WorldWideScience

Sample records for science coordination group

  1. Coordinating Group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup

  2. Report of the Task Force for Improved Coordination of the DoD Science and Technology Program. Volume 2. Reports of the Working Groups. Working Group A: Strategic Planning. Working Group B: Program Coordination. Working Group C: Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    OperabllY 19 Technolofy Area Summaries 20 Major Technology Thrws 21 Air Force S&T Investment Summary 25 Program Objectives 28 Glcazy 30 1. D-6 TH~E...8217lRI-TAC Advrane Plannzn Sy-i Mulima Radio AWAM3 IRP JSTARS fris MmAvne Anhn ABOCC 37=6 Comb !dftica~ S~ Surance Radar Ewm EAVZ SYNC Media . R~u... Social Sciences 5001 Eisenhower Avenue Alexandria VA 22333-5600 Col. Harry G. Dangerfield Telephone: (301) 663-7443 Executive Assistant to the PEO for

  3. Coordinated Control of Vehicle Groups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kumar, Vijay

    2004-01-01

    .... There are three main objectives: (1) to develop a theoretical paradigm for formalizing the concepts of a group, a team, and control of groups, with specified tasks such as exploring, mapping, searching, and transporting objects; (2...

  4. 22 CFR 94.8 - Interagency coordinating group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interagency coordinating group. 94.8 Section 94... § 94.8 Interagency coordinating group. The U.S. Central Authority shall nominate federal employees and may, from time to time, nominate private citizens to serve on an interagency coordinating group to...

  5. Group Coordination Support in Networked Multimedia Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dommel, Hans-Peter

    1999-01-01

    .... In this dissertation, we address network control and coordination functions to orchestrate synchronous multimedia groupwork, establishing a sharing discipline on multimedia resources and guaranteeing...

  6. Animal signals and emotion in music: Coordinating affect across groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A. Bryant

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers studying the emotional impact of music have not traditionally been concerned with the principled relationship between form and function in evolved animal signals. The acoustic structure of musical forms is related in important ways to emotion perception, and thus research on nonhuman animal vocalizations is relevant for understanding emotion in music. Musical behavior occurs in cultural contexts that include many other coordinated activities which mark group identity, and can allow people to communicate within and between social alliances. The emotional impact of music might be best understood as a proximate mechanism serving an ultimately social function. Here I describe recent work that reveals intimate connections between properties of certain animal signals and evocative aspects of human music, including 1 examinations of the role of nonlinearities (e.g., broadband noise in nonhuman animal vocalizations, and the analogous production and perception of these features in human music, and 2 an analysis of group musical performances and possible relationships to nonhuman animal chorusing and emotional contagion effects. Communicative features in music are likely due primarily to evolutionary byproducts of phylogenetically older, but still intact communication systems. But in some cases, such as the coordinated rhythmic sounds produced by groups of musicians, our appreciation and emotional engagement might be due to the operation of an adaptive social signaling system. Future empirical work should examine human musical behavior through the comparative lens of behavioral ecology and an adaptationist cognitive science. By this view, particular coordinated sound combinations generated by musicians exploit evolved perceptual response biases—many shared across species—and proliferate through cultural evolutionary processes.

  7. Facilitating Group Decision-Making: Facilitator's Subjective Theories on Group Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Kolbe

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A key feature of group facilitation is motivating and coordinating people to perform their joint work. This paper focuses on group coordination which is a prerequisite to group effectiveness, especially in complex tasks. Decision-making in groups is a complex task that consequently needs to be coordinated by explicit rather than implicit coordination mechanisms. Based on the embedded definition that explicit coordination does not just happen but is purposely executed by individuals, we argue that individual coordination intentions and mechanisms should be taken into account. Thus far, the subjective perspective of coordination has been neglected in coordination theory, which is understandable given the difficulties in defining and measuring subjective aspects of group facilitation. We therefore conducted focused interviews with eight experts who either worked as senior managers or as experienced group facilitators and analysed their approaches to group coordination using methods of content analysis. Results show that these experts possess sophisticated mental representations of their coordination behaviour. These subjective coordination theories can be organised in terms of coordination schemes in which coordination-releasing situations are facilitated by special coordination mechanisms that, in turn, lead to the perception of specific consequences. We discuss the importance of these subjective coordination theories for effectively facilitating group decision-making and minimising process losses. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0901287

  8. A Novel Group Coordination Protocol for Collaborative Multimedia Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    technology have advanced considerably, ef- ficient group coordination support for applications characterized by synchronous and wide-area groupwork is...As a component within a general coordination architecture for many-to-many groupwork , floor control coexists with proto- cols for reliable ordered...multicast and media synchronization at a sub-application level. Orchestration of multiparty groupwork with fine-grained and fair floor control is an

  9. The architecture of metal coordination groups in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Marjorie M

    2004-05-01

    A set of tables is presented and a survey given of the architecture of metal coordination groups in a representative set of protein structures from the Protein Data Bank [Bernstein et al. (1977), J. Mol. Biol. 112, 535-542; Berman et al. (2000), Nucleic Acids Res. 28, 235-242]. The structures have been determined to a resolution of 2.5 A or better; the metals considered are Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Na and K, with particular emphasis on Ca and Zn and the exclusion of haem groups and Fe/S clusters; the proteins are a representative set in which none has more than 30% sequence identity with any other. In them the metal is coordinated by several donor groups from different amino-acid residues in the protein chain and often also by water or other small molecules. The tables, for approximately 600 metal coordination groups, include information on the conformations of the protein chain in the region around the metal and reliability indicators. They illustrate the wide variety of coordination numbers, chelate-loop sizes and other properties and the different characteristics of different metals. They show that glycine has a particular significance in the position adjacent to a donor residue, especially in Ca coordination groups. They also show that metal coordination does not appear to lead to significant distortions of the torsion angles phi, psi from their normally allowed values. Very few metal coordination groups occur more than once in the representative set and when they do they are usually related in fold and function; they have similar but not necessarily identical conformations. However, individual chelate loops, for example Zn(-C-X-X'-C-), in which both cysteines are coordinated to Zn through S, and X and X' are any amino acids, are repeated frequently in many different and unrelated proteins. Not all chelate loops with the same composition have the same conformation, but for smaller loops there are usually one or two strongly preferred and well defined

  10. Space Interferometry Science Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Stephen T.

    1992-12-01

    Decisions taken by the astronomy and astrophysics survey committee and the interferometry panel which lead to the formation of the Space Interferometry Science Working Group (SISWG) are outlined. The SISWG was formed by the NASA astrophysics division to provide scientific and technical input from the community in planning for space interferometry and in support of an Astrometric Interferometry Mission (AIM). The AIM program hopes to measure the positions of astronomical objects with a precision of a few millionths of an arcsecond. The SISWG science and technical teams are described and the outcomes of its first meeting are given.

  11. UK Natural Analogue Coordinating Group: fourth annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, D.; Hooker, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    HMIP has a research programme investigating some naturally radioactive sites as geochemical analogues of radionuclide migration. All of the analogue sites under investigation, both in the U.K. and overseas, are located where elevated uranium concentrations occur naturally. Coordination of the programme is achieved through the UK Natural Analogue Co-ordinating Group (NACG) which has met three times in this reporting period. The NACG is steered by the British Geological Survey. Its purpose is to ensure that the different research projects have an integrated function aimed at increasing our understanding of natural geochemical processes. Effort is also being expended in testing research models which may be used in such assessments. (author)

  12. Coordinators for health science libraries in the Midwest Health Science Library Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtum, E A; McKloskey, J; Mahan, R

    1977-04-01

    In the summer of 1973 one resource library in each of the six states of the Midwest Health Science Library Network received funding from the National Library of Medicine to hire a coordinator for health science libraries. The development of the role of coordinator is examined and evaluated. The coordinators have proved valuable in the areas of consortium formation, basic unit development, communication facilitation, and program initiation. The function of the coordinators in the extensive planning effort now being undertaken by the network and the future need for the coordinator positions are discussed.

  13. The International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ronald J.; Rabin, Robert; Lujan, Barbara F.

    1993-01-01

    Throughout the 1980s, ESA and the space agencies of Canada, Germany, France, Japan, and the U.S. have pursued cooperative projects bilaterally and multilaterally to prepare for, and to respond to, opportunities in space life sciences research previously unapproachable in scale and sophistication. To cope effectively with likely future space research opportunities, broad, multilateral, coordinated strategic planning is required. Thus, life scientists from these agencies have allied to form the International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group. This Group is formally organized under a charter that specifies the purpose of the Working Group as the development of an international strategic plan for the space life sciences, with periodic revisions as needed to keep the plan current. The plan will be policy-, not operations-oriented. The Working Group also may establish specific implementation teams to coordinate multilateral science policy in specific areas; such teams have been established for space station utilization, and for sharing of flight equipment.

  14. Comprehensive coordination chemistry. The synthesis, reactions, properties and applications of coordination compounds. V.3. Main group and early transition elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, Geoffrey; Gillard, R.D.; McCleverty, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Comprehensive coordination chemistry reviews the synthesis reactions and properties of coordination compounds. Their uses in such diverse fields as nuclear fuels, toxicology, medicine and biology are discussed. Volume three concentrates on the main group and early transition element coordination compounds. (UK)

  15. Numbers and Measuring, Learning With TOR: MINNEMAST Coordinated Mathematics - Science Series, Unit 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Elaine E., Ed.

    This volume is the sixteenth in a series of 29 coordinated MINNEMAST units in mathematics and science for kindergarten and the primary grades. Intended for use by second-grade teachers, this unit guide provides a summary and overview of the unit, a list of materials needed, and descriptions of five groups of lessons. The purposes and procedures…

  16. 75 FR 30874 - National Nanotechnology Coordination Office, Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY National Nanotechnology Coordination Office, Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Subcommittee, National Science and Technology Council, Committee on Technology; The National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) Strategic Planning Stakeholder Workshop: Public...

  17. Coordination and Convening of the 2016 Arctic Science Summit Week

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinzman, Larry D. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    2016-11-13

    The Arctic Science Summit Week, Arctic Observing Summit, Arctic Council Senior Arctic Officials, Model Arctic Council, and International Arctic Assembly were convened on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks with great productivity and satisfaction of the participants. We were pleased to welcome over 1000 participants from 30 different nations and over 130 different institutions. The organization and execution of these meetings was extensive and complex involving more than 250 coordinators, volunteers and contributors from across Alaska. The participants were enthusiastic in their praise of the content and accomplishments of the meeting, but they were equally happy about the genuine welcome offered to our guests by the people of Alaska. Hosting a complex event such as this summit required an army of supporting services and we were blessed to have volunteers from Fairbanks, North Pole, Anchorage and other communities throughout Alaska helping us meet these needs. This truly was an event hosted by the people of Alaska. The significance of these events cannot be overstated. The US and global communities are finally coming to the realization of the important role that the Arctic plays in international politics, economics, and science. The Arctic has experienced tremendous changes in recent years, offering new opportunities that may be addressed through international collaborations, and serious challenges that must be addressed through active investment, adaptation and national and international coordination. Over 10% of the meeting participants were indigenous peoples, from indigenous organizations or hailed from small remote communities. This is still lower than we had hoped, but it is greater participation than similar meetings have experienced in the past. It is through such engagement that we can attack problems related to the changing environment, stagnant economies, and social ills.

  18. Student Leadership in Small Group Science Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Boz, Umit; Broadwell, George A.; Sadler, Troy D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Science educators have sought to structure collaborative inquiry learning through the assignment of static group roles. This structural approach to student grouping oversimplifies the complexities of peer collaboration and overlooks the highly dynamic nature of group activity. Purpose: This study addresses this issue of…

  19. Student leadership in small group science inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Boz, Umit; Broadwell, George A.; Sadler, Troy D.

    2014-09-01

    Background: Science educators have sought to structure collaborative inquiry learning through the assignment of static group roles. This structural approach to student grouping oversimplifies the complexities of peer collaboration and overlooks the highly dynamic nature of group activity. Purpose: This study addresses this issue of oversimplification of group dynamics by examining the social leadership structures that emerge in small student groups during science inquiry. Sample: Two small student groups investigating the burning of a candle under a jar participated in this study. Design and method: We used a mixed-method research approach that combined computational discourse analysis (computational quantification of social aspects of small group discussions) with microethnography (qualitative, in-depth examination of group discussions). Results: While in one group social leadership was decentralized (i.e., students shared control over topics and tasks), the second group was dominated by a male student (centralized social leadership). Further, decentralized social leadership was found to be paralleled by higher levels of student cognitive engagement. Conclusions: It is argued that computational discourse analysis can provide science educators with a powerful means of developing pedagogical models of collaborative science learning that take into account the emergent nature of group structures and highly fluid nature of student collaboration.

  20. Group Projects and the Computer Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Group projects in computer science are normally delivered with reference to good software engineering practice. The discipline of software engineering is rapidly evolving, and the application of the latest 'agile techniques' to group projects causes a potential conflict with constraints imposed by regulating bodies on the computer science…

  1. "Low-coordinate" 1,2-oxaphosphetanes - a new opportunity in coordination and main group chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyri, A W; Gleim, F; García Alcaraz, A; Schnakenburg, G; Espinosa Ferao, A; Streubel, R

    2018-05-17

    While 1,2σ5λ5-oxaphosphetanes are well known intermediates from the Wittig-reaction, no 1,2σ3λ3-oxaphosphetanes have been described, so far. Herein, we present the first synthesis of 1,2σ3λ3-oxaphosphetanes derived from their κP-Mo(CO)5 complexes and first investigations towards metal coordination and P-oxidation. Bonding, ring strain energy and potential retro-[2+2] cycloaddition reactions of the 1,2-oxaphosphetane ring were studied by DFT methods.

  2. Optimal Coordinated Strategy Analysis for the Procurement Logistics of a Steel Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianbo Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the optimization of an internal coordinated procurement logistics system in a steel group and the decision on the coordinated procurement strategy by minimizing the logistics costs. Considering the coordinated procurement strategy and the procurement logistics costs, the aim of the optimization model was to maximize the degree of quality satisfaction and to minimize the procurement logistics costs. The model was transformed into a single-objective model and solved using a simulated annealing algorithm. In the algorithm, the supplier of each subsidiary was selected according to the evaluation result for independent procurement. Finally, the effect of different parameters on the coordinated procurement strategy was analysed. The results showed that the coordinated strategy can clearly save procurement costs; that the strategy appears to be more cooperative when the quality requirement is not stricter; and that the coordinated costs have a strong effect on the coordinated procurement strategy.

  3. A Coordinated USGS Science Response to Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S.; Buxton, H. T.; Andersen, M.; Dean, T.; Focazio, M. J.; Haines, J.; Hainly, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    In late October 2012, Hurricane Sandy came ashore during a spring high tide on the New Jersey coastline, delivering hurricane-force winds, storm tides exceeding 19 feet, driving rain, and plummeting temperatures. Hurricane Sandy resulted in 72 direct fatalities in the mid-Atlantic and northeastern United States, and widespread and substantial physical, environmental, ecological, social, and economic impacts estimated at near $50 billion. Before the landfall of Hurricane Sandy, the USGS provided forecasts of potential coastal change; collected oblique aerial photography of pre-storm coastal morphology; deployed storm-surge sensors, rapid-deployment streamgages, wave sensors, and barometric pressure sensors; conducted Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) aerial topographic surveys of coastal areas; and issued a landslide alert for landslide prone areas. During the storm, Tidal Telemetry Networks provided real-time water-level information along the coast. Long-term networks and rapid-deployment real-time streamgages and water-quality monitors tracked river levels and changes in water quality. Immediately after the storm, the USGS serviced real-time instrumentation, retrieved data from over 140 storm-surge sensors, and collected other essential environmental data, including more than 830 high-water marks mapping the extent and elevation of the storm surge. Post-storm lidar surveys documented storm impacts to coastal barriers informing response and recovery and providing a new baseline to assess vulnerability of the reconfigured coast. The USGS Hazard Data Distribution System served storm-related information from many agencies on the Internet on a daily basis. Immediately following Hurricane Sandy the USGS developed a science plan, 'Meeting the Science Needs of the Nation in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy-A U.S. Geological Survey Science Plan for Support of Restoration and Recovery'. The plan will ensure continuing coordination of internal USGS activities as well as

  4. Research groups in biomedical sciences. Some recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Cardona

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the growing number of scientific publications reflecting a greater number of people interested in the biomedical sciences, many research groups disappear secondary to poor internal organization. From the review of the available literature, we generate a series of recommendations that may be useful for the creation of a research group or to improve the productivity of an existing group. Fluid communication between its members with a common overall policy framework allows the creation of a good foundation that will lead to the consolidation of the group.

  5. Advancing Ocean Science Through Coordination, Community Building, and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benway, H. M.

    2016-02-01

    The US Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry (OCB) Program (www.us-ocb.org) is a dynamic network of scientists working across disciplines to understand the ocean's role in the global carbon cycle and how marine ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles are responding to environmental change. The OCB Project Office, which is based at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), serves as a central information hub for this network, bringing different scientific disciplines together and cultivating partnerships with complementary US and international programs to address high-priority research questions. The OCB Project Office plays multiple important support roles, such as hosting and co-sponsoring workshops, short courses, working groups, and synthesis activities on emerging research issues; engaging with relevant national and international science planning initiatives; and developing education and outreach activities and products with the goal of promoting ocean carbon science to broader audiences. Current scientific focus areas of OCB include ocean observations (shipboard, autonomous, satellite, etc.); changing ocean chemistry (acidification, expanding low-oxygen conditions, etc.); ocean carbon uptake and storage; estuarine and coastal carbon cycling; biological pump and associated biological and biogeochemical processes and carbon fluxes; and marine ecosystem response to environmental and evolutionary changes, including physiological and molecular-level responses of individual organisms, as well as shifts in community structure and function. OCB is a bottom-up organization that responds to the continually evolving priorities and needs of its network and engages marine scientists at all career stages. The scientific leadership of OCB includes a scientific steering committee and subcommittees on ocean time-series, ocean acidification, and ocean fertilization. This presentation will highlight recent OCB activities and products of interest to the ocean science community.

  6. Using Authentic Science in the Classroom: NASA's Coordinated Efforts to Enhance STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, B.; Schwerin, T.; Low, R.

    2015-11-01

    A key NASA education goal is to attract and retain students in science, technology engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. When teachers engage students in the examination of authentic data derived from NASA satellite missions, they simultaneously build 21st century technology skills as well as core content knowledge about the Earth and space. In this session, we highlight coordinated efforts by NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public Outreach (EPO) programs to enhance educator accessibility to data resources, distribute state-of -the-art data tools and expand pathways for educators to find and use data resources. The group discussion explores how NASA SMD EPO efforts can further improve teacher access to authentic NASA data, identifies the types of tools and lessons most requested by the community, and explores how communication and collaboration between product developers and classroom educators using data tools and products can be enhanced.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF COORDINATION ABILITIES OF SPECIAL MEDICAL GROUPS STUDENTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Dotsenko

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyze the problem of motor abilities development and health of students of special medical group in the process of physical education in technical universities. Determine the major factors, characteristics, and the relationship of physical development, physical fitness and coordination abilities of female students in special medical group. Establish regularities in precise movements mastering of different coordination structure and develop model characteristics of the relationship of coordination abilities and motor characteristics of students in special medical group. To substantiate and verify efficiency of coordination abilities development method of female students with regard to their functional status in the course of physical education in higher school. Methodology. Theoretical and methodological argument, characteristic of the experimental program in physical education teaching process of students in special medical group was shown. Findings. Research is to develop the training content in special medical groups with the use of coordinating elements and exercises to enhance the motor abilities of female students. Their influence on the level of physical development, functional training, as well as regularities in mastering and movement control of different coordinating structure at the female students of special medical group was studied. The comparative characteristic of female students athletic ability in the dynamics of the educational process, differentiated into groups according to nosology was presented. The criterion of spare capacities upgrade of the motor system in controlling the movements of different coordination structure was determined. Originality. The method of coordination abilities development of female students in special medical group, that aims on the formation and correction of motor control system of different coordination structure, a sense of body position and its individual parts in space, improving

  8. Community Coordinated Modeling Center: A Powerful Resource in Space Science and Space Weather Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulaki, A.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Rastaetter, L.; MacNeice, P. J.; Shim, J. S.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Mendoza, A. M. M.; Zheng, Y.; Mullinix, R.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Maddox, M. M.; Pembroke, A. D.; Wiegand, C.

    2015-12-01

    Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a NASA affiliated interagency partnership with the primary goal of aiding the transition of modern space science models into space weather forecasting while supporting space science research. Additionally, over the past ten years it has established itself as a global space science education resource supporting undergraduate and graduate education and research, and spreading space weather awareness worldwide. A unique combination of assets, capabilities and close ties to the scientific and educational communities enable this small group to serve as a hub for raising generations of young space scientists and engineers. CCMC resources are publicly available online, providing unprecedented global access to the largest collection of modern space science models (developed by the international research community). CCMC has revolutionized the way simulations are utilized in classrooms settings, student projects, and scientific labs and serves hundreds of educators, students and researchers every year. Another major CCMC asset is an expert space weather prototyping team primarily serving NASA's interplanetary space weather needs. Capitalizing on its unrivaled capabilities and experiences, the team provides in-depth space weather training to students and professionals worldwide, and offers an amazing opportunity for undergraduates to engage in real-time space weather monitoring, analysis, forecasting and research. In-house development of state-of-the-art space weather tools and applications provides exciting opportunities to students majoring in computer science and computer engineering fields to intern with the software engineers at the CCMC while also learning about the space weather from the NASA scientists.

  9. An Internationally Coordinated Science Management Plan for Samples Returned from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltigin, T.; Smith, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Mars Sample Return (MSR) remains a high priority of the planetary exploration community. Such an effort will undoubtedly be too large for any individual agency to conduct itself, and thus will require extensive global cooperation. To help prepare for an eventual MSR campaign, the International Mars Exploration Working Group (IMEWG) chartered the international Mars Architecture for the Return of Samples (iMARS) Phase II working group in 2014, consisting of representatives from 17 countries and agencies. The overarching task of the team was to provide recommendations for progressing towards campaign implementation, including a proposed science management plan. Building upon the iMARS Phase I (2008) outcomes, the Phase II team proposed the development of an International MSR Science Institute as part of the campaign governance, centering its deliberations around four themes: Organization: including an organizational structure for the Institute that outlines roles and responsibilities of key members and describes sample return facility requirements; Management: presenting issues surrounding scientific leadership, defining guidelines and assumptions for Institute membership, and proposing a possible funding model; Operations & Data: outlining a science implementation plan that details the preliminary sample examination flow, sample allocation process, and data policies; and Curation: introducing a sample curation plan that comprises sample tracking and routing procedures, sample sterilization considerations, and long-term archiving recommendations. This work presents a summary of the group's activities, findings, and recommendations, highlighting the role of international coordination in managing the returned samples.

  10. Other Women in Science Groups | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Other Women in Science Groups. 404! error. The page your are looking for can not be found! Please check the link or use the navigation bar at the top. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be ...

  11. The patient perspective: utilizing focus groups to inform care coordination for high-risk medicaid populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheff, Alex; Park, Elyse R; Neagle, Mary; Oreskovic, Nicolas M

    2017-07-25

    Care coordination programs for high-risk, high-cost patients are a critical component of population health management. These programs aim to improve outcomes and reduce costs and have proliferated over the last decade. Some programs, originally designed for Medicare patients, are now transitioning to also serve Medicaid populations. However, there are still gaps in the understanding of what barriers to care Medicaid patients experience, and what supports will be most effective for providing them care coordination. We conducted two focus groups (n = 13) and thematic analyses to assess the outcomes drivers and programmatic preferences of Medicaid patients enrolled in a high-risk care coordination program at a major academic medical center in Boston, MA. Two focus groups identified areas where care coordination efforts were having a positive impact, as well as areas of unmet needs among the Medicaid population. Six themes emerged from the focus groups that clustered in three groupings: In the first group (1) enrollment in an existing medical care coordination programs, and (2) provider communication largely presented as positive accounts of assistance, and good relationships with providers, though participants also pointed to areas where these efforts fell short. In the second group (3) trauma histories, (4) mental health challenges, and (5) executive function difficulties all presented challenges faced by high-risk Medicaid patients that would likely require redress through additional programmatic supports. Finally, in the third group, (6) peer-to-peer support tendencies among patients suggested an untapped resource for care coordination programs. Programs aimed at high-risk Medicaid patients will want to consider programmatic adjustments to attend to patient needs in five areas: (1) provider connection/care coordination, (2) trauma, (3) mental health, (4) executive function/paperwork and coaching support, and (5) peer-to-peer support.

  12. Bio-Optical sensors on Argo Floats. Reports of the international ocean-colour coordinating group

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bernard, S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The International Ocean-Colour Coordinating Group (IOCCG) is an international group of experts in the field of satellite ocean colour, acting as a liaison and communication channel between users, managers and agencies in the ocean-colour arena...

  13. The public communication of science in public health graduate programs in Brazil: From the coordinators' perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, C. A.; Gallo, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Introduction - The elaboration process of public policies for science and technology in knowledge societies should include not only experts, but all society members. There are studies on lay people's perception of science and technology. However, what is the scientists' perspective on public communication of science? Objectives - To describe and characterize the concepts that coordinators of Brazilian public health graduate programs have about public communication of science. Methods - This is an analytical and descriptive report of an exploratory research (doctoral study). The answers of fifty-one coordinators to two questionnaires were submitted for content analysis. The categories were transformed into variables that allowed the data processing by the Hiérarchique Classificatoire et Cohésitive (CHIC®) software. Results - Similarity analysis strongly suggested (0,99) that coordinators understand public communication as a communication directed to academic peers and students, also as a form of participation in scientific events and communication by scientific papers. Likewise, the implication analysis suggested a strong implication (0,98) between scientific communication understood as public communication. Conclusion - The notion of public communication of science as a social right and as a commitment and responsibility of researchers and research centers is not explicitly present in the narrative of the coordinators, although in general the coordinators conceive it as a relevant activity. This study thus contributes to a reflection on the role of scientists, researchers and research centers in public communication of science and technology.

  14. Social dilemmas and individual/group coordination strategies in a complex rural land-use game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis García-Barrios

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Strengthening ongoing bottom-up capacity building processes for local and sustainable landscape-level governance is a multi-dimensional social endeavor. One of the tasks involved – participatory rural land use planning – requires more understanding and more awareness among all stakeholders regarding the social dilemmas local people confront when responding to each other’s land-use decisions. In this paper we will analyze and discuss a version of our game SIERRA SPRINGS that is simple to play for any stakeholder that can count to 24, yet entails a complex-coordination land use game – with an extensive and yet finite set of solutions – which can mimic in a stylized form some of the dilemmas landowners could confront in a landscape planning process where there livelihoods are at stake. The game has helped researchers and players observe and reflect on the individual coordination strategies that emerge within a group in response to these stylized dilemmas. This paper (1 develops a game-theoretical approach to cooperation, competition and coordination of land uses in small rural watersheds, (2 describe the goal, rules and mechanics of the game, (3 analyzes the structure of each farms’ solution set vs. the whole watershed’s solution set, (4 derives from them the coordination dilemmas and the risk of coordination failure, (5 describes four individual coordination strategies consistently displayed by players; mapping them in a plane we have called Group-Level Coordination Space, and (6 discusses the strengths, limitations and actual and potential uses of the game both for research and as an introductory tool for stakeholders involved in participatory land use planning.

  15. Other Women in Science Groups | Women in Science | Initiatives ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences · Resonance – Journal of Science ... The Department of Science & Technology has set up a National Task Force on Women ... The International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) has set up a ... the area of Science in Society under its Research and Innovation programmes.

  16. Representation of Coordination Mechanisms in IMS Learning Design to Support Group-based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, Yongwu; Burgos, Daniel; Griffiths, David; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    Miao, Y., Burgos, D., Griffiths, D., & Koper, R. (2008). Representation of Coordination Mechanisms in IMS Learning Design to Support Group-based Learning. In L. Lockyer, S. Bennet, S. Agostinho & B. Harper (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Learning Design and Learning Objects: Issues, Applications and

  17. Coordination of baseload power plant group control with static reactive power compensator control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Szczerba

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive power sources in power system nodes: generators and static reactive power compensators, are controlled by control systems. Generators – by generator node group controllers, compensators – by voltage controllers. The paper presents issues of these control systems’ coordination and proposals for its implementation.

  18. Minutes from the first BIOMOVS Coordinating Group Meeting in Baden October 30th 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, G.

    1985-01-01

    During 28th to 30th October 1985 the first BIOMOVS (Biosperic model validation study) workshop and coordinating group meeting were held at Baden, Switzerland. In the following paper minutes from the meeting are presented together with additional information from the Secretariat, Appendix 6. (author)

  19. [Archives of "comprehensive approach on asbestos-related diseases" supported by the "special coordination funds for promoting science and technology (H18-1-3-3-1)"-- overview of group research project, care and specimen registration, cellular characteristics of mesothelioma and immunological effects of asbestos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Takemi; Nakano, Takashi; Hasegawa, Seiki; Okada, Morihito; Tsujimura, Tohru; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Toyokuni, Shinya; Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Fukuoka, Kazuya; Tanaka, Fumihiro; Kumagai, Naoko; Maeda, Megumi; Nishimura, Yasumitsu

    2011-05-01

    The research project entitled "Comprehensive approach on asbestos-related diseases" supported by the "Special Coordination Funds for Promoting Science and Technology (H18-1-3-3-1)" began in 2006 and was completed at the end of the Japanese fiscal year of 2010. This project included four parts; (1) malignant mesothelioma (MM) cases and specimen registration, (2) development of procedures for the early diagnosis of MM, (3) commencement of clinical investigations including multimodal approaches, and (4) basic research comprising three components; (i) cellular and molecular characterization of mesothelioma cells, (ii) immunological effects of asbestos, and (iii) elucidation of asbestos-induced carcinogenesis using animal models. In this special issue of the Japanese Journal of Hygiene, we briefly introduce the achievements of our project. The second and third parts and the third component of the fourth part are described in other manuscripts written by Professors Fukuoka, Hasegawa, and Toyokuni. In this manuscript, we introduce a brief summary of the first part "MM cases and specimen registration", the first component of the fourth part "Cellular and molecular characterization of mesothelioma cells" and the second component of the fourth part "Immunological effects of asbestos". In addition, a previous special issue presented by the Study Group of Fibrous and Particulate Substances (SGFPS) (chaired by Professor Otsuki, Kawasaki Medical School, Japan) for the Japanese Society of Hygiene and published in Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine Volume 13, 2008, included reviews of the aforementioned first component of the fourth part of the project. Taken together, our project led medical investigations regarding asbestos and MM progress and contributed towards the care and examination of patients with asbestos-related diseases during these five years. Further investigations are required to facilitate the development of preventive measures and the cure of asbestos

  20. Remote Sensing Information Sciences Research Group: Santa Barbara Information Sciences Research Group, year 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, John E.; Smith, Terence; Star, Jeffrey L.

    1987-01-01

    Information Sciences Research Group (ISRG) research continues to focus on improving the type, quantity, and quality of information which can be derived from remotely sensed data. Particular focus in on the needs of the remote sensing research and application science community which will be served by the Earth Observing System (EOS) and Space Station, including associated polar and co-orbiting platforms. The areas of georeferenced information systems, machine assisted information extraction from image data, artificial intelligence and both natural and cultural vegetation analysis and modeling research will be expanded.

  1. Pd(II)-Catalyzed C–H Functionalizations Directed by Distal Weakly Coordinating Functional Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Wan, Li; Zhang, Guofu; Leow, Dasheng; Spangler, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    Ortho-C(sp2)–H olefination and acetoxylation of broadly useful synthetic building blocks phenylacetyl Weinreb amides, esters, and ketones are developed without installing an additional directing group. The interplay between the distal weak coordination and the ligand-acceleration is crucial for these reactions to proceed under mild conditions. The tolerance of longer distance between the target C–H bonds and the directing functional groups also allows for the functionalizations of more distal C–H bonds in hydrocinnamoyl ketones, Weinreb amides and biphenyl Weinreb amides. Mechanistically, the coordination of these carbonyl groups and the bisdentate amino acid ligand with Pd(II) centers provides further evidence for our early hypothesis that the carbonyl groups of the potassium carboxylate is responsible for the directed C–H activation of carboxylic acids. PMID:25768039

  2. UK Natural Analogue Co-Ordinating Group: first annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooker, P.J.; Chapman, N.A.

    1987-11-01

    The British Geological Survey is reponsible for co-ordinating the Department of the Environment's programme of natural analogue studies of radionuclide migration, a research programme that involved both UK and overseas sites. Co-ordination is achieved through the UK Natural Analogue Co-ordinating Group (NACG) which was established in October 1986. It has met three times to date and its function is to ensure that the different research projects have an integrated purpose aimed at improving and applying our understanding of natural geochemical processes in a way that will increase our confidence in long-term modelling predictions. Improved modelling prediction of radionuclide transport in the geosphere will directly benefit the performance and safety assessments of proposed radioactive waste repositories. (author)

  3. A study of collective coordinates and dynamical groups in nuclear theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopolos, Z.

    1983-01-01

    Lie-algebraic techniques for the group action on manifolds given as a direct product of coset spaces and group manifolds are developed. The microscopic realisation of the Mass Quadrupole Collective Model (MQC) in the S0(3)xSO(n) and GLsub(+)(3, R)xSO(n) schemes is studied. The problem of the separation of the kinetic energy and the velocity field into a collective and an intrinsic part is analyzed. Different coordinate schemes in phase space for the U(n)-invariant collective motion and the U(3) dynamical group are introduced. In the GL(3,C)xU(n) scheme, the invariant volume element in the new coordinates and a completely orthonormal basis is constructed. (orig.) [de

  4. Generation of symmetry coordinates for crystals using multiplier representations of the space groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    1978-01-01

    Symmetry coordinates play an important role in the normal-mode calculations of crystals. It is therefore of great importance to have a general method, which may be applied for any crystal at any wave vector, to generate these. The multiplier representations of the space groups as given by Kovalev...... and the projection-operator technique provide a basis for such a method. The method is illustrated for the nonsymmorphic D36 space group, and the theoretical background for the representations of space groups in general is reviewed and illustrated on the example above. It is desirable to perform the projection...... of symmetry coordinates in such a way that they may be used for as many wave vectors as possible. We discuss how to achieve this goal. The detailed illustrations should make it simple to apply the theory in any other case....

  5. White light emission and second harmonic generation from secondary group participation (SGP) in a coordination network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun; Zeller, Matthias; Hunter, Allen D; Xu, Zhengtao

    2012-01-25

    We describe a white emitting coordination network solid that can be conveniently applied as a thin film onto a commercial UV-LED lamp for practical white lighting applications. The solid state material was discovered in an exercise of exploring molecular building blocks equipped with secondary groups for fine-tuning the structures and properties of coordination nets. Specifically, CH(3)SCH(2)CH(2)S- and (S)-CH(3)(OH)CHCH(2)S- (2-hydroxylpropyl) were each attached as secondary groups to the 2,5- positions of 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid (bdc), and the resultant molecules (L1 and L2, respectively) were crystallized with Pb(II) into the topologically similar 3D nets of PbL1 and PbL2, both consisting of interlinked Pb-carboxyl chains. While the CH(3)S- groups in PbL1 are not bonded to the Pb(II) centers, the hydroxy groups in PbL2 participate in coordinating to Pb(II) and thus modify the bonding features around the Pb(II), but only to a slight and subtle degree (e.g., Pb-O distances 2.941-3.116 Å). Interestingly, the subtle change in structure significantly impacts the properties, i.e., while the photoluminescence of PbL1 is yellowish green, PbL2 features bright white emission. Also, the homochiral side group in PbL2 imparts significant second harmonic generation, in spite of its seemingly weak association with the main framework (the NLO-phore). In a broad perspective, this work showcases the idea of secondary group participation (SGP) in the construction of coordination networks, an idea that parallels that of hemilabile ligands in organometallics and points to an effective strategy in developing advanced functions in solid state framework materials. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. Intersection Group Dynamic Subdivision and Coordination at Intraregional Boundaries in Sudden Disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciyun Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at the traffic flow agglomeration effect characteristics and rapid evacuation requirement in sudden disaster; operation time of intraregional boundaries traffic signal coordination was presented firstly. Then intraregional boundaries intersection group dynamic subdivision and consolidation method based on relative similarity degree and similarity coefficient of adjacent intersections was put forward. As to make the traffic control strategy adapt to traffic condition of different intraregional boundaries intersection groups, this paper proposes an intraregional boundaries traffic signal coordination and optimization technology based on organic computing theory. Finally, this paper uses Delphi 7.0, MapX, and Oracle developing a software package, combined with Paramics V6 Simulator to validate the methods of this paper. The result shows that it can obviously improve disaster affected regional traffic signal control efficiency which reduces average traffic delay by 30–35%, decreases vehicle queue by more than 20% and reduces evacuation time more than 13.06%.

  7. STREAMS - Supporting Underrepresented Groups in Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho-Knighton, K.; Johnson, A.

    2009-12-01

    In Fall 2008, STREAMS (Supporting Talented and Remarkable Environmental And Marine Science students) Scholarship initiative began at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg, the only public university in Pinellas County. STREAMS is a partnership between the University of South Florida St. Petersburg’s (USFSP) Environmental Science and Policy Program and University of South Florida’s (USF) College of Marine Science. The STREAMS Student Scholarship Program has facilitated increased recruitment, retention, and graduation of USFSP environmental science and USF marine science majors. The STREAMS program has increased opportunities for minorities and women to obtain undergraduate and graduate degrees, gain valuable research experience and engage in professional development activities. STREAMS scholars have benefited from being mentored by USFSP and USF faculty and as well as MSPhDs students and NSF Florida-Georgia LSAMP Bridge to Doctorate graduate fellows. In addition, STREAMS has facilitated activities designed to prepare student participants for successful Earth system science-related careers. We will elucidate the need for this initiative and vision for the collaboration.

  8. ROLES OF INTERLOCKING DIRECTORATES IN AN EMERGING COUNTRY: CONTROL AND COORDINATION IN FAMILY BUSINESS GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Ataay

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Maman (1999 proposed that, in countries in which business groups are dominant forms for organizing economic activities, the interlocking directorate is a managerial tool that can be prioritized to control and coordinate activities of their affiliated firms within the same groups and align their business objectives. This organizational connection appears to be an intentional strategy on the part of the groups‟ headquarters. In order to study the interlocking ties in Turkish family business groups (FBG, this study focused on interlocking directorates among listed firms in Turkey. The findings of preliminary study reveal that almost all of the interlocking ties were within the business groups (BG in our sample. This is the result of assignment of familyaffiliated and/or professional inside directors to the various boards of companies in the BG. We also found that compare to vertical ties; business groups are using more horizontal interlocking connections to bond their affiliated companies together.

  9. Science Education and Public Outreach Forums (SEPOF): Providing Coordination and Support for NASA's Science Mission Directorate Education and Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, B. J.; Smith, D.; Shipp, S. S.; Schwerin, T. G.; Stockman, S. A.; Cooper, L. P.; Peticolas, L. M.

    2009-12-01

    NASA is working with four newly-formed Science Education and Public Outreach Forums (SEPOFs) to increase the overall coherence of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program. SEPOFs support the astrophysics, heliophysics, planetary and Earth science divisions of NASA SMD in three core areas: * E/PO Community Engagement and Development * E/PO Product and Project Activity Analysis * Science Education and Public Outreach Forum Coordination Committee Service. SEPOFs are collaborating with NASA and external science and education and outreach communities in E/PO on multiple levels ranging from the mission and non-mission E/PO project activity managers, project activity partners, and scientists and researchers, to front line agents such as naturalists/interpreters, teachers, and higher education faculty, to high level agents such as leadership at state education offices, local schools, higher education institutions, and professional societies. The overall goal for the SEPOFs is increased awareness, knowledge, and understanding of scientists, researchers, engineers, technologists, educators, product developers, and dissemination agents of best practices, existing NASA resources, and community expertise applicable to E/PO. By coordinating and supporting the NASA E/PO Community, the NASA/SEPOF partnerships will lead to more effective, sustainable, and efficient utilization of NASA science discoveries and learning experiences.

  10. Report of the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements: 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archinal, B. A.; Acton, C. H.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Conrad, A.; Consolmagno, G. J.; Duxbury, T.; Hestroffer, D.; Hilton, J. L.; Kirk, R. L.; Klioner, S. A.; McCarthy, D.; Meech, K.; Oberst, J.; Ping, J.; Seidelmann, P. K.; Tholen, D. J.; Thomas, P. C.; Williams, I. P.

    2018-03-01

    This report continues the practice where the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements revises recommendations regarding those topics for the planets, satellites, minor planets, and comets approximately every 3 years. The Working Group has now become a "functional working group" of the IAU, and its membership is open to anyone interested in participating. We describe the procedure for submitting questions about the recommendations given here or the application of these recommendations for creating a new or updated coordinate system for a given body. Regarding body orientation, the following bodies have been updated: Mercury, based on MESSENGER results; Mars, along with a refined longitude definition; Phobos; Deimos; (1) Ceres; (52) Europa; (243) Ida; (2867) Šteins; Neptune; (134340) Pluto and its satellite Charon; comets 9P/Tempel 1, 19P/Borrelly, 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and 103P/Hartley 2, noting that such information is valid only between specific epochs. The special challenges related to mapping 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko are also discussed. Approximate expressions for the Earth have been removed in order to avoid confusion, and the low precision series expression for the Moon's orientation has been removed. The previously online only recommended orientation model for (4) Vesta is repeated with an explanation of how it was updated. Regarding body shape, text has been included to explain the expected uses of such information, and the relevance of the cited uncertainty information. The size of the Sun has been updated, and notation added that the size and the ellipsoidal axes for the Earth and Jupiter have been recommended by an IAU Resolution. The distinction of a reference radius for a body (here, the Moon and Titan) is made between cartographic uses, and for orthoprojection and geophysical uses. The recommended radius for Mercury has been updated based on MESSENGER results. The recommended radius for Titan is returned to its

  11. Report of the IAU Working Group on cartographic coordinates and rotational elements: 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archinal, B.A.; A'Hearn, M.F.; Bowell, E.; Conrad, A.; Consolmagno, G.J.; Courtin, R.; Fukushima, T.; Hestroffer, D.; Hilton, J.L.; Krasinsky, G.A.; Neumann, G.; Oberst, J.; Seidelmann, P.K.; Stooke, P.; Tholen, D.J.; Thomas, P.C.; Williams, I.P.

    2010-01-01

    Every three years the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements revises tables giving the directions of the poles of rotation and the prime meridians of the planets, satellites, minor planets, and comets. This report takes into account the IAU Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature (WGPSN) and the IAU Committee on Small Body Nomenclature (CSBN) definition of dwarf planets, introduces improved values for the pole and rotation rate of Mercury, returns the rotation rate of Jupiter to a previous value, introduces improved values for the rotation of five satellites of Saturn, and adds the equatorial radius of the Sun for comparison. It also adds or updates size and shape information for the Earth, Mars’ satellites Deimos and Phobos, the four Galilean satellites of Jupiter, and 22 satellites of Saturn. Pole, rotation, and size information has been added for the asteroids (21) Lutetia, (511) Davida, and (2867) Šteins. Pole and rotation information has been added for (2) Pallas and (21) Lutetia. Pole and rotation and mean radius information has been added for (1) Ceres. Pole information has been updated for (4) Vesta. The high precision realization for the pole and rotation rate of the Moon is updated. Alternative orientation models for Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn are noted. The Working Group also reaffirms that once an observable feature at a defined longitude is chosen, a longitude definition origin should not change except under unusual circumstances. It is also noted that alternative coordinate systems may exist for various (e.g. dynamical) purposes, but specific cartographic coordinate system information continues to be recommended for each body. The Working Group elaborates on its purpose, and also announces its plans to occasionally provide limited updates to its recommendations via its website, in order to address community needs for some updates more often than every 3 years. Brief recommendations are also made to the general

  12. O papel de coordenador de grupos The role of group coordinators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Silvia de Arruda Andaló

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Os trabalhos com grupos, instrumental valioso nos espaços institucionais, vêm sofrendo um processo de banalização de cunho tecnicista. Este artigo pretende ser uma contribuição à reflexão sobre a coordenação de grupos. Afasta-se dos estudos sobre a personalidade dos coordenadores, propondo seu entendimento como o de mediadores entre o nível vivencial e a compreensão crítica. Isso aponta seu caráter constitutivo nos processos grupais.The work with groups, a valuable tool in institutional spaces, is becoming more and more vulgarized because of a tendency toward a mere technical approach. This article is intended to be a contribution to group coordination. It keeps away from the study of the coordinators personality, suggesting that they be understood as mediators between experiencing and critical understanding. Thus pointing out their constructive role in group processes.

  13. How groups co-ordinate their concepts and terminology: implications for medical informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrod, S

    1998-11-01

    Conceptual and terminological systems are established and maintained by the communities who use them. This paper reports experiments which investigate the role of communication and interaction in the process. The experiments show that isolated pairs of communicators and virtual communities of interacting pairs naturally converge on their own conceptual and terminological systems when confronted with a common task. The results also indicate that the system converged on is optimal for that particular group engaged in that particular task. These findings are discussed in relation to the increasing use of tightly coordinated medical teams and its implications for getting them to adopt standardized medical terminologies.

  14. Intramolecular electron transfer through a bridging carboxylate group coordinated to two cobalt(III)-ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieghardt, K.

    1978-01-01

    Reduction of the binuclear μ-p-nitrobenzoato -di-μ-hydroxo -bis[triammine cobalt(III)] cation with (CH 3 ) 2 COH radicals yields a radical cation with the p-nitrobenzoato radical being coordinated to two cobalt(III) ions at the carboxylic group. The unprotonated form of this species undergoes intramolecular electron transfer producing Co(II) (k = (3.3 +- 0.3). x 10 3 s -1 ). The role of the carboxylate group in the intramolecular electron transfer process is tentatively assessed in terms of an intramolecular outer-sphere reaction because of lack of overlap of the donor orbitals (π) and the acceptor orbital (sigma). The protonated form of the radical cation (pKsub(a) = 2.5) disproportionates via a bimolecular process without production of Co(II). The effect of two coordinated Co(III) ions as compared to only one on the properties of the nitrobenzoate radical anion are discussed. (orig.) 891 HK 892 GM [de

  15. Group B meningococcal vaccine science and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, Simon B; Pollard, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    Capsular group B Neisseria meningitidis is one of the leading causes of death in developed countries. A new vaccine (4CMenB) has recently been developed which was found to have an acceptable safety profile in clinical studies and to be immunogenic. This review examines the evidence supporting the licensure of the 4CMenB vaccine and discusses recommendations for its use. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Report of the IAU Working Group on cartographic coordinates and rotational elements: 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archinal, Brent A.; A’Hearn, Michael F.; Bowell, Edward; Conrad, Al; Consolmagno, Guy J.; Courtin, Regis; Fukushima, Toshio; Hestroffer, Daniel; Hilton, James L.; Krasinsky, Georgij A.; Neumann, Gregory; Oberst, Jurgen; Seidelmann, P. Kenneth; Stooke, Philip; Tholen, David J.; Thomas, Peter C.; Williams, Iwan P.

    2010-01-01

    Every three years the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements revises tables giving the directions of the poles of rotation and the prime meridians of the planets, satellites, minor planets, and comets. This report takes into account the IAU Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature (WGPSN) and the IAU Committee on Small Body Nomenclature (CSBN) definition of dwarf planets, introduces improved values for the pole and rotation rate of Mercury, returns the rotation rate of Jupiter to a previous value, introduces improved values for the rotation of five satellites of Saturn, and adds the equatorial radius of the Sun for comparison. It also adds or updates size and shape information for the Earth, Mars’ satellites Deimos and Phobos, the four Galilean satellites of Jupiter, and 22 satellites of Saturn. Pole, rotation, and size information has been added for the asteroids (21) Lutetia, (511) Davida, and (2867) Šteins. Pole and rotation information has been added for (2) Pallas and (21) Lutetia. Pole and rotation and mean radius information has been added for (1) Ceres. Pole information has been updated for (4) Vesta. The high precision realization for the pole and rotation rate of the Moon is updated. Alternative orientation models for Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn are noted. The Working Group also reaffirms that once an observable feature at a defined longitude is chosen, a longitude definition origin should not change except under unusual circumstances. It is also noted that alternative coordinate systems may exist for various (e.g. dynamical) purposes, but specific cartographic coordinate system information continues to be recommended for each body. The Working Group elaborates on its purpose, and also announces its plans to occasionally provide limited updates to its recommendations via its website, in order to address community needs for some updates more often than every 3 years. Brief recommendations are also made to the

  17. Mobile drama in an instrumented museum: inducing group conversation via coordinated narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Charles; Stock, Oliviero; Dekoven, Elyon; Noy, Kinneret; Citron, Yael; Dobrin, Yael

    2012-03-01

    Museum visits can be more enjoyable to small groups if they can be both social and educational experiences. One very rewarding aspect of a visit, especially those involving small groups such as families, is the unmediated group discussion that can ensue during a shared cultural experience. We present a situated, mobile museum system that delivers an hour-long drama to museum visitors. It perceives and analyzes group behavior, uses the result to dynamically deliver coordinated dramatic narrative presentations about the nearby museum exhibit, with the expected result of stimulating group discussion. To accomplish this, our drama-based presentations contain small, complementary differences in the content delivered to each participant, leveraging the narrative tension/release cycle of drama to naturally lead visitors to fill in missing pieces by interacting with friends, thus initiating a conversation. We present two evaluations for these story variations, one in a closed, non-mobile environment, and the other a formative evaluation to gauge how well the methodology used in the non-mobile evaluation performs in evaluating the fully implemented system in a real museum environment.

  18. Science Integrating Learning Objectives: A Cooperative Learning Group Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The integration of agricultural and science curricular content that capitalizes on natural and inherent connections represents a challenge for secondary agricultural educators. The purpose of this case study was to create information about the employment of Cooperative Learning Groups (CLG) to enhance the science integrating learning objectives…

  19. Extended system of space-time coordinates and generalized translation group of transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaleev, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    A method of extending space-time is considered. In the nonrelativistic case extending goes by joining a scalar to the 3-dimensional radius-vector, completing this to a quaternion. The interpretation of scalar obtained as a parameter of scale transfornation of the generalized translation of group of transformations is given. Some basic expressions of nonrelativistic classical mechanics in the quaternion representation are given. In the relativistic case space-time is constructed from two quaternions: the first one consists of a pair scalar-3-dimensional radius-vector; the second one, of a pair-time-scalar-3-dimensional time-vector. Time and space coordinates, enter into the expression with the opposite signature. The introduction of a time-vector as well as of a new scalar is stipulated by the requirement of the principle of conforming quantum mechanics of the 1/2 spin to classical mechanics [ru

  20. Partnering Against Cancer Today: A Blueprint for Coordinating Efforts Through Communication Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of the communication revolution over the past decade has been its support for participation, whether that be in the active engagement of patients searching the Web for answers to vital health questions, or in the collective energies of self-organizing communities through social media. At the same time, some of the major obstacles to achieving a full and equitable reach of evidence-based cancer control knowledge have been traced back to discontinuities in communication either within clinical care or the broader public awareness system. Communication scientists from the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the American Cancer Society joined forces in 2010 to investigate ways in which communication science can be used to improve coordination and enhance participation in cancer control for the nation. From 2010 to 2013, the three organizations worked together in 1) convening two meetings designed to assess the status of funded research in communication science, 2) completing a systematic review of literature published over the previous 10 years, and 3) authoring a blueprint for coordinated efforts using the implications of communication science. The blueprint consists of three major goals: first, to identify high-yield targets of opportunity using the health impact pyramid articulated by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director, Thomas Frieden; second, to leverage opportunities within the new communication environment, including the opportunities catalyzed by national efforts to create an infrastructure for evidence implementation through health information technology; and third, to assist in coordinating efforts across collaborative entities through participative media. PMID:24395998

  1. The Nuclear Suppliers Group: A multilateral arrangement devoted to supplier coordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedik, T.; Thorne, C.E.; Goorevich, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    When the then-26 adherents to the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) Guidelines met for the first time in more than 13 years in The Hague in April 1991 it began a new and dynamic process for coordinating the full range of nuclear supplier issues. In less than four years the NSG has expanded its membership to 31 countries and has implemented major changes to its Guidelines and commodity control lists. Enhancements to the Regime agreed to by the Group since its reinvigoration include the adoption of controls on nuclear-related-dual-use equipment, materials and technology; the requirements for a recipient country to have an agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency calling for safeguards on its entire nuclear program, both now and in the future; a major expansion of the Trigger List (the list of commodities which ''trigger'' safeguards as a condition of supply) to clarify and add detail to the controlled commodities; comparable controls on technologies associated with Trigger List items; and ''fixes'' to the Guidelines to control retransfers and exports to countries with suspect nonproliferation credentials. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of the NSG and discusses in detail the past, present and future work of the Group

  2. NASA's Coordinated Efforts to Enhance STEM Education: Bringing NASA Science into the Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, B. K.; Thomas, C.; Eyermann, S.; Mitchell, S.; LaConte, K.; Hauck, K.

    2015-11-01

    Libraries are community-centered, free-access venues serving learners of all ages and backgrounds. Libraries also recognize the importance of science literacy and strive to include science in their programming portfolio. Scientists and educators can partner with local libraries to advance mutual goals of connecting the public to Earth and Space Science. In this interactive Special Interest Group (SIG) discussion, representatives from the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public Outreach (EPO) community's library collaborations discussed the opportunities for partnership with public and school libraries; explored the resources, events, and programs available through libraries; explored NASA science programming and professional development opportunities available for librarians; and strategized about the types of support that librarians require to plan and implement programs that use NASA data and resources. We also shared successes, lessons learned, and future opportunities for incorporating NASA science programming into library settings.

  3. 'SANDANSKI-2': European east-west coordination meeting on nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oertzen, W. von; Kalpakchieva, R.

    2001-01-01

    'Sandanski-2' is a European East-West Coordination Meeting on Nuclear Science, which took place on the 5-9 May 2001 in the town of Sandanski, Bulgaria. It is the second meeting of this type. Here we present the motivations for holding this meeting, its scientific programme, the list of participants, as well as a short summary of the scientific and executive issues, which were presented by 66 reports. At the meeting 115 scientists from 17 European countries, the USA, Japan and JINR were present. Complete information on the Meeting is available on a CD and can also be found under the address: http://www.sandanski.ru/

  4. Family Experiences, the Motivation for Science Learning and Science Achievement of Different Learner Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Salomé; Lemmer, Eleanor

    2017-01-01

    Science education is particularly important for both developed and developing countries to promote technological development, global economic competition and economic growth. This study explored the relationship between family experiences, the motivation for science learning, and the science achievement of a group of Grade Nine learners in South…

  5. The Science Advancement through Group Engagement Program: Leveling the Playing Field and Increasing Retention in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Donna M.; Curtin-Soydan, Amanda J.; Canelas, Dorian A.

    2014-01-01

    How can colleges and universities keep an open gateway to the science disciplines for the least experienced first-year science students while also maintaining high standards that challenge the students with the strongest possible high school backgrounds? The Science Advancement through Group Engagement (SAGE) project targets cohorts of less…

  6. Investigating Science Collaboratively: A Case Study of Group Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinicola, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    Discussions of one urban middle school group of students who were investigating scientific phenomena were analyzed; this study was conducted to discern if and how peer interaction contributes to learning. Through a social constructivist lens, case study methodology, we examined conceptual change among group members. Data about science talk was…

  7. Taming Typhon: Advancing Climate Literacy by Coordinating Federal Earth System Science Education Investments Through the U.S. Climate Change Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, J. L.; Niepold, F.; Wei, M.; Waple, A. M.

    2008-12-01

    Thirteen Federal agencies in the United States invest in research, communication, and education activities related to climate and global change. The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) works to integrate the research activities of these different agencies, with oversight from the Office of Science and Technology Policy, the Council on Environmental Quality, the National Economic Council and the Office of Management and Budget. The CCSP is the result of a Presidential initative in 2001 to build on the Global Change Research Program, which exists as a result of the Global Change Research Act of 1990. This initiative was to shift the focus of the Program from 'discovery and characterization' to 'differentiation and strategy investigation.' With this shift, CCSP's focus is now on evaluating optimal strategies for addressing climate change risks, improving coordination among the Federal agencies, communicating research results to all stakeholders (including national policy leaders and local resource managers), and improving public debate and decision-making related to global change. Implicit to these activities is the need to educate the general public about the science of climate change and its consequences, as well as coordinate Federal investments related to climate change education. This is no small task, given the variety of missions and approaches of the participating agencies. Recognizing that its Communications Interagency Working Group (CIWG) does not have the expertise or focus to adequately address issues related to science education, the CCSP recently established an ad-hoc Education Interagency Working Group (EIWG), comprising representatives from all 13 agencies, that will work closely with the CIWG to enhance education goals. Its mission is to advance literacy in climate and related sciences and increase informed decision making for the Nation. The EIWG envisions that its primary activities in the near-term will be focused on establishing: (1) a

  8. Remote Sensing Information Sciences Research Group, Santa Barbara Information Sciences Research Group, year 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, J. E.; Smith, T.; Star, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Research continues to focus on improving the type, quantity, and quality of information which can be derived from remotely sensed data. The focus is on remote sensing and application for the Earth Observing System (Eos) and Space Station, including associated polar and co-orbiting platforms. The remote sensing research activities are being expanded, integrated, and extended into the areas of global science, georeferenced information systems, machine assissted information extraction from image data, and artificial intelligence. The accomplishments in these areas are examined.

  9. Coordinating the undergraduate medical (MBBS basic sciences programme in a Nepalese medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar PR

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available KIST Medical College follows the curriculum of the Institute ofMedicine, Tribhuvan University. The programme aims toproduce socially responsible and competent physicians whoare willing and able to meet the existing and emergingchallenges of the national and international healthcaresystem. The first cohort of undergraduate medical students(MBBS students was admitted in November 2008 and threecohorts including the one admitted in 2008 have beenadmitted at the time of writing. The basic science subjects aretaught in an integrated, organ-system-based manner withcommunity medicine during the first two years. I wasappointed as the MBBS Phase I programme coordinator inSeptember 2008 and in this article I share my experiences ofrunning the basic sciences programme and also offersuggestions for running an efficient academic programme. Themanuscript will be of special interest to readers runningundergraduate medical programmes. The reader canunderstand our experiences in running the programme inadverse circumstances, learning to achieve greater integrationamong basic science, community medicine and clinicaldepartments, obtain information about a communitydiagnosis programme and know about running specialmodules on the medical humanities and pharmaceuticalpromotion.

  10. Radiation protection dosimetry in medicine - Report of the working group n.9 of the European radiation dosimetry group (EURADOS) - coordinated network for radiation dosimetry (CONRAD - contract EC N) fp6-12684; Dosimetrie pour la radioprotection en milieu medical - rapport du groupe de travail n. 9 du European radiation dosimetry group (EURADOS) - coordinated netword for radiation dosimetry (CONRAD - contrat CE fp6-12684)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This report present the results achieved within the frame of the work the WP 7 (Radiation Protection Dosimetry of Medical Staff) of the coordination action CONRAD (Coordinated Network for Radiation Dosimetry) funded through the 6. EU Framework Program. This action was coordinated by EURADOS (European Radiation Dosimetry Group). EURADOS is an organization founded in 1981 to advance the scientific understanding and the technical development of the dosimetry of ionising radiation in the fields of radiation protection, radiobiology, radiation therapy and medical diagnosis by promoting collaboration between European laboratories. WP7 coordinates and promotes European research for the assessment of occupational exposures to staff in therapeutic and diagnostic radiology workplaces. Research is coordinated through sub-groups covering three specific areas: 1. Extremity dosimetry in nuclear medicine and interventional radiology: this sub-group coordinates investigations in the specific fields of the hospitals and studies of doses to different parts of the hands, arms, legs and feet; 2. Practice of double dosimetry: this sub-group reviews and evaluates the different methods and algorithms for the use of dosemeters placed above and below lead aprons in large exposure during interventional radiology procedures, especially to determine effective doses to cardiologists during cardiac catheterization; and 3. Use of electronic personal dosemeters in interventional radiology: this sub-group coordinates investigations in laboratories and hospitals, and intercomparisons with passive dosemeters with the aim to enable the formulation of standards. (authors)

  11. Collaborating in Life Science Research Groups: The Question of Authorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explores how life science postdocs' perceptions of contemporary academic career rationales influence how they relate to collaboration within research groups. One consequential dimension of these perceptions is the high value assigned to publications. For career progress, postdocs consider producing publications and…

  12. Improving Group Work Practices in Teaching Life Sciences: Trialogical Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammeorg, Priit; Mykkänen, Anna; Rantamäki, Tomi; Lakkala, Minna; Muukkonen, Hanni

    2017-08-01

    Trialogical learning, a collaborative and iterative knowledge creation process using real-life artefacts or problems, familiarizes students with working life environments and aims to teach skills required in the professional world. We target one of the major limitation factors for optimal trialogical learning in university settings, inefficient group work. We propose a course design combining effective group working practices with trialogical learning principles in life sciences. We assess the usability of our design in (a) a case study on crop science education and (b) a questionnaire for university teachers in life science fields. Our approach was considered useful and supportive of the learning process by all the participants in the case study: the students, the stakeholders and the facilitator. Correspondingly, a group of university teachers expressed that the trialogical approach and the involvement of stakeholders could promote efficient learning. In our case in life sciences, we identified the key issues in facilitating effective group work to be the design of meaningful tasks and the allowance of sufficient time to take action based on formative feedback. Even though trialogical courses can be time consuming, the experience of applying knowledge in real-life cases justifies using the approach, particularly for students just about to enter their professional careers.

  13. About the Nutritional Science Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nutritional Science Research Group (NSRG) promotes and supports studies establishing a comprehensive understanding of the precise role of diet and food components in modulating cancer risk and tumor cell behavior. This focus includes approaches to characterize molecular targets and variability in individual responses to nutrients and dietary patterns. |

  14. Aligning Coordination Class Theory with a New Context: Applying a Theory of Individual Learning to Group Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth-Cohen, Lauren A.; Wittmann, Michael C.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents an empirical analysis of conceptual difficulties encountered and ways students made progress in learning at both individual and group levels in a classroom environment in which the students used an embodied modeling activity to make sense of a specific scientific scenario. The theoretical framework, coordination class theory,…

  15. Working Group 7.1 on environmental transport, US-USSR Joint Coordinating Committee on Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains brief summaries of the status of projects of the Environmental Transport Group of the US-USSR Joint Coordinating Committee of Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety. Projects reported on include: Management and Administration; Atmospheric Transport; Resuspension; External Dose; Terrestrial Food Chains; Aquatic Food Chains; Hydrological Transport; and Intercalibration

  16. A Multi-layer Dynamic Model for Coordination Based Group Decision Making in Water Resource Allocation and Scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Xingnan; Li, Chenming; Wang, Jianying

    Management of group decision-making is an important issue in water source management development. In order to overcome the defects in lacking of effective communication and cooperation in the existing decision-making models, this paper proposes a multi-layer dynamic model for coordination in water resource allocation and scheduling based group decision making. By introducing the scheme-recognized cooperative satisfaction index and scheme-adjusted rationality index, the proposed model can solve the problem of poor convergence of multi-round decision-making process in water resource allocation and scheduling. Furthermore, the problem about coordination of limited resources-based group decision-making process can be solved based on the effectiveness of distance-based group of conflict resolution. The simulation results show that the proposed model has better convergence than the existing models.

  17. Homogenisation in project management for large German research projects in the Earth system sciences: overcoming the institutional coordination bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauser, Florian; Vamborg, Freja

    2016-04-01

    The interdisciplinary project on High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing climate prediction HD(CP)2 (hdcp2.eu) is an example for the trend in fundamental research in Europe to increasingly focus on large national and international research programs that require strong scientific coordination. The current system has traditionally been host-based: project coordination activities and funding is placed at the host institute of the central lead PI of the project. This approach is simple and has the advantage of strong collaboration between project coordinator and lead PI, while exhibiting a list of strong, inherent disadvantages that are also mentioned in this session's description: no community best practice development, lack of integration between similar projects, inefficient methodology development and usage, and finally poor career development opportunities for the coordinators. Project coordinators often leave the project before it is finalized, leaving some of the fundamentally important closing processes to the PIs. This systematically prevents the creation of professional science management expertise within academia, which leads to an automatic imbalance that hinders the outcome of large research programs to help future funding decisions. Project coordinators in academia often do not work in a professional project office environment that could distribute activities and use professional tools and methods between different projects. Instead, every new project manager has to focus on methodological work anew (communication infrastructure, meetings, reporting), even though the technological needs of large research projects are similar. This decreases the efficiency of the coordination and leads to funding that is effectively misallocated. We propose to challenge this system by creating a permanent, virtual "Centre for Earth System Science Management CESSMA" (cessma.com), and changing the approach from host- based to centre-based. This should

  18. Tensions et coordinations entre les acteurs des sciences de la performance sportive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Delalandre

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cet article part d’une étude qui questionne les conditions de production des savoirs scientifiques sur la performance sportive, en portant le regard sur les modes de coordination entre les chercheurs et les entraîneurs avec qui ils collaborent. L’analyse d’un matériau empirique constitué d’entretiens et d’un corpus écrit nous a conduit à mettre en évidence trois régimes de scientificité, qui constituent à la fois des modes de coordination des chercheurs et des entraîneurs et des formes particulières de production des savoirs. L’article met en lumière des tensions inhérentes à chacun de ces régimes et les solutions adoptées par les acteurs pour coopérer. Nous nous intéressons enfin aux contraintes que les chercheurs rencontrent pour passer d’un régime à l’autre.Tensions and coordinations between the actors of sports performance sciencesThis article is based on a study which examines how knowledge is produced in the field of sports performance, looking at the modes of coordination between researchers and the coaches with whom they collaborate. The analysis of empirical data made of interviews and texts leads us to show three scientific regimes, which are at the same time specific modes of coordination between scientists and coaches and particular forms of knowledge production. The paper sheds light on the tensions inherent in each regime and the solutions which the actors adopt in order to co-operate. Finally, we study the constraints scientists face when they go from one regime to another.Tensiones y coordinaciones entre los integrantes de las ciencias de la performance deportivaEste trabajo estudia las condiciones de producción del conocimiento científico respecto a la performance deportiva, destacando el modo de coordinación y colaboración entre investigadores y entrenadores. El análisis de un material empírico está constituido por entrevistas y por un corpus escrito que nos ha conducido a determinar

  19. EPA Participates in Energy Roundtable with States, Tribes, Businesses and Environmental Groups to Enhance Coordination and Promote Responsible Domestic Production of Oil and Gas Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA News Release: EPA Participates in Energy Roundtable with States, Tribes, Businesses and Environmental Groups to Enhance Coordination and Promote Responsible Domestic Production of Oil and Gas Resources

  20. Children's Oncology Group's 2013 blueprint for research: behavioral science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Robert B; Patel, Sunita K; Embry, Leanne; Hardy, Kristina K; Pelletier, Wendy; Annett, Robert D; Patenaude, Andrea; Lown, E Anne; Sands, Stephen A; Barakat, Lamia P

    2013-06-01

    Behavioral science has long played a central role in pediatric oncology clinical service and research. Early work focused on symptom relief related to side effects of chemotherapy and pain management related to invasive medical procedures. As survival rates improved, the focused has shifted to examination of the psychosocial impact, during and after treatment, of pediatric cancer and its treatment on children and their families. The success of the clinical trials networks related to survivorship highlights an even more critical role in numerous domains of psychosocial research and care. Within the cooperative group setting, the field of behavioral science includes psychologists, social workers, physicians, nurses, and parent advisors. The research agenda of this group of experts needs to focus on utilization of psychometrically robust measures to evaluate the impact of treatment on children with cancer and their families during and after treatment ends. Over the next 5 years, the field of behavioral science will need to develop and implement initiatives to expand use of standardized neurocognitive and behavior batteries; increase assessment of neurocognition using technology; early identification of at-risk children/families; establish standards for evidence-based psychosocial care; and leverage linkages with the broader behavioral health pediatric oncology community to translate empirically supported research clinical trials care to practice. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Structural studies of novel coordination compounds run in the Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipin, M.Yu.; Starikova, Z.A.; Yanovskij, A.I.; Dolgushin, F.M.; Lysenko, K.A.; Khrustalev, V.N.; Vorontsov, I.I.; Korlyukov, A.A.; Andreev, G.B.; Neretin, I.S.

    2001-01-01

    The results of the investigation into structural chemistry of coordination compounds taking place in the X-ray Laboratory of the Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences are given. The review gives an idea on the tendencies to structural researches of complexes of varying categories of coordination compounds, among which are lithium, strontium, cadmium compounds, rare earth compounds, transuranium compounds, transition element compounds, carboranes, fullerenes. An attempt was made to prove the structure and reveal the novel structural and crystallochemical regularities in the studied series of relative compounds. The outlooks for the following progress of studies on this field are determined [ru

  2. A Mentoring Program in Environmental Science for Underrepresented Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, L.; Rizzo, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    We developed a four-year program, combining educational and career support and research activities, to recruit and retain students from underrepresented groups in environmental sciences. Specifically, the program: ○ Assigns each student a faculty or graduate student mentor with whom the student conducts research activities. ○ Includes a weekly group meeting for team building and to review professional development and academic topics, such as time management and research ethics. ○ Requires students to make multiple formal presentations of their research proposals and results. ○ Provides scholarships and stipends for both the academic year and to engage students in summer research. The program seeks to achieve several goals including: ● Enhance academic performance. ● Encourage continued study in environmental science. ● Facilitate students completing their studies at UVM. ● Increase students’ interest in pursuing science careers. ● Create a more welcoming academic environment. To assess progress toward achievement of these goals, we conducted individual structured interviews with participating undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty members at two points in time. First, interviews were conducted in the fall of 2007 after two years, and again in spring 2009, after four years. An independent research consultant, Dr. Livingston, conducted the interviews. In 2009, over the course of three days, the interviews included three graduate student and two faculty mentors, and six of the seven undergraduate students. Of the six students, three were juniors and three were graduating seniors. Results of the 2009 interviews echoed those of 2007. Both students and their mentors are quite satisfied with the program. The student presentations, weekly meetings, mentoring relationships, and summer research experiences all get high ratings from program participants. Students give high praise to their mentors and the program directors for providing

  3. Metal–organic coordination architectures of tetrazole heterocycle ligands bearing acetate groups: Synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Bo-Wen; Zheng, Xiang-Yu; Ding, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Two new coordination complexes with tetrazole heterocycle ligands bearing acetate groups, [Co(L) 2 ] n (1) and [Co 3 (L) 4 (N 3 ) 2 ·2MeOH] n (2) (L=tetrazole-1-acetate) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Single crystal structure analysis shows that the cobalt-complex 1 has the 3D 3,6-connected (4 2 .6) 2 (4 4 .6 2 .8 8 .10)-ant topology. By introducing azide in this system, complex 2 forms the 2D network containing the [Co 3 ] units. And the magnetic properties of 1 and 2 have been studied. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the new coordination complexes with tetrazole heterocycle ligands bearing acetate groups are reported. - Highlights: • Two novel Cobalt(II) complexes with tetrazole acetate ligands were synthesized. • The magnetic properties of two complexes were studied. • Azide as co-ligand resulted in different structures and magnetic properties. • The new coordination mode of tetrazole acetate ligand was obtained.

  4. Co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, O.; Lemmel, H.D.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the 1996 co-ordination meeting in Brookhaven, U.S.A., of the national and regional nuclear reaction data center, convened by the IAEA at regular intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ''EXFOR'' system, and the further development of this system; the ''CINDA'' system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ''ENDF'' format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with the goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author). Refs, figs, tabs

  5. Co-ordination of the nuclear reactions data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.; Schwerer, O.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the 1998 co-ordination meeting at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna of the regional, national and specialized nuclear reaction data centers, concerned by the IAEA at two-year intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ''EXFOR'' system, and the further development of this system; the ''CINDA'' system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ''ENDF'' format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author)

  6. Co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwerer, O; Lemmel, H D [eds.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the 1996 co-ordination meeting in Brookhaven, U.S.A., of the national and regional nuclear reaction data center, convened by the IAEA at regular intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ``EXFOR`` system, and the further development of this system; the ``CINDA`` system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ``ENDF`` format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with the goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author). Refs, figs, tabs.

  7. Co-ordination of the nuclear reactions data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronyaev, V G; Schwerer, O [eds.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the 1998 co-ordination meeting at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna of the regional, national and specialized nuclear reaction data centers, concerned by the IAEA at two-year intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ``EXFOR`` system, and the further development of this system; the ``CINDA`` system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ``ENDF`` format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author) Refs, figs, tabs

  8. Coordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, D.W.; Pronyaev, V.G.

    1998-03-01

    The international network of nuclear structure and decay data (NSDD) evaluators aims at a complete and periodic nuclear structure and decay data evaluation of all nuclides, the continuous publication of these evaluations and their dissemination to the scientific community. The evaluated data resulting from this concerted international effort are introduced in the Evaluated Structure and Decay Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets. Periodic meetings of this network are held in order to maintain the coordination of all centres and groups participating in the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of NSDD, to maintain and improve the standards and rules governing NSDS evaluation, and to review the development and common use of the computerized systems and databases maintained specifically for this activity. This document is a summary report of the twelfth Meeting on the Coordination of the NSDD Evaluators held between 14-18 October 1996 in Budapest, Hungary

  9. The Community-based Organizations Working Group of the Space Science Education Support Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, J. H.; Lowes, L. L.; Asplund, S.

    2004-12-01

    The NASA Space Science Support Network Community-based Organizations Working Group (CBOWG) has been working for the past two years on issues surrounding afterschool programs and programs for youth (e.g., Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Boys and Girls Clubs, 4-H, summer camps, afterschool and weekend programs for various ages, programs with emphases on minority youth). In this session the co-leaders of the CBOWG will discuss the challenges of working with community-based organizations on a regional or national level. We will highlight some ties that we have forged with the National Institute for Out of School Time (NIOST) and the National Afterschool Association (NAA). We will also talk about efforts to coordinate how various entities within NASA cooperate with community-based organizations to serve the best interests of these groups. We will give a couple of examples of how NASA space science organizations have partnered with community-based organizations. The session will include some handouts of information and resources that the CBOWG has found useful in developing an understanding of this segment of informal education groups. We would like to thank NASA for providing resources to support the work of the CBOWG.

  10. International Earth Science Constellation Mission Operations Working Group: Constellation Coordination System (CCS) Status. [Constellation Coordination System (CCS) Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeberdis, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This is a presentation at the MOWG fall meeting that will discuss CCS purpose, future status, security enhancements, arbitrary ephemeris mission features, overview of CCS 7.3, approach for the use of NORAD TLEs, account and data security, CCS System virtualization, control box visualization modification and other enhancements.

  11. Coordinated Multi-layer Multi-domain Optical Network (COMMON) for Large-Scale Science Applications (COMMON)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vokkarane, Vinod [University of Massachusetts

    2013-09-01

    We intend to implement a Coordinated Multi-layer Multi-domain Optical Network (COMMON) Framework for Large-scale Science Applications. In the COMMON project, specific problems to be addressed include 1) anycast/multicast/manycast request provisioning, 2) deployable OSCARS enhancements, 3) multi-layer, multi-domain quality of service (QoS), and 4) multi-layer, multidomain path survivability. In what follows, we outline the progress in the above categories (Year 1, 2, and 3 deliverables).

  12. The Third Annual NASA Science Internet User Working Group Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Brian S. (Editor); Gary, J. Patrick (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Science Internet (NSI) User Support Office (USO) sponsored the Third Annual NSI User Working Group (NSIUWG) Conference March 30 through April 3, 1992, in Greenbelt, MD. Approximately 130 NSI users attended to learn more about the NSI, hear from projects which use NSI, and receive updates about new networking technologies and services. This report contains material relevant to the conference; copies of the agenda, meeting summaries, presentations, and descriptions of exhibitors. Plenary sessions featured a variety of speakers, including NSI project management, scientists, and NSI user project managers whose projects and applications effectively use NSI, and notable citizens of the larger Internet community. The conference also included exhibits of advanced networking applications; tutorials on internetworking, computer security, and networking technologies; and user subgroup meetings on the future direction of the conference, networking, and user services and applications.

  13. Metal-organic coordination architectures of tetrazole heterocycle ligands bearing acetate groups: Synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo-Wen; Zheng, Xiang-Yu; Ding, Cheng

    2015-12-01

    Two new coordination complexes with tetrazole heterocycle ligands bearing acetate groups, [Co(L)2]n (1) and [Co3(L)4(N3)2·2MeOH]n (2) (L=tetrazole-1-acetate) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Single crystal structure analysis shows that the cobalt-complex 1 has the 3D 3,6-connected (42.6)2(44.62.88.10)-ant topology. By introducing azide in this system, complex 2 forms the 2D network containing the [Co3] units. And the magnetic properties of 1 and 2 have been studied.

  14. Gender-heterogeneous working groups produce higher quality science.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley G Campbell

    Full Text Available Here we present the first empirical evidence to support the hypothesis that a gender-heterogeneous problem-solving team generally produced journal articles perceived to be higher quality by peers than a team comprised of highly-performing individuals of the same gender. Although women were historically underrepresented as principal investigators of working groups, their frequency as PIs at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis is now comparable to the national frequencies in biology and they are now equally qualified, in terms of their impact on the accumulation of ecological knowledge (as measured by the h-index. While women continue to be underrepresented as working group participants, peer-reviewed publications with gender-heterogeneous authorship teams received 34% more citations than publications produced by gender-uniform authorship teams. This suggests that peers citing these publications perceive publications that also happen to have gender-heterogeneous authorship teams as higher quality than publications with gender uniform authorship teams. Promoting diversity not only promotes representation and fairness but may lead to higher quality science.

  15. Gender-heterogeneous working groups produce higher quality science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Lesley G; Mehtani, Siya; Dozier, Mary E; Rinehart, Janice

    2013-01-01

    Here we present the first empirical evidence to support the hypothesis that a gender-heterogeneous problem-solving team generally produced journal articles perceived to be higher quality by peers than a team comprised of highly-performing individuals of the same gender. Although women were historically underrepresented as principal investigators of working groups, their frequency as PIs at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis is now comparable to the national frequencies in biology and they are now equally qualified, in terms of their impact on the accumulation of ecological knowledge (as measured by the h-index). While women continue to be underrepresented as working group participants, peer-reviewed publications with gender-heterogeneous authorship teams received 34% more citations than publications produced by gender-uniform authorship teams. This suggests that peers citing these publications perceive publications that also happen to have gender-heterogeneous authorship teams as higher quality than publications with gender uniform authorship teams. Promoting diversity not only promotes representation and fairness but may lead to higher quality science.

  16. Joint Technical Coordinating Group on Aircraft Survivability (JTCG/AS). Bibliography of Joint Aircraft Survivability Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    PMSG ). Report No.: JTCG/AS-99-D-003 Report Classification: UNCLASSIFIED Title: JTCG/AS Bibliography of Joint Aircraft Survivability Reports and...indicates those approved and not approved for funding by the Principal Members Steering Group ( PMSG ). Report No.: Report Classification: JTCG/AS-97-V-010...demonstrated by additional tests conducted at NWSC/Crane (up to Mach 0.8) and Rockwell International wind tunnel (up to Mach 1/9 and 30,000 feet altitude

  17. A Group Motor Skills Program for Children with Coordination Difficulties: Effect on Fundamental Movement Skills and Physical Activity Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Kyra J; Staples, Kerri L

    2016-01-01

    Children with coordination difficulties are at risk of low levels of physical activity (PA) participation. This intervention examined the effects of a multidisciplinary program that emphasized parent participation on motor skill performance and PA. Ten boys (5-7 years) completed a group program consisting of conditioning exercises and activities designed to address child-selected goals. Motor proficiency and PA participation were assessed before and after the program using the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD-2) and triaxial accelerometers, respectively. Rating scales captured child and parent perceptions of performance for each child's goals. TGMD-2 subtest raw scores, age equivalent and percentile scores improved, along with parent ratings of their child's performance. Six children reported skill improvements. On average, moderate to vigorous PA improved by 10 min per day although these gains were not significant. Time spent in sedentary activities was unchanged. None of the children met the Canadian PA and sedentary behaviour guidelines. The results support effectiveness of a group program to improve gross motor performance and levels of PA in children with coordination difficulties. Gains in both of these domains also have the potential to impact quality of life and reduce health risks associated with inactivity.

  18. Different-ligand coordination europium compounds with dibenzoylmethane, nitrate-group, and hexamethylphosphotriamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasev, V.E.; Botova, I.N.

    1988-01-01

    Some different-ligand europium complexes with dibenzoylmethane (DBM), hexamethylphosphotriamide (HMPA) and NO 3 -group of composition: Eu(NO 3 ) 3 x3HMPAx2H 2 O, Eu(NO 3 ) 2 xDBMx2HMPA, EuNO 3 x(DBM) 2 x2HMPA and Eu(DBM) 3 xHMPA are synthesized. Individuality of each complex is confirmed by methods of chemical, IR spectroscopic, luminescent, thermogravimetric analyses. Integral intensities of luminescence of synthesized complexes are measured, their excitation spectra in the crystal state at 77 K in the 200-600 nm range are studied

  19. Influence of a Heterocyclic Nitrogen-Donor Group on the Coordination of Trivalent Actinides and Lanthanides by Aminopolycarboxylate Complexants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Travis S; Heathman, Colt R; Jansone-Popova, Santa; Ivanov, Alexander S; Roy, Santanu; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S; Zalupski, Peter R

    2018-02-05

    The novel metal chelator N-2-(pyridylmethyl)diethylenetriamine-N,N',N″,N″-tetraacetic acid (DTTA-PyM) was designed to replace a single oxygen-donor acetate group of the well-known aminopolycarboxylate complexant diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N″,N″-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) with a nitrogen-donor 2-pyridylmethyl. Potentiometric, spectroscopic, computational, and radioisotope distribution methods show distinct differences for the 4f and 5f coordination environments and enhanced actinide binding due to the nitrogen-bearing heterocyclic moiety. The Am 3+ , Cm 3+ , and Ln 3+ complexation studies for DTTA-PyM reveal an enhanced preference, relative to DTPA, for trivalent actinide binding. Fluorescence studies indicate no changes to the octadentate coordination of trivalent curium, while evidence of heptadentate complexation of trivalent europium is found in mixtures containing EuHL (aq) complexes at the same aqueous acidity. The denticity change observed for Eu 3+ suggests that complex protonation occurs on the pyridyl nitrogen. Formation of the CmHL (aq) complex is likely due to the protonation of an available carboxylate group because the carbonyl oxygen can maintain octadentate coordination through a rotation. The observed suppressed protonation of the pyridyl nitrogen in the curium complexes may be attributed to stronger trivalent actinide binding by DTTA-PyM. Density functional theory calculations indicate that added stabilization of the actinide complexes with DTTA-PyM may originate from π-back-bonding interactions between singly occupied 5f orbitals of Am 3+ and the pyridyl nitrogen. The differences between the stabilities of trivalent actinide chelates (Am 3+ , Cm 3+ ) and trivalent lanthanide chelates (La 3+ -Lu 3+ ) are observed in liquid-liquid extraction systems, yielding unprecedented 4f/5f differentiation when using DTTA-PyM as an aqueous holdback reagent. In addition, the enhanced nitrogen-donor softness of the new DTTA-PyM chelator was perturbed by

  20. Influence of a Heterocyclic Nitrogen-Donor Group on the Coordination of Trivalent Actinides and Lanthanides by Aminopolycarboxylate Complexants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Travis S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Heathman, Colt R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jansone-Popova, Santa [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ivanov, Alexander S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Roy, Santanu [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zalupski, Peter R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2018-01-05

    Here, the novel metal chelator N-2-(pyridylmethyl)diethylenetriamine-N,N',N",N"-tetraacetic acid (DTTA-PyM) was designed to replace a single oxygen-donor acetate group of the well-known aminopolycarboxylate complexant diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N",N"-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) with a nitrogen-donor 2-pyridylmethyl. Potentiometric, spectroscopic, computational, and radioisotope distribution methods show distinct differences for the 4f and 5f coordination environments and enhanced actinide binding due to the nitrogen-bearing heterocyclic moiety. The Am3+, Cm3+, and Ln3+ complexation studies for DTTA-PyM reveal an enhanced preference, relative to DTPA, for trivalent actinide binding. Fluorescence studies indicate no changes to the octadentate coordination of trivalent curium, while evidence of heptadentate complexation of trivalent europium is found in mixtures containing EuHL(aq) complexes at the same aqueous acidity. The denticity change observed for Eu3+ suggests that complex protonation occurs on the pyridyl nitrogen. Formation of the CmHL(aq) complex is likely due to the protonation of an available carboxylate group because the carbonyl oxygen can maintain octadentate coordination through a rotation. The observed suppressed protonation of the pyridyl nitrogen in the curium complexes may be attributed to stronger trivalent actinide binding by DTTA-PyM. Density functional theory calculations indicate that added stabilization of the actinide complexes with DTTA-PyM may originate from π-back-bonding interactions between singly occupied 5f orbitals of Am3+ and the pyridyl nitrogen. The differences between the stabilities of trivalent actinide chelates (Am3+, Cm3+) and trivalent lanthanide chelates (La3+–Lu3+) are observed in liquid–liquid extraction systems, yielding unprecedented 4f/5f differentiation when using DTTA

  1. Report on identification of federal radiation issues: To the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    The Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC) was established on April 9, 1984 by the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) under the authority of the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology (FCCSET). It is chaired by OSTP. CIRRPC membership consists of those agencies having specific responsibilities or interest in radiation research and/or policy. CIRRPC has two elements: The Committee itself, consisting of subcabinet and senior policy level representatives, and a Science Panel, consisting of senior radiation scientists from the respective member agencies. The structure and membership of CIRRPC is shown in Figure 2. It was decided at the inception of CIRRPC to identify the radiation issues of concern to the Federal agencies, Congress, and professional societies faced with radiation policy or scientific issues. It was felt that a current list of national radiation issues should be assembled so that CIRRPC could concentrate on these issues and the dividends from CIRRPC's resources could be maximized at the earliest possible time. These issues are listed

  2. A sustainable storage solution for the Science Museum Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Leskard

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Museums in recent years have sought ways to reduce the environmental impact of their operations. One approach has been to look at ways to cut back on the energy required to stabilise storage conditions, particularly relative humidity, through passive moisture control rather than mechanical systems of heating and air conditioning. To this end the Science Museum Group employed hemp in the form of hemp-lime concrete, to construct a new storage facility for its collections, drawing on research into the buffering ability of hygroscopic natural building materials. The objective was to reduce energy use, to decrease reliance on mechanical systems and to produce very stable levels of relative humidity, in order to ensure the preservation of significant heritage collections. Although a prototype, to date, this building has performed as anticipated despite some initial construction snags and mechanical system malfunctions. The results encourage further investigation into hygroscopic construction materials to design even more energy-saving ways of providing stable storage conditions for museums.

  3. Coordinated science with the Solar Orbiter, Solar Probe Plus, Interhelioprobe and SPORT missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimovic, Milan; Vourlidas, Angelos; Zimovets, Ivan; Velli, Marco; Zhukov, Andrei; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Liu, Ying; Bale, Stuart; Ming, Xiong

    The concurrent science operations of the ESA Solar Orbiter (SO), NASA Solar Probe Plus (SPP), Russian Interhelioprobe (IHP) and Chinese SPORT missions will offer a truly unique epoch in heliospheric science. While each mission will achieve its own important science objectives, taken together the four missions will be capable of doing the multi-point measurements required to address many problems in Heliophysics such as the coronal origin of the solar wind plasma and magnetic field or the way the Solar transients drive the heliospheric variability. In this presentation, we discuss the capabilities of the four missions and the Science synergy that will be realized by concurrent operations

  4. Group-theoretical deduction of a dyadic Tamm-Dancoff equation by using a matrix-valued generator coordinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Seiya; Morita, Hiroyuki; Ohnishi, Hiromasa

    2004-01-01

    The traditional Tamm-Dancoff (TD) method is one of the standard procedures for solving the Schroedinger equation of fermion many-body systems. However, it meets a serious difficulty when an instability occurs in the symmetry-adapted ground state of the independent particle approximation (IPA) and when the stable IPA ground state becomes of broken symmetry. If one uses the stable but broken symmetry IPA ground state as the starting approximation, TD wave functions also become of broken symmetry. On the contrary, if we start from a symmetry-adapted but unstable wave function, the convergence of the TD expansion becomes bad. Thus, the requirements of symmetry and rapid convergence are not in general compatible in the conventional TD expansion of the systems with strong collective correlations. Along the same line as Fukutome's, we give a group-theoretical deduction of a U(n) dyadic TD equation by using a matrix-valued generator coordinate

  5. The Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) report of the Science Coordination Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) is a telescope designed to carry out high-angular resolution, high-sensitivity observations at far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. The scientific rationale for the LDR is discussed in light of the recent Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) and Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) results and the several new ground-based observatories planned for the late 1980s. The importance of high sensitivity and high angular resolution observations from space in the submillimeter region is stressed. The scientific and technical problems of using the LDR in a light bucket mode at approx. less than 5 microns and in designing the LDR as an unfilled aperture with subarcsecond resolution are also discussed. The need for an aperture as large as 20 m is established, along with the requirements of beam-shape stability, spatial chopping, thermal control, and surface figure stability. The instrument complement required to cover the wavelength-spectral resolution region of interest to the LDR is defined.

  6. Radiation protection dosimetry in medicine - Report of the working group n.9 of the European radiation dosimetry group (EURADOS) - coordinated network for radiation dosimetry (CONRAD - contract EC N) fp6-12684

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This report present the results achieved within the frame of the work the WP 7 (Radiation Protection Dosimetry of Medical Staff) of the coordination action CONRAD (Coordinated Network for Radiation Dosimetry) funded through the 6. EU Framework Program. This action was coordinated by EURADOS (European Radiation Dosimetry Group). EURADOS is an organization founded in 1981 to advance the scientific understanding and the technical development of the dosimetry of ionising radiation in the fields of radiation protection, radiobiology, radiation therapy and medical diagnosis by promoting collaboration between European laboratories. WP7 coordinates and promotes European research for the assessment of occupational exposures to staff in therapeutic and diagnostic radiology workplaces. Research is coordinated through sub-groups covering three specific areas: 1. Extremity dosimetry in nuclear medicine and interventional radiology: this sub-group coordinates investigations in the specific fields of the hospitals and studies of doses to different parts of the hands, arms, legs and feet; 2. Practice of double dosimetry: this sub-group reviews and evaluates the different methods and algorithms for the use of dosemeters placed above and below lead aprons in large exposure during interventional radiology procedures, especially to determine effective doses to cardiologists during cardiac catheterization; and 3. Use of electronic personal dosemeters in interventional radiology: this sub-group coordinates investigations in laboratories and hospitals, and intercomparisons with passive dosemeters with the aim to enable the formulation of standards. (authors)

  7. The Role of School District Science Coordinators in the District-Wide Appropriation of an Online Resource Discovery and Sharing Tool for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Victor R.; Leary, Heather M.; Sellers, Linda; Recker, Mimi

    2014-06-01

    When introducing and implementing a new technology for science teachers within a school district, we must consider not only the end users but also the roles and influence district personnel have on the eventual appropriation of that technology. School districts are, by their nature, complex systems with multiple individuals at different levels in the organization who are involved in supporting and providing instruction. Varying levels of support for new technologies between district coordinators and teachers can sometimes lead to counterintuitive outcomes. In this article, we examine the role of the district science coordinator in five school districts that participated in the implementation of an online resource discovery and sharing tool for Earth science teachers. Using a qualitative approach, we conducted and coded interviews with district coordinators and teachers to examine the varied responsibilities associated with the district coordinator and to infer the relationships that were developed and perceived by teachers. We then examine and discuss two cases that illustrate how those relationships could have influenced how the tool was adopted and used to differing degrees in the two districts. Specifically, the district that had high support for online resource use from its coordinator appeared to have the lowest level of tool use, and the district with much less visible support from its coordinator had the highest level of tool use. We explain this difference in terms of how the coordinator's promotion of teacher autonomy took distinctly different forms at those two districts.

  8. Power and Networks in Worldwide Knowledge Coordination: The Case of Global Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The article considers the global governance of knowledge systems, exploring concepts of power, networks, standards (defined as normative practices), and structuration. The focus is on science as a form of predominantly private global governance, particularly the self-regulatory and collaborative processes stretching across time and space. These…

  9. TESS Follow-up Observing Program (TFOP) Working Group:A Mission-led Effort to Coordinate Community Resources to Confirm TESS Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Karen; Quinn, Samuel N.; Latham, David W.; Christiansen, Jessie; Ciardi, David; Dragomir, Diana; Crossfield, Ian; Seager, Sara

    2018-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will observe most of the sky over a period of two years. Observations will be conducted in 26 sectors of sky coverage and each sector will be observed for ~27 days. Data from each sector is expected to produce hundreds of transiting planet candidates (PCs) per month and thousands over the two year nominal mission. The TFOP Working Group (WG) is a mission-led effort organized to efficiently provide follow-up observations to confirm candidates as planets or reject them as false positives. The primary goal of the TFOP WG is to facilitate achievement of the Level One Science Requirement to measure masses for 50 transiting planets smaller than 4 Earth radii. Secondary goals are to serve any science coming out of TESS and to foster communication and coordination both within the TESS Science Team and with the community at large. The TFOP WG is organized as five Sub Groups (SGs). SG1 will provide seeing-limited imaging to measure blending within a candidate's aperture and time-series photometry to identify false positives and in some cases to improve ephemerides, light curves, and/or transit time variation (TTV) measurements. SG2 will provide reconnaissance spectroscopy to identify astrophysical false positives and to contribute to improved host star parameters. SG3 will provide high-resolution imaging with adaptive optics, speckle imaging, and lucky imaging to detect nearby objects. SG4 will provide precise radial velocities to derive orbits of planet(s) and measure their mass(es) relative to the host star. SG5 will provide space-based photometry to confirm and/or improve the TESS photometric ephemerides, and will also provide improved light curves for transit events or TTV measurements. We describe the TFOP WG observing and planet confirmation process, the five SGs that comprise the TFOP WG, ExoFOP-TESS and other web-based tools being developed to support TFOP WG observers, other advantages of joining the TFOP WG, the TFOP

  10. 76 FR 26771 - NASA Advisory Council; Task Group of the Science Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-09

    ... of the Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as... the NASA Advisory Council (NAC) Science Committee. This Task Group reports to the Science Committee of...

  11. 76 FR 21073 - NASA Advisory Council; Task Group of the Science Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... of the Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as... the NASA Advisory Council (NAC) Science Committee. This Task Group reports to the Science Committee of...

  12. D4SCIENCE-II - Report on inter-projects coordination and collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Castelli, Donatella; Zoppi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    This deliverable reports on the collaborations with other FP7 projects and R&D programmes established by D4Science-II from the beginning of the project until July 2010. The collaborations described are of different nature, as they range from purely technical exchanges involving mutual exploitation of technologies to the sharing of e- Infrastructure resources and to the joint organization of networking and dissemination events. The deliverable presents these collaborations clustered into: (i) ...

  13. “Not Designed for Us”: How Science Museums and Science Centers Socially Exclude Low-Income, Minority Ethnic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores how people from low-income, minority ethnic groups perceive and experience exclusion from informal science education (ISE) institutions, such as museums and science centers. Drawing on qualitative data from four focus groups, 32 interviews, four accompanied visits to ISE institutions, and field notes, this paper presents an analysis of exclusion from science learning opportunities during visits alongside participants’ attitudes, expectations, and conclusions about participation in ISE. Participants came from four community groups in central London: a Sierra Leonean group (n = 21), a Latin American group (n = 18), a Somali group (n = 6), and an Asian group (n = 13). Using a theoretical framework based on the work of Bourdieu, the analysis suggests ISE practices were grounded in expectations about visitors’ scientific knowledge, language skills, and finances in ways that were problematic for participants and excluded them from science learning opportunities. It is argued that ISE practices reinforced participants preexisting sense that museums and science centers were “not for us.” The paper concludes with a discussion of the findings in relation to previous research on participation in ISE and the potential for developing more inclusive informal science learning opportunities. PMID:25574059

  14. PBL Group Autonomy in a High School Environmental Science Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, D. Mark; Belland, Brian R.

    2018-01-01

    With increasing class sizes, teachers and facilitators alike hope for learning groups where students work together in self-contained and autonomous ways requiring reduced teacher support. Yet many instructors find the idea of developing independent learning in small groups to be elusive particularly in K-12 settings (Ertmer and Simons in…

  15. Research on same-gender grouping in eighth-grade science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Jennifer Ingrid

    This study examined two hypotheses related to same-gender grouping of eighth-grade science classes in a public middle-school setting in suburban Kansas City. The first hypothesis, male and female students enrolled in same-gender eighth-grade science classes demonstrate more positive science academic achievement than their male and female peers enrolled in mixed-gender science classes. The second hypothesis, same-gender grouping of students in eighth-grade science has a positive effect on classroom climate. The participants in this study were randomly assigned to class sections of eighth-grade science. The first experimental group was an eighth-grade science class of all-male students (n = 20) taught by a male science teacher. The control group used for comparison to the male same-gender class consisted of the male students (n = 42) in the coeducational eighth-grade science classes taught by the same male teacher. The second experimental group was an eighth-grade science class of all-female students (n = 23) taught by a female science teacher. The control group for the female same-gender class consisted of female students (n = 61) in the coeducational eighth-grade science classes taught by the same female teacher. The male teacher and the female teacher did not vary instruction for the same-gender and mixed-gender classes. Science academic achievement was measured for both groups through a quantitative analysis using grades on science classroom assessment and overall science course grades. Classroom climate was measured through qualitative observations and through qualitative and quantitative analysis of a twenty-question student survey administered at the end of each trimester grading period. The results of this study did not indicate support for either hypothesis. Data led to the conclusions that same-gender grouping did not produce significant differences in student science academic achievement, and that same-gender classes did not create a more positive

  16. NETL's Energy Data Exchange (EDX) - a coordination, collaboration, and data resource discovery platform for energy science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, K.; Rowan, C.; Rager, D.; Dehlin, M.; Baker, D. V.; McIntyre, D.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-organizational research teams working jointly on projects often encounter problems with discovery, access to relevant existing resources, and data sharing due to large file sizes, inappropriate file formats, or other inefficient options that make collaboration difficult. The Energy Data eXchange (EDX) from Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is an evolving online research environment designed to overcome these challenges in support of DOE's fossil energy goals while offering improved access to data driven products of fossil energy R&D such as datasets, tools, and web applications. In 2011, development of NETL's Energy Data eXchange (EDX) was initiated and offers i) a means for better preserving of NETL's research and development products for future access and re-use, ii) efficient, discoverable access to authoritative, relevant, external resources, and iii) an improved approach and tools to support secure, private collaboration and coordination between multi-organizational teams to meet DOE mission and goals. EDX presently supports fossil energy and SubTER Crosscut research activities, with an ever-growing user base. EDX is built on a heavily customized instance of the open source platform, Comprehensive Knowledge Archive Network (CKAN). EDX connects users to externally relevant data and tools through connecting to external data repositories built on different platforms and other CKAN platforms (e.g. Data.gov). EDX does not download and repost data or tools that already have an online presence. This leads to redundancy and even error. If a relevant resource already has an online instance, is hosted by another online entity, EDX will point users to that external host either using web services, inventorying URLs and other methods. EDX offers users the ability to leverage private-secure capabilities custom built into the system. The team is presently working on version 3 of EDX which will incorporate big data analytical

  17. Coordination of the EU's emissions trading, energy taxation and subsidies for energy production. Interim Report by the Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Working Group was to make preparations for the coordination of emissions trading in the European Union, energy taxation and energy production subsidies. It was supposed to issue an interim report on the role of energy taxation by 15 December 2003. In its interim report, the Working Group examined the present energy taxation scheme and the needs for its development upon the start-up of EU-wide emissions trading in 2005. The aim has been to recognise the immediate needs for amending energy taxation and energy tax subsidies in the near future while taking account of the outlines set out in the Government Programme. From the climate policy perspective, emissions trading is an efficient means of steering, because the commitment set for the emissions trading sector can be met by means of it. At the first stage, the EU's emissions trading will concern carbon dioxide emissions only, and in the future probably also other greenhouse gas emissions mentioned in the Kyoto Protocol. Its steering effect does not extend to other emissions, such as acidifying emissions. Other measures will be required for curbing them. Emissions trading is not a sufficient instrument for energy policy, although it partly directs development in a direction that is favourable for energy policy targets. On top of that, the most important steering mechanism of emissions trading, the price of an emission allowance, is beyond the reach of Finnish energy policy. It is determined on the EU-wide emission allowances market. The current energy taxation and energy tax subsidies safeguard the position of renewable energy sources in the circumstances of emissions trading. The competitiveness of domestic fuels, too, can be partly secured with current taxes. In the energy production of communities and industry, energy wood often replaces peat. i.e. two domestic and local fuels are competing against one another. In condensing power production peat is clearly losing more of its competitive edge the higher the

  18. Effects of gender and role selection in cooperative learning groups on science inquiry achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affhalter, Maria Geralyn

    An action research project using science inquiry labs and cooperative learning groups examined the effects of same-gender and co-educational classrooms on science achievement and teacher-assigned or self-selected group roles on students' role preferences. Fifty-nine seventh grade students from a small rural school district participated in two inquiry labs in co-educational classrooms or in an all-female classroom, as determined by parents at the beginning of the academic year. Students were assigned to the same cooperative groups for the duration of the study. Pretests and posttests were administered for each inquiry-based science lab. Posttest assessments included questions for student reflection on role assignment and role preference. Instruction did not vary and a female science teacher taught all class sections. The same-gender classroom and co-ed classrooms produced similar science achievement scores on posttests. Students' cooperative group roles, whether teacher-assigned or self-selected, produced similar science achievement scores on posttests. Male and female students shared equally in favorable and unfavorable reactions to their group roles during the science inquiry labs. Reflections on the selection of the leader role revealed a need for females in co-ed groups to be "in charge". When reflecting on her favorite role of leader, one female student in a co-ed group stated, "I like to have people actually listen to me".

  19. N-1: Safeguards Science and Technology Group, Tour Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Group N-1 develops and provides training on nondestructive assay (NDA) technologies intended for nuclear material accounting and control to fulfill both international and domestic obligations. The N-1 group is located at Technical Area (TA)-35 in Buildings 2 and 27. Visitors to the area can observe developed and fielded NDA technologies, as well as the latest research efforts to develop the next generation of NDA technologies. Several areas are used for NDA training. The N-1 School House area typically is used for basic training on neutron- and gamma-ray-based NDA techniques. This area contains an assortment of gamma-ray detector systems, including sodium iodide and high-purity germanium and the associated measurement components. Many types of neutron assay systems are located here, including both standard coincidence and multiplicity counters. The N-1 School House area is also used for holdup training; located here are the mock holdup assemblies and associated holdup measurement tools. Other laboratory areas in the N-1 space are used for specialized training, such as waste NDA, calorimetry, and advanced gamma-ray NDA. Also, many research laboratories in the N-1 space are used to develop new NDA technologies. The calorimetry laboratory is used to develop and evaluate new technologies and techniques that measure the heat signature from nuclear material to determine mass. The micro calorimetry laboratory is being used to develop advanced technologies that can measure gamma rays with extremely high resolution. This technique has been proven in the laboratory setting, and the team is now working to cultivate a field-capable system. The N-1 group also develops remote and unattended systems for the tracking and control of nuclear material. A demonstration of this technology is located within one of the laboratory spaces. The source tracker software was developed by N-1 to monitor the locations and quantities of nuclear materials. This software is currently used to track

  20. Care coordination in bone health screening between individual behaviors and health care services among Korean-American women across three age groups

    OpenAIRE

    Young-Shin Lee

    2017-01-01

    Integrated continuous care is important to prevent and treat brittle bone status in the aging process; however, minority groups often have limited access to health services. The purpose of this study was to identify the care coordination among women’s perceptions about their bone health, information from health care providers, and the results of Bone Mineral Density (BMD) tests across three age groups. The study was a cross-sectional comparative design. A total of 63 Korean American women com...

  1. Palladium/IzQO-Catalyzed Coordination-Insertion Copolymerization of Ethylene and 1,1-Disubstituted Ethylenes Bearing a Polar Functional Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Hina; Nakano, Ryo; Ito, Shingo; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2018-02-07

    Coordination-insertion copolymerization of ethylene with 1,1-disubstituted ethylenes bearing a polar functional group, such as methyl methacrylate (MMA), is a long-standing challenge in catalytic polymerization. The major obstacle for this process is the huge difference in reactivity of ethylene versus 1,1-disubstituted ethylenes toward both coordination and insertion. Herein we report the copolymerization of ethylene and 1,1-disubstituted ethylenes by using an imidazo[1,5-a]quinolin-9-olate-1-ylidene-supported palladium catalyst. Various types of 1,1-disubstituted ethylenes were successfully incorporated into the polyethylene chain. In-depth characterization of the obtained copolymers and mechanistic inferences drawn from stoichiometric reactions of alkylpalladium complexes with methyl methacrylate and ethylene indicate that the copolymerization proceeds by the same coordination-insertion mechanism that has been postulated for ethylene.

  2. Action research in gender issues in science education: Towards an understanding of group work with science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyhof-Young, Joyce Marion

    Action research is emerging as a promising means of promoting individual and societal change in the context of university programmes in teacher education. However, significant gaps exist in the literature regarding the use of action research groups for the education of science teachers. Therefore, an action research group, dealing with gender issues in science education, was established within the context of a graduate course in action research at OISE. For reasons outlined in the thesis, action research was deemed an especially appropriate means for addressing issues of gender. The group met 14 times from September 1992 until May 1993 and consisted of myself and five other science teachers from the Toronto area. Two of us were in the primary panel, two in the intermediate panel, and two in the tertiary panel. Five teachers were female. One was male. The experiences of the group form the basis of this study. A methodology of participant observation supported by interviews, classroom visits, journals, group feedback and participant portfolios provides a means of examining experiences from the perspective of the participants in the group. The case study investigates the nature of the support and learning opportunities that the action research group provided for science teachers engaged in curiculum and professional development in the realm of gender issues in science education, and details the development of individuals, the whole group and myself (as group worker, researcher and participant) over the life of the project. The action research group became a resource for science teachers by providing most participants with: A place to personalize learning and research; a place for systematic reflection and research; a forum for discussion; a source of personal/professional support; a source of friendship; and a place to break down isolation and build self-confidence. This study clarifies important relational and political issues that impinge on action research in

  3. Science Research Group Leader's Power and Members' Compliance and Satisfaction with Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yi; He, Jia; Luo, Changkun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the correlations between science research group members' perceptions of power bases used by their group (lab, team) leader (coercive, reward, legitimate, expert and referent) and the effect of those perceptions on group members' attitudinal compliance, behavioral compliance, and satisfaction with supervision. Participants…

  4. Short Circuits or Superconductors? Effects of Group Composition on High-Achieving Students' Science Assessment Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Noreen M.; Nemer, Kariane Mari; Zuniga, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Studied the effects of group ability composition (homogeneous versus heterogeneous) on group processes and outcomes for high-ability students completing science assessments. Results for 83 high ability students show the quality of group functioning serves as the strongest predictor of high-ability students' performance and explained much of the…

  5. A Cooperative Learning Group Procedure for Improving CTE and Science Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to create information about the employment of Cooperative Learning Groups (CLG) to enhance the science integrating learning objectives utilized in secondary CTE courses. The objectives of the study were to determine if CLGs were an effective means for increasing the number of: a) science integrating learning…

  6. Scientifically speaking: Identifying, analyzing, and promoting science talk in small groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthuis, Nicole Inamine

    In this dissertation I define, document, and analyze the nature of students' science talk as they work in cooperative learning groups. Three questions form the basis of this research. First, what is science talk? Second, how much and what kind of science talk did students do? And, third, what conditions help promote or inhibit students' science talk? This study was conducted in a total of six classrooms in three high schools. I videotaped and audiotaped students as they worked in small groups during the course of an ecology unit. I analyzed this videotape data and field notes using both quantitative and qualitative methods. I define science talk as talk that serves to move students along in terms of the science (both content and process) required or suggested by the activity. More specifically, I identified five epistemological characteristics that delineate what counts as scientific knowledge and, subsequently, science talk. From this definition, I developed an analytic framework and science talk observation instrument to document the quantity and level of student and teacher talk during groupwork. Analysis of the data from this instrument indicates that the overall level of students' science talk is considerable and students do significantly more science talk than school talk. I also found that while the overall level and type of science talk does not vary by class or by school, it does vary by activity type. Finally, my analysis suggests that science talk does not vary by gender composition of the group. I explored the classroom conditions that promote or inhibit science talk during groupwork. My findings suggest that, among other things, teachers can promote science talk by delegating authority to students, by emphasizing content and the big idea, by implementing open-ended tasks, and by modeling science talk. In conclusion, the findings described in this dissertation point teachers and researchers toward ways in which they may improve practice in order to

  7. The effects of different gender groupings on middle school students' performance in science lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drab, Deborah D.

    Grouping students for labs in science classes is a common practice. This mixed methods quasi-experimental action research study examines homogeneous and heterogeneous gender grouping strategies to determine what gender grouping strategy is the most effective in a coeducational science classroom setting. Sixth grade students were grouped in same-gender and mixed-gender groups, alternating each quarter. Over the course of an academic year, data were collected from four sources. The teacher-researcher observed groups working during hands-on activities to collect data on student behaviors. Students completed post-lab questionnaires and an end-of-course questionnaire about their preferences and experiences in the different grouping strategies. Student scores on written lab assignments were also utilized. Data analysis focused on four areas: active engagement, student achievement, student perceptions of success and cooperative teamwork. Findings suggest that teachers may consider grouping students of different ability levels according to different gender grouping strategies to optimize learning.

  8. A Comparison of Creativity in Project Groups in Science and Engineering Education in Denmark and China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang; Valero, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Different pedagogical strategies influence the development of creativity in project groups in science and engineering education. This study is a comparison between two cases: Problem-Based Learning (PBL) in Denmark and Project-Organized Learning (POL) in China.......Different pedagogical strategies influence the development of creativity in project groups in science and engineering education. This study is a comparison between two cases: Problem-Based Learning (PBL) in Denmark and Project-Organized Learning (POL) in China....

  9. Coordinating Communities and Building Governance in the Development of Schematic and Semantic Standards: the Key to Solving Global Earth and Space Science Challenges in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyborn, L. A.

    2007-12-01

    The Information Age in Science is being driven partly by the data deluge as exponentially growing volumes of data are being generated by research. Such large volumes of data cannot be effectively processed by humans and efficient and timely processing by computers requires development of specific machine readable formats. Further, as key challenges in earth and space sciences, such as climate change, hazard prediction and sustainable development resources require a cross disciplinary approach, data from various domains will need to be integrated from globally distributed sources also via machine to machine formats. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the existing standards can be very domain specific and most existing data transfer formats require human intervention. Where groups from different communities do try combine data across the domain/discipline boundaries much time is spent reformatting and reorganizing the data and it is conservatively estimated that this can take 80% of a project's time and resources. Four different types of standards are required for machine to machine interaction: systems, syntactic, schematic and semantic. Standards at the systems (WMS, WFS, etc) and at the syntactic level (GML, Observation and Measurement, SensorML) are being developed through international standards bodies such as ISO, OGC, W3C, IEEE etc. In contrast standards at the schematic level (e.g., GeoSciML, LandslidesML, WaterML, QuakeML) and at the semantic level (ie ontologies and vocabularies) are currently developing rapidly, in a very uncoordinated way and with little governance. As the size of the community that can machine read each others data depends on the size of the community that has developed the schematic or semantic standards, it is essential that to achieve global integration of earth and space science data, the required standards need to be developed through international collaboration using accepted standard proceedures. Once developed the

  10. Patient-Reported Outcome Coordinator Did Not Improve Quality of Life Assessment Response Rates: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Johnston

    Full Text Available Health related quality of life (HRQL assessments during therapy for pediatric cancer provide valuable information to better understand the patient experience. Our objective was to determine the impact of a patient-reported outcome (PRO coordinator on HRQL questionnaire completion rates during a pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML trial.AAML1031 is a multicenter Children's Oncology Group therapeutic trial for de novo AML with a secondary aim to assess HRQL of children and adolescents treated with chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Parents/guardians are the primary respondents and four questionnaires are administered at eight time points. The questionnaires are the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales, PedsQL 3.0 Acute Cancer Module, PedsQL Multidimensional Fatigue Scale, and the Pediatric Inventory for Parents. To improve response rates, a central PRO coordinator was instituted and reminded sites about upcoming and delinquent questionnaires. The proportion of HRQL questionnaires completed were compared prior to, and following institution of the PRO coordinator. This analysis evaluated the first five assessment time points.There were231 families who consented to participate in the HRQL aim. Overall response rates for all questionnaires were 73-83%. At time point 1, within 14 days of chemotherapy initiation, post-PRO coordinator completion rates were significantly higher for three of four questionnaires. However, the effect was not sustained and at time point 4, one month following last chemotherapy or HSCT, completion rates were significantly lower post-PRO coordinator for all four questionnaires.Addition of a central PRO coordinator did not result in sustained improvement in HRQL questionnaire completion rates. Efforts to improve response rates must consider other strategies.

  11. Implementation of small group discussion as a teaching method in earth and space science subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryani, N. P.; Supriyadi

    2018-03-01

    In Physics Department Universitas Negeri Semarang, Earth and Space Science subject is included in the curriculum of the third year of physics education students. There are various models of teaching earth and space science subject such as textbook method, lecturer, demonstrations, study tours, problem-solving method, etc. Lectures method is the most commonly used of teaching earth and space science subject. The disadvantage of this method is the lack of two ways interaction between lecturers and students. This research used small group discussion as a teaching method in Earth and Space science. The purpose of this study is to identify the conditions under which an efficient discussion may be initiated and maintained while students are investigating properties of earth and space science subjects. The results of this research show that there is an increase in student’s understanding of earth and space science subject proven through the evaluation results. In addition, during the learning process, student’s activeness also increase.

  12. Under-represented students' engagement in secondary science learning: A non-equivalent control group design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann-Hamilton, Joy J.

    conducted. The reliability results prompted exploratory factory analyses, which resulted in two of the three subscale factors, cognitive and behavioral, being retained. One-within one-between subjects ANOVAs, independent samples t-test, and multiple linear regressions were also used to examine the impact of a multicultural science education, multimedia, and individual characteristics on students' engagement in science learning. Results. There were main effects found within subjects on posttest scores for the cognitive and behavioral subscales of student engagement. Both groups, using their respective versions of the multimedia science curriculum, reported increased engagement in science learning. There was also a statistical difference found for the experimental group at posttest on the measure of "online science was more interesting than school science." All five items unique to the posttest related to the multimedia variable were found to be significant predictors of cognitive and/or behavioral engagement. Conclusions. Engagement in science learning increased for both groups of participants; this finding is aligned with other significant research findings that more embracive and relevant pedagogies can potentially benefit all students. The significant difference found for the experimental group in relation to the multimedia usage was moderate and also may have reflected positive responses to other questions about the use of technology in science learning. As all five measures of multimedia usage were found to be significant predictors of student engagement in science learning, the indications were that: (a) technical difficulties did not impede engagement; (b) participants were better able to understand and visualize the physics concepts as they were presented in a variety of ways; (c) participants' abilities to use computers supported engagement; (d) participants in both groups found the online science curriculum more interesting compared to school science learning; and

  13. Reliability of functioning and reserves of system, controlling movements with different coordination structure of special health group girl students in physical education process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Pryimakov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study reliability of functioning and reserves of system, controlling movements with different coordination structure of special health group girl students (low health level in physical education process. Material: in the research special health group girl students (n=136, age 17-19 participated. They were divided into 2 groups - control and experimental. The program, directed to increase reliability and reserves of system controlling movements, was realized. It was based on physical exercises of complicated coordination with novelty elements, which were fulfilled under musical accompaniment. The research continued one academic year. Results: in girl students with health problems we registered higher differential thresholds, when reproducing local movements in complicated conditions. They used visual and hearing feedback channels for informing brain’s programming areas about made mistakes. They were worse teachable in training accurate movements. These girl students have less expressed compensation reserves under impact of hindering factors and interferences. It can be interpreted as non-specific crisscross negative response to motor functional system in case of health problems. All these determine reduction of reserve potentials of motor control system. Conclusions: The main reserve potentials’ criteria of control over different coordination structure movements are: quickness of passing to program mechanism of fine movements’ regulation in stable conditions of functioning; power and effectiveness of compensatory reactions, ensuring interference immunity of system, controlling movements under interfering factors; reliability of maintaining movements’ qualitative parameters in optimal range under interfering factors; reduction of sensor interconnections in stable functioning conditions.

  14. Learning Science in Small Multi-Age Groups: The Role of Age Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallery, Maria; Loupidou, Thomais

    2016-01-01

    The present study examines how the overall cognitive achievements in science of the younger children in a class where the students work in small multi-age groups are influenced by the number of older children in the groups. The context of the study was early-years education. The study has two parts: The first part involved classes attended by…

  15. Precincts and Prospects in the Use of Focus Groups in Social and Behavioral Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagoe, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, the focus group method has assumed a very important role as a method for collecting qualitative data in social and behavioural science research. This article elucidates theoretical and practical problems and prospects associated with the use of focus groups as a qualitative research method in social and behavioural science…

  16. Guideline group composition and group processes: article 3 in Integrating and coordinating efforts in COPD guideline development. An official ATS/ERS workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Regina; Fretheim, Atle; Cluzeau, Françoise; Wilt, Timothy J; Qaseem, Amir; Lelgemann, Monika; Kelson, Marcia; Guyatt, Gordon; Schünemann, Holger J

    2012-12-01

    Professional societies, like many other organizations around the world, have recognized the need to use more rigorous processes to ensure that health care recommendations are informed by the best available research evidence. This is the third of a series of 14 articles that were prepared to advise guideline developers in respiratory and other diseases on considerations for group compositions and group processes in guideline development, and how this can be effectively integrated in the context of respiratory disease guidelines on a national and international level. We updated a review of the literature addressing group composition and group process, focusing on the following questions: 1. How to compose a functioning and representative guideline group; Who should be included in a guideline panel?; How to select organizations, groups, and individuals; What expertise is needed?; Consultation with non-included groups. 2. How to assure a functioning group process; How to make the process constructive; Balancing participation and finding agreement; Administrative support; What constitutes sufficient resources? Our conclusions are based on available evidence from published literature, experience from guideline developers, and workshop discussions. Formal studies addressing optimal processes in developing guidelines are limited, and experience from guideline organizations supplement the formal studies. When resources are available, guideline development groups should aim for multidisciplinary groups, including patients. Prerequisites for a multidisciplinary group include: a strong chair experienced in group facilitation with broad acceptance in the group, training the group in guideline methodology, and professional technical support. Formal consensus developing methods have proved effective in reaching agreement on the final recommendations.

  17. Learning science through talk: A case study of middle school students engaged in collaborative group investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinicola, Debra Ann

    Reformers call for change in how science is taught in schools by shifting the focus towards conceptual understanding for all students. Constructivist learning is being promoted through the dissemination of National and State Science Standards that recommend group learning practices in science classrooms. This study examined the science learning and interactions, using case study methodology, of one collaborative group of 4 students in an urban middle school. Data on science talk and social interaction were collected over 9 weeks through 12 science problem solving sessions. To determine student learning through peer interaction, varied group structures were implemented, and students reflected on the group learning experience. Data included: field notes, cognitive and reflective journals, audiotapes and videotapes of student talk, and audiotapes of group interviews. Journal data were analyzed quantitatively and all other data was transcribed into The Ethnograph database for qualitative analysis. The data record was organized into social and cognitive domains and coded with respect to interaction patterns to show how group members experienced the social construction of science concepts. The most significant finding was that all students learned as a result of 12 talk sessions as evidenced by pre- and post-conceptual change scores. Interactions that promoted learning involved students connecting their thoughts, rephrasing, and challenging ideas. The role structure was only used by students about 15% of the time, but it started the talk with a science focus, created awareness of scientific methods, and created an awareness of equitable member participation. Students offered more spontaneous, explanatory talk when the role structure was relaxed, but did not engage in as much scientific writing. They said the role structure was important for helping them know what to do in the talk but they no longer needed it after a time. Gender bias, status, and early adolescent

  18. Cognitive Orientation to daily Occupational Performance (CO-OP) as group therapy for children living with motor coordination difficulties: An integrated literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Leanne; Wilson, Jessie; Williams, Gary

    2017-04-01

    Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) demonstrate limited participation in daily occupations which negatively impacts their physical and psycho-social wellbeing. The CO-OP approach is strongly supported within the literature as an effective treatment for DCD when delivered as a one-on-one therapy. Group interventions have proven to be effective in increasing self-esteem, decreasing feelings of isolation and are a cost effective way of delivering therapy. The purpose of this review was to explore the evidence for the use of the CO-OP approach in a group format for children with motor coordination difficulties. Searches of CINAHL, MEDLINE, Scopus, Proquest, PsycINFO, ERIC and OTDBase, were conducted from 2000 through until September 30, 2015. Articles included were in English, peer reviewed articles, followed principals of CO-OP and were delivered through a group therapy approach. All articles were critically reviewed and thematically analysed. 192 studies were retrieved with a final number of six articles included in the review. Six themes were highlighted: achieving a new level of perceived competence; feeling a sense of belonging; children learning how the condition affected them and strategies to overcome these challenges; careful formation of intervention groups; the value of following the CO-OP protocols; and the significance of parental involvement. The findings of this review suggest that the CO-OP approach, when administered in a group format, has the potential to benefit children living with motor coordination difficulties in both physical and psycho-social domains. More research is required to confirm these findings and contribute to evidence-based practice. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  19. The General Philosophy Behind the New Integrated and Co-ordinated Science Courses in N.S.W. and the Science Foundation for Physics Textbook Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messel, H.; Barker, E. N.

    Described are the science syllabuses and texts for the science courses written to fulfill the aims of the new system of education in the state of New South Wales, Australia. The science course was developed in two stages: (1) A four year integrated science syllabus for grades 7-10, and (2) separate courses in physics, chemistry, and biology with…

  20. Improving the Reading Ability of Science Students through Study Groups and Multiple Intelligences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Tunde; Okebukola, Foluso

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the effects of appropriate pedagogical skills (study groups and multiple intelligences) on students' efficiencies in reading skills. It employed a factorial design using three variables. A sample of 90 science students choosing from three intact classes were involved in the study. Data analyses were carried out using mean,…

  1. Communicating the Nature of Science through "The Big Bang Theory": Evidence from a Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rashel; Orthia, Lindy A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a little-studied means of communicating about or teaching the nature of science (NOS)--through fiction television. We report some results of focus group research which suggest that the American sitcom "The Big Bang Theory" (2007-present), whose main characters are mostly working scientists, has influenced…

  2. [Co-ordinate groups: reflexion in the light of the National Curriculum Guidings of the Nursing Graduation Course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, Denise Bouttelet; Fernandes, Carla Natalina da Silva

    2004-04-01

    The goal of this reflexion is to discuss about the necessary nurse characteristics as group co-ordinater and analyse, in the New National Curriculum Guidings of the Nursing Graduation Course, aspects that are necessary in this specific knowledge. For this, we base on the specific literature about the subject and in the official document of MEC about the Curriculum Guidings. It was possible to identify many points where this knowledge seams necessary to the development of the nurse abilities and competences in the management of people, groups and teams, even so signalize some indicators to make stronger the professional formation in this direction.

  3. 42 CFR 422.106 - Coordination of benefits with employer or union group health plans and Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... group health plans and Medicaid. 422.106 Section 422.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... plans and Medicaid. (a) General rule. If an MA organization contracts with an employer, labor... enrollees in an MA plan, or contracts with a State Medicaid agency to provide Medicaid benefits to...

  4. The LSC glitch group: monitoring noise transients during the fifth LIGO science run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackburn, L; Katsavounidis, E [LIGO-Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Cadonati, L [University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Caride, S; Christensen, N; Ely, G; Isogai, T [Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057 (United States); Caudill, S; Gonzalez, G; Gouaty, R; Kissel, J [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Chatterji, S; Goggin, L [LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dalrymple, J; Credico, A Di [Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States); Desai, S [The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Garofoli, J; Gray, C [LIGO Hanford Observatory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Gretarsson, A [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Prescott, AZ 86301 (United States); Hoak, D [LIGO Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA 70754 (United States)], E-mail: desai@gravity.psu.edu (and others)

    2008-09-21

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC) glitch group is part of the LIGO detector characterization effort. It consists of data analysts and detector experts who, during and after science runs, collaborate for a better understanding of noise transients in the detectors. Goals of the glitch group during the fifth LIGO science run (S5) included (1) offline assessment of the detector data quality, with focus on noise transients, (2) veto recommendations for astrophysical analysis and (3) feedback to the commissioning team on anomalies seen in gravitational wave and auxiliary data channels. Other activities included the study of auto-correlation of triggers from burst searches, stationarity of the detector noise and veto studies. The group identified causes for several noise transients that triggered false alarms in the gravitational wave searches; the times of such transients were identified and vetoed from the data generating the LSC astrophysical results.

  5. New Frontiers in Analyzing Dynamic Group Interactions: Bridging Social and Computer Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale; Hung, Hayley; Keyton, Joann

    2017-10-01

    This special issue on advancing interdisciplinary collaboration between computer scientists and social scientists documents the joint results of the international Lorentz workshop, "Interdisciplinary Insights into Group and Team Dynamics," which took place in Leiden, The Netherlands, July 2016. An equal number of scholars from social and computer science participated in the workshop and contributed to the papers included in this special issue. In this introduction, we first identify interaction dynamics as the core of group and team models and review how scholars in social and computer science have typically approached behavioral interactions in groups and teams. Next, we identify key challenges for interdisciplinary collaboration between social and computer scientists, and we provide an overview of the different articles in this special issue aimed at addressing these challenges.

  6. Individual to collaborative: guided group work and the role of teachers in junior secondary science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Dennis; Lui, Wai-mei

    2016-05-01

    This paper, through discussion of a teaching intervention at two secondary schools in Hong Kong, demonstrates the learning advancement brought about by group work and dissects the facilitating role of teachers in collaborative discussions. One-hundred and fifty-two Secondary Two (Grade 8) students were divided into three pedagogical groups, namely 'whole-class teaching', 'self-directed group work' and 'teacher-supported group work' groups, and engaged in peer-review, team debate, group presentation and reflection tasks related to a junior secondary science topic (i.e. current electricity). Pre- and post-tests were performed to evaluate students' scientific conceptions, alongside collected written responses and audio-recorded discussions. The results indicate that students achieved greater cognitive growth when they engaged in cooperative learning activities, the interactive and multi-sided argumentative nature of which is considered to apply particularly well to science education and Vygotsky's zone of proximal development framework. Group work learning is also found to be most effective when teachers play a role in navigating students during the joint construction of conceptual knowledge.

  7. The 2008-2009 Pennsylvania System of School Assessment Handbook for Assessment Coordinators: Writing, Reading and Mathematics, Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This handbook describes the responsibilities of district and school assessment coordinators in the administration of the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA). This updated guidebook contains the following sections: (1) General Assessment Guidelines for All Assessments; (2) Writing Specific Guidelines; (3) Reading and Mathematics…

  8. Promoting US-China Critical Zone Science Collaboration and Coordination Through Established Subnational Bilateral Science Partnerships: The US-China EcoPartnership for Economic and Environmental Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filley, T. R.; Guo, D.; Plante, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of critical zone (CZ) science has gained wide recognition with actively funded and emerging CZ observatory programs across the globe. There is much to be gained through international collaboration that links field, laboratory, and modeling efforts from across the emerging global CZ networks, but building international ties is difficult, especially when peer-to-peer connections are nascent, separated by great distances, and span different cultural and political environments. The U.S. and China share many climatic and geological similarities but differ greatly in the magnitude and timescale of human alteration of their landscapes making the comparative study of their respective pasts, current state, and future co-evolution an outstanding scientific opportunity to better understand, predict, and respond to human influence on the CZ. Leveraging the infrastructure and trust capital of longstanding sub-national volunteer scientific networks to bring together people and organizations is a resource-efficient mechanism to build cross-network CZ programs. The U.S.-China EcoPartnership for Environmental Sustainability (USCEES) is one of 30 current EcoPartnerships established beginning in May 2008 by a joint agreement between the U.S. Department of State and China's National Development and Reform Commission with the overarching goal of addressing the interconnected challenges of environmental, social, and economic sustainability through bi-national research innovation, communication, and entrepreneurship. The 2015 USCEES annual conference on "Critical Zone Science, Sustainability, and Services in a Changing World" was co-sponsored by the U.S. Cross-CZO Working Group on Organic Matter Dynamics and hosted three NSF-funded workshops on organic matter dynamics:1) methods for large and complex data analysis, 2) erosion and deposition processes, and 3) mineralogical and microbial controls on reactivity and persistence. This paper highlights outcomes from the workshops

  9. Effects of two distinct group motor skill interventions in psychological and motor skills of children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caçola, Priscila; Romero, Michael; Ibana, Melvin; Chuang, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) have an increased risk for mental health difficulties. The present pilot study aimed to determine whether distinct group intervention programs improved several psychological variables (anxiety; adequacy and predilection for physical activity; participation, preferences, and enjoyment for activities) and motor skills from the perspective of a child with DCD as well as parental perceptions of motor skills, rate of function, and strengths and difficulties. Eleven children participated in Program A and thirteen in Program B. Both involved 10 sessions of 1 h each. Program A focused on task-oriented activities in a large group involving motor skill training and collaboration and cooperation among children, while Program B was composed of three groups with a direct goal-oriented approach for training of skills chosen by the children. Results indicated that children improved motor skills after both programs, but showed distinct results in regards to other variables - after Program A, children showed higher anxiety and lower levels of enjoyment, even though parents detected an improvement in rate of function and a decrease in peer problems. With Program B, children decreased anxiety levels, and parents noted a higher control of movement of their children. Regardless of the group approach, children were able to improve motor skills. However, it is possible that the differences between groups may have influenced parents' perception of their children's motor and psychological skills, as well as children's perception of anxiety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 28 June 2012 - Members of the European Brain Council led by President Mary Baker visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Technology Department Group Leader L. Bottura and CMS experimental area with Run Coordinator M. Chamizo-Llatas.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    28 June 2012 - Members of the European Brain Council led by President Mary Baker visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Technology Department Group Leader L. Bottura and CMS experimental area with Run Coordinator M. Chamizo-Llatas.

  11. Status report on the land processes aircraft science management operations working group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, James G.; Mann, Lisa J.

    1991-01-01

    Since its inception three years ago, the Land Processes Aircraft Science Management Operations Working Group (MOWG) provided recommendations on the optimal use of the Agency's aircraft in support of the Land Processes Science Program. Recommendations covered topics such as aircraft and sensor usage, development of long-range plans, Multisensor Airborne Campaigns (MAC), program balance, aircraft sensor databases, new technology and sensor development, and increased University scientist participation in the program. Impacts of these recommendations improved the efficiency of various procedures including the flight request process, tracking of flight hours, and aircraft usage. The group also created a bibliography focused on publications produced by Land Processes scientists from the use of the aircraft program, surveyed NASA funded PI's on their participation in the aircraft program, and developed a planning template for multi-sensor airborne campaigns. Benefits from these activities are summarized.

  12. Canadian space agency discipline working group for space dosimetry and radiation science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waker, Anthony; Waller, Edward; Lewis, Brent; Bennett, Leslie; Conroy, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full text: One of the great technical challenges in the human and robotic exploration of space is the deleterious effect of radiation on humans and physical systems. The magnitude of this challenge is broadly understood in terms of the sources of radiation, however, a great deal remains to be done in the development of instrumentation, suitable for the space environment, which can provide real-time monitoring of the complex radiation fields encountered in space and a quantitative measure of potential biological risk. In order to meet these research requirements collaboration is needed between experimental nuclear instrumentation scientists, theoretical scientists working on numerical modeling techniques and radiation biologists. Under the auspices of the Canadian Space Agency such a collaborative body has been established as one of a number of Discipline Working Groups. Members of the Space Dosimetry and Radiation Science working group form a collaborative network across Canada including universities, government laboratories and the industrial sector. Three central activities form the core of the Space Dosimetry and Radiation Science DWG. An instrument sub-group is engaged in the development of instruments capable of gamma ray, energetic charged particle and neutron dosimetry including the ability to provide dosimetric information in real-time. A second sub-group is focused on computer modeling of space radiation fields in order to assess the performance of conceptual designs of detectors and dosimeters or the impact of radiation on cellular and sub-cellular biological targets and a third sub-group is engaged in the study of the biological effects of space radiation and the potential of biomarkers as a method of assessing radiation impact on humans. Many working group members are active in more than one sub-group facilitating communication throughout the whole network. A summary progress-report will be given of the activities of the Discipline Working Group and the

  13. Scaling up Three-Dimensional Science Learning through Teacher-Led Study Groups across a State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Brian J.; Michaels, Sarah; Moon, Jean; Bell, Tara; Dyer, Elizabeth; Edwards, Kelsey D.; McGill, Tara A. W.; Novak, Michael; Park, Aimee

    2017-01-01

    The vision for science teaching in the Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards requires a radical departure from traditional science teaching. Science literacy is defined as three-dimensional (3D), in which students engage in science and engineering practices to develop and apply science disciplinary ideas…

  14. Contemporary Issues in Group Learning in Undergraduate Science Classrooms: A Perspective from Student Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Linda C

    2018-06-01

    As the use of collaborative-learning methods such as group work in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics classes has grown, so has the research into factors impacting effectiveness, the kinds of learning engendered, and demographic differences in student response. Generalizing across the range of this research is complicated by the diversity of group-learning approaches used. In this overview, I discuss theories of how group-work formats support or hinder learning based on the ICAP (interactive, constructive, active, passive) framework of student engagement. I then use this model to analyze current issues in group learning, such as the nature of student discourse during group work, the role of group learning in making our classrooms inclusive, and how classroom spaces factor into group learning. I identify key gaps for further research and propose implications from this research for teaching practice. This analysis helps identify essential, effective, and efficient features of group learning, thus providing faculty with constructive guidelines to support their work and affirm their efforts.

  15. Network Support for Group Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    telecommuting and ubiquitous computing [40], the advent of networked multimedia, and less expensive technology have shifted telecollaboration into...of Computer Engineering,Santa Cruz,CA,95064 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10...participants A and B, the payoff structure for choosing two actions i and j is P = Aij + Bij . If P = 0, then the interaction is called a zero -sum game, and

  16. Understanding the experiences of a group of Yemeni students in an ESL science class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradi, Gihan

    American classrooms are experiencing an influx of diverse language speaking students while for science educators the study of EBL students' learning in science classrooms is a relatively new field (Lee & Buxton, 2010). At the same time there is a growing emphasis on the importance of science practices (NGSS). This poses significant challenges for science educators who are enacting science curriculum that supports all students' learning. Supporting EBL students' academic achievement is significant because literacy is important for students' access to economic and social benefits that come with science literacy (Atwater, 1996). The purpose of this study was to examine the socio-linguistic challenges that a specific group of EBL students (Yemeni) faced and the extent to which such challenges affected their academic performance in science. These challenges are related to linguistic and cultural interactions, which can lead to conflicts between student and school, thereby interfering with the effectiveness of their education. This study also examined these students' and their science teacher's perspectives on strategies that can be used to facilitate their language acquisition during science class and help them become active participants in the school and classroom communities. The study used a qualitative interpretive research methodology and involved four Arab-American EBL students (two males and two females) from Yemen, who had been in the US for different periods of time. The amount of time these students had been in the US was important to examine differences in their acculturation and challenges they faced. Similarly, the use of female and male student participants was important to understand the impact of gender in the lived experiences of these students. The results of the study indicated that all the participants struggled with linguistic, social, and cultural aspects of their life in an American high school. These in turn led to a sense of being different

  17. The Temporality of Participation in School Science: Coordination of Teacher Control and the Pace of Students' Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocksén, Miranda

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates classroom organisation and interaction focusing on phases of activity. The detailed in-depth case study is based on video recordings of 1 science unit consisting of 11 lessons about biological evolution in a Swedish ninth-grade class (aged 15). The study illuminates the temporality of student participation as a fundamental…

  18. Care coordination in bone health screening between individual behaviors and health care services among Korean-American women across three age groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Shin Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrated continuous care is important to prevent and treat brittle bone status in the aging process; however, minority groups often have limited access to health services. The purpose of this study was to identify the care coordination among women’s perceptions about their bone health, information from health care providers, and the results of Bone Mineral Density (BMD tests across three age groups. The study was a cross-sectional comparative design. A total of 63 Korean American women completed both the assessment of BMD of the femoral neck and an interview survey. One’s own risks of osteoporosis, screening behaviors, and health care providers’ advice were analyzed according to three age (pre-, peri-, and post-menopausal groups, BMD levels, and health insurance coverage. Overall, health insurance coverage and having a primary health care provider of Korean American women were 59.0% and 32.0%, respectively; 61.9% had lower than normal BMD levels, which were significantly increased by advanced age. Individual awareness of risks of osteoporosis and screening behaviors were significantly higher in peri-menopausal than in pre- and post-menopausal groups, but no differences were found in health care providers’ information. The awareness and care providers’ information by BMD level or health insurance did not differ. The findings show a discrepancy between individual perceptions and behaviors and health care providers’ recommendations regard to bone health. Health behaviors should be guided by professional health care providers. The women in the post-menopausal stage need to be educated about the high risk of osteoporosis and its management.

  19. The impact of instructor grouping strategies on student efficacy in inquiry science labs: A phenomenological case study of grouping perceptions and strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathaniel J.

    Abundant educational research has integrated Albert Bandura's concepts of self-efficacy and collective efficacy within educational settings. In this phenomenological case study, the investigation sought to capture the manifestation of self-efficacy and collective efficacy within inquiry-based science laboratory courses. Qualitative data was derived from student efficacy surveys, direct classroom observations, and three-tiered interviews with teacher participants. Four high school science instructors and their students from two school districts in Northern Illinois were selected to participate in the study. This study sought to identify instructor strategies or criteria used to formulate student laboratory groups and the impact of such groupings on student self-efficacy and collective efficacy. Open coding of interview transcripts, observation logs, and student surveys led to the development of eight emerging themes. These themes included the purpose of science laboratory activities, instructor grouping strategies, instructor roles, instructor's perceptions, science laboratory assessment, student interactions, learner self-perceptions, and grouping preferences. Results from the study suggest that some students were innately inclined to assume leadership roles, smaller groupings had greater participation from all group members, students had a strong preference for working collaboratively in groups, and students desired to maintain stable laboratory groups in lieu of periodically changing laboratory partners. As with all case study methodologies, the findings of the study were limited to the individual participants at research sites and were not generalizable to all science classrooms. Additional research in the realms of group size, group autonomy, and student interviews would provide even greater insights into the observed phenomena.

  20. Learning science in small groups: The relationship of conversation to conceptual understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, James Tarleton

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between conversation and conceptual understanding of erosion. The objective of this study was to investigate how fifth grade students' conceptions of erosion changed while they used stream tables and worked in groups of four within an inquiry-based curriculum. This study used symbolic interactionism and sociocognitive frameworks to interpret science learning in the elementary classroom. The research focused on the conceptual understanding of the focal group students, their use of classroom discourse to talk about their understandings of erosion, and the expertise that emerged while using stream tables. This study took place over a one-semester long study on erosion. Key informants were eight fifth graders. The data sources consisted of children's journals; transcripts of audiotaped interviews with the key informants before, during, and after the erosion unit; transcripts of videotapes of the students using the stream tables; and field notes recording children's discourse and activity. Individual and group cases were constructed during the study. The knowledge of the eight focal group children was placed on a hierarchy of conceptual understanding that contained 8 components of the erosion process. All four of the students whose ideas were examined in depth gained in their conceptual understanding of erosion. Students' individual expertise enhanced their own conceptual understanding. The contribution of classroom discourse and expertise to conceptual understanding differed between the two focal groups. Group 1 used essential expertise to sustain generative conversations, maximizing their learning opportunities. Students in Group 1 got along with one another, rotated assigned roles and jobs, and were able to start their own generative conversations. Members of Group 1 asked generative questions, connected stream table events to real life situations, and involved everyone in the group. Group 2 engaged in a

  1. Interagency Working Group on Ocean Social Science: Incorporating ecosystem services approaches into ocean and coastal decision-making and governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    The application of social science has been recognized as a priority for effective ocean and coastal management, driving much discussion and fostering emerging efforts in several areas. The Interagency Working Group on Ocean Social Science (IWG-OSS) is tasked with assisting the Su...

  2. Science supporting Gulf of Mexico oil-spill response, mitigation, and restoration activities-Assessment, monitoring, mapping, and coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindinger, Jack; Tihansky, Ann B.; Cimitile, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigates physical processes related to coastal and marine environments and societal implications related to natural hazards, resource sustainability, and environmental change. Immediately after the Deepwater Horizon event, the USGS began responding to data requests, directing response personnel, and providing coastal and shelf geophysical data to coastal-resource managers. The USGS provided oil-spill responders with up-to-date coastal bathymetry, geologic data, and maps characterizing vulnerability and levels of risk from potential spill impacts in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Baseline conditions prior to any spill impacts were documented through programs that included shoreline sampling and sediment coring from east Texas to the east coast of Florida and aerial photography of many environmentally sensitive Gulf coastal areas. The USGS responded to numerous verbal and written data requests from Federal, State, and local partners and academic institutions with USGS scientific staff participating in the Coast Guard Unified Commands (UC) and Operational Science Advisory Teams (OSAT). The USGS conducted technical review of reports and plans for many response activities. Oil-spill responders, managers, and personnel on the ground, including partners such as the National Park Service, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Chandeleur Islands Refuge, and State agencies, continue to rely on USGS products.

  3. NASA LWS Institute GIC Working Group: GIC science, engineering and applications readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, A. A.; Thomson, A. W. P.; Bernabeu, E.

    2016-12-01

    In recognition of the rapidly growing interest on the topic, this paper is based on the findings of the very first NASA Living With a Star (LWS) Institute Working Group that was specifically targeting the GIC issue. The new LWS Institutes program element was launched 2014 and the concept is built around small working group style meetings that focus on well defined problems that demand intense, direct interactions between colleagues in neighboring disciplines to facilitate the development of a deeper understanding of the variety of processes that link the solar activity to Earth's environment. The LWS Institute Geomagnetically Induced Currents (GIC) Working Group (WG) led by A. Pulkkinen (NASA GSFC) and co-led by E. Bernabeu (PJM) and A. Thomson (BGS) was selected competitively as the pilot activity for the new LWS element. The GIC WG was tasked to 1) identify, advance, and address the open scientific and engineering questions pertaining to GIC, 2) advance predictive modeling of GIC, 3) advocate and act as a catalyst to identify resources for addressing the multidisciplinary topic of GIC. In this paper, we target the goal 1) of the GIC WG. More specifically, the goal of this paper is to review the current status and future challenges pertaining to science, engineering and applications of the GIC problem. Science is understood here as the basic space and Earth sciences research that allow improved understanding and physics-based modeling of physical processes behind GIC. Engineering in turn is understood here as the "impact" aspect of GIC. The impact includes any physical effects GIC may have on the performance of the manmade infrastructure. Applications is understood as the models, tools and activities that can provide actionable information to entities such as power systems operators for mitigating the effects of GIC and government for managing any potential consequences from GIC impact to critical infrastructure. In this sense, applications can be considered as

  4. Making Science Matter: Collaborations between Informal Science Education Organizations and Schools. A CAISE Inquiry Group Report. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Throughout the world, and for many decades, science-rich cultural institutions, such as zoos, aquaria, museums, and others, have collaborated with schools to provide students, teachers and families with opportunities to expand their experiences and understanding of science. However, these collaborations have generally failed to institutionalize:…

  5. Inquiry and Groups: Student Interactions in Cooperative Inquiry-Based Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods-McConney, Amanda; Wosnitza, Marold; Sturrock, Keryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Science education research has recommended cooperative inquiry based science in the primary science context for more than two decades but after more than 20 years, student achievement in science has not substantially improved. This study, through direct observation and analysis, investigated content-related student interactions in an authentic…

  6. Chairmanship of the Neptune/Pluto outer planets science working group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1993-11-01

    The Outer Planets Science Working Group (OPSWG) is the NASA Solar System Exploration Division (SSED) scientific steering committee for the Outer Solar System missions. OPSWG consists of 19 members and is chaired by Dr. S. Alan Stern. This proposal summarizes the FY93 activities of OPSWG, describes a set of objectives for OPSWG in FY94, and outlines the SWG's activities for FY95. As chair of OPSWG, Dr. Stern will be responsible for: organizing priorities, setting agendas, conducting meetings of the Outer Planets SWG; reporting the results of OPSWG's work to SSED; supporting those activities relating to OPSWG work, such as briefings to the SSES, COMPLEX, and OSS; supporting the JPL/SAIC Pluto study team; and other tasks requested by SSED. As the Scientific Working Group (SWG) for Jupiter and the planets beyond, OPSWG is the SSED SWG chartered to study and develop mission plans for all missions to the giant planets, Pluto, and other distant objects in the remote outer solar system. In that role, OPSWG is responsible for: defining and prioritizing scientific objectives for missions to these bodies; defining and documenting the scientific goals and rationale behind such missions; defining and prioritizing the datasets to be obtained in these missions; defining and prioritizing measurement objectives for these missions; defining and documenting the scientific rationale for strawman instrument payloads; defining and prioritizing the scientific requirements for orbital tour and flyby encounter trajectories; defining cruise science opportunities plan; providing technical feedback to JPL and SSED on the scientific capabilities of engineering studies for these missions; providing documentation to SSED concerning the scientific goals, objectives, and rationale for the mission; interfacing with other SSED and OSS committees at the request of SSED's Director or those committee chairs; providing input to SSED concerning the structure and content of the Announcement of Opportunity

  7. Interactions of selected policy-stakeholder groups implementing middle school science standards-based systemic reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydston, Theodore Lewis, III

    1999-12-01

    This research is an interpretive inquiry into the views and interactions of stakeholders in a district office of a large school system responsible for implementing science systemic reform. Three major sources of data were used in this research: surveys, stakeholder interviews, and autobiographical reflection on experiences as part of the reform initiative. This is an emergent research that is evident in the shift in the focus of research questions and their supporting assumptions during the research. The literature review describes standards-based reform, arguments about reform, and the major dimensions of reform research. The results of the survey of stakeholders revealed that the views among the stakeholder groups followed the system hierarchy and could be separated into two large groups; staff responsible for implementing the reform initiative and the other stakeholder groups. Each of these groups was composed of identifiable subgroups. The interviews with stakeholders revealed how their different attitudes, values, and beliefs frame the context of stakeholder interactions. An over reliance on an authoritarian view of decision-making leaves many stakeholders feeling disempowered and critical of others. This atmosphere promotes blaming, which inhibits collegial interaction. Work experiences in the district office revealed how stakeholders' unaddressed assumptions, attitudes, and beliefs promote fragmentation and competition rather than cooperation. Hidden assumptions about management by control and mandate, competition, and teaching and learning appear to restrain the interactions of stakeholders. Support of the National Science Education Standards was identified as a unifying view among the stakeholders, yet the professional development program focused on content and pedagogical knowledge without addressing stakeholder concerns and beliefs about the intended constructivist framework of the program. Stakeholders' attitudes about the issue of equity demonstrated

  8. Poisson Coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian-Ying; Hu, Shi-Min

    2013-02-01

    Harmonic functions are the critical points of a Dirichlet energy functional, the linear projections of conformal maps. They play an important role in computer graphics, particularly for gradient-domain image processing and shape-preserving geometric computation. We propose Poisson coordinates, a novel transfinite interpolation scheme based on the Poisson integral formula, as a rapid way to estimate a harmonic function on a certain domain with desired boundary values. Poisson coordinates are an extension of the Mean Value coordinates (MVCs) which inherit their linear precision, smoothness, and kernel positivity. We give explicit formulas for Poisson coordinates in both continuous and 2D discrete forms. Superior to MVCs, Poisson coordinates are proved to be pseudoharmonic (i.e., they reproduce harmonic functions on n-dimensional balls). Our experimental results show that Poisson coordinates have lower Dirichlet energies than MVCs on a number of typical 2D domains (particularly convex domains). As well as presenting a formula, our approach provides useful insights for further studies on coordinates-based interpolation and fast estimation of harmonic functions.

  9. Coordination of the school interior at science teaching with some anthropometric parameters of 11-12 year old kids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Rizman Herga

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to identify adequacy of school furniture dimensions with the help of anthropometric measurements experimented on 11 - 12 year-old pupils. These are the pupils who have switched from classroom teaching to the subject teaching and have lessons in specialized classrooms, which are designed for a specific school subject. We were interested in the discrepancies between pupils' anthropometric dimensions and the dimensions of school furniture situated in science classrooms. The research included 192 pupils (N = 192 in the 6th and 7th grade of primary schools in North-Eastern Slovenia. Readings were made on certain pupils' anthropometric dimensions, including stature, popliteal height, buttock-popliteal lenght, elbow height sitting, thigh thickness, subscapular height and hip width. School furniture taken measurements showed that the dimensions of desks designed according to ISO 5970 correspond with size 6 (for height between 173 and 184 cm. Results of the anthropometric measurements are showed that 6th grade pupils are in average 152 cm high, 7th grade pupils 160 cm. The research has showed a great mismatch of school furniture with anthropometric dimensions which can have serious consequences on pupil development.

  10. The Department of the Interior Strategic Sciences Group and its Response to Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, K. A.; Machlis, G. E.; Applegate, D.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation will describe the history, mission, and current activities of the newly formed Department of the Interior (DOI) Strategic Sciences Group (SSG), with a focus on its response to Hurricane Sandy and lessons learned from using scenario building to support decision making. There have been several environmental crises of national significance in recent years, including Hurricane Katrina (2005), large-scale California wildfires (2007-2008), the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (2010), and Hurricane Sandy (2012). Such events are complex because of their impacts on the ecology, economy, and people of the affected locations. In these and other environmental disasters, the DOI has had significant responsibilities to protect people and resources and to engage in emergency response, recovery, and restoration efforts. In recognition of the increasingly critical role of strategic science in responding to such complex events, the DOI established the SSG by Secretarial Order in 2012. Its purpose is to provide the DOI with science-based assessments and interdisciplinary scenarios of environmental crises affecting Departmental resources; rapidly assemble interdisciplinary teams of scientists from government, academia, and non-governmental organizations to conduct such work; and provide results to DOI leadership as usable knowledge to support decision making. March 2013 was the SSG's first deployment since its formation. The SSG's charge was to support DOI's participation on the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force by developing scenarios of Hurricane Sandy's environmental, economic, and social consequences in the New York/New Jersey area and potential interventions that could improve regional resilience to future major storms. Over the course of one week, the SSG Sandy team (Operational Group Sandy) identified 13 first-tier consequences and 17 interventions. The SSG briefed DOI leadership, Task Force representatives, and other policy makers in both Washington, DC and

  11. Selective traditions in group discussions: teachers' views about good science and the possible obstacles when encountering a new topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Eva; Sund, Per

    2016-11-01

    There is an ongoing discussion about what content that should be taught in science education and there are different views among teachers about what represent good science content. However, teachers are not isolated individuals making their own interpretations, but are part of institutionalised systems building on patterns in the selection of teaching goals and content. Earlier research shows that teachers teach in alignment with different selective traditions, which can be understood as well-developed teaching habits. Individual teachers seem to develop their personal habits on the basis of the contextual situations created by earlier generations of teachers. In order to find out which content teachers find representative for science education, we asked nine teachers to take part in group interviews to talk about what they value as "good" science content. The participants were grouped according to their selective traditions expressed in earlier studies. The method was used to dynamically explore, challenge and highlight teachers' views. The starting point for the group discussions is national tests in science. In Sweden, national tests in biology, physics and chemistry were introduced in secondary school science (year 9) in 2009. One overarching aim of these tests is to support the implementation of the science curricula and to include for example knowledge about socio-scientific issues (SSI). The content of the tests can consequently be seen as important for teachers to consider. The findings show that `resistance' to including SSI is not just an issue for individual teachers. As individuals teachers can create many kinds of obstacles, but still be interested in integrating SSI in their science teaching. However, in group discussions the teachers tend to collectively adopt the scientific rational discourse. This discourse is what joins them and creates their common identity as science teachers. In turn, they seek to free scientific knowledge from social knowledge

  12. How Select Groups of Preservice Science Teachers with Inquiry Orientations View Teaching and Learning Science through Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Peggy

    Although hailed as a powerful form of instruction, in most teaching and learning contexts, inquiry-based instruction is fraught with ambiguous and conflicting definitions and descriptions. Yet little has been written about the experiences preservice science teacher have regarding their learning to teach science through inquiry. This project sought to understand how select preservice secondary science teachers enrolled in three UTeach programs in Arkansas conceptualize inquiry instruction and how they rationalize its value in a teaching and learning context. The three teacher education programs investigated in this study are adoption sites aligned with the UTeach Program in Austin, TX that distinguishes itself in part by its inquiry emphasis. Using a mixed method investigation design, this study utilized two sources of data to explore the preservice science teachers' thinking. In the first phase, a modified version of the Pedagogy of Science teaching Tests (POSTT) was used to identify select program participants who indicated preferences for inquiry instruction over other instructional strategies. Secondly, the study used an open-ended questionnaire to explore the selected subjects' beliefs and conceptions of teaching and learning science in an inquiry context. The study also focused on identifying particular junctures in the prospective science teachers' education preparation that might impact their understanding about inquiry. Using a constant comparative approach, this study explored 19 preservice science teachers' conceptions about inquiry. The results indicate that across all levels of instruction, the prospective teachers tended to have strong student-centered teaching orientations. Except subjects in for the earliest courses, subjects' definitions and descriptions of inquiry tended toward a few of the science practices. More advanced subjects, however, expressed more in-depth descriptions. Excluding the subjects who have completed the program, multiple

  13. 8 April 2013 - Indian Hon'ble Minister for Ministry of Science & Technology and Ministry of Earth Sciences Shri Sudini Jaipal Reddy in the LHC tunnel with K. Foraz, visiting the CMS cavern with Technical Coordinator A. Ball and Former Spokesperson T. Virdee, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Samuel Morier-Genoud

    2013-01-01

    8 April 2013 - Indian Hon'ble Minister for Ministry of Science & Technology and Ministry of Earth Sciences Shri Sudini Jaipal Reddy in the LHC tunnel with K. Foraz, visiting the CMS cavern with Technical Coordinator A. Ball and Former Spokesperson T. Virdee, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer.

  14. Coordinating Work with Groupware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Jens Kaaber; Simonsen, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    One important goal of employing groupware is to make possible complex collaboration between geographically distributed groups. This requires a dual transformation of both technology and work practice. The challenge is to re­duce the complexity of the coordination work by successfully inte....... Using the CSCW frame­work of coordination mechanisms, we have elicited six general factors influencing the integration of the groupware application in two situations....

  15. Luminescent lanthanide coordination polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, L.; Evans, O.R.; Foxman, B.M.; Lin, W.

    1999-12-13

    One-dimensional lanthanide coordination polymers with the formula Ln(isonicotinate){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb; 1a-f) were synthesized by treating nitrate or perchlorate salts of Ln(III) with 4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde under hydro(solvo)thermal conditions. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction studies indicate that these lanthanide coordination polymers adopt two different structures. While Ce(III), Pr(III), and Nd(III) complexes adopt a chain structure with alternating Ln-(carboxylate){sub 2}-Ln and Ln-(carboxylate){sub 4}-Ln linkages, Sm(III), Eu(III), and Tb(III) complexes have a doubly carboxylate-bridged infinite-chain structure with one chelating carboxylate group on each metal center. In both structures, the lanthanide centers also bind to two water molecules to yield an eight-coordinate, square antiprismatic geometry. The pyridine nitrogen atoms of the isonicotinate groups do not coordinate to the metal centers in these lanthanide(III) complexes; instead, they direct the formation of Ln(III) coordination polymers via hydrogen bonding with coordinated water molecules. Photoluminescence measurements show that Tb(isonicotinate){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} is highly emissive at room temperature with a quantum yield of {approximately}90%. These results indicate that highly luminescent lanthanide coordination polymers can be assembled using a combination of coordination and hydrogen bonds. Crystal data for 1a: monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/c, a = 9.712(2) {angstrom}, b = 19.833(4) {angstrom}, c = 11.616(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 111.89(3){degree}, Z = 4. Crystal data for 1f: monoclinic space group C2/c, a = 20.253(4) {angstrom}, b = 11.584(2) {angstrom}, c = 9.839(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 115.64(3){degree}, Z = 8.

  16. Sharpening the lens of culturally responsive science teaching: a call for liberatory education for oppressed student groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codrington, Jamila

    2014-12-01

    Wallace and Brand's framing of culturally responsive science teaching through the lens of critical race theory honors the role of social justice in science education. In this article, I extend the discussion through reflections on the particular learning needs of students from oppressed cultural groups, specifically African Americans. Understanding the political nature of education, I explore the importance of transforming science education so that it has the capacity to provide African American students with tools for their own liberation. I discuss Wallace and Brand's research findings in relation to the goal of liberatory education, and offer ideas for how science educators might push forward this agenda as they strive for culturally responsive teaching with oppressed student groups.

  17. The Power of Cooperation in International Paleoclimate Science: Examples from the PAGES 2k Network and the Ocean2k Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Past Global Changes (PAGES) project of IGBP and Future Earth supports research to understand the Earth's past environment to improve future climate predictions and inform strategies for sustainability. Within this framework, the PAGES 2k Network was established to provide a focus on the past 2000 years, a period that encompasses Medieval Climate Anomaly warming, Little Ice Age cooling, and recent anthropogenically-forced climate change. The results of these studies are used for testing earth system models, and for understanding decadal- to centennial-scale variability, which is needed for long-term planning. International coordination and cooperation among the nine regional Working Groups that make up the 2k Network has been critical to the success of PAGES 2k. The collaborative approach is moving toward scientific achievements across the regional groups, including: (i) the development of a community-driven open-access proxy climate database; (ii) integration of multi-resolution proxy records; (iii) development of multivariate climate reconstructions; and (iv) a leap forward in the spatial resolution of paleoclimate reconstructions. The last addition to the 2k Network, the Ocean2k Working Group has further innovated the collaborative approach by: (1) creating an open, receptive environment to discuss ideas exclusively in the virtual space; (2) employing an array of real-time collaborative software tools to enable communication, group document writing, and data analysis; (3) consolidating executive leadership teams to oversee project development and manage grassroots-style volunteer pools; and (4) embracing the value-added role that international and interdisciplinary science can play in advancing paleoclimate hypotheses critical to understanding future change. Ongoing efforts for the PAGES 2k Network are focused on developing new standards for data quality control and archiving. These tasks will provide the foundation for new and continuing "trans-regional" 2k

  18. Using focus groups to design systems science models that promote oral health equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kum, Susan S; Northridge, Mary E; Metcalf, Sara S

    2018-06-04

    While the US population overall has experienced improvements in oral health over the past 60 years, oral diseases remain among the most common chronic conditions across the life course. Further, lack of access to oral health care contributes to profound and enduring oral health inequities worldwide. Vulnerable and underserved populations who commonly lack access to oral health care include racial/ethnic minority older adults living in urban environments. The aim of this study was to use a systematic approach to explicate cause and effect relationships in creating a causal map, a type of concept map in which the links between nodes represent causality or influence. To improve our mental models of the real world and devise strategies to promote oral health equity, methods including system dynamics, agent-based modeling, geographic information science, and social network simulation have been leveraged by the research team. The practice of systems science modeling is situated amidst an ongoing modeling process of observing the real world, formulating mental models of how it works, setting decision rules to guide behavior, and from these heuristics, making decisions that in turn affect the state of the real world. Qualitative data were obtained from focus groups conducted with community-dwelling older adults who self-identify as African American, Dominican, or Puerto Rican to elicit their lived experiences in accessing oral health care in their northern Manhattan neighborhoods. The findings of this study support the multi-dimensional and multi-level perspective of access to oral health care and affirm a theorized discrepancy in fit between available dental providers and patients. The lack of information about oral health at the community level may be compromising the use and quality of oral health care among racial/ethnic minority older adults. Well-informed community members may fill critical roles in oral health promotion, as they are viewed as highly credible

  19. Nurturing Quality Science Learning and Teaching: The Impact of a Reading Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Ange; Cooper, Rebecca; Sarkar, Mahbub

    2016-01-01

    Teachers are key to the delivery of quality science education experiences in Australian classrooms. In achieving this, there is a need for teachers to be better supported in thinking reflexively and critically about their practice. The Centre for Science, Mathematics and Technology Education (CSMTE) at Monash University took action to address this…

  20. Coordination cycles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Steiner, Jakub

    -, č. 274 (2005), s. 1-26 ISSN 1211-3298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : coordination * crises * cycles and fluctuations Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp274.pdf

  1. Coordination cycles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Steiner, Jakub

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 1 (2008), s. 308-327 ISSN 0899-8256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : global games * coordination * crises * cycles and fluctuations Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.333, year: 2008

  2. Exploring reforms while learning to teach science: Facilitating exploration of theory-practice relationships in a teacher education study group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jacob G.

    This dissertation inserts a new view into an old problem in teacher education. The study explores the theory-practice gap, the large distance between what preservice science teachers experience in schools, are able to enact, and are told they should hold themselves to in their practice. It does so by narrowing the focus of analysis to a secondary science study group and examining how the facilitator uses sociocultural constructivism to promote discussion. The analysis surfaces key communicative moves made by the facilitator and preservice teachers that yield fruitful discussion of theory-practice relationships. Additionally, the study's use of discourse analysis as a methodology and intertextuality as a conceptual framework opens new directions for applied sociolinguistic research and scholarship in science teacher education. Findings from the study focus on what was discussed and how explorations of theory-practice relationships were facilitated. Preservice teachers in the study group engaged in meaningful conversations about constructivist theory and its application to their students and teaching of science. They discussed many science education topics such as planning science lessons that actively engage students, assessment of content understanding, and management of content-based activities. Discussions of broader science education goals, including implementation of inquiry or development of collaborative communities, were not promoted. Examination of the facilitation illuminates a number of strategies found to be helpful in supporting these explorations. This study shows that facilitation can successfully support preservice teachers to construct understanding of social constructivist assumptions underlying the National Science Education Standards (NSES), as well as a few components of the Standards themselves. The focus on the underlying assumptions suggests that science teacher education should focus on these so that preservice teachers can build a strong

  3. Cystic fibrosis: Beyond the airways. Report on the meeting of the basic science working group in Loutraki, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Margarida D; Boj, Sylvia F; Shaw, James; Leipziger, Jens; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2018-06-01

    The European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) Basic Science Working Group (BSWG) organized a session on the topic "Cystic Fibrosis: Beyond the Airways", within the 15th ECFS Basic Science Conference which gathered around 200 researchers working in the basic science of CF. The session was organized and chaired by Margarida Amaral (BioISI, University of Lisboa, Portugal) and Jeffrey Beekman (University Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands) as Chair and Vice-Chair of the BSWG and its purpose was to bring attention of participants of the ECFS Basic Science Conference to "more forgotten" organs in CF disease. In this report we attempt to review and integrate the ideas that emerged at the session. Copyright © 2018 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Friends and Family: A Literature Review on How High School Social Groups Influence Advanced Math and Science Coursetaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Michael; Owens, Ann; Williams, Darryl; Kim, Hui Yon; Musto, Michela

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we synthesized the literature on how informal contexts, namely friends and family social groups, shape high school students' likelihood of pursuing advanced math and science coursework. Extending scholarly understandings of STEM education, we turned to the body of literature with three guiding questions: (1) What influence do…

  5. Effects of Collective Efficacy, Teamwork Attitudes, and Experience on Group Project Performance: Comparisons between 2 Food Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Poppy Lauretta; Orta-Ramirez, Alicia

    2018-01-01

    The relationship between past teamwork and task-related experiences, attitude toward teamwork, collective efficacy, and task performance among undergraduates (N = 298) assigned to group projects (N = 48) in 2 different Food Science courses was examined. The results of survey data collected at the beginning and end of the projects showed that past…

  6. Comparing the Math Anxiety of Secondary School Female Students in Groups (Science and Mathematical Physics) Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Khatoon; Pourrazavy, Zinat alsadat

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is comparing math anxiety of secondary school female students in groups (Science and Mathematical Physics) Public Schools, district 2, city of Sari. The purpose of the research is applied research, it is a development branch, and in terms of the nature and method, it is a causal-comparative research. The statistical…

  7. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    Overview From a technical perspective, CMS has been in “beam operation” state since 6th November. The detector is fully closed with all components operational and the magnetic field is normally at the nominal 3.8T. The UXC cavern is normally closed with the radiation veto set. Access to UXC is now only possible during downtimes of LHC. Such accesses must be carefully planned, documented and carried out in agreement with CMS Technical Coordination, Experimental Area Management, LHC programme coordination and the CCC. Material flow in and out of UXC is now strictly controlled. Access to USC remains possible at any time, although, for safety reasons, it is necessary to register with the shift crew in the control room before going down.It is obligatory for all material leaving UXC to pass through the underground buffer zone for RP scanning, database entry and appropriate labeling for traceability. Technical coordination (notably Stephane Bally and Christoph Schaefer), the shift crew and run ...

  8. Structure and Heme-Independent Peroxidase Activity of a Fully-Coordinated Mononuclear Mn(II) Complex with a Schiff-Base Tripodal Ligand Containing Three Imidazole Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Shuranjan; Lee, Hong In [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Do Hyun [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lah, Myoung Soo [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    New complex [Mn(II)H{sub 1.5}L]{sub 2}[Mn(II)H{sub 3}L]{sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 5}·3H{sub 2}O, where H{sub 3}L is tris{2-(4-imidazolyl)methyliminoethyl} amine (imtren), has been prepared by reacting manganese(II) perchlorate hexahydrate with the imtren ligand in methanol. X-ray crystallographic study revealed that the imtren ligand hexadentately binds to Mn(II) ion through the three Schiff-base imine N atoms and three imidazole N atoms with a distorted octahedral geometry, and the apical tertiary amine N atom of the ligand pseudo-coordinates to Mn(II), forming overall a pseudo-seven coordination environment. The hydrogen-bonds between imidazole and imidazolate of [Mn(II)H{sub 1.5}L]{sup 0.5+} complex ions are extended to build a 2D puckered network with trigonal voids. [Mn(II)H{sub 3}L]{sup 2+} complex ions constitutes another extended 2D puckered layer without hydrogen bonds. Two layers are wedged each other to constitute overall stack of the crystal. Peroxidase activity of complex 1 was examined by observing the oxidation of 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)- 6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of complex 1. Generation of ABTS{sup +·} was observed by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies, indicating that the complex 1, a fully-coordinated mononuclear Mn(II) complex with nitrogen-only ligand, has a heme-independent peroxidase activity.

  9. 9 July 2012 - Academy of Sciences Malaysia (ASM), Chairman, Mathematical and Physical Sciences Discipline Group M. Yahaya FASc and his delegation visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department G. De Rijk.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    9 July 2012 - Academy of Sciences Malaysia (ASM), Chairman, Mathematical and Physical Sciences Discipline Group M. Yahaya FASc and his delegation visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department G. De Rijk.

  10. Effect of course coordinator behavior and motivation on students' achievement: Results from five curriculum blocks of two undergraduate student cohorts at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University of Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alwan, Ibrahim; Baig, Lubna Ansari; Badri, Motasim; Magzoub, Mohi Eldin; Alyousif, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the relationship between students' perception of course/block coordinators performance and attributes with students' assessment scores in respective courses. This retrospective data based study was conducted at the College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University of Health Sciences (KSAU-HS). It was started in March 2013 and completed in June 2013 after the graduation of the fourth cohort. Exam score of 3(rd) and 4(th) cohort of students from the courses taught in the last two years of medical school were correlated with faculty and block evaluation done by the students. Scores from mid-block MCQs, portfolio scores, OSCEs and end-of-block MCQs were obtained. The Mean scores of all the assessments for all five blocks were not significantly different for both batches. There was significant difference between block coordinators for students' score on portfolio, midterm exam and the final written exam. The students' Score in OSCE had significantly strong correlation with quality of station monitors, coverage of content and flow between stations. Student's perception of the commitment and motivation of the coordinator was strongly correlated with block organization, availability of clinical cases, performance of block coordinator, cooperation with students, and organization of clinical activities. Block coordinator's motivation and commitment affects quality of block organization and student`s success. Faculty training programs should include block management competencies and components identified through self-determination theory for improving the intrinsic motivation for students success.

  11. Negotiating the Inquiry Question: A Comparison of Whole Class and Small Group Strategies in Grade Five Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnetto, Andy R.; Hand, Brian; Norton-Meier, Lori

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of two strategies for negotiating the question for exploration during science inquiry on student achievement and teachers' perceptions. The study is set in the context of the Science Writing Heuristic. The first strategy (small group) consisted of each group of four students negotiating a question for inquiry with the teacher while the second strategy (whole class) consisted of the entire class negotiating a single question for inquiry with the teacher. The study utilized a mixed-method approach. A quasi-experimental repeated measures design was used to determine the effect of strategy on student achievement and semi-structured teacher interviews were used to probe the question of teacher perceptions of the two strategies. Teacher observations were conducted using the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol (RTOP) to check for variation in implementation of the two strategies. Iowa Test of Basic Skills Science (ITBSS) (2005 and 2006) and teacher/researcher developed unit exams (pre and post) were used as student achievement measures. No statistically significant differences were found among students in the two treatment groups on the ITBSS or unit exams. RTOP observations suggest that teacher implementation was consistent across the two treatment strategies. Teachers disclosed personal preferences for the two strategies, indicating the whole class treatment was easier to manage (at least at the beginning of the school year) as students gained experience with science inquiry and the associated increased responsibility. Possible mechanisms linking the two strategies, negotiated questions, and student outcomes are discussed.

  12. Gender differences in an elementary school learning environment: A study on how girls learn science in collaborative learning groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, Yvette Frank

    Girls are marked by low self-confidence manifested through gender discrimination during the early years of socialization and culturalization (AAUW, 1998). The nature of gender bias affects all girls in their studies of science and mathematics, particularly in minority groups, during their school years. It has been found that girls generally do not aspire in either mathematical or science-oriented careers because of such issues as overt and subtle stereotyping, inadequate confidence in ability, and discouragement in scientific competence. Grounded on constructivism, a theoretical framework, this inquiry employs fourth generation evaluation, a twelve-step evaluative process (Guba & Lincoln, 1989). The focus is to discover through qualitative research how fifth grade girls learn science in a co-sexual collaborative learning group, as they engage in hands-on, minds-on experiments. The emphasis is centered on one Hispanic girl in an effort to understand her beliefs, attitudes, and behavior as she becomes a stakeholder with other members of her six person collaborative learning group. The intent is to determine if cultural and social factors impact the learning of scientific concepts based on observations from videotapes, interviews, and student opinion questionnaires. QSR NUD*IST 4, a computer software program is utilized to help categorize and index data. Among the findings, there is evidence that clearly indicates girls' attitudes toward science are altered as they interact with other girls and boys in a collaborative learning group. Observations also indicate that cultural and social factors affect girls' performance as they explore and discover scientific concepts with other girls and boys. Based upon what I have uncovered utilizing qualitative research and confirmed according to current literature, there seems to be an appreciable impact on the way girls appear to learn science. Rooted in the data, the results mirror the conclusions of previous studies, which

  13. Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Flowsheet. A Report by the WPFC Expert Group on Chemical Partitioning of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Chan; Yamagishi, Isao; Choi, Yong-Joon; Glatz, Jean-Paul; Hyland, Bronwyn; Uhlir, Jan; Baron, Pascal; Warin, Dominique; De Angelis, Giorgio; Luce, Alfredo; INOUE, Tadashi; Morita, Yasuji; Minato, Kazuo; Lee, Han Soo; Ignatiev, Victor V.; Kormilitsyn, Mikhail V.; Caravaca, Concepcion; Lewin, Robert G.; Taylor, Robin J.; Collins, Emory D.; Laidler, James J.

    2012-06-01

    Under the auspices of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the Working Party on Scientific Issues of the Fuel Cycle (WPFC) has been established to co-ordinate scientific activities regarding various existing and advanced nuclear fuel cycles, including advanced reactor systems, associated chemistry and flowsheets, development and performance of fuel and materials, and accelerators and spallation targets. The WPFC has different expert groups to cover a wide range of scientific fields in the nuclear fuel cycle. The Expert Group on Chemical Partitioning was created in 2001 to (1) perform a thorough technical assessment of separations processes in application to a broad set of partitioning and transmutation (P and T) operating scenarios and (2) identify important research, development and demonstration necessary to bring preferred technologies to a deployable stage and (3) recommend collaborative international efforts to further technological development. This report aims to collect spent nuclear fuel reprocessing flowsheet of various processes developed by member states: aqueous, pyro and fluoride volatility. Contents: 1 - Hydrometallurgy process: Standard PUREX, Extended PUREX, UREX+3, Grind/Leach; 2 - Pyrometallurgy process: pyro-process (CRIEPI - Japan), 4-group partitioning process, pyro-process (KAERI - Korea), Direct electrochemical processing of metallic fuel, PyroGreen (reduce radiotoxicity to the level of low and intermediate level waste - LILW); 3 - Fluoride volatility process: Fluoride volatility process, Uranium and protactinium removal from fuel salt compositions by fluorine bubbling, Flowsheet studies on non-aqueous reprocessing of LWR/FBR spent nuclear fuel; Appendix A: Flowsheet studies of RIAR (Russian Federation), List of contributors, Members of the expert group

  14. Determination of the pKa value of the hydroxyl group in the alpha-hydroxycarboxylates citrate, malate and lactate by 13C NMR: implications for metal coordination in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Andre M N; Kong, XiaoLe; Hider, Robert C

    2009-10-01

    Citric acid is an important metal chelator of biological relevance. Citric acid helps solubilizing metals, increasing their bioavailability for plants and microbes and it is also thought to be a constituent of both the extracellular and cytoplasmic low molecular iron pools occurring in plants and vertebrates. Metal coordination by citric acid involves coordination both by the carboxylate and hydroxyl groups, of particular interest is its alpha-hydroxycarboxylate function. This structural feature is highly conserved in siderophores produced by evolutionarily distant species and seems to confer specificity toward Fe(III) binding. In order to understand the mechanism of metal coordination by alpha-hydroxycarboxylates and correctly evaluate the respective complex stability constants, it is essential to improve the knowledge about the ionisation of the alcohol group in these compounds. We have evaluated the hydroxyl pKa value of citric, malic and lactic acids with the objective of understanding the influence of alpha-carbon substitution. Studies at high pH values, utilizing (13)C NMR, permitted estimation of the pKa values for the three acids. The pKa (alcohol) values (14.4 for citric acid, 14.5 for malic acid, and 15.1 for lactic acid) are considerably higher than the previously reported value for citric acid (11.6) but still lower than the value of 15.5 for methanol. A comparative analysis of the three compounds indicates that different substitutions on the alpha-carbon introduce changes to the inductive effect experienced by the hydroxyl group thereby modulating its ionisation behaviour. Comparison with the siderophore rhizoferrin, which pKa (alcohol) values were confirmed to be 10 and 11.3, suggests that intra-molecular hydrogen bonding may also aid in the hydroxyl ionisation by stabilizing the resulting anion. Studies of metal coordination by alpha-hydroxycarboxylates should take these factors into account.

  15. Coordinating controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-07-15

    While physics Laboratories are having to absorb cuts in resources, the machines they rely on are becoming more and more complex, requiring increasingly sophisticated systems. Rather than being a resourceful engineer or physicist able to timber together solutions in his 'backyard', the modern controls specialist has become a professional in his own right. Because of possible conflicts between increasing sophistication on one hand and scarcer resources on the other, there was felt a need for more contacts among controls specialists to exchange experiences, coordinate development and discuss 'family problems', away from meetings where the main interest is on experimental physics.

  16. Coordinated unbundling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermans, Bram; Zabala-Iturriagagoitia, Jon Mikel

    2013-01-01

    Public procurement for innovation is a matter of using public demand to trigger innovation. Empirical studies have demonstrated that demand-based policy instruments can be considered to be a powerful tool in stimulating innovative processes among existing firms; however, the existing literature has...... not focused on the role this policy instrument can play in the promotion of (knowledge-intensive) entrepreneurship. This paper investigates this link in more detail and introduces the concept of coordinated unbundling as a strategy that can facilitate this purpose. We also present a framework on how...

  17. Coordinating controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    While physics Laboratories are having to absorb cuts in resources, the machines they rely on are becoming more and more complex, requiring increasingly sophisticated systems. Rather than being a resourceful engineer or physicist able to timber together solutions in his 'backyard', the modern controls specialist has become a professional in his own right. Because of possible conflicts between increasing sophistication on one hand and scarcer resources on the other, there was felt a need for more contacts among controls specialists to exchange experiences, coordinate development and discuss 'family problems', away from meetings where the main interest is on experimental physics

  18. Parameters for Organism Grouping - Gclust Server | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Gclust Server Parameters for Organism Grouping Data detail Data name Parameters for Organism...his Database Site Policy | Contact Us Parameters for Organism Grouping - Gclust Server | LSDB Archive ...

  19. Group monopolization & collaborative work: the making of a science video project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jayme, B.; Roth, W.-M.; Reis, G.; Eijck, van M.W.

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT: In the present ethnographic case study, we investigate how monopolization emerges and is maintained during collaborative working situations in elementary science classroom tasks. Our analysis suggests that monopolization is achieved in part by the position of the students around the

  20. Talk in Primary Science: A Method to Promote Productive and Contextualised Group Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braund, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Modelled Discussions About Science (MoDAS), where adults talk together about scientific ideas, procedures and applications, were devised to model and improve the quality of pupils' discussions. Two examples from one of the project schools are examined to see if these aims were fulfilled and to comment on examples of cognitive and social aspects of…

  1. Coordination theory and collaboration technology

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Gary M; Smith, John B

    2001-01-01

    The National Science Foundation funded the first Coordination Theory and Collaboration Technology initiative to look at systems that support collaborations in business and elsewhere. This book explores the global revolution in human interconnectedness. It will discuss the various collaborative workgroups and their use in technology. The initiative focuses on processes of coordination and cooperation among autonomous units in human systems, in computer and communication systems, and in hybrid organizations of both systems. This initiative is motivated by three scientific issues which have been

  2. A case-based, small-group cooperative learning course in preclinical veterinary science aimed at bridging basic science and clinical literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Schoeman

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In 1999 a dedicated problem-based learning course was introduced into the lecture-based preclinical veterinary curriculum of the University of Pretoria. The Introduction to Clinical Studies Course combines traditional lectures, practical sessions, student self-learning and guided tutorials. The self-directed component of the course utilises case-based, small group cooperative learning as an educational vehicle to link basic science with clinical medicine. The aim of this article is to describe the objectives and structure of the course and to report the results of the assessment of the students' perceptions on some aspects of the course. Students reacted very positively to the ability of the course to equip them with problem-solving skills. Students indicated positive perceptions about the workload of the course. There were, however, significantly lower scores for the clarity of the course objectives. Although the study guide for the course is very comprehensive, the practice regarding the objectives is still uncertain. It is imperative to set clear objectives in non-traditional, student-centred courses. The objectives have to be explained at the outset and reiterated throughout the course. Tutors should also communicate the rationale behind problem based learning as a pedagogical method to the students. Further research is needed to verify the effectiveness of this course in bridging the gap between basic science and clinical literacy in veterinary science. Ongoing feedback and assessment of the management and content are important to refine this model for integrating basic science with clinical literacy.

  3. A case-based, small-group cooperative learning course in preclinical veterinary science aimed at bridging basic science and clinical literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, J P; van Schoor, M; van der Merwe, L L; Meintjes, R A

    2009-03-01

    In 1999 a dedicated problem-based learning course was introduced into the lecture-based preclinical veterinary curriculum of the University of Pretoria. The Introduction to Clinical Studies Course combines traditional lectures, practical sessions, student self-learning and guided tutorials. The self-directed component of the course utilises case-based, small-group cooperative learning as an educational vehicle to link basic science with clinical medicine. The aim of this article is to describe the objectives and structure of the course and to report the results of the assessment of the students' perceptions on some aspects of the course. Students reacted very positively to the ability of the course to equip them with problem-solving skills. Students indicated positive perceptions about the workload of the course. There were, however, significantly lower scores for the clarity of the course objectives. Although the study guide for the course is very comprehensive, the practice regarding the objectives is still uncertain. It is imperative to set clear objectives in non-traditional, student-centred courses. The objectives have to be explained at the outset and reiterated throughout the course. Tutors should also communicate the rationale behind problem-based learning as a pedagogical method to the students. Further research is needed to verify the effectiveness of this course in bridging the gap between basic science and clinical literacy in veterinary science. Ongoing feedback and assessment of the management and content are important to refine this model for integrating basic science with clinical literacy.

  4. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience At the end of the first full-year running period of LHC, CMS is established as a reliable, robust and mature experiment. In particular common systems and infrastructure faults accounted for <0.6 % CMS downtime during LHC pp physics. Technical operation throughout the entire year was rather smooth, the main faults requiring UXC access being sub-detector power systems and rack-cooling turbines. All such problems were corrected during scheduled technical stops, in the shadow of tunnel access needed by the LHC, or in negotiated accesses or access extensions. Nevertheless, the number of necessary accesses to the UXC averaged more than one per week and the technical stops were inevitably packed with work packages, typically 30 being executed within a few days, placing a high load on the coordination and area management teams. It is an appropriate moment for CMS Technical Coordination to thank all those in many CERN departments and in the Collaboration, who were involved in CMS techni...

  5. EOS Aqua: Mission Status at the Earth Science Constellation (ESC) Mission Operations Working Group (MOWG) Meeting at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guit, Bill

    2017-01-01

    This presentation at the Earth Science Constellation Mission Operations Working Group meeting at KSC in December 2017 to discuss EOS (Earth Observing System) Aqua Earth Science Constellation status. Reviewed and approved by Eric Moyer, ESMO (Earth Science Mission Operations) Deputy Project Manager.

  6. Using group learning to promote integration and cooperative learning between Asian and Australian second-year veterinary science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Paul C; Woodall, Peter F; Bellingham, Mark; Noad, Michael; Lloyd, Shan

    2007-01-01

    There is a tendency for students from different nationalities to remain within groups of similar cultural backgrounds. The study reported here used group project work to encourage integration and cooperative learning between Australian students and Asian (Southeast Asian) international students in the second year of a veterinary science program. The group project involved an oral presentation during a second-year course (Structure and Function), with group formation engineered to include very high, high, moderate, and low achievers (based on previous grades). One Asian student and three Australian students were placed in each group. Student perceptions of group dynamics were analyzed through a self-report survey completed at the end of the presentations and through group student interviews. Results from the survey were analyzed by chi-square to compare the responses between Asian and Australian students, with statistical significance accepted at p learning experience. Asian students expressed a greater preference for working in a group than for working alone (p = 0.001) and reported more frequently than Australian students that teamwork produces better results (p = 0.01). Australian students were more likely than Asian students to voice their opinion in a team setting (p = 0.001), while Asian students were more likely to depend on the lecturer for directions (p = 0.001). The results also showed that group project work appeared to create an environment that supported learning and was a successful strategy to achieve acceptance of cultural differences.

  7. Research Groups & Research Subjects - RED | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rch Groups & Research Subjects Data detail Data name Research Groups & Research Sub... Number of data entries 174 entries Data item Description Research ID Research ID (Subject number) Institute...tion Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Research Groups & Research Subjects - RED | LSDB Archive ... ...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data List Contact us RED Resea... Organization Section Section (Department) User name User name Experimental title Experimental title (Rese

  8. Alkyl group dependence on structure and magnetic properties in layered cobalt coordination polymers containing substituted glutarate ligands and 4,4'-bipyridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nettleman, Joseph H.; Supkowski, Ronald M.; LaDuca, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Five two-dimensional divalent cobalt coordination polymers containing 4,4'-bipyridine (bpy) and substituted or unsubstituted glutarate ligands have been prepared hydrothermally and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. [Co(mg)(bpy)] n (1, mg=3-methylglutarate) forms a (4,4) rhomboid grid structure based on the connection of {Co 2 (CO 2 ) 2 } dimeric units. Using the more sterically encumbered ligands 3,3-dimethylglutarate (dmg) and 3-ethyl, 3-methylglutarate (emg) generated {[Co(dmg)(bpy)(H 2 O)].2H 2 O} n (2) and {[Co(emg)(bpy)(H 2 O)].H 2 O} n (3), respectively. These complexes manifest {Co(CO 2 )} n chains linked into 2-D by aliphatic dicarboxylate and bpy ligands. The 'tied-back' substituted glutarate ligand 1,1-cyclopentanediacetate (cda) afforded [Co(cda)(bpy)] n (4), and the unsubstituted glutarate (glu) generated [Co(glu)(bpy)] n (5), both of which exhibit a topology similar to that of 1. The magnetic properties of complexes 1-4 were analyzed successfully with a recently developed phenomenological chain model accounting for both magnetic coupling (J) and zero-field splitting effects (D), even though 1 and 4 contain isolated, discrete {Co 2 (CO 2 ) 2 } dimers. The D parameter in this series varied between 21.8(8) and 48.0(9) cm -1 . However weak antiferromagnetic coupling was observed in 1 (J=-2.43(4) cm -1 ) and 4 (J=-0.89(2) cm -1 ), while weak ferromagnetic coupling appears to be operative in both 2 (J=0.324(5) cm -1 ) and 3 (J=0.24(1) cm -1 ). - Five two-dimensional divalent cobalt coordination polymers containing 4,4'-bipyridine (bpy) and substituted or unsubstituted glutarate ligands have been prepared and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Three contain dimeric {Co 2 (CO 2 ) 2 } units, while two manifest {Co(CO 2 )} n chains, depending on the steric bulk of the substituent. The magnetic properties of the complexes were analyzed successfully with a recently developed phenomenological chain model

  9. Framework for development of physician competencies in genomic medicine: report of the Competencies Working Group of the Inter-Society Coordinating Committee for Physician Education in Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korf, Bruce R; Berry, Anna B; Limson, Melvin; Marian, Ali J; Murray, Michael F; O'Rourke, P Pearl; Passamani, Eugene R; Relling, Mary V; Tooker, John; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Rodriguez, Laura L

    2014-11-01

    Completion of the Human Genome Project, in conjunction with dramatic reductions in the cost of DNA sequencing and advances in translational research, is gradually ushering genomic discoveries and technologies into the practice of medicine. The rapid pace of these advances is opening up a gap between the knowledge available about the clinical relevance of genomic information and the ability of clinicians to include such information in their medical practices. This educational gap threatens to be rate limiting to the clinical adoption of genomics in medicine. Solutions will require not only a better understanding of the clinical implications of genetic discoveries but also training in genomics at all levels of professional development, including for individuals in formal training and others who long ago completed such training. The National Human Genome Research Institute has convened the Inter-Society Coordinating Committee for Physician Education in Genomics (ISCC) to develop and share best practices in the use of genomics in medicine. The ISCC has developed a framework for development of genomics practice competencies that may serve as a starting point for formulation of competencies for physicians in various medical disciplines.

  10. Patient-Centred Coordinated Care in Times of Emerging Diseases and Epidemics. Contribution of the IMIA Working Group on Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borycki, E; Cummings, E; Dexheimer, J W; Gong, Y; Kennebeck, S; Kushniruk, A; Kuziemsky, C; Saranto, K; Weber, J; Takeda, H

    2015-08-13

    In this paper the researchers describe how existing health information technologies (HIT) can be repurposed and new technologies can be innovated to provide patient-centered care to individuals affected by new and emerging diseases. The researchers conducted a focused review of the published literature describing how HIT can be used to support safe, patient-centred, coordinated care to patients who are affected by Ebola (an emerging disease). New and emerging diseases present opportunities for repurposing existing technologies and for stimulating the development of new HIT innovation. Innovative technologies may be developed such as new software used for tracking patients during new or emerging disease outbreaks or by repurposing and extending existing technologies so they can be used to support patients, families and health professionals who may have been exposed to a disease. The paper describes the development of new technologies and the repurposing and extension of existing ones (such as electronic health records) using the most recent outbreak of Ebola as an example.

  11. Multisites Coordination in Shared Multicast Trees

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dommel, H-P; Garcia-Luna-Aceves, J. J

    1999-01-01

    .... The protocol supports Internet-wide coordination for large and highly interactive groupwork, relying on transmission of coordination directives between group members across a shared end-to-end multicast tree...

  12. International Coordination of Lunar Polar Volatiles Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruener, J. E.; Suzuki, N. H.; Carpenter, J. D.

    2015-10-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) has established a study team to coordinate the worldwide interest in lunar polar volatiles, and in particular water ice, in an effort to stimulate cooperation and collaboration.

  13. The Effect of the Type of Achievement Grouping on Students' Question Generation in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the influence of different types of achievement grouping on question generation. There were 46 participants from two Grade 5 classrooms. Students completed a test to determine their achievement levels. One of the classrooms was randomly assigned, to work in homogeneous achievement groups and the other one in…

  14. Domain analysis of computational science - Fifty years of a scientific computing group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, M.

    2010-02-23

    I employed bibliometric- and historical-methods to study the domain of the Scientific Computing group at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for an extended period of fifty years, from 1958 to 2007. I noted and confirmed the growing emergence of interdisciplinarity within the group. I also identified a strong, consistent mathematics and physics orientation within it.

  15. Status of pseudo fission product cross sections for fast reactors. Results of the SWG 17, International working party on evaluation coordination of the nuclear science committee, NEA- OECD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruppelaar, H.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Pijlgroms, B.J.; Rimpault, G.; Smith, P.; Ignatyuk, A.; Koshcheev, V.; Nikolaev, M.; Thsiboulia, A.; Kawai, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Watanabe, T.; Zukeran, A.; Nakajima, Y.; Matsunobu, H.

    1998-08-01

    Within the framework of the SWG17 benchmark organized by a Working Party of the Nuclear Science Committee of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), a comparison of lumped or pseudo fission product cross sections for fast reactors has been made. Four institutions participated with data libraries based on the JEF2.2, EAF-4.2, BROND-2, FONDL-2.1, ADL-3 and JENDL-3.2 evaluated nuclear data files. Several parameters have been compared with each other: the one-group cross sections and reactivity worths of the lumped nuclide for several partial absorption and scattering cross sections, and the one-group cross sections of the individual fission products. Also graphs of the multi-group cross sections of the lumped nuclide have been compared, as well as graphs of capture cross sections for 27 nuclides. From two contributions based on JEF2.2, it can be concluded that the data processing influences the capture cross section by about 1% and the inelastic scattering cross section by 2%. The differences between the lumped cross sections of the different data libraries are surprisingly small: maximum 6% for capture and 9% for the inelastic scattering. Similar results are obtained for the reactivity effects. Since the reactivity worth of the lumped nuclide is dominated by the capture reaction, the maximum spread in the total reactivity worth is still only 5.3%. There is a systematic difference between total, elastic and capture cross sections of JENDL-3.2 and JEF2.2 of the same order of magnitude. Possible reasons for this discrepancy have been indicated. The one-group capture and inelastic scattering cross sections of most of the important individual fission products differ by less than 10% (root mean square values). Larger differences are observed for unstable nuclides where there is a lack of experimental data. For the (n,2n) group cross sections, which are rather sensitive to the weighting spectrum in the fast energy range, these differences are several tens of percents. The final

  16. A path less traveled: A self-guided action science inquiry among a small group of adult learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkman, Daniel Vance

    This dissertation provides an analysis of the dialogue that occurred among a small group of adult learners who engaged in a self-guided action science inquiry into their own practice. The following pages describe how this group of five practitioners ventured into a critical, self-reflective inquiry into their own values, feelings, and intentions in search of personal and professional growth. It is a deeply revealing story that shows how, through group dialogue, the members gradually unravel the interconnections between their values, feelings, and intention. They uncover surprising and unanticipated patterns in their reasoning-in-action that reflect lessons from present day experiences as well as childhood axioms about what constitutes appropriate behavior. They push their learning further to recognize emotional triggers that are useful in confronting old habits of mind that must be overcome if new Model II strategies are to be learned and internalized. They conclude that becoming Model II requires a centering on basic values, a personal commitment to change, a willingness to persist in the face of resistance, and the wisdom to act with deliberate caution. The transformative power of this insight lies in the realization of what it takes personally and collectively to make the world a truly respectful, productive, democratic, and socially just place in which to live and work. The action science literature holds the assumption that a trained facilitator is needed to guide such an inquiry and the learning of Model II skills. Unfortunately, there are few educator-trainers available to facilitate the learning of Model II proficiencies over the months and years that may be required. The data presented here show that it is possible for a group of highly motivated individuals to initiate and sustain their own action science inquiry without the aid of a highly skilled facilitator. A model of the group dialogue is presented that highlights the salient characteristics of an

  17. Innovation processes navigated by women groups in the Malian shea sector: How targeting of international niche markets results in fragmentation and obstructs coordination

    OpenAIRE

    Sidibe, A.; Vellema, S.; Dembele, M.M.; Traore, K.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    The incorporation of women and their associations into international markets and value chains is proposed increasingly as a development pathway in Sub-Saharan Africa. The underlying assumption is that exclusion of individual women from groups specialized in supplying a single international niche market is the main obstacle to their development. Intervention under this assumption focuses on linking women groups to international business and development organizations (NGOs). To validate this pr...

  18. Innovation in the teaching of astrophysics and space science - spacecraft design group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelli, C

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes how the design of a scientific satellite can be used to provide both a stimulating and effective subject for a physics based group study. The group study divides the satellite into distinct subsystems and small teams of two or three students carry out the detailed design of each subsystem. The aim is to produce a complete satellite system design along with the choice of launch vehicle, orbit and communications system so that all the mission requirements can be met. An important feature of the group study is that it is a student led activity with staff acting as mentors. The development of key skills and important learning outcomes from the group study is discussed along with the method for assessment, structuring and resourcing the study

  19. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2013-01-01

    The focus of Run Coordination during LS1 is to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities, to smooth interactions between subsystems and to ensure that all are ready in time to resume operations in 2015 with a fully calibrated and understood detector. After electricity and cooling were restored to all equipment, at about the time of the last CMS week, recommissioning activities were resumed for all subsystems. On 7 October, DCS shifts began 24/7 to allow subsystems to remain on to facilitate operations. That culminated with the Global Run in November (GriN), which   took place as scheduled during the week of 4 November. The GriN has been the first centrally managed operation since the beginning of LS1, and involved all subdetectors but the Pixel Tracker presently in a lab upstairs. All nights were therefore dedicated to long stable runs with as many subdetectors as possible. Among the many achievements in that week, three items may be highlighted. First, the Strip...

  20. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2013-01-01

    Since the LHC ceased operations in February, a lot has been going on at Point 5, and Run Coordination continues to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities. In the last months, the Pixel detector was extracted and is now stored in the pixel lab in SX5; the beam pipe has been removed and ME1/1 removal has started. We regained access to the vactank and some work on the RBX of HB has started. Since mid-June, electricity and cooling are back in S1 and S2, allowing us to turn equipment back on, at least during the day. 24/7 shifts are not foreseen in the next weeks, and safety tours are mandatory to keep equipment on overnight, but re-commissioning activities are slowly being resumed. Given the (slight) delays accumulated in LS1, it was decided to merge the two global runs initially foreseen into a single exercise during the week of 4 November 2013. The aim of the global run is to check that we can run (parts of) CMS after several months switched off, with the new VME PCs installed, th...

  1. Innovation processes navigated by women groups in the Malian shea sector: How targeting of international niche markets results in fragmentation and obstructs coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sidibe, A.; Vellema, S.; Dembele, M.M.; Traore, K.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    The incorporation of women and their associations into international markets and value chains is proposed increasingly as a development pathway in Sub-Saharan Africa. The underlying assumption is that exclusion of individual women from groups specialized in supplying a single international niche

  2. Report on Workshop "Planning of Future Science in the Polar Ocean Study with Cooperation among Study Groups"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuo Fukuchi

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available A workshop on "Planning of Future Science in the Polar Ocean Study with Cooperation among Study Groups" was held on November 1,2000,at the National Institute of Polar Research with 21 participants. In this workshop, a plan to charter a research vessel other than "Shirase" was introduced and a science plan using the chartered research vessel by 43rd Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition was discussed. This study is going to be conducted in the sea ice area around 140-150°E in mid-summer (February 2002, when biological production becomes active in the Antarctic Ocean. Oceanographic observations using "Shirase" are difficult to conduct in this season since she supports a wide range of summer operations around Syowa Station. The relationships between biological production and greenhouse effect gas production and the vertical transport of organic materials from the surface to deep ocean will be the focus of this study. At this stage, one deputy leader and three members of JARE, and 25-26 other scientists including graduate students and foreign scientists, will participate in the field observations using the chartered vessel. The members of JARE will conduct a project science program of the VI Phase of JARE, while the other participants will do part of the science program "Antarctic Ocean in Earth System". Since further observations for several years after the summer of 2002 will be required to understand the role of the Antarctic Ocean in global climate change, we have applied for a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research for the next project, which will start from 2001,to the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture of Japan. The proposal was discussed in detail in this workshop.

  3. Joint and Coordinated Calls for Science and Technology Programs between Ukraine and the European Commission as a Potential Tool for Harmonization of the EU-Ukraine Priorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gorohovatska

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Results of scientific cooperation between European countries, including Ukraine, within the Seventh Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development are reviewed. Terms of preparation of joint and coordinated EUUkraine calls within the Framework Programme «Horizon 2020» are discussed; terms and conditions of participation in these calls are determined.

  4. Small Group Teaching in Undergraduate Science. Higher Education Learning Project (h.e.l.p.) - Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogborn, Jon, Ed.; And Others

    While this book is focused primarily on the tutorials held in the British universities, it offers many insights that can improve the teaching in the discussion sections so common in our large universities. Introductions to analyses of group processes of technical language, and of questions are given. Lesson plans for skill building sessions are…

  5. New Frontiers in Analyzing Dynamic Group Interactions : Bridging Social and Computer Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale; Hung, H.S.; Keyton, Joann

    2017-01-01

    This special issue on advancing interdisciplinary collaboration between computer scientists and social scientists documents the joint results of the international Lorentz workshop, “Interdisciplinary Insights into Group and Team Dynamics,” which took place in Leiden, The Netherlands, July 2016.

  6. Federal interagency radiation policy coordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses Federal interagency radiation policy coordination. The Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC) is explained as being dedicated to the success and forward motion of enhanced radiation research and policy coordination. Both CIRRPC and the Science Panel are staffed with Federal employees. Their expertise includes many and various radiation disciplines including cytogenetics, dosimetry, epidemiology, genetics, health physics, nuclear medicine, radiology, radiation carcinogenesis, and risk assessment. Ten scientific and technical issues in their preliminary order are presented: radioepidemiological tables; de minimis radiation levels; radon progeny health effects; occupational exposure registry; measurement, recording, and control of radiation; food irradiation; use of radiation in science, industry, and medicine; nonionizing radiation; and remedial actions

  7. Collective coordinates on symplectic manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razumov, A.V.; Taranov, A.Yu.

    1981-01-01

    For an arbitrary Lie group of canonical transformations on a symplectic manifold collective coordinates are introduced. They describe a motion of the dynamical system as a whole under the group transformations. Some properties of Lie group of canonical transformations are considered [ru

  8. Modelling the deposition of airborne radionuclides into the urban environment. First report of the VAMP Urban Working Group. Part of the IAEA/CEC co-ordinated research programme on the validation of environmental model predictions (VAMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    A co-ordinated research programme was begun at the IAEA in 1988 with the short title of Validation of Environmental Model Predictions (VAMP). The VAMP Urban Working Group aims to examine, by means of expert review combined with formal validation exercises, modelling for the assessment of the radiation exposure of urban populations through the external irradiation and inhalation pathways. An aim of the studies is to evaluate the lessons learned and to document the improvements in modelling capability as a result of experience gained following the Chernobyl accident. This Technical Document, the first report of the Group, addresses the subject of the deposition of airborne radionuclides into the urban environment. It summarizes not only the present status of modelling in this field, but also the results of a limited validation exercise that was performed under the auspices of VAMP. 42 refs, figs and tabs

  9. The future of the pharmaceutical sciences and graduate education: recommendations from the AACP Graduate Education Special Interest Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu-Pong, Susanna; Gobburu, Jogarao; O'Barr, Stephen; Shah, Kumar; Huber, Jason; Weiner, Daniel

    2013-05-13

    Despite pharma's recent sea change in approach to drug discovery and development, U.S. pharmaceutical sciences graduate programs are currently maintaining traditional methods for master's and doctoral student education. The literature on graduate education in the biomedical sciences has long been advocating educating students to hone soft skills like communication and teamwork, in addition to maintaining excellent basic skills in research. However, recommendations to date have not taken into account the future trends in the pharmaceutical industry. The AACP Graduate Education Special Interest Group has completed a literature survey of the trends in the pharmaceutical industry and graduate education in order to determine whether our graduate programs are strategically positioned to prepare our graduates for successful careers in the next few decades. We recommend that our pharmaceutical sciences graduate programs take a proactive leadership role in meeting the needs of our future graduates and employers. Our graduate programs should bring to education the innovation and collaboration that our industry also requires to be successful and relevant in this century.

  10. Porphyrin coordination polymer nanospheres and nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongchun; Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.

    2012-12-04

    A porphyrin coordination polymer nanostructure comprising a network of pyridyl porphyrin molecules and coordinating metal ions coordinatively bound through the pyridyl groups. In some embodiments, the porphyrins are metalloporphyrins. A variety of nanostructures are formed by the network polymer, including nanospheres, polygonal nanostructures, nanorods, and nanofibers, depending on a variety of factors including coordination metal ion, porphyrin type, metal of the metalloporphyrin, and degree of agitation during nanostructure formation. Reduction of coordinating metal ions may be used to form metal nanoparticles on the coordination polymer nanostructure.

  11. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 118; Issue 6. Utilization of LVO 2 − species (L2- is a tridentate ONS donor) as an inorganic analogue of carboxylate group: A journey to a new domain of coordination chemistry. Satyabrata Samanta Subodh Kanti Dutta Muktimoy Chaudhury. Volume 118 Issue 6 ...

  12. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 127; Issue 12. Synthesis, characterization, X-ray crystal structure, ... The Cu(II) center is coordinated by two oxygen and one nitrogen donors of L2− and nitrogen atoms of the heterocyclic group. Electrochemical studies of the Cu(II) complex showed shifts in the ligand ...

  13. Basic Science of the Fundamentals and Dynamics of Social-Fringe Group Formation and Sustainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    USTIFY! G BELIEFS: WHAT MOTIVATES THE TERRORISTS •:• A 1-’ltmdry l.ist of 1\\lotivations: llonor, Trauma, Religion, llumtli:uion, Sugma, Feminism ...Group Grievance and Humiliation: A Tool in AI-Qaeda Propaganda •Jihad in Algeria today is YOUR hope with permission from Allah in redemption from...relational) and Morality ! 54! "Hear, Israel, the decrees and laws I declare in your hearing today . Learn them and be sure to foLlow them. The

  14. Setting the question for inquiry: The effects of whole class vs small group on student achievement in elementary science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnetto, Andy Roy

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of two different student-centered approaches to setting the question for inquiry. The first approach (whole class) consisted of students setting a single question for inquiry after which students worked in small groups during an investigation phase of the activity with all groups exploring the same question. The second approach (small group) consisted of each group of students setting a question resulting in numerous questions being explored per class. A mixed method quasi-experimental design was utilized. Two grade five teachers from a small rural school district in the Midwestern United States participated, each teaching two sections of science (approximately 25 students per section). Results indicate three major findings. Instructional approach (whole class vs. small group) did not effect student achievement in science or language arts. Observational data indicated the actions and skills teachers utilized to implement the approaches were similar. Specifically, the pedagogical skills of dialogical interaction (which was found to be influenced by teacher level of control of learning and teacher content knowledge) and effective rather than efficient use of time were identified as key factors in teachers' progression toward a student-centered, teacher-managed instructional approach. Unit exams along with qualitative and quantitative teacher observation data indicated that these factors do have an impact on student achievement. Specifically increased dialogical interaction in the forms of greater student voice, and increased cognitive demands placed on students by embedding and emphasizing science argument within the student inquiry corresponded to positive gains in student achievement. Additionally, teacher's perception of student abilities was also found to influence professional growth. Finally, allowing students to set the questions for inquiry and design the experiments impact the classroom environment as teacher

  15. Reimagining publics and (non)participation: Exploring exclusion from science communication through the experiences of low-income, minority ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Emily

    2018-01-01

    This article explores science communication from the perspective of those most at risk of exclusion, drawing on ethnographic fieldwork. I conducted five focus groups and 32 interviews with participants from low-income, minority ethnic backgrounds. Using theories of social reproduction and social justice, I argue that participation in science communication is marked by structural inequalities (particularly ethnicity and class) in two ways. First, participants' involvement in science communication practices was narrow (limited to science media consumption). Second, their experiences of exclusion centred on cultural imperialism (misrepresentation and 'Othering') and powerlessness (being unable to participate or change the terms of their participation). I argue that social reproduction in science communication constructs a narrow public that reflects the shape, values and practices of dominant groups, at the expense of the marginalised. The article contributes to how we might reimagine science communication's publics by taking inclusion/exclusion and the effects of structural inequalities into account.

  16. White Paper on the Status and Future of Ground-based Gamma-Ray Astronomy - Extragalactic Science Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczynski, H.; Coppi, P.; Dermer, C.; Dwek, E.; Georganopoulos, M.; Horan, D.; Jones, T.; Krennrich, F.; Mukherjee, R.; Perlman, E.; Vassiliev, V.

    2007-04-01

    In fall 2006, the Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society requested a white paper about the status and future of ground based gamma-ray astronomy. The white paper will largely be written in the year 2007. Interested scientists are invited to join the science working groups. In this contribution, we will report on some preliminary results of the extragalactic science working group. We will discuss the potential of future ground based gamma-ray experiments to elucidate how supermassive black holes accrete matter, form jets, and accelerate particles, and to study in detail the acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays in extragalactic systems like infrared galaxies and galaxy clusters. Furthermore, we discuss avenues to constrain the spectrum of the extragalactic infrared to optical background radiation, and to measure the extragalactic magnetic fields based on gamma-ray observations. Eventually, we discuss the potential of ground based experiments for conducting gamma-ray source surveys. More information about the white paper can be found at: http://cherenkov.physics.iastate.edu/wp/

  17. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2010-01-01

    Overview Once again, the bulk of this article reviews the intense activity of a recently completed shutdown, which, although quite unforeseeable until a few weeks before it started, proved by its success that our often advertised capability to conduct major maintenance within a two month period is real. Although safely completed, on-time to remarkable precision, the activity was not without incident, and highlighted our dependence on many experienced, specialist teams and their precise choreography. Even after the yoke was safely closed, magnet re-commissioning and beampipe pumpdown showed new and thought-provoking behaviour. The struggle to maintain adequate technical resources will be a pre-occupation over the coming months, in parallel with the start of truly sustained operation, for which various procedures are still being put in place. Planning for future shutdowns must now become a high priority, with many working groups and task forces already in existence to prepare infrastructure improvements and to...

  18. Invasive Species Science Update (No. 7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean Pearson; Yvette Ortega; Jack Butler

    2014-01-01

    Invasive Species Science Updates are designed to keep managers and other users up-to-date with recently completed and ongoing research by RMRS scientists, as well as highlight breaking news related to invasive species issues. The newsletter is produced by the RMRS Invasive Species Working Group (ISWG), which is a core group of scientists who volunteer to coordinate...

  19. [Development of clinical trial education program for pharmaceutical science students through small group discussion and role-playing using protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imakyure, Osamu; Shuto, Hideki; Nishikawa, Fumi; Hagiwara, Yoshifuka; Inoue, Sachiko; Koyanagi, Taeko; Hirakawa, Masaaki; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2010-08-01

    The acquirement of basic knowledge of clinical trials and professional attitude in their practices is a general instructional objective in the Model Core Curriculum for Pharmaceutical Education. Unfortunately, the previous program of clinical trial education was not effective in the acquirement of a professional attitude in their practices. Then, we developed the new clinical trial education program using protocol through small group discussion (SGD) and roll-playing. Our program consists of 7 steps of practical training. In step 1, the students find some problems after presentation of the protocol including case and prescription. In step 2, they analyse the extracted problems and share the information obtained in SGD. In steps 3 and 5, five clinical case scenarios are presented to the students and they discuss which case is suitable for entry to the clinical trial or which case corresponds to the discontinuance criteria in the present designed protocol. In steps 4 and 6, the roll-playing is performed by teachers and students as doctors and clinical research coordinators (CRC) respectively. Further, we conducted a trial practice based on this program for the students. In the student's self-evaluation into five grades, the average score of the skill acquisition level in each step was 3.8-4.7 grade. Our clinical trial education program could be effective in educating the candidates for CRC or clinical pharmacists.

  20. Macro and Micro-Nutrients Intake, Food Groups Consumption and Dietary Habits among Female Students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Azadbakht, L; Esmaillzadeh, A

    2012-01-01

    Background Improving the dietary intake among different groups and population is important for improving the health status. This study determines the nutrients and food group intake as well as dietary habits among female students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Methods Two hundreds and eighty nine healthy female youths who were randomly selected among students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in Isfahan, Iran were enrolled. A validated semi quantitative food frequency ques...

  1. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2012-01-01

      On Wednesday 14 March, the machine group successfully injected beams into LHC for the first time this year. Within 48 hours they managed to ramp the beams to 4 TeV and proceeded to squeeze to β*=0.6m, settings that are used routinely since then. This brought to an end the CMS Cosmic Run at ~Four Tesla (CRAFT), during which we collected 800k cosmic ray events with a track crossing the central Tracker. That sample has been since then topped up to two million, allowing further refinements of the Tracker Alignment. The LHC started delivering the first collisions on 5 April with two bunches colliding in CMS, giving a pile-up of ~27 interactions per crossing at the beginning of the fill. Since then the machine has increased the number of colliding bunches to reach 1380 bunches and peak instantaneous luminosities around 6.5E33 at the beginning of fills. The average bunch charges reached ~1.5E11 protons per bunch which results in an initial pile-up of ~30 interactions per crossing. During the ...

  2. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Austin Ball

    Summary of progress since last CMS week. Ten years of construction work have been completed. CMS is closed, in very close to the ideal low luminosity configuration, and performed well in the first tests with LHC beam. Behind this encouraging news is the story of a summer of intense commitment by many teams (from the collaboration and 3 CERN departments) working together, against the clock and despite many minor setbacks, to ensure that the experiment was ready to play a leading role in the excitement of September 10. Following beampipe bakeout and refill with pure neon, a magnificent effort by the ECAL group and the pt 5 technical crew made it possible to install and commission all 4 ECAL endcap Dees before the end of August. In the shadow of this activity, the barrel and forward pixel trackers and part of the beam monitoring were installed within the vac tank. The pt 5 technical teams then succeeded in safely removing the 20t installation tables and their support blocks from beneath the already installed ...

  3. Enhancement of the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Group's Website and Related Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, Ashley; Vanderbloemen, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The major problem addressed throughout the term was the need to update the group's current website, as it was outdated and required streamlining and modernization. The old Gateway to Astronaut Photography of the Earth website had multiple components, many of which involved searches through expansive databases. The amount of work required to update the website was large and due to a desired release date, assistance was needed to help build new pages and to transfer old information. Additionally, one of the tools listed on the website called Image Detective had been underutilized in the past. It was important to address why the public was not using the tool and how it could potentially become more of a resource for the team. In order to help with updating the website, it was necessary to first learn HTML. After assisting with small edits, I began creating new pages. I utilized the "view page source" and "developer" tools in the internet browser to observe how other websites created their features and to test changes without editing the code. I then edited the code to create an interactive feature on the new page. For the Image Detective Page I began an evaluation of the current page. I also asked my fellow interns and friends at my University to offer their input. I took all of the opinions into account and wrote up a document regarding my recommendations. The recommendations will be considered as I help to improve the Image Detective page for the updated website. In addition to the website, other projects included the need for additional, and updated image collections, along with various project requests. The image collections have been used by educators in the classroom and the impact crater collection was highly requested. The glaciers collection focused mostly on South American glaciers and needed to include more of the earth's many glaciers. The collections had not been updated or created due to the fact that related imagery had not been catalogued. The process

  4. An Example of Large-group Drama and Cross-year Peer Assessment for Teaching Science in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloman, Katherine; Thompson, Richard

    2010-09-01

    Undergraduate students pursuing a three-year marine biology degree programme (n = 86) experienced a large-group drama aimed at allowing them to explore how scientific research is funded and the associated links between science and society. In the drama, Year 1 students played the "general public" who decided which environmental research areas should be prioritised for funding, Year 2 students were the "scientists" who had to prepare research proposals which they hoped to get funded, and Year 3 students were the "research panel" who decided which proposals to fund with input from the priorities set by the "general public". The drama, therefore, included an element of cross-year peer assessment where Year 3 students evaluated the research proposals prepared by the Year 2 students. Questionnaires were distributed at the end of the activity to gather: (1) student perceptions on the cross-year nature of the exercise, (2) the use of peer assessment, and (3) their overall views on the drama. The students valued the opportunity to interact with their peers from other years of the degree programme and most were comfortable with the use of cross-year peer assessment. The majority of students felt that they had increased their knowledge of how research proposals are funded and the perceived benefits of the large-group drama included increased critical thinking ability, confidence in presenting work to others, and enhanced communication skills. Only one student did not strongly advocate the use of this large-group drama in subsequent years.

  5. Comparison of the effectiveness of collaborative groups and peer instruction in a large introductory physics course for science majors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalman, C.S.; Milner-Bolotin, M.; Antimitova, T.

    2010-01-01

    We report on an experiment comparing examinations of concepts using slightly modified peer instruction (MPI) interventions with a conceptual conflict strategy based on collaborative groups (CG). Four interventions were utilized in two sections of an introductory physics course for science students. Both instructors and strategies were alternated in the two classes so that instructor dependence could be factored out and so that each class could serve as both an experimental and a control group. The gain on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) used as a pre- and post-test is essentially the same in both classes. The instructors were experienced in use of MPI, but this was the first time that these instructors had used a collaborative group activity in their classes and only used it for the two interventions in each class described in this paper. CG appears to be more effective as a teaching method than PI. It also should be noted that the effectiveness of both teaching methods seems to be instructor independent as long as the instructors followed the same protocol. (author)

  6. Comparison of the effectiveness of collaborative groups and peer instruction in a large introductory physics course for science majors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalman, C.S., E-mail: Calvin.Kalman@concordia.ca [Concordia Univ., Dept. of Physics, Montreal, QC (Canada); Milner-Bolotin, M. [Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Curriculum and Pedagogy, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Antimitova, T. [Ryerson Univ., Dept. of Physics, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    We report on an experiment comparing examinations of concepts using slightly modified peer instruction (MPI) interventions with a conceptual conflict strategy based on collaborative groups (CG). Four interventions were utilized in two sections of an introductory physics course for science students. Both instructors and strategies were alternated in the two classes so that instructor dependence could be factored out and so that each class could serve as both an experimental and a control group. The gain on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) used as a pre- and post-test is essentially the same in both classes. The instructors were experienced in use of MPI, but this was the first time that these instructors had used a collaborative group activity in their classes and only used it for the two interventions in each class described in this paper. CG appears to be more effective as a teaching method than PI. It also should be noted that the effectiveness of both teaching methods seems to be instructor independent as long as the instructors followed the same protocol. (author)

  7. Partnerships for the Design, Conduct, and Analysis of Effectiveness, and Implementation Research: Experiences of the Prevention Science and Methodology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C. Hendricks; Kellam, Sheppard G.; Kaupert, Sheila; Muthén, Bengt O.; Wang, Wei; Muthén, Linda K.; Chamberlain, Patricia; PoVey, Craig L.; Cady, Rick; Valente, Thomas W.; Ogihara, Mitsunori; Prado, Guillermo J.; Pantin, Hilda M.; Gallo, Carlos G.; Szapocznik, José; Czaja, Sara J.; McManus, John W.

    2012-01-01

    What progress prevention research has made comes through strategic partnerships with communities and institutions that host this research, as well as professional and practice networks that facilitate the diffusion of knowledge about prevention. We discuss partnership issues related to the design, analysis, and implementation of prevention research and especially how rigorous designs, including random assignment, get resolved through a partnership between community stakeholders, institutions, and researchers. These partnerships shape not only study design, but they determine the data that can be collected and how results and new methods are disseminated. We also examine a second type of partnership to improve the implementation of effective prevention programs into practice. We draw on social networks to studying partnership formation and function. The experience of the Prevention Science and Methodology Group, which itself is a networked partnership between scientists and methodologists, is highlighted. PMID:22160786

  8. NASA GSFC Science Communication Working Group: Addressing Barriers to Scientist and Engineer Participation in Education and Public Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, L.; Hsu, B. C.; Campbell, B. A.; Hess, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Science Communication Working Group (SCWG) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been in existence since late 2007. The SCWG is comprised of education and public outreach (E/PO) professionals, public affairs specialists, scientists, and engineers. The goals of the SCWG are to identify barriers to scientist and engineer engagement in E/PO activities and to enable those scientists and engineers who wish to contribute to E/PO to be able to do so. SCWG members have held meetings with scientists and engineers across GSFC to determine barriers to their involvement in E/PO. During these meetings, SCWG members presented examples of successful, ongoing E/PO projects, encouraged active research scientists and engineers to talk about their own E/PO efforts and what worked for them, discussed the E/PO working environment, discussed opportunities for getting involved in E/PO (particularly in high-impact efforts that do not take much time), handed out booklets on effective E/PO, and asked scientists and engineers what they need to engage in E/PO. The identified barriers were consistent among scientists in GSFC's four science divisions (Earth science, planetary science, heliophysics, and astrophysics). Common barriers included 1) lack of time, 2) lack of funding support, 3) lack of value placed on doing E/PO by supervisors, 4) lack of training on doing appropriate/effective E/PO for different audiences, 5) lack of awareness and information about opportunities, 6) lack of understanding of what E/PO really is, and 7) level of effort required to do E/PO. Engineers reported similar issues, but the issues of time and funding support were more pronounced due to their highly structured work day and environment. Since the barriers were identified, the SCWG has taken a number of steps to address and rectify them. Steps have included holding various events to introduce scientists and engineers to E/PO staff and opportunities including an E/PO Open House, brown bag seminars on

  9. 34th Geothermal Coordinating Group Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-11-09

    Chairman William Ogle said the overall purpose of the meeting was to consider how the US government, and the Division of Geothermal Energy in particular, might apply its geothermal effort more effectively. Given the present situation, how does Uncle Sam make the best possible effort? On this theme, there are 4 main subquestions: (1) what government support is needed? (2) how can we improve cooperation between industry, the national laboratories, universities, and industries, and does it matter? (3) how do we transfer technology to industry? (4) What should the technical aims be for the next year or so?

  10. Coordination of the U.S. DOE-Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) science and technology implementing arrangement. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    In 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Environmental Management (EM) and delegated to the office the responsibility of cleaning up the US nuclear weapons complex. EM's mission has three primary activities: (1) to assess, remediate, and monitor contaminated sites and facilities; (2) to store, treat, and dispose of wastes from past and current operations; and (3) to develop and implement innovative technologies for environmental remediation. To this end, EM has established domestic and international cooperative technology development programs, including one with the Republic of Argentina. Cooperating with Argentine scientific institutes and industry meets US cleanup objectives by: (1) identifying and accessing Argentine EM-related technologies, thereby leveraging investments and providing cost-savings; (2) improving access to technical information, scientific expertise, and technologies applicable to EM needs; and (3) fostering the development of innovative environmental technologies by increasing US private sector opportunities in Argentina in EM-related areas. Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) serves as DOE-OST's primary technology transfer agent. FIU-HCET acts as the coordinating and managing body for the Department of Energy (DOE)-Argentina National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) Arrangement. Activities include implementing standard operating procedures, tracking various technical projects, hosting visiting scientists, advising DOE of potential joint projects based on previous studies, and demonstrating/transferring desired technology. HCET hosts and directs the annual Joint Coordinating Committee for Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management meeting between the DOE and CNEA representatives. Additionally, HCET is evaluating the possibility of establishing similar arrangements with other Latin American countries

  11. A case study of Markdale High School's implementation of heterogeneously-grouped classes in English, mathematics, science, and social studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre-Louis, Fred

    The purpose of this study was to describe Markdale High School's change from separate college preparatory and general level classes to heterogeneously-grouped classes in English, mathematics, science, and social studies, with particular emphasis on the principal's leadership style, change process, and teacher concerns (Hall & Hord, 2006) experienced during this effort. The researcher used Hall and Hord's (2006) Concern-Based Adoption Model (CBAM) as a conceptual framework. Specifically, the researcher applied three elements of the CBAM model: (a) the Twelve Principles of Change, (b) the Change Facilitator Styles, and (c) the Stages of Concerns. Hall and Hord's framework served as a lens through which the researcher analyzed all data. The researcher used a mixed-method (qualitative and quantitative) approach to answer the four research questions. The participants completed three instruments: (a) the Stages of Concern Questionnaire (SoCQ), (b) the Principles of Change Survey, and (c) the Facilitator Style Survey. All three instruments were self-report, paper-pencil surveys. The sample included 72 faculty members who experienced the change over the past three years. Findings from the three data sources and the school principal's comments during debriefing are indicated for each research question and reported by unit of analysis. Respective to the research questions, the researcher concluded that: (1) Markdale High School accomplished the change by implementing both structural and instructional changes supporting to the change to heterogeneous grouping; (2) even though teachers had divergent opinions on the school principal's facilitation style, the principal thought of himself as an incrementalist and a practitioner of differentiated facilitation styles; (3) while half of the faculty felt that they received formal training on heterogeneous grouping, (4) half felt that they did not have a choice in the decision-making process as it occurred with college preparatory and

  12. Study protocol: identifying and delivering point-of-care information to improve care coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Che, Xinxuan; Weaver, Sallie J; Petersen, Laura A

    2015-10-19

    The need for deliberately coordinated care is noted by many national-level organizations. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) recently transitioned primary care clinics nationwide into Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACTs) to provide more accessible, coordinated, comprehensive, and patient-centered care. To better serve this purpose, PACTs must be able to successfully sequence and route interdependent tasks to appropriate team members while also maintaining collective situational awareness (coordination). Although conceptual frameworks of care coordination exist, few explicitly articulate core behavioral markers of coordination or the related information needs of team members attempting to synchronize complex care processes across time for a shared patient population. Given this gap, we partnered with a group of frontline primary care personnel at ambulatory care sites to identify the specific information needs of PACT members that will enable them to coordinate their efforts to provide effective, coordinated care. The study has three objectives: (1) development of measurable, prioritized point-of-care criteria for effective PACT coordination; (2) identifying the specific information needed at the point of care to optimize coordination; and (3) assessing the effect of adopting the aforementioned coordination standards on PACT clinicians' coordination behaviors. The study consists of three phases. In phase 1, we will employ the Productivity Measurement and Enhancement System (ProMES), a structured approach to performance measure creation from industrial/organizational psychology, to develop coordination measures with a design team of 6-10 primary care personnel; in phase 2, we will conduct focus groups with the phase 1 design team to identify point-of-care information needs. Phase 3 is a two-arm field experiment (n PACT = 28/arm); intervention arm PACTs will receive monthly feedback reports using the measures developed in phase 1 and attend brief monthly

  13. Managing the space sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    In April 1994 the National Research Council received a request from NASA that the NRC's Space Studies Board provide guidance on questions relating to the management of NASA's programs in the space sciences. The issues raised in the request closely reflect questions posed in the agency's fiscal year 1994 Senate appropriations report. These questions included the following: Should all the NASA space science programs be gathered into a 'National Institute for Space Science'? What other organizational changes might be made to improve the coordination and oversight of NASA space science programs? What processes should be used for establishing interdisciplinary science priorities based on scientific merit and other criteria, while ensuring opportunities for newer fields and disciplines to emerge? And what steps could be taken to improve utilization of advanced technologies in future space scienc missions? This report details the findings of the Committee on the Future of Space Science (FOSS) and its three task groups: the Task Group on Alternative Organizations, Task Group on Research Prioritization, and the Task Group on Technology.

  14. The Relationship between Family Experiences and Motivation to Learn Science for Different Groups of Grade 9 Students in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Salomé; Lemmer, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide science education is a national priority due to the role played by science performance in economic growth and the supply and quality of the human capital pool in scientific fields. One factor that may impact on the motivation to learn science is family experiences. This study therefore explored the relationship between family experiences…

  15. Exposing Underrepresented Groups to Climate Change and Atmospheric Science Through Service Learning and Community-Based Participatory Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, D.

    2016-12-01

    Tennessee State University (TSU) is among seven partner institutions in the NASA-funded project "Mission Earth: Fusing Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) with NASA Assets to Build Systemic Innovation in STEM Education." The primary objective at the TSU site is to expose high school students from racial and ethnic groups traditionally underrepresented in STEM to atmospheric science and physical systems associated with climate change. Currently, undergraduate students enrolled in TSU's urban and physical courses develop lessons for high school students focused upon the analysis of global warming phenomena and related extreme weather events. The GLOBE Atmosphere Protocols are emphasized in exercises focused upon the urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon and air quality measurements. Pre-service teachers at TSU, and in-service teachers at four local high schools are being certified in the Atmosphere Protocols. Precipitation, ambient air temperature, surface temperature and other data are collected at the schools through a collaborative learning effort among the high school students, TSU undergraduates, and high school teachers. Data collected and recorded manually in the field are compared to each school's automated Weatherbug station measurements. Students and teachers engage in analysis of NASA imagery as part of the GLOBE Surface Temperature Protocol. At off-campus locations, US Clean Air Act (CAA) criteria air pollutant and Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) air pollutant sampling is being conducted in community-based participatory research (CBPR) format. Students partner with non-profit environmental organizations. Data collected using low-cost air sampling devices is being compared with readings from government air monitors. The GLOBE Aerosols Protocol is used in comparative assessments with air sampling results. Project deliverables include four new GLOBE schools, the enrollment of which is nearly entirely comprised of students

  16. The Impact of Instructor Grouping Strategies on Student Efficacy in Inquiry Science Labs: A Phenomenological Case Study of Grouping Perceptions and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathaniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Abundant educational research has integrated Albert Bandura's concepts of self-efficacy and collective efficacy within educational settings. In this phenomenological case study, the investigation sought to capture the manifestation of self-efficacy and collective efficacy within inquiry-based science laboratory courses. Qualitative data was…

  17. The role of citizen public-interest groups in the decision-making process of a science-intensive culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    This study explores how concerns about the environment have escalated in the past three decades from being peripheral to that of a mainstream social movement. Most environmental concerns stem from the deployment of technologies where technical expertise is essential to effective participation in the decision-making process. The manner in which the current policy for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste was devised and passed by Congress provides the information base through which the role of citizen groups in the decision-making process in a science-intensive culture is explored, as they seek to overcome the adverse environmental impacts and economic inequities of this Act. The actual process by which citizens have confronted this current flawed policy is described, which includes how technical expertise from various sources made the citizens' case credible and effective. Several existing and theoretical models of citizen participation are described. Recommendations and conclusions are presented briefly, and a recommended model based on the concept of sustainable development is proposed

  18. Encouraging Students with Different Profiles of Perceptions to Pursue Science by Choosing Appropriate Teaching Methods for Each Age Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Patrice; Hasni, Abdelkrim

    2017-06-01

    This research aimed at identifying student profiles of perceptions by means of a clustering method using a validated questionnaire. These profiles describe students' attraction to science and technology (S&T) studies and careers as a variable driven by school S&T self-concept and interest in school S&T. In addition to three rather predictable student profiles (confident enthusiast, average ambitious, and pessimistic dropout), the fourth fairly well-populated profile called confident indifferent was produced. Our second and third research questions allowed us to describe each profile in terms of the instructional methods to which their population was exposed (including the degree to which they were actively involved) and the instructional methods to which they would like more exposure. An analysis of the evolution of the profiles' population over time is also presented. The results suggest that pedagogical variety and active involvement in the decision to pursue S&T are important. The perception of the utility and importance of S&T both in and out of school may also play an important role in these decisions. Minor pedagogical preferences were also found in certain age groups.

  19. science

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    David Spurgeon

    Give us the tools: science and technology for development. Ottawa, ...... altered technical rela- tionships among the factors used in the process of production, and the en- .... to ourselves only the rights of audit and periodic substantive review." If a ...... and destroying scarce water reserves, recreational areas and a generally.

  20. Influence of social cognitive and ethnic variables on academic goals of underrepresented students in science and engineering: a multiple-groups analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byars-Winston, Angela; Estrada, Yannine; Howard, Christina; Davis, Dalelia; Zalapa, Juan

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the academic interests and goals of 223 African American, Latino/a, Southeast Asian, and Native American undergraduate students in two groups: biological science and engineering (S/E) majors. Using social cognitive career theory (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994), we examined the relationships of social cognitive variables (math/science academic self-efficacy, math/science outcome expectations), along with the influence of ethnic variables (ethnic identity, other-group orientation) and perceptions of campus climate to their math/science interests and goal commitment to earn an S/E degree. Path analysis revealed that the hypothesized model provided good overall fit to the data, revealing significant relationships from outcome expectations to interests and to goals. Paths from academic self-efficacy to S/E goals and from interests to S/E goals varied for students in engineering and biological science. For both groups, other-group orientation was positively related to self-efficacy and support was found for an efficacy-mediated relationship between perceived campus climate and goals. Theoretical and practical implications of the study's findings are considered as well as future research directions.

  1. Consistency of histopathological reporting of breast lesions detected by screening: findings of the U.K. National External Quality Assessment (EQA) Scheme. U. K. National Coordinating Group for Breast Screening Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloane, J P; Ellman, R; Anderson, T J; Brown, C L; Coyne, J; Dallimore, N S; Davies, J D; Eakins, D; Ellis, I O; Elston, C W

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the scheme was to determine consistency of histopathological reporting in the United Kingdom National Breast Screening Programme. This external quality assessment scheme involved 51 sets of 12 slides which were circulated to 186-251 pathologists at intervals of 6 months for 3 years. Participants recorded their diagnoses on standard reporting forms, which were submitted to the U.K. National Cancer Screening Evaluation Unit for analysis. A high level of consistency was achieved in diagnosing major categories of breast disease including invasive carcinoma and the important borderline lesions, radial scar and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the latter exceeding a national target set prior to the onset of the scheme. Atypical hyperplasia (AH) was reported with much less consistency although, where it was the majority opinion, over 86% of diagnoses were of benign disorders and only 14% were of DCIS. Inconsistency was encountered in subtyping and measuring DCIS, the former apparently due to current uncertainties about classification and the latter to poor circumscription, variation in size in different sections and merging with zones of AH. Reporting prognostic features of invasive carcinomas was variable. Measurement of size was achieved with adequate consistency except in a small number of very poorly circumscribed tumours. Grading and subtyping were inconsistent although the latter was not specifically tested and will be the subject of future study. Members of the National Coordinating Group achieved greater uniformity than the remainder of the participants in all diagnostic categories, but both groups experienced similar types of problem. Our findings suggest that participation in the scheme improves diagnostic consistency. In conclusion, consistency in diagnosing invasive carcinoma and radial scar is excellent, and good in DCIS, but improvements are desirable in diagnosing atypical hyperplasia, classifying DCIS and reporting certain prognostic features of

  2. Stigmergy based behavioural coordination for satellite clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Howard; Palmer, Phil

    2010-04-01

    Multi-platform swarm/cluster missions are an attractive prospect for improved science return as they provide a natural capability for temporal, spatial and signal separation with further engineering and economic advantages. As spacecraft numbers increase and/or the round-trip communications delay from Earth lengthens, the traditional "remote-control" approach begins to break down. It is therefore essential to push control into space; to make spacecraft more autonomous. An autonomous group of spacecraft requires coordination, but standard terrestrial paradigms such as negotiation, require high levels of inter-spacecraft communication, which is nontrivial in space. This article therefore introduces the principals of stigmergy as a novel method for coordinating a cluster. Stigmergy is an agent-based, behavioural approach that allows for infrequent communication with decisions based on local information. Behaviours are selected dynamically using a genetic algorithm onboard. supervisors/ground stations occasionally adjust parameters and disseminate a "common environment" that is used for local decisions. After outlining the system, an analysis of some crucial parameters such as communications overhead and number of spacecraft is presented to demonstrate scalability. Further scenarios are considered to demonstrate the natural ability to deal with dynamic situations such as the failure of spacecraft, changing mission objectives and responding to sudden bursts of high priority tasks.

  3. Science shops - a strategy for community-based research and teaching. What's in it for community groups and universities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    The paper discourses four discourses related to science shops, based on international experiences with science shops: (1) The role of NGOs in societal governance and the role of cooperation with researchers; (2)The curricula of universities and the competencies of the future academic professionals...

  4. Motor coordination uses external spatial coordinates independent of developmental vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heed, Tobias; Röder, Brigitte

    2014-07-01

    The constraints that guide bimanual movement coordination are informative about the processing principles underlying movement planning in humans. For example, symmetry relative to the body midline benefits finger and hand movements independent of hand posture. This symmetry constraint has been interpreted to indicate that movement coordination is guided by a perceptual code. Although it has been assumed implicitly that the perceptual system at the heart of this constraint is vision, this relationship has not been tested. Here, congenitally blind and sighted participants made symmetrical and non-symmetrical (that is, parallel) bimanual tapping and finger oscillation movements. For both groups, symmetrical movements were executed more correctly than parallel movements, independent of anatomical constraints like finger homology and hand posture. For the blind, the reliance on external spatial factors in movement coordination stands in stark contrast to their use of an anatomical reference frame in perceptual processing. Thus, the externally coded symmetry constraint evident in bimanual coordination can develop in the absence of the visual system, suggesting that the visual system is not critical for the establishment of an external-spatial reference frame in movement coordination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. 20th May 2010 - Malaysian Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation H. F: B. H. Yusof signing the guest book with Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss and CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by CERN Advisers J. Ellis and E. Tsesmelis.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien brice

    2010-01-01

    20th May 2010 - Malaysian Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation H. F: B. H. Yusof signing the guest book with Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss and CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by CERN Advisers J. Ellis and E. Tsesmelis.

  6. Project Coordinator - Karianet | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Primary Duties or Responsibilities. The specific responsibilities of the Project Coordinator are grouped into three categories: Knowledge Management, Research Management and Project Management. As Knowledge Manager, the program coordinator will play a lead role in: Introducing and using knowledge management ...

  7. Smooth Transition for Advancement to Graduate Education (STAGE) for Underrepresented Groups in the Mathematical Sciences Pilot Project: Broadening Participation through Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubanks-Turner, Christina; Beaulieu, Patricia; Pal, Nabendu

    2018-01-01

    The Smooth Transition for Advancement to Graduate Education (STAGE) project was a three-year pilot project designed to mentor undergraduate students primarily from under-represented groups in the mathematical sciences. The STAGE pilot project focused on mentoring students as they transitioned from undergraduate education to either graduate school…

  8. Online Mentoring as an Extracurricular Measure to Encourage Talented Girls in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics): An Empirical Study of One-on-One versus Group Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeger, Heidrun; Hopp, Manuel; Ziegler, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Online mentoring provides an effective means of extracurricular gifted education for talented girls in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Comparative studies on the effectiveness of one-on-one versus group mentoring are lacking, however. The authors investigated this question in the context of a Germany-wide online mentoring…

  9. 76 FR 8788 - National Nanotechnology Coordination Office; Bridging NanoEHS Research Efforts: A Joint US-EU...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY National Nanotechnology Coordination Office; Bridging NanoEHS Research Efforts: A Joint US-EU Workshop: Public Meeting AGENCY: National Nanotechnology Coordination Office, STPO. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The National Nanotechnology Coordination...

  10. NASA science communications strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    In 1994, the Clinton Administration issued a report, 'Science in the National Interest', which identified new national science goals. Two of the five goals are related to science communications: produce the finest scientists and engineers for the 21st century, and raise scientific and technological literacy of all Americans. In addition to the guidance and goals set forth by the Administration, NASA has been mandated by Congress under the 1958 Space Act to 'provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination concerning its activities and the results thereof'. In addition to addressing eight Goals and Plans which resulted from a January 1994 meeting between NASA and members of the broader scientific, education, and communications community on the Public Communication of NASA's Science, the Science Communications Working Group (SCWG) took a comprehensive look at the way the Agency communicates its science to ensure that any changes the Agency made were long-term improvements. The SCWG developed a Science Communications Strategy for NASA and a plan to implement the Strategy. This report outlines a strategy from which effective science communications programs can be developed and implemented across the agency. Guiding principles and strategic themes for the strategy are provided, with numerous recommendations for improvement discussed within the respective themes of leadership, coordination, integration, participation, leveraging, and evaluation.

  11. Coordinating the Structural Rearrangements Associated with Unidirectional Proton Transfer in the Bacteriorhodopsin Photocycle Induced by Deprotonation of the Proton-Release Group: A Time-Resolved Difference FTIR Spectroscopic Study†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Joel E.; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Lanyi, Janos K.; Gennis, Robert B.; Maeda, Akio

    2014-01-01

    In the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin at pH 7, proton release from the proton releasing group (PRG) to the extracellular medium occurs during formation of the M intermediate. This proton release is inhibited at acidic pH, below the pKa of the PRG, ∼6 in M, and instead occurs later in the cycle as the initial state is restored from the O intermediate. Here, structural changes related to deprotonation of the PRG have been investigated by time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy at 25°C. The vibrational features at 2100-1790 cm-1, 1730-1685 cm-1, 1661 cm-1, and 1130-1045 cm-1 have greater negative intensity in the pure M-minus-BR spectrum and even in the M-minus-BR spectrum, that is present earlier together with the L-minus-BR spectrum, at pH 7, than in the corresponding M-minus-BR spectra at pH 5 or pH 4. The D212N mutation abolishes the decreases in the intensities of the broad feature between 1730 and 1685 cm-1 and the band at 1661 cm-1. The 1730-1685 cm-1 feature may arise from transition dipole coupling of the backbone carbonyl groups of Glu204, Phe208, Asp212 and Lys216 interacting with Tyr57 and C15-H of the chromophore. The 1661 cm-1 band, which is insensitive to D2O substitution, may arise by interaction of the backbone carbonyl of Asp212 with C15-H. The 2100-1790 cm-1 feature with a trough at 1885 cm-1 could be due to a water cluster. Depletion of these bands upon deprotonation of the PRG is attributable to disruption of a coordinated structure, held in place by interactions of Asp212. Deprotonation of the PRG is accompanied also by disruption of the interaction of the water molecule near Arg82. The liberated Asp212 may stabilize the protonated state of Asp85, and thus confer uni-directionality to the transport. PMID:20232848

  12. Macro and Micro-Nutrients Intake, Food Groups Consumption and Dietary Habits among Female Students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadbakht, L; Esmaillzadeh, A

    2012-04-01

    Improving the dietary intake among different groups and population is important for improving the health status. This study determines the nutrients and food group intake as well as dietary habits among female students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Two hundreds and eighty nine healthy female youths who were randomly selected among students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in Isfahan, Iran were enrolled. A validated semi quantitative food frequency questionnaire was used. Folate, iron, calcium and fiber intake were lower than the recommended dietary allowances (RDA) amounts (70, 76, 90, 56% of RDA, respectively). Forty five percent of the population consumed fast foods 2 times a week and 35% used the frying oils for cooking most of the time. Female youths had lower amount of some micronutrients. Consuming frying oils, hydrogenated vegetable oils, and fast food intake should be limited among this group.

  13. Global Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telszewski, Maciej; Tanhua, Toste; Palacz, Artur

    2016-04-01

    The complexity of the marine carbon cycle and its numerous connections to carbon's atmospheric and terrestrial pathways means that a wide range of approaches have to be used in order to establish it's qualitative and quantitative role in the global climate system. Ocean carbon and biogeochemistry research, observations, and modelling are conducted at national, regional, and global levels to quantify the global ocean uptake of atmospheric CO2 and to understand controls of this process, the variability of uptake and vulnerability of carbon fluxes into the ocean. These science activities require support by a sustained, international effort that provides a central communication forum and coordination services to facilitate the compatibility and comparability of results from individual efforts and development of the ocean carbon data products that can be integrated with the terrestrial, atmospheric and human dimensions components of the global carbon cycle. The International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP) was created in 2005 by the IOC of UNESCO and the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research. IOCCP provides an international, program-independent forum for global coordination of ocean carbon and biogeochemistry observations and integration with global carbon cycle science programs. The IOCCP coordinates an ever-increasing set of observations-related activities in the following domains: underway observations of biogeochemical water properties, ocean interior observations, ship-based time-series observations, large-scale ocean acidification monitoring, inorganic nutrients observations, biogeochemical instruments and autonomous sensors and data and information creation. Our contribution is through the facilitation of the development of globally acceptable strategies, methodologies, practices and standards homogenizing efforts of the research community and scientific advisory groups as well as integrating the ocean biogeochemistry observations with the

  14. Explicitly computing geodetic coordinates from Cartesian coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huaien

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a new form of quartic equation based on Lagrange's extremum law and a Groebner basis under the constraint that the geodetic height is the shortest distance between a given point and the reference ellipsoid. A very explicit and concise formulae of the quartic equation by Ferrari's line is found, which avoids the need of a good starting guess for iterative methods. A new explicit algorithm is then proposed to compute geodetic coordinates from Cartesian coordinates. The convergence region of the algorithm is investigated and the corresponding correct solution is given. Lastly, the algorithm is validated with numerical experiments.

  15. 77 FR 55863 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied Sciences Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied Sciences Advisory Group Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... the Applied Science Advisory Group. This Subcommittee reports to the Earth Science Subcommittee... following topics: --Applied Sciences Program Update --Earth Science Data Latency Study Preliminary Update...

  16. Fatores terapêuticos em grupo de suporte na perspectiva da coordenação e dos membros do grupo Factores terapéuticos en un grupo de soporte en la perspectiva de la coordinación y de los miembros del grupo Therapeutic factors in group support from the perspective of the coordinators and group members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leidiene Ferreira Santos

    2012-01-01

    importante que puede ser usada para evaluar si los miembros se están beneficiando participando en el grupo.OBJECTIVES: To identify the therapeutic factors present in the sessions of a Parent and Family Support Group for those with hospitalized children, from the perspective of the participants and the group coordinators. METHODS: A descriptive, exploratory study. The data were obtained by means of a checklist of the families and through identification of therapeutic factors by the coordinators of the group. RESULTS: The families indicated the presence of the following therapeutic factors in the group: cohesion, sharing of information, universality, existential factors, developing social skills, instillation of hope, altruism, interpersonal learning and imitative behavior; the coordinators identified cohesion, sharing of information, universality and existential factors. CONCLUSION: Identification of therapeutic factors is an important therapeutic tool for evaluating whether members are benefitting from their participation in the group.

  17. Review of Education in Mathematics, Data Science and Quantitative Disciplines: Report to the Group of Eight Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gavin

    2009-01-01

    The Reference Committee firmly shares the view that the state of the mathematical sciences and related quantitative disciplines in Australia has deteriorated to a dangerous level, and continues to deteriorate. Accordingly the author decided to structure this Report around a small number of recommendations, some long term and others to address…

  18. "Solidarity and Support": Feminist Memory Work Focus Groups with Working-Class Women Studying Social Science Degrees in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michell, Dee; Beddoe, Liz; Fraser, Heather; Jarldorn, Michele

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on our use of a two-phased, feminist memory work in a project conducted with 11 women, social science students at an Australian university. We begin by describing government-led attempts to widen participation in Australian universities because 10 of the 11 women who participated in our project were from…

  19. Monetary and Fiscal Policy Coordination

    OpenAIRE

    Hanif, Muhammad N.; Arby, Muhammad Farooq

    2003-01-01

    Macroeconomic policies are meant to achieve non-inflationary, stable growth. There are two major groups of policy instruments to achieve the purpose; one is related to monetary conditions and the other to fiscal conditions. Monetary instruments are employed by the central bank and fiscal instruments are employed by ministry of finance. The objectives and implications of policy measures taken by the two institutions often conflict with each other and thus call for policy coordination for effec...

  20. The curvature coordinate system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almegaard, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes a concept for a curvature coordinate system on regular curved surfaces from which faceted surfaces with plane quadrangular facets can be designed. The lines of curvature are used as parametric lines for the curvature coordinate system on the surface. A new conjugate set of lin...

  1. Coordinate measuring machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo

    This document is used in connection with three exercises of 2 hours duration as a part of the course GEOMETRICAL METROLOGY AND MACHINE TESTING. The exercises concern three aspects of coordinate measuring: 1) Measuring and verification of tolerances on coordinate measuring machines, 2) Traceabilit...... and uncertainty during coordinate measurements, 3) Digitalisation and Reverse Engineering. This document contains a short description of each step in the exercise and schemes with room for taking notes of the results.......This document is used in connection with three exercises of 2 hours duration as a part of the course GEOMETRICAL METROLOGY AND MACHINE TESTING. The exercises concern three aspects of coordinate measuring: 1) Measuring and verification of tolerances on coordinate measuring machines, 2) Traceability...

  2. The "Molecular and cell Biology" program of the Presidium of the Russian Academyof sciences as an effective format for the support of promising scientific research groups

    OpenAIRE

    Sychev, V.

    2010-01-01

    There are various ways to finance science in Russia, both governmental and private. Financial support can range from tens of thousands of rubles up to several million in stipends and grants. One of the questions most often addressed to the heads of agencies or funds is about the level of transparency and objectivity when selecting groups which receive financial support. Few well-known financing organizations have avoided criticism regarding this issue. Nevertheless, there is one scientific fi...

  3. Research nurse manager perceptions about research activities performed by non-nurse clinical research coordinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carolynn Thomas; Hastings, Clare; Wilson, Lynda Law

    2015-01-01

    There has been limited research to document differences in roles between nurses and non-nurses who assume clinical research coordination and management roles. Several authors have suggested that there is no acknowledged guidance for the licensure requirements for research study coordinators and that some non-nurse research coordinators may be assuming roles that are outside of their legal scopes of practice. There is a need for further research on issues related to the delegation of clinical research activities to non-nurses. This study used nominal group process focus groups to identify perceptions of experienced research nurse managers at an academic health science center in the Southern United States about the clinical research activities that are being performed by non-nurse clinical research coordinators without supervision that they believed should only be performed by a nurse or under the supervision of a nurse. A total of 13 research nurse managers volunteered to be contacted about the study. Of those, 8 participated in two separate nominal group process focus group sessions. The group members initially identified 22 activities that they felt should only be performed by a nurse or under the direct supervision of a nurse. After discussion and clarification of results, activities were combined into 12 categories of clinical research activities that participants believed should only be performed by a nurse or under the direct supervision of a nurse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Article Commentary: Group Learning Assessments as a Vital Consideration in the Implementation of New Peer Learning Pedagogies in the Basic Science Curriculum of Health Profession Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte L. Briggs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by reports of successful outcomes in health profession education literature, peer learning has progressively grown to become a fundamental characteristic of health profession curricula. Many studies, however, are anecdotal or philosophical in nature, particularly when addressing the effectiveness of assessments in the context of peer learning. This commentary provides an overview of the rationale for using group assessments in the basic sciences curriculum of health profession programs and highlights the challenges associated with implementing group assessments in this context. The dearth of appropriate means for measuring group process suggests that professional collaboration competencies need to be more clearly defined. Peer learning educators are advised to enhance their understanding of social psychological research in order to implement best practices in the development of appropriate group assessments for peer learning.

  5. Interagency task force on the health effects of ionizing radiation: report of the work group on science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    Much of our present uncertainty about the biologic effects of ionizing radiation centers on effects at low-dose levels. One indication of this uncertainty is the current controversy surrounding several recent epidemiologic analyses which suggest that low-dose radiation exposure may be more effective in causing cancer than had previously been predicted. Populations studied in these recent analyses have included radiation workers at nuclear facilities, including nuclear shipyards, and persons receiving medical diagnostic x-rays, situations in which exposure levels are known to be in the low range. Also of concern have been recent studies involving persons present at atmospheric nuclear bomb tests or exposed to fallout from such testing. Exposure levels in these latter 2 settings, while possibly low, as yet are somewhat uncertain. The implications of these various sets of data, if confirmed, may be far-reaching with respect to occupational standards and medical practices. Their interpretation at present, therefore, is a matter of considerable scientific and public concern. In response to this concern, the White House in May, 1978, requested that the Secretary of HEW coordinate formulating an interagency program to assess current knowledge regarding the health effects of ionizing radiation, and to address concerns about care and benefits available to exposed persons, public health education, and measures to reduce dose levels

  6. Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kristy J.; Brickman, Peggy; Brame, Cynthia J.

    2018-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics faculty are increasingly incorporating both formal and informal group work in their courses. Implementing group work can be improved by an understanding of the extensive body of educational research studies on this topic. This essay describes an online, evidence-based teaching guide published by…

  7. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.The talk will present an overview of current efforts in ESI, the role members of IEEE GRSS play, and discuss

  8. Regional transit coordination guidebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Constant growth in rural areas and extensive suburban development have contributed to increasingly more people needing seamless and adequate public transportation into and from nearby cities. Coordinating existing services or determining the need for...

  9. Supercritical Airfoil Coordinates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rectangular Supercritical Wing (Ricketts) - design and measured locations are provided in an Excel file RSW_airfoil_coordinates_ricketts.xls . One sheet is with Non...

  10. Developmental coordination disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developmental coordination disorder can lead to: Learning problems Low self-esteem resulting from poor ability at sports and teasing by other children Repeated injuries Weight gain as a result of not wanting to participate ...

  11. Environmental Compliance Issue Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    An order to establish the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for coordination of significant environmental compliance issues to ensure timely development and consistent application of Departmental environmental policy and guidance

  12. Data Management Coordinators (DMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Regional Data Management Coordinators (DMCs) were identified to serve as the primary contact for each region for all Water Quality Framework activities. They will facilitate and communicate information to the necessary individuals at the region and tra

  13. Coordinate-invariant regularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    A general phase-space framework for coordinate-invariant regularization is given. The development is geometric, with all regularization contained in regularized DeWitt Superstructures on field deformations. Parallel development of invariant coordinate-space regularization is obtained by regularized functional integration of the momenta. As representative examples of the general formulation, the regularized general non-linear sigma model and regularized quantum gravity are discussed. copyright 1987 Academic Press, Inc

  14. Coordination Polymer Gels by Electron Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Ha; Cho, Young Je; Jung, Jong Hwa [Gyeongsang National Univ., Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogenation of a pyridine derivative possessing tetrazole moieties as end groups, without long alkyl chain groups, results in the formation of a Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} coordination polymer gel. The polymer exhibits a strong fluorescence enhancement upon gel formation. 1 can also be gloated with a variety of magnesium anions such as SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -} and I{sup -}, indicating that the coordination polymer gel formation of 1 does not strongly depends on anions. The Seam and ABM images of Mg{sup 2+} coordination polymer gel 1 display a flabbier network with several micrometers long, widths in the range 60-70 nm and thicknesses of about 3 nm. In addition, photophysical studies show that the hydrogel exhibits a typical {pi}-{pi} transition and gives rise to high fluorescence behavior. The coordination polymer hydrogel exhibits viscoelastic behavior as evidenced from the rheological studies.

  15. 9th Conference on Coordinate Measuring Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Dorph, Pernille

    2001-01-01

    This one-day conference on coordinate measuring machines is the 9th in a row of conferences organised in connection with the Danish CMM Club, a users’ group regarding CMMs that has existed in Denmark since 1994. The Danish CMM Club was founded by the Department of Manufacturing Engineering...... termination of the second lifetime cycle of the club. This conference treates the traceability of geometrical measurements with particular reference to those obtained using coordinate measuring machines. A number of on-going activities and new achievements in coordinate metrology are presented by European...

  16. Magnetic Coordinate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundal, K. M.; Richmond, A. D.

    2017-03-01

    Geospace phenomena such as the aurora, plasma motion, ionospheric currents and associated magnetic field disturbances are highly organized by Earth's main magnetic field. This is due to the fact that the charged particles that comprise space plasma can move almost freely along magnetic field lines, but not across them. For this reason it is sensible to present such phenomena relative to Earth's magnetic field. A large variety of magnetic coordinate systems exist, designed for different purposes and regions, ranging from the magnetopause to the ionosphere. In this paper we review the most common magnetic coordinate systems and describe how they are defined, where they are used, and how to convert between them. The definitions are presented based on the spherical harmonic expansion coefficients of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) and, in some of the coordinate systems, the position of the Sun which we show how to calculate from the time and date. The most detailed coordinate systems take the full IGRF into account and define magnetic latitude and longitude such that they are constant along field lines. These coordinate systems, which are useful at ionospheric altitudes, are non-orthogonal. We show how to handle vectors and vector calculus in such coordinates, and discuss how systematic errors may appear if this is not done correctly.

  17. Harnessing the Power of Digital Data for Science and Society: Report of the Interagency Working Group on Digital Data to the Committee on Science of the National Science and Technology Council

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — This report provides a strategy to ensure that digital scientific data can be reliably preserved for maximum use in catalyzing progress in science and...

  18. CORDEX Coordinated Output for Regional Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowski, William; Giorgi, Filippo; Lake, Irene

    2017-04-01

    The Science Advisory Team for the Coordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) has developed a baseline framework of specified regions, resolutions and simulation periods intended to provide a foundation for ongoing regional CORDEX activities: the CORDEX Coordinated Output for Regional Evaluation, or CORDEX-CORE. CORDEX-CORE was conceived in part to be responsive to IPCC needs for coordinated simulations that could provide regional climate downscaling (RCD) that yields fine-scale climate information beyond that resolved by GCMs. For each CORDEX region, a matrix of GCM-RCD experiments is designed based on the need to cover as much as possible different dimensions of the uncertainty space (e.g., different emissions and land-use scenarios, GCMs, RCD models and techniques). An appropriate set of driving GCMs can allow a program of simulations that efficiently addresses key scientific issues within CORDEX, while facilitating comparison and transfer of results and lessons learned across different regions. The CORDEX-CORE program seeks to provide, as much as possible, homogeneity across domains, so it is envisioned that a standard set of regional climate models (RCMs) and empirical statistical downscaling (ESD) methods will downscale a standard set of GCMs over all or at least most CORDEX domains for a minimum set of scenarios (high and low end). The focus is on historical climate simulations for the 20th century and projections for 21st century, implying that data would be needed minimally for the period 1950-2100 (but ideally 1900-2100). This foundational ensemble can be regionally enriched with further contributions (additional GCM-RCD pairs) by individual groups over their selected domains of interest. The RCM model resolution for these core experiments will be in the range of 10-20 km, a resolution that has been shown to provide substantial added value for a variety of climate variables and that represents a significant forward step compared in the CORDEX

  19. Coordination control of distributed systems

    CERN Document Server

    Villa, Tiziano

    2015-01-01

    This book describes how control of distributed systems can be advanced by an integration of control, communication, and computation. The global control objectives are met by judicious combinations of local and nonlocal observations taking advantage of various forms of communication exchanges between distributed controllers. Control architectures are considered according to  increasing degrees of cooperation of local controllers:  fully distributed or decentralized control,  control with communication between controllers,  coordination control, and multilevel control.  The book covers also topics bridging computer science, communication, and control, like communication for control of networks, average consensus for distributed systems, and modeling and verification of discrete and of hybrid systems. Examples and case studies are introduced in the first part of the text and developed throughout the book. They include: control of underwater vehicles, automated-guided vehicles on a container terminal, contro...

  20. How to Modernize the Academic Museum. Exhibition Activity of the Museum Group the ARAS as a Pilot Project of the Museum of History of Russian Academy of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korneva-Chaeva Irina A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article on the example of the Museum group of Archives of Russian Academy of Science is demonstrating new possibilities of representation of archival documents in the museum space. The authors focused on the potential exposure of the museum based on the principle of visualization. They explain the special role of representing scientific knowledge for education of youth. They offer a new form of interactive communication with the museum’s scientific heritage, based on the method of comprehending the reality as a “co-experience” and “re-discovery” that leads to the attainment the new generation to the new intellectual and spiritual experience. The experiment, the research paper, the science, the war, and even the modern art are the main themes of our exhibitions. The authors use the special new methods of exhibition to create the intriguing image of scientist. They use light boxes and interactive demonstrations. The main aim of the exposition is to show the documents of Archives of Russian Academy of Science, so we rely on the following materials: personal fond of academicians A.N. Nesmeyanov, V.L. Komarov, M.V. Keldysh, I.V. Kurchatov and others. Authors successfully solve the problems of the development of new theoretical principles exposing archival documents by modern methods.

  1. [Binocular coordination during reading].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassou, L; Granié, M; Pugh, A K; Morucci, J P

    1992-01-01

    Is there an effect on binocular coordination during reading of oculomotor imbalance (heterophoria, strabismus and inadequate convergence) and of functional lateral characteristics (eye preference and perceptually privileged visual laterality)? Recordings of the binocular eye-movements of ten-year-old children show that oculomotor imbalances occur most often among children whose left visual perceptual channel is privileged, and that these subjects can present optomotor dissociation and manifest lack of motor coordination. Close binocular motor coordination is far from being the norm in reading. The faster reader displays saccades of differing spatial amplitude and the slower reader an oculomotor hyperactivity, especially during fixations. The recording of binocular movements in reading appears to be an excellent means of diagnosing difficulties related to visual laterality and to problems associated with oculomotor imbalance.

  2. "Psychiatry is not a science like others" - a focus group study on psychotropic prescribing in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenrud, Tove M; Svensson, Staffan A; Wallerstedt, Susanna M

    2013-08-12

    Psychotropic drug prescribing is problematic and knowledge of factors affecting the initiation and maintenance of such prescribing is incomplete. Such knowledge could provide a basis for the design of interventions to change prescribing patterns for psychotropics. The aim of this study was to explore the views of general practitioners (GPs), GP interns, and heads of primary care units on factors affecting the prescribing of psychotropic drugs in primary care. We performed four focus group discussions in Gothenburg, Sweden, with a total of 21 participants (GPs, GP interns, and heads of primary care units). The focus group discussions were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using manifest content analysis. Three different themes emerged from the focus group discussions. The first theme Seeking care for symptoms, reflects the participants' understanding of why patients approach primary care and comprised categories such as knowledge, attitudes, and society and the media. The second theme, Lacking a framework, resources, and treatment alternatives, which reflects the conditions for the physician-patient interaction, comprised categories such as economy and resources, technology, and organizational aspects. The third theme, Restricting or maintaining prescriptions, with the subthemes Individual factors and External influences, reflects the physicians' internal decision making and comprised categories such as emotions, knowledge, and pharmaceutical industry. The results of the present study indicate that a variety of factors may affect the prescribing of psychotropic medications in primary care. Many factors were related to characteristics of the patient, the physician or their interaction, rather than the patients' medical needs per se. The results may be useful for interventions to improve psychotropic prescribing in primary care.

  3. Quantifying linguistic coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian

    task (Bahrami et al 2010, Fusaroli et al. 2012) we extend to linguistic coordination dynamical measures of recurrence employed in the analysis of sensorimotor coordination (such as heart-rate (Konvalinka et al 2011), postural sway (Shockley 2005) and eye-movements (Dale, Richardson and Kirkham 2012......). We employ nominal recurrence analysis (Orsucci et al 2005, Dale et al 2011) on the decision-making conversations between the participants. We report strong correlations between various indexes of recurrence and collective performance. We argue this method allows us to quantify the qualities...

  4. Modelling of the transfer of radiocaesium from deposition to lake ecosystems. Report of the VAMP aquatic working group. Part of the IAEA/CEC co-ordinated research programme on the validation of environmental model predictions (VAMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    The environmental impact of releases of radionuclides from nuclear installations can be predicted using assessment models. For such assessments information on their reliability must be provided. Ideally models should be developed and tested using actual data on the transfer of the nuclides which are site specific for the environment being modelled. In the past, generic data have often been taken from environmental contamination that resulted from the fallout from the nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 1960s or from laboratory experiments. However, it has always been recognized that there may be differences in the physico-chemical form of the radionuclides from these sources as compared to those that could be released from nuclear installations. Furthermore, weapons fallout was spread over time; it did not provide a single pulse which is generally used in testing models that predict time dependence. On the other hand, the Chernobyl accident resulted in a single pulse, which was detected and measured in a variety of environments throughout Europe. The acquisition of these new data sets justified the establishment of an international programme aimed at collating data from different IAEA Member States and at co-ordinating work on new model testing studies. The IAEA established a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on 'Validation of Environmental Model Predictions' (VAMP). The principal objectives of the VAMP Co-ordinated Research Programme were: (a) To facilitate the validation of assessment models for radionuclide transfer in the terrestrial, aquatic and urban environments. It is envisaged that this will be achieved by acquiring suitable sets of environmental data from the results of the national research and monitoring programmes established following the Chernobyl release. (b) To guide, if necessary, environmental research and monitoring efforts to acquire data for the validation of models used to assess the most significant radiological exposure pathways

  5. TIARA: Toward accelerator R&D coordination

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    The preparatory phase of the TIARA (Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area) project has begun. In January, members from 11 research institutes in 8 European countries began a three-year collaboration intended to enhance, improve and structure R&D efforts in the area of accelerator science and technology in Europe.   Partly funded by the European Commission under its Seventh Framework Programme (FP7), the TIARA project is being coordinated by the CEA (Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives). “The aim of the project is to arrive at an organisational structure that will provide coordination for R&D efforts and associated infrastructures in the field of particle accelerators in Europe,” explains the CEA’s Céline Tanguy, project coordinator assistant. “The new structure, which we hope will be a durable one, will be set up at the end of the project’s preparatory phase....

  6. Monitoring survey of pulsating giant stars in the Local Group galaxies: survey description, science goals, target selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saremi, E; Abedi, A; Javadi, A; Khosroshahi, H; Molaei Nezhad, A; Van Loon, J Th; Bamber, J; Hashemi, S A; Nikzat, F

    2017-01-01

    The population of nearby dwarf galaxies in the Local Group constitutes a complete galactic environment, perfect suited for studying the connection between stellar populations and galaxy evolution. In this study, we are conducting an optical monitoring survey of the majority of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, with the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT), to identify long period variable stars (LPVs). These stars are at the end points of their evolution and therefore their luminosity can be directly translated into their birth masses; this enables us to reconstruct the star formation history. By the end of the monitoring survey, we will have performed observations over ten epochs, spaced approximately three months apart, and identified long-period, dust-producing AGB stars; five epochs of data have been obtained already. LPVs are also the main source of dust; in combination with Spitzer Space Telescope images at mid-IR wavelengths we will quantify the mass loss, and provide a detailed map of the mass feedback into the interstellar medium. We will also use the amplitudes in different optical passbands to determine the radius variations of the stars, and relate this to their mass loss. (paper)

  7. Monitoring survey of pulsating giant stars in the Local Group galaxies: survey description, science goals, target selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saremi, E.; Javadi, A.; van Loon, J. Th; Khosroshahi, H.; Abedi, A.; Bamber, J.; Hashemi, S. A.; Nikzat, F.; Molaei Nezhad, A.

    2017-06-01

    The population of nearby dwarf galaxies in the Local Group constitutes a complete galactic environment, perfect suited for studying the connection between stellar populations and galaxy evolution. In this study, we are conducting an optical monitoring survey of the majority of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, with the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT), to identify long period variable stars (LPVs). These stars are at the end points of their evolution and therefore their luminosity can be directly translated into their birth masses; this enables us to reconstruct the star formation history. By the end of the monitoring survey, we will have performed observations over ten epochs, spaced approximately three months apart, and identified long-period, dust-producing AGB stars; five epochs of data have been obtained already. LPVs are also the main source of dust; in combination with Spitzer Space Telescope images at mid-IR wavelengths we will quantify the mass loss, and provide a detailed map of the mass feedback into the interstellar medium. We will also use the amplitudes in different optical passbands to determine the radius variations of the stars, and relate this to their mass loss.

  8. Natural hazards Early career scientist Team (NhET), a newborn group bridging science to a broader community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Luigi; Cigala, Valeria; Rizzi, Jonathan; Craciun, Iulya; Gain, Animesh Kumar; Albano, Raffaele

    2017-04-01

    Alongside with other major EGU divisions, Natural Hazard has recently formed his Early Career Scientist (ECS) team, known as NhET. NhET was born in 2016 and its scope includes various activities for the EGU members, the international scientific community as well as for the general public. We are a group of six early career researchers, either PhDs or Post-Docs, from different fields of Natural Hazard, keen to promote knowledge exchanges and collaborations. This is done by organizing courses, training sessions and social activities, especially targeting ECSs, during the EGU General Assembly for this year and the next to come. Outside the timeframe of the EGU conference, we constantly promote EGU contents for our division. This is done through the division website (http://www.egu.eu/nh), a mailing list (https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/nhet) and social media. With respect to the latter, a new Facebook page will be launched shortly and other platforms such as Twitter will be used to reach a broader audience. These platforms will foster the transmission of Natural Hazard topics to anyone who is interested. The main content will be researchers' interviews, information about open positions, trainings, open source software, conferences together with news on hazards and their anthropic and environmental impacts. We are NhET and we invite you all to follow and collaborate with us for a more dynamic, efficient and widespread scientific communication.

  9. Using a Non-Equivalent Groups Quasi Experimental Design to Reduce Internal Validity Threats to Claims Made by Math and Science K-12 Teacher Recruitment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, Laura

    2009-10-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act national policy established in 2009 calls for ``meaningful data'' that demonstrate educational improvements, including the recruitment of high-quality teachers. The scant data available and the low credibility of many K-12 math/science teacher recruitment program evaluations remain the major barriers for the identification of effective recruitment strategies. Our study presents a methodology to better evaluate the impact of recruitment programs on increasing participants' interest in teaching careers. The research capitalizes on the use of several control groups and presents a non-equivalent groups quasi-experimental evaluation design that produces program effect claims with higher internal validity than claims generated by current program evaluations. With this method that compares responses to a teaching career interest question from undergraduates all along a continuum from just attending an information session to participating (or not) in the recruitment program, we were able to compare the effect of the program in increasing participants' interest in teaching careers versus the evolution of the same interest but in the absence of the program. We were also able to make suggestions for program improvement and further research. While our findings may not apply to other K-12 math/science teacher recruitment programs, we believe that our evaluation methodology does and will contribute to conduct stronger program evaluations. In so doing, our evaluation procedure may inform recruitment program designers and policy makers.

  10. Climate Change 2013. The Physical Science Basis. Working Group I Contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change - Abstract for decision-makers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocker, Thomas F.; Qin, Dahe; Plattner, Gian-Kasper; Tignor, Melinda M.B.; Allen, Simon K.; Boschung, Judith; Nauels, Alexander; Xia, Yu; Bex, Vincent; Midgley, Pauline M.; Alexander, Lisa V.; Allen, Simon K.; Bindoff, Nathaniel L.; Breon, Francois-Marie; Church, John A.; Cubasch, Ulrich; Emori, Seita; Forster, Piers; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Gillett, Nathan; Gregory, Jonathan M.; Hartmann, Dennis L.; Jansen, Eystein; Kirtman, Ben; Knutti, Reto; Kumar Kanikicharla, Krishna; Lemke, Peter; Marotzke, Jochem; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Meehl, Gerald A.; Mokhov, Igor I.; Piao, Shilong; Plattner, Gian-Kasper; Dahe, Qin; Ramaswamy, Venkatachalam; Randall, David; Rhein, Monika; Rojas, Maisa; Sabine, Christopher; Shindell, Drew; Stocker, Thomas F.; Talley, Lynne D.; Vaughan, David G.; Xie, Shang-Ping; Allen, Myles R.; Boucher, Olivier; Chambers, Don; Hesselbjerg Christensen, Jens; Ciais, Philippe; Clark, Peter U.; Collins, Matthew; Comiso, Josefino C.; Vasconcellos de Menezes, Viviane; Feely, Richard A.; Fichefet, Thierry; Fiore, Arlene M.; Flato, Gregory; Fuglestvedt, Jan; Hegerl, Gabriele; Hezel, Paul J.; Johnson, Gregory C.; Kaser, Georg; Kattsov, Vladimir; Kennedy, John; Klein Tank, Albert M.G.; Le Quere, Corinne; Myhre, Gunnar; Osborn, Timothy; Payne, Antony J.; Perlwitz, Judith; Power, Scott; Prather, Michael; Rintoul, Stephen R.; Rogelj, Joeri; Rusticucci, Matilde; Schulz, Michael; Sedlacek, Jan; Stott, Peter A.; Sutton, Rowan; Thorne, Peter W.; Wuebbles, Donald

    2013-10-01

    The Working Group I contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) provides a comprehensive assessment of the physical science basis of climate change. It builds upon the Working Group I contribution to the IPCC's Fourth Assessment Report in 2007 and incorporates subsequent new findings from the Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation, as well as from research published in the extensive scientific and technical literature. The assessment considers new evidence of past, present and projected future climate change based on many independent scientific analyses from observations of the climate system, paleo-climate archives, theoretical studies of climate processes and simulations using climate models. During the process of scoping and approving the outline of its Fifth Assessment Report, the IPCC focussed on those aspects of the current understanding of the science of climate change that were judged to be most relevant to policy-makers. In this report, Working Group I has extended coverage of future climate change compared to earlier reports by assessing near-term projections and predictability as well as long-term projections and irreversibility in two separate chapters. Following the decisions made by the Panel during the scoping and outline approval, a set of new scenarios, the Representative Concentration Pathways, are used across all three Working Groups for projections of climate change over the 21. century. The coverage of regional information in the Working Group I report is expanded by specifically assessing climate phenomena such as monsoon systems and their relevance to future climate change in the regions. The Working Group I Report is an assessment, not a review or a text book of climate science, and is based on the published scientific and technical literature available up to 15 March 2013. Underlying all aspects of the report is a

  11. Dimensions of Organizational Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Schmidt; Aldewereld, Huib; Dignum, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    be supported to include organizational objectives and constraints into their reasoning processes by considering two alternatives: agent reasoning and middleware regulation. We show how agents can use an organizational specification to achieve organizational objectives by delegating and coordinating...... their activities with other agents in the society, using the GOAL agent programming language and the OperA organizational model....

  12. Reusability of coordination programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Arbab (Farhad); C.L. Blom (Kees); F.J. Burger (Freek); C.T.H. Everaars (Kees)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIsolating computation and communication concerns into separate pure computation and pure coordination modules enhances modularity, understandability, and reusability of parallel and/or distributed software. This can be achieved by moving communication primitives (such as SendMessage and

  13. [Civilian-military coordination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Montravel, G

    2002-01-01

    Current humanitarian emergencies create complex, mutidimensional situations that stimulate simultaneous responses from a wide variety of sources including governments, non-governmental organizations (NGO), United Nations agencies, and private individuals. As a result, it has become essential to establish a coherent framework in which each actor can contribute promptly and effectively to the overall effort. This is the role of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Regardless of the circumstances and level of coordination, cooperation and collaboration between humanitarian and military personnel, it is necessary to bear in mind their objectives. The purpose of humanitarian action is to reduce human suffering. The purpose of military intervention is to stop warfare. The author of this article will discuss the three major obstacles to civilian-military coordination (strategic, tactical, and operational). Operations cannot be conducted smoothly and differences cannot be ironed out without mutual respect between the two parties, an explicit definition of their respective duties and responsibilities, a clear understanding of their cultural differences, and the presence of an organization and facilities for coordination and arbitrage by a neutral referee.

  14. Coordination of hand shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesyna, Colin; Pundi, Krishna; Flanders, Martha

    2011-03-09

    The neural control of hand movement involves coordination of the sensory, motor, and memory systems. Recent studies have documented the motor coordinates for hand shape, but less is known about the corresponding patterns of somatosensory activity. To initiate this line of investigation, the present study characterized the sense of hand shape by evaluating the influence of differences in the amount of grasping or twisting force, and differences in forearm orientation. Human subjects were asked to use the left hand to report the perceived shape of the right hand. In the first experiment, six commonly grasped items were arranged on the table in front of the subject: bottle, doorknob, egg, notebook, carton, and pan. With eyes closed, subjects used the right hand to lightly touch, forcefully support, or imagine holding each object, while 15 joint angles were measured in each hand with a pair of wired gloves. The forces introduced by supporting or twisting did not influence the perceptual report of hand shape, but for most objects, the report was distorted in a consistent manner by differences in forearm orientation. Subjects appeared to adjust the intrinsic joint angles of the left hand, as well as the left wrist posture, so as to maintain the imagined object in its proper spatial orientation. In a second experiment, this result was largely replicated with unfamiliar objects. Thus, somatosensory and motor information appear to be coordinated in an object-based, spatial-coordinate system, sensitive to orientation relative to gravitational forces, but invariant to grasp forcefulness.

  15. Block coordination copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Matzger, Adam J; Benin, Annabelle I; Willis, Richard R

    2012-11-13

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  16. UnitedHealth Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    UnitedHealth Group provides accessible and affordable services, improved quality of care, coordinated health care efforts, and a supportive environment for shared decision making between patients and their physicians.

  17. Coordination failure caused by sunspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beugnot, Julie; Gürgüç, Zeynep; Øvlisen, Frederik Roose

    2012-01-01

    on the efficient equilibrium, we consider sunspots as a potential reason for coordination failure. We conduct an experiment with a three player 2x2x2 game in which coordination on the efficient equilibrium is easy and should normally occur. In the control session, we find almost perfect coordination on the payoff......-dominant equilibrium, but in the sunspot treatment, dis-coordination is frequent. Sunspots lead to significant inefficiency, and we conclude that sunspots can indeed cause coordination failure....

  18. Modeling the effects of uncertainty on fear of nuclear waste: Differences among science, business and environmental group members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, G.; Jenkins-Smith, H.

    1992-10-01

    This paper analyzes the relationships between the subjective assessment of riskiness of managing nuclear waste and the level of certainty regarding the assessment. Uncertainty can be operationalized in two ways. The direct approach asks a person to assess their own subjective beliefs about a potential hazard. The indirect approach assesses how readily an individual will change his or her beliefs when confronted with new information that conflicts with prior beliefs. This paper tests for the relationships between these two distinct operationalizations of uncertainty and overall assessments of the risks posed by radioactive wastes. First we analyze the relationships between stated levels of uncertainty about the effects of radiation on the level of perceived risks from radioactive wastes. Second, we assess the linkage between willingness to alter prior beliefs about the risks of radioactive wastes in response to new information provided by ''a neutral source'' (or responsiveness of beliefs) and uncertainty. Using data taken from random mail surveys of members of scientific, business, and environmental groups in Colorado and New Mexico in the summer of 1990, we test hypotheses that (a) greater uncertainty is associated with greater perceived risks, and (b) greater responsiveness of beliefs to new information is associated with greater uncertainty. The import of these hypotheses concerns the dynamics of uncertainty in controversial technical policy issues, wherein perceived risks are a primary ingredient in policy positions taken by participants in policy disputes

  19. Modeling the effects of uncertainty on fear of nuclear waste: Differences among science, business and environmental group members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, G. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Economics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Jenkins-Smith, H. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Political Science]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-10-01

    This paper analyzes the relationships between the subjective assessment of riskiness of managing nuclear waste and the level of certainty regarding the assessment. Uncertainty can be operationalized in two ways. The direct approach asks a person to assess their own subjective beliefs about a potential hazard. The indirect approach assesses how readily an individual will change his or her beliefs when confronted with new information that conflicts with prior beliefs. This paper tests for the relationships between these two distinct operationalizations of uncertainty and overall assessments of the risks posed by radioactive wastes. First we analyze the relationships between stated levels of uncertainty about the effects of radiation on the level of perceived risks from radioactive wastes. Second, we assess the linkage between willingness to alter prior beliefs about the risks of radioactive wastes in response to new information provided by ``a neutral source`` (or responsiveness of beliefs) and uncertainty. Using data taken from random mail surveys of members of scientific, business, and environmental groups in Colorado and New Mexico in the summer of 1990, we test hypotheses that (a) greater uncertainty is associated with greater perceived risks, and (b) greater responsiveness of beliefs to new information is associated with greater uncertainty. The import of these hypotheses concerns the dynamics of uncertainty in controversial technical policy issues, wherein perceived risks are a primary ingredient in policy positions taken by participants in policy disputes.

  20. Modeling the effects of uncertainty on fear of nuclear waste: Differences among science, business and environmental group members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, G. (Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Economics Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Jenkins-Smith, H. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Political Science Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-10-01

    This paper analyzes the relationships between the subjective assessment of riskiness of managing nuclear waste and the level of certainty regarding the assessment. Uncertainty can be operationalized in two ways. The direct approach asks a person to assess their own subjective beliefs about a potential hazard. The indirect approach assesses how readily an individual will change his or her beliefs when confronted with new information that conflicts with prior beliefs. This paper tests for the relationships between these two distinct operationalizations of uncertainty and overall assessments of the risks posed by radioactive wastes. First we analyze the relationships between stated levels of uncertainty about the effects of radiation on the level of perceived risks from radioactive wastes. Second, we assess the linkage between willingness to alter prior beliefs about the risks of radioactive wastes in response to new information provided by a neutral source'' (or responsiveness of beliefs) and uncertainty. Using data taken from random mail surveys of members of scientific, business, and environmental groups in Colorado and New Mexico in the summer of 1990, we test hypotheses that (a) greater uncertainty is associated with greater perceived risks, and (b) greater responsiveness of beliefs to new information is associated with greater uncertainty. The import of these hypotheses concerns the dynamics of uncertainty in controversial technical policy issues, wherein perceived risks are a primary ingredient in policy positions taken by participants in policy disputes.

  1. Experimental appraisal of personal beliefs in science: constraints on performance in the 9 to 14 age group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, C; Tolmie, A; Sofroniou, N

    1999-06-01

    Recent curricula initiatives have promoted experimentation as a means by which relatively young children can appraise their personal beliefs and thereby modify these beliefs towards received scientific ideas. However, key psychological theories signal problems, and the enterprise is not in any event securely grounded in empirical research. As a consequence, the study reported here aimed to provide comprehensive information about children's abilities to use experimentation to appraise their beliefs, while allowing full exploration of theorized constraints. The study involved 24 children at each of three age levels within the 9 to 14 range. The children were first interviewed to establish their beliefs about influences on outcome in four educationally significant topic areas: flotation, pressure, motion and shadows. Subsequently, they were asked to conduct investigations to determine whether selected beliefs were correct. The results showed that, regardless of age or topic, very few children appreciated that to explore whether some variable is influencing outcome it is necessary to manipulate that variable experimentally and that variable only. There was a strong tendency to manipulate other variables, a tendency attributed to the intrusion of everyday reasoning practices into the experimental context. Once extraneous variables had been introduced, the children experienced great difficulties with subsequent stages in the experimental process, e.g., predicting, observing and drawing conclusions. It is concluded that experimentation as a means of appraising beliefs is not straightforward in the 9 to 14 age group, and that the pattern of difficulties has psychological significance given the background theories. Nevertheless, while not straightforward, experimental appraisal remains possible given appropriate teacher support, and proposals are made as to the form which the support should take.

  2. Grupo terapêutico em fonoaudiologia: revisão de literatura Therapeutic Group in Speech Language and Hearing Sciences: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Veis Ribeiro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: grupo terapêutico fonoaudiológico. OBJETIVO: revisar, de maneira sistemática, pesquisas advindas de todas as áreas da Fonoaudiologia que envolveram abordagens grupais, na realidade brasileira. Foi realizada busca nos bancos de dados das bases SciELO e LILACS no período de 2005 a 2010. Foram selecionados os estudos cujos conteúdos dos resumos relacionavam-se com o objetivo da presente pesquisa. Como forma de categorização dos dados, optou-se pela análise dos seguintes aspectos: público-alvo, ano de publicação e área da Fonoaudiologia envolvida. CONCLUSÃO: observa-se um número restrito de publicações referentes ao tema (28 artigos. A maior parte dos trabalhos foi realizada com público adulto, seguido de grupos de crianças, adolescentes e idosos, respectivamente. Foi baixo o índice de artigos envolvendo grupos de familiares. Dentre as áreas da Fonoaudiologia, a de Linguagem tem o maior número de publicações envolvendo grupos, seguida pelas áreas de Voz e Audiologia. Em relação ao ano de publicação, observou-se que, de maneira geral, tem havido decréscimo do número de publicações sobre o assunto desde o ano de 2007. Concluiu-se que é restrito o número de publicações sobre grupo terapêutico na área de Fonoaudiologia. Considera-se que além de novos estudos sobre a prática grupal, outros trabalhos de revisão devam assumir a análise de categorias como aspectos metodológicos, estratégias de atuação e resultados obtidos nos processos terapêuticos grupais.BACKGROUND: therapeutic Group in Speech Language and Hearing Sciences. PURPOSE: to review, systematically, researches stemming from all areas of speech therapy that involved group approaches, in Brazil. We conducted a search in LILACS and SciELO databases in the period from 2005 to 2010. We selected studies where the contents of the abstracts were related to the objective of this research. As a way of categorizing such data, we chose to analyze the

  3. Diabetes, obesity and non-optimum blood pressure levels in a group of employees of the University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disdier-Flores, Orville M; Rodríguez-Lugo, Luis A

    2005-06-01

    To estimate the proportion of diabetes, obesity and non-optimum blood pressure levels in a group of employees of the University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus that participated in a diabetes health fair at the "Centro de Diabetes para Puerto Rico". A total of 113 participants of the diabetes health fair completed a questionnaire to obtain demographic characteristics and the frequency of self-reported diabetes. The nursing staff examined the participants in order to obtain the following clinical characteristics: body mass index, blood pressure and blood glucose levels. The proportion of self-reported diabetes, obesity (> or = 30 kg/m2) and non-optimum blood pressure levels (systolic > or = 20 mm/Hg or diastolic > or = 80 mm/Hg) were 15.4% (95% CI: 8.5% - 25.7%), 80.0% (95% CI: 70.8%-86.9%) and 70.5% (95% CI: 61.1%-78.6%), respectively. Although it was not statistically significant, diabetes was higher among females (15.4%) compared to males (12.0%). All participants with self-reported diabetes were overweight or obese, and 91.7% showed non-optimum blood pressure levels. A significant positive correlation (p diabetes, obesity, and non-optimum blood pressure levels in this sample of Medical Sciences Campus employees underscores the need for confirming these results in a larger study and developing strategies focused on reducing health risks in this population.

  4. 78 FR 45992 - National Science and Technology Council; Notice of Meeting: Open Meeting of the National Science...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ..., Engineering, and Technology Subcommittee National Nanotechnology Coordination Office ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO), on behalf of the Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology (NSET) Subcommittee of the Committee on Technology, National Science...

  5. Improving Project Manufacturing Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korpivaara Ville

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to develop firms’ project manufacturing coordination. The development will be made by centralizing the manufacturing information flows in one system. To be able to centralize information, a deep user need assessment is required. After user needs have been identified, the existing system will be developed to match these needs. The theoretical background is achieved through exploring the literature of project manufacturing, development project success factors and different frameworks and tools for development project execution. The focus of this research is rather in customer need assessment than in system’s technical expertise. To ensure the deep understanding of customer needs this study is executed by action research method. As a result of this research the information system for project manufacturing coordination was developed to respond revealed needs of the stakeholders. The new system improves the quality of the manufacturing information, eliminates waste in manufacturing coordination processes and offers a better visibility to the project manufacturing. Hence it provides a solid base for the further development of project manufacturing.

  6. Universal mechatronics coordinator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Patrick F.

    1999-11-01

    Mechatronic systems incorporate multiple actuators and sensor which must be properly coordinated to achieve the desired system functionality. Many mechatronic systems are designed as one-of-a-kind custom projects without consideration for facilitating future system or alterations and extensions to the current syste. Thus, subsequent changes to the system are slow, different, and costly. It has become apparent that manufacturing processes, and thus the mechatronics which embody them, need to be agile in order to more quickly and easily respond to changing customer demands or market pressures. To achieve agility, both the hardware and software of the system need to be designed such that the creation of new system and the alteration and extension of current system is fast and easy. This paper describes the design of a Universal Mechatronics Coordinator (UMC) which facilitates agile setup and changeover of coordination software for mechatronic systems. The UMC is capable of sequencing continuous and discrete actions that are programmed as stimulus-response pairs, as state machines, or a combination of the two. It facilitates the modular, reusable programing of continuous actions such as servo control algorithms, data collection code, and safety checking routines; and discrete actions such as reporting achieved states, and turning on/off binary devices. The UMC has been applied to the control of a z- theta assembly robot for the Minifactory project and is applicable to a spectrum of widely differing mechatronic systems.

  7. Materials Sciences Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A compilation and index of the ERDA materials sciences program is presented. This compilation is intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research and as an aid in selecting new programs

  8. Young "Science Ambassadors" Raise the Profile of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Katie

    2014-01-01

    Katie Ridley, science coordinator at St. Gregory's Catholic Primary School, Liverpool, UK, states that the inspiration for "science ambassadors" came after embarking on the Primary Science Quality Mark programme at their school. Ridley realized that science was just not recognised as such by the children, they talked about scientific…

  9. A Community-Building Framework for Collaborative Research Coordination across the Education and Biology Research Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaez, Nancy; Anderson, Trevor R.; Gardner, Stephanie M.; Yin, Yue; Abraham, Joel K.; Barlett, Edward L.; Gormally, Cara; Hurney, Carol A.; Long, Tammy M.; Newman, Dina L.; Sirum, Karen; Stevens, Michael T.

    2018-01-01

    Since 2009, the U.S. National Science Foundation Directorate for Biological Sciences has funded Research Coordination Networks (RCN) aimed at collaborative efforts to improve participation, learning, and assessment in undergraduate biology education (UBE). RCN-UBE projects focus on coordination and communication among scientists and educators who…

  10. Critical diversity: Divided or united states of social coordination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengsen Zhang

    Full Text Available Much of our knowledge of coordination comes from studies of simple, dyadic systems or systems containing large numbers of components. The huge gap 'in between' is seldom addressed, empirically or theoretically. We introduce a new paradigm to study the coordination dynamics of such intermediate-sized ensembles with the goal of identifying key mechanisms of interaction. Rhythmic coordination was studied in ensembles of eight people, with differences in movement frequency ('diversity' manipulated within the ensemble. Quantitative change in diversity led to qualitative changes in coordination, a critical value separating régimes of integration and segregation between groups. Metastable and multifrequency coordination between participants enabled communication across segregated groups within the ensemble, without destroying overall order. These novel findings reveal key factors underlying coordination in ensemble sizes previously considered too complicated or 'messy' for systematic study and supply future theoretical/computational models with new empirical checkpoints.

  11. Mathematical Abstraction: Constructing Concept of Parallel Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhasanah, F.; Kusumah, Y. S.; Sabandar, J.; Suryadi, D.

    2017-09-01

    Mathematical abstraction is an important process in teaching and learning mathematics so pre-service mathematics teachers need to understand and experience this process. One of the theoretical-methodological frameworks for studying this process is Abstraction in Context (AiC). Based on this framework, abstraction process comprises of observable epistemic actions, Recognition, Building-With, Construction, and Consolidation called as RBC + C model. This study investigates and analyzes how pre-service mathematics teachers constructed and consolidated concept of Parallel Coordinates in a group discussion. It uses AiC framework for analyzing mathematical abstraction of a group of pre-service teachers consisted of four students in learning Parallel Coordinates concepts. The data were collected through video recording, students’ worksheet, test, and field notes. The result shows that the students’ prior knowledge related to concept of the Cartesian coordinate has significant role in the process of constructing Parallel Coordinates concept as a new knowledge. The consolidation process is influenced by the social interaction between group members. The abstraction process taken place in this group were dominated by empirical abstraction that emphasizes on the aspect of identifying characteristic of manipulated or imagined object during the process of recognizing and building-with.

  12. Quadratic independence of coordinate functions of certain ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... are `quadratically independent' in the sense that they do not satisfy any nontrivial homogeneous quadratic relations among them. Using this, it is proved that there is no genuine compact quantum group which can act faithfully on C ( M ) such that the action leaves invariant the linear span of the above coordinate functions.

  13. INFCE technical co-ordinating committee documents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    A collection of the documents covering the period December 1977 through February 1980 submitted to or generated by the Technical Co-ordinating Comittee is presented. The documents cover primarily the organizational aspects of INFCE, but conclusions from the various Working Groups are summarized.

  14. Coordinator, Translation Services | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Coordinator, Translation Services coordinates the overall operations of the ... services in IDRC by acting as the main resource person for internal clients ... all operational issues in order to ensure good quality products delivered on time.

  15. Microscopic description of the collisions between nuclei. [Generator coordinate kernels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canto, L F; Brink, D M [Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Theoretical Physics

    1977-03-21

    The equivalence of the generator coordinate method and the resonating group method is used in the derivation of two new methods to describe the scattering of spin-zero fragments. Both these methods use generator coordinate kernels, but avoid the problem of calculating the generator coordinate weight function in the asymptotic region. The scattering of two ..cap alpha..-particles is studied as an illustration.

  16. Beyond leadership: political strategies for coordination in health policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Scott L; Lillvis, Denise F

    2014-05-01

    Health in All Policies (HiAP) promises to improve population health by harnessing the energies and activities of various sectors. Nevertheless, it faces well-documented bureaucratic obstacles and appears to require intersectoral governance if it is to be established. The basic problems of establishing intersectoral governance for HiAP are known to public administration and political science. On reading that literature, we find that the difficulty of establishing intersectoral governance for HiAP breaks down into two kinds of problems: that of establishing coordinated actions at all (coordination); and ensuring that they endure in changed political circumstances (durability). We further find that policymakers' solutions fall into three categories: visible ones of political will (e.g., plans and targets); bureaucratic changes such as the introduction of Health Impact Assessment or reorganization; and indirect methods such as data publication and support from outside groups to put pressure on the government. It can seem that Health in All Policies, like much of public health, depends on effective and committed policymakers but is vulnerable to changing political winds. The three kinds of strategies suggest how policymakers can, and do, create intersectoral governance that functions and persists, expanding the range of effective policy recommendations. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Recursive Advice for Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terepeta, Michal Tomasz; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Nielson, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Aspect-oriented programming is a programming paradigm that is often praised for the ability to create modular software and separate cross-cutting concerns. Recently aspects have been also considered in the context of coordination languages, offering similar advantages. However, introducing aspects...... challenging. This is important since ensuring that a system does not contain errors is often equivalent to proving that some states are not reachable. In this paper we show how to solve these challenges by applying a successful technique from the area of software model checking, namely communicating pushdown...

  18. Coordination under the Shadow of Career Concerns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander; Morgenstern, Albrecht

    To innovate, firms require their employees to develop novel ideas and to coordinate with each other to turn these ideas into products, services or business strategies. Because the quality of implemented designs that employees are associated with affects their labor market opportunities, career...... concerns arise that can both be ‘good’ (enhancing incentives for effort in developing ideas) and ‘bad’ (preventing voluntary coordination). Depending on the strength of career concerns, either group-based incentives or team production are optimal. This finding provides a possible link between the increased...

  19. IAEA Co-ordinated Research Program (CRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrenk, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Coordinated Research Project is a topical collection of research agreements and contracts. The research contracts are awarded with financial support of about 10-20% of the total contract cost. Among the activities of the project is the organization of consultant group meetings and workshops involving several international experts and representatives of users and developers of border radiation monitoring equipment. The project also supports in coordinating the development of equipment and techniques for up-to-date border monitoring and in establishing of a process for providing nuclear forensics support to member states

  20. Smart phone, smart science: how the use of smartphones can revolutionize research in cognitive science

    OpenAIRE

    Dufau, Stephane; Dunabeitia, Jon Andoni; Moret-Tatay, Carmen; McGonigal, Aileen; Peeters, David; Alario, F -Xavier; Balota, David A; Brysbaert, Marc; Carreiras, Manuel; Ferrand, Ludovic; Ktori, Maria; Perea, Manuel; Rastle, Kathy; Sasburg, Olivier; Yap, Melvin J

    2011-01-01

    Investigating human cognitive faculties such as language, attention, and memory most often relies on testing small and homogeneous groups of volunteers coming to research facilities where they are asked to participate in behavioral experiments. We show that this limitation and sampling bias can be overcome by using smartphone technology to collect data in cognitive science experiments from thousands of subjects from all over the world. This mass coordinated use of smartphones creates a novel ...

  1. The plan to coordinate NEHRP post-earthquake investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Borcherdt, Roger D.; Comartin, Craig D.; Hanson, Robert D.; Scawthorn, Charles R.; Tierney, Kathleen; Youd, T. Leslie

    2003-01-01

    This is the plan to coordinate domestic and foreign post-earthquake investigations supported by the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). The plan addresses coordination of both the NEHRP agencies—Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), National Science Foundation (NSF), and U. S. Geological Survey (USGS)—and their partners. The plan is a framework for both coordinating what is going to be done and identifying responsibilities for post-earthquake investigations. It does not specify what will be done. Coordination is addressed in various time frames ranging from hours to years after an earthquake. The plan includes measures for (1) gaining rapid and general agreement on high-priority research opportunities, and (2) conducting the data gathering and fi eld studies in a coordinated manner. It deals with identifi cation, collection, processing, documentation, archiving, and dissemination of the results of post-earthquake work in a timely manner and easily accessible format.

  2. A new analysis of Mars "Special Regions": findings of the second MEPAG Special Regions Science Analysis Group (SR-SAG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, John D; Beaty, David W; Jones, Melissa A; Bakermans, Corien; Barlow, Nadine G; Boston, Penelope J; Chevrier, Vincent F; Clark, Benton C; de Vera, Jean-Pierre P; Gough, Raina V; Hallsworth, John E; Head, James W; Hipkin, Victoria J; Kieft, Thomas L; McEwen, Alfred S; Mellon, Michael T; Mikucki, Jill A; Nicholson, Wayne L; Omelon, Christopher R; Peterson, Ronald; Roden, Eric E; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara; Tanaka, Kenneth L; Viola, Donna; Wray, James J

    2014-11-01

    A committee of the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG) has reviewed and updated the description of Special Regions on Mars as places where terrestrial organisms might replicate (per the COSPAR Planetary Protection Policy). This review and update was conducted by an international team (SR-SAG2) drawn from both the biological science and Mars exploration communities, focused on understanding when and where Special Regions could occur. The study applied recently available data about martian environments and about terrestrial organisms, building on a previous analysis of Mars Special Regions (2006) undertaken by a similar team. Since then, a new body of highly relevant information has been generated from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (launched in 2005) and Phoenix (2007) and data from Mars Express and the twin Mars Exploration Rovers (all 2003). Results have also been gleaned from the Mars Science Laboratory (launched in 2011). In addition to Mars data, there is a considerable body of new data regarding the known environmental limits to life on Earth-including the potential for terrestrial microbial life to survive and replicate under martian environmental conditions. The SR-SAG2 analysis has included an examination of new Mars models relevant to natural environmental variation in water activity and temperature; a review and reconsideration of the current parameters used to define Special Regions; and updated maps and descriptions of the martian environments recommended for treatment as "Uncertain" or "Special" as natural features or those potentially formed by the influence of future landed spacecraft. Significant changes in our knowledge of the capabilities of terrestrial organisms and the existence of possibly habitable martian environments have led to a new appreciation of where Mars Special Regions may be identified and protected. The SR-SAG also considered the impact of Special Regions on potential future human missions to Mars, both as locations of

  3. Impaired Visual Motor Coordination in Obese Adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gaul, David

    2016-09-01

    Objective. To investigate whether obesity alters the sensory motor integration process and movement outcome during a visual rhythmic coordination task. Methods. 88 participants (44 obese and 44 matched control) sat on a chair equipped with a wrist pendulum oscillating in the sagittal plane. The task was to swing the pendulum in synchrony with a moving visual stimulus displayed on a screen. Results. Obese participants demonstrated significantly (p < 0.01) higher values for continuous relative phase (CRP) indicating poorer level of coordination, increased movement variability (p < 0.05), and a larger amplitude (p < 0.05) than their healthy weight counterparts. Conclusion. These results highlight the existence of visual sensory integration deficiencies for obese participants. The obese group have greater difficulty in synchronizing their movement with a visual stimulus. Considering that visual motor coordination is an essential component of many activities of daily living, any impairment could significantly affect quality of life.

  4. Interfacial and Surface Science | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science group within the Material Science Center. He oversees research studies of surfaces and interfaces Interfacial and Surface Science Interfacial and Surface Science Image of irregular-outlined, light address a broad range of fundamental and applied issues in surface and interfacial science that are

  5. Modelling the transfer of radionuclides to fruit. Report of the Fruits Working Group of BIOMASS Theme 3. Part of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project on Biosphere Modelling and Assessment (BIOMASS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    This report contains a description of the activities carried out by the Fruits Working Group and presents the main results such as conceptual advances, quantitative data and models on the transfer of radionuclides to fruit in the context of the overall objective of BIOMASS Theme 3. The aim of the study was to improve understanding of the processes affecting the migration of radionuclides in the fruit system and to identify the uncertainties associated with modelling the transfer of radionuclides to fruit. The overall objective was to improve the accuracy of risk assessment that should translate to improved health safety for the population and associated cost savings. The significance of fruit, intended as that particular component of the human diet generally consumed as a dessert item, derives from its high economic value, the agricultural area devoted to its cultivation, and its consumption rates. These are important factors for some countries and groups of population. Fruits may become contaminated with radioactive material from nuclear facilities during routine operation, as a consequence of nuclear accidents, or due to migration through the biosphere of radionuclides from radioactive waste disposal facilities. Relevant radionuclides when considering transfer to fruit from atmospheric deposition were identified as 3 H, 14 C, 35 S, 36 Cl, 90 Sr, 129 I, 134 Cs and 137 Cs. The transfer of radionuclides to fruit is complex and involves many interactions between biotic and abiotic components. Edible fruit is borne by different plant species, such as herbaceous plants, shrubs and trees, that can grow under different climatic conditions and may be found in agricultural or natural ecosystems. A review of experimental, field and modelling information on the transfer of radionuclides to fruit was carried out at the inception of the activities of the Group, taking into account results from a Questionnaire circulated to radioecologists. Results on current experimental

  6. Modelling the transfer of radionuclides to fruit. Report of the Fruits Working Group of BIOMASS Theme 3. Part of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project on Biosphere Modelling and Assessment (BIOMASS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This report contains a description of the activities carried out by the Fruits Working Group and presents the main results such as conceptual advances, quantitative data and models on the transfer of radionuclides to fruit in the context of the overall objective of BIOMASS Theme 3. The aim of the study was to improve understanding of the processes affecting the migration of radionuclides in the fruit system and to identify the uncertainties associated with modelling the transfer of radionuclides to fruit. The overall objective was to improve the accuracy of risk assessment that should translate to improved health safety for the population and associated cost savings. The significance of fruit, intended as that particular component of the human diet generally consumed as a dessert item, derives from its high economic value, the agricultural area devoted to its cultivation, and its consumption rates. These are important factors for some countries and groups of population. Fruits may become contaminated with radioactive material from nuclear facilities during routine operation, as a consequence of nuclear accidents, or due to migration through the biosphere of radionuclides from radioactive waste disposal facilities. Relevant radionuclides when considering transfer to fruit from atmospheric deposition were identified as {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 35}S, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 129}I, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs. The transfer of radionuclides to fruit is complex and involves many interactions between biotic and abiotic components. Edible fruit is borne by different plant species, such as herbaceous plants, shrubs and trees, that can grow under different climatic conditions and may be found in agricultural or natural ecosystems. A review of experimental, field and modelling information on the transfer of radionuclides to fruit was carried out at the inception of the activities of the Group, taking into account results from a Questionnaire circulated to

  7. The Historical Origins and Economic Logic of 'Open Science'

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Modern "big science" projects, such as the LHC experiments in physics that are being prepared to run at CERN, embody the distinctive ethos of cooperation and mechanisms of coordination among distributed groups of researchers that are characteristic of 'open science'. Much has been written about the institutions of open science, their supporting social norms, and their effectiveness in generating additions to the stock of reliable knowledge. But from where have these institutions and their supporting ethos come? How robust can we assume them to be in the face of the recent trends for universities and research institutes in some domains of science to seek to appropriate the benefits of new discoveries and inventions by asserting intellectual property claims? A search for the historical origins of the institutions of open science throws some new light on these issues, and the answers may offer some lessons for contemporary science and technology policy-making.

  8. Report on a Boston University Conference December 7-8, 2012 on How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garik, Peter; Benétreau-Dupin, Yann

    2014-09-01

    This is an editorial report on the outcomes of an international conference sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) (REESE-1205273) to the School of Education at Boston University and the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University for a conference titled: How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching? The presentations of the conference speakers and the reports of the working groups are reviewed. Multiple themes emerged for K-16 education from the perspective of the history and philosophy of science. Key ones were that: students need to understand that central to science is argumentation, criticism, and analysis; students should be educated to appreciate science as part of our culture; students should be educated to be science literate; what is meant by the nature of science as discussed in much of the science education literature must be broadened to accommodate a science literacy that includes preparation for socioscientific issues; teaching for science literacy requires the development of new assessment tools; and, it is difficult to change what science teachers do in their classrooms. The principal conclusions drawn by the editors are that: to prepare students to be citizens in a participatory democracy, science education must be embedded in a liberal arts education; science teachers alone cannot be expected to prepare students to be scientifically literate; and, to educate students for scientific literacy will require a new curriculum that is coordinated across the humanities, history/social studies, and science classrooms.

  9. Network Coordinator Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himwich, Ed; Strand, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This report includes an assessment of the network performance in terms of lost observing time for the 2012 calendar year. Overall, the observing time loss was about 12.3%, which is in-line with previous years. A table of relative incidence of problems with various subsystems is presented. The most significant identified causes of loss were electronics rack problems (accounting for about 21.8% of losses), antenna reliability (18.1%), RFI (11.8%), and receiver problems (11.7%). About 14.2% of the losses occurred for unknown reasons. New antennas are under development in the USA, Germany, and Spain. There are plans for new telescopes in Norway and Sweden. Other activities of the Network Coordinator are summarized.

  10. Smart phone, smart science: how the use of smartphones can revolutionize research in cognitive science.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Dufau

    Full Text Available Investigating human cognitive faculties such as language, attention, and memory most often relies on testing small and homogeneous groups of volunteers coming to research facilities where they are asked to participate in behavioral experiments. We show that this limitation and sampling bias can be overcome by using smartphone technology to collect data in cognitive science experiments from thousands of subjects from all over the world. This mass coordinated use of smartphones creates a novel and powerful scientific "instrument" that yields the data necessary to test universal theories of cognition. This increase in power represents a potential revolution in cognitive science.

  11. 78 FR 56952 - Notice of Meetings: Public Meetings of the National Science and Technology Council; Committee on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... Science and Technology Council; Committee on Technology; Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology Subcommittee; National Nanotechnology Coordination Office AGENCY: Office of Science and Technology Policy. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO), on...

  12. Science packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Primary science teachers in Scotland have a new updating method at their disposal with the launch of a package of CDi (Compact Discs Interactive) materials developed by the BBC and the Scottish Office. These were a response to the claim that many primary teachers felt they had been inadequately trained in science and lacked the confidence to teach it properly. Consequently they felt the need for more in-service training to equip them with the personal understanding required. The pack contains five disks and a printed user's guide divided up as follows: disk 1 Investigations; disk 2 Developing understanding; disks 3,4,5 Primary Science staff development videos. It was produced by the Scottish Interactive Technology Centre (Moray House Institute) and is available from BBC Education at £149.99 including VAT. Free Internet distribution of science education materials has also begun as part of the Global Schoolhouse (GSH) scheme. The US National Science Teachers' Association (NSTA) and Microsoft Corporation are making available field-tested comprehensive curriculum material including 'Micro-units' on more than 80 topics in biology, chemistry, earth and space science and physics. The latter are the work of the Scope, Sequence and Coordination of High School Science project, which can be found at http://www.gsh.org/NSTA_SSandC/. More information on NSTA can be obtained from its Web site at http://www.nsta.org.

  13. CIMAC: A Coordinated Introduction to Calculus and Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathe, Laurie; Quinn, Jennifer; McDonald, Michael A.

    1997-04-01

    CIMAC, new course incorporating Mechanics, Precalculus, and Calculus, targets the growing number of motivated but underprepared students who wish to pursue a major in science or mathematics. Team-taught by a Physicist and a Mathematician, CIMAC, a new course incorporating Mechanics, Precalculus, and Calculus, targets the growing number of motivated but underprepared students who wish to pursue a major in science or mathematics. Team-taught by a Physicist and a Mathematician, the class contains specific content while exploiting the substantial commonality of these subjects. CIMAC also addresses variety of non-content areas, including supplementing basic mathematics and communication skills, accommodating various learning styles, and building student confidence. Specific approaches include class formats; gateway exams; group assignments; emphasis on writing and reading; use of computers and graphing calculators for comprehension, data acquisition, analysis, and modeling; student-led help sessions; and use of the Web http://www.oxy.edu/ departments/math/cimac/ This talk highlights the development of the course and teaching insights and innovations which have arisen from it, and addresses benefits and difficulties of coordinating material and team teaching across disciplinary lines. Finally, it presents data on student success and retention.

  14. Levels of use of an elementary school inquiry-based instructional innovation among a selected group of teacher participants in the Delaware Elementary Science Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchelle, Henry Ellsworth Wirt, III

    Science education in Delaware's public elementary and middle schools has experienced much change in recent years as a result of the adoption of state standards and, in particular, the adoption by school districts of the Smithsonian/National Science Resources Council-sponsored inquiry-based instruction modules as part of the "Elementary Science Initiative." As part of this adoption process, each participating elementary teacher and middle school science teacher receives extensive training in the use of several discrete science kits. The trainings include reinforcement and development of content knowledge, in addition to the modeling of and practice with complementary pedagogy. One measure of the effectiveness of the science kit training process (and perhaps the Initiative itself) is the teachers' levels of use of the Initiative. The purpose of this study was to determine the participating teachers' use of the science kit innovation through the use of the Concerns-based Adoption Model Levels of Use Questionnaire. Eight K--5 elementary classroom teachers who had completed at least three science kit trainings participated. The results of this study indicate that on the Overall Level of Use Rating Scale, teachers who had completed training in at least three science kits generally scored at the Routine (IVA) level. All of the teachers, regardless of the wide range in the number of years of experience, had achieved the Mechanical Use level in Overall (III) LoU, and 6 of the 8 participants (75%) were operating at no less than the Refinement (IVA) Overall LoU level.

  15. Towards an International Polar Data Coordination Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P L Pulsifer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Data management is integral to sound polar science. Through analysis of documents reporting on meetings of the Arctic data management community, a set of priorities and strategies are identified. These include the need to improve data sharing, make use of existing resources, and better engage stakeholders. Network theory is applied to a preliminary inventory of polar and global data management actors to improve understanding of the emerging community of practice. Under the name the Arctic Data Coordination Network, we propose a model network that can support the community in achieving their goals through improving connectivity between existing actors.

  16. Coordinates in relativistic Hamiltonian mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The physical (covariant and measurable) coordinates of free particles and covariant coordinates of the center of inertia are found for three main forms of relativistic dynamics. In the point form of dynamics, the covariant coordinates of two directly interacting particles are found, and the equations of motion are brought to the explicitly covariant form. These equations are generalized to the case of interaction with an external electromagnetic field

  17. Science, evolution, and creationism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Revising Science and Creationism

    ... are more comfortable. In the book Science, Evolution, and Creationism, a group of experts assembled by the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine explain the fundamental methods of science, document...

  18. Embedding Publication Skills in Science Research Training: A Writing Group Programme Based on Applied Linguistics Frameworks and Facilitated by a Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargill, Margaret; Smernik, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Few systematic efforts have been reported to develop higher degree by research student skills for writing publishable articles in science and technology fields. There is a need to address this lack in the light of the current importance of publication to science research students and the high supervisor workload entailed in repeated draft…

  19. Learning alternative movement coordination patterns using reinforcement feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Hsiang; Denomme, Amber; Ranganathan, Rajiv

    2018-05-01

    One of the characteristic features of the human motor system is redundancy-i.e., the ability to achieve a given task outcome using multiple coordination patterns. However, once participants settle on using a specific coordination pattern, the process of learning to use a new alternative coordination pattern to perform the same task is still poorly understood. Here, using two experiments, we examined this process of how participants shift from one coordination pattern to another using different reinforcement schedules. Participants performed a virtual reaching task, where they moved a cursor to different targets positioned on the screen. Our goal was to make participants use a coordination pattern with greater trunk motion, and to this end, we provided reinforcement by making the cursor disappear if the trunk motion during the reach did not cross a specified threshold value. In Experiment 1, we compared two reinforcement schedules in two groups of participants-an abrupt group, where the threshold was introduced immediately at the beginning of practice; and a gradual group, where the threshold was introduced gradually with practice. Results showed that both abrupt and gradual groups were effective in shifting their coordination patterns to involve greater trunk motion, but the abrupt group showed greater retention when the reinforcement was removed. In Experiment 2, we examined the basis of this advantage in the abrupt group using two additional control groups. Results showed that the advantage of the abrupt group was because of a greater number of practice trials with the desired coordination pattern. Overall, these results show that reinforcement can be successfully used to shift coordination patterns, which has potential in the rehabilitation of movement disorders.

  20. Team reasoning: Solving the puzzle of coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Andrew M; Gold, Natalie

    2017-11-03

    In many everyday activities, individuals have a common interest in coordinating their actions. Orthodox game theory cannot explain such intuitively obvious forms of coordination as the selection of an outcome that is best for all in a common-interest game. Theories of team reasoning provide a convincing solution by proposing that people are sometimes motivated to maximize the collective payoff of a group and that they adopt a distinctive mode of reasoning from preferences to decisions. This also offers a compelling explanation of cooperation in social dilemmas. A review of team reasoning and related theories suggests how team reasoning could be incorporated into psychological theories of group identification and social value orientation theory to provide a deeper understanding of these phenomena.

  1. Markov stochasticity coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-01-01

    Markov dynamics constitute one of the most fundamental models of random motion between the states of a system of interest. Markov dynamics have diverse applications in many fields of science and engineering, and are particularly applicable in the context of random motion in networks. In this paper we present a two-dimensional gauging method of the randomness of Markov dynamics. The method–termed Markov Stochasticity Coordinates–is established, discussed, and exemplified. Also, the method is tweaked to quantify the stochasticity of the first-passage-times of Markov dynamics, and the socioeconomic equality and mobility in human societies.

  2. Markov stochasticity coordinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliazar, Iddo, E-mail: iddo.eliazar@intel.com

    2017-01-15

    Markov dynamics constitute one of the most fundamental models of random motion between the states of a system of interest. Markov dynamics have diverse applications in many fields of science and engineering, and are particularly applicable in the context of random motion in networks. In this paper we present a two-dimensional gauging method of the randomness of Markov dynamics. The method–termed Markov Stochasticity Coordinates–is established, discussed, and exemplified. Also, the method is tweaked to quantify the stochasticity of the first-passage-times of Markov dynamics, and the socioeconomic equality and mobility in human societies.

  3. Impact of music type on motor coordination task performance among introverted and extroverted students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidzad, Maryam; Maghsoudipour, Maryam; Zakerian, Seyed Abolfazl; Bakhshi, Enayatollah; Coh, Paul

    2018-06-26

    People are interested in music. In this study, we assessed the impact of music type on objective performance. We distributed 64 medical science students in Tehran into four groups: Iranian pop music, traditional music, Mozart's classical music and control groups. All participants performed the two-arm coordination test once without music and once with music (except for the control group), with an interval of 1 week. In the music groups, music was playing during the performance of the test. Participants were categorized as either introverted or extroverted and were distributed equally in the groups. There was a significant decrease of test time in the second trial, observed in all music groups, and no significant difference identified in the control group. The traditional music group had less difference of mean time compared to the pop music group. The differences in the traditional and classical groups were not significantly different. In the music groups, both extroverted and introverted students decreased their test time significantly after music intervention, but extroverted students decreased more. Listening to music would enhance the speed of performance. Music with a higher tempo, such as pop music, increased the speed more.

  4. Does Coordinated Postpartum Care Influence Costs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Zemp

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Questions under study: To investigate changes to health insurance costs for post-discharge postpartum care after the introduction of a midwife-led coordinated care model. Methods: The study included mothers and their newborns insured by the Helsana health insurance group in Switzerland and who delivered between January 2012 and May 2013 in the canton of Basel Stadt (BS (intervention canton. We compared monthly post-discharge costs before the launch of a coordinated postpartum care model (control phase, n = 144 to those after its introduction (intervention phase, n = 92. Costs in the intervention canton were also compared to those in five control cantons without a coordinated postpartum care model (cross-sectional control group: n = 7, 767. Results: The average monthly post-discharge costs for mothers remained unchanged in the seven months following the introduction of a coordinated postpartum care model, despite a higher use of midwife services (increasing from 72% to 80%. Likewise, monthly costs did not differ between the intervention canton and five control cantons. In multivariate analyses, the ambulatory costs for mothers were not associated with the post-intervention phase. Cross-sectionally, however, they were positively associated with midwifery use. For children, costs in the post-intervention phase were lower in the first month after hospital discharge compared to the pre-intervention phase (difference of –114 CHF [95%CI –202 CHF to –27 CHF], yet no differences were seen in the cross-sectional comparison. Conclusions: The introduction of a coordinated postpartum care model was associated with decreased costs for neonates in the first month after hospital discharge. Despite increased midwifery use, costs for mothers remained unchanged.

  5. Interstate Solar Coordination Council. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L.

    1981-02-15

    The ISCC program accomplishments and future plans are reported as follows: overall activities; development of a national standards and certification program for solar collectors; development of a national organization for operating the collector certification program; review of applicability and use of solar collector rating procedures; development of a program for evaluation/testing/certification of solar systems; development of ISCC as a formal and independent organization; development of sizing and installation manual; and coordination efforts with other solar groups. (MHR)

  6. A role based coordination model in agent systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ya-ying; YOU Jin-yuan

    2005-01-01

    Coordination technology addresses the construction of open, flexible systems from active and independent software agents in concurrent and distributed systems. In most open distributed applications, multiple agents need interaction and communication to achieve their overall goal. Coordination technologies for the Internet typically are concerned with enabling interaction among agents and helping them cooperate with each other.At the same time, access control should also be considered to constrain interaction to make it harmless. Access control should be regarded as the security counterpart of coordination. At present, the combination of coordination and access control remains an open problem. Thus, we propose a role based coordination model with policy enforcement in agent application systems. In this model, coordination is combined with access control so as to fully characterize the interactions in agent systems. A set of agents interacting with each other for a common global system task constitutes a coordination group. Role based access control is applied in this model to prevent unauthorized accesses. Coordination policy is enforced in a distributed manner so that the model can be applied to the open distributed systems such as Intemet. An Internet online auction system is presented as a case study to illustrate the proposed coordination model and finally the performance analysis of the model is introduced.

  7. Development of an International School Nurse Asthma Care Coordination Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwick, Ann W; Svavarsdóttir, Erla Kolbrun; Seppelt, Ann M; Looman, Wendy S; Anderson, Lori S; Örlygsdóttir, Brynja

    2015-03-01

    To identify and compare how school nurses in Reykjavik, Iceland and St. Paul, Minnesota coordinated care for youth with asthma (ages 10-18) and to develop an asthma school nurse care coordination model. Little is known about how school nurses coordinate care for youth with asthma in different countries. A qualitative descriptive study design using focus group data. Six focus groups with 32 school nurses were conducted in Reykjavik (n = 17) and St. Paul (n = 15) using the same protocol between September 2008 and January 2009. Descriptive content analytic and constant comparison strategies were used to categorize and compare how school nurses coordinated care, which resulted in the development of an International School Nurse Asthma Care Coordination Model. Participants in both countries spontaneously described a similar asthma care coordination process that involved information gathering, assessing risk for asthma episodes, prioritizing healthcare needs and anticipating and planning for student needs at the individual and school levels. This process informed how they individualized symptom management, case management and/or asthma education. School nurses played a pivotal part in collaborating with families, school and healthcare professionals to ensure quality care for youth with asthma. Results indicate a high level of complexity in school nurses' approaches to asthma care coordination that were responsive to the diverse and changing needs of students in school settings. The conceptual model derived provides a framework for investigators to use in examining the asthma care coordination process of school nurses in other geographic locations. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Coordination of Conditional Poisson Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grafström Anton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sample coordination seeks to maximize or to minimize the overlap of two or more samples. The former is known as positive coordination, and the latter as negative coordination. Positive coordination is mainly used for estimation purposes and to reduce data collection costs. Negative coordination is mainly performed to diminish the response burden of the sampled units. Poisson sampling design with permanent random numbers provides an optimum coordination degree of two or more samples. The size of a Poisson sample is, however, random. Conditional Poisson (CP sampling is a modification of the classical Poisson sampling that produces a fixed-size πps sample. We introduce two methods to coordinate Conditional Poisson samples over time or simultaneously. The first one uses permanent random numbers and the list-sequential implementation of CP sampling. The second method uses a CP sample in the first selection and provides an approximate one in the second selection because the prescribed inclusion probabilities are not respected exactly. The methods are evaluated using the size of the expected sample overlap, and are compared with their competitors using Monte Carlo simulation. The new methods provide a good coordination degree of two samples, close to the performance of Poisson sampling with permanent random numbers.

  9. Coordination in continuously repeated games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeren, A.J.T.M.; Schumacher, J.M.; Engwerda, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we propose a model to describe the effectiveness of coordination in a continuously repeated two-player game. We study how the choice of a decision rule by a coordinator affects the strategic behavior of the players, resulting in more or less cooperation. Our model requires the analysis

  10. Coordinated Transportation: Problems and Promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Examines the legal, administrative, and logistical barriers that have prevented the wide acceptance of coordinating community and school transportation services and why these barriers may be breaking down. Two examples of successful implementation of coordinated transportation are examined: employing a single system to serve all transportation…

  11. Bare coordination: the semantic shift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Swart, Henriette; Le Bruyn, Bert

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops an analysis of the syntax-semantics interface of two types of split coordination structures. In the first type, two bare singular count nouns appear as arguments in a coordinated structure, as in bride and groom were happy. We call this the N&N construction. In the second type,

  12. 3rd February 2011-Science Museum Patrons-Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland-visiting CMS cavern and LHC Tunnel with A. De Roeck,CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson and M. Lamont,Beams Department, Operation Group Leader

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    The delegation: Mr Ian Blatchford,Director of the Science Museum and NMSI Mrs Susan Fisher,Director of Development, National Museum of Science and Industry (NMSI) Dr Douglas Gurr,Chairman of the Board of Trustees, NMSI Mr Martin Smith,Previous NMSI trustee Mrs Elise Smith,Spouse Mr Michael Wilson,NMSI trustee Mrs Jane Wilson,Spouse Mr Gregg Wilson,Son Dr Ann Coxon,UK Friends of the Science Museum Trustee Mr Nicholas Lewis,Contact of Martin Smith accompanied by P. Wells,Physics Department, ATLAS Inner Detector Group Leader and A. Koek,Communication group (International Arts Development, CERN Cultural Policy and Strategy with the Arts, The Collide Programme)

  13. Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and policy coordination - first annual report, June 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This is the first annual report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). CIRRPC was established on April 9, 1984, by Dr. George A. Keyworth, II, Science Advisor to the President and Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). CIRRPC replaced the Committee on Interagency Radiation Policy and was assigned responsibilities of the former Interagency Radiation Research Committee and former Radiation Policy Council. CIRRPC is chartered under the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology (FCCSET). Its overall charge is to coordinate radiation matters between agencies, evaluate radiation matters between agencies, evaluate radiation research, and provide advice on the formulation of radiation policy

  14. The students’ coordinating conjunction acquisition order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deby Irawan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at uncovering the students’ acquisition order of coordinating conjunction for then to seek the possible causes of such phenomenon. Quantitative approach with implicational scaling and qualitative approach with case study were employed with test, focused-group interview, and document analysis of some related textbooks as the instruments. A test consist of 70 questions about the usage of seven coordinating conjunctions in which each word is represented by 10 questions was given to the 13 students of eleventh grade of senior high school for the data collection related to the students’ acquisition order. The documents were then analyzed through several steps as suggested by the expert. The results show that the students acquire “and”, “so”, “for”, “but”, “or”, “yet”, and “nor” as in order. The external factors which influence the order are the formal complexity of each conjunction and the lack of exposure of coordinating conjunction both in the teaching activity and textbooks. Thus, teachers are suggested to provide more explicit teaching on coordinating conjunction and necessary knowledge about the usage of each word. Also, book writers should provide ample exposure to give students more knowledge about the usage of those conjunctions in a meaningful context.

  15. Multipole structure and coordinate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burko, Lior M

    2007-01-01

    Multipole expansions depend on the coordinate system, so that coefficients of multipole moments can be set equal to zero by an appropriate choice of coordinates. Therefore, it is meaningless to say that a physical system has a nonvanishing quadrupole moment, say, without specifying which coordinate system is used. (Except if this moment is the lowest non-vanishing one.) This result is demonstrated for the case of two equal like electric charges. Specifically, an adapted coordinate system in which the potential is given by a monopole term only is explicitly found, the coefficients of all higher multipoles vanish identically. It is suggested that this result can be generalized to other potential problems, by making equal coordinate surfaces adapt to the potential problem's equipotential surfaces

  16. Office Staff | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administration; Editorial Staff - Academy; Editorial Staff - Current Science ... Coordinator, Summer Research Fellowship Programme (Science Education Panel), .... Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on the teaching of the ...

  17. Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute (RAMSRI) - Annual Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute (RAMSRI) is the fourth Research and Development Institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), undertaking research in human health and nutrition. This annual report covers the major activities undertaken by RAMSRI for the year 2015. The activities are grouped under the following headings: Establishment; Personnel and Organisation; Major Activities of Centres; Ongoing IAEA TC Projects; Human Resource Development; IAEA Coordinated Meetings Hosted; Publications; Achievements; Challenges; Projections for the Year 2016; and Recommendations.

  18. Coordination Compounds in Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    which residues from carbohydrates, fats and proteins are used to produce ... chains of corrin are made of acetamide and/or propionamide groups. One of them is an ... lower ligand, the molecules are usually referred to as cobalamins. Thus, if R ...

  19. Modular co-ordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blach, K.

    Notatet er på engelsk, idet det er lavet som et oplæg til den internationale standardiseringsorganisations (ISO) arbejde med målkoordinering i byggeriet. Materialet har også været forelagt ekspertgrupperne i CIB W24 og i International Modular Group. Det i notatet præsenterede materiale er blevet...

  20. Second meeting of the ITPA Coordinating Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.J.; Shimada, M.

    2002-01-01

    The second meeting of the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) Coordinating Committee (CC), consisting of representatives from the ITPA participants and the topical physics group chairs and co-chairs was held at GA Technologies, San Diego, USA on 1-2 March 2002. The purpose of the meeting was to review the progress of physics R and D, especially in the high priority research ares, for burning plasma experiments including ITER, and to discuss the plans for pursuing necessary R and D. CC heard reports on the most recent developments in the areas of responsibility of the topical groups

  1. Keep Meaning in Conversational Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Clare Cuffari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coordination is a widely employed term across recent quantitative and qualitative approaches to intersubjectivity, particularly approaches that give embodiment and enaction central explanatory roles. With a focus on linguistic and bodily coordination in conversational contexts, I review the operational meaning of coordination in recent empirical research and related theorizing of embodied intersubjectivity. This discussion articulates what must be involved in treating linguistic meaning as dynamic processes of coordination. The coordination approach presents languaging as a set of dynamic self-organizing processes and actions on multiple timescales and across multiple modalities that come about and work in certain domains (those jointly constructed in social, interactive, high-order sense-making. These processes go beyond meaning at the level that is available to first-person experience. I take one crucial consequence of this to be the ubiquitously moral nature of languaging with others. Languaging coordinates experience, among other levels of behavior and event. Ethical effort is called for by the automatic autonomy-influencing forces of languaging as coordination.

  2. Coordinating distributed work : Exploring situated coordination with gaming-simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laere, J.

    2003-01-01

    Organizational work has become more and more distributed nowadays. Information and communication technologies (ICT) provide opportunities to improve coordination of distributed work, but in practice many organizations struggle with integrating new organizational structures, new work practices and

  3. Coordinating Center: Molecular and Cellular Findings of Screen-Detected Lesions | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Molecular and Cellular Characterization of Screen‐Detected Lesions ‐ Coordinating Center and Data Management Group will provide support for the participating studies responding to RFA CA14‐10. The coordinating center supports three main domains: network coordination, statistical support and computational analysis and protocol development and database support. Support for

  4. International Space Station Earth Observations Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, William L.; Oikawa, Koki

    2015-01-01

    The multilateral Earth Observations Working Group (EOWG) was chartered in May 2012 in order to improve coordination and collaboration of Earth observing payloads, research, and applications on the International Space Station (ISS). The EOWG derives its authority from the ISS Program Science Forum, and a NASA representative serves as a permanent co-chair. A rotating co-chair position can be occupied by any of the international partners, following concurrence by the other partners; a JAXA representative is the current co-chair. Primary functions of the EOWG include, 1) the exchange of information on plans for payloads, from science and application objectives to instrument development, data collection, distribution and research; 2) recognition and facilitation of opportunities for international collaboration in order to optimize benefits from different instruments; and 3) provide a formal ISS Program interface for collection and application of remotely sensed data collected in response to natural disasters through the International Charter, Space and Major Disasters. Recent examples of EOWG activities include coordination of bilateral data sharing protocols between NASA and TsNIIMash for use of crew time and instruments in support of ATV5 reentry imaging activities; discussion of continued use and support of the Nightpod camera mount system by NASA and ESA; and review and revision of international partner contributions on Earth observations to the ISS Program Benefits to Humanity publication.

  5. Multi-Agent Coordination Techniques for Naval Tactical Combat Resources Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    resource coordination and cooperation problems. The combat resource allocation planning problem is treated in the companion report [2]. 2.3 Resource...report focuses on the resource coordination problem, while allocation algorithms are discussed in the companion report [2]. First, coordination in...classification of each should be indicated as with the title.) Canada’s Leader in Defence and National Security Science and Technology Chef de file au Canada en

  6. Update of technical coordinating committee activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Technical Coordinating Committee has its origins in the earliest days of implementing the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act. Between 1982 and 1985, individuals in several of the states felt that coordination among the states would be beneficial to all by affording states a cost-effective method for sharing ideas, discussing alternatives, and presenting solutions to common problems. At the current time, the committee comprises members from each of the sited states. Various compacts, federal agencies, and industry groups participate in committee activities. The Low-Level Management Program provides support for the committee through the provision of logistical support and limited manpower allocation. Activities of the committee have recently focused on waste treatment and minimization technologies. The committee also has worked diligently to see the review of the 3RSTAT computer code completed. The committee has taken a position on various regulatory proposals the past year. The committee expects to continue its work until new sites are brought online

  7. Update of technical coordinating committee activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Technical Coordinating Committee has its origins in the earliest days of implementing the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act. Between 1982 and 1985, individuals in several of the states felt that coordination among the states would be beneficial to all by affording states a cost-effective method for sharing ideas, discussing alternatives, and presenting solutions to common problems. At the current time, the committee comprises members from each of the sited states. Various compacts, federal agencies, and industry groups participate in committee activities. The Low-Level Management Program provides support for the committee through the provision of logistical support and limited manpower allocation. Activities of the committee have recently focused on waste treatment and minimization technologies. The committee also has worked diligently to see the review of the 3RSTAT computer code completed. The committee has taken a position on various regulatory proposals the past year. The committee expects to continue its work until new sites are brought online.

  8. The coordinate transforming in geography information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiang; Chen Gang

    2003-01-01

    The coordinate transforming of geography information system includes two kinds of transforming, map projection and coordinate-transforming. This paper proposed a arithmetic of coordinate-transforming, it implement the transforming between the longitude-latitude coordinate and the screen coordinate and apply it in the GIS. The preferable effect was made. (authors)

  9. Information and Announcements Science Academies' Refresher ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2015-11-15

    Nov 15, 2015 ... Course Director: Professor Alok K Gupta, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211 002, U.P.. Course Coordinator: Dr T D Mahabaleswara, Coordinator (RC&LW), Science Education Panel,. Indian Academy of Sciences, C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar P O, Bangalore 560 080 (Email: sep@ias.ernet.in).

  10. Education in Soil Science: the Italian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Anna; Canfora, Loredana; Dazzi, Carmelo; Lo Papa, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    The Italian Society of Soil Science (SISS) was founded in Florence on February 18th, 1952. It is an association legally acknowledged by Decree of the President of the Italian Republic in February 1957. The Society is member of the International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS) of the European Confederation of Soil Science Societies (ECSSS) and collaborates with several companies, institutions and organizations having similar objectives or policy aspects. SISS promotes progress, coordination and dissemination of soil science and its applications encouraging relationships and collaborations among soil lovers. Within the SISS there are Working Groups and Technical Committees for specific issues of interest. In particular: • the Working Group on Pedotechniques; • the Working Group on Hydromorphic and Subaqueous Soils and • the Technical Committee for Soil Education and Public Awareness. In this communication we wish to stress the activities developed since its foundation by SISS to spread soil awareness and education in Italy through this last Technical Committee, focusing also the aspect concerning grants for young graduates and PhD graduates to stimulate the involvement of young people in the field of soil science. Keywords: SISS, soil education and awareness.

  11. 78 FR 24241 - Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology, National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology.... SUMMARY: The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO), on behalf of the Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology (NSET) Subcommittee of the Committee on Technology, National Science and...

  12. 77 FR 61448 - Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Subcommittee Committee on Technology, National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Subcommittee...: The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO), on behalf of the Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology (NSET) Subcommittee of the Committee on Technology, National Science and...

  13. Who matters in coordination problems?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sákovics, J.; Steiner, Jakub

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 7 (2012), s. 3439-3461 ISSN 0002-8282 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : coordination problem s * heterogeneous agents Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 2.792, year: 2012

  14. Coordination Processes in International Organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The EU is not a member of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), but relatively elaborate EU coordination takes place anyway. This paper addresses two research questions: 1) How is it possible to evaluate the coordination of the EU in its specific observable configuration in the ILO?, and 2......-à-vis their principals, the Member States. The Commission is the leading agent in the phase leading up to the Conference; the Presidency then takes over. On the one hand, due to the Treaty obligations and their interpretations by the Court of Justice, both the Presidency and the Commission are kept within tight limits...... by the principals. On the other hand, both before and during the Conference, the Member States accept the so-called discursive coordination of the Commission, which seems to be of great (but often neglected) importance. Owing to the organisational set-up in which coordination takes place, the EU is able...

  15. Hall effect in noncommutative coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayi, Oemer F.; Jellal, Ahmed

    2002-01-01

    We consider electrons in uniform external magnetic and electric fields which move on a plane whose coordinates are noncommuting. Spectrum and eigenfunctions of the related Hamiltonian are obtained. We derive the electric current whose expectation value gives the Hall effect in terms of an effective magnetic field. We present a receipt to find the action which can be utilized in path integrals for noncommuting coordinates. In terms of this action we calculate the related Aharonov-Bohm phase and show that it also yields the same effective magnetic field. When magnetic field is strong enough this phase becomes independent of magnetic field. Measurement of it may give some hints on spatial noncommutativity. The noncommutativity parameter θ can be tuned such that electrons moving in noncommutative coordinates are interpreted as either leading to the fractional quantum Hall effect or composite fermions in the usual coordinates

  16. Future in actinoids coordination chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Takafumi

    2006-01-01

    Actinoids coordination chemistry is concerned with spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, specifically with solid-state chemistry of nuclear fuels, separation process with radioactive substances, and geological disposal of high-level radioactive substances. In the 21st century, accumulation of minor actinides, Np, Am, Cm, and others will be realized according with the present program of nuclear energy development. The present article briefly introduces general properties of actinide elements, followed by their coordination chemistry compared with rare earths coordination chemistry. Special facility needed to treat actinoids as well as their chemistry is briefly explained, together with the specific experimental apparatus such as X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectrometry (TRLFS) with synchrotron radiation facilities. The effect of coordination with actinoids in the environment chemistry is important in underground disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. For theoretical analysis of the results with actinoids chemistry, relativistic calculation is needed. (S. Ohno)

  17. Map Coordinate Referencing and the use of GPS Datasets in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Map Coordinate Referencing and the use of GPS Datasets in Ghana. ... Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana) ... systems used in Ghana (the Ghana war office system and also the Clarke1880 system) using the Bursa-Wolf model.

  18. Interlimb coordination and academic performance in elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Pacheco, Sheila Cristina; Gabbard, Carl; Ries, Lilian Gerdi Kittel; Bobbio, Tatiana Godoy

    2016-10-01

    The specific mechanisms linking motor ability and cognitive performance, especially academic achievement, are still unclear. Whereas the literature provides an abundance of information on fine and visual-motor skill and cognitive attributes, much less has been reported on gross motor ability. This study examined interlimb coordination and its relationship to academic performance in children aged 8-11 years. Motor and academic skills were examined in 100 Brazilian children using the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency and the Academic Performance Test. Participants were grouped into low (75%) academic achievers. There was a significant difference between groups for Total Motor Composite (P academic performance and Body Coordination. Of the subtests of Body Coordination (Bilateral Coordination and Balance), Bilateral Coordination accounted for the highest impact on academic performance. Of interest here, that subtest consists primarily of gross motor tasks involving interlimb coordination. Overall, there was a positive relationship between motor behavior, in particular activities involving interlimb coordination, and academic performance. Application of these findings in the area of early assessment may be useful in the identification of later academic problems. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  19. Integrating Inquiry-Based Science and Education Methods Courses in a "Science Semester" for Future Elementary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, J.; Fifield, S.; Allen, D.; Brickhouse, N.; Dagher, Z.; Ford, D.; Shipman, H.

    2001-05-01

    In this NSF-funded project we will adapt problem-based learning (PBL) and other inquiry-based approaches to create an integrated science and education methods curriculum ("science semester") for elementary teacher education majors. Our goal is to foster integrated understandings of science and pedagogy that future elementary teachers need to effectively use inquiry-based approaches in their classrooms. This project responds to calls to improve science education for all students by making preservice teachers' experiences in undergraduate science courses more consistent with reforms at the K-12 level. The involved faculty teach three science courses (biology, earth science, physical science) and an elementary science education methods course that are degree requirements for elementary teacher education majors. Presently, students take the courses in variable sequences and at widely scattered times. Too many students fail to appreciate the value of science courses to their future careers as teachers, and when they reach the methods course in the junior year they often retain little of the science content studied earlier. These episodic encounters with science make it difficult for students to learn the content, and to translate their understandings of science into effective, inquiry-based teaching strategies. To encourage integrated understandings of science concepts and pedagogy we will coordinate the science and methods courses in a junior-year science semester. Traditional subject matter boundaries will be crossed to stress shared themes that teachers must understand to teach standards-based elementary science. We will adapt exemplary approaches that support both learning science and learning how to teach science. Students will work collaboratively on multidisciplinary PBL activities that place science concepts in authentic contexts and build learning skills. "Lecture" meetings will be large group active learning sessions that help students understand difficult

  20. Path integrals in curvilinear coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokhorov, L.V.

    1984-01-01

    Integration limits are studied for presenting the path integral curvilinear coordinates. For spherical (and topoloqically equivalent) coordinates it is shown that in formulas involving classical action in the exponent integration over all variables should be carried out within infinite limits. Another peculiarity is associated with appearance of the operator q which provides a complete definition of the wave functions out of the physical region. arguments are given upporting the validity of the cited statament in the general case

  1. Difficulty leading interpersonal coordination: Towards an embodied signature of social anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eVarlet

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Defined by a persistent fear of embarrassment or negative evaluation while engaged in social interaction or public performance, social anxiety disorder (SAD is one of the most common psychiatric syndromes. Previous research has made a considerable effort to better understand and assess this mental disorder. However, little attention has been paid to social motor behavior of patients with SAD despite its crucial importance in daily social interactions. Previous research has shown that the coordination of arm, head or postural movements of interacting people can reflect their mental states or feelings such as social connectedness and social motives, suggesting that interpersonal movement coordination may be impaired in patients suffering from SAD. The current study was specifically aimed at determining whether SAD affects the dynamics of social motor coordination. We compared the unintentional and intentional rhythmic coordination of a SAD group (19 patients paired with control participants with the rhythmic coordination of a control group (19 control pairs in an interpersonal pendulum coordination task. The results demonstrated that unintentional social motor coordination was preserved with SAD while intentional coordination was impaired. More specifically, intentional coordination became impaired when patients with SAD had to lead the coordination as indicated by poorer (i.e., more variable coordination. These differences between intentional and unintentional coordination as well as between follower and leader roles reveal an impaired coordination dynamics that is specific to SAD, and thus, opens promising research directions to better understand, assess and treat this mental disorder.

  2. National Science Resources Center Project for Improving Science Teaching in Elementary Schools. Appendix A. School Systems With Exemplary Elementary Science Programs. Appendix B. Elementary Science Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    Glass, Lawrence, Deer Park High School Glass, Millard, K-12 Science Supervisor Bloomfield Municipal School District Glassman, Neil, Gleason, Steve...Superientendent Vaughn Municipal Schools Knop, Ronald N., Teacher Grissom Junior High School Knox, Amie, Director of Master Teacher Program W. Wilson...Science Supervisor Pequannock Township Public Schools Mercado , Roberto, Science Coordinator Colegio Radians, Inc. Merchant, Edwin, K-12 Science

  3. Exploring Pre-Service Science Teacher Methods and Strategies for the Driving Questions in Research Inquiry: From Consulting an Instructor to Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Miraç

    2016-01-01

    An important stage in any research inquiry is the development of research questions that need to be answered. The strategies to develop research questions should be defined and described, but few studies have considered this process in greater detail. This study explores pre-service science teachers' research questions and the strategies they can…

  4. Three coordination compounds based on benzene tetracarboxylate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    YUNLONG WU

    nescence, considerable attention has been focused on the construction of coordination .... measurements were performed on ground powder samples at .... Figure 2. (a) Coordination environment of Co1 ion in compound 2. (b) Coordination.

  5. Managing interteam coordination within and between organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Thomas Arend

    2015-01-01

    To accomplish complex tasks and effectively respond to environmental contingencies, teams must coordinate task-related issues with other teams (i.e., interteam coordination). Regrettably, interteam coordination is often complicated by misunderstandings that can arise from differences in teams’

  6. Strategic transformation of population studies: recommendations of the working group on epidemiology and population sciences from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Advisory Council and Board of External Experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Véronique L; Boerwinkle, Eric; Crapo, James D; Douglas, Pamela S; Epstein, Jonathan A; Granger, Christopher B; Greenland, Philip; Kohane, Isaac; Psaty, Bruce M

    2015-03-15

    In 2013, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute assembled a working group on epidemiology and population sciences from its Advisory Council and Board of External Experts. The working group was charged with making recommendations to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Advisory Council about how the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute could take advantage of new scientific opportunities and delineate future directions for the epidemiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep diseases. Seven actionable recommendations were proposed for consideration. The themes included 1) defining the compelling scientific questions and challenges in population sciences and epidemiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep diseases; 2) developing methods and training mechanisms to integrate "big data" science into the practice of epidemiology; 3) creating a cohort consortium and inventory of major studies to optimize the efficient use of data and specimens; and 4) fostering a more open, competitive approach to evaluating large-scale longitudinal epidemiology and population studies. By building on the track record of success of the heart, lung, blood, and sleep cohorts to leverage new data science opportunities and encourage broad research and training partnerships, these recommendations lay a strong foundation for the transformation of heart, lung, blood, and sleep epidemiology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) annual technical report, fiscal year 1984 with fiscal year 1985 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1985-07-01

    The Department of Energy funded about 374 million dollars of materials science and technology activities in both fiscal years 1984 and 1985. These funds and the commensurate program management responsibilities resided in 21 DOE program offices, each of which has its own mission and responsibilities. The Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) provides a formal mechanism to insure coordinated planning and maximum programmatic effectiveness for the Department's 374 million dollar per year materials effort. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research who in turn has oversight responsibilities for proper coordination of the technical programs of the Department. In carrying out this responsibility, EMaCC hosts meetings, organizes working groups, and publishes an annual technical report. This report is mandated by the EMaCC Terms of Reference. Its purpose is to disseminate information on the DOE materials programs for more effective coordination. It describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department for FY 1984, contains funding information for FYs 1984 and 1985, and summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1985.

  8. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) annual technical report, fiscal year 1984 with fiscal year 1985 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    The Department of Energy funded about 374 million dollars of materials science and technology activities in both fiscal years 1984 and 1985. These funds and the commensurate program management responsibilities resided in 21 DOE program offices, each of which has its own mission and responsibilities. The Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) provides a formal mechanism to insure coordinated planning and maximum programmatic effectiveness for the Department's 374 million dollar per year materials effort. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research who in turn has oversight responsibilities for proper coordination of the technical programs of the Department. In carrying out this responsibility, EMaCC hosts meetings, organizes working groups, and publishes an annual technical report. This report is mandated by the EMaCC Terms of Reference. Its purpose is to disseminate information on the DOE materials programs for more effective coordination. It describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department for FY 1984, contains funding information for FYs 1984 and 1985, and summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1985

  9. HANFORD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY NEEDS STATEMENTS 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WIBLE, R.A.

    2002-04-01

    This document: (a) provides a comprehensive listing of the Hanford sites science and technology needs for fiscal year (FY) 2002; and (b) identifies partnering and commercialization opportunities within industry, other federal and state agencies, and the academic community. These needs were prepared by the Hanford projects (within the Project Hanford Management Contract, the Environmental Restoration Contract and the River Protection Project) and subsequently reviewed and endorsed by the Hanford Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG). The STCG reviews included participation of DOE-RL and DOE-ORP Management, site stakeholders, state and federal regulators, and Tribal Nations. These needs are reviewed and updated on an annual basis and given a broad distribution.

  10. Ocean Research - Perspectives from an international Ocean Research Coordination Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Jay; Williams, Albert, III

    2013-04-01

    The need for improved coordination in ocean observations is more urgent now given the issues of climate change, sustainable food sources and increased need for energy. Ocean researchers must work across disciplines to provide policy makers with clear and understandable assessments of the state of the ocean. With advances in technology, not only in observation, but also communication and computer science, we are in a new era where we can answer questions asked over the last 100 years at the time and space scales that are relevant. Programs like GLOBEC moved us forward but we are still challenged by the disciplinary divide. Interdisciplinary problem solving must be addressed not only by the exchange of data between the many sides, but through levels where questions require day-to-day collaboration. A National Science Foundation-funded Research Coordination Network (RCN) is addressing approaches for improving interdisciplinary research capabilities in the ocean sciences. During the last year, the RCN had a working group for Open Data led by John Orcutt, Peter Pissierssens and Albert Williams III. The teams has focused on three areas: 1. Data and Information formats and standards; 2. Data access models (including IPR, business models for open data, data policies,...); 3. Data publishing, data citation. There has been a significant trend toward free and open access to data in the last few years. In 2007, the US announced that Landsat data would be available at no charge. Float data from the US (NDBC), JCOMM and OceanSites offer web-based access. The IODE is developing its Ocean Data Portal giving immediate and free access to ocean data. However, from the aspect of long-term collaborations across communities, this global trend is less robust than might appear at the surface. While there are many standard data formats for data exchange, there is not yet widespread uniformity in their adoption. Use of standard data formats can be encouraged in several ways: sponsors of

  11. Anchoring in a novel bimanual coordination pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslovat, Dana; Lam, Melanie Y; Brunke, Kirstin M; Chua, Romeo; Franks, Ian M

    2009-02-01

    Anchoring in cyclical movements has been defined as regions of reduced spatial or temporal variability [Beek, P. J. (1989). Juggling dynamics. PhD thesis. Amsterdam: Free University Press] that are typically found at movement reversal points. For in-phase and anti-phase movements, synchronizing reversal points with a metronome pulse has resulted in decreased anchor point variability and increased pattern stability [Byblow, W. D., Carson, R. G., & Goodman, D. (1994). Expressions of asymmetries and anchoring in bimanual coordination. Human Movement Science, 13, 3-28; Fink, P. W., Foo, P., Jirsa, V. K., & Kelso, J. A. S. (2000). Local and global stabilization of coordination by sensory information. Experimental Brain Research, 134, 9-20]. The present experiment examined anchoring during acquisition, retention, and transfer of a 90 degrees phase-offset continuous bimanual coordination pattern (whereby the right limb lags the left limb by one quarter cycle), involving horizontal flexion about the elbow. Three metronome synchronization strategies were imposed: participants either synchronized maximal flexion of the right arm (i.e., single metronome), both flexion and extension of the right arm (i.e., double metronome within-limb), or flexion of each arm (i.e., double metronome between-limb) to an auditory metronome. In contrast to simpler in-phase and anti-phase movements, synchronization of additional reversal points to the metronome did not reduce reversal point variability or increase pattern stability. Furthermore, practicing under different metronome synchronization strategies did not appear to have a significant effect on the rate of acquisition of the pattern.

  12. Modelling of radionuclide interception and loss processes in vegetation and of transfer in semi-natural ecosystems. Second report of the VAMP terrestrial working group. Part of the IAEA/CEC co-ordinated research programme on the validation of environmental model predictions (VAMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident and on the recommendation of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) in its Summary Report on the Post-Accident Review Meeting on the Chernobyl Accident, the IAEA established a Co-ordinated Research Programme on ''The Validation of Models for the Transfer of Radionuclides in Terrestrial, Urban and Aquatic Environments and the Acquisition of Data for that Purpose''. The programme seeks to use the information on the environmental behaviour of radionuclides which became available as a result of the measurement programmes instituted in the countries of the former USSR and in many European countries after April 1986 for the purpose of testing the reliability of assessment models. Such models find application in assessing the radiological impact of all parts of the nuclear fuel cycle. They are used at the planning and design stage to predict the radiological impact of planned nuclear facilities, in assessing the possible consequences of accidents involving releases of radioactive material to the environment and in establishing criteria for the implementation of countermeasures. In the operational phase they are used together with the results of environmental monitoring to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements regarding release limitation. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Validation of models using Chernobyl fallout data from southern Finland. Scenario S. Second report of the VAMP multiple pathways assessment working group. Part of the IAEA/CEC co-ordinated research programme on the validation of environmental model predictions (VAMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident and on the recommendation of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) in its Summary Report on the Post-Accident Review Meeting on the Chernobyl Accident (Safety Series No. 75-INSAG-1, IAEA, Vienna, 1986), the IAEA established a Co-ordinated Research Programme on ``The Validation of Models for the Transfer of Radionuclides in Terrestrial, Urban and Aquatic Environments and the Acquisition of Data for that Purpose``. The programme used the information on the environmental behaviour of radionuclides which became available as a result of the measurement programmes instituted in countries of the former Soviet Union and in many European countries after April 1986 for the purpose of testing the reliability of assessment models. Such models find application in assessing the radiological impact of all parts of the nuclear fuel cycle. They are used in the planning and design stage to predict the radiological impact of nuclear facilities and in assessing the possible consequences of accidents involving releases of radioactive material to the environment and in establishing criteria for the implementation of countermeasures. In the operational phase, they are used together with the results of environmental monitoring to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements concerned with radiation dose limitation. Refs, figs, tabs.

  14. Validation of models using Chernobyl fallout data from southern Finland. Scenario S. Second report of the VAMP multiple pathways assessment working group. Part of the IAEA/CEC co-ordinated research programme on the validation of environmental model predictions (VAMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident and on the recommendation of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) in its Summary Report on the Post-Accident Review Meeting on the Chernobyl Accident (Safety Series No. 75-INSAG-1, IAEA, Vienna, 1986), the IAEA established a Co-ordinated Research Programme on ''The Validation of Models for the Transfer of Radionuclides in Terrestrial, Urban and Aquatic Environments and the Acquisition of Data for that Purpose''. The programme used the information on the environmental behaviour of radionuclides which became available as a result of the measurement programmes instituted in countries of the former Soviet Union and in many European countries after April 1986 for the purpose of testing the reliability of assessment models. Such models find application in assessing the radiological impact of all parts of the nuclear fuel cycle. They are used in the planning and design stage to predict the radiological impact of nuclear facilities and in assessing the possible consequences of accidents involving releases of radioactive material to the environment and in establishing criteria for the implementation of countermeasures. In the operational phase, they are used together with the results of environmental monitoring to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements concerned with radiation dose limitation. Refs, figs, tabs

  15. Modelling of radionuclide interception and loss processes in vegetation and of transfer in semi-natural ecosystems. Second report of the VAMP terrestrial working group. Part of the IAEA/CEC co-ordinated research programme on the validation of environmental model predictions (VAMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident and on the recommendation of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) in its Summary Report on the Post-Accident Review Meeting on the Chernobyl Accident, the IAEA established a Co-ordinated Research Programme on ``The Validation of Models for the Transfer of Radionuclides in Terrestrial, Urban and Aquatic Environments and the Acquisition of Data for that Purpose``. The programme seeks to use the information on the environmental behaviour of radionuclides which became available as a result of the measurement programmes instituted in the countries of the former USSR and in many European countries after April 1986 for the purpose of testing the reliability of assessment models. Such models find application in assessing the radiological impact of all parts of the nuclear fuel cycle. They are used at the planning and design stage to predict the radiological impact of planned nuclear facilities, in assessing the possible consequences of accidents involving releases of radioactive material to the environment and in establishing criteria for the implementation of countermeasures. In the operational phase they are used together with the results of environmental monitoring to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements regarding release limitation. Refs, figs and tabs.

  16. Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory Delivering science and technology to protect our nation and promote world stability Science & ; Innovation Collaboration Careers Community Environment Science & Innovation Facilities Science Pillars Research Library Science Briefs Science News Science Highlights Lab Organizations Science Programs Applied

  17. Big Data in Science and Healthcare: A Review of Recent Literature and Perspectives. Contribution of the IMIA Social Media Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, M M; Miron-Shatz, T; Lau, A Y S; Paton, C

    2014-08-15

    As technology continues to evolve and rise in various industries, such as healthcare, science, education, and gaming, a sophisticated concept known as Big Data is surfacing. The concept of analytics aims to understand data. We set out to portray and discuss perspectives of the evolving use of Big Data in science and healthcare and, to examine some of the opportunities and challenges. A literature review was conducted to highlight the implications associated with the use of Big Data in scientific research and healthcare innovations, both on a large and small scale. Scientists and health-care providers may learn from one another when it comes to understanding the value of Big Data and analytics. Small data, derived by patients and consumers, also requires analytics to become actionable. Connectivism provides a framework for the use of Big Data and analytics in the areas of science and healthcare. This theory assists individuals to recognize and synthesize how human connections are driving the increase in data. Despite the volume and velocity of Big Data, it is truly about technology connecting humans and assisting them to construct knowledge in new ways. Concluding Thoughts: The concept of Big Data and associated analytics are to be taken seriously when approaching the use of vast volumes of both structured and unstructured data in science and health-care. Future exploration of issues surrounding data privacy, confidentiality, and education are needed. A greater focus on data from social media, the quantified self-movement, and the application of analytics to "small data" would also be useful.

  18. Structure of a supergravity group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogievetsky, V.; Sokatchev, E.

    1978-01-01

    The supergravity group is found to be the direct product of general covariance groups in complex conjugated left and right handed superspaces. The ordinary space-time coordinate and the axial gravitational superfield are the real and imaginary parts of the complex coordinate, respectively. It is pointed out that a number of questions concerning the formalism remains open. For instance how to define superfields with external indices, supercovariant derivatives and invariants of the group, etc. However, the extremely simple and clear geometrical picture of the supergravity group given here will provide an adequate basis for the supergravity theory

  19. Deploying Team Science Principles to Optimize Interdisciplinary Lung Cancer Care Delivery: Avoiding the Long and Winding Road to Optimal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Rodriguez, Hector P; Hicks, Danielle; Signore, Raymond S; Roark, Kristi; Kedia, Satish K; Ward, Kenneth D; Lathan, Christopher; Santarella, Scott; Gould, Michael K; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-11-01

    The complexity of lung cancer care mandates interaction between clinicians with different skill sets and practice cultures in the routine delivery of care. Using team science principles and a case-based approach, we exemplify the need for the development of real care teams for patients with lung cancer to foster coordination among the multiple specialists and staff engaged in routine care delivery. Achieving coordinated lung cancer care is a high-priority public health challenge because of the volume of patients, lethality of disease, and well-described disparities in quality and outcomes of care. Coordinating mechanisms need to be cultivated among different types of specialist physicians and care teams, with differing technical expertise and practice cultures, who have traditionally functioned more as coactively working groups than as real teams. Coordinating mechanisms, including shared mental models, high-quality communication, mutual trust, and mutual performance monitoring, highlight the challenge of achieving well-coordinated care and illustrate how team science principles can be used to improve quality and outcomes of lung cancer care. To develop the evidence base to support coordinated lung cancer care, research comparing the effectiveness of a diverse range of multidisciplinary care team approaches and interorganizational coordinating mechanisms should be promoted.

  20. Comparative Study of the Effect of Three Teaching Methods of Group, Personal (Face-to-Face, and Compact Disc on Correcting the Pronunciation and Reading of the Prayer in the Students of Qom University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabanali Khansanami

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Emphasis is placed on the correction of reading the prayer as an important precept in Islamic culture, and it is essential to use an effective teaching method to promote the status of reading the prayers in youth. This study was conducted with the aim of comparing the effect of the methods of group teaching, personal (face-to-face teaching and using compact disc (CD on correcting the pronunciation and reading of the prayer in the students of Qom University of Medical Sciences in 2011.Methods: This semi-experimental study was done on the students of the Faculty of Nursery and Midwifery of Qom University of Medical Sciences. The samples were randomly assigned into three groups, and the number of students in each group was 22. A checklist of reading mistakes was completed before the intervention, and then, teaching content was given to them in the form of group and face-to-face teaching and CD. In the following, reading mistakes of the students’ prayer were recorded one month after intervention. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, and Kruskal–Wallis and Wilcoxon tests at a significance level of p0.05.Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, the effect of teaching methods of group, personal, and CD was the same in correcting the students’ reading of the prayer. Therefore, it is suggested that considering the students’ interest and current circumstances, various methods could be used for correction of the students’ reading of the prayer.

  1. Opportunities and challenges of international coordination efforts in space exploration - the DLR perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boese, Andrea

    The German Aerospace Center and German Space Agency DLR has defined internationalisation one of the four pillars of its corporate strategy. Driven by global challenges, national space agencies like DLR are seeking partnerships to contribute to essential societal needs, such as human welfare, sustainability of life, economic development, security, culture and knowledge. All partnerships with both traditional and non-traditional partners must reflect a balanced approach between national requirements and needs of the international community. In view of the challenges emerging from this complexity, endeavours like space exploration must be built on mutual cooperation especially in a challenging political environment. Effective and efficient exploitation of existing expertise, human resources, facilities and infrastructures require consolidated actions of stakeholders, interest groups and authorities. This basic principle applies to any space exploration activity. DLR is among the agencies participating in the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) from its beginning in 2007. The strategic goals of DLR regarding space exploration correspond to the purpose of ISECG as a forum to share objectives and plans to take concrete steps towards partnerships for a globally coordinated effort in space exploration. DLR contributes to ISECG publications especially the “Global Exploration Roadmap” and the “Benefits stemming from Space Exploration” to see those messages reflected that support cooperation with internal and external exploration stakeholders in science and technology and communication with those in politics and society. DLR provides input also to other groups engaging in space exploration. However, taking into account limited resources and expected results, the effectiveness of multiple coordination and planning mechanisms needs to be discussed.

  2. An argument for VP coordination: scene-setting coordination and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article demonstrates the properties of this curious construction type and proposes the first analysis to date. It is argued that this is an instance of VP coordination and that this configuration allows the possibility of high merger of direct objects in a constrained fashion. Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language ...

  3. Applied group theory applications in the engineering (physical, chemical, and medical), biological, social, and behavioral sciences and in the fine arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, S. F.

    1976-01-01

    A generalized applied group theory is developed, and it is shown that phenomena from a number of diverse disciplines may be included under the umbrella of a single theoretical formulation based upon the concept of a group consistent with the usual definition of this term.

  4. Evaluating the Relational Coordination instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke

    2014-01-01

    consistency, interrater agreement and reliability, structural validity, content validity. However as relational coordination is being used as a diagnostics tool it is important to examine further if the instrument can measure changes. Indeed we need to know how precise and sensitive the instrument is when....... We distinguish between statistical and clinical significance. Statistical significance is calculated using T-test. Clinical significance is the minimal amount of change in relational coordination score that is not considered noise. Sensitivity of the instrument i.e. the ability of the instrument...

  5. Cation coordination in oxychloride glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J A [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Holland, D [Physics Department, Warwick University, Coventry (United Kingdom); Bland, J [Physics Department, University of Liverpool, PO Box 147, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Johnson, C E [Physics Department, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States); Thomas, M F [Physics Department, University of Liverpool, PO Box 147, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-19

    Glasses containing mixtures of cations and anions of nominal compositions [Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}]{sub x} - [ZnCl{sub 2}]{sub 1-x} where x = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00, have been studied by means of neutron diffraction and Raman and Moessbauer spectroscopy. There is preferential bonding within the system with the absence of Sb-Cl bonds. Antimony is found to be threefold coordinated to oxygen, and zinc fourfold coordinated. The main contributing species are of the form [Sb(OSb){sub 2}(OZn)] and [Zn(ClZn){sub 2}(OSb){sub 2}].

  6. Cation coordination in oxychloride glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J A; Holland, D; Bland, J; Johnson, C E; Thomas, M F

    2003-01-01

    Glasses containing mixtures of cations and anions of nominal compositions [Sb 2 O 3 ] x - [ZnCl 2 ] 1-x where x = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00, have been studied by means of neutron diffraction and Raman and Moessbauer spectroscopy. There is preferential bonding within the system with the absence of Sb-Cl bonds. Antimony is found to be threefold coordinated to oxygen, and zinc fourfold coordinated. The main contributing species are of the form [Sb(OSb) 2 (OZn)] and [Zn(ClZn) 2 (OSb) 2

  7. Bare coordination: the semantic shift

    OpenAIRE

    de Swart, Henriette; Le Bruyn, Bert

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops an analysis of the syntax-semantics interface of two types of split coordination structures. In the first type, two bare singular count nouns appear as arguments in a coordinated structure, as in bride and groom were happy. We call this the N&N construction. In the second type, the determiner shows agreement with the first conjunct, while the second conjunct is bare, as in the Spanish example el hornero y hornera cobraban en panes (‘thesg.m bakersg.m and bakersg.f werepl p...

  8. Team Scaffolds: How Minimal Team Structures Enable Role-based Coordination

    OpenAIRE

    Valentine, Melissa A

    2013-01-01

    In this dissertation, I integrate research on role-based coordination with concepts adapted from the team effectiveness literature to theorize how minimal team structures support effective coordination when people do not work together regularly. I argue that role-based coordination among relative strangers can be interpersonally challenging and propose that team scaffolds (minimal team structures that bound groups of roles rather than groups of individuals) may provide occupants with a tempor...

  9. Optimal Attitude Estimation and Filtering Without Using Local Coordinates Part I: Uncontrolled and Deterministic Attitude Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Sanyal, Amit K.

    2005-01-01

    There are several attitude estimation algorithms in existence, all of which use local coordinate representations for the group of rigid body orientations. All local coordinate representations of the group of orientations have associated problems. While minimal coordinate representations exhibit kinematic singularities for large rotations, the quaternion representation requires satisfaction of an extra constraint. This paper treats the attitude estimation and filtering problem as an optimizati...

  10. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  11. 73Ge, 119Sn and 207Pb: general cooperative effects of single atom ligands on the NMR signals observed in tetrahedral [MXnY4-n] (M = Ge, Sn, Pb; 1 ≤ n ≤ 4; X, Y = Cl, Br, I) coordination compounds of heavier XIV group elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, M; De Castro, F; Fanizzi, F P

    2017-02-28

    An inverse linear relationship between 73 Ge, 119 Sn and 207 Pb NMR chemical shifts and the overall sum of ionic radii of coordinated halido ligands has been discovered in tetrahedral [MX n Y 4-n ] (M = Ge, Sn, Pb; 1 ≤ n ≤ 4; X, Y = Cl, Br, I) coordination compounds. This finding is consistent with a previously reported correlation found in octahedral, pentacoordinate and square planar platinum complexes. The effect of the coordinated halido ligands acting on the metal as shielding conducting rings is therefore confirmed also by 73 Ge, 119 Sn and 207 Pb NMR spectroscopy.

  12. Can balance trampoline training promote motor coordination and balance performance in children with developmental coordination disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Sidiropoulou, Maria; Mitsiou, Maria; Arabatzi, Fotini; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine movement difficulties among typically developing 8- to 9-year-old elementary students in Greece and to investigate the possible effects of a balance training program to those children assessed with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). The Body Coordination Test for Children (BCTC; Körperkoordinationstest fur Kinder, KTK, Kiphard & Schilling, 1974) was chosen for the purposes of this study and 20 children out of the total number of 200, exhibited motor difficulties indicating a probable DCD disorder. The 20 students diagnosed with DCD were equally separated into two groups where each individual of the experimental group was paired with an individual of the control group. The intervention group attended a 12-week balance training program while students of the second - control group followed the regular school schedule. All participants were tested prior to the start and after the end of the 12-week period by performing static balance control tasks while standing on an EPS pressure platform and structured observation of trampoline exercises while videotaping. The results indicated that after a 12-week balance training circuit including a trampoline station program, the intervention group improved both factors that were examined. In conclusion, balance training with the use of attractive equipment such as trampoline can be an effective intervention for improving functional outcomes and can be recommended as an alternative mode of physical activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 47 CFR 95.1113 - Frequency coordinator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1113 Frequency coordinator. (a) The Commission will designate a frequency coordinator(s) to manage the usage of the frequency bands for the operation of medical telemetry devices. (b) The frequency coordinator shall (1) Review and...

  14. 29 CFR 42.8 - Coordination plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Coordination plan. 42.8 Section 42.8 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor COORDINATED ENFORCEMENT § 42.8 Coordination plan. (a) Based upon, among other things, the... coordination plan concerning farm labor-related responsibilities of the Department, including migrant housing...

  15. Service Coordination Policies and Models: National Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbin, Gloria L.; Bruder, M.; Mazzarella, C.; Gabbard, G.; Reynolds, C.

    This report discusses the findings of a study that investigated state coordination of early intervention services for infants, toddlers, and young children with disabilities. State Part C coordinators participated in a survey that sought their perceptions of values under girding service coordination, approach to service coordination, policies,…

  16. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. PRASAD V BHARATAM. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 128 Issue 10 October 2016 pp 1607-1614 Regular Article. Carbene→N⁺ Coordination Bonds in Drugs: A Quantum Chemical Study · DEEPIKA KATHURIA MINHAJUL ARFEEN APOORVA A ...

  17. Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore Indian National Science ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-09-30

    .in),. (www.insaindia.org) or (www.nasi.org.in); however a copy of the application together with enclosures must be sent by post to The Coordinator, Science Education Programme, Indian. Academy of Sciences, C.V. Raman ...

  18. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. XIANG WANG. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 129 Issue 1 January 2017 pp 9-20 Regular Article. Self-assembly, structures and properties of three new Ni(II) coordination polymers derived from two different bis-pyridyl-bis-amide ligands and two ...

  19. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. HONGYAN LIN. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 127 Issue 7 July 2015 pp 1275-1285 Regular Articles. Three 2 D copper(II)/cadmium(II) coordination polymers based on semi-rigid/flexible bis-pyridyl-bis-amide ligands and 5-aminoisophthalate: ...

  20. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. Azadeh Azadbakht. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 127 Issue 11 November 2015 pp 2005-2014 Articles. Copper inorganic-organic hybrid coordination compound as a novel L-cysteine electrochemical sensor: Synthesis, characterization, ...

  1. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. G Mugesh. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 112 Issue 3 June 2000 pp 239-248. Aspects of organochalcogen (S, Se, Te) compounds stabilized by intramolecular coordination · G Mugesh Arunashree Panda Harkesh B Singh · More Details Abstract ...

  2. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. Suvarchala Devi Vudayagiri. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 116 Issue 3 March 2004 pp 169-174. Solubilization of silica: Synthesis, characterization and study of penta-coordinated pyridine N-oxide silicon complexes · Subramania Ranganathan Ch ...

  3. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. Savita S Khandolkar. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 127 Issue 9 September 2015 pp 1581-1588. Synthesis, characterization and photochemistry of a new heptamolybdate supported magnesium-aqua coordination complex · Savita S Khandolkar ...

  4. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. Aloke Kumar Ghosh. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 124 Issue 6 November 2012 pp 1377-1383. Rhomboidal [Cu4] coordination cluster from self-assembly of two asymmetric phenoxido-bridged Cu2 units: Role of 1,1-azido clips · Avijit Sarkar Aloke ...

  5. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. MINHAJUL ARFEEN. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 128 Issue 10 October 2016 pp 1607-1614 Regular Article. Carbene→N⁺ Coordination Bonds in Drugs: A Quantum Chemical Study · DEEPIKA KATHURIA MINHAJUL ARFEEN APOORVA A ...

  6. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. Malaichamy Sathiyendiran. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 126 Issue 5 September 2014 pp 1501-1506 Special issue on Chemical Crystallography. Synthesis and crystal structure of a wheel-shaped supramolecular coordination complex.

  7. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. APOORVA A BANKAR. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 128 Issue 10 October 2016 pp 1607-1614 Regular Article. Carbene→N⁺ Coordination Bonds in Drugs: A Quantum Chemical Study · DEEPIKA KATHURIA MINHAJUL ARFEEN APOORVA A ...

  8. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. GOPALAN RAJARAMAN. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 126 Issue 5 September 2014 pp 1569-1579 Special issue on Chemical Crystallography. How strongly are the magnetic anisotropy and coordination numbers correlated in lanthanide based ...

  9. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. DIPU SUTRADHAR. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 128 Issue 9 September 2016 pp 1377-1384 Regular Article. Two new hexacoordinated coordination polymers of cadmium(II) containing bridging units only: Syntheses, structures and molecular ...

  10. Co-ordinated Evaluation of Plutonium-239 in the Resonance Region - A report by the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Saint Jean, Cyrille; Noguere, Gilles; Peneliau, Yannick; Bernard, David; Serot, Olivier; McKnight, Richard D.; Leal, Luiz Carlos; Derrien, Herve; Kahler, Albert C.

    2014-04-01

    The Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) has been established under the aegis of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The WPEC determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The parties to the project are: BROND (Russian Federation), ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan) and JEFF (other NEA Data Bank member countries), as well as CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report has been issued by the WPEC Subgroup 34 with a view to solving a general discrepancy when calculating criticality benchmarks with plutonium, using the most recent evaluated data libraries. This international effort enabled the delivery of a single set of resonance parameters up to 2.5 keV. The large fluctuations of the prompt neutron multiplicities were correctly reproduced with a phenomenological decomposition of the multiplicity that involved the two-step (n,γf) process. Performances of the new 239 Pu evaluation were tested over a broad set of integral data (ICSBEP, mock-up experiments performed in the CEA facilities and in power reactors). An overall good agreement was achieved between the calculations and the experimental results. The international effort performed in the framework of this Subgroup enabled delivery of a single set of resonance parameters up to 2.5 keV able to provide good C/E results over a broad set of integral data. The resonance analysis has been performed

  11. A Draft Science Management Plan for Returned Samples from Mars: Recommendations from the International Mars Architecture for the Return of Samples (iMARS) Phase II Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltigin, T.; Lange, C.; Mugnuolo, R.; Smith, C.

    2018-04-01

    This paper summarizes the findings and recommendations of the International Mars Architecture for the Return of Samples (iMARS) Phase II Working Group, an international team comprising 38 members from 16 countries and agencies.

  12. Development of an International School Nurse Asthma Care Coordination Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwick, Ann W.; Svavarsdóttir, Erla Kolbrun; Seppelt, Ann M.; Looman, Wendy S.; Anderson, Lori S.; Örlygsdóttir, Brynja

    2015-01-01

    Aim To identify and compare how school nurses in Reykjavik, Iceland and St. Paul, Minnesota coordinated care for youth with asthma (ages 10–18) and to develop an asthma school nurse care coordination model. Background Little is known about how school nurses coordinate care for youth with asthma in different countries. Design A qualitative descriptive study design using focus group data. Methods Six focus groups with 32 school nurses were conducted in Reykjavik (n=17) and St. Paul (n=15) using the same protocol between September 2008 – January 2009. Descriptive content analytic and constant comparison strategies were used to categorize and compare how school nurses coordinated care, which resulted in the development of an International School Nurse Asthma Care Coordination Model. Findings Participants in both countries spontaneously described a similar asthma care coordination process that involved information gathering, assessing risk for asthma episodes, prioritizing health care needs and anticipating and planning for student needs at the individual and school levels. This process informed how they individualized symptom management, case management and/or asthma education. School nurses played a pivotal part in collaborating with families, school and health care professionals to ensure quality care for youth with asthma. Conclusions Results indicate a high level of complexity in school nurses’ approaches to asthma care coordination that were responsive to the diverse and changing needs of students in school settings. The conceptual model derived provides a framework for investigators to use in examining the asthma care coordination process of school nurses in other geographic locations. PMID:25223389

  13. INCREASING ACHIEVEMENT AND HIGHER-EDUCATION REPRESENTATION OF UNDER-REPRESENTED GROUPS IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS FIELDS: A REVIEW OF CURRENT K-12 INTERVENTION PROGRAMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valla, Jeffrey M; Williams, Wendy M

    2012-01-01

    The under-representation of women and ethnic minorities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education and professions has resulted in a loss of human capital for the US scientific workforce and spurred the development of myriad STEM educational intervention programs. Increased allocation of resources to such programs begs for a critical, prescriptive, evidence-based review that will enable researchers to develop optimal interventions and administrators to maximize investments. We begin by providing a theoretical backdrop for K-12 STEM programs by reviewing current data on under-representation and developmental research describing individual-level social factors undergirding these data. Next, we review prototypical designs of these programs, highlighting specific programs in the literature as examples of program structures and components currently in use. We then evaluate these interventions in terms of overall effectiveness, as a function of how well they address age-, ethnicity-, or gender-specific factors, suggesting improvements in program design based on these critiques. Finally, program evaluation methods are briefly reviewed and discussed in terms of how their empirical soundness can either enable or limit our ability to delineate effective program components. "Now more than ever, the nation's changing demographics demand that we include all of our citizens in science and engineering education and careers. For the U.S. to benefit from the diverse talents of all its citizens, we must grow the pipeline of qualified, underrepresented minority engineers and scientists to fill positions in industry and academia."-Irving P. McPhail..

  14. U.S. CWMD Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    coordination. For example, it conducted joint vehicle inspection training for Pakistani Customs and Border Guard personnel at a US- Mexico border...biological material, including such hazards as: anthrax, botulism, cholera , Ebola virus hemorrhagic fever, E. coli, Plague, and smallpox 79

  15. Motivic amplitudes and cluster coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, J.K.; Goncharov, A.B.; Spradlin, M.; Vergu, C.; Volovich, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study motivic amplitudes — objects which contain all of the essential mathematical content of scattering amplitudes in planar SYM theory in a completely canonical way, free from the ambiguities inherent in any attempt to choose particular functional representatives. We find that the cluster structure on the kinematic configuration space Conf n (ℙ 3 ) underlies the structure of motivic amplitudes. Specifically, we compute explicitly the coproduct of the two-loop seven-particle MHV motivic amplitude A 7,2 M and find that like the previously known six-particle amplitude, it depends only on certain preferred coordinates known in the mathematics literature as cluster X-coordinates on Conf n (ℙ 3 ). We also find intriguing relations between motivic amplitudes and the geometry of generalized associahedrons, to which cluster coordinates have a natural combinatoric connection. For example, the obstruction to A 7,2 M being expressible in terms of classical polylogarithms is most naturally represented by certain quadrilateral faces of the appropriate associahedron. We also find and prove the first known functional equation for the trilogarithm in which all 40 arguments are cluster X-coordinates of a single algebra. In this respect it is similar to Abel’s 5-term dilogarithm identity

  16. Co-ordinated Classroom Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Darell Boyd

    From a series of lectures, a selection of eight are oriented principally toward the biologically developing child, and the physiological operations in visual process. The numbered lectures are--(1) The Coordinated Classroom, its Philosophy and Principles, (2) An Outline of a Biological Point of View, (3) The Evolution of Structure--despite man's…

  17. Henry Taube and Coordination Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis Henry Taube and Coordination Chemistry Resources with Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus, at Stanford University, received the 1983 Nobel Prize in Chemistry " there from 1940-41. "I became deeply interested in chemistry soon after I came to Berkeley,"

  18. The Professional Development of High School Chemistry Coordinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstein, Avi; Carmeli, Miriam; Shore, Relly

    2004-02-01

    The implementation of new content and pedagogical standards in science education necessitates intensive, long-term professional development of science teachers. In this paper, we describe the rationale and structure of a comprehensive and intensive professional development program of school-based leaders, namely school chemistry coordinators. The year-long program was designed so that the chemistry teachers who enrolled in the program were able to develop in three interrelated aspects: content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, and leadership ability. Several strategies for the development of these aspects were adopted from Loucks-Horsley, Hewson, Love, & Stiles (1998). The evaluation of the program focused on the changes that participating teachers underwent regarding their personal beliefs and their functioning as school chemistry coordinators in their schools.

  19. The Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher (MAX-C): a potential rover mission for 2018. Final report of the Mars Mid-Range Rover Science Analysis Group (MRR-SAG) October 14, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    This report documents the work of the Mid-Range Rover Science Analysis Group (MRR-SAG), which was assigned to formulate a concept for a potential rover mission that could be launched to Mars in 2018. Based on programmatic and engineering considerations as of April 2009, our deliberations assumed that the potential mission would use the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) sky-crane landing system and include a single solar-powered rover. The mission would also have a targeting accuracy of approximately 7 km (semimajor axis landing ellipse), a mobility range of at least 10 km, and a lifetime on the martian surface of at least 1 Earth year. An additional key consideration, given recently declining budgets and cost growth issues with MSL, is that the proposed rover must have lower cost and cost risk than those of MSL--this is an essential consideration for the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG). The MRR-SAG was asked to formulate a mission concept that would address two general objectives: (1) conduct high priority in situ science and (2) make concrete steps toward the potential return of samples to Earth. The proposed means of achieving these two goals while balancing the trade-offs between them are described here in detail. We propose the name Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher(MAX-C) to reflect the dual purpose of this potential 2018 rover mission.

  20. Science and Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravetz, David

    2005-01-01

    This article is for teachers looking for new ways to motivate students, increase science comprehension, and understanding without using the old standard expository science textbook. This author suggests reading a science fiction novel in the science classroom as a way to engage students in learning. Using science fiction literature and language…

  1. Tanzania Journal of Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Tanzania Journal of Science (Tanz. J. Sci.) was established in 1975 as a forum for communication and co-ordination between and among scientists and allied professionals. It is also intended as a medium for dissemination of scientific knowledge among scientists and the public at large to promote the advancement of ...

  2. Atuação dos coordenadores de grupos de saúde na rede docente assistencial Actuación de los coordinadores de grupos de salud en la red docente asistencial Actions of health group coordinators within the teaching/care network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane de Medeiros dos Santos

    2010-02-01

    unidades básicas de salud. Se procedió a la observación participante para iniciar el trabajo de campo. Los relatos fueron analizados por medio de la técnica de análisis del discurso de tipo enunciativo-pragmático. ANÁLISIS DE LOS RESULTADOS: Las formas de actuación de los coordinadores congruentes al modelo preventista fueron: opresiva, pedagógica bancaria, biologicista e higienista, prescriptiva de conductas y culpabilizadora, infantilizadora, reductora de las problemáticas colectivas, desfavorecedora del setting grupal, además de utilización de soliloquio. Las formas de actuación consonantes al modelo de la nueva promoción fueron: facilitadora de la libre expresión y autonomía, comunicadora empática, construccionista, acogedora, utilizó el escuchar activamente, además de promover la superación de la violencia y alienación. CONCLUSIONES: Los coordinadores actuaron primordialmente por medio del modelo preventista y sin utilizar recursos técnicos y teóricos alusivos a la metodología grupal en el área de la salud. Las actuaciones identificadas en los modelos preventista y la nueva promoción de la salud desvelan características que se fundamentan, respectivamente, en las éticas de la – opresión/subordinación y; – en la cooperación /aceptación de los usuarios como libres y responsables por sus escogencias y consecuencias.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the model for actions by health promotion group coordinators, in primary healthcare units with links to professional training. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES: A qualitative study was carried out in the municipality of Florianópolis, Southern Brazil, in 2001. Four groups were evaluated, over a total of 24 sessions at primary healthcare units. Participant observation was performed to start the fieldwork. The reports were analyzed by means of the technique of enunciative-pragmatic discourse analysis. ANALYSIS OF RESULTS: The types of action among the coordinators that were congruent with the preventive model

  3. Possibility of extending space-time coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongcheng.

    1993-11-01

    It has been shown that one coordinate system can describe a whole space-time region except some supersurfaces on which there are coordinate singularities. The conditions of extending a coordinate from real field to complex field are studied. It has been shown that many-valued coordinate transformations may help us to extend space-time regions and many-valued metric functions may make one coordinate region to describe more than one space-time regions. (author). 11 refs

  4. Numerical construction of the p(fold) (committor) reaction coordinate for a Markov process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivov, Sergei V

    2011-10-06

    To simplify the description of a complex multidimensional dynamical process, one often projects it onto a single reaction coordinate. In protein folding studies, the folding probability p(fold) is an optimal reaction coordinate which preserves many important properties of the dynamics. The construction of the coordinate is difficult. Here, an efficient numerical approach to construct the p(fold) reaction coordinate for a Markov process (satisfying the detailed balance) is described. The coordinate is obtained by optimizing parameters of a chosen functional form to make a generalized cut-based free energy profile the highest. The approach is illustrated by constructing the p(fold) reaction coordinate for the equilibrium folding simulation of FIP35 protein reported by Shaw et al. (Science 2010, 330, 341-346). © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. The use of symmetrized valence and relative motion coordinates for crystal potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurry, H. L.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    1980-01-01

    Symmetrized valence coordinates are linear combinations of conventional valence coordinates which display the symmetry of a set of atoms bound by the valence bonds. Relative motion coordinates are relative translations, or relative rotations, of two or more strongly bonded groups of atoms among...... which relatively weak forces act. They are useful for expressing interactions between molecules in molecular crystals and should be chosen, also, to reflect the symmetry of the interacting groups. Since coordinates defined by these procedures possess elements of symmetry in common with the bonding...... interaction constants coupling coordinates of unlike symmetry with regard to the crystal point group are necessarily zero. They may be small, also, for coordinates which belong to different representations of the local symmetry when this is not the same as for the crystal. Procedures are given for defining...

  6. Coordinating Space Nuclear Research Advancement and Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Webb, Jonathon A.; Gross, Brian J.; Craft, Aaron E.

    2009-01-01

    The advancement of space exploration using nuclear science and technology has been a goal sought by many individuals over the years. The quest to enable space nuclear applications has experienced many challenges such as funding restrictions; lack of political, corporate, or public support; and limitations in educational opportunities. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) was established at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with the mission to address the numerous challenges and opportunities relevant to the promotion of space nuclear research and education.1 The CSNR is operated by the Universities Space Research Association and its activities are overseen by a Science Council comprised of various representatives from academic and professional entities with space nuclear experience. Program participants in the CSNR include academic researchers and students, government representatives, and representatives from industrial and corporate entities. Space nuclear educational opportunities have traditionally been limited to various sponsored research projects through government agencies or industrial partners, and dedicated research centers. Centralized research opportunities are vital to the growth and development of space nuclear advancement. Coordinated and focused research plays a key role in developing the future leaders in the space nuclear field. The CSNR strives to synchronize research efforts and provide means to train and educate students with skills to help them excel as leaders.

  7. Communicating through humour: A project of stand-up comedy about science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Bruno; Marçal, David; Vaz, Sofia G

    2015-10-01

    A study of a project on science stand-up comedy developed in Portugal between 2009 and 2013 is presented, in which thirteen scientists, coordinated by a science communicator and a professional actor, created and presented comedy acts. Eleven of these scientists were asked about their motivations to participate, the process of performance development and the perceived value of the project. Personal motivations were highly important, but professional reasons were also mentioned. Working in a group with the guidance of coordinators, testing and re-writing the texts and gradually gaining confidence on stage were considered fundamental in the development of the shows. Additionally, a questionnaire revealed that the audience, most of whom were young adults, and held a higher education degree, were satisfied with the show. Overall, both participating scientists and audience members considered that stand-up comedy has potential for science communication. © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Development of Moral Judgment according to Kohlberg as an Academic Performance Determining Factor in Social Sciences for a Group of Secondary Education Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Díaz-Serrano

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at defining the relation between the students’ moral development level and their academic performance in the subject of Social Sciences-Geography, with the participation of twelve students enrolled in the third year of compulsory secondary education in school of Murcia, Spain. Kohlberg theorized the moral judgment development process in which people go through six stages, identifying in each one of them how we react when confronted with a moral dilemma; an instrument designed for this study, based on such theory, will allow us to know the stage of moral development of the participants. The results will reveal a tendency to a direct and positive relation, leading to the conclusion that it is interesting to examine the stage of moral judgment in the classroom. In addition, some educational and research recommendations are provided at the end of this paper.

  9. NASA's Planetary Defense Coordination Office at NASA HQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, D.; Johnson, L.; Fast, K. E.; Landis, R.; Friedensen, V. P.; Kelley, M.

    2017-12-01

    NASA and its partners maintain a watch for near-Earth objects (NEOs), asteroids and comets that pass close to the Earth, as part of an ongoing effort to discover, catalog, and characterize these bodies. The PDCO is responsible for: Ensuring the early detection of potentially hazardous objects (PHOs) - asteroids and comets whose orbit are predicted to bring them within 0.05 Astronomical Units of Earth; and of a size large enough to reach Earth's surface - that is, greater than perhaps 30 to 50 meters; Tracking and characterizing PHOs and issuing warnings about potential impacts; Providing timely and accurate communications about PHOs; and Performing as a lead coordination node in U.S. Government planning for response to an actual impact threat. The PDCO collaborates with other U.S. Government agencies, other national and international agencies, and professional and amateur astronomers around the world. The PDCO also is responsible for facilitating communications between the science community and the public should any potentially hazardous NEO be discovered. In addition, the PDCO works closely with the United Nations Office of Outer Space Affairs, its Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, and its Action Team on Near Earth Objects (also known as Action Team 14). The PDCO is a leading member of the International Asteroid Warning Network (IAWN) and the Space Missions Planning Advisory Group (SMPAG), multinational endeavors recommended by the United Nations for an international response to the NEO impact hazard and established and operated by the space-capable nations. The PDCO also communicates with the scientific community through channels such as NASA's Small Bodies Assessment Group (SBAG). In this talk, we will provide an update to the office's various efforts and new opportunities for partnerships in the continuous international effort for Planetary Defense.

  10. On coordinates and coordinate transformation in Einstein's theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou Peiyuan

    1983-01-01

    This investigation is a further exposition of the significance of coordinates and their transformation in Einstein's theory of gravitation. The author considers the static axisymmetric field as an example, starts with its metric in the cylindrical coordinates, transforms this metric and the field equations into the Weyl-Levi-Civita system of coordinates, and supplements them with the harmonic condition. Both of the field equations and the harmonic condition are then transformed back to the original Cartesian system. Solutions for the static fields of an infinite plane with uniform surface density and an infinite rod with uniform linear density of matter, and of a body with spherical symmetry, are obtained again to show the necessity of the harmonic condition in their solutions. The fact that under the harmonic condition the solutions of the field equations for these problems contain their corresponding Newtonian potentials as approximations, is a strong support to the argument that the harmonic condition should be a physical supplement to Einstein's theory of gravitation. (Auth.)

  11. Research coordination meeting of the coordinated research project on analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The Technical Meeting hosted at the Belarus National Academy of Sciences in Minsk by the Joint Institute of Power Engineering and Nuclear Research 'SOSNY' from 5-9 December 2005 was the kick-off Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS)'. The CRP had received proposals for research agreements and contracts from scientists representing the following 25 institutions: Centro Atomico Bariloche, SCK CEN Mol, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares Sao Paulo, Joint Institute of Power Engineering and Nuclear Research SOSNY Minsk, China Institute of Atomic Energy, CEA Cadarache, CNRS Paris, FZ Rossendorf, FZ Karlsruhe, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG) Petten, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, AGH-University of Science and Technology Krakow, Institute of Atomic Energy Otwock/Swierk, ITEP Moscow, MEPHI Moscow, Kurchatov Institute, JINR Dubna, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, CIEMAT Madrid, Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm, National Science Center 'Kharkov Institute and Technology', and Argonne National Laboratory). These institutions represent 18 IAEA Member States (i.e., Argentina, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, China, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Pakistan, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine, USA), and one International Organization (JINR Dubna). The overall objective of the CRP is contributing to the generic R and D efforts in various fields common to innovative fast neutron system development, i.e., heavy liquid metal thermal hydraulics, dedicated transmutation fuels and associated core designs, theoretical nuclear reaction models, measurement and evaluation of nuclear data for transmutation, and development and validation of calculational methods and codes. Ultimately, the CRP

  12. Decision rules and group rationality: cognitive gain or standstill?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curseu, P.L.; Jansen, R.J.G.; Chappin, M.M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research in group cognition points towards the existence of collective cognitive competencies that transcend individual group members’ cognitive competencies. Since rationality is a key cognitive competence for group decision making, and group cognition emerges from the coordination of

  13. The Acquisition, Calibration, and Analysis of CTD Data. Unesco Technical Papers in Marine Science No. 54. (A Report of SCOR Working Group 51).

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    In this report the members of the Scientific Committee on Ocean Research Working Group 51 have attempted to describe the total process involved in obtaining salinity and temperature profiles with modern conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) instruments. Their objective has been to provide a guide to procedures which will, if allowed, lead to the…

  14. Translational Researchers' Perceptions of Data Management Practices and Data Curation Needs: Findings from a Focus Group in an Academic Health Sciences Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardyn, Tania P.; Resnick, Taryn; Camina, Susan K.

    2012-01-01

    How translational researchers use data is becoming an important support function for libraries to understand. Libraries' roles in this increasingly complex area of Web librarianship are often unclearly defined. The authors conducted two focus groups with physicians and researchers at an academic medical center, the UCLA David Geffen School of…

  15. Nanoscale Science and Engineering in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dascalu, Dan; Topa, Vladimir; Kleps, Irina

    2001-01-01

    In spite of difficult working conditions and with very low financial support, many groups from Romania are involved in emerging fields, such as the nanoscale science and technology. Until the last years, this activity was developed without a central coordination and without many interactions between these research groups. In the year 2000, some of the institutes and universities active in the nanotechnology field in Romania founded the MICRONANOTECH network. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the main activities and results of the Romanian groups working in this novel domain. Most of the groups are deal with the nanomaterial technology and only few of them have activities in nanostructure science and engineering, in new concepts and device modeling and technology. This paper describes the nanotechnology research development in two of the most significant institutes from Romania: Centre for Nanotechnologies from National Institute for Research and Development in Microtehnologies (IMT-Bucharest) and from National Institute for Research and Development in Materials Physics (INCD-FM), Magurele. The Romanian research results in nanotechnology field were presented in numerous papers presented in international conferences or published in national and international journals. They are also presented in patents, international awards and fellowships. The research effort and financial support are outlined. Some future trends of the Romanian nanoscale science and technology research are also described

  16. Age and sex influences on running mechanics and coordination variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Katherine A; Freedman Silvernail, Julia; Hamill, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of age on running mechanics separately for male and female runners and to quantify sex differences in running mechanics and coordination variability for older runners. Kinematics and kinetics were captured for 20 younger (10 male) and 20 older (10 male) adults running overground at 3.5 m · s -1 . A modified vector coding technique was used to calculate segment coordination variability. Lower extremity joint angles, moments and segment coordination variability were compared between age and sex groups. Significant sex-age interaction effects were found for heel-strike hip flexion and ankle in/eversion angles and peak ankle dorsiflexion angle. In older adults, mid-stance knee flexion angle, ankle inversion and abduction moments and hip abduction and external rotation moments differed by sex. Older compared with younger females had reduced coordination variability in the thigh-shank transverse plane couple but greater coordination variability for the shank rotation-foot eversion couple in early stance. These results suggest there may be a non-equivalent aging process in the movement mechanics for males and females. The age and sex differences in running mechanics and coordination variability highlight the need for sex-based analyses for future studies examining injury risk with age.

  17. Integrated care in the daily work: coordination beyond organisational boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakou, Alexandra

    2009-07-09

    In this paper, integrated care in an inter-organisational cooperative setting of in-home elderly care is studied. The aim is to explore how home care workers coordinate their daily work, identify coordination issues in situ and discuss possible actions for supporting seamless and integrated elderly care at home. The empirical findings are drawn from an ethnographic workplace study of the cooperation and coordination taking place between home care workers in a Swedish county. Data were collected through observational studies, interviews and group discussions. The paper identifies a need to support two core issues. Firstly, it must be made clear how the care interventions that are currently defined as 'self-treatment' by the home health care should be divided. Secondly, the distributed and asynchronous coordination between all care workers involved, regardless of organisational belonging must be better supported. Integrated care needs to be developed between organisations as well as within each organisation. As a matter of fact, integrated care needs to be built up beyond organisational boundaries. Organisational boundaries affect the planning of the division of care interventions, but not the coordination during the home care process. During the home care process, the main challenge is the coordination difficulties that arise from the fact that workers are distributed in time and/or space, regardless of organisational belonging. A core subject for future practice and research is to develop IT tools that reach beyond formal organisational boundaries and processes while remaining adaptable in view of future structure changes.

  18. TURNAROUND COORDINATOR. YES OR NOT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin HROMÁDKA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Both low cost carriers ‘fresh wind’ and liberalisation of ground handling market makes airlines to be cost-wise in every single field. Thus, ground handling contract are cutting down in terms of their costs. Handling companies struggle with pressure being put from the market environment, they rush 25 minutes turnaround with couple of people. This can be potentially dangerous from the safety point of view. One of possible solutions seems to be introducing turnaround coordinator, person who would supervise the ramp handling procedures. This paper discusses the role of turnaround coordinator within the aircraft turnaround process. Duties and responsibilities of this person are described. However, not every airport is staffing this position. The survey shows that smaller airports pay much more attention to this issue than the big ones.

  19. A coordination language for databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ximeng; Wu, Xi; Lluch Lafuente, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    We present a coordination language for the modeling of distributed database applications. The language, baptized Klaim-DB, borrows the concepts of localities and nets of the coordination language Klaim but re-incarnates the tuple spaces of Klaim as databases. It provides high-level abstractions...... and primitives for the access and manipulation of structured data, with integrity and atomicity considerations. We present the formal semantics of Klaim-DB and develop a type system that avoids potential runtime errors such as certain evaluation errors and mismatches of data format in tables, which are monitored...... in the semantics. The use of the language is illustrated in a scenario where the sales from different branches of a chain of department stores are aggregated from their local databases. Raising the abstraction level and encapsulating integrity checks in the language primitives have benefited the modeling task...

  20. Coordinating talk and practical action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oshima, Sae; Streeck, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates how talk and practical action are coordinated during one type of activity involving professional communication: the service-assessment sequence in hair salons. During this activity, a practical inspection of the haircut must be coupled with sequentially produced verbal acts....... Our analysis of four examples reveals that there is no fixed relationship between the organization of talk and practical action. Instead, people manipulate this relationship on a moment-by-moment basis, often coordinating the two into a single, integral package, or relying on one stream of action...... to achieve progress in the other. These findings imply that some multimodal activities that are brought into alignment may have their own, separate and independent procedural logic and sequencing patterns and that these can be brought into play to create or deal with constraints in each other....

  1. ANCRE - Stage report 2011, coordination of research on energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, Bernard; Fuchs, Alain; Ouabdesselam, Farid; Appert, Olivier; Freyssinet, Philippe; Moisan, Francois

    2011-11-01

    This document aims at proposing an assessment of works performed by ANCRE (the French National Alliance of Coordination of Research on Energy) after its first two years of existence. The main objective is to prepare the energy transition by boosting the French research in the field of energy. The report presents the ANCRE's organization as an efficient one, based on strong relationships with the industry sector. It indicates the various thematic work-groups (five 'energy sources' groups and three 'usages' groups), and the different objectives. It comments the contribution to the European research. These works and activities are commented by some high representatives of the alliance. A second part proposes an overview of the current status for the different energy sources group (biomass, fossil and geothermal, nuclear, solar, sea, hydraulic and wind) and usages groups (transports, buildings, industries and agriculture). It also presents the different actions related to coordination, programmatic synergies and prospective

  2. Improving Channel Coordination Through Franchising

    OpenAIRE

    Rajiv Lal

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the role of franchising arrangements in improving coordination between channel members. In particular we focus on two elements of the franchising contract, namely, the royalty structure and the monitoring technology. We begin with a simple analysis where a manufacturer distributes its product through a retailer and the retail demand is affected by the retail price and the service provided by the retailer. In this context we show that neither royalty payments nor moni...

  3. Coordination in the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Feldstein

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the sources of current conflict within the EU and the EMU. The topics discussed include the recent ECB policy of bond buying (the OMT policy), the attempts to advance the "European Project" of stronger political union (the fiscal compact, the banking union, and the proposals for budget supervision). Contrary to the claims of the European leadership, the progress that has been made has been by individual countries and not by coordinated action. The special problems of Franc...

  4. Coordination strategies of crew management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Sharon; Cano, Yvonne; Bryant, Don

    1991-01-01

    An exploratory study that describes and contrasts two three-person flight crews performing in a B-727 simulator is presented. This study specifically attempts to delineate crew communication patterns accounting for measured differences in performance across routine and nonroutine flight patterns. The communication patterns in the two crews evaluated indicated different modes of coordination, i.e., standardization in the less effective crew and planning/mutual adjustment in the more effective crew.

  5. Inorganic, coordination and organometallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jursik, F.

    1978-01-01

    Separation of cations and anions of inorganic, coordination and metalloorganic compounds by the method of liquid column chromatography is considered. Common scheme of multicomponent cation mixture is suggesteed. Separation conditions, adsrbents, eluents, pH value solution concenstration, elution rate are also suggested. Separation of rare earth elements Cs, Be, Cd, Te, Th, U, Mo, Re, V, Ru, Zr, In compounds is considered as an example of liquid column chromatography application. Data on column chromatography application are summarized in a table

  6. The autonomy of the University and political intervention in the trajectories of leadership and academics groups in Natural Science of The Universidad Nacional de La Plata. 1930-1955

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Flavio Soprano Manzo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article analyze two process connect in one university institution. In the first part, study the autonomy's forms of the institutional organization discipline produced for the professors and investigators of the Institute of the Museum and the Superior School/ Faculty of the Natural Sciences in the Universidad Nacional de La Plata between 1935 and 1946. In the second part, study two social situations - the university interventions of the years 1946 and 1955- where the political of the National State produced changes in the trajectories of this academics. We explore this relationship in the leadership and academics groups in geology, paleontology, zoology, botanic and anthropology.

  7. Rare earth niobate coordination polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Collin N.; Patel, Hiral; Fast, Dylan B.; Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Reinheimer, Eric W.; Dolgos, Michelle; Graham, Matt W.; Nyman, May

    2018-03-01

    Rare-earth (RE) coordination polymers are infinitely tailorable to yield luminescent materials for various applications. Here we described the synthesis of a heterometallic rare-earth coordination compound ((CH3)2SO)3(RE)NbO(C2O4)3((CH3)2SO) = dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO, (C2O2= oxalate), (RE=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb). The structure was obtained from single crystal X-ray diffraction of the La analogue. The Nb˭O and DMSO terminal-bonding character guides assembly of an open framework structure with noncentrosymmetric RE-coordination geometry, and large spacing between the RE centers. A second structure was observed by PXRD for the smaller rare earths (Dy, Ho, Er, Yb); this structure has not yet been determined. The materials were further characterized using FTIR, and photoluminescence measurements. Characteristic excitation and emission transitions were observed for RE = Nd, Sm, Eu, and Tb. Quantum yield (QY) measurements were performed by exciting Eu and Tb analoges at 394 nm (QY 66%) and 464 nm (QY 71%) for Eu; and 370 nm (QY=40%) for Tb. We attribute the high QY and bright luminescence to two main structure-function properties of the system; namely the absence of water in the structure, and absence of concentration quenching.

  8. Bringing Society to a Changing Polar Ocean: Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, O.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental changes in the Arctic and Antarctic appear to be accelerating and scientists are trying to understand both the patterns and the impacts of change. These changes will have profound impact on humanity and create a need for public education about these critical habitats. We have focused on a two-pronged strategy to increase public awareness as well as enable educators to discuss comfortably the implications of climate change. Our first focus is on entraining public support through the development of science documentaries about the science and people who conduct it. Antarctic Edge is a feature length award-winning documentary about climate change that has been released in May 2015 and has garnered interest in movie theatres and on social media stores (NetFlix, ITunes). This broad outreach is coupled with our group's interest assisting educators formally. The majority of current polar education is focused on direct educator engagement through personal research experiences that have impact on the participating educators' classrooms. Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE) proposes to improve educator and student engagement in polar sciences through exposure to scientists and polar data. Through professional development and the creation of data tools, Polar ICE will reduce the logistical costs of bringing polar science to students in grades 6-16. We will provide opportunities to: 1) build capacity of polar scientists in communicating and engaging with diverse audiences; 2) create scalable, in-person and virtual opportunities for educators and students to engage with polar scientists and their research through data visualizations, data activities, educator workshops, webinars, and student research symposia; and 3) evaluate the outcomes of Polar ICE and contribute to our understanding of science education practices. We will use a blended learning approach to promote partnerships and cross-disciplinary sharing. This combined multi-pronged approach

  9. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue ... International Year of Chemistry - 2011 ... pp 1107-1107 Science Smiles ... Coordination Compounds in Biology - The Chemistry of Vitamin B12 and Model Compounds.

  10. The Role of Research Coordination in Enhancing Integrative Research: the Co-production of Knowledge Agenda of the Global Land Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, F. M.; Boillat, S. P.; Grove, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The search for sustainability and resilience requires the integration of natural science with social science, as well as the joint production of knowledge and solutions by science and society. In this context, international science coordination initiatives, like Future Earth, have increasingly stressed the need to perform more integrated and more socially relevant research. This contribution has the objective to highlight the potential role of a research coordination initiative, the Global Land Programme (GLP), to provide guidance for more integrative research. The need to perform integrative research is particularly true for land systems, which include dynamic interactions among social and natural drivers that are often multifunctional. Thus, their governance and management is particularity complex and involve highly diverse stakeholders. A key aspect of integrative research is co-production of knowledge, understood as the interactive production of knowledge by both academics and non-academics, that leads to new forms of solutions-oriented knowledge. We relied on experiences of co-production of knowledge on land systems from the GLP network, and drove seven lessons learnt: 1) the importance of including several learning loops in the process, 2) the importance of long-term relationships, 3) the need to overcome the distinction between basic and applied science, 4) the opportunities offered by new communication technologies, 5) the need to train professionals in both breadth and depth, 6) the access to knowledge, and 7) the need to understand better the roles of scientists and decision-makers. These lessons were used to define action-research priorities for enhancing co-production of knowledge on land systems in GLP projects and working groups. As a conclusion, we argue that research coordination initiatives have the potential to provide analysis and guidance for more integrative research. This can be done by performing synthesis and self-reflection activities that

  11. Coordination in fast repetitive violin-bowing patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonderwaldt, Erwin; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of coordination behavior in complex violin-bowing patterns involving simultaneous bow changes (reversal of bowing direction) and string crossings (changing from one string to another). Twenty-two violinists (8 advanced amateurs, 8 students with violin as major subject, and 6 elite professionals) participated in the experiment. We investigated the influence of a variety of performance conditions (specific bowing patterns, dynamic level, tempo, and transposition) and level of expertise on coordination behavior (a.o., relative phase and amplitude) and stability. It was found that the general coordination behavior was highly consistent, characterized by a systematic phase lead of bow inclination over bow velocity of about 15° (i.e., string crossings were consistently timed earlier than bow changes). Within similar conditions, a high individual consistency was found, whereas the inter-individual agreement was considerably less. Furthermore, systematic influences of performance conditions on coordination behavior and stability were found, which could be partly explained in terms of particular performance constraints. Concerning level of expertise, only subtle differences were found, the student and professional groups (higher level of expertise) showing a slightly higher stability than the amateur group (lower level of expertise). The general coordination behavior as observed in the current study showed a high agreement with perceptual preferences reported in an earlier study to similar bowing patterns, implying that complex bowing trajectories for an important part emerge from auditory-motor interaction.

  12. Coordination in fast repetitive violin-bowing patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Schoonderwaldt

    Full Text Available We present a study of coordination behavior in complex violin-bowing patterns involving simultaneous bow changes (reversal of bowing direction and string crossings (changing from one string to another. Twenty-two violinists (8 advanced amateurs, 8 students with violin as major subject, and 6 elite professionals participated in the experiment. We investigated the influence of a variety of performance conditions (specific bowing patterns, dynamic level, tempo, and transposition and level of expertise on coordination behavior (a.o., relative phase and amplitude and stability. It was found that the general coordination behavior was highly consistent, characterized by a systematic phase lead of bow inclination over bow velocity of about 15° (i.e., string crossings were consistently timed earlier than bow changes. Within similar conditions, a high individual consistency was found, whereas the inter-individual agreement was considerably less. Furthermore, systematic influences of performance conditions on coordination behavior and stability were found, which could be partly explained in terms of particular performance constraints. Concerning level of expertise, only subtle differences were found, the student and professional groups (higher level of expertise showing a slightly higher stability than the amateur group (lower level of expertise. The general coordination behavior as observed in the current study showed a high agreement with perceptual preferences reported in an earlier study to similar bowing patterns, implying that complex bowing trajectories for an important part emerge from auditory-motor interaction.

  13. Wealth, equity and health care: a critique of a "population health" perspective on the determinants of health. Critical Social Science Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, B; Coburn, D; Robertson, A; Eakin, J

    1998-04-01

    In this paper we examine the recent ascendancy of a "population health" perspective on the "determinants of health" in health policy circles as conceptualized by health economists and social epidemiologists such as Evans and Stoddart [Evans and Stoddart (1990) Producing health, consuming health care. Social Science & Medicine 31(12), 1347 1363]. Their view, that the financing of health care systems may actually be deleterious for the health status of populations by drawing attention away from the (economic) determinants of health, has arguably become the "core" of the discourse of "population health". While applauding the efforts of these and other members of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research for "pushing the envelope", we nevertheless have misgivings about their conceptualization of both the "problem" and its "solutions", as well as about the implications of their perspective for policy. From our critique, we build an alternative point of view based on a political economy perspective. We point out that Evans and Stoddart's evidence is open to alternative interpretations--and, in fact, that their conclusions regarding the importance of wealth creation do not directly reflect the evidence presented, and are indicative of an oversimplified link between wealth and health. Their view also lacks an explicit substantive theory of society and of social change, and provides convenient cover for those who wish to dismantle the welfare state in the name of deficit reduction. Our alternative to the "provider dominance" theory of Evans and Stoddart and colleagues stresses that the factors or forces producing health status, which Evans and Stoddart describe, are contained within a larger whole (advanced industrial capitalism) which gives the parts their character and shapes their interrelationships. We contend that this alternative view better explains both how we arrived at a situation in which health care systems are as costly or extensive as they are, and suggests

  14. Funding of Geosciences: Coordinating National and International Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, B.; Fontaine, K. S.

    2012-12-01

    Funding is an important element of national as well as international policy for Earth observations. The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is coordinating efforts to build a Global Earth Observation System of Systems, or GEOSS. The lack of dedicated funding to support specific S&T activities in support of GEOSS is one of the most important obstacles to engaging the S&T communities in its implementation. This problem can be addressed by establishing explicit linkages between research and development programmes funded by GEO Members and Participating Organizations and GEOSS. In appropriate funding programs, these links may take the form of requiring explanations of how projects to be funded will interface with GEOSS and ensuring that demonstrating significant relevance for GEOSS is viewed as an asset of these proposals, requiring registration of Earth observing systems developed in these projects, or stipulating that data and products must adhere to the GEOSS Data Sharing Principles. Examples of Earth observations include: - Measurements from ground-based, in situ monitors; - Observations from Earth satellites; - Products and predictive capabilities from Earth system models, often using the capabilities of high-performance computers; - Scientific knowledge about the Earth system; and, - Data visualization techniques. These examples of Earth observations activities requires different types of resources, R&D top-down, bottom-up funding and programs of various sizes. Where innovation and infrastructure are involved different kind of resources are better suited, for developing countries completely other sources of funding are applicable etc. The European Commission funded Egida project is coordinating the development of a funding mechanism based on current national and international funding instruments such as the European ERANet, the new Joint Programming Initiatives, ESFRI as well as other European and non-European instruments. A general introduction to various

  15. Coordination of cassava starch to metal ions and thermolysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassava starch formed Werner-type complexes with ions of metals from the transition groups. This was proven by conductivity and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements. The coordination of starch to central metal ions influenced the thermal decomposition of starch. As a rule complexes started to decompose at ...

  16. Going Green : Framing Effects in a Dynamic Coordination Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerlagh, Reyer; van der Heijden, Eline

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study decision-making in a novel dynamic coordination game. The game captures features of a transition between externality networks. Groups consisting of three subjects start in a stable benchmark equilibrium with network externality. Over seven rounds, they can transit to an

  17. 48 CFR 1652.204-71 - Coordination of Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... payment of benefits under this contract with the payment of benefits under Medicare, other group health benefits coverages, and the payment of medical and hospital costs under no-fault or other automobile... precedence established by the NAIC Model Guidelines for Coordination of Benefits (COB) as specified by OPM...

  18. Evolutionary stability of vigilance coordination among social foragers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Girones, M.A.; Vasquez, R.

    2002-01-01

    Coordination can greatly improve the efficiency of anti-predatory vigilance scans by increasing predator detection for a constant proportion of time spent vigilant. However, it has been rarely found in nature and most studies have detected or assumed independent scanning by group members. In this

  19. Democratizing data science through data science training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Fierro, Lily; Kamdar, Jeana; Gordon, Jonathan; Stewart, Crystal; Bhattrai, Avnish; Abe, Sumiko; Lei, Xiaoxiao; O'Driscoll, Caroline; Sinha, Aakanchha; Jain, Priyambada; Burns, Gully; Lerman, Kristina; Ambite, José Luis

    2018-01-01

    The biomedical sciences have experienced an explosion of data which promises to overwhelm many current practitioners. Without easy access to data science training resources, biomedical researchers may find themselves unable to wrangle their own datasets. In 2014, to address the challenges posed such a data onslaught, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) launched the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative. To this end, the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (TCC; bigdatau.org) was funded to facilitate both in-person and online learning, and open up the concepts of data science to the widest possible audience. Here, we describe the activities of the BD2K TCC and its focus on the construction of the Educational Resource Discovery Index (ERuDIte), which identifies, collects, describes, and organizes online data science materials from BD2K awardees, open online courses, and videos from scientific lectures and tutorials. ERuDIte now indexes over 9,500 resources. Given the richness of online training materials and the constant evolution of biomedical data science, computational methods applying information retrieval, natural language processing, and machine learning techniques are required - in effect, using data science to inform training in data science. In so doing, the TCC seeks to democratize novel insights and discoveries brought forth via large-scale data science training.

  20. Science and data science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blei, David M; Smyth, Padhraic

    2017-08-07

    Data science has attracted a lot of attention, promising to turn vast amounts of data into useful predictions and insights. In this article, we ask why scientists should care about data science. To answer, we discuss data science from three perspectives: statistical, computational, and human. Although each of the three is a critical component of data science, we argue that the effective combination of all three components is the essence of what data science is about.