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Sample records for science institute mentor

  1. Postdoctoral Mentoring at the Space Telescope Science Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeples, Molly

    2018-01-01

    The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) has, on average, about 30 postdoctoral researchers. This groups is funded primarily by individual grants but includes independent Fellows (Giacconi, Lasker, and Hubble Fellows) and postdocs based at neighboring Johns Hopkins University but with supervisors based at STScI. Our mentoring program aims to support the intellectual and career development of this entire group, outside of the scientific and career mentoring they receive from their direct supervisors or fellowship sponsors. Our mentoring program consists of two parts. First and foremost, each postdoc has a mentor (someone on the research staff) with whom they meet regularly. Ideally, the mentor is not someone with whom the postdoc collaborates scientifically and can therefore provide an outside, independent, fresh perspective. As different postdocs require different kinds of mentoring, we try to best pair postdocs and mentors according to the postdocs’ needs and the mentors’ backgrounds, skills, and mentoring styles. Second, we conduct several career guidance seminars and related events throughout the year. These have included proposal writing workshops, formalized practice talks, academic job application seminars, and discussion sessions on career paths outside of academia (featuring colleagues who are no longer in academia). These workshops have the added benefit of providing the postdocs with a wider support network of staff members. Finally, we have begun to conduct an annual survey of the postdocs to gauge their experience and integration at STScI, the efficacy of the mentoring program, and to collect feedback on how to improve postdoctoral life at the Institute.

  2. Training the next generation of research mentors: the University of California, San Francisco, Clinical & Translational Science Institute Mentor Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Mitchell D; Huang, Laurence; Guglielmo, B Joseph; Jordan, Richard; Kahn, James; Creasman, Jennifer M; Wiener-Kronish, Jeanine P; Lee, Kathryn A; Tehrani, Ariane; Yaffe, Kristine; Brown, Jeanette S

    2009-06-01

    Mentoring is a critical component of career development and success for clinical translational science research faculty. Yet few programs train faculty in mentoring skills. We describe outcomes from the first two faculty cohorts who completed a Mentor Development Program (MDP) at UCSF. Eligibility includes having dedicated research time, expertise in a scientific area and a desire to be a lead research mentor. A post-MDP survey measured the program's impact on enhancement of five key mentoring skills, change in the Mentors-in-Training (MIT) self-rated importance of being a mentor to their career satisfaction, and overall confidence in their mentoring skills. Since 2007, 29 MITs participated in and 26 completed the MDP. Only 15% of the MITs reported any previous mentor training. Overall, 96% of MITs felt that participation in the MDP helped them to become better mentors. A majority reported a significant increase in confidence in mentoring skills and most reported an increased understanding of important mentoring issues at UCSF. MITs reported increased confidence in overall and specific mentoring skills after completion of the MDP. The MDP can serve as a model for other institutions to develop the next generation of clinical-translational research mentors.

  3. Institution-wide peer mentoring: Benefits for mentors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Beltman

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research has shown the benefits of mentoring, including peer mentoring, for higher education students, especially in their first year. However, few studies have focussed exclusively on the outcomes for the mentors themselves. This paper reports the findings of data gathered over three years about a university-wide peer mentoring program. Benefits identified by 858 mentors were coded inductively and four major categories emerged: altruistic, cognitive, social and personal growth. The findings have implications for the promotion of mentor programs to administrators and to prospective mentors. The study provides evidence that university-wide peer mentoring programs offer multiple positive outcomes for the mentors involved, and potentially for higher education institutions administering and supporting such programs. 

  4. A narrative inquiry into novice science mentor teachers' mentoring practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Samina

    Many teacher education programs hire new mentors every year to work with their student teacher population. The literature about teacher mentoring suggests the importance of relevant and ongoing professional development (PD) for teacher mentors at all levels. However, it is much more commonly the case that most teacher mentors volunteer and do not have access to PD. Past research about mentoring provides a descriptive sense of the practices of experienced mentors, especially within a PD context, but little is known about how novice mentors, who are mentoring for the first or the second time, with no prior PD related to mentoring articulate their work as mentors. Using the telling form of narrative inquiry, my study documented how four novice science mentors (NSMs) who had no prior mentoring-related PD articulated the work of mentoring through the stories they told about their past experiences as learners and teachers. The term learner included experiences that the NSMs had before school through K-12 and in their teacher education programs. The experiences as a teacher referred to NSMs' in-service experiences -- teaching, coaching, and mentoring (if any). Each NSM was interviewed once a month for a period of five months. The interviews captured experiences of the NSMs since their childhood to present day experiences as teachers to summarize the experiences that informed their current mentoring practices; to document salient mentoring practices they employed; to identify sources and factors that shaped those practices, and to understand mentoring from mentor teachers' perspectives. Clandinin and Connelly's (2000) three commonplaces (temporality- sociality- place ) framework was used for structuring interview questions and analyzing data. The NSMs employed number of practices discussed in the literature. The study found that the most influential life experiences were upbringing, student teaching, teaching, prior mentoring, and coaching. By taking temporality into

  5. Mentoring for Inclusion: The Impact of Mentoring on Undergraduate Researchers in the Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeger, Heather; Fresquez, Carla

    Increasing inclusion of underrepresented minority and first-generation students in mentored research experiences both increases diversity in the life sciences research community and prepares students for successful careers in these fields. However, analyses of the impact of mentoring approaches on specific student gains are limited. This study addresses the impact of mentoring strategies within research experiences on broadening access to the life sciences by examining both how these experiences impacted student success and how the quality of mentorship affected the development of research and academic skills for a diverse population of students at a public, minority-serving institution. Institutional data on student grades and graduation rates (n = 348) along with postresearch experience surveys (n = 138) found that students mentored in research had significantly higher cumulative grade point averages and similar graduation rates as a matched set of peers. Examination of the relationships between student-reported gains and mentoring strategies demonstrated that socioemotional and culturally relevant mentoring impacted student development during mentored research experiences. Additionally, extended engagement in research yielded significantly higher development of research-related skills and level of independence in research. Recommendations are provided for using mentoring to support traditionally underrepresented students in the sciences. © 2016 H. Haeger and C. Fresquez. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  6. A mentor development program for clinical translational science faculty leads to sustained, improved confidence in mentoring skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Mitchell D; Steinauer, Jody E; Khalili, Mandana; Huang, Laurence; Kahn, James S; Lee, Kathryn A; Creasman, Jennifer; Brown, Jeanette S

    2012-08-01

    Mentorship is crucial for academic productivity and advancement for clinical and translational (CT) science faculty. However, little is known about the long-term effects of mentor training programs. The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Clinical and Translational Science Institute launched a Mentor Development Program (MDP) in 2007 for CT faculty. We report on an evaluation of the first three cohorts of graduates from the MDP. In 2010, all Mentors in Training (MITs) who completed the MDP from 2007 to 2009 (n= 38) were asked to complete an evaluation of their mentoring skills and knowledge; all MITs (100%) completed the evaluation. Two-thirds of MDP graduates reported that they often apply knowledge, attitudes, or skills obtained in the MDP to their mentoring. Nearly all graduates (97%) considered being a mentor important to their career satisfaction. Graduates were also asked about the MDP's impact on specific mentoring skills; 95% agreed that the MDP helped them to become a better mentor and to focus their mentoring goals. We also describe a number of new initiatives to support mentoring at UCSF that have evolved from the MDP. To our knowledge, this is the first evaluation of the long-term impact of a mentor training program for CT researchers. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Changing Institutional Culture through Peer Mentoring of Women STEM Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nicole; Bystydzienski, Jill; Desai, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Higher education institutions often use mentoring to socialize faculty members into their academic disciplines and to retain them. Mentoring can also be used to change organizational culture to meet the needs of historically marginalized faculty members. In this article we focus on peer mentoring circles for women STEM faculty at a large,…

  8. Science and Mathematics Mentees and Mentors: Who Benefits the Most?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rosemarye T.; Karcinski, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the extent to which differences in a mentor model for science and mathematics teachers accounted for variances in mentoring effectiveness and persistence rates of teachers. School district designee, mentor, and teacher perceptions of mentoring support were collected through the use of interviews and…

  9. Holding Your Hand From a Distance: Online Mentoring and the Graduate Library and Information Science Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Buchanan, Ph.D.,

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of online education in colleges and universities brings with it a variety of issues and concerns for the remote student. One such issue is online mentoring. This paper presents a study that examines perceptions of the impact and role of online mentoring by online graduate students in a Master of Library and Information Science program. The guiding research question asked “what impact does online mentoring have on the online student experience?” A survey using open and closed-ended response questions was administered. Findings indicate that the participants see the need for online mentors in at least two forms—peer mentors to assist with the “institutional maze” surrounding distance education programs, and secondly, professional mentors to assist with career planning and development. Institutions should thus consider a two-tiered mentor network to meet the needs of students at various points in their academic lives.

  10. Developing the quality of early childhood mentoring institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Hartini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was to uncover the concept of quality improvement, the supporting and the inhibiting factors within the quality improve and the quality improvement in the early childhood mentoring institutions/kindergarten. The study was a qualitative research. The subjects in the study were kindergarten principals, kindergarten teachers and parents. The data were gathered by means of observation, interview and documentation. For the data analysis, the researcher selected the qualitative descriptive data analysis method. The results of the study were as follows. First, the concept of educational quality improvement in the early childhood mentoring institutions/ kindergarten has been improveed from the vision, the mission and the objectives and the concept includes the aspects of planning, process and output which has synergy from one to another. The planning has been formulated in the curriculum, the syllabus and the daily activity plan. Second, the approach, the strategy and the technique of quality improvement has maximized the well-qualified schools’ resources, have been supported by the sufficient facilities and have been funded by the sufficient budget. Third, the supporting factors within the quality improvement of early childhood mentoring institutions/kindergarten have been the increasing awareness within the society toward the significance of early childhood mentoring institutions, the massive socialization conducted by the Office of Education through the provision of training programs in relation to the early childhood mentoring institution/kindergarten management and the human resources empowerment toward developing the quality of early childhood mentoring institutions. Fourth, the inhibiting factors within the quality improvement of early childhood mentoring institutions have been the lack of society care and participation, the less quality human resources that early childhood mentoring institutions have, the fund limitation, the

  11. Mentoring Faculty: Results from National Science Foundation's ADVANCE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Faculty mentoring programs are common components of National Science Foundation ADVANCE awards. The ADVANCE program aims to increase the number of women on the faculty in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) departments through grants to individuals and to entire institutions. These grants target a change in institutional culture so that faculty from non-majority groups will succeed and thrive. Mentoring programs are generally designed to fit the particular institution(s) or target population (e.g., meteorologists at the beginning of their careers). A successful mentoring program makes the implicit knowledge necessary for faculty success explicit: policies and practices are made transparent; routes for finding answers are clarified or generated with faculty input; faculty overcome a sense of isolation and develop a community. Mentoring programs may be formal, with assigned mentors and mentees, or informal, with opportunities for beginning, middle and advanced career STEM faculty to mingle, generally over food and sometimes with a formal speaker. The programs are formally evaluated; in general, attention to mentoring generates better outcomes for all faculty. Research indicates that most successful scientists have a network of mentors rather than relying on one person to help navigate department, institution, and profession. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln's (UNL) award, ADVANCE-Nebraska, offered opportunities for faculty to informally network over luncheons with women speakers, advanced in their careers. We also offered after-hours networking receptions. In response to faculty feedback, we shifted to a series of panel discussions entitled "Conversations". Most panels were conducted by successful UNL faculty; about one-third had an outside expert on a given topic. Topics were chosen based on faculty feedback and targeted specifically to beginning faculty (How to Start Up a Lab; How to Balance Teaching and Writing), mid-career faculty (Putting

  12. Benefits of Peer Mentoring to Mentors, Female Mentees and Higher Education Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalpazidou Schmidt, Evanthia; Faber, Stine Thidemann

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a study of a pilot mentoring program for early career female researchers at a university that addressed the under-representation of female researchers in senior academic positions. Embracing a grounded theory approach, we draw on a design comprising an ex-ante and an ex......-post evaluation. We disclose that development mentoring was at play. Benefits for the mentees consisted of guidance to career planning, competence awareness, establishment of networks, navigating in the research environment, and moral support. In our study we also show that the mentor–mentee relationship...... was reciprocal, as also mentors benefited. Benefits for the mentors comprised professional development, institutional recognition, and personal satisfaction. We conclude with an inventory of benefits, including for the institution in terms of a strengthened research environment....

  13. Mentoring Interventions for Underrepresented Scholars in Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences: Effects on Quality of Mentoring Interactions and Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Vivian; Martina, Camille A.; McDermott, Michael P.; Chaudron, Linda; Trief, Paula M.; LaGuardia, Jennifer G.; Sharp, Daryl; Goodman, Steven R.; Morse, Gene D.; Ryan, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    Mentors rarely receive education about the unique needs of underrepresented scholars in the biomedical and behavioral sciences. We hypothesized that mentor-training and peer-mentoring interventions for these scholars would enrich the perceived quality and breadth of discussions between mentor-protégé dyads (i.e., mentor-protégé pairs). Our…

  14. Ensuring Effective Mentoring in Tertiary Institutions in Anambra State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper concerns itself only with ascertaining the strategies that could ensure effective mentoring in tertiary institutions. The survey method was employed. The study population comprised 78 teacher educators in tertiary institutions in Anambra State. One research question guided the study while one null hypothesis was ...

  15. Mentoring and Argumentation in a Game-Infused Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Deena L.; Parekh, Priyanka

    2018-04-01

    Engaging in argumentation from evidence is challenging for most middle school students. We report the design of a media-based mentoring system to support middle school students in engaging in argumentation in the context of a game-infused science curriculum. Our design emphasizes learners apprenticing with college student mentors around the socio-scientific inquiry of a designed video game. We report the results of a mixed-methods study examining the use of this media-based mentoring system with students ages 11 through 14. We observed that the discourse of groups of students that engaged with the game-infused science curriculum while interacting with college student mentors via a social media platform demonstrated statistically significant higher ratings of cognitive, epistemic, and social aspects of argumentation than groups of students that engaged with the social media platform and game-infused science curriculum without mentors. We further explored the differences between the Discourses of the mentored and non-mentored groups. This analysis showed that students in the mentored groups were invited, guided, and socialized into roles of greater agency than students in the non-mentored groups. This increased agency might explain why mentored groups demonstrated higher levels of scientific argumentation than non-mentored groups. Based on our analyses, we argue that media-based mentoring may be designed around a video game to support middle school students in engaging in argumentation from evidence.

  16. Does mentoring matter: results from a survey of faculty mentees at a large health sciences university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Mitchell D.; Arean, Patricia A.; Marshall, Sally J.; Lovett, Mark; O'Sullivan, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Background To determine the characteristics associated with having a mentor, the association of mentoring with self-efficacy, and the content of mentor–mentee interactions at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), we conducted a baseline assessment prior to implementing a comprehensive faculty mentoring program. Method We surveyed all prospective junior faculty mentees at UCSF. Mentees completed a web-based, 38-item survey including an assessment of self-efficacy and a needs assessment. We used descriptive and inferential statistics to determine the association between having a mentor and gender, ethnicity, faculty series, and self-efficacy. Results Our respondents (n=464, 56%) were 53% female, 62% white, and 7% from underrepresented minority groups. More than half of respondents (n=319) reported having a mentor. There were no differences in having a mentor based on gender or ethnicity (p≥0.05). Clinician educator faculty with more teaching and patient care responsibilities were statistically significantly less likely to have a mentor compared with faculty in research intensive series (pmentor was associated with greater satisfaction with time allocation at work (pmentor, 5.33 (sd = 1.35, pmentors, but rated highest requiring mentoring assistance with issues of promotion and tenure. Conclusion Findings from the UCSF faculty mentoring program may assist other health science institutions plan similar programs. Mentoring needs for junior faculty with greater teaching and patient care responsibilities must be addressed. PMID:20431710

  17. Employing the Five-Factor Mentoring Instrument: Analysing Mentoring Practices for Teaching Primary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Peter; Usak, Muhammet; Savran-Gencer, Ayse

    2009-01-01

    Primary science education is a concern around the world and quality mentoring within schools can develop pre-service teachers' practices. A five-factor model for mentoring has been identified, namely, personal attributes, system requirements, pedagogical knowledge, modelling, and feedback. Final-year pre-service teachers (mentees, n = 211) from…

  18. Forging a link between mentoring and collaboration: a new training model for implementation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Douglas A; Baumann, Ana A; Carothers, Bobbi J; Landsverk, John; Proctor, Enola K

    2016-10-13

    Training investigators for the rapidly developing field of implementation science requires both mentoring and scientific collaboration. Using social network descriptive analyses, visualization, and modeling, this paper presents results of an evaluation of the mentoring and collaborations fostered over time through the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) supported by Implementation Research Institute (IRI). Data were comprised of IRI participant self-reported collaborations and mentoring relationships, measured in three annual surveys from 2012 to 2014. Network descriptive statistics, visualizations, and network statistical modeling were conducted to examine patterns of mentoring and collaboration among IRI participants and to model the relationship between mentoring and subsequent collaboration. Findings suggest that IRI is successful in forming mentoring relationships among its participants, and that these mentoring relationships are related to future scientific collaborations. Exponential random graph network models demonstrated that mentoring received in 2012 was positively and significantly related to the likelihood of having a scientific collaboration 2 years later in 2014 (p = 0.001). More specifically, mentoring was significantly related to future collaborations focusing on new research (p = 0.009), grant submissions (p = 0.003), and publications (p = 0.017). Predictions based on the network model suggest that for every additional mentoring relationships established in 2012, the likelihood of a scientific collaboration 2 years later is increased by almost 7 %. These results support the importance of mentoring in implementation science specifically and team science more generally. Mentoring relationships were established quickly and early by the IRI core faculty. IRI fellows reported increasing scientific collaboration of all types over time, including starting new research, submitting new grants, presenting research results, and

  19. Does mentoring matter: results from a survey of faculty mentees at a large health sciences university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell D. Feldman

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: To determine the characteristics associated with having a mentor, the association of mentoring with self-efficacy, and the content of mentor–mentee interactions at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF, we conducted a baseline assessment prior to implementing a comprehensive faculty mentoring program. Method: We surveyed all prospective junior faculty mentees at UCSF. Mentees completed a web-based, 38-item survey including an assessment of self-efficacy and a needs assessment. We used descriptive and inferential statistics to determine the association between having a mentor and gender, ethnicity, faculty series, and self-efficacy. Results: Our respondents (n=464, 56% were 53% female, 62% white, and 7% from underrepresented minority groups. More than half of respondents (n=319 reported having a mentor. There were no differences in having a mentor based on gender or ethnicity (p≥0.05. Clinician educator faculty with more teaching and patient care responsibilities were statistically significantly less likely to have a mentor compared with faculty in research intensive series (p<0.001. Having a mentor was associated with greater satisfaction with time allocation at work (p<0.05 and with higher academic self-efficacy scores, 6.07 (sd = 1.36 compared with those without a mentor, 5.33 (sd = 1.35, p<0.001. Mentees reported that they most often discussed funding with the mentors, but rated highest requiring mentoring assistance with issues of promotion and tenure. Conclusion: Findings from the UCSF faculty mentoring program may assist other health science institutions plan similar programs. Mentoring needs for junior faculty with greater teaching and patient care responsibilities must be addressed.

  20. Mentoring the Next Generation of Science Gateway Developers and Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, L. B.; Jackson-Ward, F.

    2016-12-01

    The Science Gateway Institute (SGW-I) for the Democratization and Acceleration of Science was a SI2-SSE Collaborative Research conceptualization award funded by NSF in 2012. From 2012 through 2015, we engaged interested members of the science and engineering community in a planning process for a Science Gateway Community Institute (SGCI). Science Gateways provide Web interfaces to some of the most sophisticated cyberinfrastructure resources. They interact with remotely executing science applications on supercomputers, they connect to remote scientific data collections, instruments and sensor streams, and support large collaborations. Gateways allow scientists to concentrate on the most challenging science problems while underlying components such as computing architectures and interfaces to data collection changes. The goal of our institute was to provide coordinating activities across the National Science Foundation, eventually providing services more broadly to projects funded by other agencies. SGW-I has succeeded in identifying two underrepresented communities of future gateway designers and users. The Association of Computer and Information Science/Engineering Departments at Minority Institutions (ADMI) was identified as a source of future gateway designers. The National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE) was identified as a community of future science gateway users. SGW-I efforts to engage NOBCChE and ADMI faculty and students in SGW-I are now woven into the workforce development component of SGCI. SGCI (ScienceGateways.org ) is a collaboration of six universities, led by San Diego Supercomputer Center. The workforce development component is led by Elizabeth City State University (ECSU). ECSU efforts focus is on: Produce a model of engagement; Integration of research into education; and Mentoring of students while aggressively addressing diversity. This paper documents the outcome of the SGW

  1. Career Advancement Outcomes in Academic Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM): Gender, Mentoring Resources, and Homophily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Eun

    This dissertation examines gender differences in career advancement outcomes among academic science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) scientists. In particular, this research examines effects of gender, PhD advisors and postdoctoral supervisors mentoring resources and gender homophily in the mentoring dyads on the career advancement outcomes at early career stages. Female academic scientists have disadvantages in the career progress in the academic STEM. They tend to fall behind throughout their career paths and to leave the field compared to their male colleagues. Researchers have found that gender differences in the career advancement are shaped by gender-biased evaluations derived from gender stereotypes. Other studies demonstrate the positive impacts of mentoring and gender homophily in the mentoring dyads. To add greater insights to the current findings of female academic scientists' career disadvantages, this dissertation investigates comprehensive effects of gender, mentoring, and gender homophily in the mentoring dyads on female scientists' career advancement outcomes in academic science. Based on the Status Characteristics Theory, the concept of mentoring, Social Capital Theory, and Ingroup Bias Theory, causal path models are developed to test direct and indirect effects of gender, mentoring resources, and gender homophily on STEM faculty's career advancement. The research models were tested using structural equation modeling (SEM) with data collected from a national survey, funded by the National Science Foundation, completed in 2011 by tenured and tenure-track academic STEM faculty from higher education institutions in the United States. Findings suggest that there is no gender difference in career advancement controlling for mentoring resources and gender homophily in the mentoring dyads and other factors including research productivity and domestic caregiving responsibilities. Findings also show that the positive relationship between

  2. Hybrid-Mentoring Programs for Beginning Elementary Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, EunJin

    2013-01-01

    This study examines four induction models and teacher changes in science teaching practices, as a result of several mentoring programs. It explores three different computer-mediated mentoring programs, and a traditional offline induction program--in terms of interactivity, inquiry-based teaching, and topics of knowledge. Fifteen elementary science…

  3. Policies, activities, and structures supporting research mentoring: a national survey of academic health centers with clinical and translational science awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Robert E; Jang, Susan; Abedin, Zainab; Richards, Boyd F; Spaeth-Rublee, Brigitta; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2013-01-01

    To document the frequency of policies and activities in support of mentoring practices at institutions receiving a U.S. National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). The study consisted of a 69-item survey with questions about the inclusion (formal or informal) of policies, activities, and structures supporting mentoring within CTSA-sponsored research (i.e., KL2 programs) and, more broadly, in the CTSA's home institution. The survey, conducted from November 2010 through January 2011, was sent to the 55 institutions awarded CTSAs at the time of the survey. Follow-up phone interviews were conducted to clarify responses as needed. Fifty-one of 55 (92%) institutions completed the survey for institutional programs and 53 of 55 (96%) for KL2 programs. Responses regarding policies and activities involving mentor criteria, mentor-mentee relationship, incentives, and evaluative mechanisms revealed considerable variability between KL2 and institutional programs in some areas, such as having mentor qualification criteria and processes to evaluate mentors. The survey also identified areas, such as training and women and minority mentoring programs, where there was frequent sharing of activities between the institutional and KL2 programs. KL2 programs and institutional programs tend to have different preferences for policies versus activities to optimize qualification of mentors, the mentor-mentee relationship, incentives, and evaluation mechanisms. Frequently, these elements are informal. Individuals in charge of implementing and maintaining mentoring initiatives can use the results of the study to consider their current mentoring policies, structures, and activities by comparing them with national patterns within CTSA institutions.

  4. Jordanian Preservice Primary Teachers' Perceptions of Mentoring in Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Osama H.; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad

    2015-03-01

    Quality mentoring is fundamental to preservice teacher education because of its potential to help student and novice teachers develop the academic and pedagogical knowledge and skills germane to successful induction into the profession. This study focused on Jordanian preservice primary teachers' perceptions of their mentoring experiences as these pertain to science teaching. The Mentoring for Effective Primary Science Teaching instrument was administered to 147 senior preservice primary teachers in a university in Jordan. The results indicated that the greater majority of participants did not experience effective mentoring toward creating a supportive and reflexive environment that would bolster their confidence in teaching science; further their understanding of primary science curriculum, and associated aims and school policies; help with developing their pedagogical knowledge; and/or furnish them with specific and targeted feedback and guidance to help improve their science teaching. Substantially more participants indicated that their mentors modeled what they perceived to be effective science teaching. The study argues for the need for science-specific mentoring for preservice primary teachers, and suggests a possible pathway for achieving such a model starting with those in-service primary teachers-much like those identified by participants in the present study-who are already effective in their science teaching.

  5. Team Mentoring for Interdisciplinary Team Science: Lessons From K12 Scholars and Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Geller, Stacie; Regensteiner, Judith G; Raymond, Nancy; Nagel, Joan

    2017-02-01

    Mentoring is critical for academic success. As science transitions to a team science model, team mentoring may have advantages. The goal of this study was to understand the process, benefits, and challenges of team mentoring relating to career development and research. A national survey was conducted of Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH) program directors-current and former scholars from 27 active National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded BIRCWH NIH K12 programs-to characterize and understand the value and challenges of the team approach to mentoring. Quantitative data were analyzed descriptively, and qualitative data were analyzed thematically. Responses were received from 25/27 (93%) program directors, 78/108 (72%) current scholars, and 91/162 (56%) former scholars. Scholars reported that team mentoring was beneficial to their career development (152/169; 90%) and research (148/169; 88%). Reported advantages included a diversity of opinions, expanded networking, development of stronger study designs, and modeling of different career paths. Challenges included scheduling and managing conflicting opinions. Advice by directors offered to junior faculty entering team mentoring included the following: not to be intimidated by senior mentors, be willing to navigate conflicting advice, be proactive about scheduling and guiding discussions, have an open mind to different approaches, be explicit about expectations and mentors' roles (including importance of having a primary mentor to help navigate discussions), and meet in person as a team. These findings suggest that interdisciplinary/interprofessional team mentoring has many important advantages, but that skills are required to optimally utilize multiple perspectives.

  6. Mentoring Interventions for Underrepresented Scholars in Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences: Effects on Quality of Mentoring Interactions and Discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Vivian; Martina, Camille A; McDermott, Michael P; Chaudron, Linda; Trief, Paula M; LaGuardia, Jennifer G; Sharp, Daryl; Goodman, Steven R; Morse, Gene D; Ryan, Richard M

    2017-01-01

    Mentors rarely receive education about the unique needs of underrepresented scholars in the biomedical and behavioral sciences. We hypothesized that mentor-training and peer-mentoring interventions for these scholars would enrich the perceived quality and breadth of discussions between mentor-protégé dyads (i.e., mentor-protégé pairs). Our multicenter, randomized study of 150 underrepresented scholar-mentor dyads compared: 1) mentor training, 2) protégé peer mentoring, 3) combined mentor training and peer mentoring, and 4) a control condition (i.e., usual practice of mentoring). In this secondary analysis, the outcome variables were quality of dyad time and breadth of their discussions. Protégé participants were graduate students, fellows, and junior faculty in behavioral and biomedical research and healthcare. Dyads with mentor training were more likely than those without mentor training to have discussed teaching and work-life balance. Dyads with peer mentoring were more likely than those without peer mentoring to have discussed clinical care and career plans. The combined intervention dyads were more likely than controls to perceive that the quality of their time together was good/excellent. Our study supports the value of these mentoring interventions to enhance the breadth of dyad discussions and quality of time together, both important components of a good mentoring relationship. © 2017 V. Lewis et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  7. Sugar and Spice and Science: Encouraging Girls through Media Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jennifer B.

    2005-01-01

    Studies indicate that long held gender stereotypes lead females to a decreased self-confidence and interest in the sciences. As a result, only a minority of women pursue coursework and careers in science and technology-based fields. Several gender-based studies in science and technology education indicate that mentoring may hold great promise in…

  8. Mentoring Women in the Biological Sciences: Is Informatics Leading ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yet mathematics, science, and high technology—the building blocks of informatics—are not typically consid- ... rior scientific skills but also highly ana- lytic modeling and computer science skills? The answer is twofold: ... Training, and Mentoring of Science. Communities.” Pennington, the pri- mary investigator for this project, ...

  9. Institution-to-Institution Mentoring to Build Capacity in 24 Local US Health Departments: Best Practices and Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Veatch, Maggie; Goldstein, Gail P.; Sacks, Rachel; Lent, Megan; Van Wye, Gretchen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Institutional mentoring may be a useful capacity-building model to support local health departments facing public health challenges. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene conducted a qualitative evaluation of an institutional mentoring program designed to increase capacity of health departments seeking to address chronic disease prevention. The mentoring program included 2 program models, a one-to-one model and a collaborative model, developed and implemented ...

  10. Young Engineers and Sciences (YES) - Mentoring High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, Daniel C.; Asbell, E.; Reiff, P. H.

    2008-09-01

    Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) is a community partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA) during the past 16 years. The YES program provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real world, research experiences in physical sciences (including space science) and engineering. YES consists of two parts: 1) an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems, attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics, computers and the Internet, careers, science ethics, and other topics; and select individual research projects to be completed during the academic year; and 2) a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their mentors during the academic year and earn honors credit. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. During these years, YES has developed a website for topics in space science from the perspective of high school students, including NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) (http://yesserver.space.swri.edu). High school science teachers participate in the workshop and develop space-related lessons for classroom presentation in the academic year. Student evaluations indicate the effectiveness of YES on their academic preparation and choice of college majors. Over the past 16 years, all YES graduates have entered college, several have worked for SwRI, one business has started, and three scientific publications have resulted. Acknowledgements. We acknowledge funding and support from the NASA MMS Mission, Texas Space Grant Consortium, Northside Independent School District, SwRI, and several local charitable foundations.

  11. Mentoring BUGS: An Integrated Science and Technology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Pamela Esprivalo; Walker, Michelle; Hildreth, Bertina; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2004-01-01

    The current study describes an authentic learning experience designed to develop technology and science process skills through a carefully scaffolded curriculum using mealworms as a content focus. An individual mentor assigned to each 4th and 5th grade girl participating in the program delivered the curriculum. Results indicate mastery of science…

  12. Mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony Brewerton

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The literature contains a wide variety of definitions. The Oxford English dictionary – as you might expect – gives a classical definition: mentor. 1. a. With initial capital: The name of the Ithacan noble whose disguise the goddess Athene assumed in order to act as the guide and adviser of the young Telemachus: allusively, one who fulfils the office which the supposed Mentor fulfilled towards Telemachus. b. Hence, as common noun: An experienced and trusted counsellor. [1989

  13. Making a Life in the Life Sciences and the Role of Mentoring for Female Scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Kaplan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of sex differences in intellectual capabilities remains scant and, rather than revealing genetic origin, it is complicated by the influence of social circumstances. Some inequities persist, and although these have been decreasing in recent decades, therefore, it remains a major task for policy makers and educators to assist in setting up programs, including mentoring opportunities, that are directed at alleviating such inequities. This paper outlines some historical circumstances in science and suggests that mentoring has to be understood in a wide systemic framework. The freedom to think and act and follow research ideas through is intrinsically rewarding to society and to the individual. For female scientists, it is a freedom that has yet to be fully developed and mentoring is just one way in which such a process can be legitimized. The paper outlines how institutions can best do this, and how this might work in practice for the individual, and argues that science needs to have its own code of mentoring.

  14. The relationship of mentoring on middle school girls' science-related attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lynette M.

    This quantitative study examined the science-related attitudes of middle school girls who attended a science-focused mentoring program and those of middle school girls who attended a traditional mentoring program. Theories related to this study include social cognitive theory, cognitive development theory, and possible selves' theory. These theories emphasize social and learning experiences that may impact the science-related attitudes of middle school girls. The research questions examined the science-related attitudes of middle school girls who participate in a science-related mentoring program. The hypotheses suggested that there are significant differences that exist between the attitudes of middle school female participants in a science-related mentoring program and female participants in a traditional mentoring program. The quantitative data were collected through a survey entitled the Test of Science-Related Attitudes (TOSRA) which measures science-related attitudes. The population of interest for this study is 11-15 year old middle school girls of various racial and socio-economic backgrounds. The sample groups for the study were middle school girls participating in either a science-focused mentoring program or a traditional mentoring program. Results of the study indicated that no significant difference existed between the science-related attitudes of middle school girls in a science-related mentoring program and the attitudes of those in a traditional mentoring program. The practical implications for examining the concerns of the study would be further investigations to increase middle school girls' science-related attitudes.

  15. Peer Mentoring among Doctoral Students of Science and Engineering in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yii-nii; Hsu, Angela Yi-ping

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the peer mentoring experience from doctoral student mentors' point of view. Twelve science and engineering doctoral students participated in this phenomenology study. The findings suggest doctoral peer mentors served instrumental, psychosocial, buffering, and liaison roles; they passed on their social, professional, and…

  16. Benefits of Peer Mentoring to Mentors, Female Mentees and Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpazidou Schmidt, Evanthia; Faber, Stine Thidemann

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a study of a pilot mentoring program for early career female researchers at a university that addressed the under-representation of female researchers in senior academic positions. Embracing a grounded theory approach, we draw on a design comprising an ex-ante and an ex-post evaluation. We disclose that development…

  17. The essential role of mentors in medical institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Arez Mohamed, Elena Antoni University College London Medical School, University College London, London, UKWe read with great interest the papers written by Al Qahtani¹ and Banu et al.² The former explored the motivation of medical students to engage in mentoring in a place where this was a scarce phenomenon and the other analyzed how mentoring could be successfully implemented and enhance acquisition of knowledge among mentees.  View original paper by Al QahtaniView original paper by Banu et al 

  18. A model for mentoring newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seekoe, Eunice

    2014-04-24

    South Africa transformed higher education through the enactment of the Higher Education Act (No. 101 of 1997). The researcher identified the need to develop a model for the mentoring of newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa.  To develop and describe the model for mentoring newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa.  A qualitative and theory-generating design was used (following empirical findings regarding needs analysis) in order to develop the model. The conceptualisation of the framework focused on the context, content, process and the theoretical domains that influenced the model. Ideas from different theories were borrowed from and integrated with the literature and deductive and inductive strategies were applied.  The structure of the model is multidimensional and complex in nature (macro, mesoand micro) based on the philosophy of reflective practice, competency-based practice andcritical learning theories. The assumptions are in relation to stakeholders, context, mentoring, outcome, process and dynamic. The stakeholders are the mentor and mentee within an interactive participatory relationship. The mentoring takes place within the process with a sequence of activities such as relationship building, development, engagement, reflective process and assessment. Capacity building and empowerment are outcomes of mentoring driven by motivation.  The implication for nurse managers is that the model can be used to develop mentoring programmes for newly-appointed nurse educators.

  19. A model for mentoring newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Seekoe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Africa transformed higher education through the enactment of the Higher Education Act (No. 101 of 1997. The researcher identified the need to develop a model for the mentoring of newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa. Objectives: To develop and describe the model for mentoring newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa. Method: A qualitative and theory-generating design was used (following empirical findings regarding needs analysis in order to develop the model. The conceptualisation of the framework focused on the context, content, process and the theoretical domains that influenced the model. Ideas from different theories were borrowed from and integrated with the literature and deductive and inductive strategies were applied. Results: The structure of the model is multidimensional and complex in nature (macro, mesoand micro based on the philosophy of reflective practice, competency-based practice andcritical learning theories. The assumptions are in relation to stakeholders, context, mentoring, outcome, process and dynamic. The stakeholders are the mentor and mentee within an interactive participatory relationship. The mentoring takes place within the process with a sequence of activities such as relationship building, development, engagement, reflective process and assessment. Capacity building and empowerment are outcomes of mentoring driven by motivation. Conclusion: The implication for nurse managers is that the model can be used to develop mentoring programmes for newly-appointed nurse educators.

  20. The Nuclear Energy Agency Mentoring a Future Generation of Female Leaders in Science and Engineering. Report on the International Mentoring Workshop in Science and Engineering in Chiba, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Despite progress over the past decades, women remain under-represented in executive positions in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Female students tend to do very well in math and science early in their academic careers but often take other career paths. Many countries are working to close the gender gap and are developing policies to reverse this trend. However, considering the increasing demand worldwide for skilled workers in all areas of science and technology, including in the nuclear energy sector, more advocacy is needed to encourage the next generation and to capture their interest in these fields. Efforts to motivate young women to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM fields), and to develop policies that support their progression, are worthwhile. Today, many NEA member countries are challenged in stimulating their youth to study in STEM fields. The looming shortfall has serious implications for the future. As part of its overall strategy and mission, the NEA has stated its support to members in their efforts to secure qualified human resources, nuclear skills capability building and the development of a new generation of nuclear experts. It is essential to ensure that all young people, including young women, have the opportunity to explore careers in science and technology. The NEA encourages its membership to explore ways of attracting, recruiting and retaining youth, in particular girls, in science and technology, as well as enhancing the conditions and prospects for women and girls at every stage of their careers and education. It is in this spirit that the NEA partnered with Japan's National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST) to organise a mentoring workshop on July 25-26, 2017 in Chiba, Japan. This International Mentoring Workshop in Science and Engineering was a positive step, offering young Japanese women what was, for some, a life-changing experience. Seven

  1. Mentornet - E-Mentoring for Women Students in Engineering and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single, Peg Boyle; Muller, Carol B.; Cunningham, Christine M.; Single, Richard M.; Carlsen, William S.

    MentorNet www.MentorNet.net;, the E-Mentoring Network for Diversity in Engineering and Science, addresses the underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics "STEM". MentorNet offers a multiinstitutional, structured, electronic mentoring "e-mentoring" program that pairs undergraduate and graduate students, primarily women, with professionals and supports them through e-mentoring relationships of specified lengths. The program evaluations established that over 90% of the participants would recommend MentorNet to a friend or colleague. The e-mentoring program allowed participants to establish satisfactory and beneficial e-mentoring relationships based on investments of approximately 20 minutes per week - in between more serious exchanges, email exchanges that included light-hearted social interactions and jokes were an important aspect of sustaining e-mentoring relationships. Participation in MentorNet increased the students' self-confidence in their f elds - desire to obtain work in industry, national laboratories, or national agencies; and intent to pursue careers in their fields. Three years of evaluation results support the need for and efficacy of the program.

  2. NUCOR Institute for Life Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article discusses the Nucor Institute for Life Sciences. The institute was previously part of Nucor, but is now an autonomous institute of the University of Pretoria. The task of the institute is to promote the application of radioisotopes and radiation techniques in medicine and biology. Research projects of the institute are shortly discussed

  3. The Earth Science Women's Network: The Principles That Guide Our Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. S.; Steiner, A. L.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN) began informally in 2002 as a way for six early career female atmospheric chemists to stay in contact and support each other. Twelve years later (2014), the ESWN formally became a non-profit organization with over 2000 members. The ESWN includes scientists from all disciplines of the geosciences with members located in over 50 countries. The ESWN is dedicated to career development, peer mentoring and community building for women in the geosciences. The mentoring philosophy of ESWN has evolved to include five main principles: 1.) Support community-driven mentoring, 2.) Encourage diverse mentoring approaches for diverse individuals, 3.) Facilitate mentoring across career phases, 4.) Promote combined personal and professional mentoring, 5.) Champion effective mentoring in a safe space. Surveys of ESWN members report gains in areas that are often considered barriers to career advancement, including recognition that they are not alone, new understanding of obstacles faced by women in science, and access to professional resources.

  4. A Mentoring Program in Environmental Science for Underrepresented Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, L.; Rizzo, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    We developed a four-year program, combining educational and career support and research activities, to recruit and retain students from underrepresented groups in environmental sciences. Specifically, the program: ○ Assigns each student a faculty or graduate student mentor with whom the student conducts research activities. ○ Includes a weekly group meeting for team building and to review professional development and academic topics, such as time management and research ethics. ○ Requires students to make multiple formal presentations of their research proposals and results. ○ Provides scholarships and stipends for both the academic year and to engage students in summer research. The program seeks to achieve several goals including: ● Enhance academic performance. ● Encourage continued study in environmental science. ● Facilitate students completing their studies at UVM. ● Increase students’ interest in pursuing science careers. ● Create a more welcoming academic environment. To assess progress toward achievement of these goals, we conducted individual structured interviews with participating undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty members at two points in time. First, interviews were conducted in the fall of 2007 after two years, and again in spring 2009, after four years. An independent research consultant, Dr. Livingston, conducted the interviews. In 2009, over the course of three days, the interviews included three graduate student and two faculty mentors, and six of the seven undergraduate students. Of the six students, three were juniors and three were graduating seniors. Results of the 2009 interviews echoed those of 2007. Both students and their mentors are quite satisfied with the program. The student presentations, weekly meetings, mentoring relationships, and summer research experiences all get high ratings from program participants. Students give high praise to their mentors and the program directors for providing

  5. "What" and "how" does a mentor teacher learn during a secondary science teacher candidate's internship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmann, Scott A.

    Teaching science for understanding is hard work. Not many teachers leave a teacher education program sufficiently prepared to engage in this practice. In fact, many veteran teachers struggle with this complicated task, so effective professional development is needed. One approach that may hold some promise is being a mentor teacher to an intern. To investigate this possibility, the following central question guided this study: "What" and "how" does a secondary science teacher learn about the practices of teaching from the experience of being a mentor teacher for a science intern? A conceptual framework based on three planes of focus was utilized in this study. These planes are (a) a focus on the larger learning community and context, (b) a focus on the local learning community and activities, and (c) a focus on learners and purposes. Data were collected on two focus mentor teachers. These data included observations of interactions between the mentor and intern, responses to clarifying questions, interviews with other science teachers, and observations of both the mentor and the intern teaching lessons. Relationships among the characteristics of the context of the school and science department with the mentor teacher's theory of learning and teaching practices and the patterns of practice the mentor used in responding to specific occasions for learning were explored. It was found that these characteristics are related to five elements of mentor teacher learning: the social environment, resource use, defining tasks, the learning process, and the nature of a satisfactory conclusion. Two conclusions were made. The first was that remarkably detailed parallels exist among key elements in the context in which a mentor teacher works, the mentor teacher's approaches to teaching and learning, and the mentor's response to occasions for learning during the internship. The second was that differences among mentors in these key elements could account for differences in "what

  6. Latina Faculty Transcending Barriers: Peer Mentoring in a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Elizabeth T.; Núñez, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors conducted a research metasynthesis of publications by a group of Latina tenure-track faculty participating in a peer mentoring group, the Research for the Educational Advancement of Latin@s (REAL) collaborative, housed in one Hispanic Serving Institution. Due to the small representation of Latinas in the academy, the…

  7. Imagine a universe with 85% down quarks: Mentoring for inclusive excellence in nuclear science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yennello, Sherry J.

    2017-09-01

    If nature created six down quarks for every up quark the world might be a bit more strange. The US population is made up of over 50% women. Hispanic Americans and African Americans make up over 30% of the US population. The processes by which we foster curiosity, educate our youth, encourage people into science, recruit and retain people into physics and welcome them as members of our nuclear physics community results in a much different demographic in the membership of the DNP. Enabling the development of an identity as a scientist or nuclear scientist is a crucial part of mentoring young people to successful careers in nuclear science. Research experiences for students can play a critical role in that identity development. Since 2004, over 170 students have explored nuclear science through the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute.

  8. Mentoring women in academic surgery: overcoming institutional barriers to success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eddie L

    2006-09-01

    Women now comprise 50% of Caucasian matriculants to medical school; 66.6% of African Americans, 48% of Hispanics and 51.3% of Asians beginning medical school are also women. This trend is likely to continue since women now earn 57% of all undergraduate degrees, and they earn more degrees in the health professions and biological sciences than men. Black and Hispanic women now earn 66% and 60% of bachelor's degrees in their respective ethnic groups. Overall, women are concentrated at the lowest faculty ranks at medical schools, with 70% holding the rank of instructor or assistant professor. Women continue to experience difficulty with recruitment, retention, promotion and pay issues compared to men. They also experience additional gender-specific issues, including primary responsibility for rearing families and quality-of-life issues in some specialties, including most of the surgical disciplines. Clearly, there is an evolving population shift at work here; the pool of candidates for medical school faculty positions is likely to be evenly split between men and women for Caucasians, Hispanics and Asians, while the African-American pool is likely heavily weighted in favor of the women. Women are beginning to garner more Latin honors recognition at graduation as well and the definition of the "best and the brightest" is being redefined. Therefore, institutions must continue to identify the barriers that deter women from entering surgery, to develop research tools to understand how to improve the process of developing leadership skills among women and to insure a "buy-in" of their male counterparts when components of the plan are being implemented.

  9. Career Advancement Outcomes in Academic Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM): Gender, Mentoring Resources, and Homophily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Eun

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation examines gender differences in career advancement outcomes among academic science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) scientists. In particular, this research examines effects of gender, PhD advisors and postdoctoral supervisors mentoring resources and gender homophily in the mentoring dyads on the career advancement…

  10. Perspectives on Peer-Mentoring from Taiwanese Science and Engineering Master's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yii-nii

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the peer-mentoring experience from the perspective of 16 master's students majoring in science or engineering at a research-oriented university in Taiwan. Utilizing a qualitative method of phenomenology, these mentees shared their views about their peer-mentors through in-depth interviews. Participants…

  11. A Workbook for Scaffolding Mentored Undergraduate Research Experiences in the Social and Behavioral Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert-White, Erin; Simpson, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Research mentors strive to ensure that undergraduates gain research skills and develop professionally during mentored research experiences in the sciences. We created the SURE (Specialized Undergraduate Research Experience) Workbook, a freely-available, interactive guide to scaffold student learning during this process. The Workbook: (1)…

  12. Variability in Women Faculty’s Preferences Regarding Mentor Similarity: A Multi-Institution Study in Academic Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapinha, René; Ortiz-Walters, Rowena; McCracken, Caitlin M.; Hill, Emorcia V.; Reede, Joan Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate which mentor similarity characteristics women faculty in academic medicine rate most important and to determine whether the importance of similarity differs among women faculty based on current and prior mentoring, demographic and personal factors, and career factors. Method Cross-sectional survey data from 3,100 women faculty at 13 purposively sampled U.S. medical schools were collected in 2012. The preferences of participants regarding the importance of mentor similarity in terms of race/ethnicity, gender, personal and career interests, and department and institution were studied. Analysis entailed chi square tests and multivariable ordered logistic models. Results Overall, respondents ranked having a mentor in the same department and institution as most important. Same department and institution were less important for those without a current mentor and for senior faculty, and were more important for Asian faculty. Same career and personal interests were less important for older faculty and more important for those with a doctorate only. Same gender was more important for Black faculty, faculty at the rank of instructor, and those without current mentoring. Overall, same race/ethnicity was rated least important; however, it was more important for racial/ethnic minorities, foreign-born faculty, and those who had never had a mentor. Conclusions Mentor preferences, as indicated by level of importance assigned to types of mentor similarity, varied among women faculty. To advance effective mentoring, characterized by high degree of mentor-mentee fit, the authors provide recommendations on matching strategies to be used in academic medicine when considering the diverse mentor preferences of women faculty. PMID:27332871

  13. The Effect of a Collaborative Mentoring Program on Beginning Science Teachers' Inquiry-based Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jeonghee; Seung, Eulsun; Go, MunSuk

    2013-03-01

    This study investigated how a collaborative mentoring program influenced beginning science teachers' inquiry-based teaching and their reflection on practice. The one-year program consisted of five one-on-one mentoring meetings, weekly science education seminars, weekly mentoring group discussions, and self-evaluation activities. The participants were three beginning science teachers and three mentors at the middle school level (7-9th grades) in an urban area of South Korea. For each beginning teacher, five lessons were evaluated in terms of lesson design/implementation, procedural knowledge, and classroom culture by using the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol. Five aspects of the beginning teachers' reflections were identified. This study showed that a collaborative mentoring program focusing on inquiry-based science teaching encouraged the beginning teachers to reflect on their own perceptions and teaching practice in terms of inquiry-based science teaching, which led to changes in their teaching practice. This study also highlighted the importance of collaborative interactions between the mentors and the beginning teachers during the mentoring process.

  14. Jordanian Preservice Primary Teachers' Perceptions of Mentoring in Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Osama H.; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    Quality mentoring is fundamental to preservice teacher education because of its potential to help student and novice teachers develop the academic and pedagogical knowledge and skills germane to successful induction into the profession. This study focused on Jordanian preservice primary teachers' perceptions of their mentoring experiences as these…

  15. Online Mentoring as an Extracurricular Measure to Encourage Talented Girls in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics): An Empirical Study of One-on-One versus Group Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeger, Heidrun; Hopp, Manuel; Ziegler, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Online mentoring provides an effective means of extracurricular gifted education for talented girls in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Comparative studies on the effectiveness of one-on-one versus group mentoring are lacking, however. The authors investigated this question in the context of a Germany-wide online mentoring…

  16. Mentoring perception and academic performance: an Academic Health Science Centre survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Thanos; Patel, Vanash; Garas, George; Ashrafian, Hutan; Shetty, Kunal; Sevdalis, Nick; Panzarasa, Pietro; Darzi, Ara; Paroutis, Sotirios

    2016-10-01

    To determine the association between professors' self-perception of mentoring skills and their academic performance. Two hundred and fifteen professors from Imperial College London, the first Academic Health Science Centre (AHSC) in the UK, were surveyed. The instrument adopted was the Mentorship Skills Self-Assessment Survey. Statement scores were aggregated to provide a score for each shared core, mentor-specific and mentee-specific skill. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to evaluate their relationship with quantitative measures of academic performance (publications, citations and h-index). There were 104 professors that responded (response rate 48%). There were no statistically significant negative correlations between any mentoring statement and any performance measure. In contrast, several mentoring survey items were positively correlated with academic performance. The total survey score for frequency of application of mentoring skills had a statistically significant positive association with number of publications (B=0.012, SE=0.004, p=0.006), as did the frequency of acquiring mentors with number of citations (B=1.572, SE=0.702, p=0.030). Building trust and managing risks had a statistically significant positive association with h-index (B=0.941, SE=0.460, p=0.047 and B=0.613, SE=0.287, p=0.038, respectively). This study supports the view that mentoring is associated with high academic performance. Importantly, it suggests that frequent use of mentoring skills and quality of mentoring have positive effects on academic performance. Formal mentoring programmes should be considered a fundamental part of all AHSCs' configuration. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Creating more effective mentors: Mentoring the mentor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Monica; Johnson, Mallory

    2016-01-01

    improve awareness and mitigate these effects via the mentor-mentee relationship. Discussion Our “Mentoring the Mentors” workshop for HIV researchers/mentors offers a formal and structured curriculum on best practices, tools and techniques of effective mentoring, and methods to mitigate unconscious bias in the mentoring relationship and at the institutional level with mentees of diversity. We found quantitative and qualitative improvements in mentoring skills as assessed by self-report by participants after each workshop and plan additional programs with longitudinal longer-term assessments focused on objective mentee outcomes (grants, papers, academic retention). Mentoring training can improve mentoring skills and are likely to improve outcomes for optimally-mentored mentees. PMID:27039092

  18. Mentoring K scholars: strategies to support research mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Ellen L; Schiro, Stephanie; Fleming, Michael

    2011-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to present strategies utilized to support K scholar research mentors. K scholars are generally assistant professors who are close to developing independent research programs. Of all the various types of mentees, K scholars offer the greatest challenges, as well as the greatest rewards, for research mentors. To see one's mentee achieve independent PI status and become an established investigator is one of the great joys of being a research mentor. Research mentors for K scholars, however, may not directly benefit from their mentoring relationship, neither in terms of obtaining data to support their research program or laboratory, nor in assistance with grants or scientific papers. There is a pressing need for the research community to address the workload, institutional expectations, and reward system for research mentors. The dearth of research mentors and role models in clinical translational science parallels the decreasing number of physicians choosing careers in clinical research. While there is limited empirical information on the effectiveness of mentor support mechanisms, this white paper concludes that providing mentor support is critical to expanding the available pool of mentors, as well as providing training opportunities for K scholars. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A Blueprint for Expanding the Mentoring Networks of Undergraduate Women in the Earth and Environmental Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, E. V.; Adams, A. S.; Barnes, R.; Bloodhart, B.; Burt, M. A.; Clinton, S. M.; Godfrey, E. S.; Pollack, I. B.; Hernandez, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    Women are substantially underrepresented in the earth and environmental sciences, and that underrepresentation begins at the undergraduate level. In fall 2015, an interdisciplinary team including expertise in the broader geosciences as well as gender and quantitative educational psychology began a project focused on understanding whether mentoring can increase the interest, persistence, and achievement of undergraduate women in the geosciences. The program focuses on mentoring 1st and 2nd year female undergraduate students from five universities in Colorado and Wyoming and four universities in North and South Carolina. The mentoring program includes a weekend workshop, access to professional women across geoscience fields, and both in-person and virtual peer networks. We have found that undergraduate women with large mentoring networks, that include faculty mentors, are more likely to identify as scientists and are more committed to pursuing the geosciences. Our presentation will provide an overview of the major components of our effective and scalable program. We will include a discussion of our first published results in the context of larger social science research on how to foster effective mentoring relationships. We will offer a list of successes and challenges, and we will provide the audience with online links to the materials needed to adopt our model (https://geosciencewomen.org/materials/).

  20. Mentoring a new science teacher in reform-based ways: A focus on inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomer, Scott D.

    The processes, understandings, and uses of inquiry are identified by the National Science Education Standards (National Research Council, 1996) as a key component of science instruction. Currently, there are few examples in the literature demonstrating how teachers go about co-constructing inquiry-based activities and how mentors can promote the use of reform-based practices by novices. The purpose of this interpretive case study was to investigate how a mentor and her protege collaboratively developed, implemented and assessed three inquiry-based experiences. The questions that guided this research were: (1) How does the mentor assist protege growth in the development, implementation and assessment of inquiry-based experiences for secondary science students? (2) How are the protege's perceptions of inquiry influenced by her participation in developing, implementing and assessing inquiry-based experiences for secondary science students? The co-construction of the inquiry activities and the facilitation provided by the mentor represented Lev Vygotsky's (1978) social construction of information as the mentor guided the protege beyond her cognitive zone of proximal development. The participants in this study were a veteran science teacher who was obtaining her mentor certification, or Teacher Support Specialist, and her protege who was a science teacher in the induction phase of her career. Data were collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews, tape recordings of planning sessions, researcher field notes, and email reflections during the co-construction process. Inductive analysis of the data led to the identification of common categories and subsequent findings, which reflected what the mentor and protege discussed about inquiry and the process of collaboration. The six themes that emerged from this study led to several implications that are significant for science teacher preparation and the mentoring community. The teachers indicated tools, such as the

  1. U.S. Geological Survey Mentoring Program - Paired for a Powerful Science Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K.F.; Clarke, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) prides itself in its excellence in science. The resource bank of skills and knowledge that is contained within the current employees of the USGS is what makes our science excellent. With an aging workforce, we must ensure that the knowledge and skills represented by those years of experience are passed to new employees. To ensure that this bank of knowledge and experience is not lost and thereby sustain the excellence of our science, the Mentoring Program focuses on intentional mentoring, the deliberate transfer of skills and knowledge. Skills transfer from more experienced employees to those who are less experienced is critical. By placing an emphasis on intentional mentoring, we help to meet the scientific and technical needs of the employees by offering a cost-effective way to gain knowledge and skills necessary to maintain excellence in science. By encouraging and fostering a mentoring atmosphere within the USGS, we are investing in the future of our organization. With improved technical skills, increased job effectiveness, and resulting satisfaction, USGS employees will not only be more invested and engaged, they will also be able to work smarter, thus benefiting from the experience of their mentor.

  2. Barriers and Facilitators of Mentoring for Trainees and Early Career Investigators in Rheumatology Research: Current State, Identification of Needs, and Road Map to an Inter-Institutional Adult Rheumatology Mentoring Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogdie, Alexis; Sparks, Jeffrey A; Angeles-Han, Sheila T; Bush, Kathleen; Castelino, Flavia V; Golding, Amit; Jiang, Yihui; Kahlenberg, J Michelle; Kim, Alfred H J; Lee, Yvonne C; Machireddy, Kirthi; Ombrello, Michael J; Shah, Ami A; Wallace, Zachary S; Nigrovic, Peter A; Makris, Una E

    2018-03-01

    To determine perceived barriers and facilitators to effective mentoring for early career rheumatology investigators and to develop a framework for an inter-institutional mentoring program. Focus groups or interviews with rheumatology fellows, junior faculty, and mentors were conducted, audiorecorded, and transcribed. Content analysis was performed using NVivo software. Themes were grouped into categories (e.g., mentor-mentee relationship, barriers, and facilitators of a productive relationship). Rheumatology fellows and early career investigators were also surveyed nationwide to identify specific needs to be addressed through an inter-institutional mentoring program. Twenty-five individuals participated in focus groups or interviews. Attributes of the ideal mentee-mentor relationship included communication, accessibility, regular meetings, shared interests, aligned goals, and mutual respect. The mentee should be proactive, efficient, engaged, committed, focused, accountable, and respectful of the mentor's time. The mentor should support/promote the mentee, shape the mentee's goals and career plan, address day-to-day questions, provide critical feedback, be available, and have team leadership skills. Barriers included difficulty with career path navigation, gaining independence, internal competition, authorship, time demands, funding, and work-life balance. Facilitators of a successful relationship included having a diverse network of mentors filling different roles, mentor-mentee relationship management, and confidence. Among 187 survey respondents, the primary uses of an inter-institutional mentoring program were career development planning and oversight, goal-setting, and networking. In this mixed-methods study, tangible factors for optimizing the mentor-mentee relationship were identified and will inform the development of an adult rheumatology inter-institutional mentoring program. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  3. K-5 mentor teachers' journeys toward reform-oriented science within a professional development school context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manno, Jacqueline L.

    Reform-oriented science teaching with a specific focus on evidence and explanation provides a student-centered learning environment which encourages children to question, seek answers to those questions, experience phenomena, share ideas, and develop explanations of science concepts based on evidence. One of the ways schools have risen to meet the challenge of ever-increasing demands for success in science and all other curricular areas has been in the development of professional development schools (PDSs). Dedicated to the simultaneous renewal of schools and teacher education programs, the structure of a PDS plays a significant role in the change process. The purpose of this research study was to investigate the nature of change in mentor teachers' beliefs and pedagogical practices toward science teaching in the elementary school as conveyed through their own "stories of practice". The major research questions that guided the study were: (1) How do mentor teachers describe their science teaching practices and how have they changed as a result of participation in PDS? (a) In what ways do PDS mentor teachers' descriptions of practice reflect contemporary reform ideas and practices in science education? (b) To what extent do their stories emphasize technical aspects of teaching versus epistemological changes in their thinking and knowledge? (c) How is student learning in science reflected in teachers' stories of practice? (2) What is the relationship between the levels and types of involvement in PDS to change in thinking about and practices of teaching science? (3) What is the depth of commitment that mentors convey about changes in science teaching practices? Using case study design, the research explored the ways experienced teachers, working within the context of a PDS community, described changes in the ways they think about and teach science. The connection to the issue of change in teaching practices grew out of interest in understanding the relationship

  4. Expanding Capacity and Promoting Inclusion in Introductory Computer Science: A Focus on Near-Peer Mentor Preparation and Code Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pon-Barry, Heather; Packard, Becky Wai-Ling; St. John, Audrey

    2017-01-01

    A dilemma within computer science departments is developing sustainable ways to expand capacity within introductory computer science courses while remaining committed to inclusive practices. Training near-peer mentors for peer code review is one solution. This paper describes the preparation of near-peer mentors for their role, with a focus on…

  5. Wabanaki Youth in Science (WaYS): A Tribal Mentoring and Educational Program Integrating Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Western Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    tish carr; Laura S. Kenefic; Darren J. Ranco

    2017-01-01

    The Wabanaki Youth in Science (WaYS) program provides mentoring and training opportunities in the life sciences for Native American youth in Maine. This program, which was motivated by a shortage of young natural resource professionals to manage tribal lands, uses a multifaceted approach (i.e., camps, community outreach, and internships with cultural resource and...

  6. Mentorship needs at academic institutions in resource-limited settings: a survey at makerere university college of health sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakwagala Fred

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mentoring is a core component of medical education and career success. There is increasing global emphasis on mentorship of young scientists in order to train and develop the next leaders in global health. However, mentoring efforts are challenged by the high clinical, research and administrative demands. We evaluated the status and nature of mentoring practices at Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MAKCHS. Methods Pre-tested, self-administered questionnaires were sent by email to all Fogarty alumni at the MAKCHS (mentors and each of them was requested to complete and email back the questionnaire. In addition to training level and number of mentors, the questionnaires had open-ended questions covering themes such as; status of mentorship, challenges faced by mentors and strategies to improve and sustain mentorship within MAKCHS. Similarly, open-ended questionnaires were sent and received by email from all graduate students (mentees registered with the Uganda Society for Health Scientists (USHS. Qualitative data from mentors and mentees was analyzed manually according to the pre-determined themes. Results Twenty- two out of 100 mentors responded (14 email and 8 hard copy responses. Up to 77% (17/22 of mentors had Master's-level training and only 18% (4/22 had doctorate-level training. About 40% of the mentors had ≥ two mentees while 27% had none. Qualitative results showed that mentors needed support in terms of training in mentoring skills and logistical/financial support to carry out successful mentorship. Junior scientists and students reported that mentorship is not yet institutionalized and it is currently occurring in an adhoc manner. There was lack of awareness of roles of mentors and mentees. The mentors mentioned the limited number of practicing mentors at the college and thus the need for training courses and guidelines for faculty members in regard to mentorship at academic institutions. Conclusions

  7. A Motivation Perspective on Faculty Mentoring: The Notion of "Non-Intrusive" Mentoring Practices in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Vicente M.

    2014-01-01

    Scholars have offered numerous approaches and best practices for mentoring faculty, many of which have provided valuable insight into the complex nature of the mentoring process. Yet, little attention has been paid to how faculty mentoring practices can influence a mentee's intrinsic motivation. Through a series of 15 interviews with faculty…

  8. Distance-mediated mentoring: A telecommunication-supported model for novice rural mathematics and science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebeck, Jennifer Lyn

    Rural educators face unique professional challenges and limitations. This study investigated the effectiveness of an innovative distance-mediated mentoring program for rural novice mathematics and science teachers. Four purposes were pursued: (1) characterize and document the nature and development of the mentor-novice relationship; (2) describe how discourse influenced the novice teachers' perceptions about mathematics and science teaching; (3) determine whether telecommunication effectively supported a distance-mediated mentoring relationship for novice rural teachers; and (4) investigate program effects on novice teachers' attitudes, concerns, and professional growth. A qualitative research design was implemented during academic years 1996-98. Primary data collection focused on nine rural novice teachers and their mentors and included three sets of interviews spanning three semesters, field observation of classrooms, schools, and communities, and analysis of electronic mail messages over a four-month period. Supporting data were collected during observation of workshops and training sessions, and through surveys administered to all program participants in early 1997 and 1998. Categories of mentor-novice communication were identified: curriculum and content, validation of teaching practice, classroom and school issues, moral support, and social talk. Impact on mathematics and science teaching was accomplished by: sharing materials and activities; planning units and projects; locating resources; classroom and student concerns; long-range curriculum design, and improvement of teaching practices. Professional growth (for both novices and mentors) occurred through individual contact with partners and interaction within the larger mentoring community in both face-to-face and on-line venues. Telecommunication was highly valued by successful users. Technical difficulty curtailed access for a significant number of teachers, but they maintained successful relationships

  9. ESL Mentoring for Secondary Rural Educators: Math and Science Teachers Become Second Language Specialists through Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen-Thomas, Holly; Grosso Richins, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on data from the capstone graduate course in a specially designed professional development program for rural math and science teachers that describes how participant teachers translated their newly acquired knowledge about English as a second language (ESL) into a mentoring experience for their rural content specialist peers.…

  10. Teachers Training Teachers: Four Perspectives on an Innovative Mentoring Program for Intern Science Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Christine L.; Harris, Jerilyn; Barrios, David; O'Connor, Heather; Fong, Jennifer

    The Graduate School of Education (GSE) at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB), the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD), and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) have collaborated to pilot an on-site training and mentoring program for intern science teachers. Exit interviews suggest that its innovative mentoring…

  11. College-Mentored Polymer/Materials Science Modules for Middle and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Robert G.; Lewis, Maurica S.; Montclare, Jin Kim

    2011-01-01

    Polymers are materials with vast environmental and economic ramifications, yet are generally not discussed in secondary education science curricula. We describe a program in which college mentors develop and implement hands-on, polymer-related experiments to supplement a standard, state regents-prescribed high school chemistry course, as well as a…

  12. Innovation in Collaboration: The Summer Institute on Youth Mentoring as a university-community partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R. Jones

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Summer Institute on Youth Mentoring (SIYM at Portland State University is an intensive week-long seminar designed to offer a highly interactive educational opportunity for experienced professionals and leading researchers in the field of youth mentoring. The current study explores the extent to which SIYM represents an example of a successful university-community partnership and identifies ways in which SIYM innovates on established partnership models. Using grounded theory methods and typological analysis, the researchers analysed questionnaire responses from SIYM participants and research fellows to compare key characteristics of SIYM with the elements of effective partnerships described in the literature. Findings suggest that SIYM reflects many essential partnership qualities, including the presence of a shared vision; strong, mutually beneficial relationships; and a partnering process that includes communication and work for positive change. SIYM also introduces several innovations in format and structure that could inform the improvement or development of effective partnership efforts across disciplines. Implications for service providers, researchers and other stakeholders are discussed. Keywords communication, collaboration, mutually beneficial relationships, innovation

  13. Mentoring Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, Margo

    2018-01-01

    In this article, the author examines her experiences as a mentee at an academic institution. She has had time to look back at some of what her mentor did in mentoring, and now appreciates how novel and successful some of his approaches were. She shares them in this article because she thinks her experience is evidence that broadening the…

  14. A Prototype Two-tier Mentoring Program for Undergraduate Summer Interns from Minority-Serving Institutions at the University of Alaska Fairbanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gens, R.; Prakash, A.; Ozbay, G.; Sriharan, S.; Balazs, M. S.; Chittambakkam, A.; Starkenburg, D. P.; Waigl, C.; Cook, S.; Ferguson, A.; Foster, K.; Jones, E.; Kluge, A.; Stilson, K.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) is partnering with Delaware State University, Virginia State University, Elizabeth City State University, Bethune-Cookman University, and Morgan State University on a U.S. Department of Agriculture - National Institute for Food and Agriculture funded grant for ';Enhancing Geographic Information System Education and Delivery through Collaboration: Curricula Design, Faculty, Staff, and Student Training and Development, and Extension Services'. As a part of this grant, in summer 2013, UAF hosted a week long workshop followed by an intense two week undergraduate internship program. Six undergraduate students from partnering Universities worked with UAF graduate students as their direct mentors. This cohort of undergraduate mentees and graduate student mentors were in-turn counseled by the two UAF principal investigators who served as ';super-mentors'. The role of each person in the two-tier mentoring system was well defined. The super-mentors ensured that there was consistency in the way the internship was setup and resources were allocated. They also ensured that there were no technical glitches in the research projects and that there was healthy communication and interaction among participants. Mentors worked with the mentees ahead of time in outlining a project that aligned with the mentees research interest, provided basic reading material to the interns to get oriented, prepared the datasets required to start the project, and guided the undergraduates throughout the internship. Undergraduates gained hands-on experience in geospatial data collection and application of tools in their projects related to mapping geomorphology, landcover, geothermal sites, fires, and meteorological conditions. Further, they shared their research results and experiences with a broad university-wide audience at the end of the internship period. All participants met at lunch-time for a daily science talk from external speakers. The program offered

  15. Information Science Research Institute. Quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-06-30

    This is a second quarter 1194 progress report on the UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Included is symposium activity; staff activity; document analysis program; text retrieval program; institute activity; and goals.

  16. National Institute of General Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Over Navigation Links National Institute of General Medical Sciences Site Map Staff Search My Order Search the ... NIGMS Website Research Funding Research Training News & Meetings Science Education About NIGMS Feature Slides View All Slides ...

  17. American Institute of Biological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staff Issues AIBS Position Statements Funding for the Biological Sciences Supporting Scientific Collections Advocating for Research Policy ... Public Policy Leadership Award Graduate students in the biological sciences who have demonstrated initiative and leadership in ...

  18. Science teachers and docents as mentors to science and mathematics undergraduates in formal and information settings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koran, J.J. Jr. [Florida Museum of Natural History, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1993-10-15

    Twenty-four undergraduate science and mathematics majors who were juniors and seniors in the colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Engineering were recruited, and paid, to participate in an orientation seminar and act as teacher aides in regional schools and the Florida Museum of Natural History. Aides worked with teachers in the schools one semester and as docents in the natural history museum a second semester. Mentoring took place by the principal investigator and participating teachers and docents throughout the program. Success of the program was measured by a specially prepared attitude instrument which was administered to participants before the mentoring started and when it ended each semester. Written logs (field notes) were also prepared and submitted by participants at the end of each semester. Further, a tally was kept of the number of participants who decided to go into science or mathematics teaching as a result of the experience.

  19. Theory-Informed Research Training and Mentoring of Underrepresented Early-Career Faculty at Teaching-Intensive Institutions: The Obesity Health Disparities PRIDE Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, Bettina M; Bruce, Marino A; Thorpe, Roland J; Heitman, Elizabeth; Griffith, Derek M; Norris, Keith C

    2018-01-01

    Mentoring has been consistently identified as an important element for career advancement in many biomedical and health professional disciplines and has been found to be critical for success and promotion in academic settings. Early-career faculty from groups underrepresented in biomedical research, however, are less likely to have mentors, and in general, receive less mentoring than their majority-group peers, particularly among those employed in teaching-intensive institutions. This article describes Obesity Health Disparities (OHD) PRIDE, a theoretically and conceptually based research training and mentoring program designed for early-career faculty who trained or are employed at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

  20. Data Science for Institutional and Organizational Economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prüfer, Jens; Prüfer, Patricia

    2018-01-01

    To which extent can data science methods – such as machine learning, text analysis, or sentiment analysis – push the research frontier in the social sciences? This essay briefly describes the most prominent data science techniques that lend themselves to analyses of institutional and organizational

  1. Early-Stage Investigators and Institutional Interface: Importance of Organization in the Mentoring Culture of Today's Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Spero M

    2016-09-01

    Mentors have an active role in teaching mentees to scan their academic environments for the resources to advance their research careers, to assess the gaps between what's available and needed to succeed, and to develop strategies to fill these gaps. Yet achieving instrumentality is a necessary, but insufficient condition by which to accomplish the desired endpoints. Mentors and mentees must recognize that the organizations to which they belong are cultural in nature: characterized by vision, values, norms, systems, symbols, language, assumptions, beliefs, and habits. Understanding the collective behaviors and assumptions of peers and leaders in terms of the shared perceptions, thoughts, and feelings of organizational membership is essential to success. Institutions, in turn, must examine the extent to which they offer action possibilities: opportunities that promote the developmental trajectories of early stage investigators-in-training. Lack of awareness of the possible dissonance of this reality adversely affects many young faculty members.

  2. Mentor Advice Giving in an Alternative Certification Program for Secondary Science Teaching: Opportunities and Roadblocks in Developing a Knowledge Base for Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upson Bradbury, Leslie; Koballa, Thomas R., Jr.

    2007-12-01

    Mentoring is often an important component of alternative certification programs, yet little is known about what novices learn about science teaching through mentoring relationships. This study investigated the advice given by two mentor science teachers to their protégés. Findings indicate that mentors gave more advice related to general pedagogical knowledge than science-specific pedagogical content knowledge. Specifically, there was little to no advice related to the topics of inquiry, the nature of science, or the development of scientific literacy. Implications call for an increase in communication between university teacher education programs and school-based mentors, the development of benchmarks to help guide mentor-protégé interactions, and the importance of a multiyear induction process.

  3. University of Washington's eScience Institute Promotes New Training and Career Pathways in Data Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, S.; Parker, M. S.; Howe, B.; Lazowska, E.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid advances in technology are transforming nearly every field from "data-poor" to "data-rich." The ability to extract knowledge from this abundance of data is the cornerstone of 21st century discovery. At the University of Washington eScience Institute, our mission is to engage researchers across disciplines in developing and applying advanced computational methods and tools to real world problems in data-intensive discovery. Our research team consists of individuals with diverse backgrounds in domain sciences such as astronomy, oceanography and geology, with complementary expertise in advanced statistical and computational techniques such as data management, visualization, and machine learning. Two key elements are necessary to foster careers in data science: individuals with cross-disciplinary training in both method and domain sciences, and career paths emphasizing alternative metrics for advancement. We see persistent and deep-rooted challenges for the career paths of people whose skills, activities and work patterns don't fit neatly into the traditional roles and success metrics of academia. To address these challenges the eScience Institute has developed training programs and established new career opportunities for data-intensive research in academia. Our graduate students and post-docs have mentors in both a methodology and an application field. They also participate in coursework and tutorials to advance technical skill and foster community. Professional Data Scientist positions were created to support research independence while encouraging the development and adoption of domain-specific tools and techniques. The eScience Institute also supports the appointment of faculty who are innovators in developing and applying data science methodologies to advance their field of discovery. Our ultimate goal is to create a supportive environment for data science in academia and to establish global recognition for data-intensive discovery across all fields.

  4. An Added Layer of Support: Introducing a Heterarchical Peer Mentoring Intervention to a Preservice Science Teacher Education Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neesemann, Lisa Ann

    2017-01-01

    In an effort to support preservice science teachers during their concurrent student teaching experiences and masters coursework, I created and implemented a Peer Mentoring Intervention to add an additional layer of support to those most traditionally curated. In this intervention, preservice secondary science teachers were paired into…

  5. Exploring the Written Dialogues of Two First-Year Secondary Science Teachers in an Online Mentoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, EunJin; Luft, Julie A.

    2014-02-01

    This study explored the yearlong learning processes of two first-year secondary science teachers participating in an online mentoring program, through examination of their written dialogues within the program and other data. Using a case study method, this study (a) explored the patterns of written dialogues between the two new teachers and their mentors over the course of a year, (b) documented pertinent topics of importance, and finally (c) illustrated the new realities created in the mentees' classrooms as a result of the online mentoring process. Penelope and Bradley, who taught at an urban school and at a suburban school respectively, were selected as subjects. Our analysis revealed that the two pairs of mentee-mentors showed different participation patterns that affected the intensity of the creation of new realities, and affected whether the mentees tried/vetted new teaching practices suggested by their mentors. Yet, analysis also revealed that certain elements in the written dialogues between pairs were found to be similar, in that construction of knowledge was evident between both pairs when friction developed and appropriate teamwork emerged to deal with it. The topics of greatest interest and importance within the dialogues were those related to the logistics of the school system and the processes and methodologies of teaching. These results suggest that online mentoring programs are an effective dialogical tool for transferring the knowledge of experts to novices, and for thus expediting the professional induction and growth of new science teachers.

  6. Scientists in the Classroom Mentor Model Program - Bringing real time science into the K - 12 classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worssam, J. B.

    2017-12-01

    Field research finally within classroom walls, data driven, hands on with students using a series of electronic projects to show evidence of scientific mentor collaboration. You do not want to miss this session in which I will be sharing the steps to develop an interactive mentor program between scientists in the field and students in the classroom. Using next generation science standards and common core language skills you will be able to blend scientific exploration with scientific writing and communication skills. Learn how to make connections in your own community with STEM businesses, agencies and organizations. Learn how to connect with scientists across the globe to make your classroom instruction interactive and live for all students. Scientists, you too will want to participate, see how you can reach out and be a part of the K-12 educational system with students learning about YOUR science, a great component for NSF grants! "Scientists in the Classroom," a model program for all, bringing real time science, data and knowledge into the classroom.

  7. Onward: Reflections on Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kimberley Buster

    2018-01-01

    The author has been blessed with great mentors throughout her career. When she was invited to participate in the Leadership University of Mary Washington (UMW), a mentoring program at her institution, she did not hesitate to say yes. In this article, the author shares her reflections on mentoring.

  8. Careers of an elite cohort of U.S. basic life science postdoctoral fellows and the influence of their mentor's citation record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levitt David G

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is general agreement that the number of U.S. science PhDs being trained far exceeds the number of future academic positions. One suggested approach to this problem is to significantly reduce the number of PhD positions. A counter argument is that students are aware of the limited academic positions but have chosen a PhD track because it opens other, non-academic, opportunities. The latter view requires that students have objective information about what careers options will be available for them. Methods The scientific careers of the 1992-94 cohort of NIH National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS Kirchstein-NRSA F32 postdoctoral fellows (PD was determined by following their publications (PubMed, grants (NIH and NSF, and faculty and industry positions through 2009. These basic life science PDs receive support through individual grant applications and represent the most successful class of NIH PDs as judged by academic careers and grants. The sex dependence of the career and grant success and the influence of the PD mentor's citation record were also determined Results Of the 439 1992-94 NIGMS F32 fellows, the careers of 417 could be determined. Although females had significantly higher rates of dropping out of science (22% females, 9% males there was no significant difference in the fraction of females that ended up as associate or full professors at research universities (22.8% females, 29.1% for males. More males then females ended up in industry (34% males, 22% females. Although there was no significant correlation between male grant success and their mentor's publication record (h index, citations, publications, there was a significant correlation for females. Females whose mentor's h index was in the top quartile were nearly 3 times as likely to receive a major grant as those whose mentors were in the bottom quartile (38.7% versus 13.3%. Conclusions Sixteen years after starting their PD, only 9% of males

  9. Near-Peer Mentor Model: Synergy within Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Margery K.; Tenenbaum, Laura S.; Ramadorai, Swati B.; Yourick, Debra L.

    2015-01-01

    The near-peer mentor model provides undergraduates and recent post-baccalaureates in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields with an internship in two related disciplines, STEM research and STEM education. The near-peer mentor is both a mentored research intern and a mentor to pre-college students. During the 2013…

  10. The Effect of a State Department of Education Teacher Mentor Initiative on Science Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Stephen L.; Wallace, Carolyn S.

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a southern state's department of education program to improve science achievement through embedded professional development of science teachers in the lowest performing schools. The Science Mentor Program provided content and inquiry-based coaching by teacher leaders to science teachers in their own classrooms. The study analyzed the mean scale scores for the science portion of the state's high school graduation test for the years 2004 through 2007 to determine whether schools receiving the intervention scored significantly higher than comparison schools receiving no intervention. The results showed that all schools achieved significant improvement of scale scores between 2004 and 2007, but there were no significant performance differences between intervention and comparison schools, nor were there any significant differences between various subgroups in intervention and comparison schools. However, one subgroup, economically disadvantaged (ED) students, from high-level intervention schools closed the achievement gap with ED students from no-intervention schools across the period of the study. The study provides important information to guide future research on and design of large-scale professional development programs to foster inquiry-based science.

  11. "A good career choice for women": female medical students' mentoring experiences: a multi-institutional qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Rachel B; Mechaber, Hilit F; Reddy, Shalini T; Cayea, Danelle; Harrison, Rebecca A

    2013-04-01

    The career decisions, practice patterns, and approach to patient care of current female students, who make up close to 50% of medical school classes, will have a profound impact on the profession. This study explores the role gender plays in the mentoring experiences of female medical students. In 2011, the authors conducted focus groups with 48 third- and fourth-year female medical students at four U.S. medical schools. Using a template organizing style, they derived themes in an iterative process to explore female medical students' mentoring relationships and the impact of gender on those relationships. The authors identified four major themes: (1) Optimal mentoring relationships are highly relational. Students emphasized shared values, trust, and a personal connection in describing ideal mentoring relationships. (2) Relational mentoring is more important than gender concordance. Students identified a desire for access to female mentors but stated that when a mentor and mentee developed a personal connection, the gender of the mentor was less important. (3) Gender-based assumptions and stereotypes affect mentoring relationships. Students described gender-based assumptions and expectations for themselves and their mentors. (4) Gender-based power dynamics influence students' thinking about mentoring. Students stated that they were concerned about how their mentors might perceive their professional decisions because of their gender, which influenced what they disclosed to male mentors and mentors in positions of power. Gender appears to play a role in female medical students' expectations and experience with mentoring relationships and may influence their decision making around career planning.

  12. Peer Mentoring at the Uganda Cancer Institute: A Novel Model for Career Development of Clinician-Scientists in Resource-Limited Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Phipps

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer centers are beginning to emerge in low- and middle-income countries despite having relatively few oncologists and specialists in related fields. Uganda, like many countries in sub-Saharan Africa, has a cadre of highly motivated clinician-scientists-in-training who are committed to developing the capacity for cancer care and research. However, potential local mentors for these trainees are burdened with uniquely high demands on their time for clinical care, teaching, institutional development, advocacy, and research. Facilitated peer mentoring helps to fill skills and confidence gaps and teaches mentoring skills so that trainees can learn to support one another and regularly access a more senior facilitator/role model. With an added consultant component, programs can engage limited senior faculty time to address specific training needs and to introduce junior investigators to advisors and even potential dyadic mentors. Two years after its inception, our facilitated peer mentoring career development program at the Uganda Cancer Institute in Kampala is successfully developing a new generation of researchers who, in turn, are now providing role models and mentors from within their group. This program provides a practical model for building the next generation of clinical scientists in developing countries.

  13. From Nothing to Something: The Nuts and Bolts of Building a Mentoring Program in a Health Sciences College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I report the development of a mentoring program in a College of Health Sciences comprised of schools of nursing, pharmacy, and health professions (which include physical therapy, speech pathology and audiology, applied psychology, and physician assistant programs) at a large private university. Although university-wide mentoring…

  14. Global Science Share: Connecting young scientists from developing countries with science writing mentors to strengthen and widen the international science community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenkopf, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Collaborative science in which scientists are able to form research questions based on the current body of scientific knowledge and get feedback from colleagues on their ideas and work is essential for pushing science forward. However, not all scientists are able to fully participate in the international science community. Scientists from developing countries can face barriers to communicating with the international community due to, among other issues: fewer scientists in their home country, difficulty in getting language-specific science writing training, fewer established pre-existing international collaborations and networks, and sometimes geographic isolation. These barriers not only result in keeping individual scientists from contributing their ideas, but they also slow down the progress of the scientific enterprise for everyone. Global Science Share (http://globalscienceshare.org/) is a new project, entering its pilot phase in Fall 2012, which will work to reduce this disparity by connecting young scientists and engineers from developing countries seeking to improve their technical writing with other scientists and engineers around the world via online collaborations. Scientist-volunteers act as mentors and are paired up with mentees according to their academic field and writing needs. The mentors give feedback and constructive technical and editorial criticisms on mentees' submitted pieces of writing through a four-step email discussion. Mentees gain technical writing skills, as well as make international connections with other scientists and engineers in fields related to their own. Mentors also benefit by gaining new international scientific colleagues and honing their own writing skills through their critiques. The Global Science Share project will begin its pilot phase by first inviting Mongolian science students to apply as mentees this fall. This abstract will introduce the Global Science Share program, present a progress report from its first

  15. Teacher Training and Student Learning Outcomes in Family and Consumer Sciences: A Mentoring and Co-teaching Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melodie Davis-Bundrage

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study is a mentoring and co-teaching case study of a fashion merchandising course. It seeks to understand the impact of cross-disciplinary coteaching on student learning and instructor training by utilizing the Collaborative Responsive Educational Mentoring Model (CREMM. The course documented in the study was taught as a cross-disciplinary effort to incorporate career, business, technical, cultural, and theoretical information. It was found that a formalized mentoring program, coupled with a co-teaching experience involving a professor and a graduate student in Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS can effectively enhance educational learning outcomes. The study exemplifies how educators in FACS may benefit from utilizing CREMM to structure cross-disciplinary courses, manage time, and apply different teaching methods to best serve student needs.

  16. Smooth Transition for Advancement to Graduate Education (STAGE) for Underrepresented Groups in the Mathematical Sciences Pilot Project: Broadening Participation through Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubanks-Turner, Christina; Beaulieu, Patricia; Pal, Nabendu

    2018-01-01

    The Smooth Transition for Advancement to Graduate Education (STAGE) project was a three-year pilot project designed to mentor undergraduate students primarily from under-represented groups in the mathematical sciences. The STAGE pilot project focused on mentoring students as they transitioned from undergraduate education to either graduate school…

  17. Summer Institute for Physical Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswaranathan, Ponn; Calloway, Cliff

    2007-04-01

    A summer institute for physical science teachers was conducted at Winthrop University, June 19-29, 2006. Ninth grade physical science teachers at schools within a 50-mile radius from Winthrop were targeted. We developed a graduate level physics professional development course covering selected topics from both the physics and chemistry content areas of the South Carolina Science Standards. Delivery of the material included traditional lectures and the following new approaches in science teaching: hands-on experiments, group activities, computer based data collection, computer modeling, with group discussions & presentations. Two experienced master teachers assisted us during the delivery of the course. The institute was funded by the South Carolina Department of Education. The requested funds were used for the following: faculty salaries, the University contract course fee, some of the participants' room and board, startup equipment for each teacher, and indirect costs to Winthrop University. Startup equipment included a Pasco stand-alone, portable Xplorer GLX interface with sensors (temperature, voltage, pH, pressure, motion, and sound), and modeling software (Wavefunction's Spartan Student and Odyssey). What we learned and ideas for future K-12 teacher preparation initiatives will be presented.

  18. Basil A. Pruitt Jr. MD and the US Army Institute for Surgical Research: Five Decades of Science, Clinical Care, Mentorship, and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ronald M

    2017-08-24

    Over the past half century Dr. Basil A. Pruitt, Jr., a great citizen, surgeon, innovator, mentor and leader, transformed our world through his dogged commitment to science and service to humanity. Dr. Pruitt's contribution lives on in the work of the US Army Institute of Surgical Research and the surgeons, physicians and scientists he shaped and inspired.

  19. Research in Institutional Economics in Management Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    This report maps research in institutional economics in management science in the European Union for the 1995 to 2002 period. The reports applies Internet search based on a university listing, search on journal databases, key informants and an internet-based survey. 195 researchers are identified....... In (sub-)disciplinary terms, organization, strategy, corporate governance, and international business are the major areas of application of institutional economics ideas. In terms of countries, the EU strongholds are Holland, Denmark, UK, and Germany. There is apparently no or very little relevant...... research in Ireland, Portugal, Luxembourg and Greece. Based on the findings of the report, it seems warranted to characterize the EU research effort in the field as being rather dispersed and uncoordinated. Thus, there are no specialized journals, associations or PhD courses. This state of affairs...

  20. The Learning Outcomes of Mentoring Library Science Students in Virtual World Reference: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpur, Geraldine; Morris, Jon Levi

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the cognitive and affective development of students being mentored in virtual reference interview skills by professional librarians. The authors present a case study which examines the impact on student learning resulting from librarian mentor participation and collaboration with students on a course assignment. This study…

  1. Using Mentor Texts to Teach Writing in Science and Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytash, Kristine E.; Morgan, Denise N.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how the research-based practice of using mentor texts can support students' writing within their subject areas. Specifically, this article examines the writing demands of the Common Core Writing Standards and how using mentor texts helps teachers meet these writing standards. We share guiding principles for using mentor…

  2. AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF DIVERSIFIED MENTORING RELATIONSHIPS AMONG GRADUATE STUDENTS AND THEIR ADVISORS IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS FIELDS

    OpenAIRE

    Bodden, Krystin R.

    2014-01-01

    Minorities and women continue to be underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. In graduate education, factors such as racism, prejudice, discrimination, sexism, stereotypes, tokenism, and a lack of role models can all plague students and contribute to uncompleted degrees and non-entrance into STEM fields. One of the tools being used to combat these barriers is effective mentoring. Graduate students and their advisors generally have close working relat...

  3. Promoting Original Scientific Research and Teacher Training Through a High School Science Research Program: A Five Year Retrospective and Analysis of the Impact on Mentored 8th Grade Geoscience Students and the Mentors Themselves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danch, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    In 2010 a group of 8th grade geoscience students participated in an extracurricular activity allowing them to conduct original scientific research while being mentored by students enrolled in a 3 - year high school Science Research program. Upon entering high school the mentored students themselves enrolled in the Science Research program and continued for 4 years, culminating with their participation in Science Research 4. This allowed them to continue conducting original scientific research, act as mentors to 8th grade geoscience students and to provide teacher training for both middle and high school teachers conducting inquiry-based science lessons. Of the 7 Science Research 4 students participating since 2010, 100% plan on majoring or minoring in a STEM - related field in college and their individual research projects have been been granted over 70 different awards and honors in science fair and symposia including a 3rd and 4th place category awards at two different international science fairs - the International Sustainable Energy Engineering and Environment Project (iSWEEP) and the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). Science Research 4 students developed and conducted a Society for Science and the Public affiliated science fair for middle school students enrolled in an 8th grade honors geoscience program allowing over 100 students from 5 middle schools to present their research and be judged by STEM professionals. Students with research judged in the top 10% were nominated for participation in the National Broadcom MASTERS program which they successfully entered upon further mentoring from the Science Research 4 students. 8th grade enrollment in the Science Research program for 2015 increased by almost 50% with feedback from students, parents and teachers indicating that the mentorship and participation in the 8th grade science fair were factors in increasing interest in continuing authentic scientific research in high school.

  4. Member Perceptions of Informal Science Institution Graduate Certificate Program: Case Study of a Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lois A.

    This research attempted to understand the experiences of a cohort of informal and formal science educators and informal science institution (ISI) community representatives during and after completion of a pilot graduate certificate program. Informal science educators (ISEs) find limited opportunities for professional development and support which influence their contributions to America's science literacy and school science education. This emergent design nested case study described how an innovative program provided professional development and enabled growth in participants' abilities to contribute to science literacy. Data were collected through interviews, participant observations, and class artifacts. The program by design and constituency was the overarching entity that accounted for members' experiences. Three principal aspects of the ISI certificate program and cohort which influenced perceptions and reported positive outcomes were (1) the cohort's composition and their collaborative activities which established a vigorous community of practice and fostered community building, mentoring, and networking, (2) long term program design and implementation which promoted experiential learning in a generative classroom, and (3) ability of some members who were able to be independent or autonomous learners to embrace science education reform strategies for greater self-efficacy and career advancement. This research extends the limited literature base for professional development of informal science educators and may benefit informal science institutions, informal and formal science educators, science education reform efforts, and public education and science-technology-society understanding. The study may raise awareness of the need to establish more professional development opportunities for ISEs and to fund professional development. Further, recognizing and appreciating informal science educators as a diverse committed community of professionals who positively

  5. REFORMA/UCLA Mentor Program: A Mentoring Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauler, Sandra

    Although mentoring dates back to Greek mythology, the concept continues to thrive in today's society. Mentoring is a strategy that successful people have known about for centuries. The REFORMA/UCLA Mentor Program has made use of this strategy since its inception in November 1985 at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the…

  6. Establishing an EnvironMentors Project to Guide Minority Students into Science, Technology, and Environmental Careers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montague, W. E.

    2003-01-24

    This report of the EnvironMentors Project (TEP) for the period February 1994 through December 1998, provides a summary of activities at our program sites and of our overall organizational accomplishments. Notably, the EnvironMentors Project matched 506 teens from under-resourced neighborhoods in Washington (DC), Trenton (NJ), and Baltimore (MD) with mentors, engaged more than 1,600 members of the public in informative discussions of environmental research, and presented interactive environmental education lessons to approximately 5,700 elementary and middle school children.

  7. Earth Institute at Columbia University ADVANCE Program: Addressing Needs for Women in Earth and Environmental Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, R. E.; Cane, M.; Mutter, J.; Miller, R.; Pfirman, S.; Laird, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Earth Institute has received a major NSF ADVANCE grant targeted at increasing the participation and advancement of women scientists and engineers in the Academy through institutional transformation. The Earth Institute at Columbia University includes 9 research institutes including Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Center for Environmental Research and Conservation (CERC), Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), International Research Institute (IRI) for Climate Prediction, Earth Engineering Center, NASA-Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Center for Risks and Hazards, Center for Globalization and Sustainable Development, and Center for Global Health and Economic Development and six academic departments including Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology (E3B, School of Arts and Sciences), Earth and Environmental Engineering (DEEE, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences), Department of Environmental Health (School of Public Health), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (DEES, School of Arts and Sciences), Department of International and Public Affairs (School of International and Policy Affairs), and Barnard College Department of Environmental Science. The Earth Institute at Columbia University's ADVANCE program is based both on a study of the status of women at Columbia and research on the progression of women in science elsewhere. The five major targets of the Columbia ADVANCE program are to (1) change the demographics of the faculty through intelligent hiring practices, (2) provide support to women scientists through difficult life transitions including elder care and adoption or birth of a child, (3) enhance mentoring and networking opportunities, (4) implement transparent promotion procedures and policies, and (5) conduct an institutional self study. The Earth Institute ADVANCE program is unique in that it addresses issues that tend to manifest themselves in the earth and environmental fields, such as extended

  8. Multicultural Mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Sommerville, Lenola

    1994-01-01

    Describes the mentoring relationship between George Washington Carver and Henry Agard Wallace who later became a great scientist and Vice President of the United States. Explains what mentoring is and discusses classroom implications for mentoring. (PR)

  9. An Added Layer of Support: Introducing a Heterarchical Peer Mentoring Intervention to a Preservice Science Teacher Education Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neesemann, Lisa Ann

    In an effort to support preservice science teachers during their concurrent student teaching experiences and masters coursework, I created and implemented a Peer Mentoring Intervention to add an additional layer of support to those most traditionally curated. In this intervention, preservice secondary science teachers were paired into heterarchical (as contrasted with hierarchical) mentoring groups, instructed in norms of collaboration and given class time to work as dyads offering support and feedback to one another. During the three-semester span of the intervention data was collected in many forms, such as prompted journal entries, course assignments and semi-structured interviews. Qualitative findings are reported and the case study of one dyad is also presented. Findings included concerns and solutions regarding relating to the assigned peer, developing academic and organizational skills, navigating and learning to appreciate different layers of support, a deeper level of reflection, varying levels of commitment to social justice, and realized self-efficacy. Next steps include refining and implementing the program with a new cohort of students as well as following the participants as they move forward in their teaching careers as well as rethinking the role of mentorship to realize equality among members and challenge the traditionally established hierarchies in mentor relationships.

  10. Aspen Global Change Institute Summer Science Sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzenberger, John; Kaye, Jack A

    2006-10-01

    The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) successfully organized and convened six interdisciplinary meetings over the course of award NNG04GA21G. The topics of the meetings were consistent with a range of issues, goals and objectives as described within the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan and more broadly by the US Global Change Research Program/Our Changing Planet, the more recent Climate Change Program Strategic Plan and the NSF Pathways report. The meetings were chaired by two or more leaders from within the disciplinary focus of each session. 222 scholars for a total of 1097 participants-days were convened under the auspices of this award. The overall goal of each AGCI session is to further the understanding of Earth system science and global environmental change through interdisciplinary dialog. The format and structure of the meetings allows for presentation by each participant, in-depth discussion by the whole group, and smaller working group and synthesis activities. The size of the group is important in terms of the group dynamics and interaction, and the ability for each participant's work to be adequately presented and discussed within the duration of the meeting, while still allowing time for synthesis

  11. Creating More Effective Mentors: Mentoring the Mentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Monica; Johnson, Mallory

    2016-09-01

    Given the diversity of those affected by HIV, increasing diversity in the HIV biomedical research workforce is imperative. A growing body of empirical and experimental evidence supports the importance of strong mentorship in the development and success of trainees and early career investigators in academic research settings, especially for mentees of diversity. Often missing from this discussion is the need for robust mentoring training programs to ensure that mentors are trained in best practices on the tools and techniques of mentoring. Recent experimental evidence shows improvement in mentor and mentee perceptions of mentor competency after structured and formalized training on best practices in mentoring. We developed a 2-day "Mentoring the Mentors" workshop at UCSF to train mid-level and senior HIV researchers from around the country [recruited mainly from Centers for AIDS Research (CFARs)] on best practices, tools and techniques of effective mentoring. The workshop content was designed using principles of Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) and included training specifically geared towards working with early career investigators from underrepresented groups, including sessions on unconscious bias, microaggressions, and diversity supplements. The workshop has been held three times (September 2012, October 2013 and May 2015) with plans for annual training. Mentoring competency was measured using a validated tool before and after each workshop. Mentoring competency skills in six domains of mentoring-specifically effective communication, aligning expectations, assessing understanding, fostering independence, addressing diversity and promoting development-all improved as assessed by a validated measurement tool for participants pre- and -post the "Mentoring the Mentors" training workshops. Qualitative assessments indicated a greater awareness of the micro-insults and unconscious bias experienced by mentees of diversity and a commitment to improve awareness and

  12. The Tanenbaum Open Science Institute: Leading a Paradigm Shift at the Montreal Neurological Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poupon, Viviane; Seyller, Annabel; Rouleau, Guy A

    2017-08-30

    The Montreal Neurological Institute is adopting an Open Science Policy that will be enacted by the Tanenbaum Open Science Institute. The aim is to accelerate the generation of knowledge and novel effective treatments for brain disorders by freeing science. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Science in democracy: expertise, institutions, and representation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Mark B

    2009-01-01

    ...? In Science in Democracy, Mark Brown draws on science and technology studies, democratic theory, and the history of political thought to show why an adequate response to politicized science depends...

  14. How Effective are Your Mentoring Relationships? Mentoring Quiz for Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Nagy, Paul; Chhabra, Avneesh; Lee, Cindy S

    Mentoring is an essential part of a resident's career development. It plays an important role in nurturing, and sustaining success along the career path of a young physician. Mentoring is a long-term goal that is development-driven rather than performance-driven. Although specific learning goals may be used as a basis, the focus of mentoring may also include self-confidence, self-perception, and work-life balance. A number of residency programs have implemented mentoring programs in their institutions. This article discusses the importance of mentoring, illustrates "do's and don'ts" for mentees and demonstrates how to choose the ideal mentor. Finally, a "mentoring quiz" is designed to evaluate your mentoring relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Mentoring Experience: Leadership Development Program Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Kevan W.; Sapp, Rochelle; Lamm, Alexa J.

    2017-01-01

    Using a semi-structured interview approach, ten mentors from a leadership development program focused on building leaders in Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences across the nation provided insights regarding their mentoring method, process, and experiences. Mentors interviewed agreed the mentoring process was beneficial for themselves as well…

  16. Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2000-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center. It currently operates under a multiple year grant/cooperative agreement that began on October 1, 1997 and is up for renewal in the year 2002. Ames has been designated NASA's Center of Excellence in Information Technology. In this capacity, Ames is charged with the responsibility to build an Information Technology Research Program that is preeminent within NASA. RIACS serves as a bridge between NASA Ames and the academic community, and RIACS scientists and visitors work in close collaboration with NASA scientists. RIACS has the additional goal of broadening the base of researchers in these areas of importance to the nation's space and aeronautics enterprises. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of information technology research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: (1) Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems. Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth; (2) Human-Centered Computing. Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities; (3) High Performance Computing and Networking. Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to data analysis of large datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply information technology research to a

  17. Tutoring and Mentoring

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African institutions of higher education (HE) have increasingly come under ... instruction (SI) and peer-assisted learning (PAL) and mentoring programmes. ... New Directions in Higher Education: Peer Leadership in Higher Education (p.

  18. UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Quarterly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    This document summarizes the activities and progress for the 1994 Fall quarter for the UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Areas covered include: Symposium activity, Staff activity, Document analysis program, Text-retrieval program, and Institute activity

  19. UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-12-31

    This document summarizes the activities and progress for the 1994 Fall quarter for the UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Areas covered include: Symposium activity, Staff activity, Document analysis program, Text-retrieval program, and Institute activity.

  20. Impact of Mentoring Program in the academic performance of students from the Technological Institute of Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Imelda García López

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This research evaluates the impact of tutorship in academic achievement in the Institute. A data of 1812 first semester students who took tutorship were analyzed. It was found that gender, tutorship and GPA in high school is significantly related with academic success. Results of logistic regression indicate that the odds for a student who has tutorship fails is less than a half for a student of the same gender without tutorship. This model indicates also that a difference of one point in GPA in high school has more influence in student success that tutorship.

  1. Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education, Tata Institute of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 2. Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (A Deemed University). Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 2 February 2017 pp 189-189 ...

  2. Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science during the period April 1, 1983 through September 30, 1983 is summarized.

  3. Mentoring Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Kirsten M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to give an introduction to the definition and learning process of mentoring, a structured overview of the value of mentoring for mentees, mentors, organisations and society, as well as present the key element for designing and implementing successful mentoring...

  4. Minority students benefit from mentoring programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, D L; Rodak, B; Fitzgerald, N; Baker, S

    1993-01-01

    Mentoring has been proposed as one strategy to attract minority students to the radiologic sciences profession. This case study describes a minority mentoring program conducted for pre-radiologic science students at a Midwestern university during the 1991-92 academic year. Ten minority radiologic science students enrolled in the mentoring program. The study showed that mentoring may be a viable option to serve the special needs of minorities for recruitment and retention.

  5. Mentor Service Themes Emergent in a Holistic, Undergraduate Peer-Mentoring Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Elijah G.; Thomas, Earl E.; Disch, William B.

    2014-01-01

    Little research has focused carefully on the means by which peer mentors foster development in undergraduate protégés. Two faculty members developed a holistic, peer-mentoring project in which 26 upperclassmen mentored 74 underclassmen at a midsize, 4-year institution. Mentor journal notes, open-ended protégé responses, and participant…

  6. Organizational and training factors that promote team science: A qualitative analysis and application of theory to the National Institutes of Health's BIRCWH career development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Winter, Susan; Fiore, Stephen M; Regensteiner, Judith G; Nagel, Joan

    2017-04-01

    Research organizations face challenges in creating infrastructures that cultivates and sustains interdisciplinary team science. The objective of this paper is to identify structural elements of organizations and training that promote team science. We qualitatively analyzed the National Institutes of Health's Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health, K12 using organizational psychology and team science theories to identify organizational design factors for successful team science and training. Seven key design elements support team science: (1) semiformal meta-organizational structure, (2) shared context and goals, (3) formal evaluation processes, (4) meetings to promote communication, (5) role clarity in mentoring, (6) building interpersonal competencies among faculty and trainees, and (7) designing promotion and tenure and other organizational processes to support interdisciplinary team science. This application of theory to a long-standing and successful program provides important foundational elements for programs and institutions to consider in promoting team science.

  7. Teacher Mentoring as a Community Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley-Levine, Jill; Lee, Jean Sangmin; Mosier, Gina

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the findings from a study of a mentoring program for novice mathematics and science teachers, which was provided by their teacher education program. This study reports the findings of interviews with novice math and science teachers, their mentors, and the mentoring program administrators to explore stakeholder perceptions of…

  8. Peer mentoring works!

    OpenAIRE

    Andrews, Jane; Clark, Robin

    2011-01-01

    This report draws on the findings of a three year study into peer mentoring conducted at 6 Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), 5 of which were in the UK, 1 of which was in Norway. Following a multiple case-study design, quantitative and qualitative research was conducted in collaboration with the project partners. The research findings provide empirical evidence that peer mentoring works! In particular the report provides: - An Executive Summary outlining the main project findings - A synop...

  9. Women in Planetary Science: Career Resources and e-Mentoring on Blogs, Twitter, Facebook, Google+, and Pinterest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebur, S. M.; Singer, K.; Gardner-Vandy, K.

    2012-08-01

    Fifty-one interviews with women in planetary science are now available as an e-mentoring and teaching resource on WomeninPlanetaryScience.com. Each scientist was nominated and interviewed by a fellow member of the planetary science community, and each gladly shared her advice for advancement in the field. Women in Planetary Science was founded in 2008 to connect communities of current and prospective scientists, to promote proposal and award opportunities, and to stimulate discussion in the planetary science community at large. Regular articles, or posts, by nearly a dozen collaborators highlight a range of current issues for women in this field. These articles are promoted by collaborators on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+ and shared again by the collaborators' contacts, reaching a significantly wider audience. The group's latest project, on Pinterest, is a crowd-sourced photo gallery of more than 350 inspiring women in planetary science; each photo links to the scientist's CV. The interviews, the essays, and the photo gallery are available online as resources for prospective scientists, planetary scientists, parents, and educators.

  10. Life in the Universe - Astronomy and Planetary Science Research Experience for Undergraduates at the SETI Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiar, J.; Phillips, C. B.; Rudolph, A.; Bonaccorsi, R.; Tarter, J.; Harp, G.; Caldwell, D. A.; DeVore, E. K.

    2016-12-01

    The SETI Institute hosts an Astrobiology Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. Beginning in 2013, we partnered with the Physics and Astronomy Dept. at Cal Poly Pomona, a Hispanic-serving university, to recruit underserved students. Over 11 years, we have served 155 students. We focus on Astrobiology since the Institute's mission is to explore, understand and explain the origin, nature and prevalence of life in the universe. Our REU students work with mentors at the Institute - a non-profit organization located in California's Silicon Valley-and at the nearby NASA Ames Research Center. Projects span research on survival of microbes under extreme conditions, planetary geology, astronomy, the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), extrasolar planets and more. The REU program begins with an introductory lectures by Institute scientists covering the diverse astrobiology subfields. A week-long field trip to the SETI Institute's Allen Telescope Array (Hat Creek Radio Astronomy Observatory in Northern California) and field experiences at hydrothermal systems at nearby Lassen Volcanic National Park immerses students in radio astronomy and SETI, and extremophile environments that are research sites for astrobiologists. Field trips expose students to diverse environments and allow them to investigate planetary analogs as our scientists do. Students also participate in local trips to the California Academy of Sciences and other nearby locations of scientific interest, and attend the weekly scientific colloquium hosted by the SETI Institute at Microsoft, other seminars and lectures at SETI Institute and NASA Ames. The students meet and present at a weekly journal club where they hone their presentation skills, as well as share their research progress. At the end of the summer, the REU interns present their research projects at a session of the Institute's colloquium. As a final project, students prepare a 2-page formal abstract and 15-minute

  11. Mentor Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarappa, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Jargon associated with mentoring can be confusing. Is a new leader involved in induction, being mentored, or experiencing coaching? Induction is meant to familiarize a new employee with the details and scope of job responsibilities, while mentoring and coaching are directed at skill development. Elementary and secondary principals rate mentoring…

  12. Mentoring Postsecondary Tenure-Track Faculty: A Theory-Building Case Study and Implications for Institutional Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Dannielle Joy; Boyer, Patricia; Russell, Isela

    2011-01-01

    The featured research uses theory-building case study to understand the experiences of junior faculty in a mentoring program. Findings suggest the importance of professional interaction for faculty members' integration into their campus communities. An explanatory model illustrates the findings and supplements discussion of the implications for…

  13. A Social Capital Perspective on the Mentoring of Undergraduate Life Science Researchers: An Empirical Study of Undergraduate–Postgraduate–Faculty Triads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikens, Melissa L.; Sadselia, Sona; Watkins, Keiana; Evans, Mara; Eby, Lillian T.; Dolan, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate researchers at research universities are often mentored by graduate students or postdoctoral researchers (referred to collectively as “postgraduates”) and faculty, creating a mentoring triad structure. Triads differ based on whether the undergraduate, postgraduate, and faculty member interact with one another about the undergraduate’s research. Using a social capital theory framework, we hypothesized that different triad structures provide undergraduates with varying resources (e.g., information, advice, psychosocial support) from the postgraduates and/or faculty, which would affect the undergraduates’ research outcomes. To test this, we collected data from a national sample of undergraduate life science researchers about their mentoring triad structure and a range of outcomes associated with research experiences, such as perceived gains in their abilities to think and work like scientists, science identity, and intentions to enroll in a PhD program. Undergraduates mentored by postgraduates alone reported positive outcomes, indicating that postgraduates can be effective mentors. However, undergraduates who interacted directly with faculty realized greater outcomes, suggesting that faculty interaction is important for undergraduates to realize the full benefits of research. The “closed triad,” in which undergraduates, postgraduates, and faculty all interact directly, appeared to be uniquely beneficial; these undergraduates reported the highest gains in thinking and working like a scientist. PMID:27174583

  14. Information Science Research Institute quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1995-09-30

    Subjects studied include optical character recognition (OCR), text retrieval, and document analysis. This report discusses the OCR test system and the text retrieval program. Staff and institute activities are given. Appendices give the ISRI methodology for preparing ground-truth test data and the test of OCR systems using DOE documents.

  15. Transdisciplinary EU science institute needs funds urgently

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, T.P.; Vasbinder, Jan W.; Andersson, B.; Arthur, W. Brian; Boasson, Maarten; Boer, de Rob; Changeux, Jenb Pierre; Domingo, Esteban; Eigen, Manfred; Fersht, Alan; Frenkel, Daan; Rees, Martin; Huber, Robert; Hunt, Tim; Holland, John; May, Robert; Norby, Erling; Nijkamp, Peter; Lehn, Jean Marie; Rabbinge, Rudy; Scheffer, Maarten; Schuster, Peter; Serageldin, Ismail; Stuip, Jan; Vries, de Jan; Vierssen, van Wim; Willems, Rein

    2010-01-01

    Europe's future hinges on funding transdisciplinary scientific collaboration. But career paths, peer recognition, publication channels and the public funding of science are still mostly geared to maintain and reinforce disciplinarity. We do not properly understand the effects of technology on the

  16. Transdisciplinary EU Science Institute needs funds urgently

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasbinder, J.W.; Andersson, B.; Arthur, W.B.; Boasson, M.; Scheffer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Europe's future hinges on funding transdisciplinary scientific collaboration. But career paths, peer recognition, publication channels and the public funding of science are still mostly geared to maintain and reinforce disciplinarity. We do not properly understand the effects of technology on the

  17. The Benefits of Peer-to-Peer Mentoring: Lessons from The Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, T.; Steiner, A.; Fiore, A.; Hastings, M.; McKinley, G.; Staudt, A.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN) is a grassroots organization that began with the meeting of six women graduate students and recent Ph.D.s at the Spring 2002 AGU meeting in Washington, DC. Since then, the group has grown to over 400 members, completely by word of mouth. We provide an informal, peer-to-peer network developed to promote and support careers of women in the Earth sciences. Through the network, women have found jobs, established research collaborations, shared strategies on work/life balance, and built a community stretching around the world. We maintain an email list for members to develop an expanded peer network outside of their own institution, and we have recently launched a co-ed jobs list to benefit the wider geoscience community. We will present a summary of strategies that have been discussed by group members on how to transition to a new faculty position, build a research group, develop new research collaborations, and balance career and family.

  18. Same-same but different: integrating central university support and faculty-specific knowledge for mentor training. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Rodrigo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mentoring literature often cites a tension between local initiatives that target the needs of specific groups and more efficient centralised programs addressing common concerns across a larger population. For several years, the University of Sydney has had a Mentoring Network consisting of the faculties of Arts and Social Sciences, Health Sciences, Science, Sydney Law School and the Business School. These faculties have worked together to develop a community of best practice for mentoring programs at our large, multi-campus institution, and for the past two years have included a representative from Student Support Services to incorporate a centralised support component into their faculty-specific training programs. This Practice Report showcases the work of the University of Sydney Mentoring Network in combining central university services with faculty-based mentoring.

  19. Evaluation of a peer mentoring program for early career gerontological nursing faculty and its potential for application to other fields in nursing and health sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Abraham A; Edelman, Linda; Siegel, Elena O; Foster, Victoria; Bailey, Donald E; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Bond, Stewart M

    2016-01-01

    As the retirement rate of senior nursing faculty increases, the need to implement new models for providing mentorship to early career academics will become key to developing and maintaining an experienced faculty. This evaluation of a peer mentorship program for predoctoral and postdoctoral gerontological nurses examined its efficacy, utility, and potential for improvement. A web-based survey was developed, implemented, and completed by 22 mentees and 17 mentors (71% and 61% response rates, respectively) as part of the evaluation. The peer mentorship program was found to be valuable by both mentors (64.7%) and mentees (72.7%) in helping mentees further develop their careers and networks and providing mentors with supported mentorship experience. The peer mentorship program could serve as a model for other professional organizations, academic institutions, and consortiums to enhance and extend the formal vertical mentorship provided to early academic career individuals. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Virginia Bioinformatics Institute to expand cyberinfrastructure education and outreach project

    OpenAIRE

    Whyte, Barry James

    2008-01-01

    The National Science Foundation has awarded the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech $918,000 to expand its education and outreach program in Cyberinfrastructure - Training, Education, Advancement and Mentoring, commonly known as the CI-TEAM.

  1. Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamenov, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE) of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences is the leading Bulgarian Institute for scientific investigations and applications of nuclear science. The main Institute's activities in the field of elementary particles and nuclear physics, high energy physics and nuclear energy, radiochemistry, radioecology, radioactive wastes treatment, monitoring of the environment, nuclear instruments development ect. are briefly described. Several examples for: environmental radiation monitoring; monitoring of the radioactivity and heavy metals in aerosols, 99m Tc clinical use, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy application of IRT-2000 Research Reactor, neutron fluence for reactor vessel embrittlement, NPP safety analysis, nuclear fuel modelling are also presented

  2. Data sharing, small science and institutional repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragin, Melissa H; Palmer, Carole L; Carlson, Jacob R; Witt, Michael

    2010-09-13

    Results are presented from the Data Curation Profiles project research, on who is willing to share what data with whom and when. Emerging from scientists' discussions on sharing are several dimensions suggestive of the variation in both what it means 'to share' and how these processes are carried out. This research indicates that data curation services will need to accommodate a wide range of subdisciplinary data characteristics and sharing practices. As part of a larger set of strategies emerging across academic institutions, institutional repositories (IRs) will contribute to the stewardship and mobilization of scientific research data for e-Research and learning. There will be particular types of data that can be managed well in an IR context when characteristics and practices are well understood. Findings from this study elucidate scientists' views on 'sharable' forms of data-the particular representation that they view as most valued for reuse by others within their own research areas-and the anticipated duration for such reuse. Reported sharing incidents that provide insights into barriers to sharing and related concerns on data misuse are included.

  3. 76 FR 11765 - Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs; Institute of Education Sciences...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs; Institute of Education Sciences; Overview Information; Education Research and Special Education Research.... SUMMARY: The Director of the Institute of Education Sciences (Institute) announces the Institute's FY 2012...

  4. Pathways to URM Retention: IBP's Professional Development and Mentoring Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ricciardi, L.; Detrick, L.; Siegfried, D.; Fauver, A.; Ithier-Guzman, W.; Thomas, S. H.; Valaitis, S.

    2013-05-01

    As a not for profit organization, the Institute for Broadening Participation (IBP) hosts a variety of initiatives designed to increase the retention of underrepresented minority (URM) students pursuing pathways in STEM. IBP also assists with formative program evaluation design and implementation to help strengthen URM recruitment and retention elements. Successful initiatives include virtual and face-to-face components that bring together URM students with established URM and other scientists in academia, government and industry. These connections provide URMs with mentoring, networking opportunities, and professional skill development contributing to an improved retention rate of URM students. IBP's initiatives include the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative (NASA OSSI), Pathways to Ocean Science and Engineering, and the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S) in Earth System Science (ESS) Professional Development Program. The NASA OSSI recruits and facilitates student engagement in NASA education and employment opportunities. Pathways to Ocean Science connects and supports URM students with Ocean Science REU programs and serves as a resource for REU program directors. Pathways to Engineering has synthesized mentoring resources into an online mentoring manual for URM students that has been extensively vetted by mentoring experts throughout the country. The mentoring manual, which is organized by roles, provides undergraduates, graduates, postdocs, faculty and project directors with valuable resources. MS PHD'S, one of IBP's longest running and most successful initiatives, focuses on increasing the retention rate of URM students receiving advanced degrees in ESS. The program addresses barriers to retention in ESS including isolation, lack of preparation and professional development, and lack of mentoring. Program activities center on peer-to-peer community building, professional development exercises, networking experiences, one

  5. A framework for mentoring of medical students: thematic analysis of mentoring programmes between 2000 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yin Shuen; Teo, Shao Wen Amanda; Pei, Yiying; Sng, Julia Huina; Yap, Hong Wei; Toh, Ying Pin; Krishna, Lalit K R

    2018-03-17

    A consistent mentoring approach is key to unlocking the full benefits of mentoring, ensuring effective oversight of mentoring relationships and preventing abuse of mentoring. Yet consistency in mentoring between senior clinicians and medical students (novice mentoring) which dominate mentoring processes in medical schools is difficult to achieve particularly when mentors practice in both undergraduate and postgraduate medical schools. To facilitate a consistent approach to mentoring this review scrutinizes common aspects of mentoring in undergraduate and postgraduate medical schools to forward a framework for novice mentoring in medical schools. Four authors preformed independent literature searches of novice mentoring guidelines and programmes in undergraduate and postgraduate medical schools using ERIC, PubMed, CINAHL, OVID and Science Direct databases. 25,605 abstracts were retrieved, 162 full-text articles were reviewed and 34 articles were included. The 4 themes were identified-preparation, initiating and supporting the mentoring process and the obstacles to effective mentoring. These themes highlight 2 key elements of an effective mentoring framework-flexibility and structure. Flexibility refers to meeting the individual and changing needs of mentees. Structure concerns ensuring consistency to the mentoring process and compliance with prevailing codes of conduct and standards of practice.

  6. Learning to Be a More Effective Research Mentor for Your Trainees: Undergraduates to Post-docs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Eric; Mathieu, R.; Pfund, C.; Branchaw, J.; UW-Madison Research Mentor Training Development Team

    2010-01-01

    How do you effectively mentor individuals at different stages of their careers? Can you learn to become a more effective mentor through training? Does one size fit all? Are you ready to address the NSF's new requirement about mentoring post-docs in your next proposal? For many academics, typical answers to these questions include, "I try to make adjustments based on the trainee, but I don't have a specific plan” "Yeah, I'd better start thinking about that” and "There's training?” Scientists often are not trained for their crucial role of mentoring the next generation. The University of Wisconsin-Madison has developed, field tested, and publically released research mentor training materials for several STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines, including astronomy, to help fill this gap and improve the educational experience and ultimate success of research trainees at several career stages, from high school students to post-doctoral scholars. While initially aimed at the mentoring of undergraduate researchers at research extensive institutions, the topics are broad enough (e.g., expectations, communication, understanding, diversity, ethics, independence) to be applicable to mentoring in a wide range of project-based educational activities. Indeed, these materials have been modified, only modestly, to prepare graduate students and undergraduates to mentor high school students. In this session, we will describe the UW-Madison research mentor training seminar and illustrate how the training can be adapted and implemented. We will introduce an interactive "shopping cart” style website which allows users to obtain the materials and instructions on how to run the program at their institution. Most of the session will be devoted to an interactive implementation of elements of research mentor training using small discussion groups. Participants will experience the training seminar in practice, come face-to-face with some common mentoring

  7. Becoming a More Effective Research Mentor for Your Trainees: Undergraduates to Post-docs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Eric J.; Mathieu, R.; Pfund, C.; Branchaw, J.; UW-Madison Research Mentor Training Development Team

    2010-05-01

    How do you effectively mentor individuals at different stages of their careers? Can you learn to become a more effective mentor through training? Does one size fit all? Are you ready to address the NSF's new requirement about mentoring post-docs in your next proposal? For many academics, typical answers to these questions include, "I try to make adjustments based on the trainee, but I don't have a specific plan” "Yeah, I'd better start thinking about that” and "There's training?” Scientists often are not trained for their crucial role of mentoring the next generation. The University of Wisconsin-Madison has developed, field tested, and publicly released research mentor training materials for several STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines, including astronomy, to help fill this gap and improve the educational experience and ultimate success of research trainees at several career stages, from high school students to post-doctoral scholars. While initially aimed at the mentoring of undergraduate researchers at research extensive institutions, the topics are broad enough (e.g., expectations, communication, understanding, diversity, ethics, independence) to be applicable to mentoring in a wide range of project-based educational activities. Indeed, these materials have been modified, only modestly, to prepare graduate students and undergraduates to mentor high school students. In this session, we will describe the UW-Madison research mentor training seminar and illustrate how the training can be adapted and implemented. We will introduce an interactive "shopping cart” style website which allows users to obtain the materials and instructions on how to run the program at their institution. Most of the session will be devoted to an interactive implementation of elements of research mentor training using small discussion groups. Participants will experience the training seminar in practice, come face-to-face with some common mentoring

  8. A Social Capital Perspective on the Mentoring of Undergraduate Life Science Researchers: An Empirical Study of Undergraduate-Postgraduate-Faculty Triads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikens, Melissa L; Sadselia, Sona; Watkins, Keiana; Evans, Mara; Eby, Lillian T; Dolan, Erin L

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate researchers at research universities are often mentored by graduate students or postdoctoral researchers (referred to collectively as "postgraduates") and faculty, creating a mentoring triad structure. Triads differ based on whether the undergraduate, postgraduate, and faculty member interact with one another about the undergraduate's research. Using a social capital theory framework, we hypothesized that different triad structures provide undergraduates with varying resources (e.g., information, advice, psychosocial support) from the postgraduates and/or faculty, which would affect the undergraduates' research outcomes. To test this, we collected data from a national sample of undergraduate life science researchers about their mentoring triad structure and a range of outcomes associated with research experiences, such as perceived gains in their abilities to think and work like scientists, science identity, and intentions to enroll in a PhD program. Undergraduates mentored by postgraduates alone reported positive outcomes, indicating that postgraduates can be effective mentors. However, undergraduates who interacted directly with faculty realized greater outcomes, suggesting that faculty interaction is important for undergraduates to realize the full benefits of research. The "closed triad," in which undergraduates, postgraduates, and faculty all interact directly, appeared to be uniquely beneficial; these undergraduates reported the highest gains in thinking and working like a scientist. © 2016 M. L. Aikens et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  9. "Supporting Early Career Women in the Geosciences through Online Peer-Mentoring: Lessons from the Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN)"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, T.; Hastings, M. G.; Barnes, R. T.; Fischer, E. V.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Rodriguez, C.; Adams, M. S.; Marin-Spiotta, E.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN) is an international peer-mentoring organization with over 2000 members, dedicated to career development and community for women across the geosciences. Since its formation in 2002, ESWN has supported the growth of a more diverse scientific community through a combination of online and in-person networking activities. Lessons learned related to online networking and community-building will be presented. ESWN serves upper-level undergraduates, graduate students, professionals in a range of environmental fields, scientists working in federal and state governments, post-doctoral researchers, and academic faculty and scientists. Membership includes women working in over 50 countries, although the majority of ESWN members work in the U.S. ESWN increases retention of women in the geosciences by enabling and supporting professional person-to-person connections. This approach has been shown to reduce feelings of isolation among our members and help build professional support systems critical to career success. In early 2013 ESWN transitioned online activities to an advanced social networking platform that supports discussion threads, group formation, and individual messaging. Prior to that, on-line activities operated through a traditional list-serve, hosted by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The new web center, http://eswnonline.org, serves as the primary forum for members to build connections, seek advice, and share resources. For example, members share job announcements, discuss issues of work-life balance, and organize events at professional conferences. ESWN provides a platform for problem-based mentoring, drawing from the wisdom of colleagues across a range of career stages.

  10. Mentoring perception, scientific collaboration and research performance: is there a 'gender gap' in academic medicine? An Academic Health Science Centre perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Thanos; Patel, Vanash; Garas, George; Ashrafian, Hutan; Hull, Louise; Sevdalis, Nick; Harding, Sian; Darzi, Ara; Paroutis, Sotirios

    2016-10-01

    The 'gender gap' in academic medicine remains significant and predominantly favours males. This study investigates gender disparities in research performance in an Academic Health Science Centre, while considering factors such as mentoring and scientific collaboration. Professorial registry-based electronic survey (n=215) using bibliometric data, a mentoring perception survey and social network analysis. Survey outcomes were aggregated with measures of research performance (publications, citations and h-index) and measures of scientific collaboration (authorship position, centrality and social capital). Univariate and multivariate regression models were constructed to evaluate inter-relationships and identify gender differences. One hundred and four professors responded (48% response rate). Males had a significantly higher number of previous publications than females (mean 131.07 (111.13) vs 79.60 (66.52), p=0.049). The distribution of mentoring survey scores between males and females was similar for the quality and frequency of shared core, mentor-specific and mentee-specific skills. In multivariate analysis including gender as a variable, the quality of managing the relationship, frequency of providing corrective feedback and frequency of building trust had a statistically significant positive influence on number of publications (all presearch to investigate the relationship between mentoring perception, scientific collaboration and research performance in the context of gender. It presents a series of initiatives that proved effective in marginalising the gender gap. These include the Athena Scientific Women's Academic Network charter, new recruitment and advertisement strategies, setting up a 'Research and Family Life' forum, establishing mentoring circles for women and projecting female role models. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Peer-to-Peer Mentoring of Science Journalists in Asia and Latin ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Since 2006, IDRC has supported the Science Journalism Cooperation (SjCOOP) project in partnership with the World Federation of Science Journalists. Arguably the most ambitious project of its kind, SjCOOP's initial efforts involved promoting the development of science journalism in Africa and the Middle East through an ...

  12. Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute (RAMSRI) - Annual Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute (RAMSRI) is the fourth Research and Development Institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), undertaking research in human health and nutrition. This annual report covers the major activities undertaken by RAMSRI for the year 2015. The activities are grouped under the following headings: Establishment; Personnel and Organisation; Major Activities of Centres; Ongoing IAEA TC Projects; Human Resource Development; IAEA Coordinated Meetings Hosted; Publications; Achievements; Challenges; Projections for the Year 2016; and Recommendations.

  13. Ghana Space Science and Technology Institute (GSSTI) - Annual Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Ghana Space Science and Technology Institute (GSSTI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission was established to exploit space science and technology for socio-economic development of Ghana. The report gives the structure of GSSTI and the detailed activities of the year. Various activities include: training and seminars, projects and workshops. Publications and their abstracts are also listed. The report also highlights some of the challenges, provides some recommendations and points to some expectation for the following year.

  14. Faculty and Undergraduate Student Perceptions of an Integrated Mentoring Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Nicola; Naismith, Nicola

    2018-01-01

    The role of an academic mentor is typically diverse, discipline specific and institutionally heterogeneous. Mentoring relationships are commonplace, yet the experience and delivery of mentoring in universities reflect a broad spectrum of approaches and execution. This article reflects on the pedagogic evolution of mentoring, examining the student…

  15. Mentoring for Professional Geropsychology within a Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Bob G.

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring in doctoral programs in professional psychology has its roots in mentoring in science programs of all types. Professional psychology in general may suffer from conflating mentoring with clinical supervision. Using the Pikes Peak Model competencies as a framework, mentoring in attitudes, knowledge, and skills related to professional…

  16. Opinion & Special Articles: Mentoring in neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Effective academic mentoring significantly affects a physician's choice of career, academic productivity, and professional trajectory. The mentoring relationship is necessary for the continued success of medical training. It is critical to cultivate a climate in which mentoring can thrive. In order to improve the quality and outcomes of mentoring, we must adopt a comprehensive plan. There are interventions at every level of training that will ensure that the current cohort of neurologists receives the requisite expertise needed to flourish and inspire future trainees. Professional organizations must articulate a comprehensive vision of mentoring. Institutions must create an infrastructure to support mentors. Mentors should work in active partnerships with their mentees to forge sustained, productive relationships. Mentees must actively contribute to their own mentoring. Proper mentorship will ensure a bright future for academic neurology. PMID:24616198

  17. Faculty Mentoring Undergraduates: The Nature, Development, and Benefits of Mentoring Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth McKinsey

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Educational research shows that close student-faculty interaction is a key factor in college student learning and success. Most literature on undergraduate mentoring, however, focuses on planned programs of mentoring for targeted groups of students by non-faculty professionals or student peers. Based on the research literature and student and faculty testimony from a residential liberal arts college, this article shows that unplanned “natural” mentoring can be crucial to student learning and development and illustrates some best practices. It advances understanding of faculty mentoring by differentiating it from teaching, characterizing several functional types of mentoring, and identifying the phases through which a mentoring relationship develops. Arguing that benefits to students, faculty, and institutions outweigh the risks and costs of mentoring, it is written for faculty who want to be better mentors and provides evidence that administrators should value and reward mentoring.

  18. Exploring the Effect of Mentoring in the Degree Attainment and Career Paths of First Generation Mexican American Women Employed in Senior Administrative Leadership Roles at Hispanic-Serving Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Vivian A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This qualitative, phenomenological study explored the effect of mentoring in the degree attainment and career paths of first generation Mexican American women who are employed in senior administrative leadership roles at Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs). Methodology: This exploratory study employed a phenomenological research…

  19. NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alison Davis NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) is the NIH institute that primarily supports ...

  20. Professional Development For Community College Faculty: Lessons Learned From Intentional Mentoring Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. R.; Charlevoix, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Geoscience Workforce Development Initiative at UNAVCO supports attracting, training, and professionally developing students, educators, and professionals in the geosciences. For the past 12 years, UNAVCO has managed the highly successful Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS) program, with the goal of increasing the diversity of students entering the geosciences. Beginning in 2015, UNAVCO added Geo-Launchpad (GLP), a summer research preparation internship for Colorado community college students to prepare them for independent research opportunities, facilitate career exploration in the geosciences, and provide community college faculty with professional development to facilitate effective mentoring of students. One core element of the Geo-Launchpad program is UNAVCO support for GLP faculty mentors. Each intern applies to the program with a faculty representative (mentor) from his or her home institution. This faculty mentor is engaged with the student throughout the summer via telephone, video chat, text message, or email. At the end of each of the past two summers, UNAVCO has hosted four GLP faculty mentors in Boulder for two days of professional development focused on intentional mentoring of students. Discussions focused on the distinction between mentoring and advising, and the array of career and professional opportunities available to students. Faculty mentors also met with the external evaluator during the mentor training and provided feedback on both their observations of their intern as well as the impact on their own professional experience. Initial outcomes include re-energizing the faculty mentors' commitment to teaching, as well as the opportunity for valuable networking activities. This presentation will focus on the ongoing efforts and outcomes of the novel faculty mentor professional development activities, and the impact these activities have on community college student engagement in the geosciences.

  1. Annual report of national institute of radiological sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This annual report is a compilation of the research activities and achievement in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the fiscal year 1992 (from April 1992 through March 1993). Construction of the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) has reached semi-final stage. The research covers a wide range of radiological sciences from molecular biology to environmental studies and medicine including engineering for heavy ion therapy of cancer. Topics consists of physics, chemistry, biomedical science, clinical research, and environmental sciences, covering a total of 84 titles. A list of publications by staff members, activities of research divisions, and organization chart of the NIRS are given in Appendix. (J.P.N.) 78 refs

  2. Maintenance Mentor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacobs, John

    2003-01-01

    Maintenance Mentor (MXM) is a research effort conducted by a joint AFRL/HESR and Northrop Grumman Information Technology team to identify the basic, high-level requirements necessary for improving flight line diagnostic capabilities...

  3. Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of a Student Mentoring Program

    OpenAIRE

    Sandner, Malte

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents evidence from a natural-experiment which evaluates the effectiveness of a student mentoring program. The mentoring includes several compulsory, scheduled, faceto- face appointments between a mentor and a student in the first study year. All mentors are graduated and employed by the institution. For the evaluation, I use the fact that the mentoring is only offered to students in an economics and management program, whereas it is not offered to students in an industrial engi...

  4. Developing Earth System Science Courses and Programs at Minority Serving Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. R.; Jackson, C.; Ruzek, M.

    2004-12-01

    In the current NASA/USRA ESSE21 Program, emphasis is placed on the development of Earth System Science courses and degree offerings in Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs). Of the 18 colleges/universities being supported by NASA through USRA, 10 colleges/universities are MSIs. While there is recognition of the need for Earth system science courses, minors and degree programs by NASA and other agencies, within MSIs, a central challenge is how to provide a vision of the future opportunities in ESS and STEM disciplines that attracts and motivates students to these studies. Students need career guidance, role models and mentoring to encourage entry into STEM in general, and Earth system science in particular. Then there is the question of how to bring interested faculty together in institutions to form a critical mass that would forego the breadth and depth of disciplinary interests to undertake the development of multi/cross and interdisciplinary courses, minors and degree programs in ESS. Within the ESSE21 Diversity Working Group, the question has been raised as to how will MSIs ever be mainstream participants in ESS without teaching and engaging in research in remote sensing, modeling of the Earth's climate system and other like endeavors. Two other related questions raised within the Working Group are what are the long-term objectives of MSI adoption of ESS and what course corrections are needed to make ESS viable at MSIs. Within these considerations there are unresolved questions concerning the need and availability of resources from NASA, other agencies and local institutions. Apart from these larger considerations, efforts are underway within the ESSE21 Program that provide for sharing of resources among participants, organization of and access to materials that already exist, online resources, course outlines and successful listings for online resources by topics for particular courses and subject areas. The Lesson Learned Working Group, as well as the program

  5. One year outcomes of a mentoring scheme for female academics: a pilot study at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Rina; Hawkes, Sarah L; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Guest, David; Fear, Nicola T; Iversen, Amy C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The professional development of under-represented faculty may be enhanced by mentorship, but we understand very little about the mechanisms by which mentoring brings about change. Our study posed the research question, what are the mechanisms by which mentoring may support professional development in under-represented groups? The study aims to: (i) to pilot a mentoring scheme for female academics; (ii) to compare various health-related and attitudinal measures in mentees a...

  6. Collaboration and Near-Peer Mentoring as a Platform for Sustainable Science Education Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Boettcher, Shannon W.; Nazin, George V.; Greenaway, Ann L.; Hartle, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Decreased funding for middle and high school education has resulted in reduced classroom time, which, when coupled with an increased focus on standardized testing, has decreased the exposure of many middle school students to hands-on science education. To help address these challenges, we developed an integrated outreach program, spanning grades…

  7. Balancing Self-Directed Learning with Expert Mentoring: The Science Writing Heuristic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Mack; Fostvedt, Luke; Gonwa-Reeves, Christopher; Baenziger, Joan; McGill, Michael; Seefeld, Ashley; Hand, Brian; Therrien, William; Taylor, Jonte; Villanueva, Mary Grace

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the implementation of the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) curriculum (Hand, 2007), which combines current understandings of learning as a cognitive and negotiated process with the techniques of argument-based inquiry, critical thinking skills, and writing to strengthen student outcomes. Success of SWH is dependent on the…

  8. One year outcomes of a mentoring scheme for female academics: a pilot study at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Rina; Hawkes, Sarah L; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Guest, David; Fear, Nicola T; Iversen, Amy C

    2011-04-07

    The professional development of under-represented faculty may be enhanced by mentorship, but we understand very little about the mechanisms by which mentoring brings about change. Our study posed the research question, what are the mechanisms by which mentoring may support professional development in under-represented groups? The study aims to: (i) to pilot a mentoring scheme for female academics; (ii) to compare various health-related and attitudinal measures in mentees at baseline, 6 months, and 1 year into the mentoring relationship and, (iii) to compare pre-mentoring expectations to outcomes at 6 months and 1 year follow-up for mentees and mentors. Female academic mentees were matched 1:1 or 2:1 with more senior academic mentors. Online surveys were conducted to compare health-related and attitudinal measures and expectations of mentoring at baseline with outcomes at 6 months and 1 year using paired t-tests and McNemar's test for matched cohort data. N = 46 mentoring pairs, 44 (96%) mentees completed the pre-mentoring survey, 37 (80%) at 6 months and 30 (65%) at 1 year. Job-related well-being (anxiety-contentment), self-esteem and self-efficacy all improved significantly and work-family conflict diminished at 1 year. Highest expectations were career progression (39; 89%), increased confidence (38; 87%), development of networking skills (33; 75%), better time-management (29; 66%) and better work-life balance (28; 64%). For mentees, expectations at baseline were higher than perceived achievements at 6 months or 1 year follow-up. For mentors (N = 39), 36 (92%) completed the pre-mentoring survey, 32 (82%) at 6 months and 28 (72%) at 1 year. Mentors' highest expectations were of satisfaction in seeing people progress (26; 69%), seeing junior staff develop and grow (19; 53%), helping solve problems (18; 50%), helping women advance their careers (18; 50%) and helping remove career obstacles (13; 36%). Overall, gains at 6 months and 1 year exceeded pre-mentoring

  9. One year outcomes of a mentoring scheme for female academics: a pilot study at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fear Nicola T

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The professional development of under-represented faculty may be enhanced by mentorship, but we understand very little about the mechanisms by which mentoring brings about change. Our study posed the research question, what are the mechanisms by which mentoring may support professional development in under-represented groups? The study aims to: (i to pilot a mentoring scheme for female academics; (ii to compare various health-related and attitudinal measures in mentees at baseline, 6 months, and 1 year into the mentoring relationship and, (iii to compare pre-mentoring expectations to outcomes at 6 months and 1 year follow-up for mentees and mentors. Methods Female academic mentees were matched 1:1 or 2:1 with more senior academic mentors. Online surveys were conducted to compare health-related and attitudinal measures and expectations of mentoring at baseline with outcomes at 6 months and 1 year using paired t-tests and McNemar's test for matched cohort data. Results N = 46 mentoring pairs, 44 (96% mentees completed the pre-mentoring survey, 37 (80% at 6 months and 30 (65% at 1 year. Job-related well-being (anxiety-contentment, self-esteem and self-efficacy all improved significantly and work-family conflict diminished at 1 year. Highest expectations were career progression (39; 89%, increased confidence (38; 87%, development of networking skills (33; 75%, better time-management (29; 66% and better work-life balance (28; 64%. For mentees, expectations at baseline were higher than perceived achievements at 6 months or 1 year follow-up. For mentors (N = 39, 36 (92% completed the pre-mentoring survey, 32 (82% at 6 months and 28 (72% at 1 year. Mentors' highest expectations were of satisfaction in seeing people progress (26; 69%, seeing junior staff develop and grow (19; 53%, helping solve problems (18; 50%, helping women advance their careers (18; 50% and helping remove career obstacles (13; 36%. Overall, gains at 6 months and 1

  10. Information actions in science and technology: institutionalities, agencies and subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Rabello

    Full Text Available Considering the influence of new agency forms - intervention and interaction among subjects - in the context of information intermediation, we aim to approach information actions in Science and Technology (S&T taking into consideration the institutionalities involved. For such, we assume there is an influence of a theoretical model emerging in Information Science (IS regarding current inventive and interactive form propitiated by the Web. The text is structured in two central topics bringing: i theoretical and epistemic constructions of the "information action" concept; and ii a certain interpretation oriented by the "informational action in S&T" construct, taking as its object the actions performed by IBICT (Brazilian Institute for Information in Science and Technology, directed towards excellence in information. Finally, we discuss how limitations of the "systemic model" propitiate the construction of new study objects in the model emerging in IS from theoretical innovations and counterpoints thoughts facing the diverse forms of information action, considering, for instance, the action of subjects on what concerns the validation of information in the current scenery of institutional intermediation.

  11. 7th International Summer Institute in Surface Science

    CERN Document Server

    Howe, Russell

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains review articles which were written by the invited speak­ ers of the seventh International Summer Institute in Surface Science (ISISS), held at the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee in July 1985. The form of ISISS is a set of tutorial review lectures presented over a one-week period by internationally recognized experts on various aspects of surface science. Each speaker is asked, in addition, to write a review article on his lecture topic. No single volume in the series Chemistry and Physics of Solid Surfaces can possibly cover the entire field of modern surface science. However, the series as a whole is intended to provide experts and students alike with a comprehensive set of reviews and literature references, particularly empha­ sizing the gas-solid interface. The collected articles from previous Summer Institutes have been published under the following titles: Surface Science: Recent Progress and Perspectives, Crit. Rev. Solid State Sci. 4, 125-559 (1974) Chemistry and Physics of ...

  12. Suborganizations of Institutions in Library and Information Science Journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalibor Fiala

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyze Web of Science data records of articles published from 1991 to 2010 in library and information science (LIS journals. We focus on addresses of these articles’ authors and create citation and collaboration networks of departments which we define as the first suborganization of an institution. We present various rankings of departments (e.g., by citations, times cited, PageRank, publications, etc. and highlight the most influential of them. The correlations between the individual departments are also shown. Furthermore, we visualize the most intense citation and collaboration relationships between “LIS” departments (many of which are not genuine LIS departments but merely affiliations of authors publishing in journals covered by the specific Web of Science category and give examples of two basic research performance distributions across departments of the leading universities in the field.

  13. The Mentor inside You

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlin, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Mentoring occurs in formal and informal ways. While formal mentoring programs are valuable, the majority of people are likely to have opportunities for informal mentoring in their workplace and in their communities. The author makes the point that mentors are all around us, and each of us may have the capacity to mentor or to be mentored, whether…

  14. The institution of science and the science of institutions the legacy of Joseph Ben-David

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The present anthology, edited by Marcel Herbst, is partially based on a conference, held in 2009, to reflect on the legacy of Ben-David, and contains a selection of substantially revised papers, plus four contributions specifically written for this volume. The book focuses on three major lines of Ben-David’s research, namely “Center and Periphery” (Part I), “Role and Ethos” (Part II), and “Organization and Growth” (Part III). In addition, comprehensive introductory (“Prologue”) and concluding chapters (“Epilogue”, Part IV) by Marcel Herbst are provided. The volume addresses the following disciplines: higher education, history and sociology of science, philosophy of science, history of medicine, public administration, policy studies, Jewish studies, and economics. The anthology is one of two new publications on Joseph Ben-David after the special Minerva edition Vol. 25, Numbers 1–2, March 1987, and Gad Freudenthal’s collection of Ben-David’s writings [1991]. The text can be used i...

  15. Anesthesiology mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Volker; Gravenstein, Nikolaus

    2016-12-01

    Mentoring is fundamentally valuable and important to students considering a path into our specialty, as well as to colleagues already in it and with ambition to advance. General principles and personal experiences are collected and described to help inform future mentors and to reinforce the value of having a mentor and the satisfaction (and work) that is associated with such a role. Detecting a latent talent among medical students or residents may be challenging but is worth the effort to develop personal careers and the specialty itself. Upon agreeing to jointly move a certain project, a professional plan is needed to improve chances of success and decrease the likelihood of frustration. Various challenges always have to be detected and solved, with the ultimate goal to guide a medical student to residency, subsequently into faculty status and preferably to lifelong collaboration. Access to a mentor is an often-cited key to choosing a specialty and the success of junior colleagues and thus the entire department. Mentoring is fundamentally valuable in providing role modeling and also in protecting the mentee from the inefficiency of learning lessons the hard way.

  16. Recent fusion research in the National Institute for Fusion Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Akio; Sakakibara, Satoru; Sagara, Akio; Horiuchi, Ritoku; Yamada, Hiroshi; Takeiri, Yasuhiko

    2011-01-01

    The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), which was established in 1989, promotes academic approaches toward the exploration of fusion science for steady-state helical reactor and realizes the establishment of a comprehensive understanding of toroidal plasmas as an inter-university research organization and a key center of worldwide fusion research. The Large Helical Device (LHD) Project, the Numerical Simulation Science Project, and the Fusion Engineering Project are organized for early realization of net current free fusion reactor, and their recent activities are described in this paper. The LHD has been producing high-performance plasmas comparable to those of large tokamaks, and several new findings with regard to plasma physics have been obtained. The numerical simulation science project contributes understanding and systemization of the physical mechanisms of plasma confinement in fusion plasmas and explores complexity science of a plasma for realization of the numerical test reactor. In the fusion engineering project, the design of the helical fusion reactor has progressed based on the development of superconducting coils, the blanket, fusion materials and tritium handling. (author)

  17. Retaining STEM women with community-based mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, M.

    2011-12-01

    While women have been graduating from physical oceanography programs in increasing numbers for the past two decades, the number of women occupying senior positions in the field remains relatively low. Thus, the disparity between the percentages of women at various career stages seems to be related to the retention of those completing graduate school in physical oceanography, not in recruiting women to the field. Studies indicate that a positive mentoring experience is strongly correlated with success in science, and as such, MPOWIR (Mentoring Physical Oceanography Women to Increase Retention) provides this essential mentoring to physical oceanographers from late graduate school through their early careers. Our network includes over 400 scientists at 70 institutions participating in a variety of online and face-to-face mentoring opportunities. The MPOWIR website (www.mpowir.org) includes resources for junior scientists, ways to get involved, data and career profiles, and a blog with job postings and relevant information. In October 2011, we will hold the third Pattullo conference to bring mentors and mentees together. The 43 participants at this conference will share their research, attend professional development sessions, and openly discuss issues related to the retention of young scientists in the field.

  18. La fabrique des sciences des institutions aux pratiques

    CERN Document Server

    Benninghoff, Martin; Crettaz von Roten, Fabienne; Merz, Martina

    2006-01-01

    Aujourd'hui, les façons de produire, d'organiser, d'évaluer et d'utiliser les savoirs sont en profond débat. De plus en plus, l'Etat, la société civile et l'économie tentent d'influencer les activités des universités et des laboratoires de recherche. Ces développements mettent à l'épreuve tout à la fois les fondements des systèmes d'enseignement supérieur et de recherche, l'autonomie des institutions scientifiques, la définition des frontières des savoirs et l'acceptation des sciences. Dans des contextes suisses et européens, cet ouvrage s'intéresse aux manières dont les sciences et les technologies sont fabriquées, en analysant leurs institutions et les pratiques. A partir d'une approche relationnelle, les sciences et les technologies sont conçues comme des phénomènes profondément sociaux, culturels et politiques. Une telle démarche déstabilise les visions parfois idéalisées et stéréotypées de la construction des savoirs. Des études de cas détaillées décrivent des phénomè...

  19. 8th International Summer Institute in Surface Science

    CERN Document Server

    Howe, Russell

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains review articles written by the invited speakers at the eighth International Summer Institute in Surface Science (ISISS 1987), held at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in August of 1987. During the course of ISISS, invited speakers, all internationally recognized experts in the various fields of surface science, present tutorial review lectures. In addition, these experts are asked to write review articles on their lecture topic. Former ISISS speakers serve as advisors concerning the selection of speakers and lecture topics. Em­ phasis is given to those areas which have not been covered in depth by recent Summer Institutes, as well as to areas which have recently gained in significance and in which important progress has been made. Because of space limitations, no individual volume of Chemistry and Physics of Solid Surfaces can possibly cover the whole area of modem surface science, or even give a complete survey of recent pro­ gress in the field. However, an attempt is made to pres...

  20. Does paired mentoring work? A study of the effectiveness and affective value of academically asymmetrical peer mentoring in supporting disadvantaged students in school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Rachael; Abrahams, Ian; Fotou, Nikolaos

    2018-04-01

    In England, there is a growing need to improve the lives of secondary school students who are defined as disadvantaged and to support these students in their attainment and attitudes to secondary school science.

  1. Mentoring among scientists: Implications of interpersonal relationships within a formal mentoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maughan, B. D.

    2006-01-01

    Mentoring is an established strategy for learning that has its root in antiquity. Most, if not all, successful scientists and engineers had an effective mentor at some point in their career. In the context of scientists and engineers, mentoring has been undefined. Reports addressing critical concerns regarding the future of science and engineering in the U.S. mention the practice of mentoring a priori, leaving organizations without guidance in its application. Preliminary results from this study imply that formal mentoring can be effective when properly defined and operationalized. Recognizing the uniqueness of the individual in a symbiotic mentor-protege relationship significantly influences a protege's learning experience which carries repercussions into their career intentions. The mentor-protege relationship is a key factor in succession planning and preserving and disseminating critical information and tacit knowledge essential to the development of leadership in the science and technological industry. (authors)

  2. Mentoring Among Scientists: Implications of Interpersonal Relationships within a Formal Mentoring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan D. Maughan

    2006-11-01

    Mentoring is an established strategy for learning that has its root in antiquity. Most, if not all, successful scientists and engineers had an effective mentor at some point in their career. In the context of scientists and engineers, mentoring has been undefined. Reports addressing critical concerns regarding the future of science and engineering in the U.S. mention the practice of mentoring a priori, leaving organizations without guidance in its application. Preliminary results from this study imply that formal mentoring can be effective when properly defined and operationalized. Recognizing the uniqueness of the individual in a symbiotic mentor-protégé relationship significantly influences a protégé’s learning experience which carries repercussions into their career intentions. The mentor-protégé relationship is a key factor in succession planning and preserving and disseminating critical information and tacit knowledge essential to the development of leadership in the science and technological industry.

  3. Mentoring as the basis for social business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artcer Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the concept of mentoring as a basis for social business is considered. Besides, the ways of increase of efficiency of labor use through the institute of mentoring of young workers are considered by elderly people. Features of employment, work and dismissal of aging employees are also considered. Possibilities of application of mentoring, attraction of experience of pensioners taking into account the high level of their qualification are reflected. Tasks which the institute of mentoring will help to solve are formulated. The article examines the possibility of using mentoring and engaging retired employees with their experience, a high level of their education and professional qualification in the training of young inexperienced workers. Mentoring is presented as an element of social entrepreneurship.

  4. Career, Family, and Institutional Variables in the Work Lives of Academic Women in the Chemical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassinger, Ruth E.; Scantlebury, Kathryn; Richmond, Geraldine

    This article presents quantitative results of a study of 139 academic women in the chemical sciences who participated in a professional development program sponsored by the Committee on the Advancement of Women Chemists. The study investigated variables frequently examined in the vocational psychology of women: approaches to achievement, coping strategies, career advancement, the home-work interface, workplace climate, and mentoring. The article presents and discusses results in the context of unique issues faced by women in scientific careers.

  5. Waste management in the Institute for Nuclear Sciences 'Vinca' - Belgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raicevic, J.; Avramovic, I.; Plecas, I.; Mandic, M.; Goldammer, W.

    2004-01-01

    The Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences served for many years as the only Yugoslav (Serbia and Montenegro) nuclear institute. Therefore, it acted for many years as national storage facility for the radioactive waste from all institutional (medical, military, etc.) activities. The interim storage was situated within the Vinca Institute historically at several different places. The main fraction of the wastes is stored in two metallic hangars. In addition, underground stainless steel tanks in concrete shields have been constructed to accept all processed liquid waste from the research reactor RA. The current situation of the interim storage facilities is not satisfactory. However, the principle limitation for improvements of the waste management at the Vinca Institute lies in the fact that long-term solutions cannot be addressed at the moment. Plans for a final repository for radioactive waste do not exist yet in the Serbia and Montenegro. Consequently, waste management can only address an interim solution. In order to conduct all waste management activities in a safe manner, an overall strategy and study for improvement/rearrangement of radioactive waste storage facilities was developed which addresses all wastes and their management. The IAEA is providing assistance to these activities. This support includes a project which has been initiated by the IAEA to improve the waste management at the Vinca Institute. This paper describes the current status of the development of this overall strategy and study for improvement/rearrangement of radioactive waste storage facilities. The information available and the current status of the development of concepts for the processing and storage of the waste are summarised. (author)

  6. Status of ion sources at National Institute of Radiological Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, A; Fujita, T; Goto, A; Hattori, T; Hamano, T; Hojo, S; Honma, T; Imaseki, H; Katagiri, K; Muramatsu, M; Sakamoto, Y; Sekiguchi, M; Suda, M; Sugiura, A; Suya, N

    2012-02-01

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) maintains various ion accelerators in order to study the effects of radiation of the human body and medical uses of radiation. Two electrostatic tandem accelerators and three cyclotrons delivered by commercial companies have offered various life science tools; these include proton-induced x-ray emission analysis (PIXE), micro beam irradiation, neutron exposure, and radioisotope tracers and probes. A duoplasmatron, a multicusp ion source, a penning ion source (PIG), and an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) are in operation for these purposes. The Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is an accelerator complex for heavy-ion radiotherapy, fully developed by NIRS. HIMAC is utilized not only for daily treatment with the carbon beam but also for fundamental experiments. Several ECRISs and a PIG at HIMAC satisfy various research and clinical requirements.

  7. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    The research activities of National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) in 1997 are described, being divided into 14 categories: (1) heavy ion project research, (2) group research, (3) special research, (4) designated research, (5) ordinary research, (6) safety analysis research, (7) actual situation investigation, (8) accepted research, (9) general technology research for nuclear energy, (10) radioactivity investigation and research, (11) research for science and technology promotion, (12) international research cooperation, (13) safety evaluation for radioactive liquid waste reprocessing test, (14) human brain function research. The heavy ion project research is divided into 5 categories, further; (1) clinical research, (2) medical treatment research, (3) diagnosis research, (4) biological research, (5) physics and engineering research. A great number of research papers published are listed. Organization, personnel, budget and accounts of the NIRS are also mentioned in the report. (M. Suetake)

  8. Computer Science Research Institute 2004 annual report of activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004. During this period the CSRI hosted 166 visitors representing 81 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 65 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 4 workshops. These 4 CSRI sponsored workshops had 140 participants--74 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 66 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 14 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

  9. Computer Science Research Institute 2003 annual report of activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2003. During this period the CSRI hosted 164 visitors representing 78 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 78 were summer students or faculty members. The CSRI partially sponsored 5 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 178 participants--137 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 41 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 18 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

  10. Computer Science Research Institute 2005 annual report of activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, Bernadette M.; Collis, Samuel Scott; Ceballos, Deanna Rose; Womble, David Eugene

    2008-04-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005. During this period, the CSRI hosted 182 visitors representing 83 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these, 60 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 105 participants, 78 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 27 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 12 long-term collaborative research projects and 3 Sabbaticals.

  11. Strengthening Self-efficacy through Supportive Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haacker, R.

    2015-12-01

    The geosciences have had a chronic problem of underrepresentation of students from diverse ethnic, cultural, gender and socio-economic backgrounds. As a community we need to strengthen our support of young scientists from all backgrounds to sustain their enthusiasm and ensure their success in our field. Investing in mentoring programs that empower students and young professionals is one of the best ways to do so. The Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science (SOARS) program, now entering its 20th year, has successfully developed and tested several mentoring models. The personalized, caring and consistent support is one of the key elements of the program's success; since its inception, 90% of SOARS participants have entered graduate school, research or science related careers after graduation. Many of our alumni who are now faculty apply the same mentoring strategies to build self-esteem and perseverance in their students. This presentation will cover the design and implementation of our four mentoring strategies, and provide insights on potential challenges, training aspects and impact assessment. The mentoring strategies include: 1) Multi-faceted, long-term mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students from diverse backgrounds. 2) Empowering advanced students to serve as peer mentors and role models. 3) Training faculty and professional scientists from all backgrounds to become mentors who are aware of diversity issues. 4) Providing mentor training for partner programs and laboratories. All four strategies have contributed to the creation of a mentoring culture in the geosciences.

  12. Cyberinfrastructure for Open Science at the Montreal Neurological Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Samir; Glatard, Tristan; Rogers, Christine; Saigle, John; Paiva, Santiago; MacIntyre, Leigh; Safi-Harab, Mouna; Rousseau, Marc-Etienne; Stirling, Jordan; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; MacFarlane, David; Kostopoulos, Penelope; Rioux, Pierre; Madjar, Cecile; Lecours-Boucher, Xavier; Vanamala, Sandeep; Adalat, Reza; Mohaddes, Zia; Fonov, Vladimir S; Milot, Sylvain; Leppert, Ilana; Degroot, Clotilde; Durcan, Thomas M; Campbell, Tara; Moreau, Jeremy; Dagher, Alain; Collins, D Louis; Karamchandani, Jason; Bar-Or, Amit; Fon, Edward A; Hoge, Rick; Baillet, Sylvain; Rouleau, Guy; Evans, Alan C

    2016-01-01

    Data sharing is becoming more of a requirement as technologies mature and as global research and communications diversify. As a result, researchers are looking for practical solutions, not only to enhance scientific collaborations, but also to acquire larger amounts of data, and to access specialized datasets. In many cases, the realities of data acquisition present a significant burden, therefore gaining access to public datasets allows for more robust analyses and broadly enriched data exploration. To answer this demand, the Montreal Neurological Institute has announced its commitment to Open Science, harnessing the power of making both clinical and research data available to the world (Owens, 2016a,b). As such, the LORIS and CBRAIN (Das et al., 2016) platforms have been tasked with the technical challenges specific to the institutional-level implementation of open data sharing, including: Comprehensive linking of multimodal data (phenotypic, clinical, neuroimaging, biobanking, and genomics, etc.)Secure database encryption, specifically designed for institutional and multi-project data sharing, ensuring subject confidentiality (using multi-tiered identifiers).Querying capabilities with multiple levels of single study and institutional permissions, allowing public data sharing for all consented and de-identified subject data.Configurable pipelines and flags to facilitate acquisition and analysis, as well as access to High Performance Computing clusters for rapid data processing and sharing of software tools.Robust Workflows and Quality Control mechanisms ensuring transparency and consistency in best practices.Long term storage (and web access) of data, reducing loss of institutional data assets.Enhanced web-based visualization of imaging, genomic, and phenotypic data, allowing for real-time viewing and manipulation of data from anywhere in the world.Numerous modules for data filtering, summary statistics, and personalized and configurable dashboards. Implementing

  13. Does Paired Mentoring Work? A Study of the Effectiveness and Affective Value of Academically Asymmetrical Peer Mentoring in Supporting Disadvantaged Students in School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Rachael; Abrahams, Ian; Fotou, Nikolaos

    2018-01-01

    Background: In England, there is a growing need to improve the lives of secondary school students who are defined as disadvantaged and to support these students in their attainment and attitudes to secondary school science. Purpose: This paper reports on a project designed to support students from disadvantaged backgrounds by pairing them with…

  14. Science at Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, 1868-1893

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Linda Bart

    Science had a variety of uses at Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, a private, missionary school supported by northern whites and Virginia's black land grant school from 1872 to 1920. Samuel Chapman Armstrong, principal for the first twenty-five years (1868-1893), advocated not classical but scientific studies, primarily as applied science to improve lives and "civilize" blacks and Indians. Agriculture and mechanics were practiced in Hampton's industries, where students worked their way through school. They were organized for production rather than instruction, though Armstrong claimed that labor had a moral value and that practical experience was valuable learning. In contrast to works by James D. Anderson and Donald Spivey, this study stresses the pragmatic, business purposes of Hampton's industries rather than any ideological agenda. Problems with providing specialized facilities, apparatus, and teachers made it difficult for Hampton to provide rigorous, graded science instruction. Students learned of practical applications of science in agricultural lectures and in such classes as physiology. However, the curriculum was designed for teacher training, using broad, elementary science for general knowledge, to train minds, and to make adult remedial language lessons more effective. Not surprisingly, very few graduates pursued careers which required more than general science studies. Besides the utilitarian and disciplinary purposes, Hampton used science to discourage superstitious ideas in religion. Armstrong also argued for racially distinctive education for blacks and Indians on the basis of scientific ideas about cultural evolution and inheritance of the experience of past generations. In practice, however, Hampton teachers adapted mainstream tools and methods of instruction. Not all teachers shared Armstrong's racial views, and several demonstrated concern for students, confidence in their ability, and professional interest in advancing them as

  15. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    The fiscal year 2004 was the 4th year since the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) reformed as an Independent Administrative Institution (IAI) in April 2001. The main items of this report, being the same as the previous year's, are: the summary of NIRS activities; research and development including studies of important project, fundamental research, fundamental and frontier research, contract research and fact-finding; management; organization/budget/finance; and appendix. Important projects are radiological studies in advanced medicine, on sensitivity, of effects on human and of hazard. Fundamental research concerns studies of environmental radiation, radiobiology, heavy particle ion therapy, diagnostic imaging, dose assessment and protection in medical radiation, brain function, systematic basic technology of nuclear sciences and international cooperation. Fact-finding studies are on the present situations of people exposed by nuclear experiment at Bikini Atoll in 1954 and of patients treated with thorotrast in past. Appendix cites the personnel name list, honorable events, cooperative studies, patent situation and others. (J.P.N.)

  16. Toward Mentoring in Palliative Social Work: A Narrative Review of Mentoring Programs in Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Ying Pin; Karthik, R; Teo, Chia Chia; Suppiah, Sarasvathy; Cheung, Siew Li; Krishna, Lalit

    2018-03-01

    Mentoring by an experienced practitioner enhances professional well-being, promotes resilience, and provides a means of addressing poor job satisfaction and high burnout rates among medical social workers. This is a crucial source of support for social workers working in fields with high risk of compassion fatigue and burnout like palliative care. Implementing such a program, however, is hindered by differences in understanding and application of mentoring practice. This narrative review of mentoring practice in social work seeks to identify key elements and common approaches within successful mentoring programs in social work that could be adapted to guide the design of new mentoring programs in medical social work. Methodology and Data Sources: A literature search of mentoring programs in social work between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2015, using Pubmed, CINAHL, OVID, ERIC, Scopus, Cochrane and ScienceDirect databases, involving a senior experienced mentor and undergraduate and/or junior postgraduates, was carried out. A total of 1302 abstracts were retrieved, 22 full-text articles were analyzed, and 8 articles were included. Thematic analysis of the included articles revealed 7 themes pertaining to the mentoring process, outcomes and barriers, and the characteristics of mentoring relationships, mentors, mentees, and host organizations. Common themes in prevailing mentoring practices help identify key elements for the design of an effective mentoring program in medical social work. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of these findings upon clinical practice in palliative care and on sustaining such a program.

  17. Understanding wider environmental influences on mentoring: Towards an ecological model of mentoring in academic medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Sambunjak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mentoring is a complex developmental relationship that contributes to individual growth and career advancement in different areas of human activity, including academic medicine. This article describes a broader environmental milieux in which mentoring occurs and considers the ways in which the environmental factors may affect the process and outcomes of mentoring. An ecological model of mentoring is proposed that takes into account various factors broadly operating at three contextual levels. The first is societal or “macro” level, which implies cultural, economic, and political factors. The second is institutional or “meso” level, consisting of a system-related factors such as field and discipline characteristics, and government policies, and b organization-related factors such as mentoring climate, reward structure, and work design. The third contextual level relates to intrapersonal and interpersonal characteristics of mentor-mentee dyads. If mentoring dyad is viewed as the focal point, societal and institutional levels may be labeled as “external”, and personal level as “internal”. The conceptual diversity and methodological challenges in the study of mentoring need to be acknowledged, but should not be an excuse to leave the external contextual elements out of the researchers’ horizon, as they inevitably shape and modify the mentoring relationships. Conclusion. Model presented in this article offers a holistic view of mentoring in academic medicine that may help one comprehend and appreciate the complexity of influences on mentoring, and inform the future research agenda on this important topic.

  18. Mentoring Women in STEM: A Collegiate Investigation of Mentors and Proteges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, Nicole

    Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education in the United States lags behind that of other industrialized nations. Despite national efforts to enhance the quality of STEM education for students, progress remains elusive. Underperformance is evident in measures of outcomes, participation, and retention. In particular, inequity persists in the attraction and retention of women to STEM fields. Mentoring is heavily cited as a means to improve our national efforts to fortify STEM education. This research explores mentoring styles, gender preferences, and differential impact on outcomes. The results challenge conventional wisdom that women prefer and benefit from a style of mentoring that is different from the preferred style of men. This study found that male and female proteges do not desire different types of mentoring. In fact, male and female proteges desire task-oriented mentoring when compared to relationship-oriented mentoring styles. However, female proteges prefer to be mentored by female mentors and male proteges prefer to be mentored by male mentors. In addition, with respect to gender, mentors do not differ in the type of mentoring they employ. Additionally, results of the study indicate that task-oriented mentoring style may bring incremental explanatory power with regard to intention to pursue STEM careers. This research implicates STEM program design in university settings. Gender-focused STEM programs are advised to focus on preferences and mentoring type, but not in the conventional way. This research indicates that women in STEM disciplines are not expressing a preference for relationship-oriented mentoring type and do benefit from task-oriented mentoring styles.

  19. Mentoring: An Evolving Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michelle; Florczak, Kristine L

    2017-04-01

    The column concerns itself with mentoring as an evolving relationship between mentor and mentee. The collegiate mentoring model, the transformational transcendence model, and the humanbecoming mentoring model are considered in light of a dialogue with mentors at a Midwest university and conclusions are drawn.

  20. Annual report of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The annual report for the activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan in the fiscal year 1990 is presented. The activities are divided into research, technical aids, training, medical services, management affairs at the Nakaminato Laboratory Branch Office, library or editing, international cooperation, and general affairs. Research activities are described under the following sections: (1) special researches covering biological risk evaluation in public exposure and exposure assessment in the environment and the public involved in food chain, medical use of accelerated heavy ions, and survey for the demonstration of dose-response relationships in low dose irradiation; (2) five assigned researches; (3) ordinary researches concerning physics, pharmacochemistry, biology, genetics, pathology and physiology, cell biology, internal exposure, environmental science, clinical research, clinical research for radiation injuries, medical use of heavy particles, environmental radiation ecology, and aquatic radiation ecology; (4) risk estimation of radiation; (5) survey for radiation response phenomena in fish and in immunity associated with low dose irradiation; (6) actual surveys for Bikini victims, population doses of medical and occupational exposure, and thorotrast exposure; (7) project research; (8) integrated atomic energy-based technological research; (9) radioactivity survey; (10) research supported by Science and Technology Agency aids; (11) International research cooperation; and (12) government-private joint cooperative study. Appendices include the personnel list and the bibliography of articles reported by the staff.

  1. Activities of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliger, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) was established by the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) on June 6, 1983. RIACS is privately operated by USRA, a consortium of universities with research programs in the aerospace sciences, under contract with NASA. The primary mission of RIACS is to provide research and expertise in computer science and scientific computing to support the scientific missions of NASA ARC. The research carried out at RIACS must change its emphasis from year to year in response to NASA ARC's changing needs and technological opportunities. Research at RIACS is currently being done in the following areas: (1) parallel computing; (2) advanced methods for scientific computing; (3) high performance networks; and (4) learning systems. RIACS technical reports are usually preprints of manuscripts that have been submitted to research journals or conference proceedings. A list of these reports for the period January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1994 is in the Reports and Abstracts section of this report.

  2. Building a Science Software Institute: Synthesizing the Lessons Learned from the ISEES and WSSI Software Institute Conceptualization Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaszak, R.; Lenhardt, W. C.; Jones, M. B.; Ahalt, S.; Schildhauer, M.; Hampton, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF, in an effort to support the creation of sustainable science software, funded 16 science software institute conceptualization efforts. The goal of these conceptualization efforts is to explore approaches to creating the institutional, sociological, and physical infrastructures to support sustainable science software. This paper will present the lessons learned from two of these conceptualization efforts, the Institute for Sustainable Earth and Environmental Software (ISEES - http://isees.nceas.ucsb.edu) and the Water Science Software Institute (WSSI - http://waters2i2.org). ISEES is a multi-partner effort led by National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS). WSSI, also a multi-partner effort, is led by the Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI). The two conceptualization efforts have been collaborating due to the complementarity of their approaches and given the potential synergies of their science focus. ISEES and WSSI have engaged in a number of activities to address the challenges of science software such as workshops, hackathons, and coding efforts. More recently, the two institutes have also collaborated on joint activities including training, proposals, and papers. In addition to presenting lessons learned, this paper will synthesize across the two efforts to project a unified vision for a science software institute.

  3. Tutoring and Mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelia Frade

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available South African institutions of higher education (HE have increasingly come under pressure to broaden access to historically under-represented groups who are often underprepared for tertiary education as a result of apartheid-era secondary schooling (White Paper, 2013. This has resulted in student enrolments becoming increasingly diverse with respect to racial, cultural, socio-economic and linguistic backgrounds (Underhill & McDonald, 2010. In an attempt to address these issues and promote increased throughput rates, institutions of HE have increasingly begun to introduce tutoring, including supplemental instruction (SI and peer-assisted learning (PAL and mentoring programmes.

  4. Annual report of Nuclear Science Research Institute, JFY2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    Nuclear Science Research Institute (NSRI) is composed of Planning and Coordination Office and seven departments such as Department of Operational Safety Administration, Department of Radiation Protection, Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Department of Hot Laboratories and Facilities, Department of Criticality and Fuel Cycle Research Facilities, Department of Decommissioning and Waste Management, and Engineering Services Department. This annual report of JFY2006 summarizes the activities of NSRI, the R and D activities of the Research and Development Directorates and human resources development at site, and is expected to be referred to and utilized by R and D departments and project promotion sectors at NSRI site for the enhancement of their own research and management activities to attain their goals according to 'Middle-term Plan' successfully and effectively. In chapter 1, outline of JFY2006 activities of NSRI is described. In chapter 2, the following activities made by the departments in NSRI are summarized, i.e., (1) operation and maintenance of research reactors (JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR), criticality assemblies (STACY, TRACY, FCA, TCA), hot laboratories (BECKY, Reactor Fuel Examination Facility, WASTEF, Research Laboratory 4, Plutonium Research Laboratory 1, Tokai Hot Laboratory, etc), and large-scale facilities (Tandem accelerator, LSTF, THYNC, TPTF, etc), and (2) safety management, radiation protection, management of radioactive wastes, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, engineering services, utilities and maintenance, etc, all of which are indispensable for the stable and safe operation and utilization of the research facilities. The technical developments for the advancement of the related technologies are also summarized. In chapter 3, the R and D and human resources development activities are described including the topics of the research works and projects performed by the Research and Development Directorates at site, such as

  5. 'Silent mentors'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglas-Jones, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Unlike cadaver donation in the West, which has to a large degree maintained the anonymity of the body used to teach medical students, the Taiwanese Tzu Chi Buddhist Silent Mentor programme at the centre of this article foregrounds the identity of the training cadaver as an essential element in me...... for medical pedagogy, body donation, and Buddhist practices prompted by this programme, putting the ‘Silent Mentors’ into conversation with the ‘new immortalities’ of this special issue....

  6. Annual report of Nuclear Science Research Institute, JFY2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-04-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was inaugurated on October 1st, 2005. Works for the operation and maintenance of various research facilities as well as safety management, radiation protection, and radioactive wastes management, which have been undertaken by departments in Tokai Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), were inherited by newly established departments of Nuclear Science Research Institute (NSRI). The NSRI is composed of Planning and Coordination Office and seven departments such as Department of Operational Safety Administration, Department of Radiation Protection, Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Department of Hot Laboratories and Facilities, Department of Criticality and Fuel Cycle Research Facilities, Department of Decommissioning and Waste Management, and Engineering Services Department. This annual report of JFY 2005 summarizes the activities of NSRI and is expected to be referred to and utilized by R and D departments and project promotion sectors at NSRI site for the enhancement of their own research and management activities to attain their goals according to Middle-term Plan' successfully and effectively. In chapter 1, outline of organization and administrative activities of NSRI is described. In chapter 2, the following activities made by the departments in NSRI are summarized, i.e., (1) operation and maintenance of research reactors (JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR), criticality assemblies (STACY, TRACY, FCA, TCA), hot laboratories, (BECKY, Reactor Fuel Examination Facility, WASTEF, Research Laboratory 4, Plutonium Research Laboratory 1, Tokai Hot Laboratory, etc), and large-scale facilities (Tandem accelerator, LSTF, THYNC, TPTF, etc), and (2) safety management, radiation protection, management of radioactive wastes, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, engineering services, utilities and maintenance, etc, all of which are indispensable for the stable and safe operation and utilization of the

  7. Weaving Authenticity and Legitimacy: Latina Faculty Peer Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Anne-Marie; Murakami, Elizabeth T.; Gonzales, Leslie D.

    2015-01-01

    As an alternative to typical top-down mentoring models, the authors advance a conception of peer mentoring that is based on research about collectivist strategies that Latina faculty employ to navigate the academy. The authors advance recommendations for institutional agents to support mentoring for faculty who are members of historically…

  8. Petroleum Science and Technology Institute with the TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, H. C.; Olson, J. E.; Bryant, S. L.; Lake, L. W.; Bommer, P.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Jablonowski, C.; Willis, M.

    2009-12-01

    The TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution, a professional development program for 8th- thru 12th-grade Earth Science teachers, presented a one-week Petroleum Science and Technology Institute at The University of Texas at Austin campus. The summer program was a joint effort between the Jackson School of Geosciences and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering. The goal of the institute was to focus on the STEM components involved in the petroleum industry and to introduce teachers to the larger energy resources theme. The institute kicked off with a welcoming event and tour of a green, energy-efficient home (LEED Platinum certified) owned by one of the petroleum engineering faculty. Tours of the home included an introduction to rainwater harvesting, solar energy, sustainable building materials and other topics on energy efficiency. Classroom topics included drilling technology (including a simulator lab and an overview of the history of the technology), energy use and petroleum geology, well-logging technology and interpretation, reservoir engineering and volumetrics (including numerous labs combining chemistry and physics), risk assessment and economics, carbon capture and storage (CO2 sequestration technology) and hydraulic fracturing. A mid-week field trip included visiting the Ocean Star offshore platform in Galveston, the Weiss Energy Hall at the Houston Museum of Science and Schlumberger (to view 3-D visualization technology) in Houston. Teachers remarked that they really appreciated the focused nature of the institute and especially found the increased use of mathematics both a tool for professional growth, as well as a challenge for them to use more math in their science classes. STEM integration was an important feature of the summer institute, and teachers found the integration of science (earth sciences, geophysics), technology, engineering (petroleum, chemical and reservoir) and mathematics particularly valuable. Pre

  9. Artificial climate experiment facility in Institute for Environmental Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hisamatsu, Shunichi [Department of Radioecology, Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    The Institute for Environmental Sciences is now constructing the artificial climate experiment facility (ACEF) to research the effect of climate on movement of elements in the various environments. The ACEF will have one large, and five small artificial climate experiment chambers. The large chamber is designed to simulate climate conditions in all Japan. It will equip systems to simulate sunshine, rainfall (including acid rain), snowfall and fog (including acid fog). `Yamase` condition will also be reproduced in it. Yamase is a Japanese term describing the characteristic weather condition occurring mainly on the Pacific Ocean side at the northern Japan. While the small chamber will not have rainfall, snowfall and fog systems, radioisotopes will be used in the two small chambers which will be set up in a radioisotope facility. We describe here the outline of the ACEF and the preliminary research programs being undertaken using both kinds of chambers. (author)

  10. Artificial climate experiment facility in Institute for Environmental Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisamatsu, Shunichi

    1999-01-01

    The Institute for Environmental Sciences is now constructing the artificial climate experiment facility (ACEF) to research the effect of climate on movement of elements in the various environments. The ACEF will have one large, and five small artificial climate experiment chambers. The large chamber is designed to simulate climate conditions in all Japan. It will equip systems to simulate sunshine, rainfall (including acid rain), snowfall and fog (including acid fog). 'Yamase' condition will also be reproduced in it. Yamase is a Japanese term describing the characteristic weather condition occurring mainly on the Pacific Ocean side at the northern Japan. While the small chamber will not have rainfall, snowfall and fog systems, radioisotopes will be used in the two small chambers which will be set up in a radioisotope facility. We describe here the outline of the ACEF and the preliminary research programs being undertaken using both kinds of chambers. (author)

  11. Annual report: AEC Institute for Life Sciences, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    The AEC-Institute for life sciences research programme can be divided into four divisions: experimental nuclear medicine, radiobiology, radiopharmacy and hormone receptor studies. The experimental nuclear medicine division investigates and undertakes new developments in nuclear diagnostics with a view to clinical application, especially developments in dataprocessing techniques and radiopharmaceuticals. Physiological, biochemical and pharmacological problems are also investigated by using tracers and nuclear diagnostic techniques. The radiobiology division is concerned with the development of biochemical techniques for determining radiosensitivity amongst radiation workers as well as clinical-biochemical, diagnostic procedures for identifying exposure to ionizing types of radiation (X- or gamma radiation). The hormone receptor division is concerned with the study of the role of steroid hormone receptors, steroids and carcinogenes in the etiology of breast cancer. Research projects as well as completed and ongoing research are listed in this report

  12. Mentor Networks in Academic Medicine: Moving Beyond a Dyadic Conception of Mentoring for Junior Faculty Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCastro, Rochelle; Sambuco, Dana; Ubel, Peter A.; Stewart, Abigail; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Career development award programs often require formal establishment of mentoring relationships. The authors sought to gain a nuanced understanding of mentoring from the perspective of a diverse national sample of faculty clinician-researchers who were all members of formal mentoring relationships. Method Between February 2010 and August 2011, the authors conducted semi-structured, in-depth telephone interviews with 100 former recipients of National Institutes of Health mentored career development awards and 28 of their mentors. Purposive sampling ensured a diverse range of viewpoints. Multiple analysts thematically coded verbatim transcripts using qualitative data analysis software. Results Three relevant themes emerged: (1) the numerous roles and behaviors associated with mentoring in academic medicine, (2) the improbability of finding a single person who can fulfill the diverse mentoring needs of another individual, and (3) the importance and composition of mentor networks. Many respondents described the need to cultivate more than one mentor. Several participants discussed the utilization of peer mentors, citing benefits such as pooled resources and mutual learning. Female participants generally acknowledged the importance of having at least one female mentor. Some observed that their portfolio of mentors needed to evolve in order to remain effective. Conclusions Those who seek to promote the careers of faculty in academic medicine should focus upon developing mentoring networks, rather than hierarchical mentoring dyads. The members of each faculty member's mentoring team or network should reflect the protégé's individual needs and preferences, with special attention towards ensuring diversity in terms of area of expertise, academic rank, and gender. PMID:23425990

  13. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1999. Volume II: Life Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaussi, Rolf; Gschwend, Beatrice [eds.

    2000-07-01

    The existing activities of the Department of Life Sciences have grown out of the specific know how and the unique experimental possibilities available at PSI. Primarily, these have been and are complex facilities for using particle beams (protons, neutrons) on the one hand and know how in the production, handling and chemistry of radionuclides on the other. The common theme of the department has thus been the study and use of various types of radiation in therapy and diagnostics of human disease and in particular of cancer. The four units active in this area are: The major activity in the Radiation Medicine unit is Proton Therapy, which aims to further develop and optimise the world-wide unique spot scanning facility for irradiating malignant tumours with minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissues, including the established OPTIS program for the treatment of eye tumours. The Centre for Radiopharmaceutical Science represents a joint activity of PSI with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ) and the University of Zurich. Its major goals are the development of novel tumour targeted radioconjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy and the production and evaluation of new PET (positron emission tomography) radiotracers for various applications in neuro physiology and drug development. The Institute of Medical Radiobiology analyses questions of the molecular biology of DNA repair. It is a joint activity of PSI and the University of Zurich. The Structural Biology unit is currently being established. A strong in-house research activity in macromolecular crystallography will complement the more user-oriented protein crystallography beam line, which is being built at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). In particular, tumour targeting by molecular vehicles and DNA repair are areas where structural information can provide important insights. Progress in 1999 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 1999 is also provided.

  14. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 2000. Volume II: Life Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaussi, Rolf; Gschwend, Beatrice [eds.

    2001-07-01

    The existing activities of the Department of Life Sciences have grown out of the specific know-how and the unique experimental possibilities available at PSI. Primarily, these have been and are complex facilities for using particle beams (protons, neutrons) on the one hand and know-how in the production, handling and chemistry of radionuclides on the other. The common theme of the department has thus been the study and use of various types of radiation in therapy and diagnostics of human disease and in particular of cancer. The four units active in this area are: The major activity in the Radiation Medicine unit is Proton Therapy, which aims to further develop and optimise the world-wide unique spot scanning facility for irradiating malignant tumours with minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissues, including the established OPTIS program for the treatment of eye tumours. The Centre for Radiopharmaceutical Science represents a joint activity of PSI with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ) and the University of Zurich. Its major goals are the development of novel tumour targeted radioconjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy and the production and evaluation of new PET (positron emission tomography) radiotracers for various applications in neuro physiology and drug development. The Institute of Medical Radiobiology analyses questions of the molecular biology of DNA repair. It is a joint activity of PSI and the University of Zurich. The newly established Structural Biology group is still in the build-up phase. A strong in-house research activity in macromolecular crystallography will complement the more user-oriented protein crystallography beam line, which is being built at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). In particular, tumour targeting by molecular vehicles and DNA repair are areas where structural information can provide important insights. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2000

  15. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1999. Volume II: Life Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaussi, Rolf; Gschwend, Beatrice

    2000-01-01

    The existing activities of the Department of Life Sciences have grown out of the specific know how and the unique experimental possibilities available at PSI. Primarily, these have been and are complex facilities for using particle beams (protons, neutrons) on the one hand and know how in the production, handling and chemistry of radionuclides on the other. The common theme of the department has thus been the study and use of various types of radiation in therapy and diagnostics of human disease and in particular of cancer. The four units active in this area are: The major activity in the Radiation Medicine unit is Proton Therapy, which aims to further develop and optimise the world-wide unique spot scanning facility for irradiating malignant tumours with minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissues, including the established OPTIS program for the treatment of eye tumours. The Centre for Radiopharmaceutical Science represents a joint activity of PSI with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ) and the University of Zurich. Its major goals are the development of novel tumour targeted radioconjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy and the production and evaluation of new PET (positron emission tomography) radiotracers for various applications in neuro physiology and drug development. The Institute of Medical Radiobiology analyses questions of the molecular biology of DNA repair. It is a joint activity of PSI and the University of Zurich. The Structural Biology unit is currently being established. A strong in-house research activity in macromolecular crystallography will complement the more user-oriented protein crystallography beam line, which is being built at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). In particular, tumour targeting by molecular vehicles and DNA repair are areas where structural information can provide important insights. Progress in 1999 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 1999 is also provided

  16. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 2000. Volume II: Life Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaussi, Rolf; Gschwend, Beatrice

    2001-01-01

    The existing activities of the Department of Life Sciences have grown out of the specific know-how and the unique experimental possibilities available at PSI. Primarily, these have been and are complex facilities for using particle beams (protons, neutrons) on the one hand and know-how in the production, handling and chemistry of radionuclides on the other. The common theme of the department has thus been the study and use of various types of radiation in therapy and diagnostics of human disease and in particular of cancer. The four units active in this area are: The major activity in the Radiation Medicine unit is Proton Therapy, which aims to further develop and optimise the world-wide unique spot scanning facility for irradiating malignant tumours with minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissues, including the established OPTIS program for the treatment of eye tumours. The Centre for Radiopharmaceutical Science represents a joint activity of PSI with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ) and the University of Zurich. Its major goals are the development of novel tumour targeted radioconjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy and the production and evaluation of new PET (positron emission tomography) radiotracers for various applications in neuro physiology and drug development. The Institute of Medical Radiobiology analyses questions of the molecular biology of DNA repair. It is a joint activity of PSI and the University of Zurich. The newly established Structural Biology group is still in the build-up phase. A strong in-house research activity in macromolecular crystallography will complement the more user-oriented protein crystallography beam line, which is being built at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). In particular, tumour targeting by molecular vehicles and DNA repair are areas where structural information can provide important insights. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2000

  17. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    Five years have passed since the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) was reformed as an Independent Administrative Institution (IAI) in April 2001, and this fiscal year (2005-2006) is the last year in the first Mid-term Plan of NIRS. The main items of this report, being the same as the previous year's, are: the summary of NIRS activities; research and development including studies of important project, fundamental research, fundamental and frontier research, contract research and fact-finding; management; organization/budget/finance; and appendix. Important projects are radiological studies in advanced medicine, on sensitivity, of effects on human and of hazard. Fundamental research concerns studies of environmental radiation, radiobiology, heavy particle ion therapy, diagnostic imaging, dose assessment and protection in medical radiation, brain function, development of High-Coverage Expression Profiling (HiCEP) technique and new crossover studies. Fact-finding studies are on the present situations of people exposed by nuclear experiment at Bikini Atoll in 1954 and of patients treated with thorotrast in past. Appendix cites the personnel name list, honorable events, cooperative studies, patent situation and others. (J.P.N.)

  18. Annual report of national institute of radiological science in 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    The research activities of National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) in 1998 can be divided into 16 categories: (1) general research-heavy ion project research, (2) group research, (3) special research, (4) designed research, (5) ordinary research, (6) safety analysis research, (7) investigation of actual situation, (8) general research for the basic technology of nuclear energy, (9) human brain function research, (10) investigation and research of radioactivity, (11) research for science and technology promotion, (12) international research cooperation, (13) specific joint research, (14) technological evaluation for radioactive liquid waste decontamination test, (15) strategic basis research, (16) general research for emergency medical treatment. The heavy ion project research is divided into 5 categories further; (1) clinical research, (2) medical treatment research, (3) diagnosis research, (4) biological research, (5) physics and engineering research. The detailed subjects of study are described in the report. A great number of research papers are published in Japan and all over the world. Organization, personnel, budget and accounts of the NIRS are also mentioned in the report. (Suetake, M.)

  19. [Activities of Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2001-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of IT research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: 1. Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth. 2. Human-Centered Computing Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities. 3. High Performance Computing and Networking Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to analysis of large scientific datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply IT research to a variety of NASA application domains. RIACS also engages in other activities, such as workshops, seminars, visiting scientist programs and student summer programs, designed to encourage and facilitate collaboration between the university and NASA IT research communities.

  20. National Institutes of Health addresses the science of diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Collins, Francis S.

    2015-01-01

    The US biomedical research workforce does not currently mirror the nation’s population demographically, despite numerous attempts to increase diversity. This imbalance is limiting the promise of our biomedical enterprise for building knowledge and improving the nation’s health. Beyond ensuring fairness in scientific workforce representation, recruiting and retaining a diverse set of minds and approaches is vital to harnessing the complete intellectual capital of the nation. The complexity inherent in diversifying the research workforce underscores the need for a rigorous scientific approach, consistent with the ways we address the challenges of science discovery and translation to human health. Herein, we identify four cross-cutting diversity challenges ripe for scientific exploration and opportunity: research evidence for diversity’s impact on the quality and outputs of science; evidence-based approaches to recruitment and training; individual and institutional barriers to workforce diversity; and a national strategy for eliminating barriers to career transition, with scientifically based approaches for scaling and dissemination. Evidence-based data for each of these challenges should provide an integrated, stepwise approach to programs that enhance diversity rapidly within the biomedical research workforce. PMID:26392553

  1. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    From this year, National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) started as an administrative corporation independent of the Government and concomitant internal re-organization was conducted: Three major Centers for Radiation safety, Radiation Emergency Medicine and Charged Particle Therapy were made. This report contains the summary of NIRS activities; research and development including studies of important project, fundamental research, fundamental and frontier research, contract research and fact-finding; management; organization/budget/finance; and appendix. Important projects are radiological studies in advanced medicine, on sensitivity, of effects on human and of hazard. Fundamental research concerns studies of environmental radiation, radiobiology, heavy particle ion therapy, diagnostic imaging, dose assessment and protection in medical radiation, brain function, systematic basic technology of nuclear sciences and international cooperation. Fact-finding studies are on the present situations of people exposed by nuclear experiment at Bikini Atoll in 1954 and of patients treated with thorotrast in past. Appendix cites the personnel name list, honorable events, cooperative studies, patent situation and others. (N.I.)

  2. Dual peer mentoring program for undergraduate medical students: exploring the perceptions of mentors and mentees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolalizadeh, Parya; Pourhassan, Saeed; Gandomkar, Roghayeh; Heidari, Farrokh; Sohrabpour, Amir Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite the advantages of dual peer mentoring, there are a few reports of implementing and evaluating such programs for medical students. This study aimed at exploring the perceptions of mentors and mentees about the dual peer mentoring program for the first year undergraduate medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted at the end of the first year of implementing the mentoring program. All mentees and mentors were invited to participate in focus group discussions. Data were analyzed using a qualitative content analysis. Results: All mentors ( n= 12 ) and a group of mentees ( n= 21 ) participated in focus group discussion sessions. We provided a variety of supports for the mentees including academic and psychosocial support and positive relationship; as a result, some developments occurred to the mentors We also explored participants' views on some unique aspects of the program such as student-authorized, dual mentoring, and role model sessions. Conclusion: Our participants found the mentoring program beneficial in various academic achievements and psychosocial supports for both the mentors and the mentees. Dual peer mentoring program can be an alternative to school administered programs.

  3. 78 FR 32259 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, July 15, 2013, 8:00 a...

  4. Political Science Careers at Comprehensive Universities: Building Balanced Careers at "Greedy" Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Ryan C.; Mueller, Melinda A.; Strand, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    A considerable amount of research exists about political science careers at community colleges and liberal arts institutions, as well as about training and hiring practices across different types of institutions. However, there is virtually no commentary available on political science careers at comprehensive institutions, where a significant…

  5. Toward enhanced learning of science: An educational scheme for informal science institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Midori

    Current educational operation for informal science institutions tend to be based on the staff's experience and intuition rather than on educational theories or research findings. This status study sought research evidence for an educational scheme to give informal science institutions. Evidence for this scheme came from surveys to determine specific circumstances of educational operations and visitor behaviors. The Provus discrepancy model, seeking gaps between the actual and desired states, guided this investigation of how informal science education institution staff view the nature and status of educational operations. Another investigation sought visitors' views of the effectiveness of the main idea for exhibit understanding (n=68 for each group of with the main idea and without the main idea), effective labels (n=68), expectations toward on-site lessons(n=22 and 65 for student groups, and n=2 for teachers), and possibilities for assessments of museum operations. Institutional data were collected via a web portal, with a separate site created for administrators (n=41), exhibit developers (n=21), and program planners (n=35). The survey asked about actual and desired states in terms of goals and roles of staff, contents of exhibits and programs, assessment, and professional development. The four visitor surveys were administered individually at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. The institutional survey found that most institutions focus on attitudinal reinforcement rather than visitor learning, do not overtly value research or long-term assessment, and value partnerships with K-12 schools more than other groups. It is also clarified that the staff do not have a clear vision of the nature or function of an operations manuals. Large gaps were found between the actual and desired states in terms of assessment (administrators, exhibit developers, and program planners), professional development (exhibit developers and program planners), and partnerships

  6. 77 FR 22793 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory.... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919....D., Scientific Review Administrator, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of...

  7. 76 FR 7225 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee..., National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/3112, Research Triangle Park, NC..., National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/3112, Research Triangle Park, NC...

  8. 78 FR 32672 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the NIH Reform Act of 2006 (42 U.S.C. 281 (d)(4)), notice is hereby given that the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS... Popovich, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Division of Extramural Research and Training...

  9. 76 FR 58521 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Science, P. O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170 B... Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P. O. Box 12233, MD EC-30...

  10. 77 FR 16844 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory.... Institute Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919) 541-1307, [email protected] . Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences...

  11. 77 FR 37423 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory..., [email protected] . Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special... Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170 B...

  12. 76 FR 11500 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Administrator, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations, Scientific Review... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Novel...

  13. Can Mentors Channeling Youthful Minority and Female Students into Optical Sciences be Funded and Fostered by Use of Mc Leod's Patent-pending Naturoptics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Beatriz; Ferreira, Nadja; Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2007-04-01

    We wish to begin the repair of impaired youthful vision, using methods taught by Roger D. Mc Leod, to his adult associates for their own, restricted, personal use. Certain nations could benefit if we are able extend the development of franchise-protected and pending patent-protected methods around the globe. We prefer concentrating our initial efforts among young minority and female students, particularly those involving some indigenous heritage. This approach will be using applied optics/Naturoptics and other applied mathematics/sciences as corrective and financially motivational driving tools. Funding, accessible without time-consuming red tape, could be from money generated by Naturoptics , at a rate, for initially visually-impaired mentors, who will learn the method, free, as they are repaired. Mentored teaching will earn an equivalent of half the usual rate of 95 per individual initial 25-minute session, provided that there are satisfactory non-disclosure agreements. Improvements are guaranteed, on Snellen charts, or other equivalent vision charts, of one line per session, after the beginning visit, or the session is free. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NES07.C2.3

  14. Mapping mentor teachers' roles in mentoring dialogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. F.J.A.J. Crasborn; Paul Hennissen; Fred Korthagen; Theo Bergen; Niels Brouwer

    2008-01-01

    The dialogue between a mentor teacher and a prospective teacher is a key element in the supervision of prospective teachers in the workplace. This literature study deals with the issue of how to conceptualize the supervisory behaviour of mentor teachers in mentoring dialogues by systematically

  15. Polish Academy of Sciences Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics research report 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Scientific interests of Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics Polish Academy of Sciences are focused on DNA replication and repair, gene expression, gene sequencing and molecular biophysics. The work reviews research projects of the Institute in 1994-1995.

  16. Polish Academy of Sciences Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics research report 1994-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Scientific interests of Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics Polish Academy of Sciences are focused on DNA replication and repair, gene expression, gene sequencing and molecular biophysics. The work reviews research projects of the Institute in 1994-1995

  17. Polish Academy of Sciences Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics research report 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Scientific interests of Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics Polish Academy of Sciences are focused on DNA replication and repair, gene expression, gene sequencing and molecular biophysics. The work reviews research projects of the Institute in 1994-1995.

  18. Yelavarthy Nayudamma: Scientist, Leader, and Mentor Extraordinary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 10. Yelavarthy Nayudamma: Scientist, Leader, and Mentor Extraordinary. J Raghava Rao T Ramasami. General Article Volume 19 Issue 10 October 2014 pp 887-899 ...

  19. 78 FR 59944 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919... [[Page 59945

  20. Activities of the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period October 2, 1987 through March 31, 1988.

  1. [Research Conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period 1 Oct. 1996 - 31 Mar. 1997.

  2. Research in progress at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period April 1, 1987 through October 1, 1987.

  3. Activities of the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period April 1, 1985 through October 2, 1985 is summarized.

  4. 78 FR 66947 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... Person: Robert Horowits, Ph.D., Senior Investigator, National Institute of General Medical Sciences..., Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology...

  5. 77 FR 66853 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel Career Grants in the Environmental Health Sciences. Date: November...., Scientific Review Administrator, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program...

  6. Advancing diversity and inclusion through AGU's mentoring programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, P. M.; Marasco, L.; Hurtado, C.; Hanlon, S. M.; Ambrogio, O.

    2017-12-01

    AGU offers three separate mentoring programs at the Fall Meeting. These are the Undergraduate Mentoring Program, Career and Research Advice Mentorship (CRAM) sessions, and the Sharing Science mentoring program. While each of these have had an impact on students and mentors, these programs are limited in that the mentor and mentee interactions only occur during the Fall Meeting. To increase the impact of mentoring beyond the Fall Meeting, AGU is piloting a new program that is entirely virtual. This virtual program, called Mentoring365, is designed to have a diverse set of mentees and mentors interacting over a three-month period. Mentoring365 offers participants with a mentor that they can "meet and interact with" outside of Fall Meeting and potentially continue a relationship beyond the duration of the program. It is intended to build or add to a student's professional network and provide a student with additional support outside their research, academic, and/or graduate advisor. This presentation will highlight some of the features of the program as well as provide insight into the progress of the Mentoring365 pilot. The ultimate intent is to expand the program efficacy by collaborating across organizations in the Earth and space sciences to provide a robust and diverse pool of mentors and mentees.

  7. The impact of institutional ethics on academic health sciences library leadership: a survey of academic health sciences library directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooey, Mary Joan M J; Arnold, Gretchen N

    2014-10-01

    Ethical behavior in libraries goes beyond service to users. Academic health sciences library directors may need to adhere to the ethical guidelines and rules of their institutions. Does the unique environment of an academic health center imply different ethical considerations? Do the ethical policies of institutions affect these library leaders? Do their personal ethical considerations have an impact as well? In December 2013, a survey regarding the impact of institutional ethics was sent to the director members of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries. The objective was to determine the impact of institutional ethics on these leaders, whether through personal conviction or institutional imperative.

  8. The Deaf Mentoring Survey: A Community Cultural Wealth Framework for Measuring Mentoring Effectiveness with Underrepresented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Derek C.; Gormally, Cara; Clark, M. Diane

    2017-01-01

    Disabled individuals, women, and individuals from cultural/ethnic minorities continue to be underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Research has shown that mentoring improves retention for underrepresented individuals. However, existing mentoring surveys were developed to assess the majority population, not…

  9. A Mentoring Toolkit: Tips and Tools for Mentoring Early-Career Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Effective mentoring is a critical component in the training of early-career researchers, cultivating more independent, productive and satisfied scientists. For example, mentoring has been shown by the 2005 Sigma Xi National Postdoc Survey to be a key indicator for a successful postdoctoral outcome. Mentoring takes many forms and can include support for maximizing research skills and productivity as well as assistance in preparing for a chosen career path. Yet, because there is no "one-size-fits-all” approach, mentoring can be an activity that is hard to define. In this presentation, a series of tips and tools will be offered to aid mentors in developing a plan for their mentoring activities. This will include: suggestions for how to get started; opportunities for mentoring activities within the research group, within the institution, and outside the institution; tools for communicating and assessing professional milestones; and resources for fostering the professional and career development of mentees. Special considerations will also be presented for mentoring international scholars and women. These strategies will be helpful to the PI responding to the new NSF mentoring plan requirement for postdocs as well as to the student, postdoc, researcher or professor overseeing the research and training of others.

  10. Causes of The occurrence of Obstacles in The Implementation of “Normal Labor Attendance” Skills Lab for Midwifery Students at Institute of Health Science "Surya Mitra Husada Kediri"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Palupi Yonni Siwi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the factors that influence the occurrence of obstacles in the skills lab about Normal Labor Attendance for the students in midwifery school of Institute of Health Sciences "Surya Mitra Husada" Kediri, with cross sectional design. The subjects were 37 students of Semester IV, selected using total sampling technique. Factors studied were mentor roles, interest in learning, and tool limitations. Data were collected through questionnaires and observation sheets, then analyzed using ordinal regression test. The p-value of the ordinal regression test was 0.000; so it was concluded that the mentor roles, interest in learning and tool limitations affected the occurrence of obstacles in the skills lab.

  11. Does mentoring make a difference for women academics? Evidence from the literature and a guide for future research

    OpenAIRE

    Meschitti, Viviana; Lawton-Smith, Helen

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims at reviewing literature on mentoring in academia, with a focus on mentoring to enhance women’s careers. A significant gender imbalance in science persists, and mentoring has been recognized as an important instrument for fostering academic women’s careers and addressing such imbalance. However, often the benefits of mentoring are taken for granted. This review aims to unpack the concept of mentoring, understand which trends characterize the mentoring literature, and analyze th...

  12. Building national capacity for research mentor training: an evidence-based approach to training the trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfund, Christine; Spencer, Kimberly C; Asquith, Pamela; House, Stephanie C; Miller, Sarah; Sorkness, Christine A

    2015-01-01

    Research mentor training (RMT), based on the published Entering Mentoring curricula series, has been shown to improve the knowledge and skills of research mentors across career stages, as self-reported by both the mentors engaged in training and their mentees. To promote widespread dissemination and empower others to implement this evidence-based training at their home institutions, we developed an extensive, interactive, multifaceted train-the-trainer workshop. The specific goals of these workshops are to 1) increase facilitator knowledge of an RMT curriculum, 2) increase facilitator confidence in implementing the curriculum, 3) provide a safe environment to practice facilitation of curricular activities, and 4) review implementation strategies and evaluation tools. Data indicate that our approach results in high satisfaction and significant confidence gains among attendees. Of the 195 diverse attendees trained in our workshops since Fall 2010, 44% report implementation at 39 different institutions, collectively training more than 500 mentors. Further, mentors who participated in the RMT sessions led by our trained facilitators report high facilitator effectiveness in guiding discussion. Implications and challenges to building the national capacity needed for improved research mentoring relationships are discussed. © 2015 C. Pfund, K. C. Spencer, et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. 75 FR 65365 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review... evaluate grant applications. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell...

  14. The African Geospatial Sciences Institute (agsi): a New Approach to Geospatial Training in North Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeldenberger, S.; Khaled, K. B.

    2012-07-01

    The African Geospatial Sciences Institute (AGSI) is currently being established in Tunisia as a non-profit, non-governmental organization (NGO). Its objective is to accelerate the geospatial capacity development in North-Africa, providing the facilities for geospatial project and management training to regional government employees, university graduates, private individuals and companies. With typical course durations between one and six months, including part-time programs and long-term mentoring, its focus is on practical training, providing actual project execution experience. The AGSI will complement formal university education and will work closely with geospatial certification organizations and the geospatial industry. In the context of closer cooperation between neighboring North Africa and the European Community, the AGSI will be embedded in a network of several participating European and African universities, e. g. the ITC, and international organizations, such as the ISPRS, the ICA and the OGC. Through a close cooperation with African organizations, such as the AARSE, the RCMRD and RECTAS, the network and exchange of ideas, experiences, technology and capabilities will be extended to Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa. A board of trustees will be steering the AGSI operations and will ensure that practical training concepts and contents are certifiable and can be applied within a credit system to graduate and post-graduate education at European and African universities. The geospatial training activities of the AGSI are centered on a facility with approximately 30 part- and full-time general staff and lecturers in Tunis during the first year. The AGSI will operate a small aircraft with a medium-format aerial camera and compact LIDAR instrument for local, community-scale data capture. Surveying training, the photogrammetric processing of aerial images, GIS data capture and remote sensing training will be the main components of the practical training courses

  15. 78 FR 47715 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee, July 24, 2013, 08:00 a.m. to July 26, 2013, 02:00...

  16. 77 FR 39688 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Institute of Education Sciences; FAFSA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Institute of Education Sciences; FAFSA Completion Project Evaluation SUMMARY: The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) at the U.S. Department of Education (ED) is conducting a rigorous study of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid...

  17. 77 FR 58111 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; FAFSA Completion Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; FAFSA Completion Project Evaluation SUMMARY: The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) at the U.S. Department of Education (ED) is conducting a rigorous study of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid...

  18. A new approach to mentoring for research careers: the National Research Mentoring Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkness, Christine A; Pfund, Christine; Ofili, Elizabeth O; Okuyemi, Kolawole S; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Zavala, Maria Elena; Pesavento, Theresa; Fernandez, Mary; Tissera, Anthony; Deveci, Alp; Javier, Damaris; Short, Alexis; Cooper, Paige; Jones, Harlan; Manson, Spero; Buchwald, Dedra; Eide, Kristin; Gouldy, Andrea; Kelly, Erin; Langford, Nicole; McGee, Richard; Steer, Clifford; Unold, Thad; Weber-Main, Anne Marie; Báez, Adriana; Stiles, Jonathan; Pemu, Priscilla; Thompson, Winston; Gwathmey, Judith; Lawson, Kimberly; Johnson, Japera; Hall, Meldra; Paulsen, Douglas; Fouad, Mona; Smith, Ann; Luna, Rafael; Wilson, Donald; Adelsberger, Greg; Simenson, Drew; Cook, Abby; Feliu-Mojer, Monica; Harwood, Eileen; Jones, Amy; Branchaw, Janet; Thomas, Stephen; Butz, Amanda; Byars-Winston, Angela; House, Stephanie; McDaniels, Melissa; Quinn, Sandra; Rogers, Jenna; Spencer, Kim; Utzerath, Emily; Duplicate Of Weber-Main; Womack, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    Effective mentorship is critical to the success of early stage investigators, and has been linked to enhanced mentee productivity, self-efficacy, and career satisfaction. The mission of the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) is to provide all trainees across the biomedical, behavioral, clinical, and social sciences with evidence-based mentorship and professional development programming that emphasizes the benefits and challenges of diversity, inclusivity, and culture within mentoring relationships, and more broadly the research workforce. The purpose of this paper is to describe the structure and activities of NRMN. NRMN serves as a national training hub for mentors and mentees striving to improve their relationships by better aligning expectations, promoting professional development, maintaining effective communication, addressing equity and inclusion, assessing understanding, fostering independence, and cultivating ethical behavior. Training is offered in-person at institutions, regional training, or national meetings, as well as via synchronous and asynchronous platforms; the growing training demand is being met by a cadre of NRMN Master Facilitators. NRMN offers career stage-focused coaching models for grant writing, and other professional development programs. NRMN partners with diverse stakeholders from the NIH-sponsored Diversity Program Consortium (DPC), as well as organizations outside the DPC to work synergistically towards common diversity goals. NRMN offers a virtual portal to the Network and all NRMN program offerings for mentees and mentors across career development stages. NRMNet provides access to a wide array of mentoring experiences and resources including MyNRMN, Guided Virtual Mentorship Program, news, training calendar, videos, and workshops. National scale and sustainability are being addressed by NRMN "Coaches-in-Training" offerings for more senior researchers to implement coaching models across the nation. "Shark Tanks" provide

  19. A sustainable course in research mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martina, Camille Anne; Mutrie, Andria; Ward, Denham; Lewis, Vivian

    2014-10-01

    In this report, we describe a six-year experience (2007-2012) in a single CTSA awardee institution on the development, implementation and evaluation of a hybrid online mentoring curriculum that is applicable to CTSA trainees at various levels (graduate, medical students, and junior faculty) of career training. The curriculum offers convenience, engagement, and financial sustainability. Overall, we found high levels of satisfaction with the curriculum and mentoring experience among both protégés and mentors. Qualitative data showed remarkable consensus of 14 of the 15 domains of mentoring that form the framework of the mentoring curriculum: (1) accessibility, (2) selectivity, (3) engagement/support, (4) teaching/training, (5) clarity of performance/expectations, (6) sponsorship/sharing power judiciously, (7) demystifying the system (academia), (8) challenging/encouraging risk taking, (9) affirming, (10) providing exposure/visibility, (11) being an intentional role model, (12) protecting, (13) providing feedback, (14) self-disclosure, and lastly (15) counseling, with the fifteenth domain "counseling" being the most controversial. Quantitative survey data of both mentors and protégés indicated a high degree of overall satisfaction in their mentor-protégé dyad with 86% (59) of protégés and 86% (55) of mentors responding good or excellent to the "quality of time spent." Mentors and protégés were most satisfied in the area of research, with 93% (62) of protégés and 96% (57) of mentors finding discussions in research very to somewhat useful for their own career advancement. Along with wide acceptability, this format is a useful option for institutions where face-to-face time is limited and education budgets are lean. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Developing institutional repository at National Institute for Materials Science : Researchers directory service “SAMURAI” and Research Collection Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Masao; Tanifuji, Mikiko

    National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) has developed an institutional repository “NIMS eSciDoc” since 2008. eSciDoc is an open source repository software made in Germany, and provides E-Science infrastructures through its flexible data model and rich Web APIs. NIMS eScidoc makes use of eSciDoc functions to benefit for NIMS situations. This article also focuses on researchers directory service “SAMURAI” in addition to NIMS eSciDoc. Successfully launched in October 2010, SAMURAI provides approximately 500 researchers' profile and publication information.

  1. Building a mentoring network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Angela Barron; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Woods, Nancy Fugate; Manson, Spero M

    Mentoring has long been regarded as one of the key components of research training and faculty development. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program purposely facilitated scholars' development of a mentoring network by providing each individual with three mentors: a school-of-nursing mentor (primary), a university-based non-nurse research mentor (research), and a nationally-recognized nurse leader at another university (national). The Mentorship Effectiveness Scale was used to assess the effectiveness of each type of mentor in the first five completed cohorts. The ratings of mentorship effectiveness for all three kinds of mentors were generally high. Scholars valued most their mentors' support and advocacy; the biggest weakness in dealing with all mentors was accessibility. Even when one mentor proved a poor match, another mentor turned out to be an advocate and helpful, thus reaffirming the benefits of a mentoring network as opposed to only a single mentoring relationship. One lesson learned is the importance of preparing mentors for their role via written materials, in-person or phone orientations, and discussions at the annual meeting. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. The impacts and "best practices" of undergraduate - graduate student mentoring relationships in undergraduate research experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanile, Megan Faurot

    With the growth of undergraduate research in the U.S., over the past two decades, faculty are more often assigning graduate students to mentor undergraduate students than providing the one-on-one mentoring themselves. A critical gap that exists in the literature is how undergraduate -- graduate student mentoring relationships in undergraduate research influences both students' academic and career paths. The research questions that framed this study were: (1) What, if any, changes occur in the academic and career paths of undergraduate and graduate students who participate in undergraduate research experiences? and (2) Are there variables that constitute "best practices" in the mentoring relationships in undergraduate research experiences and, if so, what are they? The study context was the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program at Illinois Institute of Technology and the 113 undergraduate researchers and 31 graduate student mentors who participated from 2006 -- 2014. Surveys and interviews were administered to collect pre- and post-program data and follow-up data during the 2014 -- 2015 academic year. Descriptive statistics, content analysis method, and constant comparative method were used to analyze the data. Key findings on the undergraduate researchers were their actual earned graduate degree types (Ph.D. 20%, M.D. 20%, M.S. 48%, other 12%) and fields (STEM 57%, medical 35%, other 8%) and the careers they were pursuing or working in. All the graduate student mentors were pursuing or working in the STEM fields (academia 50%, industry 40%, government 10%). More than 75% of both the undergraduate and graduate students reported that their mentoring relationships had a somewhat to extremely influential impact on their academic and career paths. A set of "best practices" of mentoring were developed for both the undergraduate and graduate students and focused on the mentoring experiences related to learning and teaching about

  3. Why Mentor? Linking Mentor Teachers' Motivations to Their Mentoring Conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginkel, Gisbert; Verloop, Nico; Denessen, Eddie

    2016-01-01

    Current mentoring models for teacher preparation and induction emphasize the need to engage novice teachers' learning through collaborative professional learning communities. Mentors in such communities are expected to engage in joint knowledge construction with novices, and to be "co-thinkers" who enact a developmental view of…

  4. 76 FR 31620 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Research on Ethics and Integrity of Human and or Animal Subjects... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of..., DVM, Chief, Scientific Review Branch, Division of Extramural Research and Training, National Institute...

  5. The National Cancer Institute's Physical Sciences - Oncology Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Michael Graham

    In 2009, the NCI launched the Physical Sciences - Oncology Centers (PS-OC) initiative with 12 Centers (U54) funded through 2014. The current phase of the Program includes U54 funded Centers with the added feature of soliciting new Physical Science - Oncology Projects (PS-OP) U01 grant applications through 2017; see NCI PAR-15-021. The PS-OPs, individually and along with other PS-OPs and the Physical Sciences-Oncology Centers (PS-OCs), comprise the Physical Sciences-Oncology Network (PS-ON). The foundation of the Physical Sciences-Oncology initiative is a high-risk, high-reward program that promotes a `physical sciences perspective' of cancer and fosters the convergence of physical science and cancer research by forming transdisciplinary teams of physical scientists (e.g., physicists, mathematicians, chemists, engineers, computer scientists) and cancer researchers (e.g., cancer biologists, oncologists, pathologists) who work closely together to advance our understanding of cancer. The collaborative PS-ON structure catalyzes transformative science through increased exchange of people, ideas, and approaches. PS-ON resources are leveraged to fund Trans-Network pilot projects to enable synergy and cross-testing of experimental and/or theoretical concepts. This session will include a brief PS-ON overview followed by a strategic discussion with the APS community to exchange perspectives on the progression of trans-disciplinary physical sciences in cancer research.

  6. 78 FR 18359 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research Triangle Park... Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Research Careers in Emerging Technologies. Date: April 30...

  7. 77 FR 60445 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Research and Training, National Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room... Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Support for Conferences and Scientific Meetings. Date...

  8. 78 FR 25754 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233... Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied...

  9. 76 FR 52672 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory.... of Environmental Health Sciences, Keystone Building, 530 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC..., Division of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box...

  10. 76 FR 50235 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee... (DERT), Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 615 Davis Dr... of Extramural Research and Training (DERT), Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, National...

  11. 78 FR 39739 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review... Research and Training, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30...

  12. 78 FR 8156 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Studies of Environmental Agents to Induce Immunotoxicity... Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research...

  13. 76 FR 13650 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3171, Research... Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Review of Educational Grants with an Environmental Health...

  14. 75 FR 34147 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Review Branch, Division of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute Environmental Health Sciences... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards...

  15. 76 FR 62080 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review... Extramural Research and Training, Nat'l Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30...

  16. 78 FR 14312 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Understanding Environmental Control of Epigenetic/Mechanisms... Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30...

  17. 77 FR 33472 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel International Collaborations in Environmental Health. Date: June....D., Scientific Review Administrator, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of...

  18. 76 FR 71046 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/3112, Research Triangle Park... and Education; 93.894, Resources and Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113...

  19. 76 FR 7572 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee..., Director, Division of Extramural Research and Training, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences... of Environmental Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/3112, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919...

  20. 75 FR 45133 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory.... Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170 B, Research Triangle Park, NC... Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental...

  1. 78 FR 51734 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory..., Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations, Scientific Review... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards...

  2. 75 FR 61765 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Superfund Research and Training Program. Date: October 26...-Tilotta, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of...

  3. 76 FR 77239 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act.../boards/ibcercc/ . Place: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell... and Education; 93.894, Resources and Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113...

  4. 75 FR 32797 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Branch, Division of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P... Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental...

  5. 77 FR 30019 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233... Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied...

  6. 78 FR 14562 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Studies on Environmental Health Concerns from Superstorm Sandy... Administrator, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations, Scientific...

  7. 76 FR 80954 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act.../boards/ibcercc/ . Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium... Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/3112, Research Triangle Park...

  8. 77 FR 61613 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Environmental Health Sciences, P. O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919) 541-1307, [email protected] . Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis...

  9. 77 FR 61771 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review... applications. Place: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111...

  10. 75 FR 68367 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170 B... Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological...

  11. 78 FR 27410 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory..., Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations, Scientific Review... the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114...

  12. 76 FR 26311 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory.... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3171, Research Triangle Park, NC... and Education; 93.894, Resources and Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113...

  13. 75 FR 10293 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory.... Institute Environmental Health Sciences, P. O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919... Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied...

  14. 75 FR 65363 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Review of Minority Biomedical Research Neuro Grant Applications. Date... General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, Room 3AN18J, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  15. 75 FR 63843 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Review of Minority Biomedical Research Neuro Grant Applications. Date... General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, Room 3AN18J, Bethesda...

  16. Science self-efficacy of African Americans enrolled in freshman level physical science courses in two historically black institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prihoda, Belinda Ann

    2011-12-01

    Science education must be a priority for citizens to function and be productive in a global, technological society. African Americans receive fewer science degrees in proportion to the Caucasian population. The primary purposes of this study were to determine the difference between the pretest and posttest science self-efficacy scores of African-American nonscience majors, the difference between the pretest and posttest science self-efficacy scores of African-American science majors, the relationship between science self-efficacy and course grade, the relationship between gender and science self-efficacy score, and the relationship between science self-efficacy score and course withdrawal. This study utilized a Likert survey instrument. All participants were enrolled in freshman level courses in the physical sciences at a historically black institution: a college or university. Participants completed the pretest survey within two weeks after the 12th class day of the semester. Initially, 458 participants completed the pretest survey. The posttest was administered within two weeks before the final exam. Only 245 participants completed the posttest survey. Results indicate that there is a difference in science self-efficacy of science majors and nonscience majors. There was no significant difference between the pretest and posttest science self-efficacy scores of African-American science majors and nonscience majors. There was no significant relationship between science self-efficacy and course grade, gender and science self-efficacy score, and course withdrawal and science self-efficacy score.

  17. Mentor preparation: A qualitative study of STEM master teacher professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Click-Cuellar, Heather Lynn

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 has required districts to staff all classrooms with highly qualified teachers. Yet, retaining certified teachers in the profession has been a national concern, especially among new teachers who leave at alarming rates within their first three years. This comes at a heavy cost to districts financially and in trying to maintain highly qualified status, but also to the continuity and effective education of students. Mentoring has been identified by many researchers as a plausible solution to reducing attrition rates for beginning teachers. In this dissertation, I conducted qualitative research to explore and understand the perceptions of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) Master Teachers' mentoring professional development in the context of the Master Teacher Academies program situated at Desert State University (pseudonym), a large institution located on the Texas-Mexico border. Additionally, I examined the reported teaching self-efficacy of STEM Master Teachers (mentors), as well as that of their novice teachers (mentees). Another purpose of the study was to investigate the forms and elements of interactions between these mentors and their mentees. Participants of this study were Texas certified Master Mathematics or Master Science Teachers, and their novice mathematics or science teacher mentees; all of whom teach in a high need U.S. Mexico border city school district serving a student population that is over 93% Hispanic. A grounded theory approach was used in examining and analyzing mentor and mentee perceptions and experiences through case studies. A constructivist framework was utilized to derive findings from interviews and the review of documents and contribute a diverse context and population to the literature. The study reveals conclusions and recommendations that will benefit educators, universities, school districts, and policy makers in regard to teacher mentor preparation.

  18. Mentoring, coaching and supervision

    OpenAIRE

    McMahon, Samantha; Dyer, Mary; Barker, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    This chapter considers the purpose of coaching, mentoring and supervision in early childhood eduaction and care. It examines a number of different approaches and considers the key skills required for effective coaching, mentoring and supervision.

  19. Mentors, Mentor Substitutes, or Virtual Mentors? Alternative Mentoring Approaches for the Military

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knouse, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    This report provides an overview of mentoring: the career enhancing and psychosocial functions, the stages of development in the mentoring relationship, and a selective review of the research literature...

  20. Fra mentee til mentor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Interview med mentee og mentor ved Birger Søndergård, videodokumenteret ved Jan Apollo - til undervisningsbrug.......Interview med mentee og mentor ved Birger Søndergård, videodokumenteret ved Jan Apollo - til undervisningsbrug....

  1. Mentoring program design and implementation in new medical schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, Alice; Murray, Thomas S.; Menzin, Andrew W.; Woo, Vivian A.; Clifton, Maurice; Lombardi, Marion; Shelov, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Mentoring is considered a valuable component of undergraduate medical education with a variety of programs at established medical schools. This study presents how new medical schools have set up mentoring programs as they have developed their curricula. Methods Administrators from 14 US medical schools established since 2006 were surveyed regarding the structure and implementation of their mentoring programs. Results The majority of new medical schools had mentoring programs that varied in structure and implementation. Although the programs were viewed as valuable at each institution, challenges when creating and implementing mentoring programs in new medical schools included time constraints for faculty and students, and lack of financial and professional incentives for faculty. Conclusions Similar to established medical schools, there was little uniformity among mentoring programs at new medical schools, likely reflecting differences in curriculum and program goals. Outcome measures are needed to determine whether a best practice for mentoring can be established. PMID:24962112

  2. A Case Study of URM Retention through IBP's Professional Development and Mentoring Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ricciardi, L.; Detrick, L.; Siegfried, D.; Fauver, A.; Ithier-Guzman, W.; Thomas, S. H.; Valaitis, S.

    2012-12-01

    As a free-standing not for profit organization, the Institute for Broadening Participation (IBP) hosts a variety of initiatives designed to increase the retention of underrepresented minority (URM) students pursuing pathways in STEM. Successful initiatives include virtual and face-to-face components that bring together URM students with established URM and other scientists in academia, government and industry. These connections provide URM students with supportive mentoring, networking opportunities, and professional skill development contributing to an overall improved retention rate of URM students majoring in STEM degrees. IBP's initiatives include the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative (NASA OSSI), Pathways to Ocean Science, Pathways to Engineering, and the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S) Professional Development program in Earth System Science (ESS). The NASA OSSI initiative recruits and facilitates student engagement in NASA student education and employment opportunities. Through IBP's virtual and person-to-person communications, students learn how to identify, apply to, and participate in NASA programs. Pathways to Ocean Science connects and supports URM students with REU programs in the Ocean Sciences while serving as a resource for REU program directors. As one of IBP's newest initiatives, Pathways to Engineering has synthesized mentoring resources into an online mentoring manual for URM STEM students that has been extensively vetted by mentoring experts throughout the country. The manual which is organized by user groups serves as an e-forum providing undergraduates, graduates, postdocs, faculty members and project directors with valuable resources to facilitate a positive REU experience. This mentoring initiative also provides a mechanism for submitting new resources and inviting feedback in mentoring best practices throughout the STEM community. MS PHD'S, one of IBP's longest running and most successful initiatives

  3. Profile: Institute of Society, Ethics and the Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Daniel

    1971-01-01

    Describes an institute founded to examine moral, ethical, and legal issues raised by possibilities of euthanasia, genetic engineering, behavior control, population control, and improved disease control. Indicates scope of present research. (Editor/AL)

  4. The Arab Council for the Social Sciences: Support for Institutional ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Funding will enable the organization to deliver on its mandate of building a strong network of ... -establishing ACSS's institutional status through staff recruitment, an office in Beirut, clear internal operational procedures, and strategic planning.

  5. Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education Tata Institute of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (A Deemed University) ... level • Innovative curricula, laboratories, teaching and assessment methods • Development ... subject), M Tech or a Master's degree (MA/MSW) in any of the social/ behavioural.

  6. Being a Mentor: Novice Teachers' Mentors' Conceptions of Mentoring Prior to Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz-Oppenheimer, Orna

    2017-01-01

    This study deals with novice teachers' mentors' conceptions of mentoring prior to their mentoring training. In Israel, all novice teachers have to be supported and assessed by a mentor during their first year of teaching. The aim of this study was to elicit from prospective mentors their own conception of professional mentoring, as a basis for…

  7. Fiscal 1982 plans of works in National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Science and Technology Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    National Institute of Radiological Sciences, since its establishment in 1957, has engaged in the research and other works on the radiation injuries in human bodies, the medical utilization of radiation and the training and education of personnel in the field. The plans of works in fiscal 1982 in the NIRS are described. As special research works, there are the estimation of the degree of danger due to low level radiation for human bodies, environmental radiation exposure due to nuclear facilities, etc., the medical utilization of particle accelerators, and the biological effects of tritium in nuclear fusion reactor development. Ordinary research works include physics, chemistry, genetics, pharmacy, clinical research, etc. In other areas of activities are radiation risk evaluation, radioactivity investigation, technological aid, personnel education and training, and medical work. (Mori, K.)

  8. A Social Capital Perspective on the Mentoring of Undergraduate Life Science Researchers: An Empirical Study of Undergraduate-Postgraduate-Faculty Triads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikens, Melissa L.; Sadselia, Sona; Watkins, Keiana; Evans, Mara; Eby, Lillian T.; Dolan, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate researchers at research universities are often mentored by graduate students or postdoctoral researchers (referred to collectively as "postgraduates") and faculty, creating a mentoring triad structure. Triads differ based on whether the undergraduate, postgraduate, and faculty member interact with one another about the…

  9. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Kids' Pages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... opportunity to highly motivated science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) focused undergraduate students in the Raleigh-Durham area to solidly connect with NIEHS, and receive frontier-level training in biomedical research. More Information It's Spring! ...

  10. Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education Tata Institute of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-03-30

    Critical and analytical skills • Commitment to improve education. Science and ... Application submission deadline: March 30, 2018 • Written test: May 13, 2018 • Interview: June. 3rd week ... Those who qualify will be called for an interview.

  11. TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: Science, Technology and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This funding will help strengthen the Science, Technology and Innovation ... It also aims to raise awareness among government officials and parliamentarians of the critical role of this research for evidence-based STI policies ... Related content ...

  12. Ethics With Mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Constance L

    2017-04-01

    The concept of mentoring is a phenomenon critical to teaching-learning in coming to know in the performing art of leadership. The author of this article discusses the mentoring relationship from an alternative view through the humanbecoming lens of understanding. Possibilities of ethical nurse practice with the art of mentoring from the humanbecoming perspective are illuminated.

  13. Making Mentoring Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisling, Nina F.; Gardiner, Wendy

    2018-01-01

    Research has established that teacher-mentoring programs can have a beneficial effect on new-teacher performance and retention. However, too often, mentoring programs don't live up to their potential. This article presents four research-based strategies that improve mentoring programs' prospects for success. By setting clear expectations, getting…

  14. Electronic Mentoring of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Vicki L.

    On July 1, 1991, the ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries) Research Committee launched a pilot project to mentor academic librarians in their conduct of research. Since the mentors and protegees were potentially from all over the United States, the decision was made to mentor using the electronic conferencing capability of BITNET…

  15. The role of the student professional association in mentoring dental hygiene students for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furgeson, Danielle; George, Mary; Nesbit, Samuel; Peterson, Charlotte; Peterson, Diane; Wilder, Rebecca S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of the Student American Dental Hygienists' Association (SADHA) in mentoring/developing dental hygiene students for the future. This project also assessed attitudes and practices of SADHA advisors towards the utilization of SADHA as a mechanism for mentoring dental hygiene students' professional development to meet the oral health needs of the public, and the goals of the ADHA. These goals include promotion of education beyond the baccalaureate level to develop qualified faculty, encouraging dental hygiene research, and promoting leadership. The study also evaluated if geographic region and academic setting impacted the utilization of SADHA. After IRB exemption, a pilot-tested questionnaire was administered using Survey Monkey, an online survey website, to 277 individual contacts at Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) accredited dental hygiene programs. A response rate of 68% was achieved with 186 individual responses. Eighty percent of respondents indicated offering no mentoring opportunities outside of the curriculum, while incongruously, 58.3% felt they actively mentor through SADHA. When asked what the main focus of SADHA should be, SADHA advisors ranked community service/philanthropy as number one. SADHA chapters at institutions that offer a Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene (BSDH) degree completion program offer more mentoring opportunities (p= or conversion rate than other regions (p=.018). SADHA advisors do not agree on how SADHA should be utilized. The majority of SADHA chapters are not offering mentoring opportunities outside of the traditional curriculum for leadership and career development. What is clear is that both students and advisors desire more interaction with the local ADHA components and constituents. In order to address these issues, efforts should be made to provide networking support among SADHA advisors and increase faculty perception of the importance of the professional

  16. The development, implementation, and assessment of an innovative faculty mentoring leadership program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, Lawrence C; Borus, Jonathan F; Nadelson, Carol C; Seely, Ellen W; Haas, Audrey; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L

    2012-12-01

    Effective mentoring is an important component of academic success. Few programs exist to both improve the effectiveness of established mentors and cultivate a multispecialty mentoring community. In 2008, in response to a faculty survey on mentoring, leaders at Brigham and Women's Hospital developed the Faculty Mentoring Leadership Program as a peer learning experience for midcareer and senior faculty physician and scientist mentors to enhance their skills and leadership in mentoring and create a supportive community of mentors. A planning group representing key administrative, educational, clinical, and research mentorship constituencies designed the nine-month course.Participants met monthly for an hour and a half during lunchtime. Two cofacilitators engaged the diverse group of 16 participants in interactive discussions about cases based on the participants' experiences. While the cofacilitators discussed with the participants the dyadic mentor-mentee relationship, they specifically emphasized the value of engaging multiple mentors and establishing mentoring networks. In response to postsession and postcourse (both immediately and after six months) self-assessments, participants reported substantive gains in their mentoring confidence and effectiveness, experienced a renewed sense of enthusiasm for mentoring, and took initial steps to build a diverse network of mentoring relationships.In this article, the authors describe the rationale, design, implementation, assessment, and ongoing impact of this innovative faculty mentoring leadership program. They also share lessons learned for other institutions that are contemplating developing a similar faculty mentoring program.

  17. New Developments At The Science Archives Of The NASA Exoplanet Science Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berriman, G. Bruce

    2018-06-01

    The NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI) at Caltech/IPAC is the science center for NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program and as such, NExScI operates three scientific archives: the NASA Exoplanet Archive (NEA) and Exoplanet Follow-up Observation Program Website (ExoFOP), and the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA).The NASA Exoplanet Archive supports research and mission planning by the exoplanet community by operating a service that provides confirmed and candidate planets, numerous project and contributed data sets and integrated analysis tools. The ExoFOP provides an environment for exoplanet observers to share and exchange data, observing notes, and information regarding the Kepler, K2, and TESS candidates. KOA serves all raw science and calibration observations acquired by all active and decommissioned instruments at the W. M. Keck Observatory, as well as reduced data sets contributed by Keck observers.In the coming years, the NExScI archives will support a series of major endeavours allowing flexible, interactive analysis of the data available at the archives. These endeavours exploit a common infrastructure based upon modern interfaces such as JuypterLab and Python. The first service will enable reduction and analysis of precision radial velocity data from the HIRES Keck instrument. The Exoplanet Archive is developing a JuypterLab environment based on the HIRES PRV interactive environment. Additionally, KOA is supporting an Observatory initiative to develop modern, Python based pipelines, and as part of this work, it has delivered a NIRSPEC reduction pipeline. The ensemble of pipelines will be accessible through the same environments.

  18. Developing, testing, and implementing a survey of scientist mentoring teachers as part of an RET: The GABI RET mentor survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, B.

    2017-12-01

    The impacts of mentoring in education have been well established. Mentors have a large impact on their mentees and have been show to affect mentee attitudes towards learning, interest in subjects, future success, and more. While mentoring has a well-documented impact on the mentees, mentoring also has an impact on the mentors themselves. However, little has been studied empirically about these impacts. When we looked for a validated instrument that measured the impact of mentoring on the scientists working with the teachers, we found many anecdotal reports but no instruments that meet our specific needs. To this end, we developed, tested, and implemented our own instrument for measuring the impacts of mentoring on our scientist mentors. Our instrument contained both quantitative and qualitative items designed to reveal the effects of mentoring in two areas: 1) cognitive domain (mentoring, teaching, understanding K-12) and 2) affective domain (professional, personal, participation). We first shared our survey with experts in survey development and mentoring, gathered their feedback, and incorporated their suggestions into our instrument. We then had a subsection of our mentors complete the survey and then complete it again three to four days later (test-retest). Our survey has a high correlation for the test-retest quantitative items (0.93) and a high correlation (0.90) between the three reviewers of the qualitative items. From our findings, we feel we have a validated instrument (face, content, and contruct validity) that answers our research questions reliably. Our contribution to the study of mentoring of science teachers reveals a broad range of impacts on the mentors themselves including an improved understanding of the challenges of classroom teaching, a recognition of the importance of scientists working with science teachers, an enhanced ability to communicate their research and findings, and an increased interest and excitement for their own work.

  19. Mentoring: some ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, V

    2001-07-01

    To counter confusion about the term 'mentor', and address concerns about the scarcity of mentoring, I argue for an "honorific" definition, according to which a mentor is virtuous like a saint or hero. Given the unbounded commitment of mentors, mentoring relationships must be voluntary. In contrast, the role of advisor can be specified, mandated, and monitored. I argue that departments and research groups have a moral responsibility to devise a system of roles and structures to meet graduate students' and postdoctoral fellows' needs for information and advice.

  20. 75 FR 38100 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...- traditional communication methods to make the significance and applicability of SRP-funded research... and Social Sciences Research, and National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering. [cir... Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and Training Program Strategic Plan; Request for Comments ACTION...

  1. Mentoring Nontenured Track Nursing Faculty: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Deborah; Shieh, Carol; McLennon, Susan M; Pike, Caitlin; Hartman, Taylor; Shah, Hena

    The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of mentoring strategies for nursing faculty progression and productivity in the nontenure track at institutions of higher education. Sixty articles were included in the review. Findings revealed that nontenure track nursing faculty require planned programs and mentoring strategies unique to their role and abilities. Schools of nursing can improve on faculty progression, scholarship, and career growth by providing structured mentoring activity.

  2. Training scholars in dissemination and implementation research for cancer prevention and control: a mentored approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padek, Margaret; Mir, Nageen; Jacob, Rebekah R; Chambers, David A; Dobbins, Maureen; Emmons, Karen M; Kerner, Jon; Kumanyika, Shiriki; Pfund, Christine; Proctor, Enola K; Stange, Kurt C; Brownson, Ross C

    2018-01-22

    As the field of D&I (dissemination and implementation) science grows to meet the need for more effective and timely applications of research findings in routine practice, the demand for formalized training programs has increased concurrently. The Mentored Training for Dissemination and Implementation Research in Cancer (MT-DIRC) Program aims to build capacity in the cancer control D&I research workforce, especially among early career researchers. This paper outlines the various components of the program and reports results of systematic evaluations to ascertain its effectiveness. Essential features of the program include selection of early career fellows or more experienced investigators with a focus relevant to cancer control transitioning to a D&I research focus, a 5-day intensive training institute, ongoing peer and senior mentoring, mentored planning and work on a D&I research proposal or project, limited pilot funding, and training and ongoing improvement activities for mentors. The core faculty and staff members of the MT-DIRC program gathered baseline and ongoing evaluation data regarding D&I skill acquisition and mentoring competency through participant surveys and analyzed it by iterative collective reflection. A majority (79%) of fellows are female, assistant professors (55%); 59% are in allied health disciplines, and 48% focus on cancer prevention research. Forty-three D&I research competencies were assessed; all improved from baseline to 6 and 18 months. These effects were apparent across beginner, intermediate, and advanced initial D&I competency levels and across the competency domains. Mentoring competency was rated very highly by the fellows--higher than rated by the mentors themselves. The importance of different mentoring activities, as rated by the fellows, was generally congruent with their satisfaction with the activities, with the exception of relatively greater satisfaction with the degree of emotional support and relatively lower

  3. Environmental Aspects of Tritium Around the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miljevic, N.; Sipka, V.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of environmental distribution of tritium around the Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca during the period 1988-1994 is presented. Temporal and local variations of the specific tritium variations in precipitation (Usek, Zeleno Brdo), river waters (the Danube, the Sava and Mlaka Creek) as well as atmospheric water vapor are given. Estimates based on precipitation measurements have shown that 6.3 TBq of tritium activity should be released annually into the atmosphere from the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences. (author)

  4. Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH, JINR, was established by its founding countries in 1956 with the purpose of joining together the scientific and material potential of Member States in studies of the fundamental properties of matter. JINR is an international inter-governmental scientific research organization, whose activities are based on the principles of openness for participation to all interested states and of their equal, mutually beneficial collaboration.

  5. Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH, JINR, was established by its founding countries in 1956 with the purpose of joining together the scientific and material potential of Member States in studies of the fundamental properties of matter. JINR is an international inter-governmental scientific research organization, the activities of which are based on the principles of openness for participation to all interested states of their equal, mutually beneficial collaboration.

  6. Praxeologies and Institutional Interactions in the Advanced Science Teacher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Klaus

    disciplines in conjunction. In particular the inquiry process of Study and Research Paths (SRP) is experimented as a promising design to bring about disciplinary interaction. SRP is internationally a very recent design, entirely new to Danish teacher education, and the thesis add to the knowledge of its......The present thesis consists of six papers that address three important aspects in mathematics and science teacher education: ‘Integrating two or more teaching disciplines’, ‘learning from practice’ and ‘interaction between institutions’. These aspects are studied in combination as they have...... unfolded in the context of developing and implementing a Danish education programme called the Advanced Science Teacher Education (ASTE), that aim to educate lower secondary school teachers, who among other things are to excel at interdisciplinarity. The essence of integrated teaching is elusive...

  7. European Bioinformatics Institute: Research Infrastructure needed for Life Science

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The life science community is an ever increasing source of data from increasing diverse range of instruments and sources. EMBL-EBI has a remit to store and exploit this data, collected and made available openly across the world, for the benefit of the whole research community. The research infrastructure needed to support the big data analysis around this mission encompasses high performance networks, high-throughput computing, and a range of cloud and storage solutions - and will be described in the presentation.

  8. 76 FR 62422 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Cancellation of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Cancellation of Meeting Notice is hereby given of the cancellation of the Interagency Breast Cancer and Environmental Research Coordinating Committee, October 12, 2011, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m...

  9. 78 FR 56902 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of the following meeting. The meeting will be closed to the public in accordance...

  10. 78 FR 64221 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of the following meetings. The meetings will be closed to the public in accordance...

  11. 75 FR 5771 - Institute of Education Sciences; Overview Information; Education Research and Special Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Institute of Education Sciences; Overview Information; Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs; Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards for Fiscal....305D, 84.305E, 84.324A, 84.324B, and 84.324C. Summary: The Director of the Institute of Education...

  12. 76 FR 13197 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Strategic Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... parties. The goal of this strategic planning process is to define an overarching Vision Statement... this planning process, visit the NIEHS Strategic Planning Web site at Request for Visionary Ideas The... Environmental Health Sciences Strategic Planning AGENCY: National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute...

  13. Towards Strategic Actorhood? The Execution of Institutional Positioning Strategies at Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuori, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Given the emerging interest in institutional positioning and to augment the small number of empirical studies in this field, this paper presents discussion about how Finnish universities of applied sciences implement their profiling strategies. The analysis is based on an examination of documents recently submitted by these institutions when…

  14. 75 FR 46950 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Gulf Oil Spill Health Effects. Date: August 17, 2010. Time: 1 p.m...--Health Risks from Environmental Exposures; 93.142, NIEHS Hazardous Waste Worker Health and Safety... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of...

  15. OneFlorida Clinical Research Consortium: Linking a Clinical and Translational Science Institute With a Community-Based Distributive Medical Education Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkman, Elizabeth; Hurt, Myra; Hogan, William; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Smith, Steven; Brickman, Andrew; Nelson, David

    2018-03-01

    Developing a national pragmatic clinical trial infrastructure is central to understanding the effectiveness of interventions applied under usual conditions and where people receive health care. To address this challenge, three Florida universities-the University of Florida Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Florida State University (with its community-based distributive medical education model), and the University of Miami-created (2010-2013) a statewide consortium, the OneFlorida Clinical Research Consortium, to support the conduct of pragmatic clinical trials and provide mentored research experiences for medical and graduate students in real-world practice settings. OneFlorida has four programs, which report to a steering committee with membership from each partner, community members, and the state Medicaid agency and Department of Health to ensure shared governance. The Clinical Research Program provides support to conduct research in the network and uses champions to engage community clinicians. The Citizen Scientist Program has community members who provide input on health topics of importance to them, study design, recruitment and retention strategies, and the interpretation of findings. The Data Trust Program contains electronic health record and health care claims data for 10.6 million Floridians. The Minority Education Program, in collaboration with three historically black colleges and universities, offers minority junior faculty mentoring in pragmatic clinical trials and implementation science. OneFlorida has implemented 27 studies with diverse patient populations and in diverse community practice settings. To identify evidence-based best practices from the clinical trials conducted in the network, foster their implementation, and expand research training opportunities.

  16. 77 FR 4572 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental...

  17. 75 FR 41506 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental...

  18. 76 FR 19104 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; 2011 NIH Director's Pioneer Awards. Date: May 2-4, 2011. Time: 7:45 a.m...

  19. 75 FR 14565 - NIST Summer Institute for Middle School Science Teachers; Availability of Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) at the middle school level (grades 6-8... encourage them to inspire students to pursue careers in STEM fields. DATES: Proposals must be received at... educational institutions that are teaching students in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering and...

  20. Annual report-2011. Institute for Nuclear Research National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iivanyuk, F.O.

    2012-01-01

    Annual report contains information on the fundamental, scientific and applied investigations carried out in the Institute for Nuclear Research of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine in the year 2010. The report contains abstracts of research works in the fields of nuclear physics, atomic energy, radiation physics and radiation material science, physics of plasma, radiation ecology and biology.

  1. 78 FR 12369 - United States Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of Concern AGENCY: Office of Science and Technology Policy... comments on the proposed United States Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual... requirements for certain categories of life sciences research at institutions that accept Federal funding for...

  2. The Natural Science Institute for Teachers of Minority Students: Performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ervin, C.J.

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of the Natural Science Institute for Teachers of Minority Students is to enhance the science knowledge and skills of grades four through twelve science teachers in the District of Columbia Public Schools. The Institute brings school teachers together with practicing scientists and experienced science educators who are currently doing or involved in research and publication, especially in the area of global change. Special emphasis is placed on the interdisciplinary nature of science and the part played by the understanding and teaching about the dynamics of the environment and global change. In addition to these goals, teachers will learn a number of successful alternate strategies for teaching science to minority, disabled and non-English speaking students.

  3. Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission: Annual Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute was established in 2009, as the forth research institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. This Annual Report provides an overview of the major activities of the Institutes in the year 2014. Major items covered in the report include: Strategic objectives; Collaborations; Personnel and Organisational Structure; Facilities and Technical Services; Summary of Research and Development Projects; Human Resource Development; Publications and Technical Reports.

  4. Pioneering the Transdisciplinary Team Science Approach: Lessons Learned from National Cancer Institute Grantees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Amanda L; Stipelman, Brooke A; Hall, Kara L; Nebeling, Linda; Stokols, Daniel; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute has been a leader in supporting transdisciplinary (TD) team science. From 2005-2010, the NCI supported Transdisciplinary Research on Energetic and Cancer I (TREC I), a center initiative fostering the TD integration of social, behavioral, and biological sciences to examine the relationships among obesity, nutrition, physical activity and cancer. In the final year of TREC I, we conducted qualitative in-depth-interviews with 31 participating investigators and trainees to learn more about their experiences with TD team science, including challenges, facilitating factors, strategies for success, and impacts. Five main challenges emerged: (1) limited published guidance for how to engage in TD team science, when TREC I was implemented; (2) conceptual and scientific challenges inherent to efforts to achieve TD integration; (3) discipline-based differences in values, terminology, methods, and work styles; (4) project management challenges involved in TD team science; and (5) traditional incentive and reward systems that do not recognize or reward TD team science. Four main facilitating factors and strategies for success emerged: (1) beneficial attitudes and beliefs about TD research and team science; (2) effective team processes; (3) brokering and bridge-building activities by individuals holding particular roles in a research center; and (4) funding initiative characteristics that support TD team science. Broad impacts of participating in TD team science in the context of TREC I included: (1) new positive attitudes about TD research and team science; (2) new boundary-crossing collaborations; (3) scientific advances related to research approaches, findings, and dissemination; (4) institutional culture change and resource creation in support of TD team science; and (5) career advancement. Funding agencies, academic institutions, and scholarly journals can help to foster TD team science through funding opportunities, institutional policies on

  5. History of Science Web Resources at American Institute of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, G. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Center for History of Physics and the associated Niels Bohr Library & Archives at the American Institute of Physics were pioneers in web resource development for education and for research in the 1990s. While these units of AIP continue to add significantly to the traditional ways of putting content before the public, they are also experimenting with blogs and Facebook, and are looking at other forms of interactive web presence. This talk explores how an active research center is trying to do both.

  6. Local knowledge, science, and institutional change: the case of desertification control in Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lihua

    2015-03-01

    This article studies the influence of local knowledge on the impact of science on institutional change in ecological and environmental management. Based on an empirical study on desertification control in 12 counties in north China, the study found the following major results: (1) although there was a cubic relationship between the extent and effect of local knowledge, local knowledge significantly influenced the impact of science on institutional change; (2) local knowledge took effect mainly through affecting formal laws and regulations, major actors, and methods of desertification control in institutional change but had no significant impact on the types of property rights; and (3) local knowledge enhanced the impact of science on the results of desertification control through affecting the impact of science on institutional change. These findings provide a reference for researchers, policy makers, and practitioners, both in China and in other regions of the world, to further explore the influence of local knowledge on the impact of science on institutional change and the roles of local knowledge or knowledge in institutional change and governance.

  7. Annual report of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. April 2000-March 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    This report contains all of accomplishments of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), including research and investigations, medical practice, training and technology assistance the institute performed during the given year. Actually, the content covers NIRS activity results in the fields of physics (6 presentations), chemistry (3), bio-medical sciences, clinical research (7), environmental science (15) and space science (5). The third involves fields of biochemistry and biophysics (6), cell biology (6), immunology and hematology (1), pathology and physiology (5), genetics (8) and radiotoxicology (1). Topical issues are clinical trials of heavy-ion radiotherapy for cancer; researches of radiation-sensitive genes and gene-expression profiles; and activities for various accidents after the turning point of the JCO criticality accident in Tokai. NIRS was reborn as an independent corporative body as a result of the national administrative reform and this report is the final one as that from the national institute. (N.I.)

  8. UNLV Information Science Research Institute quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-03-31

    Sections of this report include: symposium activity, staff activity, document analysis program, text-retrieval program, institute activity, etc. It is believed that as large, complete collections of documents become available in digital libraries, users will demand complete interaction with the information; document access mechanisms will have to grow beyond keywords and full-text searches to include browsing, searching of images, and searching on basis of abstract concepts. It is proposed to study the microform document conversion process, including image preprocessing, recognition, postprocessing for extracting information, and natural language techniques. Characterization of algorithms will allow generation of a system that automatically adapts to a wide range of image quality, thereby allowing large-scale conversion efforts. It is proposed to focus first on the NSF Antarctic database (approx. 55,000 documents).

  9. Annual report of the Institute for Environmental Sciences, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    A survey research was continually made on the effects of radioactive substances on the environment in the fiscal year, 1998 as well as in the previous year. The research was conducted with the following themes; survey in natural and social environments, study on the distribution of environmental radioactivities, study on the transfer of radioactive substances into the environment, experimental study on the development of closed experiment system for ecological study and experimental study on the biological effects of radioactivity. In addition, several seminars and meetings were held in the institute aiming to spread and enlighten the scientific informations and techniques on the environmental influence of radioactivities. This survey research was entrusted by Atomic Prefecture and the National Government. (J.P.N.)

  10. Annual report of the Institute for Environmental Sciences, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    A survey research was continually made on the effects of radioactive substances on the environment in the fiscal year, 1996 as well as in the previous year. The research was conducted with the following themes; survey in natural and social environments, study on the distribution of environmental radioactivities, study on the transfer of radioactive substances into the environment, experimental study on the development of closed experiment system for ecological study and experimental study on the biological effects of radioactivity. In addition, several seminars and meetings were held in the institute aiming to spread and enlighten the scientific informations and techniques on the environmental influence of radioactivities. This survey research was entrusted by Aomori Prefecture and the National Government. (M.N.)

  11. UNLV Information Science Research Institute quarterly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    Sections of this report include: symposium activity, staff activity, document analysis program, text-retrieval program, institute activity, etc. It is believed that as large, complete collections of documents become available in digital libraries, users will demand complete interaction with the information; document access mechanisms will have to grow beyond keywords and full-text searches to include browsing, searching of images, and searching on basis of abstract concepts. It is proposed to study the microform document conversion process, including image preprocessing, recognition, postprocessing for extracting information, and natural language techniques. Characterization of algorithms will allow generation of a system that automatically adapts to a wide range of image quality, thereby allowing large-scale conversion efforts. It is proposed to focus first on the NSF Antarctic database (approx. 55,000 documents)

  12. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1998. Volume II: Life Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschwend, Beatrice; Jaussi, Rolf [eds.

    1999-09-01

    The Department of Life Sciences, is aiming to perform high quality research in biosciences focused primarily on oncology and in close interaction with the technical facilities at PSI e.g. proton therapy, SINQ, SLS, and the national and international bioscience community. Within this department, the Division of Radiation Protection and Radioactive Waste Treatment is responsible for the radiological safety of the personnel, the installations and the environment at PSI, and it is charged with dismantling obsolete nuclear installations at PSI. The principal research and development activities of this division concern novel methods for neutron dosimetry, and the study of presence and pathways of natural and man made radioactivity in humans and in the environment. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  13. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1998. Volume II: Life Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gschwend, Beatrice; Jaussi, Rolf

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Life Sciences, is aiming to perform high quality research in biosciences focused primarily on oncology and in close interaction with the technical facilities at PSI e.g. proton therapy, SINQ, SLS, and the national and international bioscience community. Within this department, the Division of Radiation Protection and Radioactive Waste Treatment is responsible for the radiological safety of the personnel, the installations and the environment at PSI, and it is charged with dismantling obsolete nuclear installations at PSI. The principal research and development activities of this division concern novel methods for neutron dosimetry, and the study of presence and pathways of natural and man made radioactivity in humans and in the environment. (author)

  14. A research mentor training curriculum for clinical and translational researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfund, Christine; House, Stephanie; Spencer, Kimberly; Asquith, Pamela; Carney, Paula; Masters, Kristyn S; McGee, Richard; Shanedling, Janet; Vecchiarelli, Stephanie; Fleming, Michael

    2013-02-01

    To design and evaluate a research mentor training curriculum for clinical and translational researchers. The resulting 8-hour curriculum was implemented as part of a national mentor training trial. The mentor training curriculum was implemented with 144 mentors at 16 academic institutions. Facilitators of the curriculum participated in a train-the-trainer workshop to ensure uniform delivery. The data used for this report were collected from participants during the training sessions through reflective writing, and following the last training session via confidential survey with a 94% response rate. A total of 88% of respondents reported high levels of satisfaction with the training experience, and 90% noted they would recommend the training to a colleague. Participants also reported significant learning gains across six mentoring competencies as well as specific impacts of the training on their mentoring practice. The data suggest the described research mentor training curriculum is an effective means of engaging research mentors to reflect upon and improve their research mentoring practices. The training resulted in high satisfaction, self-reported skill gains as well as behavioral changes of clinical and translational research mentors. Given success across 16 diverse sites, this training may serve as a national model. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Near-peer mentoring to complement faculty mentoring of first-year medical students in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satendra; Singh, Navjeevan; Dhaliwal, Upreet

    2014-01-01

    The first year is stressful for new medical students who have to cope with curricular challenges, relocation issues, and separation from family. Mentoring reduces stress and facilitates adaptation. A program for faculty mentoring of first-semester students was initiated by the Medical Education Unit in 2009 at University College of Medical Sciences, Delhi. Feedback after the first year revealed that mentees were reluctant to meet their mentors, some of whom were senior faculty. In the following year, student mentors (near-peers) were recruited to see if that would improve the rate and quality of contact between mentees and mentors. Volunteer faculty (n=52), near-peers (n=57), and new entrants (n=148) admitted in 2010 participated in the ratio of 1:1:3. The program aims were explained through an open house meeting, for reinforcement, and another meeting was conducted 5 months later. At year-end, a feedback questionnaire was administered (response rate: faculty, 28 [54%]; mentees, 74 [50%]). Many respondent faculty (27, 96%) and mentees (65, 88%) believed that near-peer mentoring was useful. Compared to the preceding year, the proportion of meetings between faculty mentors and mentees increased from 4.0±5.2 to 7.4±8.8; mentees who reported benefit increased from 23/78 (33%) to 34/74 (46%). Benefits resulted from mentors' and near-peers' demonstration of concern/support/interaction/counseling (35, 47.3% mentees); 23 mentees (82%) wanted to become near-peers themselves. Near-peer mentoring supplements faculty mentoring of first-year medical students by increasing system effectiveness.

  16. Knowledge Construction and Personal Relationship: Insights about a UK University Mentoring and Coaching Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Eleanore

    2010-01-01

    This article examines interview data from 12 mentors/coaches and eight of their clients in order to explore a mentoring and coaching service among UK university staff. Both mentors/coaches and clients were administrative or academic employees of the Institute of Education or affiliated colleges at London University, UK. Their roles related to the…

  17. NATO Advanced Research Institute on the Application of Systems Science to Energy Policy Planning

    CERN Document Server

    Cherniavsky, E; Laughton, M; Ruff, L

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Research Institute (ARI) on "The Application of Systems Science to Energy Policy Planning" was held under the auspices of the NATO Special Programme Panel on Systems Science in collaboration with the National Center for Analysis of Energy Sys­ tems, Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA, as a part of the NATO Science Committee's continuous effort to promote the advancement of science through international cooperation. Advanced Research Institutes are sponsored by the NATO Science Committee for the purposes of bringing together senior scientists to seek consensus on an assessment of the present state of knowl­ edge on a specific topic and to make recommendations for future research directions. Meetings are structured to encourage inten­ sive group discussion. Invitees are carefully selected so that the group as a whole will contain the experience and expertise neces­ sary to make the conclusions valid and significant. A final report is published presenting the various viewpoints and conclusions....

  18. Science Information Centre and Nuclear Library of 'Jozef Stefan' Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stante, A.; Smuc, S.

    2006-01-01

    The 'Jozef Stefan' Institute Science Information Centre is the central Slovene physics library and one of the largest special libraries in Slovenia. Our collection covers the fields of physics, chemistry, biochemistry, electronics, information science, artificial intelligence, energy management, environmental science, material science, robotics etc. The Nuclear Library at the Reactor Centre Podgorica is a part of the Science Information Centre. It collects and keeps literature from the field of reactor and nuclear energy and provides information to scientists employed at the Reactor Centre and users from the Nuclear Power Plant Krsko as well as other experts dealing with nuclear science and similar fields. The orders subscribed are sent by the Science Information Centre to other libraries included in inter-library lending in Slovenia and abroad. (author)

  19. Supporting learner-centered technology integration through situated mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Marian Goode

    Situated mentoring was used as a professional development method to help 11 high school science teachers integrate learner-centered technology. The teachers' learner-centered technology beliefs and practices as well as their perception of barriers to learner-centered technology integration were explored before and after participating in the mentoring program. In addition, the participants' thoughts about the effectiveness of various components of the mentoring program were analyzed along with the mentor's observations of their practices. Situated mentoring can be effective for supporting learner-centered technology integration, in particular decreasing the barriers teachers experience. Goal setting, collaborative planning, reflection, and onsite just-in-time support were thought to be the most valuable components of the mentoring program.

  20. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2001. Volume II: Life Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaussi, R; Gschwend, B [eds.

    2002-03-01

    The IMR group investigated some new approaches to tumour therapy. Several candidate molecules for targeting the tumour vasculature have been identified and are being produced for in vivo studies in tumour-bearing mice. The liposome technology is well established in this group and the goal is to produce suitably tagged liposomes for delivering a variety of cytotoxic agents to tumours. The Centre for Radiopharmaceutical Science, a joint venture with the ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich, pursues a number of projects that should eventually lead to novel radiopharmaceuticals for tumour diagnosis and therapy. Functionally, these radioactive drugs consist of a tumour targeting part, a radionuclide and a linking moiety, which stably connects the two. Optimisation of the components and their combination in terms of in vitro and in vivo properties as well as the efficient large-scale production of promising candidates for eventual first clinical trials is a demanding task. The major emphasis is still on using antibodies, antibody derivatives or peptides as tumour targeting vehicles. In collaboration with the Queens Medical Centre Nottingham, the first patients were treated with a {sup 67}Cu labelled antibody targeting bladder carcinomas. When completed, these studies should give us important information on the usefulness of {sup 67}Cu as a therapeutic radionuclide. Neuropeptides such as neurotensin and bombesin are promising starting points for tumour targeting as their receptors are over expressed on certain tumour cells. Presently, the efforts concentrate on preparing for further clinical studies with neurotensin derivatives (diagnosis of pancreatic tumours using {sup 99m}Tc) and further improving the stability and pharmacological properties of bombesin derivatives. In both these projects the ultimate goal is to label the optimised compounds with {sup 186}Re, a therapeutic radionuclide that can be attached in the stable tricarbonyl form which is easily accessible by

  1. Does the Curriculum Matter in Peer Mentoring? From Mentee to Mentor in Problem-Based Learning: A Unique Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    Peer mentoring has been used for many years by the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine to integrate new students into the academic and social culture of the institution. In 2001, an unusual situation arose. A problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum was introduced and the first cohort in this programme was mentored by senior traditional curriculum…

  2. Using Electronic Communication to Bridge the Research to Practice Gap among Mentoring Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cindy Ann; Willox, Lara; Olds, Courtney

    2017-01-01

    The field of mentoring includes a broad base of stakeholders, such as researchers and practitioners who implement mentoring programs. The research-to-practice gap is an ongoing area of concern in many fields of social science including mentoring. One reason for this is that researchers and practitioners often operate in isolation. Technology is…

  3. Mentoring in Clinical-Translational Research: A Study of Participants in Master’s Degree Programs

    OpenAIRE

    McGinn, Aileen P; Lee, Linda S; Baez, Adriana; Zwanziger, Jack; Anderson, Karl E; Seely, Ellen W; Schoenbaum, Ellie

    2015-01-01

    Research projects in translational science are increasingly complex and require interdisciplinary collaborations. In the context of training translational researchers, this suggests that multiple mentors may be needed in different content areas. This study explored mentoring structure as it relates to perceived mentoring effectiveness and other characteristics of masters-level trainees in clinical-translational research training programs.

  4. Educative Mentoring: How a Mentor Supported a Preservice Biology Teacher's Pedagogical Content Knowledge Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Ellen; Friedrichsen, Patricia J.

    2015-11-01

    Research suggests discipline-specific, educative mentoring can help preservice teachers develop more sophisticated pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). However, there are few studies examining the nature of mentors' practice and how mentors influence preservice teacher's (PST) PCK. The purpose of this case study was to describe the strategies used by a secondary biology mentor teacher to support the development of a PST's PCK. The primary data sources were the transcripts of audio-recorded, daily meetings between the mentor and the PST during two curriculum units: DNA/Protein Synthesis and Evolution. The mentor influenced the PST's teaching orientation by repeatedly comparing teacher- and student-centered approaches, asking him to consider how students learn, and asking him to self-assess whether his instruction aligned with his teaching beliefs. The mentor helped the PST develop topic-specific knowledge of instructional strategies by sharing strategies she used previously, modeling critical reflection, and inviting him to critically reflect on his own instructional strategies. Topic-specific knowledge of students' understanding of science was developed by discussing common student misconceptions revealed in students' conversations and by sharing the results of test-item analysis from previous unit tests. The mentor helped develop the PST's topic-specific knowledge of assessment by helping him critically analyze and revise previous examinations to better align with the current curriculum units. Topic-specific knowledge of curricula was developed by jointly grappling with decisions about concept sequencing within units. The study includes implications for research, science teacher education, and professional development for mentors.

  5. Annual Report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1991 - March 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This annual report is a compilation of the research activities and achievement in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the fiscal year 1991 (from April 1991 through March 1992). The research covers a wide range of radiological sciences from molecular to environmental studies and medicine including engineering. Topics consists of physics, chemistry, biomedical science, clinical research, and environmental sciences, covering a total of 69 titles. A list of publications by staff members, activities of research divisions, and organization chart of the NIRS are given in Appendix. (J.P.N.) 64 refs

  6. Annual report of national institute of radiological sciences, April 1990 - March 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This annual report is a compilation of the research activities and achievement in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the fiscal year 1990 (from April 1990 through March 1991). The research covers a wide range of radiological sciences from molecular to environmental studies and medicine including engineering. Topics consists of physics, chemistry, bio-medical science, clinical research, and environmental sciences, covering a total of 86 titles. A list of publications by staff members, activities of research divisions, and organization chart of the NIRS are given in Appendix. (J.P.N.) 102 refs

  7. U.S. Institutional Research Productivity in Major Science Education Research Journals: Top 30 for 2000's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Lloyd H.; Tang, Nai-en

    2013-01-01

    VonAalst (2010) used Google Scholar to identify the top four science education research journals: "Journal of Research in Science Teaching," "Science Education," "International Journal of Science Education," and "Journal of Science Teacher Education." U.S. institutional productivity for 2000-2009 for the…

  8. A successful online mentoring program for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Trish; Forrester, David Anthony Tony

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the successful implementation of An Online Mentoring Program for Nurses at a Magnet-designated acute care medical center, Morristown Memorial Hospital (MMH/Atlantic Health). A comprehensive approach to incorporating mentor-protégée teams into professional nurse role development has been demonstrated to (1) improve nurse employee satisfaction, retention, and recruitment outcomes; (2) change the ways nurses and others perceive nurses; (3) augment support by managers and coworkers; and (4) improve patient care outcomes. Nurses are partnered in mentor-protégée relationships and continually engage one another by evaluating the protégée's unique contributions and identifying specific strategic actions to move the protégée toward accomplishing their professional objectives. Building an online mentor-protégée collaboration: (1) maximizing potential, (2) identifying the protégée's unique contributions, and (3) strategic planning. The online mentoring process is a success and has delivered measurable results that have benefited the nurse participants and contributed to our institution's culture of nursing engagement. The online mentoring process has potential to benefit nurses and their organizations by (1) providing real-time communication, (2) facilitating strategic thinking, (3) monitoring progress, (4) "going green," and (5) improving organizational knowledge.

  9. "Wow! Look at That!": Discourse as a Means to Improve Teachers' Science Content Learning in Informal Science Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Gary M.; Lederman, Judith S.; Lederman, Norman G.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, it is not clear whether professional development staff at Informal Science Institutions (ISIs) are considering the way exhibits contribute to the social aspects of learning as described by the contextual model of learning (CML) (Falk & Dierking in "The museum experience." Whalesback, Washington, 1992; "Learning from…

  10. Mentoring in Clinical-Translational Research: A Study of Participants in Master's Degree Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinn, Aileen P; Lee, Linda S; Baez, Adriana; Zwanziger, Jack; Anderson, Karl E; Seely, Ellen W; Schoenbaum, Ellie

    2015-12-01

    Research projects in translational science are increasingly complex and require interdisciplinary collaborations. In the context of training translational researchers, this suggests that multiple mentors may be needed in different content areas. This study explored mentoring structure as it relates to perceived mentoring effectiveness and other characteristics of master's-level trainees in clinical-translational research training programs. A cross-sectional online survey of recent graduates of clinical research master's program was conducted. Of 73 surveys distributed, 56.2% (n = 41) complete responses were analyzed. Trainees were overwhelmingly positive about participation in their master's programs and the impact it had on their professional development. Overall the majority (≥75%) of trainees perceived they had effective mentoring in terms of developing skills needed for conducting clinical-translational research. Fewer trainees perceived effective mentoring in career development and work-life balance. In all 15 areas of mentoring effectiveness assessed, higher rates of perceived mentor effectiveness was seen among trainees with ≥2 mentors compared to those with solo mentoring (SM). In addition, trainees with ≥2 mentors perceived having effective mentoring in more mentoring aspects (median: 14.0; IQR: 12.0-15.0) than trainees with SM (median: 10.5; IQR: 8.0-14.5). Results from this survey suggest having ≥2 mentors may be beneficial in fulfilling trainee expectations for mentoring in clinical-translational training. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Mentoring in Clinical‐Translational Research: A Study of Participants in Master's Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda S.; Baez, Adriana; Zwanziger, Jack; Anderson, Karl E.; Seely, Ellen W.; Schoenbaum, Ellie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Research projects in translational science are increasingly complex and require interdisciplinary collaborations. In the context of training translational researchers, this suggests that multiple mentors may be needed in different content areas. This study explored mentoring structure as it relates to perceived mentoring effectiveness and other characteristics of master's‐level trainees in clinical‐translational research training programs. A cross‐sectional online survey of recent graduates of clinical research master's program was conducted. Of 73 surveys distributed, 56.2% (n = 41) complete responses were analyzed. Trainees were overwhelmingly positive about participation in their master's programs and the impact it had on their professional development. Overall the majority (≥75%) of trainees perceived they had effective mentoring in terms of developing skills needed for conducting clinical‐translational research. Fewer trainees perceived effective mentoring in career development and work‐life balance. In all 15 areas of mentoring effectiveness assessed, higher rates of perceived mentor effectiveness was seen among trainees with ≥2 mentors compared to those with solo mentoring (SM). In addition, trainees with ≥2 mentors perceived having effective mentoring in more mentoring aspects (median: 14.0; IQR: 12.0–15.0) than trainees with SM (median: 10.5; IQR: 8.0–14.5). Results from this survey suggest having ≥2 mentors may be beneficial in fulfilling trainee expectations for mentoring in clinical‐translational training. PMID:26534872

  12. The Woods Hole Partnership Education Program: Increasing Diversity in the Ocean and Environmental Sciences in One Influential Science Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jearld, A.

    2011-12-01

    To increase diversity in one influential science community, a consortium of public and private institutions created the Woods Hole Partnership Education Program, or PEP, in 2008. Participating institutions are the Marine Biological Laboratory, Northeast Fisheries Science Center of NOAA's Fisheries Service, Sea Education Association, U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the Woods Hole Research Center, and University of Maryland Eastern Shore. Aimed at college juniors and seniors with some course work in marine and/or environmental sciences, PEP is a four-week course and a six-to-eight-week individual research project under the guidance of a research mentor. Forty-six students have participated to date. Investigators from the science institutions serve as course faculty and research mentors. We listened to experts regarding critical mass, mentoring, adequate support, network recruitment, and then built a program based on those features. Three years in we have a program that works and that has its own model for choosing applicants and for matching with mentors. We continue fine-tuning our match process, enhancing mentoring skills, preparing our students for a variety of lab cultures, and setting expectations high while remaining supportive. Our challenges now are to keep at it, using leverage instead of capacity to make a difference. Collaboration, not competition, is key since a rising tide floats all boats.

  13. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science, April 1995 -March 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This annual report presents a brief summary of the research activities and the achievements in the Institute for fiscal year 1995 (from April 1995 to March 1996). The clinical trial of cancer therapy using heavy ion beams is making progress with successful results. Various kinds of basic researches using the same heavy ion beams are also growing up gradually in an open use system available to many researchers not only inside but also outside the Institute. Studies of newly assembled research groups are also going to appear. The Institute is covering a very wide area of comprehensive radiological sciences including physics, chemistry, biomedical sciences, clinical research and environmental science. The recent publications, list of keywords, author index, and organization and staff are included in this report. (M.N.)

  14. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science, April 1995 - March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This annual report presents a brief summary of the research activities and the achievements in the Institute for fiscal year 1995 (from April 1995 to March 1996). The clinical trial of cancer therapy using heavy ion beams is making progress with successful results. Various kinds of basic researches using the same heavy ion beams are also growing up gradually in an open use system available to many researchers not only inside but also outside the Institute. Studies of newly assembled research groups are also going to appear. The Institute is covering a very wide area of comprehensive radiological sciences including physics, chemistry, biomedical sciences, clinical research and environmental science. The recent publications, list of keywords, author index, and organization and staff are included in this report. (M.N.)

  15. Collide@CERN is looking for mentors

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The Collide@CERN Artist-in-Residence Programme is currently seeking CERN scientists interested in engaging in thought-provoking and creative collaborations with visiting artists.     In early 2012, a Digital artist will take up a 2-month residency and a Dance and Performance artist a 3-month residency.  Each artist will be allocated a specially selected science inspiration partner to work with. Both the artists and their mentors will give a public lecture in the Globe of Science and Innovation at the beginning and end of the residencies.  One scientist will be selected for each artist. Mentors and artists will be required to share knowledge by:   ·      Meeting once a week throughout the residency ·      Conducting online communications (such as a blog). If you are interested in becoming a mentor, please send the following information by e-m...

  16. The effects of integrating service learning into computer science: an inter-institutional longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Jamie; Barnes, Tiffany; Buch, Kim; Rorrer, Audrey; Zuo, Huifang

    2015-07-01

    This study is a follow-up to one published in computer science education in 2010 that reported preliminary results showing a positive impact of service learning on student attitudes associated with success and retention in computer science. That paper described how service learning was incorporated into a computer science course in the context of the Students & Technology in Academia, Research, and Service (STARS) Alliance, an NSF-supported broadening participation in computing initiative that aims to diversify the computer science pipeline through innovative pedagogy and inter-institutional partnerships. The current paper describes how the STARS Alliance has expanded to diverse institutions, all using service learning as a vehicle for broadening participation in computing and enhancing attitudes and behaviors associated with student success. Results supported the STARS model of service learning for enhancing computing efficacy and computing commitment and for providing diverse students with many personal and professional development benefits.

  17. Management information system of research institute supported by ministry of science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-15

    This book mentions development strategy of MIS. This book contains development strategy of MIS research institute supported by government, computerization of administrative work of research institute, library computer system, methodology on system development, LAN build of ministry science and technology, ocean data base energy data base, computerization of research data management case of construction and analysis for chemical DB, information system of life science, electronic data interchange, queueing theory, biotechnology and computer, comprehensive weather information system, special equipment of data and data processing of oil-hunt operation.

  18. Management information system of research institute supported by ministry of science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This book mentions development strategy of MIS. This book contains development strategy of MIS research institute supported by government, computerization of administrative work of research institute, library computer system, methodology on system development, LAN build of ministry science and technology, ocean data base energy data base, computerization of research data management case of construction and analysis for chemical DB, information system of life science, electronic data interchange, queueing theory, biotechnology and computer, comprehensive weather information system, special equipment of data and data processing of oil-hunt operation.

  19. Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences: reincarnation of a 50 year old State Observatory of Nainital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Ram

    2006-03-01

    The fifty year old State Observatory, well known as U.P. State Observatory till the formation of Uttaranchal in November 2000, was reincarnated on March 22, 2004 as Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences with acronym ARIES, an autonomous institute, under the Department of Science & Technology, Government of India. The growth of academic and technical activities and new mandate of the Institute are briefly described. In early 60's, the Institute was one of the 12 centres established by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, USA, all over the globe but the only centre in India for imaging artificial earth satellites. Commensurating with its observing capabilities, the Institute started a number of front-line research programmes during the last decade, e.g., optical follow up observations of GRB afterglows, radio and space borne astronomical resources, intra-night optical variability in active galactic nuclei as well as gravitational microlensing and milli-magnitude variations in the rapidly oscillating peculiar A type stars. As a part of atmospheric studies, characterisation of aerosol at an altitude of about 2 km is going on since 2002. ARIES has plans for establishing modern observing facilities equipped with latest backend instruments in the area of both astrophysics and atmospheric science. Formation of ARIES, therefore augurs well for the overall development of astrophysics and atmospheric science in India.

  20. Ms. Mentor Unmasked

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Paula

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Emily Toth, who writes the monthly "Ms. Mentor" academic advice column in the "Chronicle of Higher Education" and teaches in the English department at Louisiana State University, in Baton Rouge. She is the author of "Ms. Mentor's Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia" (1997), "Inside Peyton Place: The Life…

  1. Design mentoring tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In 2004 a design engineer on-line mentoring tool was developed and implemented The purpose of the tool was to assist senior engineers : mentoring new engineers to the INDOT design process and improve their technical competency. This approach saves se...

  2. Mentor - den fleksible vejleder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogen handler om det at være mentor. Bidragsyderne i bogen er undervisere og studerende på en diplomuddannelse i mentoring. Der har været meget repons på især kapitel 12, som er skrevet af Birte Kaiser og bærer titlen: Mentorkarrusellen...

  3. Den reflekterende mentor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trine Hinchley, Harck; Day, Barbara Noel; Kaiser, Birte

    Bogen belyser mentorskaber både praktisk og teoretisk for at kvalificere følgende niveuaer: * Individniveauet - mentors kompetenceudvikling * Det relationelle - kvalificering af mentorskabet og relationen mellem mentor og mentee * Det organisatoriske - kvalificering af organisationens opgaveløsning...

  4. Supporting Music Teacher Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffini, Erin Dineen

    2015-01-01

    While much discussion and research is focused on the importance of music teacher mentors for preservice teachers and novice in-service music educators, little discussion has been devoted to the topic of how we, as members of the music education profession, can support the role of music teacher mentors. This article explores some of the benefits…

  5. Developing institutional collaboration between Wageningen University and the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnema, A.B.; Lin, Zhai; Qu, Liang; Jacobsen, E.

    2006-01-01

    Scientific co-operation between the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS) and Wageningen University (WU) has been underway since 1990, especially in the field of plant sciences. In 2001, CAAS and WU initiated a formal joint PhD training programme to further structure their co-operation. The goals of this co-operation are to: (1) initiate long-term institutional collaboration through capacity building; (2) jointly establish a modern laboratory; (3) jointly develop a cross-cultural sc...

  6. Best practices in doctoral retention: Mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judie L. Brill

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available  The aim of this critical literature review is to outline best practices in doctoral retention and the successful approach of one university to improve graduation success by providing effective mentorship for faculty and students alike. The focus of this literature review is on distance learning relationships between faculty and doctoral students, regarding retention, persistence, and mentoring models. Key phrases and words used in the search and focusing on mentoring resulted in over 20,000 sources. The search was narrowed to include only doctoral study and mentoring. Research questions of interest were: Why do high attrition rates exist for doctoral students? What are the barriers to retention? What are the benefits of doctoral mentoring? What programs do institutions have in place to reduce attrition? The researchers found a key factor influencing doctoral student retention and success is effective faculty mentorship. In particular, the design of a mentoring and faculty training program to increase retention and provide for success after graduation is important. This research represents a key area of interest in the retention literature, as institutions continue to search for ways to better support students during their doctoral programs and post-graduation. DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v4i2.186

  7. Mentoring Doctoral Students Online: Mentor Strategies and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Swapna; Johnson, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of our research was to explore faculty members' experiences with online mentoring during the dissertation stage of an online doctoral program. During semi-structured interviews, four mentors reflected on their online mentoring of students, specifically the strategies that worked well, challenges faced while mentoring online, and other…

  8. Developing Mentors: An Analysis of Shared Mentoring Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower-Phipps, Laura; Klecka, Cari Van Senus; Sature, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how experienced teachers share and articulate effective mentoring practices can guide efforts to prepare quality mentors. This qualitative study focused on mentoring practices within a teacher-designed student-teaching program conceptualized while the mentor teachers within the program were students in a graduate-level mentoring…

  9. Air Force Mentoring: the Mentor’s Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    serving -as a mentor provides a creative and rejuvinating life challenge to an adult. Along these same lines, Erikson (8) states that in the seventh stage ...9 Career Functions.. . . . ........ .. 13 Psychosocial Functions ..... ..... .. 14 The Effects :f Mentorinq on the Mentor...in-depth look at the mentoring concept as a leadership development tool. Unfortunately, articles found in the literature address military mentoring

  10. Promoting Physical Understanding through Peer Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, S. M.; Huesmann, A.; Hooper, E.; Moore, C.; Watson, L.; Trestrail, A.; Weber, J.; Timbie, P.; Jacob, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides a supportive learning community for students studying introductory physics, as well as teaching and leadership experience for undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors who receive extensive training and supervision. Many of our Peer Tutors were former Physics Learning Center participants. A central goal of the Physics Learning Center is to address achievement/equity gaps (e.g. race, gender, socio-economic status, disability, age, transfer status, etc.) for undergraduate students pursuing majors and coursework in STEM fields. Students meet twice a week in small learning teams of 3-8 students, facilitated by a trained Peer Mentor Tutor or staff member. These active learning teams focus on discussing core physical concepts and practicing problem-solving. The weekly training of the tutors addresses both teaching and mentoring issues in science education such as helping students to build confidence, strategies for assessing student understanding, and fostering a growth mindset. A second weekly training meeting addresses common misconceptions and strategies for teaching specific physics topics. For non-science majors we have a small Peer Mentor Tutor program for Physics in the Arts. We will discuss the Physics Learning Center's approaches to promoting inclusion, understanding, and confidence for both our participants and Peer Mentor Tutors, as well as examples from the geosciences that can be used to illustrate introductory physics concepts.

  11. Near-peer mentoring to complement faculty mentoring of first-year medical students in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satendra Singh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The first year is stressful for new medical students who have to cope with curricular challenges, relocation issues, and separation from family. Mentoring reduces stress and facilitates adaptation. A program for faculty mentoring of first-semester students was initiated by the Medical Education Unit in 2009 at University College of Medical Sciences, Delhi. Feedback after the first year revealed that mentees were reluctant to meet their mentors, some of whom were senior faculty. In the following year, student mentors (near-peers were recruited to see if that would improve the rate and quality of contact between mentees and mentors. Methods: Volunteer faculty (n=52, near-peers (n=57, and new entrants (n=148 admitted in 2010 participated in the ratio of 1:1:3. The program aims were explained through an open house meeting, for reinforcement, and another meeting was conducted 5 months later. At year-end, a feedback questionnaire was administered (response rate: faculty, 28 [54%]; mentees, 74 [50%]. Results: Many respondent faculty (27, 96% and mentees (65, 88% believed that near-peer mentoring was useful. Compared to the preceding year, the proportion of meetings between faculty mentors and mentees increased from 4.0±5.2 to 7.4±8.8; mentees who reported benefit increased from 23/78 (33% to 34/74 (46%. Benefits resulted from mentors’ and near-peers’ demonstration of concern/support/interaction/counseling (35, 47.3% mentees; 23 mentees (82% wanted to become near-peers themselves. Conclusion: Near-peer mentoring supplements faculty mentoring of first-year medical students by increasing system effectiveness.

  12. Near-peer mentoring to complement faculty mentoring of first-year medical students in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The first year is stressful for new medical students who have to cope with curricular challenges, relocation issues, and separation from family. Mentoring reduces stress and facilitates adaptation. A program for faculty mentoring of first-semester students was initiated by the Medical Education Unit in 2009 at University College of Medical Sciences, Delhi. Feedback after the first year revealed that mentees were reluctant to meet their mentors, some of whom were senior faculty. In the following year, student mentors (near-peers) were recruited to see if that would improve the rate and quality of contact between mentees and mentors. Methods: Volunteer faculty (n=52), near-peers (n=57), and new entrants (n=148) admitted in 2010 participated in the ratio of 1:1:3. The program aims were explained through an open house meeting, for reinforcement, and another meeting was conducted 5 months later. At year-end, a feedback questionnaire was administered (response rate: faculty, 28 [54%]; mentees, 74 [50%]). Results: Many respondent faculty (27, 96%) and mentees (65, 88%) believed that near-peer mentoring was useful. Compared to the preceding year, the proportion of meetings between faculty mentors and mentees increased from 4.0±5.2 to 7.4±8.8; mentees who reported benefit increased from 23/78 (33%) to 34/74 (46%). Benefits resulted from mentors’ and near-peers’ demonstration of concern/support/interaction/counseling (35, 47.3% mentees); 23 mentees (82%) wanted to become near-peers themselves. Conclusion: Near-peer mentoring supplements faculty mentoring of first-year medical students by increasing system effectiveness. PMID:24980428

  13. Summary of research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science during the period October 1, 1983 through March 31, 1984 is summarized.

  14. Summary of research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period October 1, 1988 through March 31, 1989 is summarized.

  15. Research in progress and other activities of the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics and computer science during the period April 1, 1993 through September 30, 1993. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustic and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  16. Being a mentor: what's in it for me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Wendy C

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of mentorship for the protégé are well established and include increased career satisfaction, advancement, and income. Mentors can derive satisfaction from personal and professional networks within their institutions and specialties. However, the advantages of being a mentor are underreported in the medical literature. The purpose of this review is to investigate the effect of the mentoring relationship on the mentors and institutions in disciplines that have studied it widely and to draw parallels to academic medicine. Literature in the fields of business, organizational psychology, and kindergarten through high school (K-12) education describe benefits of serving as a mentor to the individual, organization, and discipline. Potential mentors are intensely self-motivated and derive satisfaction from developing junior colleagues and improving their institutions. Business mentors take pride in junior colleagues' achievements and enjoy improved recognition by superiors, favorable perception within the organization, increased job satisfaction, accelerated promotion rates, higher salaries, development of managerial skills, and improved technical expertise. Organizations enjoy worker longevity from both members of the partnership and benefit from the formation of networks. In the K-12 education model, master teachers who train novices are more likely to remain in the classroom or advance to an administrative role. Application of the principles from these disciplines to academic medicine is likely to produce similarly positive outcomes of personal satisfaction, collaboration, and academic and institutional advancement. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  17. New FINESSE Faculty Institutes for NASA Earth and Space Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.; Slater, Stephanie; Marshall, Sunette Sophia; Stork, Debra; Pomeroy, J. Richard R

    2014-06-01

    In a systematic effort to improve the preparation of future science teachers, scholars coordinated by the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research are providing a series of high-quality, 2-day professional development workshops, with year-round follow-up support, for college and university professors who prepare future science teachers to work with highly diverse student populations. These workshops focus on reforming and revitalizing undergraduate science teaching methods courses and Earth and Space science content courses that future teachers most often take to reflect contemporary pedagogies and data-rich problem-based learning approaches steeped in authentic scientific inquiry, which consistently demonstrate effectiveness with diverse students. Participants themselves conduct science data-rich research projects during the institutes using highly regarded approaches to inquiry using proven models. In addition, the Institute allocates significant time to illustrating best practices for working with diverse students. Moreover, participants leave with a well-formulated action plan to reform their courses targeting future teachers to include more data-rich scientific inquiry lessons and to be better focused on improving science education for a wide diversity of students. Through these workshops faculty use a backwards faded scaffolding mechanism for working inquiry into a deeper understanding of science by using existing on-line data to develop and research astronomy, progressing from creating a valid and easily testable question, to simple data analysis, arriving at a conclusion, and finally presenting and supporting that conclusion in the classroom. An updated schedule is available at FINESSEProgram.org

  18. E-Mentoring: A New Approach in Mentoring

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Kuzu; Mehmet Kahraman; H. Ferhan Odabasi

    2012-01-01

    Mentoring goes long time back in history, arising from the knowledge transfer through the expert to the apprentice. Mentoring is based on the ideal of the development of all stakeholders and improving the communication among them. E-mentoring is one of the different applications of mentoring which developed due to technological developments. It includes the effective use of communication tools in e-learning media, plus forming a base for planning and evaluation. Mentoring that includes differ...

  19. Mentoring For Success: REU Program That Help Every Student Succeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    NSF REU site programs provide remarkable opportunities for students to experience first-hand the challenges and rewards of science research. Because REU positions are relatively scarce, applicant pools are large, and it is easy to fill available positions with students who already have well-developed research skills and proven abilities to excel academically. Advisors bringing REU participants into their labs may see this as the ideal situation. However, using experience and academic record as the primary selection criteria ignores an enormous pool of talented students who have simply never been in a position to show, or discover themselves, what they can do. Reaching this audience requires a shift in strategy: recruiting in ways that reach students who are unaware of REU opportunities; adjusting our selection criteria to look beyond academics and experience, putting as much emphasis on future potential as we do on past performance; finding, or developing, mentors who share this broader vision of working with students; and providing an institutional culture that ensure every student has the kind of multi-node support network that maximizes his or her success. REU programs should be primary tools to developing a deeper and broader science workforce. Achieving that goal will require innovative approaches to finding, recruiting, and mentoring participants.

  20. Best Practices in Academic Mentoring: A Model for Excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan M. Nick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mentoring is important for the recruitment and retention of qualified nurse faculty, their ongoing career development, and leadership development. However, what are current best practices of mentoring? The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of a model for excellence in establishing a formal mentoring program for academic nurse educators. Six themes for establishing a formal mentoring program are presented, highlighting best practices in mentoring as culled from experience and the literature. Themes reflect aims to achieve appropriately matched dyads, establish clear mentorship purpose and goals, solidify the dyad relationship, advocate for and guide the protégé, integrate the protégé into the academic culture, and mobilize institutional resources for mentoring support. Attending to the six themes will help mentors achieve important protégé outcomes, such as orientation to the educator role, integration into the academic community, development of teaching, scholarship, and service skills, as well as leadership development. The model is intended to be generalizable for faculty teaching in a variety of academic nursing institution types and sizes. Mentoring that integrates the six themes assists faculty members to better navigate the academic environment and more easily transition to new roles and responsibilities.

  1. Foreign Science and Engineering Presence in U.S. Institutions and the Labor Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-23

    United States, Washington, DC, May 2005, pp. 17-65. 8 Center for Immigration Studies, Davis, Donald R. and David E. Weinstein , United States Technological...Academy of Sciences, Wm. A. Wulf, President, National Academy of Engineering, and Harvey Fineberg, President, Institute of Medicine, December 13, 2002

  2. 78 FR 7794 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Sentinel Animal Study for Public Health. Date: February 27, 2013... from Environmental Exposures; 93.142, NIEHS Hazardous Waste Worker Health and Safety Training; 93.143...; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated...

  3. Report on the work of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences 27 January - December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    The work of the New Zealand Institute of Nuclear Sciences during the period January-June 1975 is summarized under the following headings: A) Nuclear Physics; B) Radiation Research; C) Isotope Geochemistry - Stable Isotopes; D) Radiocarbon Dating and Fallout; E) Radioisotope Applications; F) Instrumentation. Appendices on current research projects, staff publications and library holdings are included. (D.C.R.)

  4. Report on the work of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences 26 July - December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-04-01

    The work of the New Zealand Institute of Nuclear Sciences during the period January-June 1975 is summarized under the following headings: A) Nuclear Physics; B) Radiation Research; C) Isotope Geochemistry - Stable Isotopes; D) Radiocarbon Dating and Fallout; E) Radioisotope Applications; F) Instrumentation. Appendices on current research projects, staff publications and library holdings are included. (D.C.R.)

  5. Looking in the Right Places: Minority-Serving Institutions as Sources of Diverse Earth Science Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaris, John R.; Manduca, Cathryn A.; Iverson, Ellen R.; Orr, Cailin Huyck

    2017-01-01

    Despite gains over the last decade, the geoscience student population in the United States today continues to lag other science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines in terms of diversity. Minority-serving institutions (MSIs) can play an important role in efforts to broaden underrepresented student engagement with Earth Science…

  6. Summer Teacher Enhancement Institute for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Using the Problem-Based Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard H.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the Institute were: (a) increase participants' content knowledge about aeronautics, science, mathematics, and technology, (b) model and promote the use of scientific inquiry through problem-based learning, (c) investigate the use of instructional technologies and their applications to curricula, and (d) encourage the dissemination of TEI experiences to colleagues, students, and parents.

  7. 75 FR 36111 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Cranbrook Institute of Science, Bloomfield Hills, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan, on behalf of the Michigan Anishnaabek..., Oakland County Medical Examiner (CIS reference 9738 and 9739). No known individuals were identified. No... to the Cranbrook Institute of Science by the Little Traverse Bay Bands of the Odawa Indians on behalf...

  8. Radioactive waste treatment at the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovic, Z [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1989-07-01

    The results of many years work on the problems of treatment and interim storage of radioactive waste at the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences are presented. The main R/D work based on chemical treatment, solidification and pressing is described (author)

  9. Radioactive waste treatment at the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, Z.

    1989-01-01

    The results of many years work on the problems of treatment and interim storage of radioactive waste at the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences are presented. The main R/D work based on chemical treatment, solidification and pressing is described (author)

  10. 6-33 Optimization of ARP System in Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang; Yongping[1; Gou; Shizhe[1; Yuan; Chao[1; Yue; Min[1; Ma; Yuan[1

    2015-01-01

    The Academia Resource Planning (hereafter abbreviated as ARP) of the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) was launched in 2005. It is an important scientific research management system of CAS. In order to meet the multiple dimensions and levels application requirements, the second phase of ARP has gradually formed ten management systems, two application platforms and four application projects.

  11. Post-doctoral research work developed at the National Institute for Fusion Science - Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, M.

    1992-05-01

    This is a research report report on the work developed at the National Institute for Fusion Science - Japan, involving study of Beam Emission Spectroscopy. It describes the use of a fast neutral lithium beam (8 KeV) to measure the density profile in a Compact Helical Device. (A.C.A.S.)

  12. [Eugène-Humbert Guitard and French Institute of History of Science (1932-1939)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Named "membre-conseil" of the French Institute of History of Science in April 1932, Guitard gives there, from January 1935 to February 1939, a dozen history of pharmacy conferences. Those conferences will give birth to her especially valuable Manuel d'histoire de la littérature pharmaceutique, published in 1942 by Caffin. The author re-examines this intellectual adventure.

  13. 77 FR 48506 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; What Works Clearinghouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; What... request to continue a currently approved collection under OMB Control Number 1850-0788 for the What Works... considered public records. Title of Collection: What Works Clearinghouse. OMB Control Number: 1850-0788. Type...

  14. An evaluation of nursing and midwifery sign off mentors, new mentors and nurse lecturers' understanding of the sign off mentor role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooke, Nickey

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a small scale evaluation examining nursing and midwifery mentors and nursing lecturers perceptions of the Nursing and Midwifery Council 'sign off' mentor role (NMC, 2008). For this evaluation 114 new sign off mentors, 37 preparation for mentorship students and 13 nursing and midwifery lecturers within a Higher Education Institute (HEI) in the United Kingdom participated in the evaluation project. Nursing and midwifery students were not included in this initial evaluation. The initial findings suggested that all participants viewed the introduction of sign off mentors positively; offering a more robust mechanism for ensuring students were competent, helped to protect the public, and offered an increased level of support for students themselves. Concerns were raised about varying levels of support available for sign off mentors and some Stage 2 mentors' abilities to assess competence. Several participants felt the 1 h protected time per week per final placement student would be difficult to implement, whilst anxieties were also expressed about levels of responsibility for ensuring fitness to practice alongside concern that some mentors may leave sign off mentors to manage and identify under-achieving students. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of atomic spectroscopy methods in geological institutes of Faculty of Natural Sciences Comenius University and Slovak Academy of Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medved, E.

    1998-01-01

    Development of atomic spectrochemistry methods in Geological Institute of Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University (GI FNS CU) is connected with its establishment in 1957. Its instrumental equipment and location resulted from the already existing Laboratory in the Chair for Mineralogy and Crystallography of FNS CU. In Geological Institute of Slovak Academy of Science (GI SAS) the development of atomic spectroscopy methods started later, only since 1963, when the Member of Academy, Prof. RNDr. B. Cambel, DrSc. became its director. In both institutes the methods of atomic emission spectrography were used as first. A new quality in the development started since 1969 when the Institutes moved to common buildings in Petrzalka (Bratislava), the first atomic absorption spectrometers were acquired and the Institutes were 'strengthened' by coming of Prof. Ing. E. Plsko, DrSc. In the following years the Institutes started to collaborate with some other organisations which were equipped with new facilities, e.g. in 1975 with X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, electron microprobe and in 1985 with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. This enabled to improve essentially the quality of research activities of both institutes in the chemical characterisation of geological materials, as well as in pedagogical work (students practice, diploma works and dissertations). In the present time characterized by new economic conditions a reduction of GI SAS laboratory activities has been realised. The laboratories of the GI FNS CU have, thanks to their director Ing. V. Stresko, PhD. shown also hence-forward a rich research, pedagogical and society activities what can be documented by numerous publications, citations, obtained awards, representations in professional societies and commissions, local and foreign advisory boards, accreditation boards etc. (author)

  16. Mentoring future engineers in higher education: a descriptive study using a developed conceptual framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlington Agholor

    Full Text Available Abstract Mentoring research is recent and multidisciplinary and is found in mostly English speaking cultural contexts. The purpose of this study is to describe a fifty-year old mentoring practice involving faculty-mentors and engineering student-mentees, at the school of engineering of a Spanish university, a non-English speaking context. Mentoring is part of the process of developing the career of the engineering students. For this description, we first developed a more complete conceptual framework of mentoring from literature, identifying the key elements or components. The description of each element in the mentoring practice at the study setting was obtained from archival documents, records, observations and interviews of faculty-mentors and student-mentees. The usefulness of the framework is thereby tested and areas for improvement of the mentoring practice are identified. In addition, this study extends mentoring research into the Spanish speaking European culture and highlights a mentoring experience that could be replicated in other universities. We provide a definition of mentoring that is based on the mentoring experience and practice at the institution given the lack of a generally accepted definition of mentoring.

  17. Science on the net: an analysis of the websites of the European public research institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Massoli

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a study on the websites of several European public research institutions that aims at identifying the science communication model chosen and implemented online with the purpose of reaching different target publics. The analytical approach takes into account a number of indicators: from the institutional identity to the scientific features, from the interactive services to the internationalisation level, in order to evaluate whether the web provides an added value in the adopted communication model and in building a relation with the users. Lights and shades emerge from this study in which good practices side examples of a much weaker science communication approach, outlining a general context where a public research institution website has been still used as a presentation tool and its interactive opportunities have not been capitalised.

  18. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1993 - March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This report summarized briefly the research activities and achievements in the Institute for fiscal year 1993 (from April 1993 through March 1994). At the end of this period, the construction of HIMAC has been completed and preparatory experiments of physical and biological studies necessary to the clinical trial have started by use of the heavy ion beams of HIMAC itself. The Institute is covering a wide range of comprehensive radiological sciences from molecular biology to environmental studies and medicine including engineering for heavy ion therapy of cancer. Therefore, the topics collected in the main part have been classified into five categories (physics, chemistry, bio-medical sciences, clinical research and environmental sciences). (J.P.N.).

  19. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1993 - March 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This report summarized briefly the research activities and achievements in the Institute for fiscal year 1993 (from April 1993 through March 1994). At the end of this period, the construction of HIMAC has been completed and preparatory experiments of physical and biological studies necessary to the clinical trial have started by use of the heavy ion beams of HIMAC itself. The Institute is covering a wide range of comprehensive radiological sciences from molecular biology to environmental studies and medicine including engineering for heavy ion therapy of cancer. Therefore, the topics collected in the main part have been classified into five categories (physics, chemistry, bio-medical sciences, clinical research and environmental sciences). (J.P.N.)

  20. An Exploration of the Relationships between Mentor Recruitment, the Implementation of Mentoring, and Mentors' Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser-Abu Alhija, Fadia; Fresko, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Mentoring of new teachers is generally examined from the viewpoint of the mentees. In the present study, mentoring is explored based on reports from mentors within the context of the Israeli induction program. Recruitment variables (selection and training) were examined in relation to mentoring implementation (frequency, initiation, regularity,…

  1. A Matrix Mentoring Model That Effectively Supports Clinical and Translational Scientists and Increases Inclusion in Biomedical Research: Lessons From the University of Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byington, Carrie L; Keenan, Heather; Phillips, John D; Childs, Rebecca; Wachs, Erin; Berzins, Mary Anne; Clark, Kim; Torres, Maria K; Abramson, Jan; Lee, Vivian; Clark, Edward B

    2016-04-01

    Physician-scientists and scientists in all the health professions are vital members of the U.S. biomedical workforce, but their numbers at academic health centers are declining. Mentorship has been identified as a key component in retention of faculty members at academic health centers. Effective mentoring may promote the retention of clinician-scientists in the biomedical workforce. The authors describe a holistic institutional mentoring program to support junior faculty members engaged in clinical and translational science at the University of Utah. The clinical and translational scholars (CATS) program leverages the resources of the institution, including the Center for Clinical and Translational Science, to augment departmental resources to support junior faculty investigators and uses a multilevel mentoring matrix that includes self, senior, scientific, peer, and staff mentorship. Begun in the Department of Pediatrics, the program was expanded in 2013 to include all departments in the school of medicine and the health sciences. During the two-year program, scholars learn management essentials and have leadership training designed to develop principal investigators. Of the 86 program participants since fiscal year 2008, 92% have received extramural awards, 99% remain in academic medicine, and 95% remain at the University of Utah. The CATS program has also been associated with increased inclusion of women and underrepresented minorities in the institutional research enterprise. The CATS program manifests institutional collaboration and coordination of resources, which have benefited faculty members and the institution. The model can be applied to other academic health centers to support and sustain the biomedical workforce.

  2. Mentored undergraduate research in the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Shelley; Pollock, Meagen; Wiles, Greg; Wilson, Mark

    2012-09-01

    There is little argument about the merits of undergraduate research, but it can seem like a complex, resource-intensive endeavor [e.g., Laursen et al., 2010; Lopatto, 2009; Hunter et al., 2006]. Although mentored undergraduate research can be challenging, the authors of this feature have found that research programs are strengthened when students and faculty collaborate to build new knowledge. Faculty members in the geology department at The College of Wooster have conducted mentored undergraduate research with their students for more than 60 years and have developed a highly effective program that enhances the teaching, scholarship, and research of our faculty and provides life-changing experiences for our students. Other colleges and universities have also implemented successful mentored undergraduate research programs in the geosciences. For instance, the 18 Keck Geology Consortium schools (http://keckgeology.org/), Princeton University, and other institutions have been recognized for their senior capstone experiences by U.S. News & World Report.

  3. NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Science and Technology for Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Greg; Bailey, Brad; Gibbs, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is a virtual institute focused on research at the intersection of science and exploration, training the next generation of lunar scientists, and development and support of the international community. As part of its mission, SSERVI acts as a hub for opportunities that engage the larger scientific and exploration communities in order to form new interdisciplinary, research-focused collaborations. The nine domestic SSERVI teams that comprise the U.S. complement of the Institute engage with the international science and exploration communities through workshops, conferences, online seminars and classes, student exchange programs and internships. SSERVI represents a close collaboration between science, technology and exploration enabling a deeper, integrated understanding of the Moon and other airless bodies as human exploration moves beyond low Earth orbit. SSERVI centers on the scientific aspects of exploration as they pertain to the Moon, Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and the moons of Mars, with additional aspects of related technology development, including a major focus on human exploration-enabling efforts such as resolving Strategic Knowledge Gaps (SKGs). The Institute focuses on interdisciplinary, exploration-related science focused on airless bodies targeted as potential human destinations. Areas of study represent the broad spectrum of lunar, NEA, and Martian moon sciences encompassing investigations of the surface, interior, exosphere, and near-space environments as well as science uniquely enabled from these bodies. This research profile integrates investigations of plasma physics, geology/geochemistry, technology integration, solar system origins/evolution, regolith geotechnical properties, analogues, volatiles, ISRU and exploration potential of the target bodies. New opportunities for both domestic and international partnerships are continually generated through these research and

  4. Mentoring in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shiria Banu, Fatema Zehra Juma, Tamkin Abas Manchester Medical School, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK  We read the paper by Al Qahtani1 with great interest and agree that mentoring is an important educational tool. As medical students from the University of Manchester who have been exposed to various mentoring schemes, we have experienced some of the benefits mentioned in this article. We found that the mentoring schemes provided us with a valuable support system, enhanced our professional and social development, and opened doors for networking. We have primarily been involved in two different types of mentoring schemes and feel that each has its own benefits.  View the original paper by Al Qahtani.

  5. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1989 - March 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    This annual report is a compilation of the research activities and achievement in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the fiscal year 1990 (from April 1989 through March 1990). Efforts at the NIRS are particularly aimed at three long term projects: 'risk due to low level radiation exposure to the general population', 'assessment of radiation exposure of the public to radioactivities as related to the environment', and 'food chain and medical use of accelerated heavy ions'. The research covers a wide range of radiological sciences from molecular to environmental studies and medicine including engineering. Topics consists of physics, chemistry, bio-medical science, clinical research, and environmental sciences, covering a total of 80 titles. A list of publications by staff members, activities of research divisions, and organization chart of the NIRS are given in Appendix. (N.K.)

  6. The GLOBE Program in Alabama: A Mentoring Approach to State-wide Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G. N.

    2003-12-01

    Established in 1997, the GLOBE in Alabama (GIA) partnership has trained more than 1,000 teachers in almost 500 schools - over 25% of the total number of K-12 schools in Alabama. Over those five years, GIA has strived to achieve recognition of GLOBE as the "glue" to Alabama's new education program, the Alabama Math, Science and Technology Initiative (AMSTI). In 2003, GIA trained over 370 AMSTI K-8 teachers at two AMSTI hub sites in north Alabama. As the AMSTI program grows with the addition of future hub sites (eleven are planned), GIA must ready itself to train thousands of AMSTI teachers during the two-week summer professional development institutes that are part of AMSTI. A key component of AMSTI is a mentoring program conducted by math and science specialists - classroom educators loaned to the AMSTI hub sites by the school systems each hub site serves. The AMSTI mentoring program mirrors the GIA mentoring model begun in 1999 that originally funded regional GLOBE master teachers to provide technical assistance, feedback, and coaching for other GLOBE teachers. In schools where GIA mentor teachers were working, nearly a 100% increase in GLOBE student data reporting was noted. The GIA mentors now work within the hub site framework to ensure implementation of GLOBE as an integrated part of AMSTI. With the continued support of the State of Alabama, GIA will establish a network of mentors who work with the AMSTI hub site specialists in providing support for all AMSTI teachers. GIA is administered by the National Space Science and Technology Center, a partnership between NASA and the State of Alabama's seven research universities. Operational funding for GIA has been provided by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's Earth System Science Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the Alabama Space Grant Consortium, The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, the Alabama State Department of Education, and Legacy. GIA has been able to build on these

  7. Does formal mentoring for faculty members matter? A survey of clinical faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylona, Elza; Brubaker, Linda; Williams, Valerie N; Novielli, Karen D; Lyness, Jeffrey M; Pollart, Susan M; Dandar, Valerie; Bunton, Sarah A

    2016-06-01

    Mentoring relationships, for all medical school faculty members, are an important component of lifelong development and education, yet an understanding of mentoring among medical school clinical faculty members is incomplete. This study examined associations between formal mentoring relationships and aspects of faculty members' engagement and satisfaction. It then explored the variability of these associations across subgroups of clinical faculty members to understand the status of mentoring and outcomes of mentoring relationships. The authors hypothesised that academic clinical faculty members currently in formal mentoring relationships experience enhanced employee engagement and satisfaction with their department and institution. Medical school faculty members at 26 self-selected USA institutions participated in the 2011-2014 Faculty Forward Engagement Survey. Responses from clinical faculty members were analysed for relationships between mentoring status and perceptions of engagement by faculty members. Of the 11 953 clinical faculty respondents, almost one-third reported having a formal mentoring relationship (30%; 3529). Most mentored faculty indicated the relationship was important (86%; n = 3027), and over three-fourths were satisfied with their mentoring experience (77%; n = 2722). Mentored faculty members across ranks reported significantly higher levels of satisfaction and more positive perceptions of their roles in the organisation. Faculty members who were not receiving mentoring reported significantly less satisfaction with their workplace environment and lower overall satisfaction. Mentored clinical faculty members have significantly greater satisfaction with their department and institution. This multi-institutional study provides evidence that fostering mentoring opportunities may facilitate faculty members' satisfaction and engagement, which, in turn, may help medical schools retain high-quality faculty staff committed to the multidimensional

  8. Characteristics of mentoring relationships formed by medical students and faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; von der Borch, Philip; Störmann, Sylvère; Meinel, Felix G.; Moder, Stefan; Reincke, Martin; Fischer, Martin R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the characteristics of mentoring relationships formed between faculty and medical students. Individual mentoring relationships of clinical medical students at Munich Medical School were characterized quantitatively and qualitatively. Methods All students signing up for the mentoring program responded to a questionnaire on their expectations (n = 534). Mentees were asked to give feedback after each of their one-on-one meetings (n = 203). A detailed analysis of the overall mentoring process and its characteristics was performed. For qualitative text analysis, free-text items were analyzed and categorized by two investigators. Quantitative analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon-test to assess differences in grades between students with and without mentors. Results High-performing students were significantly more likely to participate in the mentoring program (pmentors as counselors (88.9%), providers of ideas (85.0%), and role models (73.3%). Mentees emphasized the positive impact of the mentoring relationship on career planning (77.2%) and research (75.0%). Conclusions Medical students with strong academic performance as defined by their grades are more likely to participate in formal mentoring programs. Mentoring relationships between faculty and medical students are perceived as a mutually satisfying and effective instrument for key issues in medical students’ professional development. Practical implications Mentoring relationships are a highly effective means of enhancing the bidirectional flow of information between faculty and medical students. A mentoring program can thus establish a feedback loop enabling the educational institution to swiftly identify and address issues of medical students. PMID:22989620

  9. Understanding bureaucracy in health science ethics: toward a better institutional review board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Barry; Slade, Catherine; Hirsch, Paul

    2009-09-01

    Research involving human participants continues to grow dramatically, fueled by advances in medical technology, globalization of research, and financial and professional incentives. This creates increasing opportunities for ethical errors with devastating effects. The typical professional and policy response to calamities involving human participants in research is to layer on more ethical guidelines or strictures. We used a recent case-the Johns Hopkins University/Kennedy Kreiger Institute Lead Paint Study-to examine lessons learned since the Tuskegee Syphilis Study about the role of institutionalized science ethics in the protection of human participants in research. We address the role of the institutional review board as the focal point for policy attention.

  10. Evaluating virtual STEM mentoring programs: The SAGANet.org experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, S. M.; Walker, S. I.; Miller, E.; Anbar, M.; Kacar, B.; Forrester, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Many school districts within the United States continue to seek new ways of engaging students within Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. SAGANet.org, a web-based 501c3 Astrobiology outreach initiative, works with a number of schools, partnering K-12 students and their families with professional scientist mentors from around the world to teach and inspire students using virtual technology platforms. Current programs include two mentoring partnerships: pairing scientist-mentors with at-risk youth at the Pittsburg Community School in Pittsburg CA, and pairing scientist-mentors with families from the Kyrene del Cielo Elementary School in Chandler AZ. These programs represent two very different models for utilizing the virtual media platform provided by SAGANet.org to engage K-12 students and their families in STEM. For the former, scientists mentor the students of the Pittsburg School as part of the formal in-class curriculum. For the latter, scientists work with K-5 students and their families through Cielo's Science & Engineering Discovery Room to develop a science project as part of an informal learning experience that is independent of the formal curriculum. In this presentation, we (1) discuss the challenges and successes of engaging these two distinct audiences through virtual media, (2) present the results of how these two very-different mentoring partnership impact K-12 students science self-efficacy, interest in science, and STEM career awareness, and (3) share the impact of the mentoring experience on the mentor's confidence and self-efficacy with communicating science to the public.

  11. 1992 Environmental Summer Science Camp Program evaluation. The International Environmental Institute of Westinghouse Hanford Company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    This report describes the 1992 Westinghouse Hanford Company/US Department of Energy Environmental Summer Science Camp. The objective of the ``camp`` was to motivate sixth and seventh graders to pursue studies in math, science, and the environment. This objective was accomplished through hands-on fun activities while studying the present and future challenges facing our environment. The camp was funded through Technical Task Plan, 424203, from the US Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Technology Development,to Westinghouse Hanford Company`s International Environmental Institute, Education and Internship Performance Group.

  12. Relationships between academic institutions and industry in the life sciences--an industry survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, D; Causino, N; Campbell, E; Louis, K S

    1996-02-08

    Despite growing acceptance of relationships between academia and industry in the life sciences, systematic, up-to-date information about their extent and the consequences for the parties involved remains scarce. We attempted to collect information about the prevalence, magnitude, commercial benefits, and potential risks of such relationships by surveying a representative sample of life-science companies in the United States to determine their relationships with academic institutions. We collected data by telephone from May through September 1994 from senior executives of 210 life-science companies (of 306 companies surveyed; response rate, 69 percent). The sample contained all Fortune 500 companies in the fields of agriculture, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals; all international pharmaceutical companies with sales volumes similar to those of the Fortune 500 companies; and a random sample of non-Fortune 500 companies in the life sciences drawn from multiple commercial and noncommercial directories. Both the survey instrument and the survey methods resembled those of our 1984 study of 106 biotechnology companies, allowing us to assess the evolution of relationships between academia and industry over the past decade. Ninety percent of companies conducting life-science research in the United States had relationships involving the life sciences with an academic institution in 1994. Fifty-nine percent supported research in such institutions, providing an estimated $1.5 billion, or approximately 11.7 percent of all research-and-development funding received that year. The agreements with universities tended to be short-term and to involve small amounts, implying that most such relationships supported applied research or development. Over 60 percent of companies providing support for life-science research in universities had received patents, products, and sales as a result of those relationships. At the same time, the companies reported that their relationships with

  13. 77 FR 3842 - Agency Information Collection (Mentor-Protégé Program Application and Reports) Activities Under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-0723] Agency Information Collection (Mentor... will be used to institute a mentor-prot[eacute]g[eacute] program whereby large businesses agree to... developmental plan contained in the approved agreement and to report the specific actions taken by the mentor to...

  14. 76 FR 70828 - Proposed Information Collection (Mentor-Protégé Program Application and Reports) Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-0723] Proposed Information Collection (Mentor... in response to the notice. This notice solicits comments on information needed to establish a mentor... will be used to institute a mentor-prot[eacute]g[eacute] program whereby large businesses agree to...

  15. A Novel Measure of "Good" Mentoring: Testing Its Reliability and Validity in Four Academic Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pololi, Linda H; Evans, Arthur T; Civian, Janet T; Gibbs, Brian K; Gillum, Linda H; Brennan, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-recognized benefits of mentoring in academic medicine, there is a lack of clarity regarding what constitutes effective mentoring. We developed a tool to assess mentoring activities experienced by faculty and evaluated evidence for its validity. The National Initiative on Gender, Culture, and Leadership in Medicine-"C-Change"-previously developed the C-Change Faculty Survey to assess the culture of academic medicine. After intensive review, we added six items representing six components of mentoring to the survey-receiving help with career and personal goals, learning skills, sponsorship, and resources. We tested the items in four academic health centers during 2013 to 2014. We estimated reliability of the new items and tested the correlation of the new items with a mentoring composite variable representing faculty mentoring experiences as positive, neutral, or inadequate and with other C-Change dimensions of culture. Among the 1520 responding faculty (response rate 61-63%), there was a positive association between each of the six mentoring activities and satisfaction with both the amount and quality of mentoring received. There was no difference by sex. Cronbach α coefficients ranged from 0.89 to 0.95 across subgroups of faculty (by sex, race, and principal roles). The mentoring responses were associated most closely with dimensions of Institutional Support (r = 0.58, P Mentoring scale is a valid instrument to assess mentoring. Survey results could facilitate mentoring program development and evaluation.

  16. "Having the right chemistry": a qualitative study of mentoring in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Vicki A; Palepu, Anita; Szalacha, Laura; Caswell, Cheryl; Carr, Phyllis L; Inui, Thomas

    2003-03-01

    To develop a deeper understanding of mentoring by exploring lived experiences of academic medicine faculty members. Mentoring relationships are key to developing productive careers in academic medicine, but such alliances hold a certain "mystery." Using qualitative techniques, between November 1999 and March 2000, the authors conducted individual telephone interviews of 16 faculty members about their experiences with mentoring. Interviews were taped and transcribed and authors identified major themes through multiple readings. A consensus taxonomy for classifying content evolved from comparisons of coding by four reviewers. Themes expressed by participants were studied for patterns of connection and grouped into broader categories. Almost 98% of participants identified lack of mentoring as the first (42%) or second (56%) most important factor hindering career progress in academic medicine. Finding a suitable mentor requires effort and persistence. Effective mentoring necessitates a certain chemistry for an appropriate interpersonal match. Prized mentors have "clout," knowledge, and interest in the mentees, and provide both professional and personal support. In cross-gender mentoring, maintaining clear boundaries is essential for an effective relationship. Same-gender or same-race matches between mentor and mentee were not felt to be essential. Having a mentor is critical to having a successful career in academic medicine. Mentees need to be diligent in seeking out these relationships and institutions need to encourage and value the work of mentors. Participants without formalized mentoring relationships should look to peers and colleagues for assistance in navigating the academic system.

  17. Final assessment of nursing students in clinical practice: Perspectives of nursing teachers, students and mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helminen, Kristiina; Johnson, Martin; Isoaho, Hannu; Turunen, Hannele; Tossavainen, Kerttu

    2017-12-01

    To describe the phenomenon of final assessment of the clinical practice of nursing students and to examine whether there were differences in assessments by the students and their teachers and mentors. Final assessment of students in clinical practice during their education has great importance for ensuring that enough high-quality nursing students are trained, as assessment tasks affect what the nursing student learns during the clinical practice. This study used descriptive, cross-sectional design. The population of this study comprised nursing students (n = 276) and their teachers (n = 108) in five universities of applied sciences in Finland as well as mentors (n = 225) who came from five partner hospitals. A questionnaire developed for this study contained questions about background variables as well as structured questions scored on a four-point scale, which also allowed the respondents to provide additional comments. When comparing the results related to nursing teachers' presence in the final assessment situation, it was found that teachers and mentors evaluated this as being carried out more often than nursing students suggested. Nursing students noted that fair and consistent assessment is carried out more often than nursing teachers thought. Mentors and teachers said that honest and direct criteria-based final assessment was carried out more often than nursing students evaluated. Nursing students and mentors need support from educational institutions and from nursing teachers in order to ensure the completion of a relevant assessment process. The findings of this study highlight an awareness of final assessment process. It is desirable to have a common understanding, for example, of how the assessment should be managed and what the assessment criteria are, as this will ensure a good quality process. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Liaison activities with the Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences: FY 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.; Elovich, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    The Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences is conducting a program of fundamental and applied research into the chemistry of the actinides and technetium in alkaline media such as are present in the Hanford Site underground waste storage tanks. This work is being coordinated and the results disseminated through a technical liaison maintained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The technical liaison is performing laboratory studies on plutonium chemistry in alkaline media. The activities at the Institute of Physical Chemistry and through the liaison are pursued to improve understanding of the chemical behavior of key long-lived radioactive elements under current operating and proposed tank waste processing conditions. Both activities are supported by the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program under the Office of Science and Technology of the U.S. Department of Energy

  19. Annual report of National Institute for Fusion Science. April 2011 - March 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This annual report summarizes the research activities at NIFS (the National Institute for Fusion Science) between April 2011 and March 2012. NIFS is pursuing the integration of science and technology to realize a fusion power plant. The systematization of plasma physics, and research and development of reactor relevant engineering are key elements in our strategy. NIFS has been exploiting its role as an inter-university research organization and executing a variety of excellent collaborating studies together with universities and research institutes abroad as well as in Japan. The major projects of NIFS are the Large Helical Device (LHD) Project, the Numerical Simulation Research Project, the Fusion Engineering Research Project and the Coordination Research Project. These major projects are accompanied by unique supporting research. Advanced engineering and fusion reactor design studies are strongly promoted. (J.P.N.)

  20. Annual report of National Institute for Fusion Science. April 2009 - March 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This annual report summarizes the research activities at NIFS (the National Institute for Fusion Science) between April 2009 and March 2010. NIFS is pursuing the integration of science and technology to realize a fusion power plant. The systematization of plasma physics, and research and development of reactor relevant engineering are key elements in our strategy. NIFS has been exploiting its role as an inter-university research organization and executing a variety of excellent collaborating studies together with universities and research institutes abroad as well as in Japan. The major projects of NIFS are the Large Helical Device (LHD) Project, the Numerical Simulation Research Project, the Fusion Engineering Research Project and the Coordination Research Project. These major projects are accompanied by unique supporting research. Advanced engineering and fusion reactor design studies are strongly promoted. (J.P.N.)

  1. Climate change, uncertainty, and resilient fisheries: Institutional responses through integrative science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, K.; Charles, A.; Barange, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the importance of a focus on the fundamental goals of resilience and adaptive capacity in the governance of uncertain fishery systems, particularly in the context of climate change. Climate change interacts strongly with fishery systems, and adds to the inherent uncertainty...... that understanding these aspects of fishery systems and fishery governance is valuable even in the absence of climate-induced processes of change, but that attention to climate change both reinforces the need for, and facilitates the move toward, implementation of integrative science for improved fishery governance....... and processes – to support suitable institutional responses, a broader planning perspective, and development of suitable resilience-building strategies. The paper explores how synergies between institutional change and integrative science can facilitate the development of more effective fisheries policy...

  2. Institutional repository in communication: the REPOSCOM project implemented in the digital libraries federation of communication science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Mara Soares Pinto Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the conceptualization, characterization and context of the institutional repositories (IR this paper discuss the procedures, policies and strategies delineated to the implementation of IR in a research environment. The object of discussion is the project called Reposcom - Institutional Repository of Intercom (Brazilian Society of Interdisciplinary Studies of Communication – which is part of a broader project managed by the Portcom – Information Network in Communication Sciences of Countries of Portuguese Language – and called Digital Libraries Federation in the Communication Sciences. Aiming to share the knowledge and experience acquired with the implementation of the Reposcom, this paper describes its work activities, the decisions made, the customization of the software DSpace (the technological solution and the initial results achieved with the project.

  3. Annual report of National Institute for Fusion Science. April 2012 - March 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This annual report summarizes the research activities at NIFS (the National Institute for Fusion Science) between April 2012 and March 2013. NIFS is pursuing the integration of science and technology to realize a fusion power plant. The systematization of plasma physics, and research and development of reactor relevant engineering are key elements in our strategy. NIFS has been exploiting its role as an inter-university research organization and executing a variety of excellent collaborating studies together with universities and research institutes abroad as well as in Japan. The major projects of NIFS are the Large Helical Device (LHD) Project, the Numerical Simulation Research Project, the Fusion Engineering Research Project and the Coordination Research Project. These major projects are accompanied by unique supporting research. Advanced engineering and fusion reactor design studies are strongly promoted. (J.P.N.)

  4. Science Hall of Atomic Energy in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takeo

    1979-01-01

    The Science Hall of Atomic Energy was built as a subsidiary facility of the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University. The purpose of this facility is to accept outside demands concerning the application of the research reactor. The building is a two story building, and has the floor area of 901.47 m 2 . There are an exhibition room, a library, and a big lecture room. In the exhibition room, models of the Kyoto University Research Reactor and the Kyoto University Critical Assembly are placed. Various pictures concerning the application of the reactor are on the wall. In the library, people from outside of the Institute can use various books on science. Books for boys and girls are also stocked and used for public use. At the lecture room, various kinds of meeting can be held. (Kato, T.)

  5. Steltzer Receives 2013 Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Michael N.

    2014-07-01

    Heidi Steltzer, an assistant professor at Fort Lewis College, received the 2013 Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring at the 2013 Fall Meeting. This award "recognizes women in AGU who have sustained an active research career in a field related to biogeosciences, while excelling in teaching and especially in mentoring young scientists." Awardees are to serve as critical role models for the next generation of female scientists by sharing their passion for the natural world. Those who know her best agree that Heidi's passion for teaching and training the next generation of researchers truly embodies the spirit of the Sulzman award. According to one nominator, "Heidi single-handedly pushed [her] department toward a more modern and integrated view of the biological sciences, revamping curricula in both majors' and non-majors' courses to include citizen science, cross-disciplinary investigation techniques, and thought-provoking forays into real-world/real-time problems." Another nominator commented that "Heidi has made an incredibly strong impact on the careers of countless students through both compassionate and enthusiastic mentoring, as well as leadership in institutional and programmatic efforts that foster student professional development and that provide research experiences. I think it is extraordinary that at this relatively early point in her career, she has already achieved a lasting legacy."

  6. NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Merging Science and Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Yvonne J.

    2016-10-01

    Established in 2013, through joint funding from the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is focused on science at the intersection of these two enterprises. Addressing questions of value to the human exploration program that also represent important research relevant to planetary science, SSERVI creates a bridge between HEOMD and SMD. The virtual institute model reduces travel costs, but its primary virtue is the ability to join together colleagues who bring the right expertise, techniques and tools, regardless of their physical location, to address multi-faceted problems, at a deeper level than could be achieved through the typical period of smaller research grants. In addition, collaboration across team lines and international borders fosters the creation of new knowledge, especially at the intersections of disciplines that might not otherwise overlap.SSERVI teams investigate the Moon, Near-Earth Asteroids, and the moons of Mars, addressing questions fundamental to these target bodies and their near space environments. The institute is currently composed of nine U.S. teams of 30-50 members each, distributed geographically across the United States, ten international partners, and a Central Office located at NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, CA. U.S. teams are competitively selected through peer-reviewed proposals submitted to NASA every 2-3 years, in response to a Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN). The current teams were selected under CAN-1, with funding for five years (2014-2019). A smaller, overlapping set of teams are expected to be added in 2017 in response to CAN-2, thereby providing continuity and a firm foundation for any directional changes NASA requires as the CAN-1 teams end their term. This poster describes the research areas and composition of the institute to introduce SSERVI to the broader planetary

  7. NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Merging Science and Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Schmidt, G. K.; Bailey, B. E.; Minafra, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) represents a close collaboration between science, technology and exploration, and was created to enable a deeper understanding of the Moon and other airless bodies. SSERVI is supported jointly by NASA's Science Mission Directorate and Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The institute currently focuses on the scientific aspects of exploration as they pertain to the Moon, Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and the moons of Mars, but the institute goals may expand, depending on NASA's needs, in the future. The 9 initial teams, selected in late 2013 and funded from 2014-2019, have expertise across the broad spectrum of lunar, NEA, and Martian moon sciences. Their research includes various aspects of the surface, interior, exosphere, near-space environments, and dynamics of these bodies. NASA anticipates a small number of additional teams to be selected within the next two years, with a Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) likely to be released in 2016. Calls for proposals are issued every 2-3 years to allow overlap between generations of institute teams, but the intent for each team is to provide a stable base of funding for a five year period. SSERVI's mission includes acting as a bridge between several groups, joining together researchers from: 1) scientific and exploration communities, 2) multiple disciplines across a wide range of planetary sciences, and 3) domestic and international communities and partnerships. The SSERVI central office is located at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA. The administrative staff at the central office forms the organizational hub for the domestic and international teams and enables the virtual collaborative environment. Interactions with geographically dispersed teams across the U.S., and global partners, occur easily and frequently in a collaborative virtual environment. This poster will provide an overview of the 9 current US teams and

  8. Education program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology research reactor for pre-college science teachers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, G.R.; Fecych, W.; Harling, O.K.

    1989-01-01

    A Pre-College Science Teacher (PCST) Seminar program has been in place at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Nuclear Reactor Laboratory for 4 yr. The purpose of the PCST program is to educate teachers in nuclear technology and to show teachers, and through them the community, the types of activities performed at research reactors. This paper describes the background, content, and results of the MIT PCST program

  9. Polish Academy of Sciences. Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Research Report 1998-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The report presented research activities of the Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, in 1998-1999. Research interests focus on: replication, mutagenesis and repair of DNA, regulation of gene expression, biosynthesis and post-translational modifications of proteins, gene sequencing and functional gene analysis, structure and function of enzymes, conformation of proteins and peptides, modeling of structures and prediction of function of proteins.

  10. Stimulating translational research: several European life science institutions put their heads together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentires-Alj, Mohamed; Rajan, Abinaya; van Harten, Wim; van Luenen, Henri G A M; Kubicek, Stefan; Andersen, Jesper B; Saarela, Janna; Cook, Simon J; Van Minnebruggen, Geert; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Maurer, Cornelia; Erler, Janine T; Bertero, Michela G

    2015-09-01

    Translational research leaves no-one indifferent and everyone expects a particular benefit. We as EU-LIFE (www.eu-life.eu), an alliance of 13 research institutes in European life sciences, would like to share our experience in an attempt to identify measures to promote translational research without undermining basic exploratory research and academic freedom. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Polish Academy of Sciences. Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Research Report 1998-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The report presented research activities of the Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, in 1998-1999. Research interests focus on: replication, mutagenesis and repair of DNA, regulation of gene expression, biosynthesis and post-translational modifications of proteins, gene sequencing and functional gene analysis, structure and function of enzymes, conformation of proteins and peptides, modeling of structures and prediction of function of proteins

  12. The compact AMS facility at Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Sanyuan; Ding, Ping; Wang, Ning; Shen, Chengde; Jia, Guodong; Zhang, Gan

    2015-10-01

    A compact 14C AMS facility manufactured by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC) has been installed at Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (GIGCAS). The system is based on a Model 1.5SDH-1 Pelletron accelerator with a maximum terminal volt 0.6 MV. This paper reports the performance and the operation of this machine in the first several months after installation.

  13. The compact AMS facility at Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Sanyuan [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ding, Ping; Wang, Ning; Shen, Chengde [State Key Laboratory of Isotopic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Jia, Guodong [Key laboratory of Marginal Sea Geology, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhang, Gan [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2015-10-15

    A compact {sup 14}C AMS facility manufactured by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC) has been installed at Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (GIGCAS). The system is based on a Model 1.5SDH-1 Pelletron accelerator with a maximum terminal volt 0.6 MV. This paper reports the performance and the operation of this machine in the first several months after installation.

  14. First 3 years of operation of RIACS (Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science) (1983-1985)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    The focus of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) is to explore matches between advanced computing architectures and the processes of scientific research. An architecture evaluation of the MIT static dataflow machine, specification of a graphical language for expressing distributed computations, and specification of an expert system for aiding in grid generation for two-dimensional flow problems was initiated. Research projects for 1984 and 1985 are summarized.

  15. Difficulties of Turkish Science Gifted Teachers: Institutions of Science and Art Centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Küçük

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the fundamental problems of science gifted teachers (SG/Ts who teach Turkish gifted children (G/C and compare it with the international milieu. Turkish G/C are taught in different educational contexts named “Science and Art Centers” (SACs in which better opportunities are presented for them. In this project, field observations were done at three of the SACs in Turkey - in Bayburt, Sinop, and Trabzon - and, semi-structured interviews were conducted with each of ten SG/Ts who work in these centers by one of the researchers. Data analysis showed that SG/Ts do not perceive their duties holistically and feel they need help with measurement and assessment techniques, modern learning theories, planning and implementation of a research project, questioning techniques and using laboratory-based methods for G/C. Moving from the research data, it is suggested that in service education courses, which include the above issues, should be organized for the SG/Ts and they should be encouraged to use an action research approach in teaching G/C in SACs.

  16. Section 7033 of the America COMPETES Act: Hispanic-Serving Institutions and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    On March 1, 2009 from 2 pm to 5 pm at the Madison Hotel in Washington, DC, the National Science Foundation hosted a listening session, requesting input on Section 7033 of the America COMPETES (Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science) Act regarding Hispanic-serving institutions and science,…

  17. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science, April 1996 - March 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This report presents a brief summary of the research activities and the achievements in the Institute for the fiscal year of 1996. The clinical trial of cancer therapy using heavy ion beams have been progressed with promising results. Various kinds of basic studies using the heavy ion beams have been performed in an open use system and remarkable outcomes have been derived from many collaborative researchers. The reported topics extended over several categories including physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, radiopharmacy and environmental science. As another important role of the Institute, training of personnels who are being engaged in and willing to come into the radiation-related fields such as radiation protection, nursing, emergency measures, biomedicine, etc. was carried out. This report presents a total of 91 abstracts of researches made in the institute and the list of publications in the fiscal year of 1996. (M.N.)

  18. Broadening Participation: Mentoring Community College Students in a Geoscience REU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M.; Osborn, J.

    2015-12-01

    Increasingly, REUs are recruiting from community colleges as a means of broadening participation of underrepresented minorities, women, and low-income students in STEM. As inclusion of community college students becomes normalized, defining the role of science faculty and preparing them to serve as mentors to community college students is a key component of well-designed programs. This session will present empirical research regarding faculty mentoring in the first two years of an NSF-REU grant to support community college students in a university's earth and environmental science labs. Given the documented benefits of undergraduate research on students' integration into the scientific community and their career trajectory in STEM, the focus of the investigation has been on the processes and impact of mentoring community college STEM researchers at a university serving a more traditionally privileged population; the degree to which the mentoring relationships have addressed community college students needs including their emotional, cultural and resource needs; and gaps in mentor training and the mentoring relationship identified by mentors and students.

  19. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1988 - March 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    The Annual Report of April 1988 - March 1989 provides the information on up-to-date research activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan. Researches undertaken in the NIRS aim at promoting medical application of radiation and at investigating health effects of radiation and radiation protection. The research scope is therefore widely ranging from physics to genetics and from environmental science to clinical medicine. In addition to basic researches carried out by 14 research divisions. This volume is divided into the following scientific categories for ease of reader's understanding: physics, chemistry, biochemistry and biophysics, cell biology, immunology and hematology, pathology and physiology, genetics, clinical research, and environmental science, covering a total of 84 titles. Activities of each research division and organization of the NIRS are given in appendix. (J.P.N.)

  20. Overview of graduate training program of John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryi, Andrei

    The John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science is a center of excellence in the UK for advanced and novel accelerator technology, providing expertise, research, development and training in accelerator techniques, and promoting advanced accelerator applications in science and society. We work in JAI on design of novel light sources upgrades of 3-rd generation and novel FELs, on plasma acceleration and its application to industrial and medical fields, on novel energy recovery compact linacs and advanced beam diagnostics, and many other projects. The JAI is based on three universities - University of Oxford, Imperial College London and Royal Holloway University of London. Every year 6 to 10 accelerators science experts, trained via research on cutting edge projects, defend their PhD thesis in JAI partner universities. In this presentation we will overview the research and in particular the highly successful graduate training program in JAI.

  1. Public science policy and administration. [cooperation of government industry, foundations, and educational institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, A. H. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    Science, the overwhelming concern of our time, is no longer a matter of private research and development but one of public policy and administration, in which government, industry, foundations, and educational institutions must all work together as never before. Few other single tasks are of such decisive importance to the collective and individual welfare of American citizens as the formulation of public science policy and the administration of scientific programs. Eleven national authorities of varied background in science, education, and government administration contribute their experience and their judgment in an effort to deal with the major aspects of the subject. Their focus is on the meeting of actual problems; they consider the decision making process in both public and public-private organizations. Topics are grouped in three general categories: personnel needs and resources, organizational problems and techniques, and the administrative role in policy leadership.

  2. Summary of researches being performed in the Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science on computer science and information technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artiom Alhazov

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of the informatization notion (which assumes automation of majority of human activities applying computers, computer networks, information technologies towards the notion of {\\it Global Information Society} (GIS challenges the determination of new paradigms of society: automation and intellectualization of production, new level of education and teaching, formation of new styles of work, active participation in decision making, etc. To assure transition to GIS for any society, including that from Republic of Moldova, requires both special training and broad application of progressive technologies and information systems. Methodological aspects concerning impact of GIS creation over the citizen, economic unit, national economy in the aggregate demands a profound study. Without systematic approach to these aspects the GIS creation would have confront great difficulties. Collective of researchers from the Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science (IMCS of Academy of Sciences of Moldova, which work in the field of computer science, constitutes the center of advanced researches and activates in those directions of researches of computer science which facilitate technologies and applications without of which the development of GIS cannot be assured.

  3. Equity in Elementary Science Education: A Study of Institutional and Policy Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Kathryn N.

    Despite recognition that the foundation for interest in science is laid down at the elementary level (Tai, et al., 2006), in the last ten years elementary science instruction time has declined in K-6 schooling (Center on Education Policy, 2007). A lack of access to excellent science education is exacerbated for low-income students, prompting significant questions regarding inequities within the science education pipeline (Maulucci, 2010). The critical factors needed to address these inequities include teacher preparation, access to resources, and instructional leadership, as well as a supportive policy and institutional milieu. However, although the former three have been studied extensively, the role of policy and institutions in creating the conditions for equity in science education are little understood despite their likely significant role (Lemke, 2001). This mixed methods study addressed this gap by examining the role the policy and institutional milieu play in constraining or supporting equitable elementary science education. Institutional theory provides the framework for understanding how various institutional logics and regulatory pressures permeate schools and districts across contexts, influencing science education implementation (Scott, 2014). Two distinct approaches were used to first quantitatively examine the predictors of differentiation in elementary science education instructional time and methods, and second qualitatively analyze the nature and process by which these mechanisms exert influence. Data for the first two papers was derived from a case study of a purposively sampled district, including surveys of 200 teachers and embedded case studies of four schools. Analysis consisted of multi-level models of teacher attributes and school and policy factors in predicting differential distribution of science education instructional time and methods (Raudenbush & Bryk, 2002). Data for the third paper arose out of a series of principal, administrator

  4. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Medical Sciences Division report for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, F.; Poston, S.; Engle, J.

    1995-01-01

    The primary mission of the Medical Sciences Division is (1) to conduct basic and applied biomedical research on human health related to energy systems, (2) to provide technical assistance and training in occupational and environmental medicine, and (3) to make related biomedical applications available to others through technology transfer. As can be gleaned from this report, the strengths and capabilities of their staff in carrying out this mission are closely aligned with the four core competencies of ORISE: (1) occupational and environmental health, (2) environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, (3) education and training, and (4) enabling research. Brief descriptions of the various scientific and technical programs and their progress, as well as the staff responsible for the accomplishments made during 1994, are presented in this report. Research programs include the following: biochemistry; cytogenetics; Center for Epidemiologic Research; Center for Human Reliability Studies; occupational medicine; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiation Internal Dose Information Center

  5. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Medical Sciences Division report for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, F.; Poston, S.; Engle, J. [eds.

    1995-08-01

    The primary mission of the Medical Sciences Division is (1) to conduct basic and applied biomedical research on human health related to energy systems, (2) to provide technical assistance and training in occupational and environmental medicine, and (3) to make related biomedical applications available to others through technology transfer. As can be gleaned from this report, the strengths and capabilities of their staff in carrying out this mission are closely aligned with the four core competencies of ORISE: (1) occupational and environmental health, (2) environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, (3) education and training, and (4) enabling research. Brief descriptions of the various scientific and technical programs and their progress, as well as the staff responsible for the accomplishments made during 1994, are presented in this report. Research programs include the following: biochemistry; cytogenetics; Center for Epidemiologic Research; Center for Human Reliability Studies; occupational medicine; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiation Internal Dose Information Center.

  6. Capturing mentor teachers’ reflective moments during mentoring dialogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crasborn, F.J.A.J.; Hennissen, P.P.M.; Brouwer, C.N.; Korthagen, F.A.J.; Bergen, T.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of the current study is to capture differential frequencies of mentor teachers' reflective moments, as indicators of different levels of consciousness in mentor teachers' use and acquisition of supervisory skills during mentoring dialogues. For each of the 30 participants, two

  7. Mentors' Perspectives on the Effectiveness of a Teacher Mentoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tant-Tierce, Tabatha

    2013-01-01

    Teacher retention is an issue in education, and the loss of teachers has a direct affect on student achievement. Schools are battling the attrition of beginning teachers by the use of mentoring programs. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a mentoring program, according to teachers who have served as mentors,…

  8. Mentoring Human Performance - 12480

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geis, John A.; Haugen, Christian N. [CALIBRE Systems, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Although the positive effects of implementing a human performance approach to operations can be hard to quantify, many organizations and industry areas are finding tangible benefits to such a program. Recently, a unique mentoring program was established and implemented focusing on improving the performance of managers, supervisors, and work crews, using the principles of Human Performance Improvement (HPI). The goal of this mentoring was to affect behaviors and habits that reliably implement the principles of HPI to ensure continuous improvement in implementation of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) within a Conduct of Operations framework. Mentors engaged with personnel in a one-on-one, or one-on-many dialogue, which focused on what behaviors were observed, what factors underlie the behaviors, and what changes in behavior could prevent errors or events, and improve performance. A senior management sponsor was essential to gain broad management support. A clear charter and management plan describing the goals, objectives, methodology, and expected outcomes was established. Mentors were carefully selected with senior management endorsement. Mentors were assigned to projects and work teams based on the following three criteria: 1) knowledge of the work scope; 2) experience in similar project areas; and 3) perceived level of trust they would have with project management, supervision, and work teams. This program was restructured significantly when the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) and the associated funding came to an end. The program was restructured based on an understanding of the observations, attributed successes and identified shortfalls, and the consolidation of those lessons. Mentoring the application of proven methods for improving human performance was shown effective at increasing success in day-to-day activities and increasing confidence and level of skill of supervisors. While mentoring program effectiveness is difficult to

  9. Training trainers in health and human rights: implementing curriculum change in South African health sciences institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Elena G; Baldwin-Ragaven, Laurel; London, Leslie

    2011-07-25

    The complicity of the South African health sector in apartheid and the international relevance of human rights as a professional obligation prompted moves to include human rights competencies in the curricula of health professionals in South Africa. A Train-the-Trainers course in Health and Human Rights was established in 1998 to equip faculty members from health sciences institutions nationwide with the necessary skills, attitudes and knowledge to teach human rights to their students. This study followed up participants to determine the extent of curriculum implementation, support needed as well as barriers encountered in integrating human rights into health sciences teaching and learning. A survey including both quantitative and qualitative components was distributed in 2007 to past course participants from 1998-2006 via telephone, fax and electronic communication. Out of 162 past participants, 46 (28%) completed the survey, the majority of whom were still employed in academic settings (67%). Twenty-two respondents (48%) implemented a total of 33 formal human rights courses into the curricula at their institutions. Respondents were nine times more likely (relative risk 9.26; 95% CI 5.14-16.66) to implement human rights education after completing the training. Seventy-two extracurricular activities were offered by 21 respondents, many of whom had successfully implemented formal curricula. Enabling factors for implementation included: prior teaching experience in human rights, general institutional support and the presence of allies - most commonly coworkers as well as deans. Frequently cited barriers to implementation included: budget restrictions, time constraints and perceived apathy of colleagues or students. Overall, respondents noted personal enrichment and optimism in teaching human rights. This Train-the-Trainer course provides the historical context, educational tools, and collective motivation to incorporate human rights educational initiatives at health

  10. Training Trainers in health and human rights: Implementing curriculum change in South African health sciences institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin-Ragaven Laurel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complicity of the South African health sector in apartheid and the international relevance of human rights as a professional obligation prompted moves to include human rights competencies in the curricula of health professionals in South Africa. A Train-the-Trainers course in Health and Human Rights was established in 1998 to equip faculty members from health sciences institutions nationwide with the necessary skills, attitudes and knowledge to teach human rights to their students. This study followed up participants to determine the extent of curriculum implementation, support needed as well as barriers encountered in integrating human rights into health sciences teaching and learning. Methods A survey including both quantitative and qualitative components was distributed in 2007 to past course participants from 1998-2006 via telephone, fax and electronic communication. Results Out of 162 past participants, 46 (28% completed the survey, the majority of whom were still employed in academic settings (67%. Twenty-two respondents (48% implemented a total of 33 formal human rights courses into the curricula at their institutions. Respondents were nine times more likely (relative risk 9.26; 95% CI 5.14-16.66 to implement human rights education after completing the training. Seventy-two extracurricular activities were offered by 21 respondents, many of whom had successfully implemented formal curricula. Enabling factors for implementation included: prior teaching experience in human rights, general institutional support and the presence of allies - most commonly coworkers as well as deans. Frequently cited barriers to implementation included: budget restrictions, time constraints and perceived apathy of colleagues or students. Overall, respondents noted personal enrichment and optimism in teaching human rights. Conclusion This Train-the-Trainer course provides the historical context, educational tools, and collective motivation

  11. Strategies for Mentoring Pedagogical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental for mentoring a preservice teacher is the mentor's articulation of pedagogical knowledge, which in this research draws upon specific practices, viz.: planning, timetabling lessons, preparation, teaching strategies, content knowledge, problem solving, questioning, classroom management, implementation, assessment and viewpoints for…

  12. Inequality in societies, academic institutions and science journals: Gini and k-indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Asim; Chattopadhyay, Nachiketa; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2014-09-01

    Social inequality is traditionally measured by the Gini-index (g). The g-index takes values from 0 to 1 where g=0 represents complete equality and g=1 represents complete inequality. Most of the estimates of the income or wealth data indicate the g value to be widely dispersed across the countries of the world: g values typically range from 0.30 to 0.65 at a particular time (year). We estimated similarly the Gini-index for the citations earned by the yearly publications of various academic institutions and the science journals. The ISI web of science data suggests remarkably strong inequality and universality (g=0.70±0.07) across all the universities and institutions of the world, while for the journals we find g=0.65±0.15 for any typical year. We define a new inequality measure, namely the k-index, saying that the cumulative income or citations of (1-k) fraction of people or papers exceed those earned by the fraction (k) of the people or publications respectively. We find, while the k-index value for income ranges from 0.60 to 0.75 for income distributions across the world, it has a value around 0.75±0.05 for different universities and institutions across the world and around 0.77±0.10 for the science journals. Apart from above indices, we also analyze the same institution and journal citation data by measuring Pietra index and median index.

  13. John Archibald Wheeler: A study of mentoring in modern physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Terry M.

    This dissertation has two objectives. The first objective is to determine where best to situate the study of mentoring (i.e. the 'making of scientists') on the landscape of the history of science and science studies. This task is accomplished by establishing mentoring studies as a link between the robust body of literature dealing with Research Schools and the emerging scholarship surrounding the development, dispersion, and evolution of pedagogy in the training of twentieth century physicists. The second, and perhaps more significant and novel objective, is to develop a means to quantitatively assess the mentoring workmanship of scientific craftsmen who preside over the final stages of preparation when apprentices are transformed into professional scientists. The project builds upon a 2006 Master's Thesis that examined John Archibald Wheeler's work as a mentor of theoretical physicists at Princeton University in the years 1938--1976. It includes Wheeler's work as a mentor at the University of Texas and is qualitatively and quantitatively enhanced by virtue of the author having access to five separate collections with archival holdings of John Wheeler's papers and correspondence, as well as having access to thirty one tape recorded interviews that feature John Wheeler as either the interviewee or a prominent subject of discussion. The project also benefited from the opportunity to meet with and gather background information from a number of John Wheeler's former colleagues and students. Included in the dissertation is a content analysis of the acknowledgements in 949 Ph.D. dissertations, 122 Master's Theses, and 670 Senior Theses that were submitted during Wheeler's career as an active mentor. By establishing a census of the students of the most active mentors at Princeton and Texas, it is possible to tabulate the publication record of these apprentice groups and obtain objective measures of mentoring efficacy. The dissertation concludes by discussing the wider

  14. Virtual Mentoring of Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe music teachers' perceptions of the benefits and challenges they experienced as virtual mentors of preservice music teachers. Each mentor was assigned a cohort of preservice teachers who were enrolled in an elementary general music methods course. Cohorts observed their mentor's teaching via Skype. Mentors…

  15. Liaison activities with the Institute of Physical Chemistry/Russian Academy of Science Fiscal Year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    Investigations into the chemistry of alkaline Hanford Site tank waste (TTP RL4-3-20-04) were conducted in Fiscal Year 1995 at Westinghouse Hanford Company under the support of the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (EM-53). The investigation had two main subtasks: liaison with the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Science and further laboratory testing of the chemistry of thermal reconstitution of Hanford Site tank waste. Progress, which was achieved in the liaison subtask during Fiscal Year 1995, is summarized as follows: (1) A technical dialogue has been established with Institute scientists. (2) Editing was done on a technical literature review on the chemistry of transuranic elements and technetium in alkaline media written by researchers at the Institute. The report was issued in May 1995 as a Westinghouse Hanford Company document. (3) Four tasks from the Institute were selected for support by the U.S. Department of Energy. Work on three tasks commenced on 1 March 1995; the fourth task commenced on 1 April 1995. (4) Technical information describing the composition of Hanford Site tank waste was supplied to the Institute. (5) A program review of the four tasks was conducted at the Institute during a visit 25 August to 1 September, 1995. A lecture on the origin, composition, and proposed treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes was presented during this visit. Eight additional tasks were proposed by Institute scientists for support in Fiscal Year 1996. (6) A paper was presented at the Fifth International Conference on Radioactive Waste Management and Environmental Remediation (ICEM'95) in Berlin, Germany on 3 to 9 September, 1995 on the solubility of actinides in alkaline media

  16. SMART social science? Examining the nature and role of social scientific expertise in institutional design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan C. Tait

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Bromley argues against Oran Young's FIT model as a basis for environmental governance, on the grounds that humans cannot manage nature and that attempts to do so are based on a scientistic, modernist conceit. At issue is the role of natural and social scientists in adjudicating questions about what we ought to do to close governance gaps and address unsustainable behaviors. If Bromley is right, then the lessons of the American pragmatist tradition recommend against attempts to "fit" social institutions to the natural world. The first objective of this paper is to argue that Bromley's view is not in keeping with the pragmatism of C. S. Peirce and John Dewey, which actually places a high value on natural and social scientific modes of inquiry in the service of social ends. I argue that Young's proposal is in fact a development of the pragmatist idea that social institutions must be fit in the sense of fitness, i.e., resilient and able to navigate uncertainty. Social institutions must also evolve to accommodate the emerging values of the agents who operate within them. The second objective of this paper is to examine the role of social science expertise in the design of social policies. Governance institutions typically rely on the testimony of natural scientists, at least in part, to understand the natural systems they operate within. However, natural systems are also social systems, so it seems pertinent to ask whether there is a role for social systems experts to play in helping to design environmental governance institutions. I argue that social scientists can make a unique contribution as experts on social institutions, and as such, are necessary to bring about a transformation of the unsustainable institutions that are preventing us from achieving stated sustainable development goals.

  17. Mentoring in mathematics education

    CERN Document Server

    Hyde, Rosalyn

    2013-01-01

    Designed to support both teachers and university-based tutors in mentoring pre-service and newly qualified mathematics teachers at both primary and secondary levels, Mentoring Mathematics Teachers offers straightforward practical advice that is based on practice, underpinned by research, and geared specifically towards this challenging subject area.Developed by members of The Association of Mathematics Education Teachers, the authors draw upon the most up-to-date research and theory to provide evidence-based practical guidance. Themes covered include:

  18. Integration, mentoring & networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Lotte

    KVINFOs mentornetværk har siden 2003 anvendt mentoring og networking med det formål at åbne døre til det danske samfund og arbejdsmarked for kvinder med indvandrer-/flygtningebaggrund. I mentoringdelen matches kvinder med flygtninge- og indvandrerbaggrund (mentees) med kvinder, som er solidt...... KVINFOs mentornetværk, at indsamle og analysere disses erfaringer med at indgå i netværket samt opnå større viden om mentoring og networking som integrationsfremmende metoder....

  19. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science, April 1994 -March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    This annual report summarizes briefly the research activities and the achievement in the Institute for fiscal year of 1994 (from April 1994 to March 1995). As the middle of this period, commissioning of the new clinical trial of cancer treatment was successfully started using heavy ion beams of the HIMAC (heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba) which was completed at the end of fiscal year 1993. At the same time, various kinds of basic research projects using the same heavy ion beams were also begun in an open use system available to many facilities outside the Institute. The Institute is covering a very wide area of comprehensive radiological sciences from molecular biology to environmental studies and radiation medicine including physics and engineering related to therapy and diagnosis. Therefore, the collected topics have been classified into several categories from physics to environmental science. The appendix of this report includes recent publication in each area, list of keywords, author, index, and organization and staff. (M.N.)

  20. Annual report of National Institute for Fusion Science. April 2013 - March 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This annual report summarizes achievements from research activities at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) between April 2013 and March 2014. NIFS is an inter-university research organization and conducts open collaboration research under three frameworks which are the General Collaboration Research, the Large Helical Device Collaboration Research and the Bilateral Collaboration Research. More than 500 collaborating studies were implemented during the covered period. About 2,400 collaborators studies were implemented during the covered period. About 2,400 collaborators participated in joint research from 220 external institutions. Many intensively advanced results in plasma physics, fusion science and related fields have been obtained from these studies. Not only NIFS, but also 6 university centers serve as joint research laboratories/centers under bilateral collaboration research. NIFS also organizes diversified frameworks for international collaboration through 6 bilateral agreements, 3 multi-lateral agreements and academic exchange agreements with 18 institutes abroad for the global development of the function of inter-university research organization. (J.P.N.)

  1. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science, April 1994 - March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This annual report summarizes briefly the research activities and the achievement in the Institute for fiscal year of 1994 (from April 1994 to March 1995). As the middle of this period, commissioning of the new clinical trial of cancer treatment was successfully started using heavy ion beams of the HIMAC (heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba) which was completed at the end of fiscal year 1993. At the same time, various kinds of basic research projects using the same heavy ion beams were also begun in an open use system available to many facilities outside the Institute. The Institute is covering a very wide area of comprehensive radiological sciences from molecular biology to environmental studies and radiation medicine including physics and engineering related to therapy and diagnosis. Therefore, the collected topics have been classified into several categories from physics to environmental science. The appendix of this report includes recent publication in each area, list of keywords, author, index, and organization and staff. (M.N.)

  2. Transformational mentoring: Leadership behaviors of spinal cord injury peer mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Robert B; McBride, Christopher B; Casemore, Sheila; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the leadership behaviors of spinal cord injury (SCI) peer mentors and examine whether behaviors of peer mentors align with the tenets of transformational leadership theory. A total of 12 SCI peer mentors aged 28-75 (M = 49.4) who had between 3 and 56 years (M = 13.9) of mentoring experience were recruited for the study. Utilizing a qualitative methodology (informed by a social constructionist approach), each mentor engaged in a semistructured interview about their experiences as a peer mentor. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and subjected to a directed content analysis. SCI peer mentors reported using mentorship behaviors and engaging with mentees in a manner that closely aligns with the core components of transformational leadership theory: idealized influence, inspirational motivation, individualized consideration, and intellectual stimulation. A new subcomponent of inspirational motivation described as 'active promotion of achievement' was also identified and may be unique to the context of peer mentorship. SCI peer mentors inherently use behaviors associated with transformational leadership theory when interacting with mentees. The results from this study have the potential to inform SCI peer mentor training programs about specific leadership behaviors that mentors could be taught to use and could lead to more effective mentoring practices for people with SCI. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. DYSFUNCTION OF MODERN RUSSIAN INSTITUTES OF STATE AWARDS IN THE SPHERE OF EDUCATION AND SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey V. Ruchkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to analyze the main dysfunctions of the Russian premium institutes in the field of education and science, and to find out its leveling instruments, by examining the experience of foreign countries; to identify the basic requirements for the novitiate for state awards to employees of education and science in modern Russia in comparison with foreign countries. Methods. Neo institutional approach is used by the author. Methods involve comparative analysis, cross-national analysis, and classification. The original solution of tasks associated with the use of a single system-approach to the sociological study of state awards in the sphere of education and science, is extrapolated from institutional economics. Results. The basic approaches to the determination of the nature and functions of awards institutions in the field of education and science are considered; its relationship with other social, economic and political trends of contemporary politics in Russia is noted. The basic conditions of non-material motivation of workers of scientifically-educational area in modern Russia in comparison with other countries, including the post-Soviet territory states are defined. Both officially established rules and other requirements to candidates on reception of the state honourable distinctions, observed with the Soviet period are considered. The study identifies the main factors that influence the perception of the role of changes in modern society awards, offers solutions to the identified problems. Scientific novelty. The critical analysis of working rules of the Russian legislation regulating an order (procedures of rewarding has allowed to reveal major disadvantages of the Russian institute of the state awards: opacity of estimated judgements considering the work of the applicant for the award; absence of accurate hierarchy of the state awards and quantity indicators at measurement of merits and results of activity

  4. [MENTORING IN NURSING, A PHENOMENOLOGICAL APPROACH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuna Torres, Blanca Herlinda; González Rendón, M C E Cristina

    2014-11-01

    The essay explains that mentoring, originally established to improve student trajectories, reflects a deeper improvement of the people involved in the process. The method used is the analysis of the mentoring experience from participant observation and phenomenology of lived processes. The results reveal that the early analysis of risk factors present in academics--socio-psychological, family and institutional matters, that may affect the student experience in its passage through the academic unit--, requires the intervention of a preventive nature and monitoring operating variables. In addition, tutoring is a teaching experience which is consolidated with the daily life from the human relationship established between the mentor and the mentee, from the position of the older adult and experience is a state meet demand related care. However, in the tutorial process face to face, usually with academic aspects, therefore, the teaching function is fulfilled but operated in particular. By helping to find meaning to knowledge not understood, this function is still performed if tutors pairs learn to know each other that occasionally is the mirror which reflects the own story. While they are recognizing the problems of the mentee, the mentor will exorcise his ghosts. Therefore, we argue that, although originally born tutoring to abate dropout rates, failure and increase retention and degree, over time, has become a process of improving people.

  5. Mentoring and diversity tips for students and professionals for developing and maintaining a diverse scientific community

    CERN Document Server

    Landefeld, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Mentoring has always been an important factor in life and particularly in academia. In fact, making choices about educational pursuits and subsequent careers without input from mentors can prove disastrous. Fortunately, many individuals have “natural” mentors and for them these choices are greatly facilitated. Others are not privileged with natural mentors and as such often struggle with making these tough choices. Many times these individuals are from under served and disadvantaged backgrounds, where mentors are too few and far between. For them, deciding on which career path to take can be based not only on insufficient information but oft times on inaccurate information. Although the tips in this monograph are designed for helping all individuals who are interested in pursuing the study of science and science careers, a special mentoring focus is on those students who have not experienced the advantages of the privileged class. Additionally, tips are included for those who are interested in effectively...

  6. Mentoring Experiences of Aging and Disability Rehabilitation Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Egan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To explore research mentoring experiences and perceived mentoring needs of aging and disability researchers at different career stages. Design. Focus group and individual interviews with rehabilitation researchers at various career stages based in hospitals, universities, and hospital-based research institutes in Ontario, Canada. Results. The overall theme was mentoring for transition. Participants across career stages referred to helpful mentoring experiences as those that assisted them to move from their previous stage into the present stage or from the present stage into their next career progression. Unhelpful mentoring experiences were characterized by mentor actions that were potentially detrimental to transition. Subsumed under this theme were three categories. The first, “hidden information” referred to practical information that was difficult to access. The second “delicate issues” referred to helping the participant work through issues related to sensitive matters, the discussion of which could put the participants or their colleagues in a vulnerable position. The third category was “special challenges of clinician-researchers”. Conclusions. Helpful mentoring for rehabilitation researchers working on concerns related to aging and disability appears to be characterized by interaction with more experienced individuals who aid the researcher work through issues related to career transition.

  7. The Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute at Texas A&M University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio A. Gariazzo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute (NSSPI is a multidisciplinary organization at Texas A&M University and was the first U.S. academic institution focused on technical graduate education, research, and service related to the safeguarding of nuclear materials and the reduction of nuclear threats. NSSPI employs science, engineering, and policy expertise to: (1 conduct research and development to help detect, prevent, and reverse nuclear and radiological proliferation and guard against nuclear terrorism; (2 educate the next generation of nuclear security and nuclear nonproliferation leaders; (3 analyze the interrelationships between policy and technology in the field of nuclear security; and (4 serve as a public resource for knowledge and skills to reduce nuclear threats. Since 2006, over 31 Doctoral and 73 Master degrees were awarded through NSSPI-sponsored research. Forty-one of those degrees are Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering with a specialization in Nuclear Nonproliferation and 16 were Doctorate of Philosophy degrees with a specific focus on nuclear nonproliferation. Over 200 students from both technical and policy backgrounds have taken classes provided by NSSPI at Texas A&M. The model for creating safeguards and security experts, which has in large part been replicated worldwide, was established at Texas A&M by NSSPI faculty and staff. In addition to conventional classroom lectures, NSSPI faculty have provided practical experiences; advised students on valuable research projects that have contributed substantially to the overall nuclear nonproliferation, safeguards and security arenas; and engaged several similar academic and research institutes around the world in activities and research for the benefit of Texas A&M students. NSSPI has had an enormous impact on the nuclear nonproliferation workforce (across the international community in the past 8 years, and this paper is an attempt to summarize the activities

  8. The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering - a model for university-national laboratory collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammon, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the aims and activities of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE), from its foundation in 1958 through to 1993. The philosophy, structure and funding of the Institute are briefly reviewed, followed by an account of the development of national research facilities at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, with particular emphasis on nuclear techniques of analyses using neutron scattering instruments and particle accelerators. AINSE's program of Grants, fellowships and studentships are explained with many examples given of projects having significance in the context of Australia's national goals. Conference and training programs are also included. The achievements during these years demonstrate that AINSE has been an efficient and cost-effective model for collaboration between universities and a major national laboratory. In recent years, industry, government organisations and the tertiary education system have undergone major re-structuring and rationalization. A new operational structure for AINSE has evolved in response to these changes and is described

  9. [Mycology at the Institute of Microbiology, Russian Academy of Sciences: history and prospects for the future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feofilova, E P

    2004-01-01

    This review deals with the historical development of mycology at the Winogradsky Institute of Microbiology (Russian Academy of Sciences). Starting from the works of Academician G.A. Nadson, the review considers from the historical perspective the main achievements of the researchers of the Institute in the field of mycology, including such important subfields as the cytology, genetics, physiology, and biochemistry of mycelial fungi and yeast. The review concerns itself with the major theoretical ideas generated by the team of the Laboratory of Experimental Mycology in the course of their studies of micro- and macromycetes. Special attention is also given to recent developments in biotechnology and medicine, including the development of new drug preparations from biologically active substances of fungi.

  10. TOOLS OF KNOWLEDGE DISSEMINATION WITHIN A NATIONAL DEFENSE INSTITUTION FOR INNOVATION, TECHNOLOGY AND SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Aparecida de Araújo Querido Oliveira

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes and analyzes in a National Defense Institution for Innovation, Technology and Science its tools of knowledge dissemination. The methodology contemplates the period of 2004 and 2005. Qualitative and quantitative information orientate the research in order to understand focal aspects on knowledge dissemination, in comparison with theoretical references of renowned authors and other elaborated research searching for elements to perform an organizational diagnosis, focused on the knowledge dissemination as well as on the forces which promote or obstruct the organizational development. Conclusions are that the tools of knowledge dissemination must suitable to spread the tacit knowledge in such a way as the explicit ones and that, in a National Defense Institution, other important aspects must be considered, a time that, being the spread knowledge of wrong form can, besides bringing damages for the organization, to compromise the national sovereignty.

  11. Liaison activities with the Institute of Physcial Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences: Midyear report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.

    1996-01-01

    The task 'IPC/RAS Liaison and Tank Waste Testing' is a program being conducted in fiscal year (FY) 1996 with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology, EM-53 Efficient Separations and Processing (ESP) Crosscutting Program, under the technical task plan (TTP) RLA6C342. The principal investigator is Cal Delegard of the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The task involves a technical liaison with the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPC/RAS) and their DOE-supported investigations into the fundamental and applied chemistry of the transuranium elements (primarily neptunium, plutonium, and americium) and technetium in at sign ine media. The task has three purposes: 1. Providing technical information and technical direction to the IPC/RAS. 2. Disseminating IPC/RAS data and information to the DOE technical community. 3. Verifying IPC/RAS results through laboratory testing and comparison with published data

  12. Central Scientific and Research Institute of Nuclear Information as the branch centre of information on nuclear science and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhangel'skij, I.A.; Sokolov, D.D.; Kalinin, V.F.; Nikiforov, V.S.

    1982-01-01

    The main tasks are considered in the scope of the Central Scientific-Research Institute for Information and Technological and Economic Studies on Nuclear Science and Technology. (TsNIIAtominform). The institute coordinates scientific research and information activity of information agencies of all the USSR organizations engaged in nuclear science and technology, excercises a centralized completion of their libraries, develops and puts into practice the most progressive methods for the information servicing. The institute is a national INIS center of the USSR. Here a system for the automatic information dissemination has been successfully elaborated and employed. Much of the institute activity is given to the estimation and analysis of information and to the determination of tendencies in the nuclear science and technology development. A conclusion is drawn to the effect that TsNIIAtominform, within 15 years of its existence, has formed as a center ensuring functioning of the system of scientific and technical information on nuclear science and technology

  13. [A catalog of fish specimens preserved within Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Li-Na; Chen, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Jun-Xing

    2013-08-01

    As of 2013, some 178 fish type species and 2131 type specimens belonging to 4 orders and 11 families were currently being preserved at the Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology, located as art of the Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences. These specimens were collected from across western China, includingYunnan, Sicuan, Guizhou, Guangxi, Hunan, Chongqi, Gansu and Xinjiang. In general, most species are Cyprinidae (71 species and 1103 specimens), followed by Nemacheilidae (52 species and 556 specimens). For the convenience of research and communication, the present paper presents a detailed list of fish type species preserved in the Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology.

  14. Academic health sciences librarians' contributions to institutional animal care and use committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steelman, Susan C; Thomas, Sheila L

    2014-07-01

    The study gathered data about librarians' membership in institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs) and their professional activities supporting animal researchers. Libraries affiliated with medical schools that were members of the Association of American Medical Colleges were surveyed. A survey was distributed via library directors' email discussion lists and direct email messages. Sixty surveys were completed: 35 (58%) reported that librarians performed database searches for researchers, and 22 (37%) reported that a librarian currently serves on the IACUC. The survey suggests that academic health sciences librarians provide valuable, yet underutilized, services to support animal research investigators.

  15. Publications and geothermal sample library facilities of the Earth Science Laboratory, University of Utah Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Phillip M.; Ruth, Kathryn A.; Langton, David R.; Bullett, Michael J.

    1990-03-30

    The Earth Science Laboratory of the University of Utah Research Institute has been involved in research in geothermal exploration and development for the past eleven years. Our work has resulted in the publication of nearly 500 reports, which are listed in this document. Over the years, we have collected drill chip and core samples from more than 180 drill holes in geothermal areas, and most of these samples are available to others for research, exploration and similar purposes. We hope that scientists and engineers involved in industrial geothermal development will find our technology transfer and service efforts helpful.

  16. Evolution of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Osama; Makishima, Hirokazu; Kamada, Tadashi

    2018-03-06

    Charged particles can achieve better dose distribution and higher biological effectiveness compared to photon radiotherapy. Carbon ions are considered an optimal candidate for cancer treatment using particles. The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Chiba, Japan was the first radiotherapy hospital dedicated for carbon ion treatments in the world. Since its establishment in 1994, the NIRS has pioneered this therapy with more than 69 clinical trials so far, and hundreds of ancillary projects in physics and radiobiology. In this review, we will discuss the evolution of carbon ion radiotherapy at the NIRS and some of the current and future projects in the field.

  17. Networking of institutions in India to promote research and education in nuclear science and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, R.R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The Programme of Nuclear Energy and its Applications (NEA) is knowledge intensive requiring engineers and scientists having special education and training for its implementation. The paucity of manpower in managing this programme is partly due to limitations of the university system in catering to the needs of the nuclear industry. Those limitations arise due to several reasons, like, regulatory requirements which make it difficult to set up nuclear facilities in university environment, capital intensive nature of nuclear set-ups, paucity of teaching staff having hands-on experience and limited employment opportunities making nuclear option unattractive for talented youngsters. The Department of Atomic Energy of India (DAE) established in 1954 for shaping and managing the Indian NEA programme realized those limitations and opted for an in-house education and training programme leading to assured employment for young Engineering Graduates and Science Post Graduates. Called the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) Training School Programme, it is in place since 1957. The Indian NEA programme is thus fortunate to be supported by a visionary human resource development (HRD) programme in nuclear science and technology practically right since its inception. The success of HRD programme of DAE lies in its broader outlook based on the premise that technology development and basic research go hand-in-hand. This outlook is reflected also in the way DAE has been managing the implementation of its programme in that on one hand it has set up centres for technological Research and Development and, on the other, it is providing Grant-in-Aid to several Institutes for carrying basic research. Moreover, DAE has not lost sight of the fact that success of its initiatives lies as much in the vibrant university system as in its own training and educational efforts. It has, therefore, created avenues for extra-mural funding for supporting research activities in universities in

  18. Role of Institutes of Social Sciences in Enhancing the Quality of Postgraduate Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yılmaz TONBUL

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop suggestions for the management of the Institute of Social Sciences on the effective execution of postgraduate education. A ‘mixed’ design was used. Data collection tools were applied directly to student population without the use of any sampling method. For advisors, criterion sampling was used.The participants of the study were composed of 207 postgraduate students registered at the Institute of Social Sciences and 39 instructors at Ege University. The student data were collected via the Supervisor Evaluation Scale and interview guide consisting of open-ended questions. The instructor data were collected during semi-structured focus group interviews. The participants stressed the informative, supportive and instructional roles of the institute for improving the quality of graduate education. In addition, differences as well as commonalities between the expectations of the students and those of the instructors were detected. The students’ expectations from the institute were the protection of students’ rights, mediation, ensuring the diversity of elective courses, the proper teaching of the courses in accordance with the nature of graduate education, and provision of information about career, time and stress management. Besides, the instructors’ expectations included attracting qualified candidates to programs, informing students, supporting the students with cadre and scholarship, reducing bureaucratic procedures, regulating the processes of supervisor selection and thesis proposal, providing access to resources during the processes of both course work and thesis writing, and forming colloquiums. The institute’s existing structure, authority distribution, staff and budget resources were found to be inadequate for increasing the quality of postgraduate education. Regarding the course and thesis stages, one third of the supervisors were evaluated as insufficient by the students. Many suggestions related to

  19. Forensic Science Research and Development at the National Institute of Justice: Opportunities in Applied Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Gregory

    Forensic science is a collection of applied disciplines that draws from all branches of science. A key question in forensic analysis is: to what degree do a piece of evidence and a known reference sample share characteristics? Quantification of similarity, estimation of uncertainty, and determination of relevant population statistics are of current concern. A 2016 PCAST report questioned the foundational validity and the validity in practice of several forensic disciplines, including latent fingerprints, firearms comparisons and DNA mixture interpretation. One recommendation was the advancement of objective, automated comparison methods based on image analysis and machine learning. These concerns parallel the National Institute of Justice's ongoing R&D investments in applied chemistry, biology and physics. NIJ maintains a funding program spanning fundamental research with potential for forensic application to the validation of novel instruments and methods. Since 2009, NIJ has funded over 179M in external research to support the advancement of accuracy, validity and efficiency in the forensic sciences. An overview of NIJ's programs will be presented, with examples of relevant projects from fluid dynamics, 3D imaging, acoustics, and materials science.

  20. Interdisciplinary and inter-institutional differences in learning preferences among Malaysian medical and health sciences students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rebecca S Y; Siow, Heng Loke; Kumarasamy, Vinoth; Shaherah Fadhlullah Suhaimi, Nazrila

    2017-10-01

    The learner-centred approach in medical and health sciences education makes the study of learning preferences relevant and important. This study aimed to investigate the interdisciplinary, inter-institutional, gender and racial differences in the preferred learning styles among Malaysian medical and health sciences students in three Malaysian universities, namely SEGi University (SEGi), University of Malaya (UM) and Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR). It also investigated the differences in the preferred learning styles of these students between high achievers and non-high achievers. This cross-sectional study was carried out on medical and health sciences students from three Malaysian universities following the approval of the Research and Ethics Committee, SEGi University. Purposive sampling was used and the preferred learning styles were assessed using the VARK questionnaire. The questionnaire was validated prior to its use. Three disciplines (medicine, pharmacy and dentistry) were chosen based on their entry criteria and some similarities in their course structure. The three participating universities were Malaysian universities with a home-grown undergraduate entry medical program and students from a diverse cultural and socioeconomic background. The data were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software, version 22. VARK subscale scores were expressed as mean+standard deviation. Comparisons of the means were carried out using t-test or ANOVA. A p value of 0.05). This study gives an insight into the learner characteristics of more than one medical school in Malaysia. Such multi-institutional studies are lacking in the published literature and this study gives a better representation of the current situation in the learning preferences among medical students in Malaysia.