, the Board of Management was impelled to re-examine the mode of management of TRIUMF as a national facility and the basic relationship of TRIUMF with the federal government. A record amount of beam time was recorded from the cyclotron, permitting a crop of important discoveries in the areas of proton, pion and muon physics. It also permitted the applied program to advance in areas including pion cancer therapy and positron emission tomography

  20. Annual report, scientific activities, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    The year 1988 saw the start of the KAON Factory Project Definition Study and the design and construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron designed expressly for isotope production. Also the first steps were taken toward legal incorporation of the TRIUMF Joint Venture. The founding four universities (Alberta, Victoria, Simon Fraser and British Columbia) have been joined by the universities of Montreal, Toronto and Manitoba. The University of Regina is expected to join in 1989. Regular research programs in particle physics, nuclear physics, chemistry, solid state physics, theoretical physics, and accelerator design continued

  1. Annual report scientific activities 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    In 1991 the TRIUMF project welcomed the announcement by the government of Canada of its intent to join British Columbia and Canada's foreign partners in the construction of KAON. The ongoing science program of TRIUMF was beset with funding shortfalls but continued to provide world-class science. its science and technology transfer. The science covered in this report includes, a very important and difficult experiment on radiative muon capture which probes the standard model of quarks, leptons and unified forces. In the proton hall the new TISOL facility is providing important new information on nucleosynthesis in stars. In materials science studies with muons the elucidation of the properties of high-temperature superconductors remains of great interest. In 1991 the materials studied for this purpose include C 60 , colloquially termed 'bucky balls'. The TRIUMF/KAON Technology Transfer Office, funded by the provincial government, aided in the development of many new ventures. In the meantime a variety of accelerator studies prospered, some pertaining to the improvement of the existing TRIUMF cyclotron and some to TRIUMF's future. (659 refs.)

  2. Annual report, scientific activities, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    During 1981 achievement of reliable cyclotron operation became the highest project prikrity at TRIUMF. Redesign and replacement of the RF systems was underway, and progress is being made toward improved polarized ion sources and toward higher intensity. The basic science programs spanned a wide range from chemical reaction rates to the structure of elementary particles. A large team preparing to take measurements on neutrinoless muon-electron conversion using the time projection chamber made strides toward data taking. This project is part of a general shift in the interests of TRIUMF toward particle physics. Several major experimental facilities have received improvements in 1981. The positron emission tomograph was near completion, and the CP42 isotope production cyclotron was delivered. Interest developed in the concept of an accelerator for a kaon factory

  3. Annual report, scientific activities, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    TRIUMF delivered an integrated current of 110 mAh in 1980, and the cyclotron demonstrated its capability of routinely extracting three independent beams of differing energies and intensities. A VAX 11/780 computer has been purchased to meet the increasing demand for computing power. More time was devoted during the year to routine maintenance and to improvements in component reliability. Cyclotron availability was 84 percent. The development of experimental facilities continued, the major accomplishment being the installation of the fast pion beam line M11. The advent of the time projection chamber and the beginning of two experiments to measure muon decay parameters and the continuation of a precision determination of the pion decay branching ratio marked a swing to particle physics on many of the secondary beam lines. Several patients were irradiated at the pion therapy unit. Hot cells were commissioned to allow increased preparation of radiopharmaceuticals by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. Construction of a positron emission tomograph was undertaken

  4. Annual report, scientific activities, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    At TRIUMF in 1979 cyclotron availability approached 88 percent and 100 μA operation became routine. Tests showed a beam-energy resolution of 10 -3 was possible and a trial run at a current of 150 μA on beam line 1 was successful. The integrated current delivered during the year was increased by a factor of over three. A new primary beam line, 1B, became available for use during polarized-beam operation, and the extraction of a 70-100 MeV beam was demonstrated. The nucleon-nucleon scattering program completed measurements for dewermining Wolfstein parameters at 200-500 MeV. Clinical tests in negative pion cancer therapy were started. Federal government funding increased from $10,513,000 in 1978-79 to $11,204,040 in 1979-80. (DN)

  5. Scientific Data Management Center for Enabling Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vouk, Mladen A.

    2013-01-15

    data management technologies to DOE application scientists in astrophysics, climate, fusion, and biology. Equally important, it established collaborations with these scientists to better understand their science as well as their forthcoming data management and data analytics challenges. Building on our early successes, we have greatly enhanced, robustified, and deployed our technology to these communities. In some cases, we identified new needs that have been addressed in order to simplify the use of our technology by scientists. This report summarizes our work so far in SciDAC-2. Our approach is to employ an evolutionary development and deployment process: from research through prototypes to deployment and infrastructure. Accordingly, we have organized our activities in three layers that abstract the end-to-end data flow described above. We labeled the layers (from bottom to top): a) Storage Efficient Access (SEA), b) Data Mining and Analysis (DMA), c) Scientific Process Automation (SPA). The SEA layer is immediately on top of hardware, operating systems, file systems, and mass storage systems, and provides parallel data access technology, and transparent access to archival storage. The DMA layer, which builds on the functionality of the SEA layer, consists of indexing, feature identification, and parallel statistical analysis technology. The SPA layer, which is on top of the DMA layer, provides the ability to compose scientific workflows from the components in the DMA layer as well as application specific modules. NCSU work performed under this contract was primarily at the SPA layer.

  6. 77 FR 6784 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Scientific Research, Exempted Fishing, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Scientific Research, Exempted Fishing, and Exempted Activity Submissions AGENCY... collection. Fishery regulations do not generally affect scientific research activities conducted by a scientific research vessel. Persons planning to conduct such research are encouraged to submit a scientific...

  7. Scientific goals of SCHOOLS & QUAKES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückl, Ewald; Köberl, Christian; Lenhardt, Wolfgang; Mertl, Stefan; Rafeiner-Magor, Walter; Stark, Angelika; Stickler, Gerald; Weber, Robert

    2015-04-01

    In many countries around the world seismometers are used in schools to broaden the knowledge in seismology in a vivid way and to take part in the observation of the current worldwide seismic activity. SCHOOLS & QUAKES is a project within the Sparkling Science program (http://www.sparklingscience.at), which not only pursues the given educational goals but also integrates scholars in seismological research permitting their own contributions. Research within SCHOOLS & QUAKES concentrates on the seismic activity of the Mürz Valley - Semmering - Vienna Basin transfer fault system in Austria because of its relatively high earthquake hazard and risk. The detection of low magnitude local earthquakes (magnitude ≤ 2), precise location of hypocenters, determination of the focal mechanisms, and correlation of hypocenters with active geological structures are the main scientific goals in this project. Furthermore, the long term build-up of tectonic stress, slip deficit and aseismic slip, and the maximum credible earthquake in this area are issues to be addressed. The scientific efforts of SCHOOLS & QUAKES build on the work of the Seismological Service of Austria at the Zentralanstalt für Meteorologie und Geodynamik (ZAMG), and benefit from the findings on the lithospheric structure of the Eastern Alps gained by the CELEBRATION 2000 and ALP 2002 projects. Regional Vp and Vs-models were derived from this data covering the SCHOOLS & QUAKES target area. Within the ALPAACT project (Seismological and geodetic monitoring of ALpine-PAnnonian ACtive Tectonics) the seismic network of the target area was densified by 7 broadband und 2 short period stations. Relocations based on a 3D-velocity model and the densified seismic network yielded substantially higher spatial resolution of seismically active structures. A new method based on waveform stacking (GRA, 16, EGU2014-5722) allowed for focal mechanism solutions of low magnitude (Ml ~2.5) events. Data from 22 GNSS stations have been

  8. Scientific and Technological Report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado Cuba, Antonio; Santiago Contreras, Julio; Solis Veliz, Jose; Lopez Moreno, Edith

    2011-10-01

    This annual scientific and technological report provides an overview of research and development activities at Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN) during the period from 1 january to 31 december, 2010. This report includes 41 papers divided in 8 subject matters, such as: physics and chemistry, materials science, nuclear engineering, mining industrial and environmental applications, medical and biological applications, radiation protection and nuclear safety, scientific instrumentation and management aspects. It also includes annexes. (APC)

  9. Scientific and Technological Report 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Milla, Alcides; Prado Cuba, Antonio; Agapito Panta, Juan; Montoya Rossi, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This annual scientific and technological report provides an overview of research and development activities at Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN) during the period from 1 january to 31 december, 2011. This report includes 30 papers divided in 8 subject matters, such as: physics and chemistry, materials science, nuclear engineering, mining industrial and environmental applications, medical and biological applications, radiation protection and nuclear safety, scientific instrumentation and management aspects. It also includes annexes. (APC)

  10. Human-scientific Planning Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Hagen, Aksel

    1998-01-01

    This working report is a paper written to XII AESOP Congress 22 – 25 July 1998, Aveiro, Portugal. It is a presentation of human-scientific action theory and its linkage to planning, both planning theory and planning practice. Human-scientific action theory is created by professor Gunnar Olsson and professor José Luis Ramírez, Nordic School of Planning, Stockholm. Planning is primarily a practical and reflective activity. The notion ”Planning” may, therefore, describe the activi...

  11. Professional scientific blog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Beke

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The professional blog is a weblog that on the whole meets the requirements of scientific publication. In my opinion it bear a resemblance to digital notice board, where the competent specialists of the given branch of science can place their ideas, questions, possible solutions and can raise problems. Its most important function can be collectivization of the knowledge. In this article I am going to examine the characteristics of the scientific blog as a genre. Conventional learning counts as a rather solitary activity. If the students have access to the materials of each other and of the teacher, their sense of solitude diminishes and this model is also closer to the constructivist approach that features the way most people think and learn. Learning does not mean passively collecting tiny pieces of knowledge; it much more esembles ‘spinning a conceptual net’ which is made up by the experiences and observations of the individual. With the spreading of the Internet more universities and colleges worldwide gave a try to on-line educational methods, but the most efficient one has not been found yet. The publication of the curriculum (the material of the lectures and the handling of the electronic mails are not sufficient; much more is needed for collaborative learning. Our scholastic scientific blog can be a sufficient field for the start of a knowledge-building process based on cooperation. In the Rocard-report can be read that for the future of Europe it is crucial to develop the education of the natural sciences, and for this it isnecessary to act on local, regional, national and EU-level. To the educational processes should be involved beyond the traditional actors (child, parent, teacher also others (scientists, professionals, universities, local institutions, the actors of the economic sphere, etc.. The scholastic scientific blog answer the purposes, as a collaborative knowledge-sharing forum.

  12. Scientific report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This scientific report of the Fuel Cycle Direction of the Cea, presents the Direction activities and research programs in the fuel cycle domain during the year 1999. The first chapter is devoted to the front end of the fuel cycle with the SILVA process as main topic. The second chapter is largely based on the separation chemistry of the back end cycle. The third and fourth chapters present studies of more applied and sometimes more technical developments in the nuclear industry or not. (A.L.B.)

  13. Scientific report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosset, J.; Gueneau, C.; Doizi, D.

    1998-01-01

    In this book are found technical and scientific papers on the main works of the Direction of the Fuel Cycle (DCC) in France. The study fields are: the up-side of the nuclear fuel cycle with theoretical studies (plasma simulation) and technological developments and instrumentation (lasers diodes, carbides plasma projection, carbon 13 enrichment); the down-side nuclear fuel cycle with theoretical studies (ion Eu 3+ complexation simulation, decay simulation, uranium and plutonium diffusion study, electrolyser operating simulation), scenario studies ( recycling, wastes management), experimental studies; dismantling and cleaning (soils cleaning, surface-active agent for decontamination, fault tree analysis); analysis with expert systems and mass spectrometry. (A.L.B.)

  14. Forms of address in Isizulu

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.A. (African Studies) The study deals with forms of address in isiZulu. Therefore, the various aspects of speech that play roles when addressing a person, the factors affecting forms of address in isiZulu and the effect of languages such as English, Afrikaans and other African languages on the forms of address in isiZulu are of interest. Research was conducted on forms of address in isiZulu in parts of Soweto and it was discovered that form of address are determined by different factors i...

  15. BAID: The Barrow Area Information Database - an interactive web mapping portal and cyberinfrastructure for scientific activities in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, R. P.; Kassin, A.; Gaylord, A.; Brown, J.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Barrow area of northern Alaska is one of the most intensely researched locations in the Arctic. The Barrow Area Information Database (BAID, www.baidims.org) is a cyberinfrastructure (CI) that details much of the historic and extant research undertaken within in the Barrow region in a suite of interactive web-based mapping and information portals (geobrowsers). The BAID user community and target audience for BAID is diverse and includes research scientists, science logisticians, land managers, educators, students, and the general public. BAID contains information on more than 9,600 Barrow area research sites that extend back to the 1940's and more than 640 remote sensing images and geospatial datasets. In a web-based setting, users can zoom, pan, query, measure distance, and save or print maps and query results. Data are described with metadata that meet Federal Geographic Data Committee standards and are archived at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) where non-proprietary BAID data can be freely downloaded. BAID has been used to: Optimize research site choice; Reduce duplication of science effort; Discover complementary and potentially detrimental research activities in an area of scientific interest; Re-establish historical research sites for resampling efforts assessing change in ecosystem structure and function over time; Exchange knowledge across disciplines and generations; Facilitate communication between western science and traditional ecological knowledge; Provide local residents access to science data that facilitates adaptation to arctic change; (and) Educate the next generation of environmental and computer scientists. This poster describes key activities that will be undertaken over the next three years to provide BAID users with novel software tools to interact with a current and diverse selection of information and data about the Barrow area. Key activities include: 1. Collecting data on research

  16. WELCOME ADDRESS: Welcome Address for the 60th Yamada Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Hidetoshi

    2006-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen On behalf of Yamada Science Foundation, I would like to extend our hearty welcome to all of you who are participating in the 60th Yamada Conference and International Symposium on Research in High Magnetic Fields particularly to those who have come a long way to Japan from various places all over the world. Yamada Science Foundation was founded in 1977 at Osaka, Japan. It develops its activities by giving support to the outstanding research projects in the basic natural sciences, especially in the interdisciplinary domains that bridge between well established research fields such as physics, chemistry, and biology. The Foundation also provides travel funds for scientists to visit or to go out of Japan in order to carry out international collaborative projects. It also holds conferences and workshops. Among these activities, one of the most important is the organization of Yamada Conferences, which are usually held two or three times a year on various topics which seem to be pioneering current research activities in natural sciences. Upon organizing Yamada Conferences, The Board of Directors of The Foundation put emphasis on the three symbolic English letter `I's. The first I stands for International, the second I means Interdisciplinary, and the third, perhaps the most important I symbolizes Innovative. As for this conference, I think it is in some sense interdisciplinary, because it deals with on one hand, the smallest scale of matter, the elementary particles while, on the other hand deals with the largest scale of matter, the universe, which are linked together. I also think many innovative ideas are presented in this conference. In this context, I believe this Conference is well suited to the scope of our Foundation. Another important aspect of holding Yamada Conference is to provide the forum of `Friendship' among the participants. We encourage all of you, particularly young scientists, to get acquainted with each other not only through hot

  17. Test Driven Development of Scientific Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Test-Driven Development (TDD), a software development process that promises many advantages for developer productivity and software reliability, has become widely accepted among professional software engineers. As the name suggests, TDD practitioners alternate between writing short automated tests and producing code that passes those tests. Although this overly simplified description will undoubtedly sound prohibitively burdensome to many uninitiated developers, the advent of powerful unit-testing frameworks greatly reduces the effort required to produce and routinely execute suites of tests. By testimony, many developers find TDD to be addicting after only a few days of exposure, and find it unthinkable to return to previous practices.After a brief overview of the TDD process and my experience in applying the methodology for development activities at Goddard, I will delve more deeply into some of the challenges that are posed by numerical and scientific software as well as tools and implementation approaches that should address those challenges.

  18. The Crossroads between Biology and Mathematics: The Scientific Method as the Basics of Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsai, Istvan; Kampis, George

    2010-01-01

    Biology is changing and becoming more quantitative. Research is creating new challenges that need to be addressed in education as well. New educational initiatives focus on combining laboratory procedures with mathematical skills, yet it seems that most curricula center on a single relationship between scientific knowledge and scientific method:…

  19. 50 CFR 21.23 - Scientific collecting permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... take, transport, or possess migratory birds, their parts, nests, or eggs for scientific research or... project involved; (4) Name and address of the public, scientific, or educational institution to which all... possessed under authority of a scientific collecting permit must be donated and transferred to the public...

  20. 48 CFR 435.010 - Scientific and technical reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTING 435.010 Scientific and technical reports... all scientific and technical reports to the National Technical Information Service at the address... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scientific and technical...

  1. CALCULATION OF STATISTICAL INDICATORS FOR EVALUATION OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES IN THE FEDERAL BODIES OF EXECUTIVE POWER AND OF THE MINISTRY OF THE INTERNAK AFFAIRS OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy V. Dianov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific and technical activity is part of development work. Is very important to plan scientic and technical activities. The article discusses the types of reports, calculation of statistical indicators, built charts and diagrams. These data will help to analyze the execution plans. Statistical indicators can be used in the Ministry of internal Affairs of the Russian Federation and other departments.

  2. Annual Report on Scientific Activities in 1997 of Department of Physics and Nuclear Techniques, Academy of Mining and Metallurgy, Cracow; Sprawozdanie z dzialalnosci naukowej w roku 1997, Wydzial Fizyki i Techniki Jadrowej, Akademia Gorniczo-Hutnicza, Cracow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolny, J.; Olszynska, E. [eds.

    1998-12-31

    The Annual Report 1997 is the review of scientific activities of the Department of Nuclear Physics and Techniques (DNPT) of the Academy of Mining and Metallurgy, Cracow. The studies connected with: radiometric analysis, nuclear electronics, solid state physics, elementary particle and detectors, medical physics, physics of environment, theoretical physics, nuclear geophysics, energetic problems, industrial radiometry and tracer techniques have been broadly presented. The fill list of works being published and presented at scientific conferences in 1997 by the staff of DNPT are also included.

  3. Data processing for the Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer and initial scientific results from Chang'e-3 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao-Hui; Li, Chun-Lai; Zhang, Guang-Liang; Zou, Yong-Liao; Liu, Jian-Jun; Ren, Xin; Tan, Xu; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; Zuo, Wei; Wen, Wei-Bin; Peng, Wen-Xi; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Wang, Huan-Yu

    2014-12-01

    The Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is an important payload mounted on the Yutu rover, which is part of the Chang'e-3 mission. The scientific objective of APXS is to perform in-situ analysis of the chemical composition of lunar soil and rock samples. The radioactive sources, 55Fe and 109Cd, decay and produce α-particles and X-rays. When X-rays and α-particles interact with atoms in the surface material, they knock electrons out of their orbits, which release energy by emitting X-rays that can be measured by a silicon drift detector (SDD). The elements and their concentrations can be determined by analyzing their peak energies and intensities. APXS has analyzed both the calibration target and lunar soil once during the first lunar day and again during the second lunar day. The total detection time lasted about 266 min and more than 2000 frames of data records have been acquired. APXS has three operating modes: calibration mode, distance sensing mode and detection mode. In detection mode, work distance can be calculated from the X-ray counting rate collected by SDD. Correction for the effect of temperature has been performed to convert the channel number for each spectrum to X-ray energy. Dead time correction is used to eliminate the systematic error in quantifying the activity of an X-ray pulse in a sample and derive the real count rate. We report APXS data and initial results during the first and second lunar days for the Yutu rover. In this study, we analyze the data from the calibration target and lunar soil on the first lunar day. Seven major elements, including Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti and Fe, have been identified. Comparing the peak areas and ratios of calibration basalt and lunar soil the landing site was found to be depleted in K, and have lower Mg and Al but higher Ca, Ti, and Fe. In the future, we will obtain the elemental concentrations of lunar soil at the Chang'e-3 landing site using APXS data.

  4. Scientific integrity in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Liliane; Carvalho, Fernando Martins

    2014-09-01

    This article focuses on scientific integrity and the identification of predisposing factors to scientific misconduct in Brazil. Brazilian scientific production has increased in the last ten years, but the quality of the articles has decreased. Pressure on researchers and students for increasing scientific production may contribute to scientific misconduct. Cases of misconduct in science have been recently denounced in the country. Brazil has important institutions for controlling ethical and safety aspects of human research, but there is a lack of specific offices to investigate suspected cases of misconduct and policies to deal with scientific dishonesty.

  5. Scientific Discoveries the Year I Was Born

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, Abour

    2012-01-01

    The author has successfully used a learning activity titled "The Year I Was Born" to motivate students to conduct historical research and present key scientific discoveries from their birth year. The activity promotes writing, helps students enhance their scientific literacy, and also improves their attitude toward the learning of science. As one…

  6. Reclaiming unused IPv4 addresses

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2016-01-01

    As many people might know, the number of IPv4 addresses is limited and almost all have been allocated (see here and here for more information).   Although CERN has been allocated some 340,000 addresses, the way these are allocated across the site is not as efficient as we would like. As we face an increasing demand for IPv4 addresses with the growth in virtual machines, the IT Department’s Communication Systems Group will be reorganising address allocation during 2016 to make more efficient use of the IPv4 address ranges that have been allocated to CERN. We aim, wherever possible, to avoid giving out fixed IP addresses, and have all devices connected to the campus network obtain an address dynamically each time they connect. As a first stage, starting in February, IP addresses that have not been used for more than 9 months will be reclaimed. No information about the devices concerned will be deleted from LANDB, but a new IP address will have to be requested if they are ever reconnected to t...

  7. Port virtual addressing for PC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolanos, L.; Arista, E.; Osorio Deliz, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Instruments for nuclear signal measurements based on add-on card for a personal computer (PC) are designed often. Then one faces the problem of the addressing of data input/output devices which show an integration level or intelligence that makes the use of several port address indispensable, and these are limited in the PC. The virtual addressing offers the advantage of the occupation of few addresses to accede to many of these devices. The principles of this technique and the appliances of a solution in radiometric in a radiometric card based on programmed logic are discussed in this paper

  8. Social science as a tool in developing scientific thinking skills in underserved, low-achieving urban students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Elizabeth; Kuhn, Deanna

    2016-03-01

    Engagement in purposeful problem solving involving social science content was sufficient to develop a key set of inquiry skills in low-performing middle school students from an academically and economically disadvantaged urban public school population, with this skill transferring to a more traditional written scientific thinking assessment instrument 3weeks later. Students only observing their peers' activity or not participating at all failed to show these gains. Implications are addressed with regard to the mastery of scientific thinking skills among academically disadvantaged students. Also addressed are the efficacy of problem-based learning and the limits of observational learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Drilling for scientific purpose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Shoichi

    1987-09-01

    Drilling for scientific purpose is a process of conducting geophysical exploration at deep underground and drilling for collecting crust samples directly. This is because earth science has advanced to get a good understanding about the top of the crust and has shifted its main interest to the lower layer of the crust in land regions. The on-land drilling plan in Japan has just started, and the planned drilling spots are areas around the Minami River, Hidaka Mts., kinds of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic granite in outside zone, the extension of Japan Sea, Ogasawara Is., Minami-Tori Is., and active volcanos. The paper also outlines the present situation of on-land drilling in the world, focusing on the SG-3rd super-deep well SG-3 on the Kola Peninsula, USSR, Satori SG-1st well SG-1 in Azerbaidzhan S.S.R, V.S.S.R, Sweden's wells, Cyprus' wells, Bayearn well Plan in West Germany, and Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program in the U.S. At its end, the paper explains the present situation and the future theme of the Japanese drilling technique and points out the necessity of developing equipment, and techniques. (14 figs, 5 tabs, 26 refs)

  10. Load Balancing Scientific Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, Olga Tkachyshyn [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The largest supercomputers have millions of independent processors, and concurrency levels are rapidly increasing. For ideal efficiency, developers of the simulations that run on these machines must ensure that computational work is evenly balanced among processors. Assigning work evenly is challenging because many large modern parallel codes simulate behavior of physical systems that evolve over time, and their workloads change over time. Furthermore, the cost of imbalanced load increases with scale because most large-scale scientific simulations today use a Single Program Multiple Data (SPMD) parallel programming model, and an increasing number of processors will wait for the slowest one at the synchronization points. To address load imbalance, many large-scale parallel applications use dynamic load balance algorithms to redistribute work evenly. The research objective of this dissertation is to develop methods to decide when and how to load balance the application, and to balance it effectively and affordably. We measure and evaluate the computational load of the application, and develop strategies to decide when and how to correct the imbalance. Depending on the simulation, a fast, local load balance algorithm may be suitable, or a more sophisticated and expensive algorithm may be required. We developed a model for comparison of load balance algorithms for a specific state of the simulation that enables the selection of a balancing algorithm that will minimize overall runtime.

  11. Scientific Ethics: A New Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menapace, Marcello

    2018-06-04

    Science is an activity of the human intellect and as such has ethical implications that should be reviewed and taken into account. Although science and ethics have conventionally been considered different, it is herewith proposed that they are essentially similar. The proposal set henceforth is to create a new ethics rooted in science: scientific ethics. Science has firm axiological foundations and searches for truth (as a value, axiology) and knowledge (epistemology). Hence, science cannot be value neutral. Looking at standard scientific principles, it is possible to construct a scientific ethic (that is, an ethical framework based on scientific methods and rules), which can be applied to all sciences. These intellectual standards include the search for truth (honesty and its derivatives), human dignity (and by reflection the dignity of all animals) and respect for life. Through these it is thence achievable to draft a foundation of a ethics based purely on science and applicable beyond the confines of science. A few applications of these will be presented. Scientific ethics can have vast applications in other fields even in non scientific ones.

  12. Scientific Productivity and Academic Promotion: A Study on French and Italian Physicists. NBER Working Paper No. 16341

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissoni, Francesco; Mairesse, Jacques; Montobbio, Fabio; Pezzoni, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The paper examines the determinants of scientific productivity (number of articles and journals' impact factor) for a panel of about 3600 French and Italian academic physicists active in 2004-05. Endogeneity problems concerning promotion and productivity are addressed by specifying a generalized Tobit model, in which a selection probit equation…

  13. The Scientific Enterprise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 9. The Scientific Enterprise - Assumptions, Problems, and Goals in the Modern Scientific Framework. V V Raman. Reflections Volume 13 Issue 9 September 2008 pp 885-894 ...

  14. Extensional scientific realism vs. intensional scientific realism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seungbae

    2016-10-01

    Extensional scientific realism is the view that each believable scientific theory is supported by the unique first-order evidence for it and that if we want to believe that it is true, we should rely on its unique first-order evidence. In contrast, intensional scientific realism is the view that all believable scientific theories have a common feature and that we should rely on it to determine whether a theory is believable or not. Fitzpatrick argues that extensional realism is immune, while intensional realism is not, to the pessimistic induction. I reply that if extensional realism overcomes the pessimistic induction at all, that is because it implicitly relies on the theoretical resource of intensional realism. I also argue that extensional realism, by nature, cannot embed a criterion for distinguishing between believable and unbelievable theories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Description and Methods of the Automated Document Management System Usage in Scientific Organizational Activities of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (ADS SOA JINR)

    CERN Document Server

    Borisovsky, V F; Kekelidze, M G; Nikonov, E G; Senchenko, V A

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the structure description and user guide for Information program system for automation of a document flow for support of scientific arrangement planning (ADS SOA) which can be used for planning and carrying out seminars, workshops, conferences and other arrangements of research management. This work is intended for automation of scientific research management in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. The complex of programs represents the CDS Agenda system used in the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), which is adapted to the conditions of JINR.

  16. Role of editors and journals in detecting and preventing scientific misconduct: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marusic, Ana; Katavic, Vedran; Marusic, Matko

    2007-09-01

    Scientific journals have a central place in protecting research integrity because published articles are the most visible documentation of research. We used SWOT analysis to audit (S)trengths and (W)eaknesses as internal and (O)pportunities and (T)hreats as external factors affecting journals' responsibility in addressing research integrity issues. Strengths include editorial independence, authority and expertise, power to formulate editorial policies, and responsibility for the integrity of published records. Weaknesses stem from having no mandate for legal action, reluctance to get involved, and lack of training. Opportunities for editors are new technologies for detecting misconduct, policies by editorial organization or national institutions, and greater transparency of published research. Editors face threats from the lack of legal regulation and culture of research integrity in academic communities, lack of support from stakeholders in scientific publishing, and different pressures. Journal editors cannot be the policing force of the scientific community but they should actively ensure the integrity of the scientific record.

  17. Scientific journal cancellations

    CERN Multimedia

    The Library

    2001-01-01

    Earlier this year the Scientific Information Policy Board (SIPB) requested the Library and the Working Group for Acquisitions to revise the current printed journal collection in order to cancel those titles that are less required. Savings could then be used for the development of other collections and particularly electronic resources needed to support CERN current research activities. A list of proposed cancellations was drawn and posted on the Library web pages: http://library.cern.ch/library_general/cancel.html The SIPB invites every one to check if any of the titles are of importance to their work, in which case you are invited to inform the Library before the 25th of September by sending an e-mail to: eliane.chaney@cern.ch Titles not reconsidered by the users will be cancelled by the end of the year. Thank you, The Library

  18. WWW: The Scientific Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blystone, Robert V.; Blodgett, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The scientific method is the principal methodology by which biological knowledge is gained and disseminated. As fundamental as the scientific method may be, its historical development is poorly understood, its definition is variable, and its deployment is uneven. Scientific progress may occur without the strictures imposed by the formal…

  19. Scientific Assistant Virtual Laboratory (SAVL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghband, Gita; Fardi, Hamid; Gnabasik, David

    2007-03-01

    The Scientific Assistant Virtual Laboratory (SAVL) is a scientific discovery environment, an interactive simulated virtual laboratory, for learning physics and mathematics. The purpose of this computer-assisted intervention is to improve middle and high school student interest, insight and scores in physics and mathematics. SAVL develops scientific and mathematical imagination in a visual, symbolic, and experimental simulation environment. It directly addresses the issues of scientific and technological competency by providing critical thinking training through integrated modules. This on-going research provides a virtual laboratory environment in which the student directs the building of the experiment rather than observing a packaged simulation. SAVL: * Engages the persistent interest of young minds in physics and math by visually linking simulation objects and events with mathematical relations. * Teaches integrated concepts by the hands-on exploration and focused visualization of classic physics experiments within software. * Systematically and uniformly assesses and scores students by their ability to answer their own questions within the context of a Master Question Network. We will demonstrate how the Master Question Network uses polymorphic interfaces and C# lambda expressions to manage simulation objects.

  20. Scientific-methodological approaches to designing risk-oriented model of control and surveillance activities in the sphere of consumer rights protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Zaitseva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We present scientific-methodological approaches to defining risk categories of economic entities which are subject to surveillance in the sphere of consumer rights protection. Risk is suggested to be assessed as a product of violations frequency comprising violations of separate provisions of the law on consumer rights protection detected in the course of scheduled and unscheduled inspections; a number of claims per one detected violation which were satisfied by courts in favor of consumers; each separate case of harm accepted by court in money terms (as a sum of physical and moral damage to health and damage to property; and coefficient of a potential impact scope which differentiates risks for economic entities belonging to micro-, small, medium-sized and large business. Our information sources are official statistic data obtained due to realization of state control in the sphere of consumer rights protection and court practice collected in all the RF regions over 2012–2016. It is shown that a share of economic entities with extremely high risk potential which can cause total material damage to consumers in sums greater than 10 million rubles per year amounts to about 0.15 % of the total number of economic entities (both juridical persons and private entrepreneurs; economic entities with high risk potential account for about 2 %. Such groups are made of companies involved in financial markets, share construction services, insurance and tourism. About 23 % of juridical persons and private entrepreneurs can be classified as having low risk potential and they can be excluded from scheduled inspections. Economic entities structure in general corresponds to world practices. It is shown that risk-oriented surveillance model development requires improvements in keeping registers of juridical persons and private entrepreneurs as such registers should contain comprehensive information; it is necessary for correct risk category (or hazard category

  1. Scientific and Technological Report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado Cuba, Antonio; Robles Nique, Anita; Solis Veliz, Jose; Rodriguez R, Juan

    2005-08-01

    This annual scientific and technological report provides an overview of research and development activities at Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN) during the period from 1 january to 31 december, 2004. This report includes 48 papers divided in 6 subject matters, such as: materials science, nuclear engineering, industrial and environmental applications, medical and biological applications, radiation protection and nuclear safety, and management aspects

  2. NASA Guidelines for Promoting Scientific and Research Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Amy P.; Neogi, Natasha A.

    2017-01-01

    This guidebook provides an overarching summary of existing policies, activities, and guiding principles for scientific and research integrity with which NASA's workforce and affiliates must conform. This document addresses NASA's obligations as both a research institution and as a funder of research, NASA's use of federal advisory committees, NASA's public communication of research results, and professional development of NASA's workforce. This guidebook is intended to provide a single resource for NASA researchers, NASA research program administrators and project managers, external entities who do or might receive funding from NASA for research or technical projects, evaluators of NASA research proposals, NASA advisory committee members, NASA communications specialists, and members of the general public so that they can understand NASA's commitment to and expectations for scientific and integrity across the agency.

  3. Exploring the Potential of Using Stories about Diverse Scientists and Reflective Activities to Enrich Primary Students' Images of Scientists and Scientific Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkawy, Azza

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the potential of using stories about diverse scientists to broaden primary students' images of scientists and scientific work. Stories featuring scientists from diverse socio-cultural backgrounds (i.e., physical ability, gender, ethnicity) were presented to 11 grade one students over a 15-week…

  4. Volume 1: president's address, CNA committee reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The president's address summarizes the 1974-75 activities of the CNA and reports are given by CNA subcommittees on codes, standards and practices, economic development, education and manpower, international affairs, nuclear insurance, nuclear safety and environment, public relations, and technology. (E.C.B.)

  5. Scientific data management challenges, technology and deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Rotem, Doron

    2010-01-01

    Dealing with the volume, complexity, and diversity of data currently being generated by scientific experiments and simulations often causes scientists to waste productive time. Scientific Data Management: Challenges, Technology, and Deployment describes cutting-edge technologies and solutions for managing and analyzing vast amounts of data, helping scientists focus on their scientific goals. The book begins with coverage of efficient storage systems, discussing how to write and read large volumes of data without slowing the simulation, analysis, or visualization processes. It then focuses on the efficient data movement and management of storage spaces and explores emerging database systems for scientific data. The book also addresses how to best organize data for analysis purposes, how to effectively conduct searches over large datasets, how to successfully automate multistep scientific process workflows, and how to automatically collect metadata and lineage information. This book provides a comprehensive u...

  6. Addressing the Puzzle of Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Although racial discrimination poses a devastating instrument of oppression, social work texts lack a clear and consistent definition of "race". The solution lies in according race the status of an "actor version" concept, while exploring the origins and variations of race ideas using "scientific observer version" explanations. This distinction…

  7. See Me Smoke-Free: Protocol for a Research Study to Develop and Test the Feasibility of an mHealth App for Women to Address Smoking, Diet, and Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobbi, Peter; Hingle, Melanie; Johnson, Thienne; Cunningham, James K; Armin, Julie; Gordon, Judith S

    2016-01-21

    This paper presents the protocol for an ongoing research study to develop and test the feasibility of a multi-behavioral mHealth app. Approximately 27 million women smoke in the US, and more than 180,000 women die of illnesses linked to smoking annually. Women report greater difficulties quitting smoking. Concerns about weight gain, negative body image, and low self-efficacy may be key factors affecting smoking cessation among women. Recent studies suggest that a multi-behavioral approach, including diet and physical activity, may be more effective at helping women quit. Guided imagery has been successfully used to address body image concerns and self-efficacy in our 3 target behaviors-exercise, diet and smoking cessation. However, it has not been used simultaneously for smoking, diet, and exercise behavior in a single intervention. While imagery is an effective therapeutic tool for behavior change, the mode of delivery has generally been in person, which limits reach. mHealth apps delivered via smart phones offer a unique channel through which to distribute imagery-based interventions. The objective of our study is to evaluate the feasibility of an mHealth app for women designed to simultaneously address smoking, diet, and physical activity behaviors. The objectives are supported by three specific aims: (1) develop guided imagery content, user interface, and resources to reduce weight concern, and increase body image and self-efficacy for behavior change among women smokers, (2) program a prototype of the app that contains all the necessary elements of text, graphics, multimedia and interactive features, and (3) evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of the app with women smokers. We created the program content and designed the prototype application for use on the Android platform in collaboration with 9 participants in multiple focus groups and in-depth interviews. We programmed and tested the application's usability with 6 participants

  8. See Me Smoke-Free: Protocol for a Research Study to Develop and Test the Feasibility of an mHealth App for Women to Address Smoking, Diet, and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thienne; Gordon, Judith S

    2016-01-01

    Background This paper presents the protocol for an ongoing research study to develop and test the feasibility of a multi-behavioral mHealth app. Approximately 27 million women smoke in the US, and more than 180,000 women die of illnesses linked to smoking annually. Women report greater difficulties quitting smoking. Concerns about weight gain, negative body image, and low self-efficacy may be key factors affecting smoking cessation among women. Recent studies suggest that a multi-behavioral approach, including diet and physical activity, may be more effective at helping women quit. Guided imagery has been successfully used to address body image concerns and self-efficacy in our 3 target behaviors—exercise, diet and smoking cessation. However, it has not been used simultaneously for smoking, diet, and exercise behavior in a single intervention. While imagery is an effective therapeutic tool for behavior change, the mode of delivery has generally been in person, which limits reach. mHealth apps delivered via smart phones offer a unique channel through which to distribute imagery-based interventions. Objective The objective of our study is to evaluate the feasibility of an mHealth app for women designed to simultaneously address smoking, diet, and physical activity behaviors. The objectives are supported by three specific aims: (1) develop guided imagery content, user interface, and resources to reduce weight concern, and increase body image and self-efficacy for behavior change among women smokers, (2) program a prototype of the app that contains all the necessary elements of text, graphics, multimedia and interactive features, and (3) evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of the app with women smokers. Methods We created the program content and designed the prototype application for use on the Android platform in collaboration with 9 participants in multiple focus groups and in-depth interviews. We programmed and tested the application

  9. Scientific Visualization & Modeling for Earth Systems Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, S. Raj; Rodriguez, Waldo J.

    2003-01-01

    Providing research experiences for undergraduate students in Earth Systems Science (ESS) poses several challenges at smaller academic institutions that might lack dedicated resources for this area of study. This paper describes the development of an innovative model that involves students with majors in diverse scientific disciplines in authentic ESS research. In studying global climate change, experts typically use scientific visualization techniques applied to remote sensing data collected by satellites. In particular, many problems related to environmental phenomena can be quantitatively addressed by investigations based on datasets related to the scientific endeavours such as the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). Working with data products stored at NASA's Distributed Active Archive Centers, visualization software specifically designed for students and an advanced, immersive Virtual Reality (VR) environment, students engage in guided research projects during a structured 6-week summer program. Over the 5-year span, this program has afforded the opportunity for students majoring in biology, chemistry, mathematics, computer science, physics, engineering and science education to work collaboratively in teams on research projects that emphasize the use of scientific visualization in studying the environment. Recently, a hands-on component has been added through science student partnerships with school-teachers in data collection and reporting for the GLOBE Program (GLobal Observations to Benefit the Environment).

  10. Superphenix: technical and scientific achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidez, Joel; Prele, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    In this book, the authors propose a synthesis of technical and scientific achievements related to the design, fabrication and eleven-year operation of Superphenix, the most powerful fast breeder reactor ever built and operated. They had the opportunity to use various and important archives maintained by the different involved institutions, actors and companies, such as the CEA with its MADONA database, AREVA and EDF. They address all the different fields: construction, chemistry, exploitation, handling, small and large components, materials, fuel manufacturing, environmental assessment, thermal hydraulics, the sodium-water reaction, sodium fires, the release of residual power, in-service inspection, and dismantling operations. Moreover, a chapter addresses design studies for Superphenix 2 and for the European Fast Reactor (EFR) which should be the successors of Superphenix

  11. Validation of Housing Standards Addressing Accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, Tina

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to explore the use of an activity-based approach to determine the validity of a set of housing standards addressing accessibility. This included examination of the frequency and the extent of accessibility problems among older people with physical functional limitations who used...... participant groups were examined. Performing well-known kitchen activities was associated with accessibility problems for all three participant groups, in particular those using a wheelchair. The overall validity of the housing standards examined was poor. Observing older people interacting with realistic...... environments while performing real everyday activities seems to be an appropriate method for assessing accessibility problems....

  12. Mythical thinking, scientific discourses and research dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroar Klempe, Sven

    2011-06-01

    This article focuses on some principles for understanding. By taking Anna Mikulak's article "Mismatches between 'scientific' and 'non-scientific' ways of knowing and their contributions to public understanding of science" (IPBS 2011) as a point of departure, the idea of demarcation criteria for scientific and non-scientific discourses is addressed. Yet this is juxtaposed with mythical thinking, which is supposed to be the most salient trait of non-scientific discourses. The author demonstrates how the most widespread demarcation criterion, the criterion of verification, is self-contradictory, not only when it comes to logic, but also in the achievement of isolating natural sciences from other forms of knowledge. According to Aristotle induction is a rhetorical device and as far as scientific statements are based on inductive inferences, they are relying on humanities, which rhetoric is a part of. Yet induction also has an empirical component by being based on sense-impressions, which is not a part of the rhetoric, but the psychology. Also the myths are understood in a rhetorical (Lévi-Strauss) and a psychological (Cassirer) perspective. Thus it is argued that both scientific and non-scientific discourses can be mythical.

  13. Scientific productivity and academic promotion: a study on French and Italian physicists

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Lissoni; Jacques Mairesse; Fabio Montobbio; Michele Pezzoni

    2011-01-01

    The article examines the determinants of scientific productivity (number of articles and journals' impact factor) for a panel of about 3600 French and Italian academic physicists active in 2004--2005. Endogeneity problems concerning promotion and productivity are addressed by specifying a generalized Tobit model, in which a selection probit equation accounts for the individual scientist's probability of promotion to her present rank, and a productivity regression estimates the effects of age,...

  14. Addressing problems of employee performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Employee performance problems are essentially of 2 kinds: those that are motivational in origin and those resulting from skill deficiencies. Both kinds of problems are the province of the department manager. Performance problems differ from problems of conduct in that traditional disciplinary processes ordinarily do not apply. Rather, performance problems are addressed through educational and remedial processes. The manager has a basic responsibility in ensuring that everything reasonable is done to help each employee succeed. There are a number of steps the manager can take to address employee performance problems.

  15. Physical activity prescription: a critical opportunity to address a modifiable risk factor for the prevention and management of chronic disease: a position statement by the Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Jane S; Frémont, Pierre; Khan, Karim; Poirier, Paul; Fowles, Jonathon; Wells, Greg D; Frankovich, Renata J

    2016-09-01

    Non-communicable disease is a leading threat to global health. Physical inactivity is a large contributor to this problem; in fact, the WHO ranks it as the fourth leading risk factor for overall morbidity and mortality worldwide. In Canada, at least 4 of 5 adults do not meet the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines of 150 min of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per week. Physicians play an important role in the dissemination of physical activity (PA) recommendations to a broad segment of the population, as over 80% of Canadians visit their doctors every year and prefer to get health information directly from them. Unfortunately, most physicians do not regularly assess or prescribe PA as part of routine care, and even when discussed, few provide specific recommendations. PA prescription has the potential to be an important therapeutic agent for all ages in primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of chronic disease. Sport and exercise medicine (SEM) physicians are particularly well suited for this role and should collaborate with their primary care colleagues for optimal patient care. The purpose of this Canadian Academy and Sport and Exercise Medicine position statement is to provide an evidence-based, best practices summary to better equip SEM and primary care physicians to prescribe PA and exercise, specifically for the prevention and management of non-communicable disease. This will be achieved by addressing common questions and perceived barriers in the field.Author note This position statement has been endorsed by the following nine sport medicine societies: Australasian College of Sports and Exercise Physicians (ACSEP), American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM), British Association of Sports and Exercise Medicine (BASEM), European College of Sport & Exercise Physicians (ECOSEP), Norsk forening for idrettsmedisin og fysisk aktivite (NIMF), South African Sports Medicine Association (SASMA), Schweizerische Gesellschaft für Sportmedizin

  16. Scientific collaboration: genuine and false motivators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VOLPATO, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Here, I emphasize the need for collaborative research among scientists. Such collaboration should aim to address the genuine integrative need to build knowledge rather than searching for visibility based on the international prestige of a collaborator, increased productivity, or funding. Scientists must provide a valid and honest counterpart, such as a solid scientific proposal and performance, and avoid opportunistic motivators.

  17. Which Scientific Knowledge is a Common Good?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radder, Hans

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I address the question of whether science can and should be seen as a common good. For this purpose, the first section focuses on the notion of (scientific) knowledge and examines its main characteristics. I discuss and assess the core view of analytic epistemology, that knowledge

  18. The ESA Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions element, first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnos, Yves-Louis; Regner, Peter; Delwart, Steven; Benveniste, Jerome; Engdahl, Marcus; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Gascon, Ferran; Donlon, Craig; Davidson, Malcolm; Pinnock, Simon; Foumelis, Michael; Ramoino, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    SEOM is a program element within the fourth period (2013-2017) of ESA's Earth Observation Envelope Programme (http://seom.esa.int/). The prime objective is to federate, support and expand the international research community that the ERS, ENVISAT and the Envelope programmes have built up over the last 25 years. It aims to further strengthen the leadership of the European Earth Observation research community by enabling them to extensively exploit future European operational EO missions. SEOM will enable the science community to address new scientific research that are opened by free and open access to data from operational EO missions. Based on community-wide recommendations for actions on key research issues, gathered through a series of international thematic workshops and scientific user consultation meetings, a work plan is established and is approved every year by ESA Members States. During 2015 SEOM, Science users consultation workshops have been organized for Sentinel1/3/5P ( Fringe, S3 Symposium and Atmospheric science respectively) , new R&D studies for scientific exploitation of the Sentinels have been launched ( S3 for Science SAR Altimetry and Ocean Color , S2 for Science,) , open-source multi-mission scientific toolboxes have been launched (in particular the SNAP/S1-2-3 Toolbox). In addition two advanced international training courses have been organized in Europe to exploit the new S1-A and S2-A data for Land and Ocean remote sensing (over 120 participants from 25 countries) as well as activities for promoting the first scientific results ( e.g. Chili Earthquake) . In addition the First EO Open Science 2.0 was organised at ESA in October 2015 with 225 participants from 31 countries bringing together young EO scientists and data scientists. During the conference precursor activities in EO Open Science and Innovation were presented, while developing a Roadmap preparing for future ESA scientific exploitation activities. Within the conference, the first

  19. Zone memories and pseudorandom addressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, D.; Mirizzi, N.; Stella, R.; Visaggio, G.

    1975-01-01

    A quantitative comparison between zone memories, pseudorandom addressed memories and an alternative special purpose memory (spread zone memory) in which the distance between any two transformed descriptors, at first adjacent, is independent of the descriptors pair and results the maximum one is presented. This memory has not been particularly considered at present in spite of its efficiency and its simple implementation

  20. Introduction to IP address management

    CERN Document Server

    Rooney, Tim

    2010-01-01

    "The book begins with a basic overview of IP networking, followed by chapters describing each of the three core IPAM technologies: IPv4 and IPv6 addressing, DHCP, and DNS. The next three chapters describe IPAM management techniques and practice, followed by chapters on IPv4-IPv6 co-existence, security and the IPAM business case"--

  1. Age and Scientific Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Stephen

    1979-01-01

    The long-standing belief that age is negatively associated with scientific productivity and creativity is shown to be based upon incorrect analysis of data. Studies reported in this article suggest that the relationship between age and scientific performance is influenced by the operation of the reward system. (Author)

  2. Scientific Notation Watercolor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, Kyle; Oltman, Kathleen; Daisey, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    (Purpose) The purpose of this paper is to describe visual literacy, an adapted version of Visual Thinking Strategy (VTS), and an art-integrated middle school mathematics lesson about scientific notation. The intent of this lesson was to provide students with a real life use of scientific notation and exponents, and to motivate them to apply their…

  3. Scientific rigor through videogames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treuille, Adrien; Das, Rhiju

    2014-11-01

    Hypothesis-driven experimentation - the scientific method - can be subverted by fraud, irreproducibility, and lack of rigorous predictive tests. A robust solution to these problems may be the 'massive open laboratory' model, recently embodied in the internet-scale videogame EteRNA. Deploying similar platforms throughout biology could enforce the scientific method more broadly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Rediscovering the scientific ethos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djørup, Stine

    The doctoral dissertation discusses some of the moral standards of good scientific practice that areunderexposed in the literature. In particular, attempts are made to correct the conceptual confusionsurrounding the norm of 'disinterestedness' in science (‘uhildethed’), and the norm of scientific...

  5. Scientific Infrastructure To Support Manned And Unmanned Aircraft, Tethered Balloons, And Related Aerial Activities At Doe Arm Facilities On The North Slope Of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, M.; Dexheimer, D.; Hardesty, J.; Lucero, D. A.; Helsel, F.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through its scientific user facility, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) facilities, provides scientific infrastructure and data to the international Arctic research community via its research sites located on the North Slope of Alaska. DOE has recently invested in improvements to facilities and infrastructure to support operations of unmanned aerial systems for science missions in the Arctic and North Slope of Alaska. A new ground facility, the Third ARM Mobile Facility, was installed at Oliktok Point Alaska in 2013. Tethered instrumented balloons were used to make measurements of clouds in the boundary layer including mixed-phase clouds. A new Special Use Airspace was granted to DOE in 2015 to support science missions in international airspace in the Arctic. Warning Area W-220 is managed by Sandia National Laboratories for DOE Office of Science/BER. W-220 was successfully used for the first time in July 2015 in conjunction with Restricted Area R-2204 and a connecting Altitude Reservation Corridor (ALTRV) to permit unmanned aircraft to operate north of Oliktok Point. Small unmanned aircraft (DataHawks) and tethered balloons were flown at Oliktok during the summer and fall of 2015. This poster will discuss how principal investigators may apply for use of these Special Use Airspaces, acquire data from the Third ARM Mobile Facility, or bring their own instrumentation for deployment at Oliktok Point, Alaska. The printed poster will include the standard DOE funding statement.

  6. Opening address; Allocution d`ouverture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carle, R

    1996-12-31

    In this opening address the president of WANO underlines the relative isolation of the Kozloduy NPP from the international nuclear community due to the lack of information and contacts. The need for eliminating the isolation is stressed and the following measures are proposed: to make the Kozloduy NPP an active member of the international community; to improve and maintain the safety level; to contribute to the electricity exchange system of Southeastern Europe.

  7. Social behavioural epistemology and the scientific community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watve, Milind

    2017-07-01

    The progress of science is influenced substantially by social behaviour of and social interactions within the scientific community. Similar to innovations in primate groups, the social acceptance of an innovation depends not only upon the relevance of the innovation but also on the social dominance and connectedness of the innovator. There are a number of parallels between many well-known phenomena in behavioural evolution and various behavioural traits observed in the scientific community. It would be useful, therefore, to use principles of behavioural evolution as hypotheses to study the social behaviour of the scientific community. I argue in this paper that a systematic study of social behavioural epistemology is likely to boost the progress of science by addressing several prevalent biases and other problems in scientific communication and by facilitating appropriate acceptance/rejection of novel concepts.

  8. Scientific and Technological Report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado Cuba, Antonio; Robles Nique, Anita; Rodriguez R, Juan; Solis Veliz, Jose

    2006-07-01

    This annual scientific and technological report provides an overview of research and development activities at Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN) during the period from 1 january to 31 december, 2005. This report includes 38 papers divided in 7 subject matters, such as: physics and chemistry, materials science, nuclear engineering, industrial and environmental applications, medical and biological applications, radiation protection and nuclear safety, and management aspects

  9. Scientific and Technological Report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado Cuba, Antonio; Santiago Contreras, Julio; Lopez Milla, Alcides; Ramos Trujillo, Bertha

    2010-11-01

    This annual scientific and technological report provides an overview of research and development activities at Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN) during the period from 1 january to 31 december, 2009. This report includes 46 papers divided in 7 subject matters, such as: physics and chemistry, materials science, nuclear engineering, mining industrial and environmental applications, medical and biological applications, radiation protection and nuclear safety, and management aspects. It also includes annexes. (APC)

  10. Scientific and Technological Report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado Cuba, Antonio; Robles Nique, Anita; Solis Veliz, Jose; Osores Rebaza, Jose

    2007-08-01

    This annual scientific and technological report provides an overview of research and development activities at Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN) during the period from 1 january to 31 december, 2006. This report includes 54 papers divided in 7 subject matters, such as: physics and chemistry, materials science, nuclear engineering, industrial and environmental applications, medical and biological applications, radiation protection and nuclear safety, and management aspects. (APC)

  11. Scientific and Technological Report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado Cuba, A.; Santiago Contreras, J.; Rojas Tapia, J.; Ramos Trujillo, B.; Vela Mora, M.; Castro Gamero, E.

    2010-04-01

    This annual scientific and technological report provides an overview of research and development activities at Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN) during the period from 1 january to 31 december, 2008. This report includes 60 papers divided in 7 subject matters, such as: physics and chemistry, materials science, nuclear engineering, mining industrial and environmental applications, medical and biological applications, radiation protection and nuclear safety, and management aspects. It also includes annexes. (APC)

  12. The ESA Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnos, Yves-Louis; Regner, Peter; Delwart, Steven; Benveniste, Jerome; Engdahl, Marcus; Zehner, Claus; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Bojkov, Bojan; Gascon, Ferran; Donlon, Craig; Davidson, Malcolm; Goryl, Philippe; Pinnock, Simon

    2015-04-01

    SEOM is a program element within the fourth period (2013-2017) of ESA's Earth Observation Envelope Programme (http://seom.esa.int/). The prime objective is to federate, support and expand the international research community that the ERS,ENVISAT and the Envelope programmes have built up over the last 25 years. It aims to further strengthen the leadership of the European Earth Observation research community by enabling them to extensively exploit future European operational EO missions. SEOM will enable the science community to address new scientific research that are opened by free and open access to data from operational EO missions. Based on community-wide recommendations for actions on key research issues, gathered through a series of international thematic workshops and scientific user consultation meetings, a work plan has been established and is approved every year by ESA Members States. The 2015 SEOM work plan is covering the organisation of three Science users consultation workshops for Sentinel1/3/5P , the launch of new R&D studies for scientific exploitation of the Sentinels, the development of open-source multi-mission scientific toolboxes, the organisation of advanced international training courses, summer schools and educational materials, as well as activities for promoting the scientific use of EO data. The first SEOM projects have been tendered since 2013 including the development of Sentinel toolboxes, advanced INSAR algorithms for Sentinel-1 TOPS data exploitation, Improved Atmospheric Spectroscopic data-base (IAS), as well as grouped studies for Sentinel-1, -2, and -3 land and ocean applications and studies for exploiting the synergy between the Sentinels. The status and first results from these SEOM projects will be presented and an outlook for upcoming SEOM studies will be given.

  13. ICTP: A Successful Model of International Scientific Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The importance of international scientific collaboration in the changing world where the centre of gravity of fundamental research may be moving towards the east and the south is addressed. The unique role of ICTP in supporting global science is highlighted.

  14. Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics at AGU - Strategies and Actions to Impact Sexual Harassment in Science and other Work Climate Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaden, Michael; Davidson, Eric; McEntee, Christine; Williams, Billy

    2017-04-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU), a scientific society of 62,000 members worldwide, has established a set of scientific integrity and professional ethics guidelines for the actions of its members, for the governance of the union in its internal activities, and for the operations and participation in its publications and scientific meetings. More recently AGU has undertaken strategies and actions to help address the issue of harassment in the sciences and other work climate issues. This presentation will provide an overview of the role of scientific societies in helping to address these important issues, as well as specific strategies and actions underway at AGU and other societies. Progress to date and remaining challenges of this effort will be discussed, including AGU's work to provide additional program strength in this area.

  15. The Revista Scientific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Antonio Martínez Molina

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Revista Scientific aims to publish quality papers that include the perspective of analysis in educational settings. Together with www.indtec.com.ve, this electronic publication aims to promote and disseminate, with seriousness and rigor, the academic production in this field. Editorial of the new stage Revista Scientific was created with the aim of constituting a reference space for scientific research in the field of research analysis that is carried out within the universities in Latin America, once the distribution list hosted on the INDTEC platform (http://www.indtec.com.ve is consolidated as a space for dissemination and development of new ideas and initiatives. The first presentation of INDTEC Magazine was held in August 2016 in Venezuela. Thanks to the support of the INDTEC platform, SCIENTIFIC Magazine has been able to develop from the cooperative work of the people who make up its Editorial Committee, Academic Committee and Scientific Committee in Electronic Edition, and of the referees of each one of the numbers. Part of the success is due to the motivation of its co-editors and excellent professionals from different parts of the world: Argentina, Belgium, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, Spain, Mexico, Venezuela, which form the various committees, with enthusiasm and joy participating in this project (whose organizational structure is presented in this edition and continues in increcendo. Also, the strategy adopted to edit a monographic number from the various events organized in the framework of the universities, has contributed to provide SCIENTIFIC with a point value speaker of intellectual progress in the field of education. SCIENTIFIC Magazine is currently indexed in ISI, International Scientific Indexing, Dubai - UAE; ROAD, the Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources (ISSN International Center, France; REVENCYT-ULA, Venezuela; Google Scholar (Google Scholar, International Index; Published in Calaméo; ISSUU; Academia

  16. Scientific uncertainties and climate risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, M.

    2005-01-01

    Human activities have induced a significant change in the Earth's atmospheric composition and, most likely, this trend will increase throughout the coming decades. During the last decades, the mean temperature has actually increased by the expected amount. Moreover, the geographical distribution of the warming, and day-to-night temperature variation have evolved as predicted. The magnitude of those changes is relatively small for the time being, but is expected to increase alarmingly during the coming decades. Greenhouse warming is a representative example of the problems of sustainable development: long-term risks can be estimated on a rational basis from scientific laws alone, but the non-specialist is generally not prepared to understand the steps required. However, even the non-specialist has obviously the right to decide about his way of life and the inheritance that he would like to leave for his children, but it is preferable that he is fully informed before making his decisions. Dialog, mutual understanding and confidence must prevail between Science and Society to avoid irrational actions. Controversy among experts is quite frequent. In the case of greenhouse warming, a commendable collective expertise has drastically reduced possible confusion. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was created jointly by the World Meteorology Organization (WMO) and the UN Program for the Environment (UNEP). Its reports evaluate the state of knowledge on past and future global climate changes, their impact, and the possibility of controlling anthropogenic emissions. The main targeted readers are, nevertheless, non-specialists, who should be made aware of results deduced from approaches that they may not be able to follow step by step. Moreover, these results, in particular, future projections, are, and will remain, subject to some uncertainty, which a fair description of the state of knowledge must include. Many misunderstandings between writers and readers can

  17. INTEGRATION OF UKRAINIAN INDUSTRY SCIENTIFIC PERIODACLS INTO WORLD SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION SPACE: PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Kolesnykova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Problem of representation lack of scientists’ publications, including transport scientists, in the international scientometric databases is the urgent one for Ukrainian science. To solve the problem one should study the structure and quality of the information flow of scientific periodicals of railway universities in Ukraine and to determine the integration algorithm of scientific publications of Ukrainian scientists into the world scientific information space. Methodology. Applying the methods of scientific analysis, synthesis, analogy, comparison and prediction the author has investigated the problem of scientific knowledge distribution using formal communications. The readiness of Ukrainian railway periodicals to registration procedure in the international scientometric systems was analyzed. The level of representation of articles and authors of Ukrainian railway universities in scientometric database Scopus was studied. Findings. Monitoring of the portals of railway industry universities of Ukraine and the sites of their scientific periodicals and analysis of obtained data prove insufficient readiness of most scientific publications for submission to scientometric database. The ways providing sufficient "visibility" of industry periodicals of Ukrainian universities in the global scientific information space were proposed. Originality. The structure and quality of documentary flow of scientific periodicals in railway transport universities of Ukraine and its reflection in scientometric DB Scopus were first investigated. The basic directions of university activities to integrate the results of transport scientists research into the global scientific digital environment were outlined. It was determined the leading role of university libraries in the integration processes of scientific documentary resources of universities into the global scientific and information communicative space. Practical value. Implementation of the proposed

  18. Scientific meeting abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document is a collection of the scientific meeting abstracts in the fields of nuclear physics, medical sciences, chemistry, agriculture, environment, engineering, different aspects of energy and presents research done in 1999 in these fields

  19. Identifying Strategic Scientific Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    As NCI's central scientific strategy office, CRS collaborates with the institute's divisions, offices, and centers to identify research opportunities to advance NCI's vision for the future of cancer research.

  20. Visualization in scientific computing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nielson, Gregory M; Shriver, Bruce D; Rosenblum, Lawrence J

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this text is to provide a reference source to scientists, engineers, and students who are new to scientific visualization or who are interested in expanding their knowledge in this subject...

  1. The Scientific Enterprise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    The phrase pre-modern scientific may be used to describe certain attitudes and ..... But unfortunately, in the general atmosphere of poor education and collective fears .... present day science and technology that old time beliefs and traditional ...

  2. WITHER SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No library or information service and especially in a developing .... Good public relations, consultancy services including bilateral and ... project proposal for the creation of a scientific and technological information ... For example, in 1995 the ...

  3. Agile Scientists? : Investigating Agile Practices in Scientific Software Development

    OpenAIRE

    Sletholt, Magnus Thorstein

    2011-01-01

    The topic of this master thesis is development of scientific software. The research questions put forth are oriented towards specific agile practices and whether these are present in the development processes of scientific software projects. Moreover, the effects of applying such agile practices, particularly pertaining to the handling of requirements and testing, in scientific software projects are addressed in the thesis. In order to answer the proposed research questions a table consisting...

  4. [Scientific journals of medical students in Latin-America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Samith, Ignacio; Oróstegui-Pinilla, Diana; Angulo-Bazán, Yolanda; Mayta-Tristán, Percy; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2010-11-01

    This article deals with the history and evolution of student's scientific journals in Latin-America, their beginnings, how many still exist and which is their future projection. Relevant events show the growth of student's scientific journals in Latin-America and how are they working together to improve their quality. This article is addressed not only for Latin American readers but also to worldwide readers. Latin American medical students are consistently working together to publish scientific research, whose quality is constantly improving.

  5. Scientific Opinion on Risk Assessment of Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Michelle M; Vermeire, Theo

    2016-08-01

    In 2013, three Scientific Committees of the European Commission (EC) drafted Scientific Opinions on synthetic biology that provide an operational definition and address risk assessment methodology, safety aspects, environmental risks, knowledge gaps, and research priorities. These Opinions contribute to the international discussions on the risk governance for synthetic biology developments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Analogy and Intersubjectivity: Political Oratory, Scholarly Argument and Scientific Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Alan G.

    1983-01-01

    Focuses on the different ways political oratory, scholarly argument, and scientific reports use analogy. Specifically, analyzes intersubjective agreement in Franklin D. Roosevelt's First Inaugural address, the scholarly argument between Sir Karl Popper and Thomas S. Kuhn, and the scientific reports of various mathematicians and scientists. (PD)

  7. Scientific publishing: some food for thought (Italian original version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Bo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Scientific publishing, here to be considered in a broader sense, as publishing of both specialised scientific journals and science popularisation works addressed to a wider audience, has been sailing for some years on troubled waters. To gather some possible food for thought is the purpose of this brief article.

  8. Shaping a Scientific Self

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade-Molina, Melissa; Valero, Paola

    us to understand how a truth is reproduced, circulating among diverse fields of human knowledge. Also it will show why we accept and reproduce a particular discourse. Finally, we state Euclidean geometry as a truth that circulates in scientific discourse and performs a scientific self. We unfold...... the importance of having students following the path of what schools perceive a real scientist is, no to become a scientist, but to become a logical thinker, a problem solver, a productive citizen who uses reason....

  9. Scientific information processing procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García, Maylin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper systematizes several theoretical view-points on scientific information processing skill. It decomposes the processing skills into sub-skills. Several methods such analysis, synthesis, induction, deduction, document analysis were used to build up a theoretical framework. Interviews and survey to professional being trained and a case study was carried out to evaluate the results. All professional in the sample improved their performance in scientific information processing.

  10. Scientific Encounters of the Mysterious Sea. Reading Activities That Explore the Mysterious Creatures of the Deep Blue Sea. Grades 4-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embry, Lynn

    This activity book presents reading activities for grades 4-7 exploring the mysterious creatures of the deep sea. The creatures include: angel sharks; argonauts; barberfish; comb jelly; croakers; electric rays; flying fish; giganturid; lantern fish; narwhals; northern basket starfish; ocean sunfish; Portuguese man-of-war; sea cucumbers; sea…

  11. GBF scientific progress report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The structure and style of representation of the paragraphs about scientific results are adjusted to the research and development program 1979. Since in this program an arrangement according to fields or departments resp. was chosen, the individual reports of this report on results were arranged as to departments too. In doing so, however, a survey of the aims and the development of the department as a whole precedes, and subsequently information on the results of the individual projects is given. In addition to the results of the year under report, the aims during the life of the project are summarized. Para. 2.1 puts the individual FE (research and development) projects into relation to the five research programs, which are at present dealt with by the GBF (Society for Biotechnological Research). The reports on the individual projects refer to the FE program number. For the first time, the report on the results contains a paragraph about the collecting activity and the research work of the DSM (German collection of microorganisms), which became part of the GBF at the beginning of the year under report. A separate paragraph deals with the scientific and technical infrastructure, especially with the work of the Service-Unit 'Biotechnikum' which produces natural substances, which are commercially not available. Paragraphs about further activities in the fields of scientific cooperation, results transfer etc, as well as about the staff and the economical developments of the GBF follow. (orig./AJ) [de

  12. Open scientific communication urged

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    In a report released last week the National Academy of Sciences' Panel on Scientific Communication and National Security concluded that the ‘limited and uncertain benefits’ of controls on the dissemination of scientific and technological research are ‘outweighed by the importance of scientific progress, which open communication accelerates, to the overall welfare of the nation.’ The 18-member panel, chaired by Dale R. Corson, president emeritus of Cornell University, was created last spring (Eos, April 20, 1982, p. 241) to examine the delicate balance between open dissemination of scientific and technical information and the U.S. government's desire to protect scientific and technological achievements from being translated into military advantages for our political adversaries.The panel dealt almost exclusively with the relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union but noted that there are ‘clear problems in scientific communication and national security involving Third World countries.’ Further study of this matter is necessary.

  13. Addressing the workforce pipeline challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard Bond; Kevin Kostelnik; Richard Holman

    2006-11-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundations to enable future economic growth. To meet this goal the next generation energy workforce in the U.S., in particular those needed to support instrumentation, controls and advanced operations and maintenance, is a critical element. The workforce is aging and a new workforce pipeline, to support both current generation and new build has yet to be established. The paper reviews the challenges and some actions being taken to address this need.

  14. Addressing chronic operational issues at the W. M. Keck Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Tom; Matsuda, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO) has a good track record at addressing large critical faults which impact observing. Our performance tracking and correcting chronic minor faults has been mixed, yet this class of problems has a significant negative impact on scientific productivity and staff effectiveness. We have taken steps to address this shortcoming. This paper outlines the creation of a program to identify, categorize and rank these chronic operational issues, track them over time, and develop management options for their resolution. The success of the program at identifying these chronic operational issues and the advantages of dedicating observatory resources to this endeavor are presented.

  15. The scientific case for a JET D-T experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisen, H.; Sips, A. C. C.; Horton, L. D.; Challis, C. D.; Sharapov, S. E.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Batistoni, P.

    2014-01-01

    After the first high power D-T experiment in JET in 1997 (DTE1), when JET was equipped with Carbon PFC's, a proposed second high power (up to ∼40MW) D-T campaign (DTE2) in the current Be/W vessel will address essential operational, technical, diagnostics and scientific issues in support of ITER. These experiments are proposed to minimize the risks to ITER by testing strategies for the management of the in-vessel tritium content, by providing the basis for transferring operational scenarios from non-active operation to D-T mixtures and by addressing the issue of the neutron measurement accuracy. Dedicated campaigns with operation in Deuterium, Hydrogen and Tritium before the D-T campaign proper will allow the investigation of isotope scaling of the H-mode transition, pedestal physics, heat, particle, momentum and impurity transport in much greater detail than was possible in DTE1. The D-T campaign proper will include validations of the baseline ELMy H-Mode scenario, of the hybrid H-mode and advanced tokamak scenarios, as well as the investigation of alpha particle physics and the qualification of ICRH scenarios suitable for D-T operation. This paper reviews the scientific goals of DTE2 together with a summary of the results of DTE1

  16. Tracing Young Children's Scientific Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tytler, Russell; Peterson, Suzanne

    2003-08-01

    This paper explores the scientific reasoning of 14 children across their first two years of primary school. Children's view of experimentation, their approach to exploration, and their negotiation of competing knowledge claims, are interpreted in terms of categories of epistemological reasoning. Children's epistemological reasoning is distinguished from their ability to control variables. While individual children differ substantially, they show a relatively steady growth in their reasoning, with some contextual variation. A number of these children are reasoning at a level well in advance of curriculum expectations, and it is argued that current recommended practice in primary science needs to be rethought. The data is used to explore the relationship between reasoning and knowledge, and to argue that the generation and exploration of ideas must be the key driver of scientific activity in the primary school.

  17. A Life’s Addresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, Søren Hattesen

    According to Jonathan Culler’s essay ”Apostrophe”, ”…post-enlightenment poetry seeks to overcome the alienation of subject from object”, and “apostrophe takes the crucial step of constituting the object as another subject with whom the poetic subject might hope to strike up a harmonious relations......According to Jonathan Culler’s essay ”Apostrophe”, ”…post-enlightenment poetry seeks to overcome the alienation of subject from object”, and “apostrophe takes the crucial step of constituting the object as another subject with whom the poetic subject might hope to strike up a harmonious...... to a number of different aspects of Koch’s own life such as marijuana, the Italian language, World War Two, etc. In this way, the book quite conventionally inscribes itself in the tradition of post-enlightenment apostrophic poetry as characterized by Culler, just as all its poems belong to the favourite......, are literally troped as and addressed in the manner of so many acquaintances, personal connections, relatives, friends, lovers, and family members in Koch’s life. My main claim is that Koch’s poetics in New Addresses is one that slightly dislocates the romantic dichotomy between the world of things...

  18. A Commentary on Innovation and Emerging Scientific Careers: Is Social Work Prepared to Compete in Today's Scientific Marketplace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Jaih B.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to address some of the questions Dr. Paula S. Nurius presents in her article, "Innovation and Emerging Scientific Careers: Is Social Work Prepared to Compete in Today?s Scientific Marketplace?" Specifically, this article will focus on what we can do to better prepare our emerging research scholars to be…

  19. Phase I Final Scientific Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xijia [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Fetvedt, Jeremy [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Dimmig, Walker [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2017-10-15

    This Final Scientific Report addresses the accomplishments achieved during Phase I of DE- FE0023985, Coal Syngas Combustor Development for Supercritical CO2 Power Cycles. The primary objective of the project was to develop a coal syngas-fueled combustor design for use with high-pressure, high-temperature, oxy-fuel, supercritical CO2 power cycles, with particular focus given to the conditions required by the Allam Cycle. The primary goals, from the Statement of Project Objectives, were to develop: (1) a conceptual design of a syngas-fueled combustor-turbine block for a 300MWe high-pressure, oxy-fuel, sCO2 power plant; (2) the preliminary design of a 5MWt test combustor; and (3) the definition of a combustor test program. Accomplishments for each of these goals are discussed in this report.

  20. Factors of Knowledge Management and the impact of employee turnover in activity and performance in scientific and technological parks in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasja Roblek

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Technology parks provide infrastructure for the creation and developmentof knowledge-based organizations, which are associated with centers oftechnological excellence, mainly universities. This research addresses thequestion of management and skills acquisition in member organizations oftechnology parks in Slovenia. As means and lever for development organizations,we recognize the values and organizational culture, which cannot be achievedwithout employees who possess good knowledge. We associated knowledgemanagement with employee turnover factor. The central purpose of this researchis to focus on exploring the impact of movements in knowledge management on theturnover in organizations, which are members of technology parks. By usingmultivariate regression methods we confirmed that the required skills,knowledge acquisition and knowledge transfer channels, have a statisticallysignificant effect on employee turnover in technology parks.

  1. Mapping the evolution of scientific fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Mark; Roberts, David C; Gulbahce, Natali

    2010-05-04

    Despite the apparent cross-disciplinary interactions among scientific fields, a formal description of their evolution is lacking. Here we describe a novel approach to study the dynamics and evolution of scientific fields using a network-based analysis. We build an idea network consisting of American Physical Society Physics and Astronomy Classification Scheme (PACS) numbers as nodes representing scientific concepts. Two PACS numbers are linked if there exist publications that reference them simultaneously. We locate scientific fields using a community finding algorithm, and describe the time evolution of these fields over the course of 1985-2006. The communities we identify map to known scientific fields, and their age depends on their size and activity. We expect our approach to quantifying the evolution of ideas to be relevant for making predictions about the future of science and thus help to guide its development.

  2. Science and Societal Partnerships to Address Cumulative Impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Lundquist, Carolyn J.; Fisher, Karen T.; Le Heron, Richard; Lewis, Nick I.; Ellis, Joanne I.; Hewitt, Judi E.; Greenaway, Alison J.; Cartner, Katie J.; Burgess-Jones, Tracey C.; Schiel, David R.; Thrush, Simon F.

    2016-01-01

    Funding and priorities for ocean research are not separate from the underlying sociological, economic, and political landscapes that determine values attributed to ecological systems. Here we present a variation on science prioritization exercises, focussing on inter-disciplinary research questions with the objective of shifting broad scale management practices to better address cumulative impacts and multiple users. Marine scientists in New Zealand from a broad range of scientific and social...

  3. Address at the opening session of the Niels Bohr Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayor, F.

    1998-01-01

    In his address at the opening session of the Niels Bohr Symposium organized jointly by UNESCO and the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen in May 1998 in order to examine the latest developments in key fields of physics, the Director General of UNESCO presented the scientific work and the spirit of Niels Bohr, emphasizing the impact of his discoveries for new openings in science and in society in general

  4. An Ethnomethodological Perspective on How Middle School Students Addressed a Water Quality Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belland, Brian R.; Gu, Jiangyue; Kim, Nam Ju; Turner, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Science educators increasingly call for students to address authentic scientific problems in science class. One form of authentic science problem--socioscientific issue--requires that students engage in complex reasoning by considering both scientific and social implications of problems. Computer-based scaffolding can support this process by…

  5. SDM center technologies for accelerating scientific discoveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoshani, Arie; Altintas, Ilkay; Choudhary, Alok; Critchlow, Terence; Kamath, Chandrika; Ludaescher, Bertram; Nieplocha, Jarek; Parker, Steve; Ross, Rob; Samatova, Nagiza; Vouk, Mladen

    2007-01-01

    With the increasing volume and complexity of data produced by ultra-scale simulations and high-throughput experiments, understanding the science is largely hampered by the lack of comprehensive, end-to-end data management solutions ranging from initial data acquisition to final analysis and visualization. The SciDAC-1 Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center succeeded in bringing an initial set of advanced data management technologies to DOE application scientists in astrophysics, climate, fusion, and biology. Equally important, it established collaborations with these scientists to better understand their science as well as their forthcoming data management and data analytics challenges. Our future focus is on improving the SDM framework to address the needs of ultra-scale science during SciDAC-2. Specifically, we are enhancing and extending our existing tools to allow for more interactivity and fault tolerance when managing scientists' workflows, for better parallelism and feature extraction capabilities in their data analytics operations, and for greater efficiency and functionality in users' interactions with local parallel file systems, active storage, and access to remote storage. These improvements are necessary for the scalability and complexity challenges presented by hardware and applications at ultra scale, and are complemented by continued efforts to work with application scientists in various domains

  6. Kuhn's "The structure of scientific revolutions" revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Arabatzis, Theodore

    2012-01-01

    The year 2012 marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of Thomas S. Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Up until recently, the book's philosophical reception has been shaped, for the most part, by the debates and the climate in philosophy of science in the 1960s and 1970s; this new collection of essays takes a renewed look at this work. This volume concentrates on particular issues addressed or raised in light of recent scholarship and without the pressure of the immediate concerns scholars had at the time of the Structure's publication. There has been extensive research on all of the major issues concerning the development of science which are discussed in Structure, work in which the scholars contributing to this volume have all been actively involved. In recent years they have pursued novel research on a number of topics relevant to Structure's concerns, such as the nature and function of concepts, the complexity of logical positivism and its legacy, the relation of history to philosophy o...

  7. SCWEB, Scientific Workstation Evaluation Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffenetti, R C [Computing Services-Support Services Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    1988-06-16

    1 - Description of program or function: The SCWEB (Scientific Workstation Evaluation Benchmark) software includes 16 programs which are executed in a well-defined scenario to measure the following performance capabilities of a scientific workstation: implementation of FORTRAN77, processor speed, memory management, disk I/O, monitor (or display) output, scheduling of processing (multiprocessing), and scheduling of print tasks (spooling). 2 - Method of solution: The benchmark programs are: DK1, DK2, and DK3, which do Fourier series fitting based on spline techniques; JC1, which checks the FORTRAN function routines which produce numerical results; JD1 and JD2, which solve dense systems of linear equations in double- and single-precision, respectively; JD3 and JD4, which perform matrix multiplication in single- and double-precision, respectively; RB1, RB2, and RB3, which perform substantial amounts of I/O processing on files other than the input and output files; RR1, which does intense single-precision floating-point multiplication in a tight loop, RR2, which initializes a 512x512 integer matrix in a manner which skips around in the address space rather than initializing each consecutive memory cell in turn; RR3, which writes alternating text buffers to the output file; RR4, which evaluates the timer routines and demonstrates that they conform to the specification; and RR5, which determines whether the workstation is capable of executing a 4-megabyte program

  8. [Development and opportunities from de scientific committee of 25 SECA congress held in Barcelona, 2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astier Peña, M P; Lorenzo Martínez, S; Santiñá, M; Martín, A

    2009-01-01

    To perform a self-assessment of the Scientific Committee of the 25th Conference of the Spanish Society for Quality in Healthcare held in Barcelona on October 2007 in order to identify improvement areas for future Conferences. Applying PDCA methodology to the tasks undertaken by the Scientific Committee (SC) of the Conference. Plan: A description of the preparation of the conference based on the abstract management of the Scientific Committee. Do: description of the implementation. Check: evaluation of activities. A: improvement proposals for the coming conferences. The SC (22 people) worked in the abstracts management, book publishing and development of the scientific aspects of the Conference. Abstracts evaluation was conducted by 11 pairs of blind evaluators who analysed 348 oral communications and 457 posters, and 10.09% were rejected. Oral communications were performed in a total of 36 oral presentations sessions and 24 poster sessions. The book was published with the abstracts, addresses and the Conference opening and closing sessions. Awards: communications graded over 7.5 applied for an award and were reassessed by the SC. The on-line conference was also well received. The satisfaction with the Conference regarding the scientific activities was good; however, several areas of improvement were identified.

  9. Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center for Enabling Technologies. 2007-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludascher, Bertram [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Altintas, Ilkay [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-09-06

    Over the past five years, our activities have both established Kepler as a viable scientific workflow environment and demonstrated its value across multiple science applications. We have published numerous peer-reviewed papers on the technologies highlighted in this short paper and have given Kepler tutorials at SC06,SC07,SC08,and SciDAC 2007. Our outreach activities have allowed scientists to learn best practices and better utilize Kepler to address their individual workflow problems. Our contributions to advancing the state-of-the-art in scientific workflows have focused on the following areas. Progress in each of these areas is described in subsequent sections. Workflow development. The development of a deeper understanding of scientific workflows "in the wild" and of the requirements for support tools that allow easy construction of complex scientific workflows; Generic workflow components and templates. The development of generic actors (i.e.workflow components and processes) which can be broadly applied to scientific problems; Provenance collection and analysis. The design of a flexible provenance collection and analysis infrastructure within the workflow environment; and, Workflow reliability and fault tolerance. The improvement of the reliability and fault-tolerance of workflow environments.

  10. Addressing Issues for Land Change Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braimoh, Ademola; Huang, He Qing

    2009-09-01

    Workshop on Vulnerability and Resilience of Land Systems in Asia; Beijing, China, 15-17 June 2009; There is a growing international community of scholars who work within the interdisciplinary field of land change science, a scientific domain that seeks to understand the dynamics of the land system as a coupled human-environment system. A coupled human-environment system is one in which the social and biophysical subsystems are intertwined so that the system's condition and responses to external forcing are based on the synergy of the two subsystems. Research on land system vulnerability, defined as a function of exposure and sensitivity to natural and anthropogenic perturbations, such as climate variability and sudden changes in macroeconomic conditions and the ability to cope with the impacts of those perturbations, is a fundamental component of land change science. To address issues related to land system vulnerability, the Global Land Project (GLP; http://www.glp-beijing.org.cn/index.php and http://www.glp.hokudai.ac.jp) brought together an interdisciplinary group of researchers with backgrounds ranging from environmental to social sciences. Participants came from both developed and developing countries. The workshop sought to (1) improve knowledge of the causal processes that affect a system's vulnerability and capacity to cope with different perturbations and (2) identify factors that hinder the integration of vulnerability assessment into policies and decision making.

  11. Scientific computer simulation review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaizer, Joshua S.; Heller, A. Kevin; Oberkampf, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Before the results of a scientific computer simulation are used for any purpose, it should be determined if those results can be trusted. Answering that question of trust is the domain of scientific computer simulation review. There is limited literature that focuses on simulation review, and most is specific to the review of a particular type of simulation. This work is intended to provide a foundation for a common understanding of simulation review. This is accomplished through three contributions. First, scientific computer simulation review is formally defined. This definition identifies the scope of simulation review and provides the boundaries of the review process. Second, maturity assessment theory is developed. This development clarifies the concepts of maturity criteria, maturity assessment sets, and maturity assessment frameworks, which are essential for performing simulation review. Finally, simulation review is described as the application of a maturity assessment framework. This is illustrated through evaluating a simulation review performed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In making these contributions, this work provides a means for a more objective assessment of a simulation’s trustworthiness and takes the next step in establishing scientific computer simulation review as its own field. - Highlights: • We define scientific computer simulation review. • We develop maturity assessment theory. • We formally define a maturity assessment framework. • We describe simulation review as the application of a maturity framework. • We provide an example of a simulation review using a maturity framework

  12. Integrated project: Sorption processes for removal of airborne pollutants. Sub-project 2. Scientific and technical activities accompanying the production of foamed zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueck, M.

    1991-01-01

    The project was to find economically efficient applications of zeolits for sorptive and catalytic treatment of hydrocarbon-containing exhaust gases. The investigations of gaseous-phase adsorption followed by desorption were carried out using hydrophobic zeolites, ceramic sorbents based on Al 2 O 3 and mixed materials of zeolite, Al 2 O 3 and activated carbon. The materials were in pellet form or, in the case of the zeolites, in the form of foamed bodies. Comparative measurements of the adsorption and desorption characteristics of pelleted and foamed hydrophobic zeolite indicated a somewhat faster and more, even desorption in the case of the foams, but there was no difference in terms of adsorptivity. The catalytic activities of zeolites with different dopings were measured using different solvent/air mixtures and different volume flow rates. Solvents used were toluene, methylisobutyl ketone, isopropanol, and n-hexane, each in a concentration of 5 g/m 3 . Volume flow rates were 7500, 11250 and 22500 l/h. The conversion/temperature behaviour of the catalyst was found to be influenced by the concentration of the active component and, in the case of the doped foams, also by the layer thickness of the zeolite/active component mixture. There is an optimum concentration and an optimum layer thickness for each active component. Below this concentration, efficiency will decrease dramatically while a further increase will not lead to higher efficiencies. (orig.) [de

  13. Scientific collaboratories in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Li, Bin

    2003-01-01

    Scientific collaboratories hold the promise of providing students access to specialized scientific instruments, data and experts, enabling learning opportunities perhaps otherwise not available. However, evaluation of scientific collaboratories in higher education has lagged behind...

  14. Developing good scientific publishing practices: one pharmaceutical company's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, Sherie A; Van Campen, Luann E; Bednar, Lisa A

    2010-06-01

    The scientific publishing practices of the pharmaceutical industry have been heavily criticized in recent years due to the inherent conflict of interest that arises when a pharmaceutical company publishes findings around its own drugs. Eli Lilly and Company ('Lilly') strives for transparency in its day-to-day activities, and, here, shares its principles, policies and practices on publishing "Lilly-sponsored" research. A conflict of interest does not necessarily equate to biased presentation of research findings, and operating a successful, for-profit business and maintaining a focus on improving the health of patients are not mutually exclusive goals. There is, however, potential for bias, and it is incumbent upon a for-profit to develop publication principles, policies and practices to address this. To this end, Lilly's Principles of Medical Research states that 'Lilly discloses publicly all medical research results that are important to patients, healthcare providers or payers--whether favorable or unfavorable to a Lilly product--in an accurate, objective, and balanced manner ...' The preparation of publications of Lilly-sponsored research involves close collaboration between external (i.e., academic or otherwise non-industry employees) and Lilly scientific researchers (including scientific writers), with both serving as authors. Lilly does not support 'ghost' or 'guest' authorship. Authorship is not just recognition of contribution but also public acknowledgement of responsibility for content, and all authors are expected to take an active role in developing the manuscript in line with the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors-based authorship requirements. This is agreed to by authors before the manuscript is started. Lilly provides external authors with access to the trial data for manuscript development. Lilly does not pay external authors for their involvement in manuscript development. Scientific writers at Lilly, often with advanced scientific

  15. Making better scientific figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Ed; McNeall, Doug

    2016-04-01

    In the words of the UK government chief scientific adviser "Science is not finished until it's communicated" (Walport 2013). The tools to produce good visual communication have never been so easily accessible to scientists as at the present. Correspondingly, it has never been easier to produce and disseminate poor graphics. In this presentation, we highlight some good practice and offer some practical advice in preparing scientific figures for presentation to peers or to the public. We identify common mistakes in visualisation, including some made by the authors, and offer some good reasons not to trust defaults in graphics software. In particular, we discuss the use of colour scales and share our experiences in running a social media campaign (http://tiny.cc/endrainbow) to replace the "rainbow" (also "jet", or "spectral") colour scale as the default in (climate) scientific visualisation.

  16. Plagiarism in scientific publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2012-12-01

    Scientific publishing is the ultimate product of scientist work. Number of publications and their quoting are measures of scientist success while unpublished researches are invisible to the scientific community, and as such nonexistent. Researchers in their work rely on their predecessors, while the extent of use of one scientist work, as a source for the work of other authors is the verification of its contributions to the growth of human knowledge. If the author has published an article in a scientific journal it cannot publish the article in any other journal h with a few minor adjustments or without quoting parts of the first article, which are used in another article. Copyright infringement occurs when the author of a new article with or without the mentioning the author used substantial portions of previously published articles, including tables and figures. Scientific institutions and universities should,in accordance with the principles of Good Scientific Practice (GSP) and Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) have a center for monitoring,security, promotion and development of quality research. Establish rules and compliance to rules of good scientific practice are the obligations of each research institutions,universities and every individual-researchers,regardless of which area of science is investigated. In this way, internal quality control ensures that a research institution such as a university, assume responsibility for creating an environment that promotes standards of excellence, intellectual honesty and legality. Although the truth should be the aim of scientific research, it is not guiding fact for all scientists. The best way to reach the truth in its study and to avoid the methodological and ethical mistakes is to consistently apply scientific methods and ethical standards in research. Although variously defined plagiarism is basically intended to deceive the reader's own scientific contribution. There is no general regulation of control of

  17. PLAGIARISM IN SCIENTIFIC PUBLISHING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2012-01-01

    Scientific publishing is the ultimate product of scientist work. Number of publications and their quoting are measures of scientist success while unpublished researches are invisible to the scientific community, and as such nonexistent. Researchers in their work rely on their predecessors, while the extent of use of one scientist work, as a source for the work of other authors is the verification of its contributions to the growth of human knowledge. If the author has published an article in a scientific journal it cannot publish the article in any other journal h with a few minor adjustments or without quoting parts of the first article, which are used in another article. Copyright infringement occurs when the author of a new article with or without the mentioning the author used substantial portions of previously published articles, including tables and figures. Scientific institutions and universities should,in accordance with the principles of Good Scientific Practice (GSP) and Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) have a center for monitoring,security, promotion and development of quality research. Establish rules and compliance to rules of good scientific practice are the obligations of each research institutions,universities and every individual-researchers,regardless of which area of science is investigated. In this way, internal quality control ensures that a research institution such as a university, assume responsibility for creating an environment that promotes standards of excellence, intellectual honesty and legality. Although the truth should be the aim of scientific research, it is not guiding fact for all scientists. The best way to reach the truth in its study and to avoid the methodological and ethical mistakes is to consistently apply scientific methods and ethical standards in research. Although variously defined plagiarism is basically intended to deceive the reader’s own scientific contribution. There is no general regulation of control of

  18. [Scientific publications: a resource for the physician's intellectual development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    The physician's professional life involves reading and analysis of scientific journals, regardless of the specialization field. The hospital and academic areas lead to the scientific-literary activity development. The aim of this editorial is to make some reflections about the way a physician reaches intellectual development, through the creation of a culture of writing and reading scientific publications.

  19. Theoretical bases analysis of scientific prediction on marketing principles

    OpenAIRE

    A.S. Rosohata

    2012-01-01

    The article presents an overview categorical apparatus of scientific predictions and theoretical foundations results of scientific forecasting. They are integral part of effective management of economic activities. The approaches to the prediction of scientists in different fields of Social science and the categories modification of scientific prediction, based on principles of marketing are proposed.

  20. An Integrated Assessment Approach to Address Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niladri Basu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM is growing in many regions of the world including Ghana. The problems in these communities are complex and multi-faceted. To help increase understanding of such problems, and to enable consensus-building and effective translation of scientific findings to stakeholders, help inform policies, and ultimately improve decision making, we utilized an Integrated Assessment approach to study artisanal and small-scale gold mining activities in Ghana. Though Integrated Assessments have been used in the fields of environmental science and sustainable development, their use in addressing specific matter in public health, and in particular, environmental and occupational health is quite limited despite their many benefits. The aim of the current paper was to describe specific activities undertaken and how they were organized, and the outputs and outcomes of our activity. In brief, three disciplinary workgroups (Natural Sciences, Human Health, Social Sciences and Economics were formed, with 26 researchers from a range of Ghanaian institutions plus international experts. The workgroups conducted activities in order to address the following question: What are the causes, consequences and correctives of small-scale gold mining in Ghana? More specifically: What alternatives are available in resource-limited settings in Ghana that allow for gold-mining to occur in a manner that maintains ecological health and human health without hindering near- and long-term economic prosperity? Several response options were identified and evaluated, and are currently being disseminated to various stakeholders within Ghana and internationally.

  1. An Integrated Assessment Approach to Address Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Niladri; Renne, Elisha P; Long, Rachel N

    2015-09-17

    Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) is growing in many regions of the world including Ghana. The problems in these communities are complex and multi-faceted. To help increase understanding of such problems, and to enable consensus-building and effective translation of scientific findings to stakeholders, help inform policies, and ultimately improve decision making, we utilized an Integrated Assessment approach to study artisanal and small-scale gold mining activities in Ghana. Though Integrated Assessments have been used in the fields of environmental science and sustainable development, their use in addressing specific matter in public health, and in particular, environmental and occupational health is quite limited despite their many benefits. The aim of the current paper was to describe specific activities undertaken and how they were organized, and the outputs and outcomes of our activity. In brief, three disciplinary workgroups (Natural Sciences, Human Health, Social Sciences and Economics) were formed, with 26 researchers from a range of Ghanaian institutions plus international experts. The workgroups conducted activities in order to address the following question: What are the causes, consequences and correctives of small-scale gold mining in Ghana? More specifically: What alternatives are available in resource-limited settings in Ghana that allow for gold-mining to occur in a manner that maintains ecological health and human health without hindering near- and long-term economic prosperity? Several response options were identified and evaluated, and are currently being disseminated to various stakeholders within Ghana and internationally.

  2. Neophilia Ranking of Scientific Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packalen, Mikko; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2017-01-01

    The ranking of scientific journals is important because of the signal it sends to scientists about what is considered most vital for scientific progress. Existing ranking systems focus on measuring the influence of a scientific paper (citations)-these rankings do not reward journals for publishing innovative work that builds on new ideas. We propose an alternative ranking based on the proclivity of journals to publish papers that build on new ideas, and we implement this ranking via a text-based analysis of all published biomedical papers dating back to 1946. In addition, we compare our neophilia ranking to citation-based (impact factor) rankings; this comparison shows that the two ranking approaches are distinct. Prior theoretical work suggests an active role for our neophilia index in science policy. Absent an explicit incentive to pursue novel science, scientists underinvest in innovative work because of a coordination problem: for work on a new idea to flourish, many scientists must decide to adopt it in their work. Rankings that are based purely on influence thus do not provide sufficient incentives for publishing innovative work. By contrast, adoption of the neophilia index as part of journal-ranking procedures by funding agencies and university administrators would provide an explicit incentive for journals to publish innovative work and thus help solve the coordination problem by increasing scientists' incentives to pursue innovative work.

  3. Lexical Features of Scientific Discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Rusko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a lot of emphasis is placed of the ability of a person to successfully communicate in any sphere of activity, which along with upbringing and education is among the factors that determine a person’s culture. In the context of rapid scientific and technological progress, it is vital to constantly exchange relevant infor- mation. The effectiveness of this process relies not only on the proficient knowledge of the subject and the ability to make grammatically correct sentences, but to a large extent on the level of competence in scientific language. The present article attempts to consider the interaction of discourse and vocabulary, different types of cognitive phenomena responsible for the use of a language in real time and related to the language as a means of storing and organising information. Analysing and classifying some key elements of a scientific discourse lexicon contributes to the development of certain provisions of lexicology, functional stylistics, cognitive linguistics and terminology. The results of the analysis may be advantageous both to linguistics and teaching the language for specific purposes.

  4. Recording Scientific Knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowker, Geof

    2006-01-01

    The way we record knowledge, and the web of technical, formal, and social practices that surrounds it, inevitably affects the knowledge that we record. The ways we hold knowledge about the past - in handwritten manuscripts, in printed books, in file folders, in databases - shape the kind of stories we tell about that past. In this talk, I look at how over the past two hundred years, information technology has affected the nature and production of scientific knowledge. Further, I explore ways in which the emergent new cyberinfrastructure is changing our relationship to scientific practice.

  5. Usability in Scientific Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Suduc

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Usability, most often defined as the ease of use and acceptability of a system, affects the users' performance and their job satisfaction when working with a machine. Therefore, usability is a very important aspect which must be considered in the process of a system development. The paper presents several numerical data related to the history of the scientific research of the usability of information systems, as it is viewed in the information provided by three important scientific databases, Science Direct, ACM Digital Library and IEEE Xplore Digital Library, at different queries related to this field.

  6. Technical innovation and policy of scientific technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Wi Jin

    2006-04-01

    This book deals with system of innovation and policy of scientific technology : main view point and Topic, technical politics and technical learning, spread of internet and change of structure in information and communications industry, characteristic of technical innovation of software as open source, transfer into national innovation system, change of activity of public scientific technology, theory on technical innovation, evolution of technical innovation policy and participation of civil.

  7. The Scientific Method in a Cup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Bradley W.; More, M. B.

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes an inexpensive hands-on activity that invites students to investigate an intriguing mystery and so discover for themselves the essence of the scientific method. When a spoon is tapped against the bottom of a mug of freshly made hot chocolate, a tone of constantly rising pitch is heard. Students’ reactions to this “hot chocolate effect” illustrate how the scientific method may be constructed from the common sense and curiosity present in us all.

  8. C Versus Fortran-77 for Scientific Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom MacDonald

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The predominant programming language for numeric and scientific applications is Fortran-77 and supercomputers are primarily used to run large-scale numeric and scientific applications. Standard C* is not widely used for numerical and scientific programming, yet Standard C provides many desirable linguistic features not present in Fortran-77. Furthermore, the existence of a standard library and preprocessor eliminates the worst portability problems. A comparison of Standard C and Fortran-77 shows several key deficiencies in C that reduce its ability to adequately solve some numerical problems. Some of these problems have already been addressed by the C standard but others remain. Standard C with a few extensions and modifications could be suitable for all numerical applications and could become more popular in supercomputing environments.

  9. Scientific collaboration and collective knowledge new essays

    CERN Document Server

    Mayo-Wilson, Conor; Weisberg, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Descartes once argued that, with sufficient effort and skill, a single scientist could uncover fundamental truths about our world. Contemporary science proves the limits of this claim. From synthesizing the human genome to predicting the effects of climate change, some current scientific research requires the collaboration of hundreds (if not thousands) of scientists with various specializations. Additionally, the majority of published scientific research is now co-authored, including more than 80% of articles in the natural sciences, meaning small collaborative teams have become the norm in science. This volume is the first to address critical philosophical questions regarding how collective scientific research could be organized differently and how it should be organized. For example, should scientists be required to share knowledge with competing research teams? How can universities and grant-giving institutions promote successful collaborations? When hundreds of researchers contribute to a discovery, how ...

  10. Student Perceptions of Peer Credibility Based on Email Addresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, Jeffrey A.; Scafe, Marla G.; Wiechowski, Linda S.; Maier, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate students' perceptions of their peer's credibility based on email addresses. The survey was conducted at a community college in Michigan where all students were registered and actively taking at least one course. The survey results show that a student's selection of an email address does influence other…

  11. A region addresses patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Karen Wolk; Grunden, Naida; Harrison, Edward I

    2002-06-01

    The Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiative (PRHI) is a coalition of 35 hospitals, 4 major insurers, more than 30 major and small-business health care purchasers, dozens of corporate and civic leaders, organized labor, and partnerships with state and federal government all working together to deliver perfect patient care throughout Southwestern Pennsylvania. PRHI believes that in pursuing perfection, many of the challenges facing today's health care delivery system (eg, waste and error in the delivery of care, rising costs, frustration and shortage among clinicians and workers, financial distress, overcapacity, and lack of access to care) will be addressed. PRHI has identified patient safety (nosocomial infections and medication errors) and 5 clinical areas (obstetrics, orthopedic surgery, cardiac surgery, depression, and diabetes) as ideal starting points. In each of these areas of work, PRHI partners have assembled multifacility/multidisciplinary groups charged with defining perfection, establishing region-wide reporting systems, and devising and implementing recommended improvement strategies and interventions. Many design and conceptual elements of the PRHI strategy are adapted from the Toyota Production System and its Pittsburgh derivative, the Alcoa Business System. PRHI is in the proof-of-concept phase of development.

  12. Online Discovery and Mapping of Great Lakes Climate Change Education and Scientific Research Activities: Building an Online Collaborative Learning Community of Scientists and Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuddenham, P.; Bishop, K.; Walters, H.; Carley, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Great Lakes Climate Change Science and Education Systemic Network (GLCCSESN) project is an NSF-funded CCEP program awarded to Eastern Michigan University in 2010. The College of Exploration is one of the project partners and has conducted a series of online surveys, workshop and focus group to identify a wide range of organizations, individuals, resources and needs related to climate change education and research activities in and about the Great Lakes Region and to provide information about climate change science to the education community. One of the first steps taken to build this community was to build a web site that features a dynamic online map of individuals and organizations concerned about climate change as well as interested in resources and activities specific to the Great Lakes. Individuals and organizations have been, and are still, invited to put themselves on the map at http://greatlakesclimate.org This map of the Great Lakes region provides both a visual representation of activities and resources as well as a database of climate change activities. This map will grow over time as more people and organizations put themselves on the map. The use of online technologies has helped broaden the participation and representation in the GLCCSESN from all states/provinces in the Great Lakes region, encouraging diverse audiences and stakeholders, including scientists, educators, and journalists, etc.to engage with the project. In the fall of 2011 a combined online professional development workshop and focus group is planned. Educators and scientists working on climate change studies and issues related to the Great Lakes will be sharing their work and expertise in an online workshop and focus group. Following the professional development activity a focus group will be conducted online using a model developed as part of a NSF funded COSEE project. The focus group purpose is to review current educational resources and to identify gaps and needs for further

  13. Addressing Safeguards Challenges for the Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majali, Raed; Yim, Man-Sung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    IAEA safeguard system is considered the corner stone of the international nuclear nonproliferation regime. Effective implementation of this legal instrument enables the IAEA to draw a conclusion with a high degree of confidence on the peaceful use of nuclear material and activities in the state. This paper aims to provide an opportunity to address various challenges encountered by IAEA. Strengthening safeguards system for verification is one of the most urgent challenges facing the IAEA. The IAEA should be able to provide credible assurance not only about declared use of nuclear material and facilities but also about the absence of undeclared material and activities. Implementation of IAEA safeguards continue to play a vital role within the nuclear non-proliferation regime. IAEA must move towards more enhanced safeguards system that is driven by the full use of all the safeguards available relevant information. Safeguards system must be responsive to evolving challenges and continue innovation through efficient implementations of more effective safeguards.

  14. The United States of America and scientific research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J Hather

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To gauge the current commitment to scientific research in the United States of America (US, we compared federal research funding (FRF with the US gross domestic product (GDP and industry research spending during the past six decades. In order to address the recent globalization of scientific research, we also focused on four key indicators of research activities: research and development (R&D funding, total science and engineering doctoral degrees, patents, and scientific publications. We compared these indicators across three major population and economic regions: the US, the European Union (EU and the People's Republic of China (China over the past decade. We discovered a number of interesting trends with direct relevance for science policy. The level of US FRF has varied between 0.2% and 0.6% of the GDP during the last six decades. Since the 1960s, the US FRF contribution has fallen from twice that of industrial research funding to roughly equal. Also, in the last two decades, the portion of the US government R&D spending devoted to research has increased. Although well below the US and the EU in overall funding, the current growth rate for R&D funding in China greatly exceeds that of both. Finally, the EU currently produces more science and engineering doctoral graduates and scientific publications than the US in absolute terms, but not per capita. This study's aim is to facilitate a serious discussion of key questions by the research community and federal policy makers. In particular, our results raise two questions with respect to: a the increasing globalization of science: "What role is the US playing now, and what role will it play in the future of international science?"; and b the ability to produce beneficial innovations for society: "How will the US continue to foster its strengths?"

  15. The United States of America and scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hather, Gregory J; Haynes, Winston; Higdon, Roger; Kolker, Natali; Stewart, Elizabeth A; Arzberger, Peter; Chain, Patrick; Field, Dawn; Franza, B Robert; Lin, Biaoyang; Meyer, Folker; Ozdemir, Vural; Smith, Charles V; van Belle, Gerald; Wooley, John; Kolker, Eugene

    2010-08-16

    To gauge the current commitment to scientific research in the United States of America (US), we compared federal research funding (FRF) with the US gross domestic product (GDP) and industry research spending during the past six decades. In order to address the recent globalization of scientific research, we also focused on four key indicators of research activities: research and development (R&D) funding, total science and engineering doctoral degrees, patents, and scientific publications. We compared these indicators across three major population and economic regions: the US, the European Union (EU) and the People's Republic of China (China) over the past decade. We discovered a number of interesting trends with direct relevance for science policy. The level of US FRF has varied between 0.2% and 0.6% of the GDP during the last six decades. Since the 1960s, the US FRF contribution has fallen from twice that of industrial research funding to roughly equal. Also, in the last two decades, the portion of the US government R&D spending devoted to research has increased. Although well below the US and the EU in overall funding, the current growth rate for R&D funding in China greatly exceeds that of both. Finally, the EU currently produces more science and engineering doctoral graduates and scientific publications than the US in absolute terms, but not per capita. This study's aim is to facilitate a serious discussion of key questions by the research community and federal policy makers. In particular, our results raise two questions with respect to: a) the increasing globalization of science: "What role is the US playing now, and what role will it play in the future of international science?"; and b) the ability to produce beneficial innovations for society: "How will the US continue to foster its strengths?"

  16. Funding scientific open access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canessa, E.; Fonda, C.; Zennaro, M.

    2006-11-01

    In order to reduce the knowledge divide, more Open Access Journals (OAJ) are needed in all languages and scholarly subject areas that exercise peer-review or editorial quality control. To finance needed costs, it is discussed why and how to sell target specific advertisement by associating ads to given scientific keywords. (author)

  17. Dorky Poll Scientific Fears

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The questions posed in yesterday's posts about hopes for 2008 were half of what we were asked by the Powers That Be. The other half: What scientific development do you fear you'll be blogging or reading about in 2008?

  18. Is risk analysis scientific?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Sven Ove; Aven, Terje

    2014-07-01

    This article discusses to what extent risk analysis is scientific in view of a set of commonly used definitions and criteria. We consider scientific knowledge to be characterized by its subject matter, its success in developing the best available knowledge in its fields of study, and the epistemic norms and values that guide scientific investigations. We proceed to assess the field of risk analysis according to these criteria. For this purpose, we use a model for risk analysis in which science is used as a base for decision making on risks, which covers the five elements evidence, knowledge base, broad risk evaluation, managerial review and judgment, and the decision; and that relates these elements to the domains experts and decisionmakers, and to the domains fact-based or value-based. We conclude that risk analysis is a scientific field of study, when understood as consisting primarily of (i) knowledge about risk-related phenomena, processes, events, etc., and (ii) concepts, theories, frameworks, approaches, principles, methods and models to understand, assess, characterize, communicate, and manage risk, in general and for specific applications (the instrumental part). © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis.

  19. Scientific Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientific Medical Journal: an official journal of Egyptian Medical Education provides a forum for dissemination of knowledge, exchange of ideas, inform of exchange of ideas, information and experience among workers, investigators and clinicians in all disciplines of medicine with emphasis on its treatment and prevention.

  20. Assessing Scientific Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, John M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A method for assessing scientific performance based on relationships displayed numerically in published documents is proposed and illustrated using published documents in pediatric oncology for the period 1979-1982. Contributions of a major clinical investigations group, the Childrens Cancer Study Group, are analyzed. Twenty-nine references are…

  1. 3 CFR - Scientific Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... information in policymaking. The selection of scientists and technology professionals for positions in the... Administration on a wide range of issues, including improvement of public health, protection of the environment... technological findings and conclusions. If scientific and technological information is developed and used by the...

  2. Scientific annual report 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report is given on the scientific research at DESY in 1973, which included the first storage of electrons in the double storage ring DORIS. Also mentioned are the two large spectrometers PLUTO and DASP, and experiments relating to elementary particles, synchrotron radiation, and the improvement of the equipment are described. (WL/AK) [de

  3. Mario Bunge's Scientific Realism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents and comments on Mario Bunge's scientific realism. After a brief introduction in Sects. 1 and 2 outlines Bunge's conception of realism. Focusing on the case of quantum mechanics, Sect. 3 explores how his approach plays out for problematic theories. Section 4 comments on Bunge's project against the background of the current…

  4. Toward executable scientific publications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkers, R.J.; Cushing, R.; Vasyunin, D.; Laat, C. de; Belloum, A.S.Z.; Meijer, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    Reproducibility of experiments is considered as one of the main principles of the scientific method. Recent developments in data and computation intensive science, i.e. e-Science, and state of the art in Cloud computing provide the necessary components to preserve data sets and re-run code and

  5. INNER DIALOGICITY OF MEDICAL SCIENTIFIC TEXTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efremova Nataliya Vladimirovna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The author studies inner dialogicity as an integral property of a scientist's thinking activity, a way of a scientific idea development, one of the cognitive and discursive mechanisms of new knowledge formation, its crystallization and dementalisation in a text, as a way of search for truth. Such approach to dialogicity in the study of a scientific text makes it possible to analyze the cogitative processes proceeding in human consciousness and cognitive activity, allows to fully understand the stated scientific concept, to define pragmatic strategies of the author, to plunge into his reflexive world. On the material of medical scientific texts of N.M. Amosov and F. G. Uglov, famous scientists in the field of cardio surgery, it is established that traces of internal dialogicity manifestation in the textual space of scientists actualize the origin of new knowledge, the change of author's semantic positions, his ability to reflect, compare, analyze his own thoughts and actions, to estimate oneself and the features of thinking process which are realized in logic of a statement of the scientific concept, an explanation of concepts, terms at judgment of the points of view of contemporaries and predecessors, adherents and scientist's opponents, and also orientation to the addressee's presupposition, activization of his cogitative activity. Linguistic, discursive, verbal analysis singles out the impact on the addressee, his mental activity.

  6. Scientific Tourism in Armenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashchyan, Davit

    2016-12-01

    The Scientific Tourism is relatively new direction in the world, however it already has managed to gain great popularity. As it is, it has arisen in 1980s, but its ideological basis comes from the earliest periods of the human history. In Armenia, it is a completely new phenomenon and still not-understandable for many people. At global level, the Scientific Tourism has several definitions: for example, as explains the member of the scientific tourist centre of Zlovlen Mrs. Pichelerova "The essence of the scientific tourism is based on the provision of the educational, cultural and entertainment needs of a group of people of people who are interested in the same thing", which in our opinion is a very comprehensive and discreet definition. We also have our own views on this type of tourism. Our philosophy is that by keeping the total principles, we put the emphasis on the strengthening of science-individual ties. Our main emphasis is on the scientific-experimental tourism. But this does not mean that we do not take steps to other forms of tourism. Studying the global experience and combining it with our resources, we are trying to get a new interdisciplinary science, which will bring together a number of different professionals as well as individuals, and as a result will have a new lore. It is in this way that an astronomer will become an archaeologist, an archaeologist will become an astrophysicist, etc. Speaking on interdisciplinary sciences, it's worth mentioning that in recent years, the role of interdisciplinary sciences at global level every day is being considered more and more important. In these terms, tourism is an excellent platform for the creation of interdisciplinary sciences and, therefore, the preparation of corresponding scholars. Nevertheless, scientific tourism is very important for the revelation, appreciation and promotion of the country's historical-cultural heritage and scientific potential. Let us not forget either that tourism in all its

  7. Scientific Research & Subsistence: Protocols to Ensure Co-Existence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachman, C.; Holman, A.; DeMaster, D.

    2017-12-01

    used in a larger context to address concerns over increased vessel traffic from other activities. We will outline the importance of establishing the guidelines, describe the general process, and highlight examples of positive interactions with Alaska Native hunters during scientific research operations using this protocol.

  8. OPENING ADDRESS: Heterostructures in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmeiss, Hermann G.

    1996-01-01

    Good morning, Gentlemen! On behalf of the Nobel Foundation, I should like to welcome you to the Nobel Symposium on "Heterostructures in Semiconductors". It gives me great pleasure to see so many colleagues and old friends from all over the world in the audience and, in particular, to bid welcome to our Nobel laureates, Prof. Esaki and Prof. von Klitzing. In front of a different audience I would now commend the scientific and technological importance of heterostructures in semiconductors and emphatically emphasise that heterostructures, as an important contribution to microelectronics and, hence, information technology, have changed societies all over the world. I would also mention that information technology is one of the most important global key industries which covers a wide field of important areas each of which bears its own character. Ever since the invention of the transistor, we have witnessed a fantastic growth in semiconductor technology, leading to more complex functions and higher densities of devices. This development would hardly be possible without an increasing understanding of semiconductor materials and new concepts in material growth techniques which allow the fabrication of previously unknown semiconductor structures. But here and today I will not do it because it would mean to carry coals to Newcastle. I will therefore not remind you that heterostructures were already suggested and discussed in detail a long time before proper technologies were available for the fabrication of such structures. Now, heterostructures are a foundation in science and part of our everyday life. Though this is certainly true, it is nevertheless fair to say that not all properties of heterostructures are yet understood and that further technologies have to be developed before a still better understanding is obtained. The organisers therefore hope that this symposium will contribute not only to improving our understanding of heterostructures but also to opening new

  9. Scientific opinion on the assessment of a decontamination process for dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs in fish oil by physical filtration with activated carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Annette

    the amount of dioxins (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs)) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs). All feed decontamination processes must comply with the acceptability criteria specified in the Commission Regulation (EU) 2015/786. The data...... to demonstrate the safe disposal of the waste material. The CONTAM Panel concluded that on the basis of the information submitted by the feed business operator the proposed decontamination process to remove dioxins (PCDD/Fs) and DL-PCBs from the fish oil by means of physical filtration with activated carbon...

  10. A scientific curiosity: viviparous reproduction in an activated sludge rotifer; Una curiosidad para la ciencia: reproduccion vivipara en un rotifero del fango activado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zornoza, A.; Rodriguez, E.; Isac, L.; Fernandez, N.; Salas, M. D.

    2004-07-01

    This article offers reader the opportunity to witness a marvel of nature: the birth of a new being. It, in addition, it is borne in mind that we are talking about an organisms measuring less than 500?m and with a life span of just a few days, this is, to say the least, an unforgettable experience. We are in the presence of the miracle of life the microscopic level. This communication provides the chance to find out more about the physiology of this type of animal- the whet- el animalcule which is part of the micro fauna of activated sludge. (Author) 13 refs.

  11. Nuclear and non-nuclear risks: Address to the Parliamentary and Scientific Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.

    1988-01-01

    Risk assessment is first explained. For example, for a loss of coolant accident at Sizewell B the estimate of the likelihood that radioactivity would be released involves three numbers:- the frequency of loss of coolant from the reactor; how often the safety pumps which would have to work in case of a loss of coolant have failed when tested; and the chance that the containment round the reactor will fail. As each risk number is small, the combined risk is very small. Using the same method of assessment the risk of an accident affecting public safety at the liquid gas plant on Canvey Island is 1000 larger, but still small and acceptable. Much time and money was spent on establishing the 1000 times lower risk of an accident affecting public safety at the Sizewell reactor. The risk assessment was however, finally accepted. Fast reactors are even safer than pressurised water reactors and use a renewable energy source; their development is strongly advocated. It is noted that the risks from a medieval water-wheel were enormous compared with nuclear risks today. (U.K.)

  12. Addressing Emerging Risks: Scientific and Regulatory Challenges Associated with Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Tammy R; Lomnicki, Slawomir; Cormier, Stephania A; Dellinger, Barry; Reams, Margaret

    2016-06-08

    Airborne fine and ultrafine particulate matter (PM) are often generated through widely-used thermal processes such as the combustion of fuels or the thermal decomposition of waste. Residents near Superfund sites are exposed to PM through the inhalation of windblown dust, ingestion of soil and sediments, and inhalation of emissions from the on-site thermal treatment of contaminated soils. Epidemiological evidence supports a link between exposure to airborne PM and an increased risk of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. It is well-known that during combustion processes, incomplete combustion can lead to the production of organic pollutants that can adsorb to the surface of PM. Recent studies have demonstrated that their interaction with metal centers can lead to the generation of a surface stabilized metal-radical complex capable of redox cycling to produce ROS. Moreover, these free radicals can persist in the environment, hence their designation as Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFR). EPFR has been demonstrated in both ambient air PM2.5 (diameter challenges associated with regulating this new, emerging contaminant.

  13. Scientific and non-scientific information in the uptake of health information: The case of Ebola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bankole A. Falade

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa (2013–2016 claimed over 10 000 lives in less than 18 months. Low levels of familiarity with the disease, ease of transmission, scale of infection, gruesomeness of symptoms, lack of cure and high fatality rate created a global panic. From the perspective of the social psychology of communication and content analysis, this study examines media coverage of the crisis in Africa with a view to unpacking the scientific and non-scientific information that may have framed public understanding of the disease. Findings show that accepting scientific advice was not unproblematic, because of the similarity of early symptoms with known diseases such as Lassa, dengue and malaria fevers. Cultural and religious actors and beliefs posed a paradox for believers as the public assimilated disease prevention information into existing norms and practices. Rumours and conspiracy theories about Western governments and pharmaceuticals also contributed to the rejection of the scientific explanation of its origin. Fear of the devastating effects of the disease and the lack of a cure led to the stigmatisation of the infected and treatment centres and ultimately to public revolts. Findings show the importance of non-scientific information and actors in matters of health and illness in Africa. Significance: Scientific knowledge is not enough to change health behaviour. Non-scientific knowledge and actors, traditional and religious practices, rumours and conspiracy theories must all be factored into efforts to address behavioural change.

  14. Final Scientific/Technical Report for Subseasonal to Seasonal Prediction of Extratropical Storm Track Activity over the U.S. using NMME data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Edmund Kar-Man [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2017-10-30

    The goals of the project are: 1) To develop and assess subseasonal to seasonal prediction products for storm track activity derived from NMME data; 2) Assess how much of the predictable signal can be associated with ENSO and other modes of large scale low frequency atmosphere-ocean variability; and 3) Further explore the link between storm track variations and extreme weather statistics. Significant findings of this project include the followings: 1) Our assessment of NMME reforecasts of storm track variability has demonstrated that NMME models have substantial skill in predicting storm track activity in the vicinity of North America - Subseasonal skill is high only for leads of less than 1 month. However, seasonal (winter) prediction skill near North America is high even out to 4 to 5 months lead - Much of the skill for leads of 1 month or longer is related to the influence of ENSO - Nevertheless, lead 0 NMME predictions are significantly more skillful than those based on ENSO influence 2) Our results have demonstrated that storm track variations highly modulate the frequency of occurrence of weather extremes - Extreme cold, high wind, and extreme precipitation events in winter - Extreme heat events in summer - These results suggest that NMME storm track predictions can be developed to serve as a useful guidance to assist the formulation of monthly/seasonal outlooks

  15. Turning Scientific Presentations into Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruffo, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    To increase students' confidence in giving scientific presentations, students were shown how to present scientific findings as a narrative story. Students who were preparing to give a scientific talk attended a workshop in which they were encouraged to experience the similarities between telling a personal anecdote and presenting scientific data.…

  16. Event generators for address event representation transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Gotarredona, Rafael; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Linares Barranco, Bernabe

    2005-06-01

    Address Event Representation (AER) is an emergent neuromorphic interchip communication protocol that allows for real-time virtual massive connectivity between huge number neurons located on different chips. By exploiting high speed digital communication circuits (with nano-seconds timings), synaptic neural connections can be time multiplexed, while neural activity signals (with mili-seconds timings) are sampled at low frequencies. Also, neurons generate 'events' according to their activity levels. More active neurons generate more events per unit time, and access the interchip communication channel more frequently, while neurons with low activity consume less communication bandwidth. In a typical AER transmitter chip, there is an array of neurons that generate events. They send events to a peripheral circuitry (let's call it "AER Generator") that transforms those events to neurons coordinates (addresses) which are put sequentially on an interchip high speed digital bus. This bus includes a parallel multi-bit address word plus a Rqst (request) and Ack (acknowledge) handshaking signals for asynchronous data exchange. There have been two main approaches published in the literature for implementing such "AER Generator" circuits. They differ on the way of handling event collisions coming from the array of neurons. One approach is based on detecting and discarding collisions, while the other incorporates arbitration for sequencing colliding events . The first approach is supposed to be simpler and faster, while the second is able to handle much higher event traffic. In this article we will concentrate on the second arbiter-based approach. Boahen has been publishing several techniques for implementing and improving the arbiter based approach. Originally, he proposed an arbitration squeme by rows, followed by a column arbitration. In this scheme, while one neuron was selected by the arbiters to transmit his event out of the chip, the rest of neurons in the array were

  17. Scientific Opportunity to Reduce Risk in Groundwater and Soil Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Looney, Brian B.; Zachara, John M.; Liang, Liyuan; Lesmes, D.; Chamberlain, G. M.; Skubal, Karen L.; Adams, V.; Denham, Miles E.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2009-08-25

    In this report, we start by examining previous efforts at linking science and DOE EM research with cleanup activities. Many of these efforts were initiated by creating science and technology roadmaps. A recurring feature of successfully implementing these roadmaps into EM applied research efforts and successful cleanup is the focus on integration. Such integration takes many forms, ranging from combining information generated by various scientific disciplines, to providing technical expertise to facilitate successful application of novel technology, to bringing the resources and creativity of many to address the common goal of moving EM cleanup forward. Successful projects identify and focus research efforts on addressing the problems and challenges that are causing “failure” in actual cleanup activities. In this way, basic and applied science resources are used strategically to address the particular unknowns that are barriers to cleanup. The brief descriptions of the Office of Science basic (Environmental Remediation Science Program [ERSP]) and EM’s applied (Groundwater and Soil Remediation Program) research programs in subsurface science provide context to the five “crosscutting” themes that have been developed in this strategic planning effort. To address these challenges and opportunities, a tiered systematic approach is proposed that leverages basic science investments with new applied research investments from the DOE Office of Engineering and Technology within the framework of the identified basic science and applied research crosscutting themes. These themes are evident in the initial portfolio of initiatives in the EM groundwater and soil cleanup multi-year program plan. As stated in a companion document for tank waste processing (Bredt et al. 2008), in addition to achieving its mission, DOE EM is experiencing a fundamental shift in philosophy from driving to closure to enabling the long-term needs of DOE and the nation.

  18. Development and Application of a Category System to Describe Pre-Service Science Teachers' Activities in the Process of Scientific Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, Moritz; Walzer, Christine; Hergert, Susann; Krüger, Dirk

    2017-09-01

    As part of their professional competencies, science teachers need an elaborate meta-modelling knowledge as well as modelling skills in order to guide and monitor modelling practices of their students. However, qualitative studies about (pre-service) science teachers' modelling practices are rare. This study provides a category system which is suitable to analyse and to describe pre-service science teachers' modelling activities and to infer modelling strategies. The category system was developed based on theoretical considerations and was inductively refined within the methodological frame of qualitative content analysis. For the inductive refinement, modelling practices of pre-service teachers (n = 4) have been video-taped and analysed. In this study, one case was selected to demonstrate the application of the category system to infer modelling strategies. The contribution of this study for science education research and science teacher education is discussed.

  19. Realization and Addressing Analysis In Blockchain Bitcoin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakti Arief Daulay, Raja; Michrandi Nasution, Surya; Paryasto, Marisa W.

    2017-11-01

    The implementation research and analyze address blockchain on this bitcoin will have the results that refers to making address bitcoin a safe and boost security of address the bitcoin. The working mechanism of blockchain in making address bitcoin which is already in the blockchain system.

  20. Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office independent scientific investigations program annual report, May 1997 - April 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    This annual summary report, prepared by the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office (NWRPO), summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1997 to April 30, 1998. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO's on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment; identifying areas not being addressed adequately by the Department of Energy (DOE). Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues. This report summarizes the results of monitoring from two boreholes and the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) tunnel that have been instrumented by Nye County since March and April of 1995. The preliminary data and interpretations presented in this report do not constitute and should not be considered as the official position of Nye County. The ISIP presently includes borehole and tunnel instrumentation, monitoring, data analysis, and numerical modeling activities to address the concerns of Nye County

  1. Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office independent scientific investigations program annual report, May 1997--April 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This annual summary report, prepared by the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office (NWRPO), summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1997 to April 30, 1998. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO`s on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment; identifying areas not being addressed adequately by the Department of Energy (DOE). Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues. This report summarizes the results of monitoring from two boreholes and the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) tunnel that have been instrumented by Nye County since March and April of 1995. The preliminary data and interpretations presented in this report do not constitute and should not be considered as the official position of Nye County. The ISIP presently includes borehole and tunnel instrumentation, monitoring, data analysis, and numerical modeling activities to address the concerns of Nye County.

  2. Compendium in astronomy a volume dedicated to professor John Xanthakis on the occasion of completing twenty-five years of scientific activities as fellow of the National Academy of Athens

    CERN Document Server

    Theocaris, Pericles; Mavridis, L

    1982-01-01

    When we first approached some colleagues allover the world to sound them about a volume dedicated to Professor John Xanthakis on the occasion of completing twenty-five years of scientific activities as fellow of the National Academy of Athens, any possible doubts as to the feasibility of the project were quickly dispelled by their warm and encouraging response. In a short time 50 authors from 15 countries, coming from a wide range of Professor Xanthakis' immediate colleagues, pupils and friends joined to produce the 36 contributions included in this volume. Some of those who where originally approached found themselves un­ able to contribute, because of the time-limit necessarily imposed. Happi­ ly, they were only few in number, and we should like to record our grat­ itude to them for their good wishes for the success of the venture. Their warm words were among the many sources of inspiring encouragement extended to us.

  3. Lemont B. Kier: a bibliometric exploration of his scientific production and its use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Guillermo; Llanos, Eugenio J; Silva, Adriana E

    2013-12-01

    We thought an appropriate way to celebrate the seminal contribution of Kier is to explore his influence on science, looking for the impact of his research through the citation of his scientific production. From a bibliometric approach the impact of Kier's work is addressed as an individual within a community. Reviewing data from his curriculum vitae, as well as from the ISI Web of Knowledge (ISI), his role within the scientific community is established and the way his scientific results circulate is studied. His curriculum vitae is explored emphasising the approaches he used in his research activities and the social ties with other actors of the community. The circulation of Kier's publications in the ISI is studied as a means for spreading and installing his discourse within the community. The citation patterns found not only show the usage of Kier's scientific results, but also open the possibility to identify some characteristics of this discursive community, such as a common vocabulary and common research goals. The results show an interdisciplinary research work that consolidates a scientific community on the topic of drug discovery.

  4. Advocates or cartographers? Scientific advisors and the narratives of German energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leipprand, Anna; Flachsland, Christian; Pahle, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Political debate on energy in Germany has been shaped by two historically opposed discourses, one pushing for a transition to renewables, the other holding on to the status quo. Scientific policy advice (SPA) has been involved in their evolution from the beginning. This paper draws on the Advocacy Coalition Framework and on discourse and narrative theory to study the role of SPA in recent German energy policy. We explore 1) whether scientific advisors have been members of advocacy coalitions, and 2) how their contributions may have interacted with the evolution of the discourses and major narratives. We perform a qualitative text analysis of 50 SPA reports published between 2000 and 2015. We find that the majority of studies clearly take sides in the debate, and that in most cases the reports’ positions are fully transparent. Despite the polarization, SPA provides differentiated information on key aspects of the discourses, and alternative design options for policy instruments. We conclude that SPA contributions have improved the conditions for political consensus and compromise. Collectively, SPA studies provide a basis for mapping different policy pathways and their consequences. In the future, SPA should address additional critical issues such as coal phase-out and international leadership. - Highlights: • We explore the role of scientific policy advice in Germany's energy transition. • There is widespread, mostly transparent advocacy in scientific advisory reports. • We conclude that scientific policy advice has facilitated dialogue and compromise. • We discuss implications for future advisory activity and further improvements.

  5. The logical foundations of scientific theories languages, structures, and models

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Decio

    2016-01-01

    This book addresses the logical aspects of the foundations of scientific theories. Even though the relevance of formal methods in the study of scientific theories is now widely recognized and regaining prominence, the issues covered here are still not generally discussed in philosophy of science. The authors focus mainly on the role played by the underlying formal apparatuses employed in the construction of the models of scientific theories, relating the discussion with the so-called semantic approach to scientific theories. The book describes the role played by this metamathematical framework in three main aspects: considerations of formal languages employed to axiomatize scientific theories, the role of the axiomatic method itself, and the way set-theoretical structures, which play the role of the models of theories, are developed. The authors also discuss the differences and philosophical relevance of the two basic ways of aximoatizing a scientific theory, namely Patrick Suppes’ set theoretical predicate...

  6. Scientific Programming in Fortran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Van Snyder

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fortran programming language was designed by John Backus and his colleagues at IBM to reduce the cost of programming scientific applications. IBM delivered the first compiler for its model 704 in 1957. IBM's competitors soon offered incompatible versions. ANSI (ASA at the time developed a standard, largely based on IBM's Fortran IV in 1966. Revisions of the standard were produced in 1977, 1990, 1995 and 2003. Development of a revision, scheduled for 2008, is under way. Unlike most other programming languages, Fortran is periodically revised to keep pace with developments in language and processor design, while revisions largely preserve compatibility with previous versions. Throughout, the focus on scientific programming, and especially on efficient generated programs, has been maintained.

  7. Scientific report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this report is to outline the main developments of the 'Departement des Reacteurs Nucleaires' (DRN) during the year 1999. DRN is one of the CEA Institutions. This report is divided in three main parts: the DRN scientific programs, the scientific and technical publications (with abstracts in English) and economic data on staff, budget and communication. Main results of the Department for the year 1999 are presented giving information on the simulation of low mach number compressible flow, experimental irradiation of multi-materials, progress in the dry route conversion process of UF 6 to UO 2 , the neutronics, the CASCADE installation, the corium, the BWR type reactor cores technology, the reactor safety, the transmutation of americium and fuel cell flow studies, the crack propagation, the hybrid systems and the CEA sites improvement. (A.L.B.)

  8. Scientific publications in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magar, A

    2012-09-01

    Scientific publications have become a mainstay of communication among readers, academicians, researchers and scientists worldwide. Although, its existence dates back to 17 th century in the West, Nepal is still struggling to take few steps towards improving its local science for last 50 years. Since the start of the first medical journal in 1963, the challenges remains as it were decades back regarding role of authors, peer reviewers, editors and even publishers in Nepal. Although, there has been some development in terms of the number of articles being published and appearances of the journals, yet there is a long way to go. This article analyzes the past and present scenario, and future perspective for scientific publications in Nepal.

  9. Sherlock Holmes: scientific detective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Laura J

    2004-09-01

    Sherlock Holmes was intended by his creator, Arthur Conan Doyle, to be a 'scientific detective'. Conan Doyle criticized his predecessor Edgar Allan Poe for giving his creation - Inspector Dupin - only the 'illusion' of scientific method. Conan Doyle believed that he had succeeded where Poe had failed; thus, he has Watson remark that Holmes has 'brought detection as near an exact science as it will ever be brought into the world.' By examining Holmes' methods, it becomes clear that Conan Doyle modelled them on certain images of science that were popular in mid- to late-19th century Britain. Contrary to a common view, it is also evident that rather than being responsible for the invention of forensic science, the creation of Holmes was influenced by the early development of it.

  10. Collaboration in scientific practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenknecht, Susann

    2014-01-01

    This monograph investigates the collaborative creation of scientific knowledge in research groups. To do so, I combine philosophical analysis with a first-hand comparative case study of two research groups in experimental science. Qualitative data are gained through observation and interviews......, and I combine empirical insights with existing approaches to knowledge creation in philosophy of science and social epistemology. On the basis of my empirically-grounded analysis I make several conceptual contributions. I study scientific collaboration as the interaction of scientists within research...... to their publication. Specifically, I suggest epistemic difference and the porosity of social structure as two conceptual leitmotifs in the study of group collaboration. With epistemic difference, I emphasize the value of socio-cognitive heterogeneity in group collaboration. With porosity, I underline the fact...

  11. Scientific report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this report is to outline the main developments of the ''Departement des Reacteurs Nucleaires'', (DRN) during the year 1998. DRN is one of the CEA Institution. This report is divided in three main parts: the DRN scientific programs, the scientific and technical publications (with abstracts in english) and economic data on staff, budget and communication. Main results of the Department, for the year 1998, are presented giving information on the reactors technology and safety, the neutronics, the transmutation and the hybrid systems, the dismantling and the sites improvement, the nuclear accidents, the nuclear matter transport, the thermonuclear fusion safety, the fuel cladding materials and radioactive waste control. (A.L.B.)

  12. Scientific Resource EXplorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Z.; Wormuth, A.; Smith, A.; Arca, J.; Lu, Y.; Sayfi, E.

    2014-12-01

    Inquisitive minds in our society are never satisfied with curatedimages released by a typical public affairs office. They always want tolook deeper and play directly on original data. However, most scientificdata products are notoriously hard to use. They are immensely large,highly distributed and diverse in format. In this presentation,we will demonstrate Resource EXplorer (REX), a novel webtop applicationthat allows anyone to conveniently explore and visualize rich scientificdata repositories, using only a standard web browser. This tool leverageson the power of Webification Science (w10n-sci), a powerful enabling technologythat simplifies the use of scientific data on the web platform.W10n-sci is now being deployed at an increasing number of NASA data centers,some of which are the largest digital treasure troves in our nation.With REX, these wonderful scientific resources are open for teachers andstudents to learn and play.

  13. Spent fuel management systems, burnup credit approach experience in expert activity of State Scientific and Technical Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovbasenko, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Implementing new devices and mechanisms, including those developed and manufactured abroad, at enterprises of the Ukrainian power industry makes it necessary to license them in advance by the Ukrainian Regulatory Authority. From time to time, situations occur when these systems or their close analogues have been already used in some countries and have successively passed licensing by the relevant Regulatory Authorities; however, they do not meet the regulatory requirements in force in Ukraine. Preliminary analysis of the regulations in Ukraine concerning nuclear safety of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management systems shows that some regulatory requirements in force are too conservative in view of current international practice. The extent of conservatism can be reduced, if necessary, only on the base of improving our level of understanding the processes occurring in nuclear dangerous systems and improving our capabilities as regards accuracy, correctness, and reliability in numerical modeling these processes. Such activity is consistent with the state-of-the-art production requirements. This work was intended to demonstrate that the excessive conservatism laid previously into the requirements on nuclear safety in Ukraine due to insufficient development of tools for modeling processes in nuclear fuel can be considerably decreased through using more modern and real modeling fuel systems. If such modeling is performed with the use of state-of-the-art methods, based on more complete understanding the processes in fuel systems, then removal of the excessive conservatism will not reduce the safety of nuclear dangerous systems

  14. Keynote Address from V. Sucha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sucha, V.; )

    2015-01-01

    1. Nuclear Energy in Europe: In the EU, the whole nuclear fuel cycle is fully monitored, from uranium enrichment, to fuel production, power reactors, including the two largest plants for reprocessing of spent fuel in the world and final disposal: It goes without saying that the European Union sees nuclear safety, security and safeguards as one of its utmost priorities. 2. Euratom Nuclear safeguards system: The Euratom treaty introduced a strict system of safeguards throughout the EU to ensure that nuclear materials are used only for declared, peaceful purposes; The European Commission's Safeguards Service-better known internationally as Euratom - is a global and quite unique safeguards actor with exceptional enforcement powers; Inspections in the Non-Nuclear Weapon States and in certain installations in the two Nuclear Weapon States of the EU, France and the UK, are carried out jointly by Euratom and IAEA inspectors. More generally, Euratom and IAEA safeguards activities complement each other, which requires close cooperation. In 2013, 1300 inspections took place in the EU in accordance with the Comprehensive Safeguards Agreement in place for the Non-Nuclear Weapon States of the EU and the voluntary Safeguards Agreements for UK and France; In this regard, it is important to mention that Euratom has historically supported all measures aimed to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of the Agency's safeguards system, and currently this is the case with the IAEA's State-Level Concept. State-level Approaches are being used by the IAEA for a couple of years for all non-nuclear weapon EU member states; these should now be further developed by putting more emphasis on utilizing the unique features of the Euratom regional system of safeguards. 3. EU current support to IAEA in the field of nuclear safeguards: The obligations for the European Commission to safeguard a large variety of nuclear facilities, which are becoming ever more sophisticated

  15. Scientific progress report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The R + D-projects in this field and the infrastructural tasks mentioned are handled in seven working- and two project groups: Computer systems, Numerical and applied mathematics, Software development, Process calculation systems- hardware, Nuclear electronics, measuring- and automatic control technique, Research of component parts and irradiation tests, Central data processing, Processing of process data in the science of medicine, Co-operation in the BERNET-project in the 'Wissenschaftliches Rechenzentrum Berlin (WRB)' (scientific computer center in Berlin). (orig./WB)

  16. Evaluating a scientific collaboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Whitton, Mary C.; Maglaughlin, Kelly L.

    2003-01-01

    of the system, and post-interviews to understand the participants' views of doing science under both conditions. We hypothesized that study participants would be less effective, report more difficulty, and be less favorably inclined to adopt the system when collaborating remotely. Contrary to expectations...... of collaborating remotely. While the data analysis produced null results, considered as a whole, the analysis leads us to conclude there is positive potential for the development and adoption of scientific collaboratory systems....

  17. Scientific Equipment Division - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halik, J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Scientific Equipment Division consists of the Design Group and the Mechanical Workshop. The activity of the Division includes the following: - designing of devices and equipment for experiments in physics, their mechanical construction and assembly. In particular, there are vacuum chambers and installations for HV and UHV; - maintenance and upgrading of the existing installations and equipment in our Institute; - participation of our engineers and technicians in design works, equipment assembly and maintenance for experiments in foreign laboratories. The Design Group is equipped with PC-computers and AutoCAD graphic software (release 2000 and Mechanical Desktop 4.0) and a AO plotter, what allows us to make drawings and 2- and 3-dimensional mechanical documentation to the world standards. The Mechanical Workshop can offer a wide range of machining and treatment methods with satisfactory tolerances and surface quality. It offers the following possibilities: - turning - cylindrical elements of a length up to 2000 mm and a diameter up to 400 mm, and also disc-type elements of a diameter up to 600 mm and a length not exceeding 300 mm; - milling - elements of length up to 1000 mm and gear wheels of diameter up to 300 mm; - grinding - flat surfaces of dimensions up to 300 mm x 1000 mm and cylindrical elements of a diameter up to 200 mm and a length up to 800 mm; - drilling - holes of a diameter up to 50 mm; - welding - electrical and gas welding, including TIG vacuum-tight welding; - soft and hard soldering; - mechanical works including precision engineering; - plastics treatment - machining and polishing using diamond milling, modelling, lamination of various shapes and materials, including plexiglas, scintillators and light-guides; - painting - paint spraying with possibility of using furnace-fred drier of internal dimensions of 800 mm x 800 mm x 800 mm. Our workshop posses CNC milling machine which can be used for machining of work-pieces up to 500 kg

  18. PSI scientific report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-04-01

    This comprehensive report on the activities at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI in Switzerland reviews work done in 2010. Apart from reports on several projects being carried out at PSI, particular attention is given to the realization of the new Free-Electron Laser facility (SwissFEL) whose core was put into operation in 2010. The ability of the SwissFEL to rapidly initiate a catalytic process will allow the characterization of short-lived intermediate states and will aid in the development of more efficient catalysts. The various component parts of the facility are discussed in detail. Initial operation of the system and examples of the future use of the facility are discussed. The report goes on to report on research foci and selected highlights of work done. These include the Swiss Synchrotron Light Source which has seen another year of many highlights. Increasing experimental capabilities based on resonant soft X-ray absorption are described and four-dimensional measurements of the interface-kinetics of solid-liquid mixtures during coarsening are reported on. The handling of nano-volume crystallisation drops in the macromolecular crystallography beamline is described and the use of X-rays and neutrons at the micrometre scale to elucidate a metal artefact from the Bronze Age is discussed, as is the investigation of newly discovered iron-based superconductors with muons and neutrons. Neutron grating interferometry is reported on and over 14 years of successful operation of SINQ, PSI's Spallation Neutron Source, is looked back on, Fundamental muon physics is discussed and emergent magnetic monopoles that have been directly observed in a two-dimensional array of nanoscale magnets arranged in a honeycomb geometry is reported on. Nano field-emitter arrays as high-brightness electron beam sources are described. G protein-coupled receptors, the largest group of trans-membrane signal transducers in the human genome, as targets for pharmaceutical intervention are looked

  19. PROSCENIUM OF SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Berlingher

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available During the last three decades of the nineteenth century, organizations developed rapidly, their managers began to realize that they had too frequent managerial problems; this awareness lead to a new phase of development of scientific management. Examining the titles published in that period, it can be concluded that management issues that pose interest related to payroll and payroll systems, problems exacerbated by the industrial revolution and related work efficiency. Noting that large organizations losing power, direct supervision, the managers were looking for incentives to replace this power . One of the first practitioners of this new management system was Henry R. Towne, the president of the well-known enterprise "Yale and Towne Manufacturing Company", which applied the management methods in his company workshops. Publishers of magazines "Industrial Management" and "The Engineering Magazine" stated that HR Towne is, undisputedly, the pioneer of scientific management. He initiated the systematic application of effective management methods and his famous article "The Engineer as Economist" provided to the company. "American Society of Mechanical Engineers" in 1886 was the one that probably inspired Frederick W. Taylor to devote his entire life and work in scientific management.

  20. The next scientific revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Tony

    2010-11-01

    For decades, computer scientists have tried to teach computers to think like human experts. Until recently, most of those efforts have failed to come close to generating the creative insights and solutions that seem to come naturally to the best researchers, doctors, and engineers. But now, Tony Hey, a VP of Microsoft Research, says we're witnessing the dawn of a new generation of powerful computer tools that can "mash up" vast quantities of data from many sources, analyze them, and help produce revolutionary scientific discoveries. Hey and his colleagues call this new method of scientific exploration "machine learning." At Microsoft, a team has already used it to innovate a method of predicting with impressive accuracy whether a patient with congestive heart failure who is released from the hospital will be readmitted within 30 days. It was developed by directing a computer program to pore through hundreds of thousands of data points on 300,000 patients and "learn" the profiles of patients most likely to be rehospitalized. The economic impact of this prediction tool could be huge: If a hospital understands the likelihood that a patient will "bounce back," it can design programs to keep him stable and save thousands of dollars in health care costs. Similar efforts to uncover important correlations that could lead to scientific breakthroughs are under way in oceanography, conservation, and AIDS research. And in business, deep data exploration has the potential to unearth critical insights about customers, supply chains, advertising effectiveness, and more.

  1. First results on DEPFET Active Pixel Sensors fabricated in a CMOS foundry—a promising approach for new detector development and scientific instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschauer, S.; Majewski, P.; Lutz, G.; Soltau, H.; Holl, P.; Hartmann, R.; Schlosser, D.; Paschen, U.; Weyers, S.; Dreiner, S.; Klusmann, M.; Hauser, J.; Kalok, D.; Bechteler, A.; Heinzinger, K.; Porro, M.; Titze, B.; Strüder, L.

    2017-11-01

    DEPFET Active Pixel Sensors (APS) have been introduced as focal plane detectors for X-ray astronomy already in 1996. Fabricated on high resistivity, fully depleted silicon and back-illuminated they can provide high quantum efficiency and low noise operation even at very high read rates. In 2009 a new type of DEPFET APS, the DSSC (DEPFET Sensor with Signal Compression) was developed, which is dedicated to high-speed X-ray imaging at the European X-ray free electron laser facility (EuXFEL) in Hamburg. In order to resolve the enormous contrasts occurring in Free Electron Laser (FEL) experiments, this new DSSC-DEPFET sensor has the capability of nonlinear amplification, that is, high gain for low intensities in order to obtain single-photon detection capability, and reduced gain for high intensities to achieve high dynamic range for several thousand photons per pixel and frame. We call this property "signal compression". Starting in 2015, we have been fabricating DEPFET sensors in an industrial scale CMOS foundry maintaining the outstanding proven DEPFET properties and adding new capabilities due to the industrial-scale CMOS process. We will highlight these additional features and describe the progress achieved so far. In a first attempt on double-sided polished 725 μm thick 200 mm high resistivity float zone silicon wafers all relevant device related properties have been measured, such as leakage current, depletion voltage, transistor characteristics, noise and energy resolution for X-rays and the nonlinear response. The smaller feature size provided by the new technology allows for an advanced design and significant improvements in device performance. A brief summary of the present status will be given as well as an outlook on next steps and future perspectives.

  2. National Institutes of Health addresses the science of diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Collins, Francis S.

    2015-01-01

    The US biomedical research workforce does not currently mirror the nation’s population demographically, despite numerous attempts to increase diversity. This imbalance is limiting the promise of our biomedical enterprise for building knowledge and improving the nation’s health. Beyond ensuring fairness in scientific workforce representation, recruiting and retaining a diverse set of minds and approaches is vital to harnessing the complete intellectual capital of the nation. The complexity inherent in diversifying the research workforce underscores the need for a rigorous scientific approach, consistent with the ways we address the challenges of science discovery and translation to human health. Herein, we identify four cross-cutting diversity challenges ripe for scientific exploration and opportunity: research evidence for diversity’s impact on the quality and outputs of science; evidence-based approaches to recruitment and training; individual and institutional barriers to workforce diversity; and a national strategy for eliminating barriers to career transition, with scientifically based approaches for scaling and dissemination. Evidence-based data for each of these challenges should provide an integrated, stepwise approach to programs that enhance diversity rapidly within the biomedical research workforce. PMID:26392553

  3. Keynote address: International nuclear cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    These meetings provide an important opportunity for the nuclear community to assess the scope and direction of its wide-ranging activities. Nuclear technology has given us the tools to understand and shape our physical environment in ways which can solve ancient problems of health, food supply, energy, and many others which affect the quality of our lives. International cooperation is necessary to secure the peaceful benefits of nuclear technology. Meeting global energy needs must be high on any priority list of issues for the coming decade and the 21st century. The satisfaction of energy needs is today and will increasingly be a crucial factor in international stability. Hand in hand with the need to assure energy sufficiency is the need to assure the long-term protection of the environment. Three key elements that give a useful framework for approaching the future of nuclear cooperation are technological factors, economic issues, and political acceptability. Technological avenues to greater safety must be vigorously pursued. Economic alternatives must be identified and objectively weighed. Most important of all, the framework of public confidence must be strengthened

  4. The paradox of scientific expertise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrøe, Hugo Fjelsted; Noe, Egon

    2011-01-01

    Modern societies depend on a growing production of scientific knowledge, which is based on the functional differentiation of science into still more specialised scientific disciplines and subdisciplines. This is the basis for the paradox of scientific expertise: The growth of science leads to a f...... cross-disciplinary research and in the collective use of different kinds of scientific expertise, and thereby make society better able to solve complex, real-world problems.......Modern societies depend on a growing production of scientific knowledge, which is based on the functional differentiation of science into still more specialised scientific disciplines and subdisciplines. This is the basis for the paradox of scientific expertise: The growth of science leads...... to a fragmentation of scientific expertise. To resolve this paradox, the present paper investigates three hypotheses: 1) All scientific knowledge is perspectival. 2) The perspectival structure of science leads to specific forms of knowledge asymmetries. 3) Such perspectival knowledge asymmetries must be handled...

  5. Keynote Address from G. Berdennikov

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdennikov, G.

    2015-01-01

    Russia was one of the originators of the IAEA safeguards system and throughout the Agency's history consistently supported its effective implementation and development. We always felt that the safeguards system is crucial for the well being of the Non-Proliferation Treaty and the regime build on its foundation. The safeguards system is not something cast in stone or frozen but is a living organism that for its very survival has to change in order to adapt to the changing world and the growing demands placed upon it by the ever more complex requirement of preserving peace and international security in conditions of rapidly developing technologies and changing relationships among nations. However, in the process of such adaptation the system should preserve its core features and functions which have been tested by time. It should remain objective, depoliticised, technically credible, understandable for Member States and based on rights and obligations of the Parties in accordance with Safeguards Agreements they have concluded. Classic safeguards were fully in line with those principles. They were based on facility-specific approach and were underpinned by technical safeguards criteria that were established for each type of facility or location outside facilities and specified the scope, the normal frequency and the extent of the verification activities required to meet the inspection goals. In other words, verification activities were predetermined by quantity and quality of nuclear material as well as quantity and type of nuclear facilities in a State. This system was by nature resistant to political or other extraneous considerations and generated very little risk in terms of undue interference into the affairs of States unrelated to the nuclear sphere. In addition it was universal in the sense that verification requirements for facilities of certain types were the same for all States with the same type of legal obligations regardless of their affiliation or

  6. Insect anaphylaxis: addressing clinical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, James M; Lewis, Elena J; Demain, Jeffrey G

    2011-08-01

    Few allergic reactions are as potentially life-threatening, or frightening to the patient, as anaphylaxis. Food, medications, and insect stings are the three most common triggers of anaphylaxis, but insect allergy provides the best opportunity to understand the biology of anaphylaxis. If the physician can establish a diagnosis of insect allergy, treatment with nearly 98% effectiveness can be initiated. However, sometimes patients have a compelling history of insect sting anaphylaxis, but negative skin and blood tests. This situation presents us with a fascinating opportunity to understand the biology of insect anaphylaxis. Recent and ongoing work shows that occult mast cell disease may be critical in insect anaphylaxis. Mastocytosis, serum tryptase and basophil biology are key elements; genetic markers may potentially help us diagnose at-risk individuals and determine proper treatment. Understanding basophil activation may play an additional role both in diagnosis and knowing when therapy might be terminated. Mast cell disease, serum tryptase and basophil biology are providing an opportunity to better understand and manage insect allergy. This evolving understanding should improve long-term management of insect anaphylaxis and help us to better understand the clinical dilemma of appropriate management of the history-positive patient in which testing is unable to detect venom-specific IgE. Furthermore, omalizumab's immunomodulatory effects may play a role in difficult-to-treat insect allergy and mastocytosis. Finally, unrelated to these, but still important as an ongoing risk factor, is the continued underutilization of epinephrine for both acute and long-term management of insect anaphylaxis.

  7. Scientific Wealth in Middle East and North Africa: Productivity, Indigeneity, and Specialty in 1981-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Afreen; Stoppani, Jonathan; Anadon, Laura Diaz; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    patterns of stagnation and contraction of scientific activity for several MENA countries contributing to a widening productivity gap on an international comparative yardstick. The results prompt questions about the strength of the developing scientific enterprise and highlight the need for consistent long-term policy for effectively addressing regional challenges with domestic research.

  8. On the Possibility of a Scientific Theory of Scientific Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nola, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the philosophical strengths and weaknesses of Laudan's normative naturalism, which understands the principles of scientific method to be akin to scientific hypotheses, and therefore open to test like any principle of science. Contains 19 references. (Author/WRM)

  9. SCIENTIFIC STUDY OF NATURE AND SCIENTIFIC STUDY OF CULTURE: INTE-GRATION TREND, PRACTICAL VALUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fokina Zoya Titovna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with a topic of interest : studying the expanding and deepening trend of integration of natural, technical, social and humanities fields of scientific knowledge. The point of absolute opposition between the sciences dealing with nature and those dealing with culture is subjected to criticism, the forms of integration of scientific knowledge are identified: mathematization, formalization, computerization of knowledge; philosophization/dialectization and environmentalization of the scientific knowledge. It is noted that such areas of scientific knowledge as synergetics, cybernetics, system theory, information technology, sociosynergetics, historical informatics, cliometrics, informatics for economics, evolutionary economics, human ecology, etc. Many scientific fields appear on the border between the science, technology and mathematics, and social and humanities studies, while the sharp borders between the natural sciences and cultural sciences tend to disappear, although specifics of studying the social reality still exists. Within the context of integration of sciences, comprehensive approach, synergetics, cybernetics, and mathematical model approach are analyzed. The philosophy of technology, and environmental problems, which are caused by the development of technological civilization, are studied. Practical value of integration processes in science is identified. The studied data is addressed to the specialists who are interested in the modern processes of integration of sciences, and modern issues of scientific and technical development of humanity, survival of humanity under the conditions of increasing technological understanding of the nature.

  10. Project FIT: Rationale, design and baseline characteristics of a school- and community-based intervention to address physical activity and healthy eating among low-income elementary school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Hyun J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes Project FIT, a collaboration between the public school system, local health systems, physicians, neighborhood associations, businesses, faith-based leaders, community agencies and university researchers to develop a multi-faceted approach to promote physical activity and healthy eating toward the general goal of preventing and reducing childhood obesity among children in Grand Rapids, MI, USA. Methods/design There are four overall components to Project FIT: school, community, social marketing, and school staff wellness - all that focus on: 1 increasing access to safe and affordable physical activity and nutrition education opportunities in the schools and surrounding neighborhoods; 2 improving the affordability and availability of nutritious food in the neighborhoods surrounding the schools; 3 improving the knowledge, self-efficacy, attitudes and behaviors regarding nutrition and physical activity among school staff, parents and students; 4 impacting the 'culture' of the schools and neighborhoods to incorporate healthful values; and 5 encouraging dialogue among all community partners to leverage existing programs and introduce new ones. Discussion At baseline, there was generally low physical activity (70% do not meet recommendation of 60 minutes per day, excessive screen time (75% do not meet recommendation of rd-5th grade children (n = 403. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01385046

  11. Project FIT: rationale, design and baseline characteristics of a school- and community-based intervention to address physical activity and healthy eating among low-income elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Joey C; Alaimo, Katherine; Pfeiffer, Karin; Paek, Hye-Jin; Carlson, Joseph J; Hayes, Heather; Thompson, Tracy; Kelleher, Deanne; Oh, Hyun J; Orth, Julie; Randall, Sue; Mayfield, Kellie; Holmes, Denise

    2011-07-29

    This paper describes Project FIT, a collaboration between the public school system, local health systems, physicians, neighborhood associations, businesses, faith-based leaders, community agencies and university researchers to develop a multi-faceted approach to promote physical activity and healthy eating toward the general goal of preventing and reducing childhood obesity among children in Grand Rapids, MI, USA. There are four overall components to Project FIT: school, community, social marketing, and school staff wellness - all that focus on: 1) increasing access to safe and affordable physical activity and nutrition education opportunities in the schools and surrounding neighborhoods; 2) improving the affordability and availability of nutritious food in the neighborhoods surrounding the schools; 3) improving the knowledge, self-efficacy, attitudes and behaviors regarding nutrition and physical activity among school staff, parents and students; 4) impacting the 'culture' of the schools and neighborhoods to incorporate healthful values; and 5) encouraging dialogue among all community partners to leverage existing programs and introduce new ones. At baseline, there was generally low physical activity (70% do not meet recommendation of 60 minutes per day), excessive screen time (75% do not meet recommendation of < 2 hours per day), and low intake of vegetables and whole grains and high intake of sugar-sweetened beverages, French fries and chips and desserts as well as a high prevalence of overweight and obesity (48.5% including 6% with severe obesity) among low income, primarily Hispanic and African American 3rd-5th grade children (n = 403). ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01385046.

  12. Marie Curie: scientific entrepreneur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudia, S.

    1998-01-01

    Marie Curie is best known for her discovery of radium one hundred years ago this month, but she also worked closely with industry in developing methods to make and monitor radioactive material, as Soraya Boudia explains. One hundred years ago this month, on 28 December 1898, Pierre Curie, Marie Sklodowska-Curie and Gustave Bemont published a paper in Comptes-rendus - the journal of the French Academy of Sciences. In the paper they announced that they had discovered a new element with astonishing properties: radium. But for one of the authors, Marie Curie, the paper was more than just the result of outstanding work: it showed that a woman could succeed in what was then very much a male-dominated scientific world. Having arrived in Paris from Poland in 1891, Marie Curie became the first woman in France to obtain a PhD in physics, the first woman to win a Nobel prize and the first woman to teach at the Sorbonne. She also helped to found a new scientific discipline: the study of radioactivity. She became an icon and a role-model for other women to follow, someone who succeeded - despite many difficulties - in imposing herself on the world of science. Although Curie's life story is a familiar and well documented one, there is one side to her that is less well known: her interaction with industry. As well as training many nuclear physicists and radiochemists in her laboratory, she also became a scientific pioneer in industrial collaboration. In this article the author describes this side of Marie Curie. (UK)

  13. Scientific (Wo)manpower?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amilon, Anna; Persson, Inga

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate to what extent male and female PhDs choose academic vs non‐academic employment. Further, it analyses gender earnings differences in the academic and non‐academic labour markets. Design/methodology/approach – Rich Swedish cross‐sectional regist...... scientific human capital. Originality/value – The study is the first to investigate career‐choice and earnings of Swedish PhDs. Further, the study is the first to investigate both the academic and the non‐academic labour markets....

  14. SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yegane GÜVEN

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Technological and scientific innovations have increased exponentially over the past years in the dentistry profession. In this article, these developments are evaluated both in terms of clinical practice and their place in the educational program. The effect of the biologic and digital revolutions on dental education and daily clinical practice are also reviewed. Biomimetics, personalized dental medicine regenerative dentistry, nanotechnology, high-end simulations providing virtual reality, genomic information, and stem cell studies will gain more importance in the coming years, moving dentistry to a different dimension.

  15. Practical scientific computing

    CERN Document Server

    Muhammad, A

    2011-01-01

    Scientific computing is about developing mathematical models, numerical methods and computer implementations to study and solve real problems in science, engineering, business and even social sciences. Mathematical modelling requires deep understanding of classical numerical methods. This essential guide provides the reader with sufficient foundations in these areas to venture into more advanced texts. The first section of the book presents numEclipse, an open source tool for numerical computing based on the notion of MATLAB®. numEclipse is implemented as a plug-in for Eclipse, a leading integ

  16. Energy and scientific communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, E.

    2013-06-01

    Energy communication is a paradigmatic case of scientific communication. It is particularly important today, when the world is confronted with a number of immediate, urgent problems. Science communication has become a real duty and a big challenge for scientists. It serves to create and foster a climate of reciprocal knowledge and trust between science and society, and to establish a good level of interest and enthusiasm for research. For an effective communication it is important to establish an open dialogue with the audience, and a close collaboration among scientists and science communicators. An international collaboration in energy communication is appropriate to better support international and interdisciplinary research and projects.

  17. Scientific visualization and radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrance, D.P.; Hoyer, C.E.; Wrestler, F.A.; Kuhn, M.J.; Moore, W.D.; Anderson, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    Scientific visualization is the visual presentation of numerical data. The National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) has developed methods for visualizing computerbased simulations of digital imaging data. The applicability of these various tools for unique and potentially medical beneficial display of MR images is investigated. Raw data are obtained from MR images of the brain, neck, spine, and brachial plexus obtained on a 1.5-T imager with multiple pulse sequences. A supercomputer and other mainframe resources run a variety of graphic and imaging programs using this data. An interdisciplinary team of imaging scientists, computer graphic programmers, an physicians works together to achieve useful information

  18. Scientific issues in fuel behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The current limits on discharge burnup in today's nuclear power stations have proven the fuel to be very reliable in its performance, with a negligibly small rate of failure. However, for reasons of economy, there are moves to increase the fuel enrichment in order to extend both the cycle time and the discharge burnup. But, longer periods of irradiation cause increased microstructural changes in the fuel and cladding, implying a larger degradation of physical and mechanical properties. This degradation may well limit the plant life, hence the NSC concluded that it is of importance to develop a predictive capability of fuel behaviour at extended burnup. This can only be achieved through an improved understanding of the basic underlying phenomena of fuel behaviour. The Task Force on Scientific Issues Related to Fuel Behaviour of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee has identified the most important scientific issues on the subject and has assigned priorities. Modelling aspects are listed in Appendix A and discussed in Part II. In addition, quality assurance process for performing and evaluating new integral experiments is considered of special importance. Main activities on fuel behaviour modelling, as carried out in OECD Member countries and international organisations, are listed in Part III. The aim is to identify common interests, to establish current coverage of selected issues, and to avoid any duplication of efforts between international agencies. (author). refs., figs., tabs

  19. Scientific report 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A general introduction gives a summary of the present scientific program of the SPEC and presents some of the recent highlights, the organization, the recent evolution and the relationship of the laboratory with the CEA and the scientific community. Most of the information on the organization is gathered at the end of the report in a section called 'Facts and Figures'. The central part consists in 20 chapters which can be divided in 4 subsets corresponding to the contributions of the four laboratories of the SPEC. In front of each of these subsets, an inset gives a summary of the respective contributions. The distribution is as follows: Chapter 1 - 4: Soft matter, interfaces and turbulence. Chapter 5 - 11: Solid state and novel materials. Chapter 12 - 16 : Quantum condensed matter. Chapter 17 - 20: Condensed matter theory. The headings of each chapter list the physicists, technicians, PhD students as well as the visitors and main collaborators which have taken part in the corresponding activities. In most cases, graduate students were involved in some of the work during their training period. Their names can be found in the section Facts and Figures (subsection Teaching and Training). The Index lists all the contributors and gives the page numbers at which their names appear. (authors)

  20. Scientific Investigation with the SJCSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbey, E.; Delpeyroux, G.; Douay, E.; Juchereau, C.; Garavet, O.

    2012-04-01

    Scientific Investigation with the SJCSI (Saint Jean* Crime Scene Investigation) Our work, which we have been teaching for 3 years, consists of a scientific investigation. We create a case from A to Z and then our students (15 to 16 years old) are meant to collect samples and clues from a reconstituted crime scene and then have to catch the culprit thanks to laboratory tests crossing four subjects: Physics and Chemistry, Biology, Math and English. I'm a biology teacher and I work with 3 other teachers in my school. The objectives of these activities are: • Make sciences more attractive by putting them into a context of crime investigation. • Use science techniques to find a culprit or to clear a suspect. • To acquire scientific knowledge. • Realize that the different scientific subjects complement each other to carry out a survey. • Use English language and improve it. The investigation consists of doing experiments after collecting different samples and clues on the crime scene. Examples of Biology experimentation: • Detecting the origin of the blood samples found on the crime scene. Students observe blood samples with a microscope and compare the characteristics to those of human blood found on the web. They discover that blood samples found aren't human blood because the red cells have a nucleus. By using the information given in the scenario, they discover that blood sample belongs to the parrot of a suspect. Students, also take a photo of their microscopic preparations, add title and caption and so they learn the cell's structure and the characteristics of blood cells. • In another case, students have to study the blood sample found under the victims fingernails. They observe blood preparation and compare it to the blood of a suspect who has a genetic disease: drepanocytosis. So, they discover the characteristics of blood cells by comparing them to sickle cells. • DNA electrophoresis to identify DNA found, for example, on the gun. • Blood type