WorldWideScience

Sample records for science center institute

  1. Difficulties of Turkish Science Gifted Teachers: Institutions of Science and Art Centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Küçük

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the fundamental problems of science gifted teachers (SG/Ts who teach Turkish gifted children (G/C and compare it with the international milieu. Turkish G/C are taught in different educational contexts named “Science and Art Centers” (SACs in which better opportunities are presented for them. In this project, field observations were done at three of the SACs in Turkey - in Bayburt, Sinop, and Trabzon - and, semi-structured interviews were conducted with each of ten SG/Ts who work in these centers by one of the researchers. Data analysis showed that SG/Ts do not perceive their duties holistically and feel they need help with measurement and assessment techniques, modern learning theories, planning and implementation of a research project, questioning techniques and using laboratory-based methods for G/C. Moving from the research data, it is suggested that in service education courses, which include the above issues, should be organized for the SG/Ts and they should be encouraged to use an action research approach in teaching G/C in SACs.

  2. Institutional overviews. Overview of the JAEA and the Nuclear Nonproliferation Science and Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senzaki, Masao

    2006-01-01

    The Nuclear Nonproliferation Science and Technology Center (NPSTC) was formed within the new Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to carry out safeguards and material control duties for the JAEA. Development of technologies and procedures for safeguards is an important duty. In addition, the new NPSTC will assume a 'think tank' role in support of the nonproliferation regime, help train nonproliferation experts, and cooperate with academic, government and non-governmental organizations on nonproliferation issues. This report briefly summarizes the formation of the JAEA and describes the duties and structure of the NPSTC in detail. (author)

  3. Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA): Universities, Oceanographic Institutions, Science Centers and Aquariums Working Together to Improve Ocean Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, S.; McDonnell, J.; Halversen, C.; Zimmerman, T.; Ingram, L.

    2007-12-01

    Ocean observatories have already demonstrated their ability to maintain long-term time series, capture episodic events, provide context for improved shipboard sampling, and improve accessibility to a broader range of participants. Communicating Ocean Sciences, an already existing college course from COSEE-California has demonstrated its ability to teach future scientists essential communication skills. The NSF-funded Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA) project has leveraged these experiences and others to demonstrate a long-term model for promoting effective science communication skills and techniques applicable to diverse audiences. The COSIA effort is one of the pathfinders for ensuring that the new scientific results from the increasing U.S. investments in ocean observatories is effectively communicated to the nation, and will serve as a model for other fields. Our presentation will describe a long-term model for promoting effective science communication skills and techniques applicable to diverse audiences. COSIA established partnerships between informal science education institutions and universities nationwide to facilitate quality outreach by scientists and the delivery of rigorous, cutting edge science by informal educators while teaching future scientists (college students) essential communication skills. The COSIA model includes scientist-educator partnerships that develop and deliver a college course that teaches communication skills through the understanding of learning theory specifically related to informal learning environments and the practice of these skills at aquariums and science centers. The goals of COSIA are to: provide a model for establishing substantive, long-term partnerships between scientists and informal science education institutions to meet their respective outreach needs; provide future scientists with experiences delivering outreach and promoting the broader impact of research; and provide diverse role models

  4. Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science Center for Computational Imaging XNAT: A multimodal data archive and processing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, Robert L; Yvernault, Benjamin C; Boyd, Brian D; Damon, Stephen M; Gibney, Kyla David; Conrad, Benjamin N; Phillips, Nicholas S; Rogers, Baxter P; Gao, Yurui; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-01-01

    The Vanderbilt University Institute for Imaging Science (VUIIS) Center for Computational Imaging (CCI) has developed a database built on XNAT housing over a quarter of a million scans. The database provides framework for (1) rapid prototyping, (2) large scale batch processing of images and (3) scalable project management. The system uses the web-based interfaces of XNAT and REDCap to allow for graphical interaction. A python middleware layer, the Distributed Automation for XNAT (DAX) package, distributes computation across the Vanderbilt Advanced Computing Center for Research and Education high performance computing center. All software are made available in open source for use in combining portable batch scripting (PBS) grids and XNAT servers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The P50 Research Center in Perioperative Sciences: How the investment by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences in team science has reduced postburn mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Capek, Karel D; Voigt, Charles; Hundeshagen, Gabriel; Cambiaso-Daniel, Janos; Porter, Craig; Sousse, Linda E; El Ayadi, Amina; Zapata-Sirvent, Ramon; Guillory, Ashley N; Suman, Oscar E; Herndon, David N

    2017-09-01

    Since the inception of the P50 Research Center in Injury and Peri-operative Sciences (RCIPS) funding mechanism, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences has supported a team approach to science. Many advances in critical care, particularly burns, have been driven by RCIPS teams. In fact, burns that were fatal in the early 1970s, prior to the inception of the P50 RCIPS program, are now routinely survived as a result of the P50-funded research. The advances in clinical care that led to the reduction in postburn death were made by optimizing resuscitation, incorporating early excision and grafting, bolstering acute care including support for inhalation injury, modulating the hypermetabolic response, augmenting the immune response, incorporating aerobic exercise, and developing antiscarring strategies. The work of the Burn RCIPS programs advanced our understanding of the pathophysiologic response to burn injury. As a result, the effects of a large burn on all organ systems have been studied, leading to the discovery of persistent dysfunction, elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanisms, and identification of potential therapeutic targets. Survival and subsequent patient satisfaction with quality of life have increased. In this review article, we describe the contributions of the Galveston P50 RCIPS that have changed postburn care and have considerably reduced postburn mortality.

  6. Production technology readiness assessment of surfactant in the research center for Chemistry-Indonesian Institute of Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Arief Ameir Rahman; Sulaswatty, Anny

    2017-11-01

    The common problem faced by the institution working on research, innovation and technology development is lack of quantitative measures to determine the technology readiness of research. No common communication language between R & D Institutions and industry about the level of preparedness of a research resulting a barrier to technology diffusion interaction. This lack of connection between R & D institutes with industry may lead to "sluggishness" occurs in innovating. For such circumstance, assessing technology readiness of research is very important. One of wide spread methods for the assessment is Technology Readiness Level (TRL, also known as Technometer), which is introduced by NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). TRL is a general guide that provides an overview of maturity level of a technology. This study aims to identify and demonstrate the implementation of TRL to assess a number of surfactant researches in the Research Center for Chemistry, Indonesian Institute of Sciences. According to the assessment, it has been obtained the surfactant recommended for further development towards commercialization of R & D results, i.e. Glycerol Mono Stearate (GMS), which has reached the level of TRL 7.

  7. Genetic Science Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic Science Learning Center Making science and health easy for everyone to understand Home News Our Team What We Do ... Collaboration Conferences Current Projects Publications Contact The Genetic Science Learning Center at The University of Utah is a ...

  8. [Climate implications of terrestrial paleoclimate]. Quaternary Sciences Center, Desert Research Institute annual report, fiscal year 1994/1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigand, P.E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study is to collect terrestrial climate indicators for paleoclimate synthesis. The paleobiotic and geomorphic records are being examined for the local and regional impact of past climates to assess Yucca Mountain's suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. In particular these data are being used to provide estimates of the timing, duration and extremes of past periods of moister climate for use in hydrological models of local and regional recharge that are being formulated by USGS and other hydrologists for the Yucca Mountain area. The project includes botanical, faunal, and geomorphic components that will be integrated to accomplish this goal. To this end personnel at the Quaternary Sciences Center of the Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nevada are conducting the following activities: Analyses of packrat middens; Analysis of pollen samples; and Determination of vegetation climate relationships

  9. Great Lakes Science Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Since 1927, Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC) research has provided critical information for the sound management of Great Lakes fish populations and other important...

  10. Scientific activity of the National Center for Archaeological Studies of the Institute of History, Tatarstan Academy of Sciences, in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitdikov Ayrat G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work of the National Center for Archaeological Studies named after A.Sh. Khalikov with the Institute of History named after Sh Mardjani of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan (NCAS in 2013 was conducted within three Departments: prehistoric and medieval archaeology, conservation studies, and a bioarchaeological laboratory. The basic problems were: “Archaeology of the ancient population of the Volga-Kama: the formation and interaction of cultures”; “Medieval Turkic-Tatar civilization: the emergence, development, interaction with the peoples of Eurasia”; “Anthropology and genetics of the ancient population of the Middle Volga region”. Within the project on “Geographic information systems of Tatarstan archaeological heritage”, preparatory works for monitoring of the condition of cultural heritage objects located in the Kuibyshev and Nizhnekamsk reservoirs zones of influence were conducted. Archaeological fieldwork was conducted in the framework of the Primitive, Early Bulgar, Kazan, Bulgar, Lower Volga, Sviyazhsk archaeological expeditions and Preservation and salvation expedition in the area of Nizhnekamsk and Kuibyshev reservoirs. Beyond the Republic of Tatarstan, exploratory research was conducted in the territory of the Chuvash and Mordovian republics, Ulyanovsk and Samara Oblasts. The study of monuments in the Lower Volga region continued in collaboration with colleagues from the Astrakhan Oblast and the Republic of Mari El. Joint international archaeological research was carried out in the territory of the Republic of Bulgaria and Ukraine. 5 conferences were organized, including 4 international ones. The NCAS staff participated in 16 conferences, including 11 international ones. 2 Doctor habilitatus and 3 Doctor’s theses were defended. 5 collections of articles and theses, and 4 issues of the “Privolzhskaya arkheologiya” (Volga region archaeology were published. The NCAS staff prepared 216

  11. Research activity by National Center of Archaeological studies of Institute of History of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitdikov Ayrat G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work of the National Center for Archaeological Studies named after A.Sh. Khalikov with the Institute of History named after Sh Mardjani of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan (NCAS in 2013 was conducted within three Departments: prehistoric and medieval archaeology, conservation studies, and a bioarchaeological laboratory. The basic problems were: “Archaeology of the ancient population of the Volga-Kama: the formation and interaction of cultures”; “Medieval Turkic-Tatar civilization: the emergence, development, interaction with the peoples of Eurasia”; “Anthropology and genetics of the ancient population of the Middle Volga region”. Within the project on “Geographic information systems of Tatarstan archaeological heritage”, preparatory works for monitoring of the condition of cultural heritage objects located in the Kuibyshev and Nizhnekamsk reservoirs zones of influence were conducted. Archaeological fieldwork was conducted in the framework of the Primitive, Early Bulgar, Kazan, Bulgar, Lower Volga, Sviyazhsk archaeological expeditions and Preservation and salvation expedition in the area of Nizhnekamsk and Kuibyshev reservoirs. Beyond the Republic of Tatarstan, exploratory research was conducted in the territory of the Chuvash and Mordovian republics, Ulyanovsk and Samara Oblasts. The study of monuments in the Lower Volga region continued in collaboration with colleagues from the Astrakhan Oblast and the Republic of Mari El. Joint international archaeological research was carried out in the territory of the Republic of Bulgaria and Ukraine. 5 conferences were organized, including 4 international ones. The NCAS staff participated in 16 conferences, including 11 international ones. 2 Doctor habilitatus and 3 Doctor’s theses were defended. 5 collections of articles and theses, and 4 issues of the “Privolzhskaya arkheologiya” (Volga region archaeology were published. The NCAS staff prepared 216

  12. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  13. NUCOR Institute for Life Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article discusses the Nucor Institute for Life Sciences. The institute was previously part of Nucor, but is now an autonomous institute of the University of Pretoria. The task of the institute is to promote the application of radioisotopes and radiation techniques in medicine and biology. Research projects of the institute are shortly discussed

  14. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  15. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-01-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together

  16. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to

  17. National Institute of Justice Center Requirements Definition, Technical Assistance, Agile Test and Evaluation and Cyber Science Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frantz, Frederick

    2003-01-01

    This task provided for assembly, definition, and completion of technical enhancements in coordination with the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center -Northeast Region (NLECTC-NE...

  18. AM data activities (1999-2001) at Data and Planning Center, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, I.

    2001-01-01

    In this report recent work at the Data and Planning Center, NIFS, consisting of compilation activities, research and collaboration programmes, data publications, and future plans, is presented. The NIFS website and services, the status of data records in the numerical databases (AMDIS, CHART, SPUTY and BACKS) and bibliographic databases are reviewed. These databases are accessed through the www and require a simple user registration process. The new database on recombination processes has been constructed and contains 26000 records for cross sections and rate coefficients for radiative, dielectronic or three-body recombination. New numerical databases in progress in 2001 include impact and ion/atom/molecule impact for molecular processes and autoionization

  19. AM data activities (1999-2001) at Data and Planning Center, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, I [DPC, NIFS (Japan)

    2001-12-01

    In this report recent work at the Data and Planning Center, NIFS, consisting of compilation activities, research and collaboration programmes, data publications, and future plans, is presented. The NIFS website and services, the status of data records in the numerical databases (AMDIS, CHART, SPUTY and BACKS) and bibliographic databases are reviewed. These databases are accessed through the www and require a simple user registration process. The new database on recombination processes has been constructed and contains 26000 records for cross sections and rate coefficients for radiative, dielectronic or three-body recombination. New numerical databases in progress in 2001 include impact and ion/atom/molecule impact for molecular processes and autoionization.

  20. Center for Rehabilitation Sciences Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Rehabilitation Sciences Research (CRSR) was established as a research organization to promote successful return to duty and community reintegration of...

  1. Center for Environmental Health Sciences

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The primary research objective of the Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS) at the University of Montana is to advance knowledge of environmental impacts...

  2. Report compiled by Research Center for Carbonaceous Resources, Institute for Chemical Reaction Science, Tohoku University; Tohoku Daigaku Hanno Kagaku Kenkyusho tanso shigen hanno kenkyu center hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-04-01

    The Research Center for Carbonaceous Resources was established in April 1991 for the purpose of developing a comprehensive process for converting carbonaceous resources into clean fuels or into materials equipped with advanced functions. In this report, the track records etc. of the center are introduced. Under study in the conversion process research department is the organization of a comprehensive coal conversion process which will be a combination of solvent extraction, catalytic decomposition, and catalytic gasification, whose goal is to convert coal in a clean way at high efficiency. Under study in the conversion catalyst research department are the development of a coal denitrogenation method, development of a low-temperature gasification method by use of inexpensive catalysts, synthesis of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons in a methane/carbon dioxide reaction, etc. Other endeavors under way involve the designing and development of new organic materials such as new carbon materials and a study of the foundation on which such efforts stand, that is, the study of the control of reactions between solids. Furthermore, in the study of interfacial reaction control, the contact gasification of coal, brown coal ion exchange capacity and surface conditions, carbonization of cation exchanged brown coal, etc., are being developed. (NEDO)

  3. The Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center Summer Fellows Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depken, Diane E.; Zeman, Catherine L.; Lensch, Ellen Kabat; Brown, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the background, activities, and outcomes of the Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center (ATEEC) and its Summer Fellows Institutes as a model for disciplinary and cross-disciplinary infusion of environmental science and technology content, curriculum, and methods into the classroom. Presents experiences, themes, and activities…

  4. Institutional aspects of the energy centers concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-03-01

    Information is presented concerning the socio-economic impacts of nuclear energy centers; equity considerations relating to taxation and revenue distribution; report on jurisdictional authorities of state and local government related to centralized and decentralized alternative energy systems; federal-state conflicts and cooperation in the siting of nuclear energy facilities; the energy park experience in Pennsylvania; and a socio-economic institution summary of energy centers in Washington State

  5. Institutional aspects of the energy centers concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser, George H.

    1977-03-01

    Information is presented concerning the socio-economic impacts of nuclear energy centers; equity considerations relating to taxation and revenue distribution; report on jurisdictional authorities of state and local government related to centralized and decentralized alternative energy systems; federal-state conflicts and cooperation in the siting of nuclear energy facilities; the energy park experience in Pennsylvania; and a socio-economic institution summary of energy centers in Washington State.

  6. Akhiezer Institute for Theoretical Physics at the National Science Center 'Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology', National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine: origins, events, facts, comments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan'shina, A V

    2013-01-01

    The titled institute is the only historical example in Ukraine of a scientific school maintaining research continuity for over 80 years already. Today, it seems appropriate to remember the origins, to reflect on where this longevity came from, and to take a look at numerous behind-the-scenes legends and fiction stories that have grown around the institute. (from the history of physics)

  7. Information Science Research Institute. Quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-06-30

    This is a second quarter 1194 progress report on the UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Included is symposium activity; staff activity; document analysis program; text retrieval program; institute activity; and goals.

  8. National Institute of General Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Over Navigation Links National Institute of General Medical Sciences Site Map Staff Search My Order Search the ... NIGMS Website Research Funding Research Training News & Meetings Science Education About NIGMS Feature Slides View All Slides ...

  9. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-08

    For more than 30 years the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has provided the scientific underpinnings in nuclear physics and material science needed to ensure the safety and surety of the nuclear stockpile into the future. In addition to national security research, the LANSCE User Facility has a vibrant research program in fundamental science, providing the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons and protons to perform experiments supporting civilian research and the production of medical and research isotopes. Five major experimental facilities operate simultaneously. These facilities contribute to the stockpile stewardship program, produce radionuclides for medical testing, and provide a venue for industrial users to irradiate and test electronics. In addition, they perform fundamental research in nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, materials science, and many other areas. The LANSCE User Program plays a key role in training the next generation of top scientists and in attracting the best graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and early-career scientists. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) —the principal sponsor of LANSCE—works with the Office of Science and the Office of Nuclear Energy, which have synergistic long-term needs for the linear accelerator and the neutron science that is the heart of LANSCE.

  10. American Institute of Biological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staff Issues AIBS Position Statements Funding for the Biological Sciences Supporting Scientific Collections Advocating for Research Policy ... Public Policy Leadership Award Graduate students in the biological sciences who have demonstrated initiative and leadership in ...

  11. National Space Science Data Center Master Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The National Space Science Data Center serves as the permanent archive for NASA space science mission data. 'Space science' means astronomy and astrophysics, solar...

  12. Data Science for Institutional and Organizational Economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prüfer, Jens; Prüfer, Patricia

    2018-01-01

    To which extent can data science methods – such as machine learning, text analysis, or sentiment analysis – push the research frontier in the social sciences? This essay briefly describes the most prominent data science techniques that lend themselves to analyses of institutional and organizational

  13. Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2000-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center. It currently operates under a multiple year grant/cooperative agreement that began on October 1, 1997 and is up for renewal in the year 2002. Ames has been designated NASA's Center of Excellence in Information Technology. In this capacity, Ames is charged with the responsibility to build an Information Technology Research Program that is preeminent within NASA. RIACS serves as a bridge between NASA Ames and the academic community, and RIACS scientists and visitors work in close collaboration with NASA scientists. RIACS has the additional goal of broadening the base of researchers in these areas of importance to the nation's space and aeronautics enterprises. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of information technology research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: (1) Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems. Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth; (2) Human-Centered Computing. Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities; (3) High Performance Computing and Networking. Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to data analysis of large datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply information technology research to a

  14. DOE SciDAC’s Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Final Report for University of Southern California Information Sciences Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chervenak, Ann Louise [Univ. of Southern California Information Sciences Inst., Marina del Rey, CA (United States)

    2013-12-19

    The mission of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is to provide the worldwide climate-research community with access to the data, information, model codes, analysis tools, and intercomparison capabilities required to make sense of enormous climate data sets. Its specific goals are to (1) provide an easy-to-use and secure web-based data access environment for data sets; (2) add value to individual data sets by presenting them in the context of other data sets and tools for comparative analysis; (3) address the specific requirements of participating organizations with respect to bandwidth, access restrictions, and replication; (4) ensure that the data are readily accessible through the analysis and visualization tools used by the climate research community; and (5) transfer infrastructure advances to other domain areas. For the ESGF, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultra-scale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (such as the Community Earth System Model and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate, Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, etc.), and analysis and visualization tools, all serving a diverse user community. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as ANL, LANL, LBNL/NERSC, LLNL/PCMDI, NCAR, and ORNL) and at unfunded partner sites, such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate Computing

  15. National Center for Mathematics and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCISLA logo National Center for Improving Student Learning and Achievement in Mathematics and Wisconsin-Madison Powerful Practices in Mathematics & Sciences A multimedia product for educators . Scaling Up Innovative Practices in Mathematics and Science (Research Report). Thomas P. Carpenter, Maria

  16. High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is the primary archive for NASA missions dealing with extremely energetic phenomena, from...

  17. Multi-Institution Research Centers: Planning and Management Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Catherine; Lavey, Lisa; Mukuka, Chilandu; Eames-Brown, Rosslyn

    2016-01-01

    Funding multi-institution centers of research excellence (CREs) has become a common means of supporting collaborative partnerships to address specific research topics. However, there is little guidance for those planning or managing a multi-institution CRE, which faces specific challenges not faced by single-institution research centers. We…

  18. Cooperative efforts to improve nuclear materials accounting, control and physical protection at the National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelensky, V.F.; Mikhailov, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ukrainian Government are engaged in a program of cooperation to enhance the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons by developing a strong national system of nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A). This paper describes the capabilities and work of the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) and cooperative efforts to improve MPC and A at this facility. It describes how these cooperative efforts grew out of Ukraine''s decision to become a non-nuclear weapon state and the shortcomings in MPC and A that developed at KIPT after the disintegration of the former Soviet Union. It also envisions expanded future cooperation in other areas of nuclear materials management

  19. The National Institutes of Health Clinical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a rare disease not typically found in children — Cushing's Syndrome. Her adrenal glands produced too much of the ... Jane did a school science fair project on Cushing's Syndrome. She also wrote a book so that other ...

  20. 76 FR 40733 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, (NIOSH), World Trade Center Health Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, (NIOSH), World Trade Center Health Program Science/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP-STAC) Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register on June 23...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Microsystems Science & Technology Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Management System Pollution Prevention History 60 impacts Diversity Locations Facts & Figures Programs Nuclear Weapons About Nuclear Weapons Safety & Security Weapons Science & Technology Robotics R&D 100 Awards Laboratory Directed Research & Development Technology Deployment Centers

  2. Project of international science-education center and integration problems of nano science education in far eastern region of Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plusnin, N I; Lazarev, G I

    2008-01-01

    Some conception of international science-education center on nano science in Vladivostok is presented. The conception is based on internal and external prerequisites. Internal one is high intellectual potential of institutes of Russian Academy of Sciences and universities of Vladivostok and external one is need of countries of Far Eastern region of Asia in high level manpower. The conception takes into account a specific distribution of science and education potential between Russian Academy of Sciences and Russian universities and a specific their dislocation in Vladivostok. First specific dictates some similarity of organization structure and function of international science-education center to typical science-education center in Russia. But as for dislocation of the international science-education center in Vladivostok, it should be near dislocation of institutes of Far Eastern Brunch of Russian Academy of Sciences in Vladivostok, which are dislocated very compactly in suburb zone of Vladivostok

  3. Fort Collins Science Center-Fiscal year 2009 science accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2010-01-01

    Public land and natural resource managers in the United States are confronted with increasingly complex decisions that have important ramifications for both ecological and human systems. The scientists and technical professionals at the U.S. Geological Survey Fort Collins Science Center?many of whom are at the forefront of their fields?possess a unique blend of ecological, socioeconomic, and technological expertise. Because of this diverse talent, Fort Collins Science Center staff are able to apply a systems approach to investigating complicated ecological problems in a way that helps answer critical management questions. In addition, the Fort Collins Science Center has a long record of working closely with the academic community through cooperative agreements and other collaborations. The Fort Collins Science Center is deeply engaged with other U.S. Geological Survey science centers and partners throughout the Department of the Interior. As a regular practice, we incorporate the expertise of these partners in providing a full complement of ?the right people? to effectively tackle the multifaceted research problems of today's resource-management world. In Fiscal Year 2009, the Fort Collins Science Center's scientific and technical professionals continued research vital to Department of the Interior's science and management needs. Fort Collins Science Center work also supported the science needs of other Federal and State agencies as well as non-government organizations. Specifically, Fort Collins Science Center research and technical assistance focused on client and partner needs and goals in the areas of biological information management and delivery, enterprise information, fisheries and aquatic systems, invasive species, status and trends of biological resources (including human dimensions), terrestrial ecosystems, and wildlife resources. In the process, Fort Collins Science Center science addressed natural-science information needs identified in the U

  4. DOE - BES Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beecher, Cathy Jo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-14

    These are slides from a powerpoint shown to guests during tours of Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It shows the five DOE-BES nanoscale science research centers (NSRCs), which are located at different national laboratories throughout the country. Then it goes into detail specifically about the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at LANL, including statistics on its user community and CINT's New Mexico industrial users.

  5. Summer Institute for Physical Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswaranathan, Ponn; Calloway, Cliff

    2007-04-01

    A summer institute for physical science teachers was conducted at Winthrop University, June 19-29, 2006. Ninth grade physical science teachers at schools within a 50-mile radius from Winthrop were targeted. We developed a graduate level physics professional development course covering selected topics from both the physics and chemistry content areas of the South Carolina Science Standards. Delivery of the material included traditional lectures and the following new approaches in science teaching: hands-on experiments, group activities, computer based data collection, computer modeling, with group discussions & presentations. Two experienced master teachers assisted us during the delivery of the course. The institute was funded by the South Carolina Department of Education. The requested funds were used for the following: faculty salaries, the University contract course fee, some of the participants' room and board, startup equipment for each teacher, and indirect costs to Winthrop University. Startup equipment included a Pasco stand-alone, portable Xplorer GLX interface with sensors (temperature, voltage, pH, pressure, motion, and sound), and modeling software (Wavefunction's Spartan Student and Odyssey). What we learned and ideas for future K-12 teacher preparation initiatives will be presented.

  6. Interior's Climate Science Centers: Focus or Fail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udall, B.

    2012-12-01

    After a whirlwind two years of impressive and critical infrastructure building, the Department of Interior's Climate Science Centers are now in a position to either succeed or fail. The CSCs have a number of difficult structural problems including too many constituencies relative to the available resources, an uneasy relationship among many of the constituencies including the DOI agencies themselves, a need to do science in a new, difficult and non-traditional way, and a short timeframe to produce useful products. The CSCs have built a broad and impressive network of scientists and stakeholders. These entities include science providers of the universities and the USGS, and decision makers from the states, tribes, DOI land managers and other federal agencies and NGOs. Rather than try to support all of these constituencies the CSCs would be better served by refocusing on a core mission of supporting DOI climate related decision making. The CSCs were designed to service the climate science needs of DOI agencies, many of which lost their scientific capabilities in the 1990s due to a well-intentioned but ultimately harmful re-organization at DOI involving the now defunct National Biological Survey. Many of these agencies would like to have their own scientists, have an uneasy relationship with the nominal DOI science provider, the USGS, and don't communicate effectively among themselves. The CSCs must not succumb to pursuing science in either the traditional mode of the USGS or in the traditional mode of the universities, or worse, both of them. These scientific partners will need to be flexible, learn how to collaborate and should expect to see fewer resources. Useful CSC processes and outputs should start with the recommendations of the 2009 NRC Report Informing Decisions in a Changing Climate: (1) begin with users' needs; (2) give priority to process over products; (3) link information producers and users; (4) build connections across disciplines and organizations

  7. Research in Institutional Economics in Management Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    This report maps research in institutional economics in management science in the European Union for the 1995 to 2002 period. The reports applies Internet search based on a university listing, search on journal databases, key informants and an internet-based survey. 195 researchers are identified....... In (sub-)disciplinary terms, organization, strategy, corporate governance, and international business are the major areas of application of institutional economics ideas. In terms of countries, the EU strongholds are Holland, Denmark, UK, and Germany. There is apparently no or very little relevant...... research in Ireland, Portugal, Luxembourg and Greece. Based on the findings of the report, it seems warranted to characterize the EU research effort in the field as being rather dispersed and uncoordinated. Thus, there are no specialized journals, associations or PhD courses. This state of affairs...

  8. Molecular Science Research Center 1992 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knotek, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    The Molecular Science Research Center is a designated national user facility, available to scientists from universities, industry, and other national laboratories. After an opening section, which includes conferences hosted, appointments, and projects, this document presents progress in the following fields: chemical structure and dynamics; environmental dynamics and simulation; macromolecular structure and dynamics; materials and interfaces; theory, modeling, and simulation; and computing and information sciences. Appendices are included: MSRC staff and associates, 1992 publications and presentations, activities, and acronyms and abbreviations.

  9. Trends of Training Courses Conducted in the Human Resources Development Center of the National Institute for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology After the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yuko; Iida, Haruzo; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2017-07-01

    Environmental contamination with radioactive materials caused by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident in 2011 raised a serious health concern among residents in Japan, and the demand for radiation experts who can handle the radiation-associated problems has increased. The Human Resources Development Center (HRDC) of the National Institute of for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology in Japan has offered a variety of training programs covering a wide range of technologies associated with radiation since 1959. In this study, the time-course change in the number and age of the applicants for training programs regularly scheduled at HRDC were analyzed to characterize the demand after the NPP accident. The results suggested that the demand for the training of industrial radiation experts elevated sharply after the NPP accident followed by a prompt decrease, and that young people were likely stimulated to learn the basics of radiation. The demand for the training of medical radiation experts was kept high regardless of the NPP accident. The demand for the training of radiation emergency experts fluctuated apparently with three components: a terminating demand after the criticality accident that occurred in 1999, an urgent demand for handling of the NPP accident, and a sustained demand from local governments that undertook reinforcement of their nuclear disaster prevention program. The demand for the training of school students appeared to be increasing after the NPP accident. It could be foreseen that the demand for training programs targeting young people and medical radiation experts would be elevated in future.

  10. The GLAST LAT Instrument Science Operations Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, Robert A.; SLAC

    2007-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled for launch in late 2007. Operations support and science data processing for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on GLAST will be provided by the LAT Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The ISOC supports GLAST mission operations in conjunction with other GLAST mission ground system elements and supports the research activities of the LAT scientific collaboration. The ISOC will be responsible for monitoring the health and safety of the LAT, preparing command loads for the LAT, maintaining embedded flight software which controls the LAT detector and data acquisition flight hardware, maintaining the operating configuration of the LAT and its calibration, and applying event reconstruction processing to down-linked LAT data to recover information about detected gamma-ray photons. The SLAC computer farm will be used to process LAT event data and generate science products, to be made available to the LAT collaboration through the ISOC and to the broader scientific community through the GLAST Science Support Center at NASA/GSFC. ISOC science operations will optimize the performance of the LAT and oversee automated science processing of LAT data to detect and monitor transient gamma-ray sources

  11. The impact of institutional ethics on academic health sciences library leadership: a survey of academic health sciences library directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooey, Mary Joan M J; Arnold, Gretchen N

    2014-10-01

    Ethical behavior in libraries goes beyond service to users. Academic health sciences library directors may need to adhere to the ethical guidelines and rules of their institutions. Does the unique environment of an academic health center imply different ethical considerations? Do the ethical policies of institutions affect these library leaders? Do their personal ethical considerations have an impact as well? In December 2013, a survey regarding the impact of institutional ethics was sent to the director members of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries. The objective was to determine the impact of institutional ethics on these leaders, whether through personal conviction or institutional imperative.

  12. Building a Science Software Institute: Synthesizing the Lessons Learned from the ISEES and WSSI Software Institute Conceptualization Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaszak, R.; Lenhardt, W. C.; Jones, M. B.; Ahalt, S.; Schildhauer, M.; Hampton, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF, in an effort to support the creation of sustainable science software, funded 16 science software institute conceptualization efforts. The goal of these conceptualization efforts is to explore approaches to creating the institutional, sociological, and physical infrastructures to support sustainable science software. This paper will present the lessons learned from two of these conceptualization efforts, the Institute for Sustainable Earth and Environmental Software (ISEES - http://isees.nceas.ucsb.edu) and the Water Science Software Institute (WSSI - http://waters2i2.org). ISEES is a multi-partner effort led by National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS). WSSI, also a multi-partner effort, is led by the Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI). The two conceptualization efforts have been collaborating due to the complementarity of their approaches and given the potential synergies of their science focus. ISEES and WSSI have engaged in a number of activities to address the challenges of science software such as workshops, hackathons, and coding efforts. More recently, the two institutes have also collaborated on joint activities including training, proposals, and papers. In addition to presenting lessons learned, this paper will synthesize across the two efforts to project a unified vision for a science software institute.

  13. Communications among data and science centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James L.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to electronically access and query the contents of remote computer archives is of singular importance in space and earth sciences; the present evaluation of such on-line information networks' development status foresees swift expansion of their data capabilities and complexity, in view of the volumes of data that will continue to be generated by NASA missions. The U.S.'s National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) manages NASA's largest science computer network, the Space Physics Analysis Network; a comprehensive account is given of the structure of NSSDC international access through BITNET, and of connections to the NSSDC available in the Americas via the International X.25 network.

  14. National Center for Mathematics and Science - publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Designing Statistics Instruction for Middle School Students Summer 2003: Algebraic Skills and Strategies for newsletter cover The National Center for Research in Mathematical Sciences Education (NCRMSE) (1987-1995 -Level Reform Fall 1993: Assessment Models Winter 1994: Reforming Geometry Spring 1994: Statistics and

  15. Fernbank Science Center Forest Teacher's Guide-1967.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Jim; And Others

    This guide is designed primarily to familiarize teachers with the types of programs available through the Fernback Science Center. Instructional programs involving the use of the Fernbank Forest are outlined. Programs for secondary students include Plant Taxonomy, Field Ecology, Winter Taxonomy of Plants, and Climax Forest Succession. Elementary…

  16. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Nuclear Science Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wender, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-06-19

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facilities for Nuclear Science consist of a high-energy "white" neutron source (Target 4) with 6 flight paths, three low-energy nuclear science flight paths at the Lujan Center, and a proton reaction area. The neutron beams produced at the Target 4 complement those produced at the Lujan Center because they are of much higher energy and have shorter pulse widths. The neutron sources are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam of the LANSCE linear accelerator. With these facilities, LANSCE is able to deliver neutrons with energies ranging from a milli-electron volt to several hundreds of MeV, as well as proton beams with a wide range of energy, time and intensity characteristics. The facilities, instruments and research programs are described briefly.

  17. Photometric Analysis in the Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twicken, Joseph D.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wu, Hayley; Jenkins, Jon M.; Girouard, Forrest; Klaus, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the Photometric Analysis (PA) software component and its context in the Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) pipeline. The primary tasks of this module are to compute the photometric flux and photocenters (centroids) for over 160,000 long cadence (thirty minute) and 512 short cadence (one minute) stellar targets from the calibrated pixels in their respective apertures. We discuss the science algorithms for long and short cadence PA: cosmic ray cleaning; background estimation and removal; aperture photometry; and flux-weighted centroiding. We discuss the end-to-end propagation of uncertainties for the science algorithms. Finally, we present examples of photometric apertures, raw flux light curves, and centroid time series from Kepler flight data. PA light curves, centroid time series, and barycentric timestamp corrections are exported to the Multi-mission Archive at Space Telescope [Science Institute] (MAST) and are made available to the general public in accordance with the NASA/Kepler data release policy.

  18. Aspen Global Change Institute Summer Science Sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzenberger, John; Kaye, Jack A

    2006-10-01

    The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) successfully organized and convened six interdisciplinary meetings over the course of award NNG04GA21G. The topics of the meetings were consistent with a range of issues, goals and objectives as described within the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan and more broadly by the US Global Change Research Program/Our Changing Planet, the more recent Climate Change Program Strategic Plan and the NSF Pathways report. The meetings were chaired by two or more leaders from within the disciplinary focus of each session. 222 scholars for a total of 1097 participants-days were convened under the auspices of this award. The overall goal of each AGCI session is to further the understanding of Earth system science and global environmental change through interdisciplinary dialog. The format and structure of the meetings allows for presentation by each participant, in-depth discussion by the whole group, and smaller working group and synthesis activities. The size of the group is important in terms of the group dynamics and interaction, and the ability for each participant's work to be adequately presented and discussed within the duration of the meeting, while still allowing time for synthesis

  19. Students build glovebox at Space Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Students in the Young Astronaut Program at the Coca-Cola Space Science Center in Columbus, GA, constructed gloveboxes using the new NASA Student Glovebox Education Guide. The young astronauts used cardboard copier paper boxes as the heart of the glovebox. The paper boxes transformed into gloveboxes when the students pasted poster-pictures of an actual NASA microgravity science glovebox inside and outside of the paper boxes. The young astronauts then added holes for gloves and removable transparent top covers, which completed the construction of the gloveboxes. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  20. The Lederman Science Center: Past, Present, Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardeen, Marjorie G.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    For 30 years, Fermilab has offered K-12 education programs, building bridges between the Lab and the community. The Lederman Science Center is our home. We host field trips and tours, visit schools, offer classes and professional development workshops, host special events, support internships and have a strong web presence. We develop programs based on identified needs, offer programs with peer-leaders and improve programs from participant feedback. For some we create interest; for others we build understanding and develop relationships, engaging participants in scientific exploration. We explain how we created the Center, its programs, and what the future holds.

  1. Transplant programs, centers, and institutes: what does it all mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouljoud, Marwan; Whitehouse, Sarah

    2013-04-01

    There are more than 250 transplant centers in the USA, but variation continues to exist in organizational structure for transplant multidisciplinary services. We reviewed the literature to explore the definitions for transplant organizational structures and address existing rationale for the development of the integrated transplant service line. No standard definitions exist to differentiate the use of program, center, institute, or service line. A survey of 20 multiorgan transplant centers in the USA showed that most were named centers or institutes, but some were organized as departments and service lines. The prevailing themes were the perceived need for autonomy of the transplant entity, alignment among services and finances, and the alignment of authority with responsibility. In addition, perceived benefits included growth, alignment, efficiency, and resource allocation. The multidisciplinary nature of transplantation generally has been fit into the matrix organizational model, although many hospitals today have departments, centers, institutes, and service lines structures. Integration has been viewed as beneficial by most transplant entities reviewed, with a sense that it is better adapted for the evolving healthcare climate.

  2. Recent fusion research in the National Institute for Fusion Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Akio; Sakakibara, Satoru; Sagara, Akio; Horiuchi, Ritoku; Yamada, Hiroshi; Takeiri, Yasuhiko

    2011-01-01

    The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), which was established in 1989, promotes academic approaches toward the exploration of fusion science for steady-state helical reactor and realizes the establishment of a comprehensive understanding of toroidal plasmas as an inter-university research organization and a key center of worldwide fusion research. The Large Helical Device (LHD) Project, the Numerical Simulation Science Project, and the Fusion Engineering Project are organized for early realization of net current free fusion reactor, and their recent activities are described in this paper. The LHD has been producing high-performance plasmas comparable to those of large tokamaks, and several new findings with regard to plasma physics have been obtained. The numerical simulation science project contributes understanding and systemization of the physical mechanisms of plasma confinement in fusion plasmas and explores complexity science of a plasma for realization of the numerical test reactor. In the fusion engineering project, the design of the helical fusion reactor has progressed based on the development of superconducting coils, the blanket, fusion materials and tritium handling. (author)

  3. The TESS Science Processing Operations Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; Twicken, Joseph D.; McCauliff, Sean; Campbell, Jennifer; Sanderfer, Dwight; Lung, David; Mansouri-Samani, Masoud; Girouard, Forrest; Tenenbaum, Peter; Klaus, Todd; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will conduct a search for Earth's closest cousins starting in early 2018 and is expected to discover approximately 1,000 small planets with R(sub p) less than 4 (solar radius) and measure the masses of at least 50 of these small worlds. The Science Processing Operations Center (SPOC) is being developed at NASA Ames Research Center based on the Kepler science pipeline and will generate calibrated pixels and light curves on the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division's Pleiades supercomputer. The SPOC will also search for periodic transit events and generate validation products for the transit-like features in the light curves. All TESS SPOC data products will be archived to the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST).

  4. The Emirates Mars Mission Science Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, J.; Al Hammadi, O.; DeWolfe, A. W.; Staley, B.; Schafer, C.; Pankratz, C. K.

    2017-12-01

    The Emirates Mars Mission (EMM), led by the Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Center (MBRSC) in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, is expected to arrive at Mars in January 2021. The EMM Science Data Center (SDC) is to be developed as a joint effort between MBRSC and the University of Colorado's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP). The EMM SDC is responsible for the production, management, distribution, and archiving of science data collected from the three instruments on board the Hope spacecraft.With the respective SDC teams on opposite sides of the world evolutionary techniques and cloud-based technologies are being utilized in the development of the EMM SDC. This presentation will provide a top down view of the EMM SDC, summarizing the cloud-based technologies being implemented in the design, as well as the tools, best practices, and lessons learned for software development and management in a geographically distributed team.

  5. Fort Collins Science Center fiscal year 2010 science accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2011-01-01

    The scientists and technical professionals at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Fort Collins Science Center (FORT), apply their diverse ecological, socioeconomic, and technological expertise to investigate complicated ecological problems confronting managers of the Nation's biological resources. FORT works closely with U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) agency scientists, the academic community, other USGS science centers, and many other partners to provide critical information needed to help answer complex natural-resource management questions. In Fiscal Year 2010 (FY10), FORT's scientific and technical professionals conducted ongoing, expanded, and new research vital to the science needs and management goals of DOI, other Federal and State agencies, and nongovernmental organizations in the areas of aquatic systems and fisheries, climate change, data and information integration and management, invasive species, science support, security and technology, status and trends of biological resources (including the socioeconomic aspects), terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems, and wildlife resources, including threatened and endangered species. This report presents selected FORT science accomplishments for FY10 by the specific USGS mission area or science program with which each task is most closely associated, though there is considerable overlap. The report also includes all FORT publications and other products published in FY10, as well as staff accomplishments, appointments, committee assignments, and invited presentations.

  6. The Tanenbaum Open Science Institute: Leading a Paradigm Shift at the Montreal Neurological Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poupon, Viviane; Seyller, Annabel; Rouleau, Guy A

    2017-08-30

    The Montreal Neurological Institute is adopting an Open Science Policy that will be enacted by the Tanenbaum Open Science Institute. The aim is to accelerate the generation of knowledge and novel effective treatments for brain disorders by freeing science. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Annual report of Nuclear Science Research Institute, JFY2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    Nuclear Science Research Institute (NSRI) is composed of Planning and Coordination Office and seven departments such as Department of Operational Safety Administration, Department of Radiation Protection, Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Department of Hot Laboratories and Facilities, Department of Criticality and Fuel Cycle Research Facilities, Department of Decommissioning and Waste Management, and Engineering Services Department. This annual report of JFY2006 summarizes the activities of NSRI, the R and D activities of the Research and Development Directorates and human resources development at site, and is expected to be referred to and utilized by R and D departments and project promotion sectors at NSRI site for the enhancement of their own research and management activities to attain their goals according to 'Middle-term Plan' successfully and effectively. In chapter 1, outline of JFY2006 activities of NSRI is described. In chapter 2, the following activities made by the departments in NSRI are summarized, i.e., (1) operation and maintenance of research reactors (JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR), criticality assemblies (STACY, TRACY, FCA, TCA), hot laboratories (BECKY, Reactor Fuel Examination Facility, WASTEF, Research Laboratory 4, Plutonium Research Laboratory 1, Tokai Hot Laboratory, etc), and large-scale facilities (Tandem accelerator, LSTF, THYNC, TPTF, etc), and (2) safety management, radiation protection, management of radioactive wastes, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, engineering services, utilities and maintenance, etc, all of which are indispensable for the stable and safe operation and utilization of the research facilities. The technical developments for the advancement of the related technologies are also summarized. In chapter 3, the R and D and human resources development activities are described including the topics of the research works and projects performed by the Research and Development Directorates at site, such as

  8. Science in democracy: expertise, institutions, and representation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Mark B

    2009-01-01

    ...? In Science in Democracy, Mark Brown draws on science and technology studies, democratic theory, and the history of political thought to show why an adequate response to politicized science depends...

  9. UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Quarterly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    This document summarizes the activities and progress for the 1994 Fall quarter for the UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Areas covered include: Symposium activity, Staff activity, Document analysis program, Text-retrieval program, and Institute activity

  10. UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-12-31

    This document summarizes the activities and progress for the 1994 Fall quarter for the UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Areas covered include: Symposium activity, Staff activity, Document analysis program, Text-retrieval program, and Institute activity.

  11. Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education, Tata Institute of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 2. Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (A Deemed University). Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 2 February 2017 pp 189-189 ...

  12. Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science during the period April 1, 1983 through September 30, 1983 is summarized.

  13. Earth Institute at Columbia University ADVANCE Program: Addressing Needs for Women in Earth and Environmental Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, R. E.; Cane, M.; Mutter, J.; Miller, R.; Pfirman, S.; Laird, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Earth Institute has received a major NSF ADVANCE grant targeted at increasing the participation and advancement of women scientists and engineers in the Academy through institutional transformation. The Earth Institute at Columbia University includes 9 research institutes including Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Center for Environmental Research and Conservation (CERC), Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), International Research Institute (IRI) for Climate Prediction, Earth Engineering Center, NASA-Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Center for Risks and Hazards, Center for Globalization and Sustainable Development, and Center for Global Health and Economic Development and six academic departments including Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology (E3B, School of Arts and Sciences), Earth and Environmental Engineering (DEEE, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences), Department of Environmental Health (School of Public Health), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (DEES, School of Arts and Sciences), Department of International and Public Affairs (School of International and Policy Affairs), and Barnard College Department of Environmental Science. The Earth Institute at Columbia University's ADVANCE program is based both on a study of the status of women at Columbia and research on the progression of women in science elsewhere. The five major targets of the Columbia ADVANCE program are to (1) change the demographics of the faculty through intelligent hiring practices, (2) provide support to women scientists through difficult life transitions including elder care and adoption or birth of a child, (3) enhance mentoring and networking opportunities, (4) implement transparent promotion procedures and policies, and (5) conduct an institutional self study. The Earth Institute ADVANCE program is unique in that it addresses issues that tend to manifest themselves in the earth and environmental fields, such as extended

  14. Suborbital Science Program: Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelFrate, John

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the suborbital science program at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The Program Objectives are given in various areas: (1) Satellite Calibration and Validation (Cal/val)--Provide methods to perform the cal/val requirements for Earth Observing System satellites; (2) New Sensor Development -- Provide methods to reduce risk for new sensor concepts and algorithm development prior to committing sensors to operations; (3) Process Studies -- Facilitate the acquisition of high spatial/temporal resolution focused measurements that are required to understand small atmospheric and surface structures which generate powerful Earth system effects; and (4) Airborne Networking -- Develop disruption-tolerant networking to enable integrated multiple scale measurements of critical environmental features. Dryden supports the NASA Airborne Science Program and the nation in several elements: ER-2, G-3, DC-8, Ikhana (Predator B) & Global Hawk and Reveal. These are reviewed in detail in the presentation.

  15. Molecular Science Research Center, 1991 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knotek, M.L.

    1992-03-01

    During 1991, the Molecular Science Research Center (MSRC) experienced solid growth and accomplishment and the Environmental, and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) construction project moved forward. We began with strong programs in chemical structure and dynamics and theory, modeling, and simulation, and both these programs continued to thrive. We also made significant advances in the development of programs in materials and interfaces and macromolecular structure and dynamics, largely as a result of the key staff recruited to lead these efforts. If there was one pervasive activity for the past year, however, it was to strengthen the role of the EMSL in the overall environmental restoration and waste management (ER/WM) mission at Hanford. These extended activities involved not only MSRC and EMSL staff but all PNL scientific and technical staff engaged in ER/WM programs.

  16. A Computer Learning Center for Environmental Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, John F.

    2000-01-01

    In the fall of 1998, MacMillan Hall opened at Brown University to students. In MacMillan Hall was the new Computer Learning Center, since named the EarthLab which was outfitted with high-end workstations and peripherals primarily focused on the use of remotely sensed and other spatial data in the environmental sciences. The NASA grant we received as part of the "Centers of Excellence in Applications of Remote Sensing to Regional and Global Integrated Environmental Assessments" was the primary source of funds to outfit this learning and research center. Since opening, we have expanded the range of learning and research opportunities and integrated a cross-campus network of disciplines who have come together to learn and use spatial data of all kinds. The EarthLab also forms a core of undergraduate, graduate, and faculty research on environmental problems that draw upon the unique perspective of remotely sensed data. Over the last two years, the Earthlab has been a center for research on the environmental impact of water resource use in and regions, impact of the green revolution on forest cover in India, the design of forest preserves in Vietnam, and detailed assessments of the utility of thermal and hyperspectral data for water quality analysis. It has also been used extensively for local environmental activities, in particular studies on the impact of lead on the health of urban children in Rhode Island. Finally, the EarthLab has also served as a key educational and analysis center for activities related to the Brown University Affiliated Research Center that is devoted to transferring university research to the private sector.

  17. WFIRST: User and mission support at ISOC - IPAC Science Operations Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeson, Rachel; Armus, Lee; Bennett, Lee; Colbert, James; Helou, George; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Laine, Seppo; Meshkat, Tiffany; Paladini, Roberta; Ramirez, Solange; Wang, Yun; Xie, Joan; Yan, Lin

    2018-01-01

    The science center for WFIRST is distributed between the Goddard Space Flight Center, the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) and the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI). The main functions of the IPAC Science Operations Center (ISOC) are:* Conduct the GO, archival and theory proposal submission and evaluation process* Support the coronagraph instrument, including observation planning, calibration and data processing pipeline, generation of data products, and user support* Microlensing survey data processing pipeline, generation of data products, and user support* Community engagement including conferences, workshops and general support of the WFIRST exoplanet communityWe will describe the components planned to support these functions and the community of WFIRST users.

  18. Better Broader Impacts through National Science Foundation Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, K. M.

    2010-12-01

    National Science Foundation Science and Technology Centers (STCs) play a leading role in developing and evaluating “Better Broader Impacts”; best practices for recruiting a broad spectrum of American students into STEM fields and for educating these future professionals, as well as their families, teachers and the general public. With staff devoted full time to Broader Impacts activities, over the ten year life of a Center, STCs are able to address both a broad range of audiences and a broad range of topics. Along with other NSF funded centers, such as Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence, Engineering Research Centers and Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers, STCs develop both models and materials that individual researchers can adopt, as well as, in some cases, direct opportunities for individual researchers to offer their disciplinary research expertise to existing center Broader Impacts Programs. The National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics is an STC headquartered at the University of Minnesota. NCED’s disciplinary research spans the physical, biological and engineering issues associated with developing an integrative, quantitative and predictive understanding of rivers and river basins. Funded in 2002, we have had the opportunity to partner with individuals and institutions ranging from formal to informal education and from science museums to Tribal and women’s colleges. We have developed simple table top physical models, complete museum exhibitions, 3D paper maps and interactive computer based visualizations, all of which have helped us communicate with this wide variety of learners. Many of these materials themselves or plans to construct them are available online; in many cases they have also been formally evaluated. We have also listened to the formal and informal educators with whom we partner, from whom we have learned a great deal about how to design Broader Impacts activities and programs. Using NCED as a case study

  19. The Brazilian Science Data Center (BSDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Ulisses Barres; Bodmann, Benno; Giommi, Paolo; Brandt, Carlos H.

    Astrophysics and Space Science are becoming increasingly characterised by what is now known as “big data”, the bottlenecks for progress partly shifting from data acquisition to “data mining”. Truth is that the amount and rate of data accumulation in many fields already surpasses the local capabilities for its processing and exploitation, and the efficient conversion of scientific data into knowledge is everywhere a challenge. The result is that, to a large extent, isolated data archives risk being progressively likened to “data graveyards”, where the information stored is not reused for scientific work. Responsible and efficient use of these large data-sets means democratising access and extracting the most science possible from it, which in turn signifies improving data accessibility and integration. Improving data processing capabilities is another important issue specific to researchers and computer scientists of each field. The project presented here wishes to exploit the enormous potential opened up by information technology at our age to advance a model for a science data center in astronomy which aims to expand data accessibility and integration to the largest possible extent and with the greatest efficiency for scientific and educational use. Greater access to data means more people producing and benefiting from information, whereas larger integration of related data from different origins means a greater research potential and increased scientific impact. The project of the BSDC is preoccupied, primarily, with providing tools and solutions for the Brazilian astronomical community. It nevertheless capitalizes on extensive international experience, and is developed in full cooperation with the ASI Science Data Center (ASDC), from the Italian Space Agency, granting it an essential ingredient of internationalisation. The BSDC is Virtual Observatory-complient and part of the “Open Universe”, a global initiative built under the auspices of the

  20. [Activities of Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2001-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of IT research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: 1. Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth. 2. Human-Centered Computing Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities. 3. High Performance Computing and Networking Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to analysis of large scientific datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply IT research to a variety of NASA application domains. RIACS also engages in other activities, such as workshops, seminars, visiting scientist programs and student summer programs, designed to encourage and facilitate collaboration between the university and NASA IT research communities.

  1. Activities of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliger, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) was established by the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) on June 6, 1983. RIACS is privately operated by USRA, a consortium of universities with research programs in the aerospace sciences, under contract with NASA. The primary mission of RIACS is to provide research and expertise in computer science and scientific computing to support the scientific missions of NASA ARC. The research carried out at RIACS must change its emphasis from year to year in response to NASA ARC's changing needs and technological opportunities. Research at RIACS is currently being done in the following areas: (1) parallel computing; (2) advanced methods for scientific computing; (3) high performance networks; and (4) learning systems. RIACS technical reports are usually preprints of manuscripts that have been submitted to research journals or conference proceedings. A list of these reports for the period January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1994 is in the Reports and Abstracts section of this report.

  2. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisowski, Paul W.; Schoenberg, Kurt F.

    2006-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, or LANSCE, uses the first truly high-current medium-energy proton linear accelerator, which operated originally at a beam power of 1 MW for medium-energy nuclear physics. Today LANSCE continues operation as one of the most versatile accelerator-based user facilities in the world. During eight months of annual operation, scientists from around the world work at LANSCE to execute an extraordinarily broad program of defense and civilian research. Several areas operate simultaneously. The Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center) is a moderated spallation source (meV to keV), the Weapons Neutron Research Facility (WNR) is a bare spallation neutron source (keV to 800 MeV), and a new ultra-cold neutron source will be operational in 2005. These sources give LANSCE the ability to produce and use neutrons with energies that range over 14 orders of magnitude. LANSCE also supplies beam to WNR and two other areas for applications requiring protons. In a proton radiography (pRad) area, a sequence of narrow proton pulses is transmitted through shocked materials and imaged to study dynamic properties. In 2005, LANSCE began operating a facility that uses 100-MeV protons to produce medical radioisotopes. To sustain a vigorous program beyond this decade, LANSCE has embarked on a project to refurbish key elements of the facility and to plan capabilities beyond those that presently exist

  3. Annual report of Nuclear Science Research Institute, JFY2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-04-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was inaugurated on October 1st, 2005. Works for the operation and maintenance of various research facilities as well as safety management, radiation protection, and radioactive wastes management, which have been undertaken by departments in Tokai Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), were inherited by newly established departments of Nuclear Science Research Institute (NSRI). The NSRI is composed of Planning and Coordination Office and seven departments such as Department of Operational Safety Administration, Department of Radiation Protection, Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Department of Hot Laboratories and Facilities, Department of Criticality and Fuel Cycle Research Facilities, Department of Decommissioning and Waste Management, and Engineering Services Department. This annual report of JFY 2005 summarizes the activities of NSRI and is expected to be referred to and utilized by R and D departments and project promotion sectors at NSRI site for the enhancement of their own research and management activities to attain their goals according to Middle-term Plan' successfully and effectively. In chapter 1, outline of organization and administrative activities of NSRI is described. In chapter 2, the following activities made by the departments in NSRI are summarized, i.e., (1) operation and maintenance of research reactors (JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR), criticality assemblies (STACY, TRACY, FCA, TCA), hot laboratories, (BECKY, Reactor Fuel Examination Facility, WASTEF, Research Laboratory 4, Plutonium Research Laboratory 1, Tokai Hot Laboratory, etc), and large-scale facilities (Tandem accelerator, LSTF, THYNC, TPTF, etc), and (2) safety management, radiation protection, management of radioactive wastes, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, engineering services, utilities and maintenance, etc, all of which are indispensable for the stable and safe operation and utilization of the

  4. Science at Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, 1868-1893

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Linda Bart

    Science had a variety of uses at Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, a private, missionary school supported by northern whites and Virginia's black land grant school from 1872 to 1920. Samuel Chapman Armstrong, principal for the first twenty-five years (1868-1893), advocated not classical but scientific studies, primarily as applied science to improve lives and "civilize" blacks and Indians. Agriculture and mechanics were practiced in Hampton's industries, where students worked their way through school. They were organized for production rather than instruction, though Armstrong claimed that labor had a moral value and that practical experience was valuable learning. In contrast to works by James D. Anderson and Donald Spivey, this study stresses the pragmatic, business purposes of Hampton's industries rather than any ideological agenda. Problems with providing specialized facilities, apparatus, and teachers made it difficult for Hampton to provide rigorous, graded science instruction. Students learned of practical applications of science in agricultural lectures and in such classes as physiology. However, the curriculum was designed for teacher training, using broad, elementary science for general knowledge, to train minds, and to make adult remedial language lessons more effective. Not surprisingly, very few graduates pursued careers which required more than general science studies. Besides the utilitarian and disciplinary purposes, Hampton used science to discourage superstitious ideas in religion. Armstrong also argued for racially distinctive education for blacks and Indians on the basis of scientific ideas about cultural evolution and inheritance of the experience of past generations. In practice, however, Hampton teachers adapted mainstream tools and methods of instruction. Not all teachers shared Armstrong's racial views, and several demonstrated concern for students, confidence in their ability, and professional interest in advancing them as

  5. Next generation neutron scattering at Neutron Science Center project in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yasusada; Watanabe, Noboru; Niimura, Nobuo; Morii, Yukio; Katano, Susumu; Aizawa, Kazuya; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Koizumi, Satoshi; Osakabe, Toyotaka.

    1997-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has promoted neutron scattering researches by means of research reactors in Tokai Research Establishment, and proposes 'Neutron Science Research Center' to develop the future prospect of the Tokai Research Establishment. The scientific fields which will be expected to progress by the neutron scattering experiments carried out at the proposed facility in the Center are surveyed. (author)

  6. Fort Collins Science Center Ecosystem Dynamics Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jim; Melcher, C.; Bowen, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Complex natural resource issues require understanding a web of interactions among ecosystem components that are (1) interdisciplinary, encompassing physical, chemical, and biological processes; (2) spatially complex, involving movements of animals, water, and airborne materials across a range of landscapes and jurisdictions; and (3) temporally complex, occurring over days, weeks, or years, sometimes involving response lags to alteration or exhibiting large natural variation. Scientists in the Ecosystem Dynamics Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey, Fort Collins Science Center, investigate a diversity of these complex natural resource questions at the landscape and systems levels. This Fact Sheet describes the work of the Ecosystems Dynamics Branch, which is focused on energy and land use, climate change and long-term integrated assessments, herbivore-ecosystem interactions, fire and post-fire restoration, and environmental flows and river restoration.

  7. Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidd, E.M.

    1995-03-01

    The Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC), is the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) centralized software management facility. It is operated under contract for the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The ESTSC is authorized by DOE and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to license and distribute DOE-and NRC-sponsored software developed by national laboratories and other facilities and by contractors of DOE and NRC. ESTSC also has selected software from the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) through a software exchange agreement that DOE has with the agency.

  8. AGILE Data Center and AGILE science highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittori, C.

    2013-01-01

    AGILE is a scientific mission of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) with INFN, INAF e CIFS participation, devoted to gamma-ray astrophysics. The satellite is in orbit since April 23rd, 2007. Gamma-ray astrophysics above 100 MeV is an exciting field of astronomical sciences that has received a strong impulse in recent years. Despite the small size and budget, AGILE produced several important scientific results, among which the unexpected discovery of strong and rapid gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula. This discovery won to the AGILE PI and the AGILE Team the prestigious Bruno Rossi Prize for 2012, an international recognition in the field of high energy astrophysics. We present here the AGILE data center main activities, and we give an overview of the AGILE scientific highlights after 5 years of operations

  9. Leon M. Lederman Science Education Center: General Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    . Designed for middle school field trips, the hands-on exhibits at the Lederman Science Center are available Maintainer: ed-webmaster@fnal.gov Lederman Science Education Center Fermilab MS 777 Box 500 Batavia, IL 60510 Programs | Science Adventures | Calendar | Registration | About | Contact | FAQ | Fermilab Friends

  10. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    From this year, National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) started as an administrative corporation independent of the Government and concomitant internal re-organization was conducted: Three major Centers for Radiation safety, Radiation Emergency Medicine and Charged Particle Therapy were made. This report contains the summary of NIRS activities; research and development including studies of important project, fundamental research, fundamental and frontier research, contract research and fact-finding; management; organization/budget/finance; and appendix. Important projects are radiological studies in advanced medicine, on sensitivity, of effects on human and of hazard. Fundamental research concerns studies of environmental radiation, radiobiology, heavy particle ion therapy, diagnostic imaging, dose assessment and protection in medical radiation, brain function, systematic basic technology of nuclear sciences and international cooperation. Fact-finding studies are on the present situations of people exposed by nuclear experiment at Bikini Atoll in 1954 and of patients treated with thorotrast in past. Appendix cites the personnel name list, honorable events, cooperative studies, patent situation and others. (N.I.)

  11. Information Science Research Institute quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1995-09-30

    Subjects studied include optical character recognition (OCR), text retrieval, and document analysis. This report discusses the OCR test system and the text retrieval program. Staff and institute activities are given. Appendices give the ISRI methodology for preparing ground-truth test data and the test of OCR systems using DOE documents.

  12. The institution of science and the science of institutions the legacy of Joseph Ben-David

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The present anthology, edited by Marcel Herbst, is partially based on a conference, held in 2009, to reflect on the legacy of Ben-David, and contains a selection of substantially revised papers, plus four contributions specifically written for this volume. The book focuses on three major lines of Ben-David’s research, namely “Center and Periphery” (Part I), “Role and Ethos” (Part II), and “Organization and Growth” (Part III). In addition, comprehensive introductory (“Prologue”) and concluding chapters (“Epilogue”, Part IV) by Marcel Herbst are provided. The volume addresses the following disciplines: higher education, history and sociology of science, philosophy of science, history of medicine, public administration, policy studies, Jewish studies, and economics. The anthology is one of two new publications on Joseph Ben-David after the special Minerva edition Vol. 25, Numbers 1–2, March 1987, and Gad Freudenthal’s collection of Ben-David’s writings [1991]. The text can be used i...

  13. Transdisciplinary EU science institute needs funds urgently

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, T.P.; Vasbinder, Jan W.; Andersson, B.; Arthur, W. Brian; Boasson, Maarten; Boer, de Rob; Changeux, Jenb Pierre; Domingo, Esteban; Eigen, Manfred; Fersht, Alan; Frenkel, Daan; Rees, Martin; Huber, Robert; Hunt, Tim; Holland, John; May, Robert; Norby, Erling; Nijkamp, Peter; Lehn, Jean Marie; Rabbinge, Rudy; Scheffer, Maarten; Schuster, Peter; Serageldin, Ismail; Stuip, Jan; Vries, de Jan; Vierssen, van Wim; Willems, Rein

    2010-01-01

    Europe's future hinges on funding transdisciplinary scientific collaboration. But career paths, peer recognition, publication channels and the public funding of science are still mostly geared to maintain and reinforce disciplinarity. We do not properly understand the effects of technology on the

  14. Transdisciplinary EU Science Institute needs funds urgently

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasbinder, J.W.; Andersson, B.; Arthur, W.B.; Boasson, M.; Scheffer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Europe's future hinges on funding transdisciplinary scientific collaboration. But career paths, peer recognition, publication channels and the public funding of science are still mostly geared to maintain and reinforce disciplinarity. We do not properly understand the effects of technology on the

  15. Pioneering the Transdisciplinary Team Science Approach: Lessons Learned from National Cancer Institute Grantees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Amanda L; Stipelman, Brooke A; Hall, Kara L; Nebeling, Linda; Stokols, Daniel; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute has been a leader in supporting transdisciplinary (TD) team science. From 2005-2010, the NCI supported Transdisciplinary Research on Energetic and Cancer I (TREC I), a center initiative fostering the TD integration of social, behavioral, and biological sciences to examine the relationships among obesity, nutrition, physical activity and cancer. In the final year of TREC I, we conducted qualitative in-depth-interviews with 31 participating investigators and trainees to learn more about their experiences with TD team science, including challenges, facilitating factors, strategies for success, and impacts. Five main challenges emerged: (1) limited published guidance for how to engage in TD team science, when TREC I was implemented; (2) conceptual and scientific challenges inherent to efforts to achieve TD integration; (3) discipline-based differences in values, terminology, methods, and work styles; (4) project management challenges involved in TD team science; and (5) traditional incentive and reward systems that do not recognize or reward TD team science. Four main facilitating factors and strategies for success emerged: (1) beneficial attitudes and beliefs about TD research and team science; (2) effective team processes; (3) brokering and bridge-building activities by individuals holding particular roles in a research center; and (4) funding initiative characteristics that support TD team science. Broad impacts of participating in TD team science in the context of TREC I included: (1) new positive attitudes about TD research and team science; (2) new boundary-crossing collaborations; (3) scientific advances related to research approaches, findings, and dissemination; (4) institutional culture change and resource creation in support of TD team science; and (5) career advancement. Funding agencies, academic institutions, and scholarly journals can help to foster TD team science through funding opportunities, institutional policies on

  16. Foreign Science and Engineering Presence in U.S. Institutions and the Labor Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-23

    United States, Washington, DC, May 2005, pp. 17-65. 8 Center for Immigration Studies, Davis, Donald R. and David E. Weinstein , United States Technological...Academy of Sciences, Wm. A. Wulf, President, National Academy of Engineering, and Harvey Fineberg, President, Institute of Medicine, December 13, 2002

  17. The National Cancer Institute's Physical Sciences - Oncology Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Michael Graham

    In 2009, the NCI launched the Physical Sciences - Oncology Centers (PS-OC) initiative with 12 Centers (U54) funded through 2014. The current phase of the Program includes U54 funded Centers with the added feature of soliciting new Physical Science - Oncology Projects (PS-OP) U01 grant applications through 2017; see NCI PAR-15-021. The PS-OPs, individually and along with other PS-OPs and the Physical Sciences-Oncology Centers (PS-OCs), comprise the Physical Sciences-Oncology Network (PS-ON). The foundation of the Physical Sciences-Oncology initiative is a high-risk, high-reward program that promotes a `physical sciences perspective' of cancer and fosters the convergence of physical science and cancer research by forming transdisciplinary teams of physical scientists (e.g., physicists, mathematicians, chemists, engineers, computer scientists) and cancer researchers (e.g., cancer biologists, oncologists, pathologists) who work closely together to advance our understanding of cancer. The collaborative PS-ON structure catalyzes transformative science through increased exchange of people, ideas, and approaches. PS-ON resources are leveraged to fund Trans-Network pilot projects to enable synergy and cross-testing of experimental and/or theoretical concepts. This session will include a brief PS-ON overview followed by a strategic discussion with the APS community to exchange perspectives on the progression of trans-disciplinary physical sciences in cancer research.

  18. NASA Center for Computational Sciences: History and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The Nasa Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS) has been a leading capacity computing facility, providing a production environment and support resources to address the challenges facing the Earth and space sciences research community.

  19. National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Models Core Technologies Clinical Innovation Clinical and Translational Science Awards Program Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network Patient ... to our monthly e-newsletter. About Translation Translational Science Spectrum Explore the full spectrum of translational science, ...

  20. Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Todd C.; McCauliff, Sean; Cote, Miles T.; Girouard, Forrest R.; Wohler, Bill; Allen, Christopher; Middour, Christopher; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler mission is designed to continuously monitor up to 170,000 stars at a 30 minute cadence for 3.5 years searching for Earth-size planets. The data are processed at the Science Operations Center (SOC) at NASA Ames Research Center. Because of the large volume of data and the memory and CPU-intensive nature of the analysis, significant computing hardware is required. We have developed generic pipeline framework software that is used to distribute and synchronize the processing across a cluster of CPUs and to manage the resulting products. The framework is written in Java and is therefore platform-independent, and scales from a single, standalone workstation (for development and research on small data sets) to a full cluster of homogeneous or heterogeneous hardware with minimal configuration changes. A plug-in architecture provides customized control of the unit of work without the need to modify the framework itself. Distributed transaction services provide for atomic storage of pipeline products for a unit of work across a relational database and the custom Kepler DB. Generic parameter management and data accountability services are provided to record the parameter values, software versions, and other meta-data used for each pipeline execution. A graphical console allows for the configuration, execution, and monitoring of pipelines. An alert and metrics subsystem is used to monitor the health and performance of the pipeline. The framework was developed for the Kepler project based on Kepler requirements, but the framework itself is generic and could be used for a variety of applications where these features are needed.

  1. Science Outreach at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebo, George

    2002-07-01

    At the end of World War II Duane Deming, an internationally known economist enunciated what later came to be called "Total Quality Management" (TQM). The basic thrust of this economic theory called for companies and governments to identify their customers and to do whatever was necessary to meet their demands and to keep them satisfied. It also called for companies to compete internally. That is, they were to build products that competed with their own so that they were always improving. Unfortunately most U.S. corporations failed to heed this advice. Consequently, the Japanese who actively sought Deming's advice and instituted it in their corporate planning, built an economy that outstripped that of the U.S. for the next three to four decades. Only after U.S. corporations reorganized and fashioned joint ventures which incorporated the tenets of TQM with their Japanese competitors did they start to catch up. Other institutions such as the U.S. government and its agencies and schools face the same problem. While the power of the U.S. government is in no danger of being usurped, its agencies and schools face real problems which can be traced back to not heeding Deming's advice. For example, the public schools are facing real pressure from private schools and home school families because they are not meeting the needs of the general public, Likewise, NASA and other government agencies find themselves shortchanged in funding because they have failed to convince the general public that their missions are important. In an attempt to convince the general public that its science mission is both interesting and important, in 1998 the Science Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) instituted a new outreach effort using the interact to reach the general public as well as the students. They have called it 'Science@NASA'.

  2. Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamenov, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE) of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences is the leading Bulgarian Institute for scientific investigations and applications of nuclear science. The main Institute's activities in the field of elementary particles and nuclear physics, high energy physics and nuclear energy, radiochemistry, radioecology, radioactive wastes treatment, monitoring of the environment, nuclear instruments development ect. are briefly described. Several examples for: environmental radiation monitoring; monitoring of the radioactivity and heavy metals in aerosols, 99m Tc clinical use, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy application of IRT-2000 Research Reactor, neutron fluence for reactor vessel embrittlement, NPP safety analysis, nuclear fuel modelling are also presented

  3. Data sharing, small science and institutional repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragin, Melissa H; Palmer, Carole L; Carlson, Jacob R; Witt, Michael

    2010-09-13

    Results are presented from the Data Curation Profiles project research, on who is willing to share what data with whom and when. Emerging from scientists' discussions on sharing are several dimensions suggestive of the variation in both what it means 'to share' and how these processes are carried out. This research indicates that data curation services will need to accommodate a wide range of subdisciplinary data characteristics and sharing practices. As part of a larger set of strategies emerging across academic institutions, institutional repositories (IRs) will contribute to the stewardship and mobilization of scientific research data for e-Research and learning. There will be particular types of data that can be managed well in an IR context when characteristics and practices are well understood. Findings from this study elucidate scientists' views on 'sharable' forms of data-the particular representation that they view as most valued for reuse by others within their own research areas-and the anticipated duration for such reuse. Reported sharing incidents that provide insights into barriers to sharing and related concerns on data misuse are included.

  4. NATO Advanced Research Institute on the Application of Systems Science to Energy Policy Planning

    CERN Document Server

    Cherniavsky, E; Laughton, M; Ruff, L

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Research Institute (ARI) on "The Application of Systems Science to Energy Policy Planning" was held under the auspices of the NATO Special Programme Panel on Systems Science in collaboration with the National Center for Analysis of Energy Sys­ tems, Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA, as a part of the NATO Science Committee's continuous effort to promote the advancement of science through international cooperation. Advanced Research Institutes are sponsored by the NATO Science Committee for the purposes of bringing together senior scientists to seek consensus on an assessment of the present state of knowl­ edge on a specific topic and to make recommendations for future research directions. Meetings are structured to encourage inten­ sive group discussion. Invitees are carefully selected so that the group as a whole will contain the experience and expertise neces­ sary to make the conclusions valid and significant. A final report is published presenting the various viewpoints and conclusions....

  5. 76 FR 11765 - Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs; Institute of Education Sciences...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs; Institute of Education Sciences; Overview Information; Education Research and Special Education Research.... SUMMARY: The Director of the Institute of Education Sciences (Institute) announces the Institute's FY 2012...

  6. Science Centers in the Electronic Age: Are We Doomed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Robert L., Ed.; West, Robert M., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This issue is a debate-discussion concerning science centers in the electronic age. The articles are based on presentations made at the Science Center World Congress (1st, Heureka, Finland, June 13-17, 1996). The four articles are: (1) "Lessons from Laboratorio dell'Immaginario Scientifico" (Andrea Bandelli); (2) "The Doom-Shaped Thing in the…

  7. [Body-centered psychotherapy IKP (Institute of Body-Centered Psychotherapy): holistic psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer-Groeli, Y

    1996-03-01

    Body centered Psychotherapy IKP is treated in this article under the aspect of a holistic approach. First the theory and the system of science are summarised and shown as to which amount they are changing concerning knowledge of details and wholeness. It is pointed out that the actual paradigma "to the depth" has to be completed by that of "wideness". The way of holistic-multirelational thinking, stating a diagnosis and doing therapy is demonstrated along a case study going on at the background of a therapeutic encounter-relationship which is emotionally warm (Gestalt-approach).

  8. National Center for Mathematics and Science - links to related sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathematics and Science (NCISLA) HOME | WHAT WE DO | K-12 EDUCATION RESEARCH | PUBLICATIONS | TEACHER Modeling Middle School Mathematics National Association of Biology Teachers National Association for Mathematics National Science Teachers Assocation Show-Me Center Summit on Science TERC - Weaving Gender Equity

  9. Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute (RAMSRI) - Annual Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute (RAMSRI) is the fourth Research and Development Institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), undertaking research in human health and nutrition. This annual report covers the major activities undertaken by RAMSRI for the year 2015. The activities are grouped under the following headings: Establishment; Personnel and Organisation; Major Activities of Centres; Ongoing IAEA TC Projects; Human Resource Development; IAEA Coordinated Meetings Hosted; Publications; Achievements; Challenges; Projections for the Year 2016; and Recommendations.

  10. Ghana Space Science and Technology Institute (GSSTI) - Annual Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Ghana Space Science and Technology Institute (GSSTI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission was established to exploit space science and technology for socio-economic development of Ghana. The report gives the structure of GSSTI and the detailed activities of the year. Various activities include: training and seminars, projects and workshops. Publications and their abstracts are also listed. The report also highlights some of the challenges, provides some recommendations and points to some expectation for the following year.

  11. Program Analysis and Design Requirements for tne National Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    shell of an old exposition building with secondhand furniture to display exhibit items, to the Ontario Science Center, which is a more modem building...Storage Area Pigeonhole storage cabinets for children’s school books , coats, and boots are provided at the Indianapolis Center. The Ontario center...used shopping carts for school groups to store their coats and books . They do not work well according to center staff and are cumbersome and unsightly

  12. Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (a Brazilian regional center for nuclear sciences) - activities report - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    The annual activities report of 1999 of nuclear sciences regional center - Brazilian organization - introduces the next main topics: institutional relations; sectorial actions - logistic support and training, laboratory of radiation protection and dosimetry, laboratory of metrology, laboratory of chemical characterization; technical and scientific events; and financial resources and perspectives for 2000

  13. 78 FR 28601 - National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences; Request for Comment on Proposed Methods for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for... resources that leverage basic research in support of translational science; and by developing partnerships...-newsletter, distribution of emails to NCATS stakeholder listservs, and announcements on NCATS Facebook page...

  14. Central Scientific and Research Institute of Nuclear Information as the branch centre of information on nuclear science and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhangel'skij, I.A.; Sokolov, D.D.; Kalinin, V.F.; Nikiforov, V.S.

    1982-01-01

    The main tasks are considered in the scope of the Central Scientific-Research Institute for Information and Technological and Economic Studies on Nuclear Science and Technology. (TsNIIAtominform). The institute coordinates scientific research and information activity of information agencies of all the USSR organizations engaged in nuclear science and technology, excercises a centralized completion of their libraries, develops and puts into practice the most progressive methods for the information servicing. The institute is a national INIS center of the USSR. Here a system for the automatic information dissemination has been successfully elaborated and employed. Much of the institute activity is given to the estimation and analysis of information and to the determination of tendencies in the nuclear science and technology development. A conclusion is drawn to the effect that TsNIIAtominform, within 15 years of its existence, has formed as a center ensuring functioning of the system of scientific and technical information on nuclear science and technology

  15. Information center as a technical institute unifying a user community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maskewitz, B.F.; McGill, B.; Hatmaker, N.A.

    1976-01-01

    The historical background to the information analysis center concept is presented first. The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) at ORNL is cited as an example of the information analysis center. RSIC objectives and scope are described, and RSIC's role in unification of the field of shielding is discussed. Some problems in handling information exchange with respect to computer codes are examined

  16. How do science centers perceive their role in science teaching?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan Alexis; Stougaard, Birgitte; Andersen, Beth Wehner

    This poster presents the data of a survey of 11 science centres in the Region of Southern Denmark. The survey is the initial step in a project which aims, on the one hand, to identify the factors which conditions successful learning outcomes of visits to science centres, and, on the other hand...... and teachers. In the present survey we have approached the topic from the perspective of science centres. Needless to say, the science centres’ own perception of their role in science teaching plays a vital role with respect to the successfulness of such visits. The data of our survey suggest that, also from......, to apply this identification so as to guide the interaction of science teachers and science centres. Recent literature on this topic (Rennie et. al. 2003; Falk & Dierking 2000) suggest that stable learning outcomes of such visits require that such visits are (1) prepared in the sense that the teacher has...

  17. LANSCE: Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The principle goals of this project is to increase flux and improve resolution for neutron energies above 1 keV for nuclear physics experiments; and preserve current strong performance at thermal energies for material science.

  18. LANSCE: Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-02

    The principle goals of this project is to increase flux and improve resolution for neutron energies above 1 keV for nuclear physics experiments; and preserve current strong performance at thermal energies for material science.

  19. Fort Collins Science Center: Ecosystem Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Zack

    2004-01-01

    Many challenging natural resource management issues require consideration of a web of interactions among ecosystem components. The spatial and temporal complexity of these ecosystem problems demands an interdisciplinary approach integrating biotic and abiotic processes. The goals of the Ecosystem Dynamics Branch are to provide sound science to aid federal resource managers and use long-term, place-focused research and monitoring on federal lands to advance ecosystem science.

  20. Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) is the home (archive) of Precipitation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics, and...

  1. NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alison Davis NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) is the NIH institute that primarily supports ...

  2. The role of informal science centers in science education: attitudes, skills, and self-efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Sasson, Irit

    2014-01-01

    Informal learning relates to activities that occur outside the school environment. These learning environments, such as visits to science centers provide valuable motivational opportunities for students to learn science. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the pre-academic center in science education and particularly to explore its effects on 750 middle-school students' attitudes toward science, their scientific thinking skills and self-efficacy. Pre and post-case based q...

  3. PUTTING COMMUNICATION FRONT AND CENTER IN INSTITUTIONAL THEORY AND ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J.P.; Durand, R.; Fiss, P.C.; Lammers, J.C.; Vaara, E.

    2015-01-01

    We conceptualize the roots of cognitive, linguistic, and communicative theories of institutions and outline the promise and potential of a stronger communication focus for institutional theory. In particular, we outline a theoretical approach that puts communication at the heart of theories of

  4. The USGS Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Stephen Corn; Suzanna C. Soileau

    2014-01-01

    The Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute (ALWRI) was conceived as an interagency partnership, and its founding in 1993 coincided with the creation of the National Biological Service (NBS), from the biological research programs and staff in the Department of the Interior. NBS research zoologist Steve Corn moved to Missoula to join the staff at ALWRI in 1996, at...

  5. Annual report of national institute of radiological sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This annual report is a compilation of the research activities and achievement in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the fiscal year 1992 (from April 1992 through March 1993). Construction of the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) has reached semi-final stage. The research covers a wide range of radiological sciences from molecular biology to environmental studies and medicine including engineering for heavy ion therapy of cancer. Topics consists of physics, chemistry, biomedical science, clinical research, and environmental sciences, covering a total of 84 titles. A list of publications by staff members, activities of research divisions, and organization chart of the NIRS are given in Appendix. (J.P.N.) 78 refs

  6. The financial management of research centers and institutes at U.S. medical schools: findings from six institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, William T

    2006-06-01

    To explore three questions surrounding the financial management of research centers and institutes at U.S. medical schools: How do medical schools allocate institutional funds to centers and institutes? How and by whom are those decisions made? What are the implications of these decision-making models on the future of the academic biomedical research enterprise? Using a qualitative research design, the author and associates interviewed over 150 faculty members and administrators at six medical schools and their parent universities in 2004. Interview data were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. This methodology generated rich descriptions and explanations of the six medical schools, which can produce extrapolations to, but not necessarily generalizable findings to, other institutions and settings. An examination of four dimensions of financial decision-making-funding timing, process, structure, and culture-produces two essential models of how medical schools approach the financial management of research centers. In the first, a "charity" model, center directors make hat-in-hand appeals directly to the dean, the result of which may depend on individual negotiation skills and personal relationships. In the second, a "planned-giving" model, the process for obtaining and renewing funds is institutionalized, agreed upon, and monitored. The ways in which deans, administrators, department chairs, and center directors attend to, decide upon, and carry out financial decisions can influence how people throughout the medical school think about interdisciplinary and collaborative activities marshalled though centers and institutes.

  7. KBTAC [Knowledge-Based Technology Application Center] - The EPRI [Electric Power Research Institute]-sponsored knowledge-based technology application center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.; Wood, R.M.; Scherer, J.

    1990-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has announced the establishment of the Knowledge-Based Technology Application Center (KBTAC), whose goal is to assist member utilities with expert system technology and applications. The center, established November 7, 1989, is located on the campus of Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, and will be operated jointly by Kaman Sciences Corporation and the university. The mission of the KBTAC is to assist EPRI member utilities to develop, test, and transfer expert systems into nuclear power plant operations, maintenance, and administration

  8. Bringing You the Moon: Lunar Education Efforts of the Center for Lunar Science and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, A. J.; Shupla, C.; Shipp, S.; Allen, J.; Kring, D. A.; Halligan, E.; LaConte, K.

    2012-01-01

    The Center for Lunar Science and Exploration (CLSE), a collaboration between the Lunar and Planetary Institute and NASA's Johnson Space Center, is one of seven member teams of the NASA Lunar Science Institute. In addition to research and exploration activities, the CLSE team is deeply invested in education and public outreach. Overarching goals of CLSE education are to strengthen the future science workforce, attract and retain students in STEM disciplines, and develop advocates for lunar exploration. The team's efforts have resulted in a variety of programs and products, including the creation of a variety of Lunar Traveling Exhibits and the High School Lunar Research Project, featured at http://www.lpi.usra.edu/nlsi/education/.

  9. Science Center Public Forums: Engaging Lay-Publics in Resilience Deliberations Through Informal Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittenfeld, D.; Choi, F.; Farooque, M.; Helmuth, B.

    2017-12-01

    Because climate hazards present a range of potential impacts and considerations for different kinds of stakeholders, community responses to increase resilience are best considered through the inclusion of diverse, informed perspectives. The Science Center Public Forums project has created multifaceted modules to engage diverse publics in substantive deliberations around four hazards: heat waves, drought, extreme precipitation, and sea level rise. Using a suite of background materials including visualization and narrative components, each of these daylong dialogues engage varied groups of lay-participants at eight US science centers in learning about hazard vulnerabilities and tradeoffs of proposed strategies for building resilience. Participants listen to and consider the priorities and perspectives of fellow residents and stakeholders, and work together to formulate detailed resilience plans reflecting both current science and informed public values. Deliverables for the project include visualizations of hazard vulnerabilities and strategies through immersive planetarium graphics and Google Earth, stakeholder perspective narratives, and detailed background materials for each project hazard. This session will: communicate the process for developing the hazard modules with input from subject matter experts, outline the process for iterative revisions based upon findings from formative focus groups, share results generated by participants of the project's first two pilot forums, and describe plans for broader implementation. These activities and outcomes could help to increase the capacity of informal science education institutions as trusted conveners for informed community dialogue by educating residents about vulnerabilities and engaging them in critical thinking about potential policy responses to critical climate hazards while sharing usable public values and priorities with civic planners.

  10. Stanford MFEL and Near Infrared Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    are incorporated into glass catadioptric lenses that are mounted and sealed at each end of the stainless steel microscope. In addition to the self...highly effective in preventing biofilm formation , as well as in killing biofilms that are already present. b) Peer-Reviewed publications (in reversed...Multiphoton Microscopy in the Biomedical Sciences VII, SPIE, vol. 6442 (2007). 3. On Image formation in Near-field Infrared Microscopy, D. M

  11. New Developments At The Science Archives Of The NASA Exoplanet Science Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berriman, G. Bruce

    2018-06-01

    The NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI) at Caltech/IPAC is the science center for NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program and as such, NExScI operates three scientific archives: the NASA Exoplanet Archive (NEA) and Exoplanet Follow-up Observation Program Website (ExoFOP), and the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA).The NASA Exoplanet Archive supports research and mission planning by the exoplanet community by operating a service that provides confirmed and candidate planets, numerous project and contributed data sets and integrated analysis tools. The ExoFOP provides an environment for exoplanet observers to share and exchange data, observing notes, and information regarding the Kepler, K2, and TESS candidates. KOA serves all raw science and calibration observations acquired by all active and decommissioned instruments at the W. M. Keck Observatory, as well as reduced data sets contributed by Keck observers.In the coming years, the NExScI archives will support a series of major endeavours allowing flexible, interactive analysis of the data available at the archives. These endeavours exploit a common infrastructure based upon modern interfaces such as JuypterLab and Python. The first service will enable reduction and analysis of precision radial velocity data from the HIRES Keck instrument. The Exoplanet Archive is developing a JuypterLab environment based on the HIRES PRV interactive environment. Additionally, KOA is supporting an Observatory initiative to develop modern, Python based pipelines, and as part of this work, it has delivered a NIRSPEC reduction pipeline. The ensemble of pipelines will be accessible through the same environments.

  12. History of Science Web Resources at American Institute of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, G. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Center for History of Physics and the associated Niels Bohr Library & Archives at the American Institute of Physics were pioneers in web resource development for education and for research in the 1990s. While these units of AIP continue to add significantly to the traditional ways of putting content before the public, they are also experimenting with blogs and Facebook, and are looking at other forms of interactive web presence. This talk explores how an active research center is trying to do both.

  13. “Not Designed for Us”: How Science Museums and Science Centers Socially Exclude Low-Income, Minority Ethnic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores how people from low-income, minority ethnic groups perceive and experience exclusion from informal science education (ISE) institutions, such as museums and science centers. Drawing on qualitative data from four focus groups, 32 interviews, four accompanied visits to ISE institutions, and field notes, this paper presents an analysis of exclusion from science learning opportunities during visits alongside participants’ attitudes, expectations, and conclusions about participation in ISE. Participants came from four community groups in central London: a Sierra Leonean group (n = 21), a Latin American group (n = 18), a Somali group (n = 6), and an Asian group (n = 13). Using a theoretical framework based on the work of Bourdieu, the analysis suggests ISE practices were grounded in expectations about visitors’ scientific knowledge, language skills, and finances in ways that were problematic for participants and excluded them from science learning opportunities. It is argued that ISE practices reinforced participants preexisting sense that museums and science centers were “not for us.” The paper concludes with a discussion of the findings in relation to previous research on participation in ISE and the potential for developing more inclusive informal science learning opportunities. PMID:25574059

  14. New FINESSE Faculty Institutes for NASA Earth and Space Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.; Slater, Stephanie; Marshall, Sunette Sophia; Stork, Debra; Pomeroy, J. Richard R

    2014-06-01

    In a systematic effort to improve the preparation of future science teachers, scholars coordinated by the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research are providing a series of high-quality, 2-day professional development workshops, with year-round follow-up support, for college and university professors who prepare future science teachers to work with highly diverse student populations. These workshops focus on reforming and revitalizing undergraduate science teaching methods courses and Earth and Space science content courses that future teachers most often take to reflect contemporary pedagogies and data-rich problem-based learning approaches steeped in authentic scientific inquiry, which consistently demonstrate effectiveness with diverse students. Participants themselves conduct science data-rich research projects during the institutes using highly regarded approaches to inquiry using proven models. In addition, the Institute allocates significant time to illustrating best practices for working with diverse students. Moreover, participants leave with a well-formulated action plan to reform their courses targeting future teachers to include more data-rich scientific inquiry lessons and to be better focused on improving science education for a wide diversity of students. Through these workshops faculty use a backwards faded scaffolding mechanism for working inquiry into a deeper understanding of science by using existing on-line data to develop and research astronomy, progressing from creating a valid and easily testable question, to simple data analysis, arriving at a conclusion, and finally presenting and supporting that conclusion in the classroom. An updated schedule is available at FINESSEProgram.org

  15. 76 FR 39076 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: Under the... Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. Date: August 3 and 4, 2011. Time of Meeting...

  16. 75 FR 43496 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: Under the... Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. Date: August 10 and 11, 2010. Time of Meeting...

  17. 77 FR 62223 - Board of Visitors Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Board of Visitors Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: Under the... Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. Date: October 31, 2012 and November 1, 2012...

  18. 76 FR 45543 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY: Department of the Army, DOD. ACTION: Notice; cancellation. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center meeting scheduled for August 3 and 4, 2011...

  19. 77 FR 13571 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... matters, ACCJC interactions, and a review of previous BoV recommendations. Agenda: Summary--March 21--The... Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. Date: March 21, 2012. Time of Meeting... Institute Foreign Language Center in response to the agenda. All written statements shall be submitted to...

  20. WFIRST: STScI Science Operations Center (SSOC) Activities and Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Karoline M.; STScI WFIRST Team

    2018-01-01

    The science operations for the WFIRST Mission will be distributed between Goddard Space Flight Center, the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC). The STScI Science Operations Center (SSOC) will schedule and archive all WFIRST observations, will calibrate and produce pipeline-reduced data products for the Wide Field Instrument, and will support the astronomical community in planning WFI observations and analyzing WFI data. During the formulation phase, WFIRST team members at STScI have developed operations concepts for scheduling, data management, and the archive; have performed technical studies investigating the impact of WFIRST design choices on data quality and analysis; and have built simulation tools to aid the community in exploring WFIRST’s capabilities. We will highlight examples of each of these efforts.

  1. Information actions in science and technology: institutionalities, agencies and subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Rabello

    Full Text Available Considering the influence of new agency forms - intervention and interaction among subjects - in the context of information intermediation, we aim to approach information actions in Science and Technology (S&T taking into consideration the institutionalities involved. For such, we assume there is an influence of a theoretical model emerging in Information Science (IS regarding current inventive and interactive form propitiated by the Web. The text is structured in two central topics bringing: i theoretical and epistemic constructions of the "information action" concept; and ii a certain interpretation oriented by the "informational action in S&T" construct, taking as its object the actions performed by IBICT (Brazilian Institute for Information in Science and Technology, directed towards excellence in information. Finally, we discuss how limitations of the "systemic model" propitiate the construction of new study objects in the model emerging in IS from theoretical innovations and counterpoints thoughts facing the diverse forms of information action, considering, for instance, the action of subjects on what concerns the validation of information in the current scenery of institutional intermediation.

  2. Energy Frontier Research Center, Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd R. Allen

    2011-12-01

    This is a document required by Basic Energy Sciences as part of a mid-term review, in the third year of the five-year award period and is intended to provide a critical assessment of the Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels (strategic vision, scientific plans and progress, and technical accomplishments).

  3. 7th International Summer Institute in Surface Science

    CERN Document Server

    Howe, Russell

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains review articles which were written by the invited speak­ ers of the seventh International Summer Institute in Surface Science (ISISS), held at the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee in July 1985. The form of ISISS is a set of tutorial review lectures presented over a one-week period by internationally recognized experts on various aspects of surface science. Each speaker is asked, in addition, to write a review article on his lecture topic. No single volume in the series Chemistry and Physics of Solid Surfaces can possibly cover the entire field of modern surface science. However, the series as a whole is intended to provide experts and students alike with a comprehensive set of reviews and literature references, particularly empha­ sizing the gas-solid interface. The collected articles from previous Summer Institutes have been published under the following titles: Surface Science: Recent Progress and Perspectives, Crit. Rev. Solid State Sci. 4, 125-559 (1974) Chemistry and Physics of ...

  4. Suborganizations of Institutions in Library and Information Science Journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalibor Fiala

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyze Web of Science data records of articles published from 1991 to 2010 in library and information science (LIS journals. We focus on addresses of these articles’ authors and create citation and collaboration networks of departments which we define as the first suborganization of an institution. We present various rankings of departments (e.g., by citations, times cited, PageRank, publications, etc. and highlight the most influential of them. The correlations between the individual departments are also shown. Furthermore, we visualize the most intense citation and collaboration relationships between “LIS” departments (many of which are not genuine LIS departments but merely affiliations of authors publishing in journals covered by the specific Web of Science category and give examples of two basic research performance distributions across departments of the leading universities in the field.

  5. Modern Data Center Services Supporting Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, J. D.; Cartwright, J.; McLean, S. J.; Boucher, J.; Neufeld, D.; LaRocque, J.; Fischman, D.; McQuinn, E.; Fugett, C.

    2011-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) World Data Center for Geophysics and Marine Geology provides scientific stewardship, products and services for geophysical data, including bathymetry, gravity, magnetics, seismic reflection, data derived from sediment and rock samples, as well as historical natural hazards data (tsunamis, earthquakes, and volcanoes). Although NGDC has long made many of its datasets available through map and other web services, it has now developed a second generation of services to improve the discovery and access to data. These new services use off-the-shelf commercial and open source software, and take advantage of modern JavaScript and web application frameworks. Services are accessible using both RESTful and SOAP queries as well as Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standard protocols such as WMS, WFS, WCS, and KML. These new map services (implemented using ESRI ArcGIS Server) are finer-grained than their predecessors, feature improved cartography, and offer dramatic speed improvements through the use of map caches. Using standards-based interfaces allows customers to incorporate the services without having to coordinate with the provider. Providing fine-grained services increases flexibility for customers building custom applications. The Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping program and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning program are two examples of national initiatives that require common data inventories from multiple sources and benefit from these modern data services. NGDC is also consuming its own services, providing a set of new browser-based mapping applications which allow the user to quickly visualize and search for data. One example is a new interactive mapping application to search and display information about historical natural hazards. NGDC continues to increase the amount of its data holdings that are accessible and is augmenting the capabilities with modern web

  6. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described

  7. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  8. Identifying the Local Impacts of National ATE Centers on Their Host Institutions: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Charles; Fynewever, Herb; Petcovic, Heather; Bierema, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the local impacts of national advanced technological education (ATE) centers on their host institutions. A sample of three mature, national ATE centers are chosen, with each center serving as a case for a mixed-methods, collective case study research design. Results, drawn from interviews and surveys,…

  9. Molecular Science Research Center annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knotek, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics group is studying chemical kinetics and reactions dynamics of terrestrial and atmospheric processes as well as the chemistry of complex waste forms and waste storage media. Staff are using new laser systems and surface-mapping techniques in combination with molecular clusters that mimic adsorbate/surface interactions. The Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics group is determining biomolecular structure/function relationships for processes the control the biological transformation of contaminants and the health effects of toxic substances. The Materials and Interfaces program is generating information needed to design and synthesize advanced materials for the analysis and separation of mixed chemical waste, the long-term storage of concentrated hazardous materials, and the development of chemical sensors for environmental monitoring of various organic and inorganic species. The Theory, Modeling, and Simulation group is developing detailed molecular-level descriptions of the chemical, physical, and biological processes in natural and contaminated systems. Researchers are using the full spectrum of computational techniques. The Computer and Information Sciences group is developing new approaches to handle vast amounts of data and to perform calculations for complex natural systems. The EMSL will contain a high-performance computing facility, ancillary computing laboratories, and high-speed data acquisition systems for all major research instruments.

  10. USGS science in Menlo Park -- a science strategy for the U.S. Geological Survey Menlo Park Science Center, 2005-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Carr, Michael D.; Halsing, David L.; John, David A.; Langenheim, V.E.; Mangan, Margaret T.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Takekawa, John Y.; Tiedeman, Claire

    2006-01-01

    In the spring of 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Menlo Park Center Council commissioned an interdisciplinary working group to develop a forward-looking science strategy for the USGS Menlo Park Science Center in California (hereafter also referred to as "the Center"). The Center has been the flagship research center for the USGS in the western United States for more than 50 years, and the Council recognizes that science priorities must be the primary consideration guiding critical decisions made about the future evolution of the Center. In developing this strategy, the working group consulted widely within the USGS and with external clients and collaborators, so that most stakeholders had an opportunity to influence the science goals and operational objectives.The Science Goals are to: Natural Hazards: Conduct natural-hazard research and assessments critical to effective mitigation planning, short-term forecasting, and event response. Ecosystem Change: Develop a predictive understanding of ecosystem change that advances ecosystem restoration and adaptive management. Natural Resources: Advance the understanding of natural resources in a geologic, hydrologic, economic, environmental, and global context. Modeling Earth System Processes: Increase and improve capabilities for quantitative simulation, prediction, and assessment of Earth system processes.The strategy presents seven key Operational Objectives with specific actions to achieve the scientific goals. These Operational Objectives are to:Provide a hub for technology, laboratories, and library services to support science in the Western Region. Increase advanced computing capabilities and promote sharing of these resources. Enhance the intellectual diversity, vibrancy, and capacity of the work force through improved recruitment and retention. Strengthen client and collaborative relationships in the community at an institutional level.Expand monitoring capability by increasing density, sensitivity, and

  11. La fabrique des sciences des institutions aux pratiques

    CERN Document Server

    Benninghoff, Martin; Crettaz von Roten, Fabienne; Merz, Martina

    2006-01-01

    Aujourd'hui, les façons de produire, d'organiser, d'évaluer et d'utiliser les savoirs sont en profond débat. De plus en plus, l'Etat, la société civile et l'économie tentent d'influencer les activités des universités et des laboratoires de recherche. Ces développements mettent à l'épreuve tout à la fois les fondements des systèmes d'enseignement supérieur et de recherche, l'autonomie des institutions scientifiques, la définition des frontières des savoirs et l'acceptation des sciences. Dans des contextes suisses et européens, cet ouvrage s'intéresse aux manières dont les sciences et les technologies sont fabriquées, en analysant leurs institutions et les pratiques. A partir d'une approche relationnelle, les sciences et les technologies sont conçues comme des phénomènes profondément sociaux, culturels et politiques. Une telle démarche déstabilise les visions parfois idéalisées et stéréotypées de la construction des savoirs. Des études de cas détaillées décrivent des phénomè...

  12. 8th International Summer Institute in Surface Science

    CERN Document Server

    Howe, Russell

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains review articles written by the invited speakers at the eighth International Summer Institute in Surface Science (ISISS 1987), held at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in August of 1987. During the course of ISISS, invited speakers, all internationally recognized experts in the various fields of surface science, present tutorial review lectures. In addition, these experts are asked to write review articles on their lecture topic. Former ISISS speakers serve as advisors concerning the selection of speakers and lecture topics. Em­ phasis is given to those areas which have not been covered in depth by recent Summer Institutes, as well as to areas which have recently gained in significance and in which important progress has been made. Because of space limitations, no individual volume of Chemistry and Physics of Solid Surfaces can possibly cover the whole area of modem surface science, or even give a complete survey of recent pro­ gress in the field. However, an attempt is made to pres...

  13. Waste management in the Institute for Nuclear Sciences 'Vinca' - Belgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raicevic, J.; Avramovic, I.; Plecas, I.; Mandic, M.; Goldammer, W.

    2004-01-01

    The Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences served for many years as the only Yugoslav (Serbia and Montenegro) nuclear institute. Therefore, it acted for many years as national storage facility for the radioactive waste from all institutional (medical, military, etc.) activities. The interim storage was situated within the Vinca Institute historically at several different places. The main fraction of the wastes is stored in two metallic hangars. In addition, underground stainless steel tanks in concrete shields have been constructed to accept all processed liquid waste from the research reactor RA. The current situation of the interim storage facilities is not satisfactory. However, the principle limitation for improvements of the waste management at the Vinca Institute lies in the fact that long-term solutions cannot be addressed at the moment. Plans for a final repository for radioactive waste do not exist yet in the Serbia and Montenegro. Consequently, waste management can only address an interim solution. In order to conduct all waste management activities in a safe manner, an overall strategy and study for improvement/rearrangement of radioactive waste storage facilities was developed which addresses all wastes and their management. The IAEA is providing assistance to these activities. This support includes a project which has been initiated by the IAEA to improve the waste management at the Vinca Institute. This paper describes the current status of the development of this overall strategy and study for improvement/rearrangement of radioactive waste storage facilities. The information available and the current status of the development of concepts for the processing and storage of the waste are summarised. (author)

  14. Status of ion sources at National Institute of Radiological Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, A; Fujita, T; Goto, A; Hattori, T; Hamano, T; Hojo, S; Honma, T; Imaseki, H; Katagiri, K; Muramatsu, M; Sakamoto, Y; Sekiguchi, M; Suda, M; Sugiura, A; Suya, N

    2012-02-01

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) maintains various ion accelerators in order to study the effects of radiation of the human body and medical uses of radiation. Two electrostatic tandem accelerators and three cyclotrons delivered by commercial companies have offered various life science tools; these include proton-induced x-ray emission analysis (PIXE), micro beam irradiation, neutron exposure, and radioisotope tracers and probes. A duoplasmatron, a multicusp ion source, a penning ion source (PIG), and an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) are in operation for these purposes. The Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is an accelerator complex for heavy-ion radiotherapy, fully developed by NIRS. HIMAC is utilized not only for daily treatment with the carbon beam but also for fundamental experiments. Several ECRISs and a PIG at HIMAC satisfy various research and clinical requirements.

  15. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    The research activities of National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) in 1997 are described, being divided into 14 categories: (1) heavy ion project research, (2) group research, (3) special research, (4) designated research, (5) ordinary research, (6) safety analysis research, (7) actual situation investigation, (8) accepted research, (9) general technology research for nuclear energy, (10) radioactivity investigation and research, (11) research for science and technology promotion, (12) international research cooperation, (13) safety evaluation for radioactive liquid waste reprocessing test, (14) human brain function research. The heavy ion project research is divided into 5 categories, further; (1) clinical research, (2) medical treatment research, (3) diagnosis research, (4) biological research, (5) physics and engineering research. A great number of research papers published are listed. Organization, personnel, budget and accounts of the NIRS are also mentioned in the report. (M. Suetake)

  16. Computer Science Research Institute 2004 annual report of activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004. During this period the CSRI hosted 166 visitors representing 81 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 65 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 4 workshops. These 4 CSRI sponsored workshops had 140 participants--74 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 66 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 14 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

  17. Computer Science Research Institute 2003 annual report of activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2003. During this period the CSRI hosted 164 visitors representing 78 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 78 were summer students or faculty members. The CSRI partially sponsored 5 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 178 participants--137 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 41 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 18 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

  18. Computer Science Research Institute 2005 annual report of activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, Bernadette M.; Collis, Samuel Scott; Ceballos, Deanna Rose; Womble, David Eugene

    2008-04-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005. During this period, the CSRI hosted 182 visitors representing 83 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these, 60 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 105 participants, 78 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 27 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 12 long-term collaborative research projects and 3 Sabbaticals.

  19. TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: Center for Study of Science ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    For CSTEP, this project will help enhance its research quality, organizational performance, and policy engagement. Building a strong think tank for India Through this support over the ... -raise the bar for excellence in policy engagement tools and approaches -build a robust system of decision-making structures, systems, ...

  20. Secondary Educational Institution Centered Diffusion of ICT in Rural Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Md. Saifuddin

    for development (ICT4D) and educational technology in the scope and findings as follows. The current literature lacks a holistic understanding of the complexities of the barriers that are rooted and entangled across individual, social, and organizational policies and power structures. Moreover......This dissertation presents a holistic approach for exploring, analyzing, solving, and circumventing the barriers to the integration and adoption of ICT in relation to the learning environments of secondary educational institutions in rural Bangladesh. It contributes to the fields of ICT......, there is an absence of empirical studies for the diffusion of ICT using mixed methods, methodological appropriation, and practical diffusion strategy identification. Therefore, I have taken my motivation from the “Vision 2021: Digital Bangladesh” initiatives and consider that ICT is a relatively new field...

  1. Overview of graduate training program of John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryi, Andrei

    The John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science is a center of excellence in the UK for advanced and novel accelerator technology, providing expertise, research, development and training in accelerator techniques, and promoting advanced accelerator applications in science and society. We work in JAI on design of novel light sources upgrades of 3-rd generation and novel FELs, on plasma acceleration and its application to industrial and medical fields, on novel energy recovery compact linacs and advanced beam diagnostics, and many other projects. The JAI is based on three universities - University of Oxford, Imperial College London and Royal Holloway University of London. Every year 6 to 10 accelerators science experts, trained via research on cutting edge projects, defend their PhD thesis in JAI partner universities. In this presentation we will overview the research and in particular the highly successful graduate training program in JAI.

  2. Cyberinfrastructure for Open Science at the Montreal Neurological Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Samir; Glatard, Tristan; Rogers, Christine; Saigle, John; Paiva, Santiago; MacIntyre, Leigh; Safi-Harab, Mouna; Rousseau, Marc-Etienne; Stirling, Jordan; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; MacFarlane, David; Kostopoulos, Penelope; Rioux, Pierre; Madjar, Cecile; Lecours-Boucher, Xavier; Vanamala, Sandeep; Adalat, Reza; Mohaddes, Zia; Fonov, Vladimir S; Milot, Sylvain; Leppert, Ilana; Degroot, Clotilde; Durcan, Thomas M; Campbell, Tara; Moreau, Jeremy; Dagher, Alain; Collins, D Louis; Karamchandani, Jason; Bar-Or, Amit; Fon, Edward A; Hoge, Rick; Baillet, Sylvain; Rouleau, Guy; Evans, Alan C

    2016-01-01

    Data sharing is becoming more of a requirement as technologies mature and as global research and communications diversify. As a result, researchers are looking for practical solutions, not only to enhance scientific collaborations, but also to acquire larger amounts of data, and to access specialized datasets. In many cases, the realities of data acquisition present a significant burden, therefore gaining access to public datasets allows for more robust analyses and broadly enriched data exploration. To answer this demand, the Montreal Neurological Institute has announced its commitment to Open Science, harnessing the power of making both clinical and research data available to the world (Owens, 2016a,b). As such, the LORIS and CBRAIN (Das et al., 2016) platforms have been tasked with the technical challenges specific to the institutional-level implementation of open data sharing, including: Comprehensive linking of multimodal data (phenotypic, clinical, neuroimaging, biobanking, and genomics, etc.)Secure database encryption, specifically designed for institutional and multi-project data sharing, ensuring subject confidentiality (using multi-tiered identifiers).Querying capabilities with multiple levels of single study and institutional permissions, allowing public data sharing for all consented and de-identified subject data.Configurable pipelines and flags to facilitate acquisition and analysis, as well as access to High Performance Computing clusters for rapid data processing and sharing of software tools.Robust Workflows and Quality Control mechanisms ensuring transparency and consistency in best practices.Long term storage (and web access) of data, reducing loss of institutional data assets.Enhanced web-based visualization of imaging, genomic, and phenotypic data, allowing for real-time viewing and manipulation of data from anywhere in the world.Numerous modules for data filtering, summary statistics, and personalized and configurable dashboards. Implementing

  3. Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Center (GES DISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempler, Steve

    2016-01-01

    The GES DIS is one of 12 NASA Earth science data centers. The GES DISC vision is to enable researchers and educators maximize knowledge of the Earth by engaging in understanding their goals, and by leading the advancement of remote sensing information services in response to satisfying their goals. This presentation will describe the GES DISC approach, successes, challenges, and best practices.

  4. Research Centers & Consortia | College of Engineering & Applied Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academics Admission Student Life Research Schools & Colleges Libraries Athletics Centers & ; Applied Science Powerful Ideas. Proven Results. Search for: Go This site All UWM Search Site Menu Skip to content Academics Undergraduate Programs Majors Minors Integrated Bachelor/Master Degree Applied Computing

  5. 15 CFR 950.6 - Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC). 950.6 Section 950.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE...

  6. Visitor empowerment and the authority of science: Exploring institutionalized tensions in a science center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Molly

    This research explored the relationships among societal, organizational, and visitor assumptions about learning in a science center. The study combined a sociocultural theory of learning with a constructivist theory of organizations to examine empirical links among the history of the Exploratorium (founded in 1969 and located in San Francisco, California), its organizational practices, and family activity at its exhibits. The study focused on three perspectives on science learning in a science center: (1) the societal perspective, which traced assumptions about science learning to the history of science centers; (2) the organizational perspective, which documented the ways that assumptions about science learning were manifested in historic museum exhibits; and (3) the family perspective, which documented the assumptions about science learning that characterized family activity at historic exhibits. All three perspectives uncovered a tension between the goals of supporting public empowerment on the one hand and preserving scientific authority on the other. Findings revealed this tension to be grounded in the social context of the organization's development, where ideas about promoting democracy and preserving the authority of science intersected. The tension was manifested in museum exhibits, which had as their task addressing the dual purposes of supporting all visitors, while also supporting committed visitors. The tension was also evident in the activity of families, who echoed sentiments about potential for their own empowerment but deferred to scientific authority. The study draws on critiques of a hidden curriculum in schools in order to explore the relationship between empowerment and authority in science centers, specifically as they are conveyed in the explicit and underlying missions of the Exploratorium. Findings suggest the need for science centers to engage in ongoing critical reflection and also lend empirical justification to the need for science

  7. Interdisciplinary research center devoted to molecular environmental science opens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, David J.

    In October, a new research center opened at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom. The center is the product of over a decade of ground-breaking interdisciplinary research in the Earth and related biological and chemical sciences at the university The center also responds to the British governments policy of investing in research infrastructure at key universities.The Williamson Research Centre, the first of its kind in Britain and among the first worldwide, is devoted to the emerging field of molecular environmental science. This field also aims to bring about a revolution in understanding of our environment. Though it may be a less violent revolution than some, perhaps, its potential is high for developments that could affect us all.

  8. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    The fiscal year 2004 was the 4th year since the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) reformed as an Independent Administrative Institution (IAI) in April 2001. The main items of this report, being the same as the previous year's, are: the summary of NIRS activities; research and development including studies of important project, fundamental research, fundamental and frontier research, contract research and fact-finding; management; organization/budget/finance; and appendix. Important projects are radiological studies in advanced medicine, on sensitivity, of effects on human and of hazard. Fundamental research concerns studies of environmental radiation, radiobiology, heavy particle ion therapy, diagnostic imaging, dose assessment and protection in medical radiation, brain function, systematic basic technology of nuclear sciences and international cooperation. Fact-finding studies are on the present situations of people exposed by nuclear experiment at Bikini Atoll in 1954 and of patients treated with thorotrast in past. Appendix cites the personnel name list, honorable events, cooperative studies, patent situation and others. (J.P.N.)

  9. Annual report of National Institute for Fusion Science. April 2013 - March 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This annual report summarizes achievements from research activities at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) between April 2013 and March 2014. NIFS is an inter-university research organization and conducts open collaboration research under three frameworks which are the General Collaboration Research, the Large Helical Device Collaboration Research and the Bilateral Collaboration Research. More than 500 collaborating studies were implemented during the covered period. About 2,400 collaborators studies were implemented during the covered period. About 2,400 collaborators participated in joint research from 220 external institutions. Many intensively advanced results in plasma physics, fusion science and related fields have been obtained from these studies. Not only NIFS, but also 6 university centers serve as joint research laboratories/centers under bilateral collaboration research. NIFS also organizes diversified frameworks for international collaboration through 6 bilateral agreements, 3 multi-lateral agreements and academic exchange agreements with 18 institutes abroad for the global development of the function of inter-university research organization. (J.P.N.)

  10. NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Science and Technology for Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Greg; Bailey, Brad; Gibbs, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is a virtual institute focused on research at the intersection of science and exploration, training the next generation of lunar scientists, and development and support of the international community. As part of its mission, SSERVI acts as a hub for opportunities that engage the larger scientific and exploration communities in order to form new interdisciplinary, research-focused collaborations. The nine domestic SSERVI teams that comprise the U.S. complement of the Institute engage with the international science and exploration communities through workshops, conferences, online seminars and classes, student exchange programs and internships. SSERVI represents a close collaboration between science, technology and exploration enabling a deeper, integrated understanding of the Moon and other airless bodies as human exploration moves beyond low Earth orbit. SSERVI centers on the scientific aspects of exploration as they pertain to the Moon, Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and the moons of Mars, with additional aspects of related technology development, including a major focus on human exploration-enabling efforts such as resolving Strategic Knowledge Gaps (SKGs). The Institute focuses on interdisciplinary, exploration-related science focused on airless bodies targeted as potential human destinations. Areas of study represent the broad spectrum of lunar, NEA, and Martian moon sciences encompassing investigations of the surface, interior, exosphere, and near-space environments as well as science uniquely enabled from these bodies. This research profile integrates investigations of plasma physics, geology/geochemistry, technology integration, solar system origins/evolution, regolith geotechnical properties, analogues, volatiles, ISRU and exploration potential of the target bodies. New opportunities for both domestic and international partnerships are continually generated through these research and

  11. The Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Astro Space Center: yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagkesamanskii, Rustam D

    2009-01-01

    The development of Russian (formerly Soviet) radio astronomy is indissolubly linked with the P N Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Russian Academy of Sciences. From the late 1940s, the institute conducted most of its radio astronomy research in the Crimea, at stations or on field trips; in the late 1950s, the center of gravity of research moved to the southern Moscow region, where one of the largest radio astronomy observatories in the country and in the world was developed within less than twenty years. The observatory unique instrumentation system is briefly reviewed in a historical perspective. Key research areas and some major achievements are outlined, and the prospects of the observatory as (currently) part of the LPI Astro Space Center are examined. (conferences and symposia)

  12. The Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Astro Space Center: yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagkesamanskii, Rustam D [Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory, Astro Space Center, Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-30

    The development of Russian (formerly Soviet) radio astronomy is indissolubly linked with the P N Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Russian Academy of Sciences. From the late 1940s, the institute conducted most of its radio astronomy research in the Crimea, at stations or on field trips; in the late 1950s, the center of gravity of research moved to the southern Moscow region, where one of the largest radio astronomy observatories in the country and in the world was developed within less than twenty years. The observatory unique instrumentation system is briefly reviewed in a historical perspective. Key research areas and some major achievements are outlined, and the prospects of the observatory as (currently) part of the LPI Astro Space Center are examined. (conferences and symposia)

  13. Teachers' professional development needs and current practices at the Alexander Science Center School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargus, Gerald Vincent

    meetings, classroom coaching/Big Lab co-teaching, summer institutes, and off-campus conferences and seminars. Results indicated that the effectiveness of the six venues was closely tied to the level of collaborative planning that took place between the Alexander Science Center School and the associated California Science Center. Examination of teachers' and stakeholders opinions reflect that after a year-and-a-half of operations, the school's professional development program is perceived as disjointed and ineffective, but that the foundation of a sound program has been established.

  14. University of Washington's eScience Institute Promotes New Training and Career Pathways in Data Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, S.; Parker, M. S.; Howe, B.; Lazowska, E.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid advances in technology are transforming nearly every field from "data-poor" to "data-rich." The ability to extract knowledge from this abundance of data is the cornerstone of 21st century discovery. At the University of Washington eScience Institute, our mission is to engage researchers across disciplines in developing and applying advanced computational methods and tools to real world problems in data-intensive discovery. Our research team consists of individuals with diverse backgrounds in domain sciences such as astronomy, oceanography and geology, with complementary expertise in advanced statistical and computational techniques such as data management, visualization, and machine learning. Two key elements are necessary to foster careers in data science: individuals with cross-disciplinary training in both method and domain sciences, and career paths emphasizing alternative metrics for advancement. We see persistent and deep-rooted challenges for the career paths of people whose skills, activities and work patterns don't fit neatly into the traditional roles and success metrics of academia. To address these challenges the eScience Institute has developed training programs and established new career opportunities for data-intensive research in academia. Our graduate students and post-docs have mentors in both a methodology and an application field. They also participate in coursework and tutorials to advance technical skill and foster community. Professional Data Scientist positions were created to support research independence while encouraging the development and adoption of domain-specific tools and techniques. The eScience Institute also supports the appointment of faculty who are innovators in developing and applying data science methodologies to advance their field of discovery. Our ultimate goal is to create a supportive environment for data science in academia and to establish global recognition for data-intensive discovery across all fields.

  15. Annual report of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The annual report for the activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan in the fiscal year 1990 is presented. The activities are divided into research, technical aids, training, medical services, management affairs at the Nakaminato Laboratory Branch Office, library or editing, international cooperation, and general affairs. Research activities are described under the following sections: (1) special researches covering biological risk evaluation in public exposure and exposure assessment in the environment and the public involved in food chain, medical use of accelerated heavy ions, and survey for the demonstration of dose-response relationships in low dose irradiation; (2) five assigned researches; (3) ordinary researches concerning physics, pharmacochemistry, biology, genetics, pathology and physiology, cell biology, internal exposure, environmental science, clinical research, clinical research for radiation injuries, medical use of heavy particles, environmental radiation ecology, and aquatic radiation ecology; (4) risk estimation of radiation; (5) survey for radiation response phenomena in fish and in immunity associated with low dose irradiation; (6) actual surveys for Bikini victims, population doses of medical and occupational exposure, and thorotrast exposure; (7) project research; (8) integrated atomic energy-based technological research; (9) radioactivity survey; (10) research supported by Science and Technology Agency aids; (11) International research cooperation; and (12) government-private joint cooperative study. Appendices include the personnel list and the bibliography of articles reported by the staff.

  16. 75 FR 47797 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY: Department of the Army, DOD. ACTION: Notice; cancellation. SUMMARY: The Board of... be held on September 13 & 14, 2010 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Defense Language Institute Foreign...

  17. 75 FR 59720 - Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research... responsibility for appointing not more than 15 members to a Methodology Committee of the Patient- Centered Outcomes Research Institute. In addition, the Directors of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  18. Strategic plan for science-U.S. Geological Survey, Ohio Water Science Center, 2010-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2010-01-01

    This Science Plan identifies specific scientific and technical programmatic issues of current importance to Ohio and the Nation. An examination of those issues yielded a set of five major focus areas with associated science goals and strategies that the Ohio Water Science Center will emphasize in its program during 2010-15. A primary goal of the Science Plan is to establish a relevant multidisciplinary scientific and technical program that generates high-quality products that meet or exceed the expectations of our partners while supporting the goals and initiatives of the U.S. Geological Survey. The Science Plan will be used to set the direction of new and existing programs and will influence future training and hiring decisions by the Ohio Water Science Center.

  19. The Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline Framework Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Todd C.; Cote, Miles T.; McCauliff, Sean; Girouard, Forrest R.; Wohler, Bill; Allen, Christopher; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Bryson, Stephen T.; Middour, Christopher; Caldwell, Douglas A.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) is responsible for several aspects of the Kepler Mission, including managing targets, generating on-board data compression tables, monitoring photometer health and status, processing the science data, and exporting the pipeline products to the mission archive. We describe how the generic pipeline framework software developed for Kepler is extended to achieve these goals, including pipeline configurations for processing science data and other support roles, and custom unit of work generators that control how the Kepler data are partitioned and distributed across the computing cluster. We describe the interface between the Java software that manages the retrieval and storage of the data for a given unit of work and the MATLAB algorithms that process these data. The data for each unit of work are packaged into a single file that contains everything needed by the science algorithms, allowing these files to be used to debug and evolve the algorithms offline.

  20. [Science and society. Guidelines for the Leopoldina Study Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    In order to adequately perform its many diverse tasks as a scholars' society and as the German National Academy of Sciences, the Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher Leopoldina needs to view itself in a historical context. This can only happen as part of a culture of remembrance which fosters the memory of the Leopoldina's past and subjects this to a critical analysis in the context of the history of science and academies. The newly founded Leopoldina Study Center for the History of Science and Science Academies is to be a forum that pursues established forms of historical research at the Leopoldina, organizes new scientific projects, and presents its findings to the public. The aim is to involve as many Leopoldina members as possible from all of its disciplines, as well as to collaborate with national and international partners.

  1. The Centers for Ocean Science Education Excellence (COSEE) initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, S.; Rom, E.

    2003-04-01

    Seven regional Centers for Ocean Science Education Excellence have recently been established to promote the integration of ocean science research into high-quality education programs aimed at both formal and informal audiences throughout the United States. The regional Centers include two complementary partnerships in California, a New England regional effort, a Mid-Atlantic partnership, a Southeastern collaborative, a Florida initiative and a central Gulf of Mexico alliance. A Central Coordinating Office in Washington DC will help the group develop into a cohesive and focused national network. Initial funding has been provided by the National Science Foundation with complementary support from the Office of Naval Research and multiple units within the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (specifically the National Ocean Service, the Office of Ocean Exploration and the National SeaGrant Office). Under an umbrella of common goals and objectives, the first cohort of Centers in the COSEE network is remarkably diverse in terms of geography, organizational structure and programmatic focus. NSF’s presentation will describe these partnerships, the different approaches that are being taken by the individual Centers and the expectations that NSF has for the network as a whole.

  2. New Center Links Earth, Space, and Information Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswathanarayana, U.

    2004-05-01

    Broad-based geoscience instruction melding the Earth, space, and information technology sciences has been identified as an effective way to take advantage of the new jobs created by technological innovations in natural resources management. Based on this paradigm, the University of Hyderabad in India is developing a Centre of Earth and Space Sciences that will be linked to the university's super-computing facility. The proposed center will provide the basic science underpinnings for the Earth, space, and information technology sciences; develop new methodologies for the utilization of natural resources such as water, soils, sediments, minerals, and biota; mitigate the adverse consequences of natural hazards; and design innovative ways of incorporating scientific information into the legislative and administrative processes. For these reasons, the ethos and the innovatively designed management structure of the center would be of particular relevance to the developing countries. India holds 17% of the world's human population, and 30% of its farm animals, but only about 2% of the planet's water resources. Water will hence constitute the core concern of the center, because ecologically sustainable, socially equitable, and economically viable management of water resources of the country holds the key to the quality of life (drinking water, sanitation, and health), food security, and industrial development of the country. The center will be focused on interdisciplinary basic and pure applied research that is relevant to the practical needs of India as a developing country. These include, for example, climate prediction, since India is heavily dependent on the monsoon system, and satellite remote sensing of soil moisture, since agriculture is still a principal source of livelihood in India. The center will perform research and development in areas such as data assimilation and validation, and identification of new sensors to be mounted on the Indian meteorological

  3. Spatial analyses identify the geographic source of patients at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shu-Chih; Kanarek, Norma; Fox, Michael G; Guseynova, Alla; Crow, Shirley; Piantadosi, Steven

    2010-02-01

    We examined the geographic distribution of patients to better understand the service area of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, a designated National Cancer Institute (NCI) comprehensive cancer center located in an urban center. Like most NCI cancer centers, the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center serves a population beyond city limits. Urban cancer centers are expected to serve their immediate neighborhoods and to address disparities in access to specialty care. Our purpose was to learn the extent and nature of the cancer center service area. Statistical clustering of patient residence in the continental United States was assessed for all patients and by gender, cancer site, and race using SaTScan. Primary clusters detected for all cases and demographically and tumor-defined subpopulations were centered at Baltimore City and consisted of adjacent counties in Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, New Jersey and New York, and the District of Columbia. Primary clusters varied in size by race, gender, and cancer site. Spatial analysis can provide insights into the populations served by urban cancer centers, assess centers' performance relative to their communities, and aid in developing a cancer center business plan that recognizes strengths, regional utility, and referral patterns. Today, 62 NCI cancer centers serve a quarter of the U.S. population in their immediate communities. From the Baltimore experience, we might project that the population served by these centers is actually more extensive and varies by patient characteristics, cancer site, and probably cancer center services offered.

  4. NASA's astrophysics archives at the National Space Science Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansteenberg, M. E.

    1992-01-01

    NASA maintains an archive facility for Astronomical Science data collected from NASA's missions at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) at Goddard Space Flight Center. This archive was created to insure the science data collected by NASA would be preserved and useable in the future by the science community. Through 25 years of operation there are many lessons learned, from data collection procedures, archive preservation methods, and distribution to the community. This document presents some of these more important lessons, for example: KISS (Keep It Simple, Stupid) in system development. Also addressed are some of the myths of archiving, such as 'scientists always know everything about everything', or 'it cannot possibly be that hard, after all simple data tech's do it'. There are indeed good reasons that a proper archive capability is needed by the astronomical community, the important question is how to use the existing expertise as well as the new innovative ideas to do the best job archiving this valuable science data.

  5. Status of the TESS Science Processing Operations Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Campbell, Jennifer; Tenebaum, Peter; Sanderfer, Dwight; Davies, Misty D.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Morris, Rob; Mansouri-Samani, Masoud; Girouardi, Forrest; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) science pipeline is being developed by the Science Processing Operations Center (SPOC) at NASA Ames Research Center based on the highly successful Kepler Mission science pipeline. Like the Kepler pipeline, the TESS science pipeline will provide calibrated pixels, simple and systematic error-corrected aperture photometry, and centroid locations for all 200,000+ target stars, observed over the 2-year mission, along with associated uncertainties. The pixel and light curve products are modeled on the Kepler archive products and will be archived to the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST). In addition to the nominal science data, the 30-minute Full Frame Images (FFIs) simultaneously collected by TESS will also be calibrated by the SPOC and archived at MAST. The TESS pipeline will search through all light curves for evidence of transits that occur when a planet crosses the disk of its host star. The Data Validation pipeline will generate a suite of diagnostic metrics for each transit-like signature discovered, and extract planetary parameters by fitting a limb-darkened transit model to each potential planetary signature. The results of the transit search will be modeled on the Kepler transit search products (tabulated numerical results, time series products, and pdf reports) all of which will be archived to MAST.

  6. Petroleum Science and Technology Institute with the TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, H. C.; Olson, J. E.; Bryant, S. L.; Lake, L. W.; Bommer, P.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Jablonowski, C.; Willis, M.

    2009-12-01

    The TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution, a professional development program for 8th- thru 12th-grade Earth Science teachers, presented a one-week Petroleum Science and Technology Institute at The University of Texas at Austin campus. The summer program was a joint effort between the Jackson School of Geosciences and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering. The goal of the institute was to focus on the STEM components involved in the petroleum industry and to introduce teachers to the larger energy resources theme. The institute kicked off with a welcoming event and tour of a green, energy-efficient home (LEED Platinum certified) owned by one of the petroleum engineering faculty. Tours of the home included an introduction to rainwater harvesting, solar energy, sustainable building materials and other topics on energy efficiency. Classroom topics included drilling technology (including a simulator lab and an overview of the history of the technology), energy use and petroleum geology, well-logging technology and interpretation, reservoir engineering and volumetrics (including numerous labs combining chemistry and physics), risk assessment and economics, carbon capture and storage (CO2 sequestration technology) and hydraulic fracturing. A mid-week field trip included visiting the Ocean Star offshore platform in Galveston, the Weiss Energy Hall at the Houston Museum of Science and Schlumberger (to view 3-D visualization technology) in Houston. Teachers remarked that they really appreciated the focused nature of the institute and especially found the increased use of mathematics both a tool for professional growth, as well as a challenge for them to use more math in their science classes. STEM integration was an important feature of the summer institute, and teachers found the integration of science (earth sciences, geophysics), technology, engineering (petroleum, chemical and reservoir) and mathematics particularly valuable. Pre

  7. Energy Frontier Research Center, Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Todd R.

    2011-01-01

    The Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, has funded the INL as one of the Energy Frontier Research Centers in the area of material science of nuclear fuels. This document is the required annual report to the Office of Science that outlines the accomplishments for the period of May 2010 through April 2011. The aim of the Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuels (CMSNF) is to establish the foundation for predictive understanding of the effects of irradiation-induced defects on thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. The science driver of the center's investigation is to understand how complex defect and microstructures affect phonon mediated thermal transport in UO2, and achieve this understanding for the particular case of irradiation-induced defects and microstructures. The center's research thus includes modeling and measurement of thermal transport in oxide fuels with different levels of impurities, lattice disorder and irradiation-induced microstructure, as well as theoretical and experimental investigation of the evolution of disorder, stoichiometry and microstructure in nuclear fuel under irradiation. With the premise that thermal transport in irradiated UO2 is a phonon-mediated energy transport process in a crystalline material with defects and microstructure, a step-by-step approach will be utilized to understand the effects of types of defects and microstructures on the collective phonon dynamics in irradiated UO2. Our efforts under the thermal transport thrust involved both measurement of diffusive phonon transport (an approach that integrates over the entire phonon spectrum) and spectroscopic measurements of phonon attenuation/lifetime and phonon dispersion. Our distinct experimental efforts dovetail with our modeling effort involving atomistic simulation of phonon transport and prediction of lattice thermal conductivity using the Boltzmann transport framework.

  8. NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Merging Science and Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Yvonne J.

    2016-10-01

    Established in 2013, through joint funding from the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is focused on science at the intersection of these two enterprises. Addressing questions of value to the human exploration program that also represent important research relevant to planetary science, SSERVI creates a bridge between HEOMD and SMD. The virtual institute model reduces travel costs, but its primary virtue is the ability to join together colleagues who bring the right expertise, techniques and tools, regardless of their physical location, to address multi-faceted problems, at a deeper level than could be achieved through the typical period of smaller research grants. In addition, collaboration across team lines and international borders fosters the creation of new knowledge, especially at the intersections of disciplines that might not otherwise overlap.SSERVI teams investigate the Moon, Near-Earth Asteroids, and the moons of Mars, addressing questions fundamental to these target bodies and their near space environments. The institute is currently composed of nine U.S. teams of 30-50 members each, distributed geographically across the United States, ten international partners, and a Central Office located at NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, CA. U.S. teams are competitively selected through peer-reviewed proposals submitted to NASA every 2-3 years, in response to a Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN). The current teams were selected under CAN-1, with funding for five years (2014-2019). A smaller, overlapping set of teams are expected to be added in 2017 in response to CAN-2, thereby providing continuity and a firm foundation for any directional changes NASA requires as the CAN-1 teams end their term. This poster describes the research areas and composition of the institute to introduce SSERVI to the broader planetary

  9. NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Merging Science and Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Schmidt, G. K.; Bailey, B. E.; Minafra, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) represents a close collaboration between science, technology and exploration, and was created to enable a deeper understanding of the Moon and other airless bodies. SSERVI is supported jointly by NASA's Science Mission Directorate and Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The institute currently focuses on the scientific aspects of exploration as they pertain to the Moon, Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and the moons of Mars, but the institute goals may expand, depending on NASA's needs, in the future. The 9 initial teams, selected in late 2013 and funded from 2014-2019, have expertise across the broad spectrum of lunar, NEA, and Martian moon sciences. Their research includes various aspects of the surface, interior, exosphere, near-space environments, and dynamics of these bodies. NASA anticipates a small number of additional teams to be selected within the next two years, with a Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) likely to be released in 2016. Calls for proposals are issued every 2-3 years to allow overlap between generations of institute teams, but the intent for each team is to provide a stable base of funding for a five year period. SSERVI's mission includes acting as a bridge between several groups, joining together researchers from: 1) scientific and exploration communities, 2) multiple disciplines across a wide range of planetary sciences, and 3) domestic and international communities and partnerships. The SSERVI central office is located at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA. The administrative staff at the central office forms the organizational hub for the domestic and international teams and enables the virtual collaborative environment. Interactions with geographically dispersed teams across the U.S., and global partners, occur easily and frequently in a collaborative virtual environment. This poster will provide an overview of the 9 current US teams and

  10. AMS data production facilities at science operations center at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choutko, V.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Shan, B.

    2017-10-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a high energy physics experiment on the board of the International Space Station (ISS). This paper presents the hardware and software facilities of Science Operation Center (SOC) at CERN. Data Production is built around production server - a scalable distributed service which links together a set of different programming modules for science data transformation and reconstruction. The server has the capacity to manage 1000 paralleled job producers, i.e. up to 32K logical processors. Monitoring and management tool with Production GUI is also described.

  11. Life Sciences at the Cyclotron Center of the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podhorsky, D.; Kovac, P.; Macasek, F.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation the history and present status of the Cyclotron Center of the Slovak (CC SR) are presented. A state run scientific center and production facility ensuring: - the basic and applied research in nuclear physics, chemistry, biology and medicine; - production of radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals; - and applications of heavy ions and electron accelerator technologies in medicine and material science. Current financial status of the CC SR is following: Deblocation of the Russian; Federation debt to the Slovak Republic (94 %); State budget of the Slovak Republic (3 %); IAEA (3 %)

  12. Artificial climate experiment facility in Institute for Environmental Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hisamatsu, Shunichi [Department of Radioecology, Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    The Institute for Environmental Sciences is now constructing the artificial climate experiment facility (ACEF) to research the effect of climate on movement of elements in the various environments. The ACEF will have one large, and five small artificial climate experiment chambers. The large chamber is designed to simulate climate conditions in all Japan. It will equip systems to simulate sunshine, rainfall (including acid rain), snowfall and fog (including acid fog). `Yamase` condition will also be reproduced in it. Yamase is a Japanese term describing the characteristic weather condition occurring mainly on the Pacific Ocean side at the northern Japan. While the small chamber will not have rainfall, snowfall and fog systems, radioisotopes will be used in the two small chambers which will be set up in a radioisotope facility. We describe here the outline of the ACEF and the preliminary research programs being undertaken using both kinds of chambers. (author)

  13. Artificial climate experiment facility in Institute for Environmental Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisamatsu, Shunichi

    1999-01-01

    The Institute for Environmental Sciences is now constructing the artificial climate experiment facility (ACEF) to research the effect of climate on movement of elements in the various environments. The ACEF will have one large, and five small artificial climate experiment chambers. The large chamber is designed to simulate climate conditions in all Japan. It will equip systems to simulate sunshine, rainfall (including acid rain), snowfall and fog (including acid fog). 'Yamase' condition will also be reproduced in it. Yamase is a Japanese term describing the characteristic weather condition occurring mainly on the Pacific Ocean side at the northern Japan. While the small chamber will not have rainfall, snowfall and fog systems, radioisotopes will be used in the two small chambers which will be set up in a radioisotope facility. We describe here the outline of the ACEF and the preliminary research programs being undertaken using both kinds of chambers. (author)

  14. Annual report: AEC Institute for Life Sciences, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    The AEC-Institute for life sciences research programme can be divided into four divisions: experimental nuclear medicine, radiobiology, radiopharmacy and hormone receptor studies. The experimental nuclear medicine division investigates and undertakes new developments in nuclear diagnostics with a view to clinical application, especially developments in dataprocessing techniques and radiopharmaceuticals. Physiological, biochemical and pharmacological problems are also investigated by using tracers and nuclear diagnostic techniques. The radiobiology division is concerned with the development of biochemical techniques for determining radiosensitivity amongst radiation workers as well as clinical-biochemical, diagnostic procedures for identifying exposure to ionizing types of radiation (X- or gamma radiation). The hormone receptor division is concerned with the study of the role of steroid hormone receptors, steroids and carcinogenes in the etiology of breast cancer. Research projects as well as completed and ongoing research are listed in this report

  15. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1999. Volume II: Life Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaussi, Rolf; Gschwend, Beatrice [eds.

    2000-07-01

    The existing activities of the Department of Life Sciences have grown out of the specific know how and the unique experimental possibilities available at PSI. Primarily, these have been and are complex facilities for using particle beams (protons, neutrons) on the one hand and know how in the production, handling and chemistry of radionuclides on the other. The common theme of the department has thus been the study and use of various types of radiation in therapy and diagnostics of human disease and in particular of cancer. The four units active in this area are: The major activity in the Radiation Medicine unit is Proton Therapy, which aims to further develop and optimise the world-wide unique spot scanning facility for irradiating malignant tumours with minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissues, including the established OPTIS program for the treatment of eye tumours. The Centre for Radiopharmaceutical Science represents a joint activity of PSI with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ) and the University of Zurich. Its major goals are the development of novel tumour targeted radioconjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy and the production and evaluation of new PET (positron emission tomography) radiotracers for various applications in neuro physiology and drug development. The Institute of Medical Radiobiology analyses questions of the molecular biology of DNA repair. It is a joint activity of PSI and the University of Zurich. The Structural Biology unit is currently being established. A strong in-house research activity in macromolecular crystallography will complement the more user-oriented protein crystallography beam line, which is being built at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). In particular, tumour targeting by molecular vehicles and DNA repair are areas where structural information can provide important insights. Progress in 1999 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 1999 is also provided.

  16. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 2000. Volume II: Life Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaussi, Rolf; Gschwend, Beatrice [eds.

    2001-07-01

    The existing activities of the Department of Life Sciences have grown out of the specific know-how and the unique experimental possibilities available at PSI. Primarily, these have been and are complex facilities for using particle beams (protons, neutrons) on the one hand and know-how in the production, handling and chemistry of radionuclides on the other. The common theme of the department has thus been the study and use of various types of radiation in therapy and diagnostics of human disease and in particular of cancer. The four units active in this area are: The major activity in the Radiation Medicine unit is Proton Therapy, which aims to further develop and optimise the world-wide unique spot scanning facility for irradiating malignant tumours with minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissues, including the established OPTIS program for the treatment of eye tumours. The Centre for Radiopharmaceutical Science represents a joint activity of PSI with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ) and the University of Zurich. Its major goals are the development of novel tumour targeted radioconjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy and the production and evaluation of new PET (positron emission tomography) radiotracers for various applications in neuro physiology and drug development. The Institute of Medical Radiobiology analyses questions of the molecular biology of DNA repair. It is a joint activity of PSI and the University of Zurich. The newly established Structural Biology group is still in the build-up phase. A strong in-house research activity in macromolecular crystallography will complement the more user-oriented protein crystallography beam line, which is being built at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). In particular, tumour targeting by molecular vehicles and DNA repair are areas where structural information can provide important insights. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2000

  17. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1999. Volume II: Life Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaussi, Rolf; Gschwend, Beatrice

    2000-01-01

    The existing activities of the Department of Life Sciences have grown out of the specific know how and the unique experimental possibilities available at PSI. Primarily, these have been and are complex facilities for using particle beams (protons, neutrons) on the one hand and know how in the production, handling and chemistry of radionuclides on the other. The common theme of the department has thus been the study and use of various types of radiation in therapy and diagnostics of human disease and in particular of cancer. The four units active in this area are: The major activity in the Radiation Medicine unit is Proton Therapy, which aims to further develop and optimise the world-wide unique spot scanning facility for irradiating malignant tumours with minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissues, including the established OPTIS program for the treatment of eye tumours. The Centre for Radiopharmaceutical Science represents a joint activity of PSI with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ) and the University of Zurich. Its major goals are the development of novel tumour targeted radioconjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy and the production and evaluation of new PET (positron emission tomography) radiotracers for various applications in neuro physiology and drug development. The Institute of Medical Radiobiology analyses questions of the molecular biology of DNA repair. It is a joint activity of PSI and the University of Zurich. The Structural Biology unit is currently being established. A strong in-house research activity in macromolecular crystallography will complement the more user-oriented protein crystallography beam line, which is being built at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). In particular, tumour targeting by molecular vehicles and DNA repair are areas where structural information can provide important insights. Progress in 1999 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 1999 is also provided

  18. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 2000. Volume II: Life Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaussi, Rolf; Gschwend, Beatrice

    2001-01-01

    The existing activities of the Department of Life Sciences have grown out of the specific know-how and the unique experimental possibilities available at PSI. Primarily, these have been and are complex facilities for using particle beams (protons, neutrons) on the one hand and know-how in the production, handling and chemistry of radionuclides on the other. The common theme of the department has thus been the study and use of various types of radiation in therapy and diagnostics of human disease and in particular of cancer. The four units active in this area are: The major activity in the Radiation Medicine unit is Proton Therapy, which aims to further develop and optimise the world-wide unique spot scanning facility for irradiating malignant tumours with minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissues, including the established OPTIS program for the treatment of eye tumours. The Centre for Radiopharmaceutical Science represents a joint activity of PSI with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ) and the University of Zurich. Its major goals are the development of novel tumour targeted radioconjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy and the production and evaluation of new PET (positron emission tomography) radiotracers for various applications in neuro physiology and drug development. The Institute of Medical Radiobiology analyses questions of the molecular biology of DNA repair. It is a joint activity of PSI and the University of Zurich. The newly established Structural Biology group is still in the build-up phase. A strong in-house research activity in macromolecular crystallography will complement the more user-oriented protein crystallography beam line, which is being built at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). In particular, tumour targeting by molecular vehicles and DNA repair are areas where structural information can provide important insights. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2000

  19. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Medical Sciences Division report for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, F.; Poston, S.; Engle, J.

    1995-01-01

    The primary mission of the Medical Sciences Division is (1) to conduct basic and applied biomedical research on human health related to energy systems, (2) to provide technical assistance and training in occupational and environmental medicine, and (3) to make related biomedical applications available to others through technology transfer. As can be gleaned from this report, the strengths and capabilities of their staff in carrying out this mission are closely aligned with the four core competencies of ORISE: (1) occupational and environmental health, (2) environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, (3) education and training, and (4) enabling research. Brief descriptions of the various scientific and technical programs and their progress, as well as the staff responsible for the accomplishments made during 1994, are presented in this report. Research programs include the following: biochemistry; cytogenetics; Center for Epidemiologic Research; Center for Human Reliability Studies; occupational medicine; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiation Internal Dose Information Center

  20. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Medical Sciences Division report for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, F.; Poston, S.; Engle, J. [eds.

    1995-08-01

    The primary mission of the Medical Sciences Division is (1) to conduct basic and applied biomedical research on human health related to energy systems, (2) to provide technical assistance and training in occupational and environmental medicine, and (3) to make related biomedical applications available to others through technology transfer. As can be gleaned from this report, the strengths and capabilities of their staff in carrying out this mission are closely aligned with the four core competencies of ORISE: (1) occupational and environmental health, (2) environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, (3) education and training, and (4) enabling research. Brief descriptions of the various scientific and technical programs and their progress, as well as the staff responsible for the accomplishments made during 1994, are presented in this report. Research programs include the following: biochemistry; cytogenetics; Center for Epidemiologic Research; Center for Human Reliability Studies; occupational medicine; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiation Internal Dose Information Center.

  1. Postdoctoral Mentoring at the Space Telescope Science Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeples, Molly

    2018-01-01

    The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) has, on average, about 30 postdoctoral researchers. This groups is funded primarily by individual grants but includes independent Fellows (Giacconi, Lasker, and Hubble Fellows) and postdocs based at neighboring Johns Hopkins University but with supervisors based at STScI. Our mentoring program aims to support the intellectual and career development of this entire group, outside of the scientific and career mentoring they receive from their direct supervisors or fellowship sponsors. Our mentoring program consists of two parts. First and foremost, each postdoc has a mentor (someone on the research staff) with whom they meet regularly. Ideally, the mentor is not someone with whom the postdoc collaborates scientifically and can therefore provide an outside, independent, fresh perspective. As different postdocs require different kinds of mentoring, we try to best pair postdocs and mentors according to the postdocs’ needs and the mentors’ backgrounds, skills, and mentoring styles. Second, we conduct several career guidance seminars and related events throughout the year. These have included proposal writing workshops, formalized practice talks, academic job application seminars, and discussion sessions on career paths outside of academia (featuring colleagues who are no longer in academia). These workshops have the added benefit of providing the postdocs with a wider support network of staff members. Finally, we have begun to conduct an annual survey of the postdocs to gauge their experience and integration at STScI, the efficacy of the mentoring program, and to collect feedback on how to improve postdoctoral life at the Institute.

  2. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    Five years have passed since the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) was reformed as an Independent Administrative Institution (IAI) in April 2001, and this fiscal year (2005-2006) is the last year in the first Mid-term Plan of NIRS. The main items of this report, being the same as the previous year's, are: the summary of NIRS activities; research and development including studies of important project, fundamental research, fundamental and frontier research, contract research and fact-finding; management; organization/budget/finance; and appendix. Important projects are radiological studies in advanced medicine, on sensitivity, of effects on human and of hazard. Fundamental research concerns studies of environmental radiation, radiobiology, heavy particle ion therapy, diagnostic imaging, dose assessment and protection in medical radiation, brain function, development of High-Coverage Expression Profiling (HiCEP) technique and new crossover studies. Fact-finding studies are on the present situations of people exposed by nuclear experiment at Bikini Atoll in 1954 and of patients treated with thorotrast in past. Appendix cites the personnel name list, honorable events, cooperative studies, patent situation and others. (J.P.N.)

  3. Network Science Center Research Teams Visit to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Network Science Center, West Point www.netscience.usma.edu 845.938.0804 Corporation as a gift from the Government of China, and consists of a 2,500...first glimpse into what became a common thread throughout the trip: the presence of a gap between microfinance and large corporate investments in the...cutting out other middlemen and increasing their own profits. Some even sell directly to major coffee names (such as Starbucks ). In our discussion it

  4. Annual report of national institute of radiological science in 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    The research activities of National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) in 1998 can be divided into 16 categories: (1) general research-heavy ion project research, (2) group research, (3) special research, (4) designed research, (5) ordinary research, (6) safety analysis research, (7) investigation of actual situation, (8) general research for the basic technology of nuclear energy, (9) human brain function research, (10) investigation and research of radioactivity, (11) research for science and technology promotion, (12) international research cooperation, (13) specific joint research, (14) technological evaluation for radioactive liquid waste decontamination test, (15) strategic basis research, (16) general research for emergency medical treatment. The heavy ion project research is divided into 5 categories further; (1) clinical research, (2) medical treatment research, (3) diagnosis research, (4) biological research, (5) physics and engineering research. The detailed subjects of study are described in the report. A great number of research papers are published in Japan and all over the world. Organization, personnel, budget and accounts of the NIRS are also mentioned in the report. (Suetake, M.)

  5. National Institutes of Health addresses the science of diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Collins, Francis S.

    2015-01-01

    The US biomedical research workforce does not currently mirror the nation’s population demographically, despite numerous attempts to increase diversity. This imbalance is limiting the promise of our biomedical enterprise for building knowledge and improving the nation’s health. Beyond ensuring fairness in scientific workforce representation, recruiting and retaining a diverse set of minds and approaches is vital to harnessing the complete intellectual capital of the nation. The complexity inherent in diversifying the research workforce underscores the need for a rigorous scientific approach, consistent with the ways we address the challenges of science discovery and translation to human health. Herein, we identify four cross-cutting diversity challenges ripe for scientific exploration and opportunity: research evidence for diversity’s impact on the quality and outputs of science; evidence-based approaches to recruitment and training; individual and institutional barriers to workforce diversity; and a national strategy for eliminating barriers to career transition, with scientifically based approaches for scaling and dissemination. Evidence-based data for each of these challenges should provide an integrated, stepwise approach to programs that enhance diversity rapidly within the biomedical research workforce. PMID:26392553

  6. Guidance for Science Data Centers through Understanding Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    NASA has built a multi-year set of transaction and user satisfaction information about the evolving, broad collection of earth science products from a diverse set of users of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The transaction and satisfaction trends provide corroborative information to support perception and intuition, and can often be the basis for understanding the results of cross-cutting initiatives and for management decisions about future strategies. The information is available through two fundamental complementary methods, product and user transaction data collected regularly from the major science data centers, and user satisfaction information collected through the American Customer Satisfaction Index survey. The combination provides the fundamental data needed to understand utilization trends in the research community. This paper will update trends based on 2006 metrics from the NASA earth science data centers and results from the 2006 EOSDIS ACSI survey. Principle concepts are explored that lead to sound guidance for data center managers and strategists over the next year.

  7. The MMS Science Data Center: Operations, Capabilities, and Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, K. W.; Pankratz, C. K.; Giles, B. L.; Kokkonen, K.; Putnam, B.; Schafer, C.; Baker, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) constellation of satellites completed their six month commissioning period in August, 2015 and began science operations. Science operations for the Solving Magnetospheric Acceleration, Reconnection, and Turbulence (SMART) instrument package occur at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP). The Science Data Center (SDC) at LASP is responsible for the data production, management, distribution, and archiving of the data received. The mission will collect several gigabytes per day of particles and field data. Management of these data requires effective selection, transmission, analysis, and storage of data in the ground segment of the mission, including efficient distribution paths to enable the science community to answer the key questions regarding magnetic reconnection. Due to the constraints on download volume, this includes the Scientist-in-the-Loop program that identifies high-value science data needed to answer the outstanding questions of magnetic reconnection. Of particular interest to the community is the tools and associated website we have developed to provide convenient access to the data, first by the mission science team and, beginning March 1, 2016, by the entire community. This presentation will demonstrate the data and tools available to the community via the SDC and discuss the technologies we chose and lessons learned.

  8. Summary of researches being performed in the Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science on computer science and information technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artiom Alhazov

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of the informatization notion (which assumes automation of majority of human activities applying computers, computer networks, information technologies towards the notion of {\\it Global Information Society} (GIS challenges the determination of new paradigms of society: automation and intellectualization of production, new level of education and teaching, formation of new styles of work, active participation in decision making, etc. To assure transition to GIS for any society, including that from Republic of Moldova, requires both special training and broad application of progressive technologies and information systems. Methodological aspects concerning impact of GIS creation over the citizen, economic unit, national economy in the aggregate demands a profound study. Without systematic approach to these aspects the GIS creation would have confront great difficulties. Collective of researchers from the Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science (IMCS of Academy of Sciences of Moldova, which work in the field of computer science, constitutes the center of advanced researches and activates in those directions of researches of computer science which facilitate technologies and applications without of which the development of GIS cannot be assured.

  9. The Value of Metrics for Science Data Center Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, J.; Behnke, J.; Watts, T. H.; Lu, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) has been collecting and analyzing records of science data archive, processing and product distribution for more than 10 years. The types of information collected and the analysis performed has matured and progressed to become an integral and necessary part of the system management and planning functions. Science data center managers are realizing the importance that metrics can play in influencing and validating their business model. New efforts focus on better understanding of users and their methods. Examples include tracking user web site interactions and conducting user surveys such as the government authorized American Customer Satisfaction Index survey. This paper discusses the metrics methodology, processes and applications that are growing in EOSDIS, the driving requirements and compelling events, and the future envisioned for metrics as an integral part of earth science data systems.

  10. 78 FR 32259 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, July 15, 2013, 8:00 a...

  11. Political Science Careers at Comprehensive Universities: Building Balanced Careers at "Greedy" Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Ryan C.; Mueller, Melinda A.; Strand, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    A considerable amount of research exists about political science careers at community colleges and liberal arts institutions, as well as about training and hiring practices across different types of institutions. However, there is virtually no commentary available on political science careers at comprehensive institutions, where a significant…

  12. Toward enhanced learning of science: An educational scheme for informal science institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Midori

    Current educational operation for informal science institutions tend to be based on the staff's experience and intuition rather than on educational theories or research findings. This status study sought research evidence for an educational scheme to give informal science institutions. Evidence for this scheme came from surveys to determine specific circumstances of educational operations and visitor behaviors. The Provus discrepancy model, seeking gaps between the actual and desired states, guided this investigation of how informal science education institution staff view the nature and status of educational operations. Another investigation sought visitors' views of the effectiveness of the main idea for exhibit understanding (n=68 for each group of with the main idea and without the main idea), effective labels (n=68), expectations toward on-site lessons(n=22 and 65 for student groups, and n=2 for teachers), and possibilities for assessments of museum operations. Institutional data were collected via a web portal, with a separate site created for administrators (n=41), exhibit developers (n=21), and program planners (n=35). The survey asked about actual and desired states in terms of goals and roles of staff, contents of exhibits and programs, assessment, and professional development. The four visitor surveys were administered individually at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. The institutional survey found that most institutions focus on attitudinal reinforcement rather than visitor learning, do not overtly value research or long-term assessment, and value partnerships with K-12 schools more than other groups. It is also clarified that the staff do not have a clear vision of the nature or function of an operations manuals. Large gaps were found between the actual and desired states in terms of assessment (administrators, exhibit developers, and program planners), professional development (exhibit developers and program planners), and partnerships

  13. 77 FR 22793 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory.... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919....D., Scientific Review Administrator, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of...

  14. 76 FR 7225 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee..., National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/3112, Research Triangle Park, NC..., National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/3112, Research Triangle Park, NC...

  15. 78 FR 32672 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the NIH Reform Act of 2006 (42 U.S.C. 281 (d)(4)), notice is hereby given that the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS... Popovich, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Division of Extramural Research and Training...

  16. 76 FR 58521 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Science, P. O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170 B... Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P. O. Box 12233, MD EC-30...

  17. 77 FR 16844 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory.... Institute Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919) 541-1307, [email protected] . Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences...

  18. 77 FR 37423 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory..., [email protected] . Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special... Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170 B...

  19. 76 FR 11500 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Administrator, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations, Scientific Review... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Novel...

  20. The proposed EROSpace institute, a national center operated by space grant universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul L.; Swiden, LaDell R.; Waltz, Frederick A.

    1993-01-01

    The "EROSpace Institute" is a proposed visiting scientist program in associated with the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center (EDC). The Institute would be operated by a consortium of universities, possible drawn from NASA's Space Grant College and Fellowship Program consortia and the group of 17 capability-enhancement consortia, or perhaps from consortia though out the nation with a topical interest in remote sensing. The National Center for Atmospheric Research or the Goddard Institute for Space Studies provide models for the structure of such an institute. The objectives of the Institute are to provide ready access to the body of data housed at the EDC and to increase the cadre of knowledgeable and trained scientists able to deal with the increasing volume of remote sensing data to become available from the Earth Observing System. The Institute would have a staff of about 100 scientists at any one time, about half permanent staff, and half visiting scientists. The latter would include graduate and undergraduate students, as well as faculty on temporary visits, summer fellowships, or sabbatical leaves. The Institute would provide office and computing facilities, as well as Internet linkages to the home institutions so that scientists could continue to participate in the program from their home base.

  1. Abstracts of the International Congress of Research Center in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences & Human Development (2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Reis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The papers published in this book of abstracts / proceedings were submitted to the Scientific Commission of the International Congress of Research Center in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences & Human Development, held on 11 and 12 November 2016, at the University of Évora, Évora, Portugal, under the topic of Exercise and Health, Sports and Human Development. The content of the abstracts is solely and exclusively of its authors responsibility. The editors and the Scientific Committee of the International Congress of Research Center in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences & Human Development do not assume any responsibility for the opinions and statements expressed by the authors. Partial reproduction of the texts and their use without commercial purposes is allowed, provided the source / reference is duly mentioned.

  2. Results of an Institutional LGBT Climate Survey at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Sean D; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Eckstrand, Kristen L

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the climate and culture experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) employees and students at one large academic medical center. An anonymous, online institutional climate survey was used to assess the attitudes and experiences of LGBT employees and students. There were 42 LGBT and 14 non-LGBT survey participants. Results revealed that a surprisingly large percentage of LGBT individuals experienced pressure to remain "closeted" and were harassed despite medical center policies of non-discrimination. Continuing training, inclusive policies and practices, and the development of mechanisms to address LGBT-specific harassment are necessary for improving institutional climate.

  3. Community health centers and community development financial institutions: joining forces to address determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelchuck, Ronda; Lowenstein, Daniel; Tobin, Jonathan N

    2011-11-01

    Community health centers and community development financial institutions share similar origins and missions and are increasingly working together to meet community needs. Addressing the social and economic determinants of health is a common focus. The availability of new federal grants and tax credits has led these financial institutions to invest in the creation and expansion of community health centers. This article reviews the most recent trends in these two sectors and explores opportunities for further collaboration to transform the health and well-being of the nation's low-income communities.

  4. Status of the TESS Science Processing Operations Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jon Michael; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Davies, Misty; Li, Jie; Morris, Robert L.; Rose, Mark; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Ting, Eric; Twicken, Joseph D.; Wohler, Bill

    2018-06-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) was selected by NASA’s Explorer Program to conduct a search for Earth’s closest cousins starting in 2018. TESS will conduct an all-sky transit survey of F, G and K dwarf stars between 4 and 12 magnitudes and M dwarf stars within 200 light years. TESS is expected to discover 1,000 small planets less than twice the size of Earth, and to measure the masses of at least 50 of these small worlds. The TESS science pipeline is being developed by the Science Processing Operations Center (SPOC) at NASA Ames Research Center based on the highly successful Kepler science pipeline. Like the Kepler pipeline, the TESS pipeline provides calibrated pixels, simple and systematic error-corrected aperture photometry, and centroid locations for all 200,000+ target stars observed over the 2-year mission, along with associated uncertainties. The pixel and light curve products are modeled on the Kepler archive products and will be archived to the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST). In addition to the nominal science data, the 30-minute Full Frame Images (FFIs) simultaneously collected by TESS will also be calibrated by the SPOC and archived at MAST. The TESS pipeline searches through all light curves for evidence of transits that occur when a planet crosses the disk of its host star. The Data Validation pipeline generates a suite of diagnostic metrics for each transit-like signature, and then extracts planetary parameters by fitting a limb-darkened transit model to each potential planetary signature. The results of the transit search are modeled on the Kepler transit search products (tabulated numerical results, time series products, and pdf reports) all of which will be archived to MAST. Synthetic sample data products are available at https://archive.stsci.edu/tess/ete-6.html.Funding for the TESS Mission has been provided by the NASA Science Mission Directorate.

  5. A phenomenological investigation of science center exhibition developers' expertise development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Denise L.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the exhibition developer role in the context of United States (U.S.) science centers, and more specifically, to investigate the way science center exhibition developers build their professional expertise. This research investigated how successfully practicing exhibition developers described their current practices, how they learned to be exhibition developers, and what factors were the most important to the developers in building their professional expertise. Qualitative data was gathered from 10 currently practicing exhibition developers from three science centers: the Exploratorium, San Francisco, California; the Field Museum, Chicago, Illinois; and the Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota. In-depth, semistructured interviews were used to collect the data. The study embraced aspects of the phenomenological tradition and sought to derive a holistic understanding of the position and how expertise was built for it. The data were methodically coded and organized into themes prior to analysis. The data analysis found that the position consisted of numerous and varied activities, but the developers' primary roles were advocating for the visitor, storytelling, and mediating information and ideas. They conducted these activities in the context of a team and relied on an established exhibition planning process to guide their work. Developers described a process of learning exhibition development that was experiential in nature. Learning through daily practice was key, though they also consulted with mentors and relied on visitor studies to gauge the effectiveness of their work. They were adept at integrating prior knowledge gained from many aspects of their lives into their practice. The developers described several internal factors that contributed to their expertise development including the desire to help others, a natural curiosity about the world, a commitment to learning, and the ability to accept critique. They

  6. SNU-KAERI Degree and Research Center for Radiation Convergence Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Sungkee; Kim, S. U.; Roh, C. H

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we tried to establish and perform the demonstrative operation of the 'Degree and Research Center for Radiation Convergence Sciences' to raise the Korea's technology competitiveness. As results of this project we got the successful accomplishment as below: 1. Operation of Degree and Research Center for Radiation Convergence Sciences and establishment of expert researcher training system Ο Presentation of an efficient model for expert researcher training program through the operation of university-institute collaboration courses by combining of Graduate course and DRC system. Ο Radiation Convergence Sciences major is scheduled to be established in 2013 at SNU Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology Ο A big project for research, education, and training of radiation convergence science is under planning 2. Establishment and conduction of joint research by organization of radiation convergence research consortium · Joint research was conducted in close connection with the research projects of researchers participating in this DRC project (44 articles published in journals, 6 patents applied, 88 papers presented in conferences) · The resources of the two organization (SNU and KAERI), such as research infrastructure (hightech equipment and etc), manpower (professor/researcher), and original technology and know how were utilized to conduct the joint research and to establish the collaboration system of the two organizations

  7. Unique life sciences research facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenburg, G. M.; Vasques, M.; Caldwell, W. F.; Tucker, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Life Science Division at NASA's Ames Research Center has a suite of specialized facilities that enable scientists to study the effects of gravity on living systems. This paper describes some of these facilities and their use in research. Seven centrifuges, each with its own unique abilities, allow testing of a variety of parameters on test subjects ranging from single cells through hardware to humans. The Vestibular Research Facility allows the study of both centrifugation and linear acceleration on animals and humans. The Biocomputation Center uses computers for 3D reconstruction of physiological systems, and interactive research tools for virtual reality modeling. Psycophysiological, cardiovascular, exercise physiology, and biomechanical studies are conducted in the 12 bed Human Research Facility and samples are analyzed in the certified Central Clinical Laboratory and other laboratories at Ames. Human bedrest, water immersion and lower body negative pressure equipment are also available to study physiological changes associated with weightlessness. These and other weightlessness models are used in specialized laboratories for the study of basic physiological mechanisms, metabolism and cell biology. Visual-motor performance, perception, and adaptation are studied using ground-based models as well as short term weightlessness experiments (parabolic flights). The unique combination of Life Science research facilities, laboratories, and equipment at Ames Research Center are described in detail in relation to their research contributions.

  8. Polish Academy of Sciences Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics research report 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Scientific interests of Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics Polish Academy of Sciences are focused on DNA replication and repair, gene expression, gene sequencing and molecular biophysics. The work reviews research projects of the Institute in 1994-1995.

  9. Polish Academy of Sciences Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics research report 1994-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Scientific interests of Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics Polish Academy of Sciences are focused on DNA replication and repair, gene expression, gene sequencing and molecular biophysics. The work reviews research projects of the Institute in 1994-1995

  10. Polish Academy of Sciences Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics research report 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Scientific interests of Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics Polish Academy of Sciences are focused on DNA replication and repair, gene expression, gene sequencing and molecular biophysics. The work reviews research projects of the Institute in 1994-1995.

  11. Energy Frontier Research Center, Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd R. Allen, Director

    2011-04-01

    The Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, has funded the INL as one of the Energy Frontier Research Centers in the area of material science of nuclear fuels. This document is the required annual report to the Office of Science that outlines the accomplishments for the period of May 2010 through April 2011. The aim of the Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuels (CMSNF) is to establish the foundation for predictive understanding of the effects of irradiation-induced defects on thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. The science driver of the center’s investigation is to understand how complex defect and microstructures affect phonon mediated thermal transport in UO2, and achieve this understanding for the particular case of irradiation-induced defects and microstructures. The center’s research thus includes modeling and measurement of thermal transport in oxide fuels with different levels of impurities, lattice disorder and irradiation-induced microstructure, as well as theoretical and experimental investigation of the evolution of disorder, stoichiometry and microstructure in nuclear fuel under irradiation. With the premise that thermal transport in irradiated UO2 is a phonon-mediated energy transport process in a crystalline material with defects and microstructure, a step-by-step approach will be utilized to understand the effects of types of defects and microstructures on the collective phonon dynamics in irradiated UO2. Our efforts under the thermal transport thrust involved both measurement of diffusive phonon transport (an approach that integrates over the entire phonon spectrum) and spectroscopic measurements of phonon attenuation/lifetime and phonon dispersion. Our distinct experimental efforts dovetail with our modeling effort involving atomistic simulation of phonon transport and prediction of lattice thermal conductivity using the Boltzmann transport framework.

  12. 78 FR 59944 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919... [[Page 59945

  13. Activities of the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period October 2, 1987 through March 31, 1988.

  14. [Research Conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period 1 Oct. 1996 - 31 Mar. 1997.

  15. Research in progress at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period April 1, 1987 through October 1, 1987.

  16. Activities of the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period April 1, 1985 through October 2, 1985 is summarized.

  17. 78 FR 66947 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... Person: Robert Horowits, Ph.D., Senior Investigator, National Institute of General Medical Sciences..., Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology...

  18. 77 FR 66853 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel Career Grants in the Environmental Health Sciences. Date: November...., Scientific Review Administrator, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program...

  19. Basic and Applied Science Research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisowski, Paul W.

    2005-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, or LANSCE, is an accelerator-based national user facility for research in basic and applied science using four experimental areas. LANSCE has two areas that provide neutrons generated by the 800-MeV proton beam striking tungsten target systems. A third area uses the proton beam for radiography. The fourth area uses 100 MeV protons to produce medical radioisotopes. This paper describes the four LANSCE experimental areas, gives nuclear science highlights of the past operating period, and discusses plans for the future

  20. Challenges for Data Archival Centers in Evolving Environmental Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y.; Cook, R. B.; Gu, L.; Santhana Vannan, S. K.; Beaty, T.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental science has entered into a big data era as enormous data about the Earth environment are continuously collected through field and airborne missions, remote sensing observations, model simulations, sensor networks, etc. An open-access and open-management data infrastructure for data-intensive science is a major grand challenge in global environmental research (BERAC, 2010). Such an infrastructure, as exemplified in EOSDIS, GEOSS, and NSF EarthCube, will provide a complete lifecycle of environmental data and ensures that data will smoothly flow among different phases of collection, preservation, integration, and analysis. Data archival centers, as the data integration units closest to data providers, serve as the source power to compile and integrate heterogeneous environmental data into this global infrastructure. This presentation discusses the interoperability challenges and practices of geosciences from the aspect of data archival centers, based on the operational experiences of the NASA-sponsored Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) and related environmental data management activities. Specifically, we will discuss the challenges to 1) encourage and help scientists to more actively share data with the broader scientific community, so that valuable environmental data, especially those dark data collected by individual scientists in small independent projects, can be shared and integrated into the infrastructure to tackle big science questions; 2) curate heterogeneous multi-disciplinary data, focusing on the key aspects of identification, format, metadata, data quality, and semantics to make them ready to be plugged into a global data infrastructure. We will highlight data curation practices at the ORNL DAAC for global campaigns such as BOREAS, LBA, SAFARI 2000; and 3) enhance the capabilities to more effectively and efficiently expose and deliver "big" environmental data to broad range of users and systems

  1. 2004 research briefs :Materials and Process Sciences Center.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieslak, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    This report is the latest in a continuing series that highlights the recent technical accomplishments associated with the work being performed within the Materials and Process Sciences Center. Our research and development activities primarily address the materials-engineering needs of Sandia's Nuclear-Weapons (NW) program. In addition, we have significant efforts that support programs managed by the other laboratory business units. Our wide range of activities occurs within six thematic areas: Materials Aging and Reliability, Scientifically Engineered Materials, Materials Processing, Materials Characterization, Materials for Microsystems, and Materials Modeling and Simulation. We believe these highlights collectively demonstrate the importance that a strong materials-science base has on the ultimate success of the NW program and the overall DOE technology portfolio.

  2. Life Sciences Division and Center for Human Genome Studies 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cram, L.S.; Stafford, C. [comp.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Life Sciences Division and the biological aspects of the Center for Human Genome Studies for the calendar year 1994. The technical portion of the report is divided into two parts, (1) selected research highlights and (2) research projects and accomplishments. The research highlights provide a more detailed description of a select set of projects. A technical description of all projects is presented in sufficient detail so that the informed reader will be able to assess the scope and significance of each project. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the group leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  3. Operational status of the Los Alamos neutron science center (LANSCE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Kevin W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erickson, John L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schoenberg, Kurt F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator and beam delivery complex generates the proton beams that serve three neutron production sources; the thermal and cold source for the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) high-energy neutron source, and a pulsed Ultra-Cold Neutron Source. These three sources are the foundation of strong and productive multi-disciplinary research programs that serve a diverse and robust user community. The facility also provides multiplexed beams for the production of medical radioisotopes and proton radiography of dynamic events. The recent operating history of these sources will be reviewed and plans for performance improvement will be discussed, together with the underlying drivers for the proposed LANSCE Refurbishment project. The details of this latter project are presented in a separate contribution.

  4. Facility Design Program Requirements for National Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    a turn of the century structure and secondhand furniture to display exhibit items, to the Ontario Science Center in Canada which is a 10-year-old...mothers should be considered. 1.3 Visitors Coat Storage Areas 550 sq ft Pigeon hole or other storage cabinets for children’s school books , coats, and...1.4.4 Work Area (200 sq ft) 1.4.5 Office for Assistant Museum Shop Manager (75 sq ft) Function: Area for sale of books , posters, cards, slides, games

  5. IAEA and International Science and Technology Center sign cooperative agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA and the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) today signed an agreement that calls for an increase in cooperation between the two organizations. The memorandum of understanding seeks to amplify their collaboration in the research and development of applications and technology that could contribute to the IAEA's activities in the fields of verification and nuclear security, including training and capacity building. IAEA Safeguards Director of Technical Support Nikolay Khlebnikov and ISTC Executive Director Adriaan van der Meer signed the Agreement at IAEA headquarters in Vienna on 22 October 2008. (IAEA)

  6. The Wetland and Aquatic Research Center strategic science plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2017-02-02

    IntroductionThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Wetland and Aquatic Research Center (WARC) has two primary locations (Gainesville, Florida, and Lafayette, Louisiana) and field stations throughout the southeastern United States and Caribbean. WARC’s roots are in U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and National Park Service research units that were brought into the USGS as the Biological Research Division in 1996. Founded in 2015, WARC was created from the merger of two long-standing USGS biology science Centers—the Southeast Ecological Science Center and the National Wetlands Research Center—to bring together expertise in biology, ecology, landscape science, geospatial applications, and decision support in order to address issues nationally and internationally. WARC scientists apply their expertise to a variety of wetland and aquatic research and monitoring issues that require coordinated, integrated efforts to better understand natural environments. By increasing basic understanding of the biology of important species and broader ecological and physiological processes, this research provides information to policymakers and aids managers in their stewardship of natural resources and in regulatory functions.This strategic science plan (SSP) was developed to guide WARC research during the next 5–10 years in support of Department of the Interior (DOI) partnering bureaus such as the USFWS, the National Park Service, and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, as well as other Federal, State, and local natural resource management agencies. The SSP demonstrates the alignment of the WARC goals with the USGS mission areas, associated programs, and other DOI initiatives. The SSP is necessary for workforce planning and, as such, will be used as a guide for future needs for personnel. The SSP also will be instrumental in developing internal funding priorities and in promoting WARC’s capabilities to both external cooperators and other groups within the USGS.

  7. 78 FR 47419 - Requirements for the OSHA Training Institute Education Centers Program and the OSHA Outreach...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration [Docket No. OSHA-2009-0022] Requirements for the OSHA Training Institute Education Centers Program and the OSHA Outreach Training Program...) Requirements AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor. ACTION...

  8. Equity in Elementary Science Education: A Study of Institutional and Policy Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Kathryn N.

    Despite recognition that the foundation for interest in science is laid down at the elementary level (Tai, et al., 2006), in the last ten years elementary science instruction time has declined in K-6 schooling (Center on Education Policy, 2007). A lack of access to excellent science education is exacerbated for low-income students, prompting significant questions regarding inequities within the science education pipeline (Maulucci, 2010). The critical factors needed to address these inequities include teacher preparation, access to resources, and instructional leadership, as well as a supportive policy and institutional milieu. However, although the former three have been studied extensively, the role of policy and institutions in creating the conditions for equity in science education are little understood despite their likely significant role (Lemke, 2001). This mixed methods study addressed this gap by examining the role the policy and institutional milieu play in constraining or supporting equitable elementary science education. Institutional theory provides the framework for understanding how various institutional logics and regulatory pressures permeate schools and districts across contexts, influencing science education implementation (Scott, 2014). Two distinct approaches were used to first quantitatively examine the predictors of differentiation in elementary science education instructional time and methods, and second qualitatively analyze the nature and process by which these mechanisms exert influence. Data for the first two papers was derived from a case study of a purposively sampled district, including surveys of 200 teachers and embedded case studies of four schools. Analysis consisted of multi-level models of teacher attributes and school and policy factors in predicting differential distribution of science education instructional time and methods (Raudenbush & Bryk, 2002). Data for the third paper arose out of a series of principal, administrator

  9. Science Production in Germany, France, Belgium, and Luxembourg: Comparing the Contributions of Research Universities and Institutes to Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Justin J W; Dusdal, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Charting significant growth in science production over the 20th century in four European Union member states, this neo-institutional analysis describes the development and current state of universities and research institutes that bolster Europe's position as a key region in global science. On-going internationalization and Europeanization of higher education and science has been accompanied by increasing competition as well as collaboration. Despite the policy goals to foster innovation and further expand research capacity, in cross-national and historical comparison neither the level of R&D investments nor country size accounts completely for the differential growth of scientific productivity. Based on a comprehensive historical database from 1900 to 2010, this analysis uncovers both stable and dynamic patterns of production and productivity in Germany, France, Belgium, and Luxembourg. Measured in peer-reviewed research articles collected in Thomson Reuters' Science Citation Index Expanded, which includes journals in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Health, we show the varying contributions of different organizational forms, especially research universities and research institutes. Comparing the institutionalization pathways that created the conditions necessary for continuous and strong growth in scientific productivity in the European center of global science emphasizes that the research university is the key organizational form across countries.

  10. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2001. Volume II: Life Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaussi, R; Gschwend, B [eds.

    2002-03-01

    a procedure developed in this laboratory. In vivo molecular imaging methods have important applications in disease diagnosis, in drug development and, increasingly, in monitoring the expression of genes introduced through gene therapy vectors. The PET tracer group of the Center for Radiopharmaceutical Science has successfully started operation of the new HIDAC camera, which is optimally suited to study new tracers during their development in small animals. Presently, the major efforts are in developing tracers for imaging glutamatergic and nicotinergic receptors of the brain as well as for amyloid plaques, the characteristic markers of Alzheimer disease. In the division of radiation medicine 27 patients have been treated on the Spot Scanning Gantry in this fifth beam period. In the OPTIS program, nearly 200 patients were treated for ocular tumours in 2001. A list of scientific publications in 2000 is also provided.

  11. "Innovation" institutes in academic health centers: enhancing value through leadership, education, engagement, and scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Jesse M; Farmer, Steven A; Akman, Jeffrey S

    2014-09-01

    In the next decade, the biggest change in medicine in the United States will be the organizational transformation of the delivery system. Organizations-including academic health centers-able to achieve better outcomes for less will be the financial winners as new payment models become more prevalent. For medical educators, the question is how to prepare the next generation of physicians for these changes. One solution is the development of new "innovation" or "value" institutes. Around the nation, many of these new institutes are focused on surmounting barriers to value-based care in academic health centers, educating faculty, house staff, and medical students in discussions of cost-conscious care. Innovation institutes can also lead discussions about how value-based care may impact education in environments where there may be less autonomy and more standardization. Quality metrics will play a larger role at academic health centers as metrics focus more on outcomes than processes. Optimizing outcomes will require that medical educators both learn and teach the principles of patient safety and quality improvement. Innovation institutes can also facilitate cross-institutional discussions to compare data on utilization and outcomes, and share best practices that maximize value. Another barrier to cost-conscious care is defensive medicine, which is highly engrained in U.S. medicine and culture. Innovation institutes may not be able to overcome all the barriers to making medical care more cost-conscious, but they can be critical in enabling academic health centers to optimize their teaching and research missions while remaining financially competitive.

  12. Networking of institutions in India to promote research and education in nuclear science and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, R.R.

    2007-01-01

    broader areas of interest to it. The desire of DAE in strengthening university system is reflected in yet another of its visionary initiative which is the establishment of University Grants Commission (UGC)-DAE consortium for Scientific Research which is aimed at opening up DAE advanced research facilities to academic institutions. Providing post-doctoral fellowships for carrying research in its laboratories is another step that DAE has taken to strengthened research-technology linkage. Furthermore, the BARC Training School Programme has been keeping pace with emerging demands of the expanding Indian NEA Programme by educating and training manpower in diverse specializations at newer centres. Having established R and D centers and institutions for basic research, DAE has taken the next logical step of weaving them in to a network for advancing the pace of research in nuclear science on one hand and, on the other, for accelerating the process of transforming R and D into technology products and their applications. This end is sought to be achieved by bringing the academic programmes of the R and D centers and the grant-in-aid institutes of DAE under one umbrella institute named Homi Bhabha National Institute (HBNI) having the status of a Deemed to be University. The status of a Deemed to be University was conferred upon HBNI on June 3, 2005 by the Ministry of Human Resource Development, Government of India. Its academic programmes are scheduled to start from August-September 2006. The HBNI is a network of ten institutions in DAE. Called its constituent Institutions (CIs), four of them are the R and D centers and six are the grant-in-aid institutions. The HBNI would conduct academic programmes in Engineering, Physical, Chemical, Life and Mathematical Sciences and also in Strategic Studies for the award of Masters and Doctoral degrees and Post Graduate Diploma with its curricula and research oriented to the needs of the nuclear science and technology and related fields. HBNI

  13. Energy, environment, and policy choices: Summer institutes for science and social studies educators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marek, E.A.; Chiodo, J.J.; Gerber, B.L.

    1997-06-01

    The Center for Energy Education (CEE) is a partnership linking the University of Oklahoma, Close Up Foundation and Department of Energy. Based upon the theme of energy, environment and public policy, the CEE`s main purposes are to: (1) educate teachers on energy sources, environmental issues and decisionmaking choices regarding public policy; (2) develop interdisciplinary curricula that are interactive in nature (see attachments); (3) disseminate energy education curricula; (4) serve as a resource center for a wide variety of energy education materials; (5) provide a national support system for teachers in energy education; and (6) conduct research in energy education. The CEE conducted its first two-week experimentially-based program for educators during the summer of 1993. Beginning at the University of Oklahoma, 57 teachers from across the country examined concepts and issues related to energy and environment, and how the interdependence of energy and environment significantly influences daily life. During the second week of the institute, participants went to Washington, D.C. to examine the processes used by government officials to make critical decisions involving interrelationships among energy, environment and public policy. Similar institutes were conducted during the summers of 1994 and 1995 resulting in nearly 160 science and social studies educators who had participated in the CEE programs. Collectively the participants represented 36 states, the Pacific Territories, Puerto Rico, and Japan.

  14. 75 FR 65365 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review... evaluate grant applications. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell...

  15. 78 FR 47715 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee, July 24, 2013, 08:00 a.m. to July 26, 2013, 02:00...

  16. 77 FR 39688 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Institute of Education Sciences; FAFSA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Institute of Education Sciences; FAFSA Completion Project Evaluation SUMMARY: The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) at the U.S. Department of Education (ED) is conducting a rigorous study of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid...

  17. 77 FR 58111 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; FAFSA Completion Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; FAFSA Completion Project Evaluation SUMMARY: The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) at the U.S. Department of Education (ED) is conducting a rigorous study of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid...

  18. Developing institutional repository at National Institute for Materials Science : Researchers directory service “SAMURAI” and Research Collection Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Masao; Tanifuji, Mikiko

    National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) has developed an institutional repository “NIMS eSciDoc” since 2008. eSciDoc is an open source repository software made in Germany, and provides E-Science infrastructures through its flexible data model and rich Web APIs. NIMS eScidoc makes use of eSciDoc functions to benefit for NIMS situations. This article also focuses on researchers directory service “SAMURAI” in addition to NIMS eSciDoc. Successfully launched in October 2010, SAMURAI provides approximately 500 researchers' profile and publication information.

  19. Russian center of nuclear science and education is the way of nuclear engineering skilled personnel training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murogov, V.M.; Sal'nikov, N.L.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear power engineering as the key of nuclear technologies is not only the element of the power market but also the basis of the country's social-economic progress. Obninsk as the first science town in Russia is the ideal place for the creation of integrated Science-Research Center of Nuclear Science and Technologies - The Russian Center of Nuclear Science and Education (Center for conservation and development of nuclear knowledge) [ru

  20. Technical liaison with the Institute of Physical Chemistry (Russian Academy of Science)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.

    1995-12-01

    The Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Science (IPC/RAS) is engaged by the DOE to conduct studies of the fundamental and applied chemistry of the transuranium elements (TRU; primarily neptunium, plutonium, and americium; Np, Pu, Am) and technetium T c in alkaline media. This work is being supported by the DOE because the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks at DOE sites (Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge) contain TRU and T c , are alkaline, and the chemistries of TRU and T c are not well developed in this system. Previous studies at the IPC/RAS centered on the fundamental chemistry and on coprecipitation. Work continuing in FY 1996 will focus more on the applied chemistry of the TRU and T c in alkaline media and continue effort on the coprecipitation task

  1. The Role of Informal Science Centers in Science Education: Attitudes, Skills, and Self-efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irit Sasson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Informal learning relates to activities that occur outside the school environment. These learning environments, such as visits to science centers provide valuable motivational opportunities for students to learn science. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the pre-academic center in science education and particularly to explore its effects on 750 middle-school students' attitudes toward science, their scientific thinking skills and self-efficacy. Pre and post-case based questionnaires were designed to assess the students’ higher order thinking skills – inquiry, graphing, and argumentation. In addition, a five-point Likert scale questionnaire was used to assess students' attitudes and self-efficacy. The research results indicated a positive effect of the pre-academic science center activities on scientific thinking skills. A significant improvement in the students' inquiry and graphing skills was found, yet non significant differences were found in argumentation skill. The students significantly improved their ability to ask research questions based on reading a scientific text, and to describe and analyze research results that were presented graphically. While no significant differences were found between girls and boys in the pre-questionnaire, in the post-questionnaire the girls' scores in inquiry skill were significantly higher than boys' scores. Increases in students' positive attitudes toward science and self-efficacy were found but the results were not statistically significant. However, the program length was found to be an important variable that affects achievement of educational goals. A three-dimension-based framework is suggested to characterize learning environments: organizational, psychological, and pedagogical.

  2. 76 FR 31620 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Research on Ethics and Integrity of Human and or Animal Subjects... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of..., DVM, Chief, Scientific Review Branch, Division of Extramural Research and Training, National Institute...

  3. Defense, basic, and industrial research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longshore, A.; Salgado, K. [comps.

    1995-10-01

    The Workshop on Defense, Basic, and Industrial Research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center gathered scientists from Department of Energy national laboratories, other federal institutions, universities, and industry to discuss the use of neutrons in science-based stockpile stewardship, The workshop began with presentations by government officials, senior representatives from the three weapons laboratories, and scientific opinion leaders. Workshop participants then met in breakout sessions on the following topics: materials science and engineering; polymers, complex fluids, and biomaterials; fundamental neutron physics; applied nuclear physics; condensed matter physics and chemistry; and nuclear weapons research. They concluded that neutrons can play an essential role in science-based stockpile stewardship and that there is overlap and synergy between defense and other uses of neutrons in basic, applied, and industrial research from which defense and civilian research can benefit. This proceedings is a collection of talks and papers from the plenary, technical, and breakout session presentations. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Fort Collins Science Center- Policy Analysis and Science Assistance Branch : Integrating social, behavioral, economic and biological sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The Fort Collins Science Center's Policy Analysis and Science Assistance (PASA) Branch is a team of approximately 22 scientists, technicians, and graduate student researchers. PASA provides unique capabilities in the U.S. Geological Survey by leading projects that integrate social, behavioral, economic, and biological analyses in the context of human-natural resource interactions. Resource planners, managers, and policymakers in the U.S. Departments of the Interior (DOI) and Agriculture (USDA), State and local agencies, as well as international agencies use information from PASA studies to make informed natural resource management and policy decisions. PASA scientists' primary functions are to conduct both theoretical and applied social science research, provide technical assistance, and offer training to advance performance in policy relevant research areas. Management and research issues associated with human-resource interactions typically occur in a unique context, involve difficult to access populations, require knowledge of both natural/biological science in addition to social science, and require the skill to integrate multiple science disciplines. In response to these difficult contexts, PASA researchers apply traditional and state-of-the-art social science methods drawing from the fields of sociology, demography, economics, political science, communications, social-psychology, and applied industrial organization psychology. Social science methods work in concert with our rangeland/agricultural management, wildlife, ecology, and biology capabilities. The goal of PASA's research is to enhance natural resource management, agency functions, policies, and decision-making. Our research is organized into four broad areas of study.

  5. L'interdisciplinarite en sciences sociales pour l'etude du contact des langues (Interdisciplinarity in Social Sciences of the Study of the Relationships of Languages). Proceedings of a Colloquium of the International Center for Research on Bilingualism and the Institute for Interethnic and Intercultural Studies and Research (2nd, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, October 1-5, 1984).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prujiner, Alain, Ed.

    Papers given at an international conference applying the social sciences to the study of the relationships of languages include the following: "Reseaux sociaux et comportements langagiers en milieu de contact des langues" ("Social Networks and Language Behaviors in a Language Contact Setting") by M. Blanc and J. Hamers, with…

  6. 78 FR 18359 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research Triangle Park... Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Research Careers in Emerging Technologies. Date: April 30...

  7. 77 FR 60445 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Research and Training, National Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room... Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Support for Conferences and Scientific Meetings. Date...

  8. 78 FR 25754 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233... Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied...

  9. 76 FR 52672 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory.... of Environmental Health Sciences, Keystone Building, 530 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC..., Division of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box...

  10. 76 FR 50235 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee... (DERT), Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 615 Davis Dr... of Extramural Research and Training (DERT), Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, National...

  11. 78 FR 39739 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review... Research and Training, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30...

  12. 78 FR 8156 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Studies of Environmental Agents to Induce Immunotoxicity... Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research...

  13. 76 FR 13650 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3171, Research... Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Review of Educational Grants with an Environmental Health...

  14. 75 FR 34147 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Review Branch, Division of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute Environmental Health Sciences... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards...

  15. 76 FR 62080 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review... Extramural Research and Training, Nat'l Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30...

  16. 78 FR 14312 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Understanding Environmental Control of Epigenetic/Mechanisms... Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30...

  17. 77 FR 33472 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel International Collaborations in Environmental Health. Date: June....D., Scientific Review Administrator, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of...

  18. 76 FR 71046 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/3112, Research Triangle Park... and Education; 93.894, Resources and Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113...

  19. 76 FR 7572 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee..., Director, Division of Extramural Research and Training, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences... of Environmental Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/3112, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919...

  20. 75 FR 45133 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory.... Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170 B, Research Triangle Park, NC... Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental...

  1. 78 FR 51734 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory..., Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations, Scientific Review... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards...

  2. 75 FR 61765 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Superfund Research and Training Program. Date: October 26...-Tilotta, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of...

  3. 76 FR 77239 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act.../boards/ibcercc/ . Place: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell... and Education; 93.894, Resources and Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113...

  4. 75 FR 32797 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Branch, Division of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P... Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental...

  5. 77 FR 30019 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233... Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied...

  6. 78 FR 14562 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Studies on Environmental Health Concerns from Superstorm Sandy... Administrator, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations, Scientific...

  7. 76 FR 80954 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act.../boards/ibcercc/ . Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium... Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/3112, Research Triangle Park...

  8. 77 FR 61613 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Environmental Health Sciences, P. O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919) 541-1307, [email protected] . Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis...

  9. 77 FR 61771 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review... applications. Place: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111...

  10. 75 FR 68367 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170 B... Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological...

  11. 78 FR 27410 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory..., Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations, Scientific Review... the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114...

  12. 76 FR 26311 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory.... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3171, Research Triangle Park, NC... and Education; 93.894, Resources and Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113...

  13. 75 FR 10293 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory.... Institute Environmental Health Sciences, P. O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919... Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied...

  14. 75 FR 65363 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Review of Minority Biomedical Research Neuro Grant Applications. Date... General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, Room 3AN18J, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  15. 75 FR 63843 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Review of Minority Biomedical Research Neuro Grant Applications. Date... General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, Room 3AN18J, Bethesda...

  16. National evaluation of policies on individual financial conflicts of interest in Canadian academic health science centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexchin, Joel; Sekeres, Melanie; Gold, Jennifer; Ferris, Lorraine E; Kalkar, Sunila R; Wu, Wei; Van Laethem, Marleen; Chan, An-Wen; Moher, David; Maskalyk, M James; Taback, Nathan; Rochon, Paula A

    2008-11-01

    Conflicts of interest (COI) in research are an important emerging topic of investigation and are frequently cited as a serious threat to the integrity of human participant research. To study financial conflicts of interest (FCOI) policies for individual investigators working in Canadian academic health centers. Survey instrument containing 61 items related to FCOI. All Canadian academic health science centers (universities with faculties of medicine, faculties of medicine and teaching hospitals) were requested to provide their three primary FCOI policies. Number of all centers and teaching hospitals with policies addressing each of the 61 items related to FCOI. Only one item was addressed by all 74 centers. Thirteen items were present in fewer than 25% of centers. Fewer than one-quarter of hospitals required researchers to disclose FCOI to research participants. The role of research ethics boards (REBs) in hospitals was marginal. Asking centers to identify only three policies may not have inclusively identified all FCOI policies in use. Additionally, policies at other levels might apply. For instance, all institutions receiving federal grant money must comply with the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans. Canadian centers within the same level (for instance, teaching hospitals) differ significantly in the areas that their policies address and these policies differ widely in their coverage. Presently, no single policy in any Canadian center informs researchers about the broad range of individual FCOI issues. Canadian investigators need to understand the environment surrounding FCOI, be able to access and follow the relevant policies and be confident that they can avoid entering into a FCOI.

  17. Life in the Universe - Astronomy and Planetary Science Research Experience for Undergraduates at the SETI Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiar, J.; Phillips, C. B.; Rudolph, A.; Bonaccorsi, R.; Tarter, J.; Harp, G.; Caldwell, D. A.; DeVore, E. K.

    2016-12-01

    The SETI Institute hosts an Astrobiology Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. Beginning in 2013, we partnered with the Physics and Astronomy Dept. at Cal Poly Pomona, a Hispanic-serving university, to recruit underserved students. Over 11 years, we have served 155 students. We focus on Astrobiology since the Institute's mission is to explore, understand and explain the origin, nature and prevalence of life in the universe. Our REU students work with mentors at the Institute - a non-profit organization located in California's Silicon Valley-and at the nearby NASA Ames Research Center. Projects span research on survival of microbes under extreme conditions, planetary geology, astronomy, the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), extrasolar planets and more. The REU program begins with an introductory lectures by Institute scientists covering the diverse astrobiology subfields. A week-long field trip to the SETI Institute's Allen Telescope Array (Hat Creek Radio Astronomy Observatory in Northern California) and field experiences at hydrothermal systems at nearby Lassen Volcanic National Park immerses students in radio astronomy and SETI, and extremophile environments that are research sites for astrobiologists. Field trips expose students to diverse environments and allow them to investigate planetary analogs as our scientists do. Students also participate in local trips to the California Academy of Sciences and other nearby locations of scientific interest, and attend the weekly scientific colloquium hosted by the SETI Institute at Microsoft, other seminars and lectures at SETI Institute and NASA Ames. The students meet and present at a weekly journal club where they hone their presentation skills, as well as share their research progress. At the end of the summer, the REU interns present their research projects at a session of the Institute's colloquium. As a final project, students prepare a 2-page formal abstract and 15-minute

  18. National Science and Technology Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM): advancing the field of translational medicine and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallak, Jaime E C; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Quevedo, João; Roesler, Rafael; Schröder, Nadja; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Kapczinski, Flávio

    2010-03-01

    Translational medicine has been described as the integrated application of innovative pharmacology tools, biomarkers, clinical methods, clinical technologies and study designs to improve the understanding of medical disorders. In medicine, translational research offers an opportunity for applying the findings obtained from basic research to every-day clinical applications. The National Science and Technology Institute for Translational Medicine is comprised of six member institutions (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Universidade de São Paulo-Ribeirão Preto, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Universidade Estadual de Santa Catarina and a core facility that serves all centers). The objectives of the project are divided into four areas: Institutional, Research, Human Resources and Technology for the Community and Productive Sector. In this manuscript, we describe some of the approaches used to attain the main objectives of the National Science and Technology Institute for Translational Medicine, which include the development of 1) animal models for bipolar disorder; 2) strategies to investigate neurobehavioral function and cognitive dysfunction associated with brain disorders; 3) experimental models of brain function and behavior, neuropsychiatric disorders, cell proliferation, and cancer; 4) Simulated Public Speaking and 5) Virtual reality simulation for inducing panic disorder and agoraphobia. The main focus of the National Science and Technology Institute for Translational Medicine is the development of more useful methods that allow for a better application of basic research-based knowledge to the medical field.

  19. ATHENA: Remote Sensing Science Center for Cultural Heritage in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Agapiou, Athos; Lysandrou, Vasiliki; Themistocleous, Kyriakos; Cuca, Branka; Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola; Krauss, Thomas; Cerra, Daniele; Gessner, Ursula; Schreier, Gunter

    2016-04-01

    The Cultural Heritage (CH) sector, especially those of monuments and sites has always been facing a number of challenges from environmental pressure, pollution, human intervention from tourism to destruction by terrorism.Within this context, CH professionals are seeking to improve currently used methodologies, in order to better understand, protect and valorise the common European past and common identity. "ATHENA" H2020-TWINN-2015 project will seek to improve and expand the capabilities of the Cyprus University of Technology, involving professionals dealing with remote sensing technologies for supporting CH sector from the National Research Center of Italy (CNR) and German Aerospace Centre (DLR). The ATHENA centre will be devoted to the development, introduction and systematic use of advanced remote sensing science and technologies in the field of archaeology, built cultural heritage, their multi-temporal analysis and interpretation and the distant monitoring of their natural and anthropogenic environment in the area of Eastern Mediterranean.

  20. New evaporator station for the center for accelerator target science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, John P.; Labib, Mina

    2018-05-01

    As part of an equipment grant provided by DOE-NP for the Center for Accelerator Target Science (CATS) initiative, the procurement of a new, electron beam, high-vacuum deposition system was identified as a priority to insure reliable and continued availability of high-purity targets. The apparatus is designed to contain TWO electron beam guns; a standard 4-pocket 270° geometry source as well as an electron bombardment source. The acquisition of this new system allows for the replacement of TWO outdated and aging vacuum evaporators. Also included is an additional thermal boat source, enhancing our capability within this deposition unit. Recommended specifications for this system included an automated, high-vacuum pumping station, a deposition chamber with a rotating and heated substrate holder for uniform coating capabilities and incorporating computer-controlled state-of-the-art thin film technologies. Design specifications, enhanced capabilities and the necessary mechanical modifications for our target work are discussed.

  1. Health science center faculty attitudes towards interprofessional education and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Jodie C; Gosselin, Kevin; Bentley, Regina

    2018-03-01

    The attitudes of faculty towards interprofessional education (IPE) and teamwork impact the education of health professions education (HPE) students. This paper reports on a study evaluating attitudes from health professions educators towards IPE and teamwork at one academic health science center (HSC) where modest IPE initiatives have commenced. Drawing from the results of a previous investigation, this study was conducted to examine current attitudes of the faculty responsible for the training of future healthcare professionals. Survey data were collected to evaluate attitudes from HSC faculty, dentistry, nursing, medicine, pharmacy and public health. In general, positive HSC faculty attitudes towards interprofessional learning, education, and teamwork were significantly predicted by those affiliated with the component of nursing. Faculty development aimed at changing attitudes and increasing understanding of IPE and teamwork are critical. Results of this study serve as an underpinning to leverage strengths and evaluate weakness in initiating IPE.

  2. Scheduling at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1999-01-01

    The centerpieces of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) are a half-mile long 800-MeV proton linear accelerator and proton storage ring. The accelerator, storage ring, and target stations provide the protons and spallation neutrons that are used in the numerous basic research and applications experimental programs supported by the US Department of Energy. Experimental users, facility maintenance personnel, and operations personnel must work together to achieve the most program benefit within defined budget and resource constraints. In order to satisfy the experimental users programs, operations must provide reliable and high quality beam delivery. Effective and efficient scheduling is a critical component to achieve this goal. This paper will detail how operations scheduling is presently executed at the LANSCE accelerator facility

  3. Students-exhibits interaction at a science center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Agostinho; Morais, Ana M.

    2006-12-01

    In this study we investigate students' learning during their interaction with two exhibits at a science center. Specifically, we analyze both students' procedures when interacting with exhibits and their understanding of the scientific concepts presented therein. Bernstein's theory of pedagogic discourse (1990, 2000) provided the sociological foundation to assess the exhibit-student interaction and allowed analysis of the influence of the characteristics of students, exhibits, and interactions on students' learning. Eight students (ages 12ndash;13 years of age) with distinct sociological characteristics participated in the study. Several findings emerged from the results. First, the characteristics of the students, exhibits, and interactions appeared to influence student learning. Second, to most students, what they did interactively (procedures) seems not to have had any direct consequence on what they learned (concept understanding). Third, the data analysis suggest an important role for designers and teachers in overcoming the limitations of exhibit-student interaction.

  4. The Process of Science Communications at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horack, John M.; Treise, Deborah

    1998-01-01

    The communication of new scientific knowledge and understanding is an integral component of science research, essential for its continued survival. Like any learning- based activity, science cannot continue without communication between and among peers so that skeptical inquiry and learning can take place. This communication provides necessary organic support to maintain the development of new knowledge and technology. However, communication beyond the peer-community is becoming equally critical for science to survive as an enterprise into the 21st century. Therefore, scientists not only have a 'noble responsibility' to advance and communicate scientific knowledge and understanding to audiences within and beyond the peer-community, but their fulfillment of this responsibility is necessary to maintain the survival of the science enterprise. Despite the critical importance of communication to the viability of science, the skills required to perform effective science communications historically have not been taught as a part of the training of scientist, and the culture of science is often averse to significant communication beyond the peer community. Thus scientists can find themselves ill equipped and uncomfortable with the requirements of their job in the new millennium. At NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, we have developed and implemented an integrated science communications process, providing an institutional capability to help scientist accurately convey the content and meaning of new scientific knowledge to a wide variety of audiences, adding intrinsic value to the research itself through communication, while still maintaining the integrity of the peer-review process. The process utilizes initial communication through the world-wide web at the site http://science.nasa.gov to strategically leverage other communications vehicles and to reach a wide-variety of audiences. Here we present and discuss the basic design of the science communications process, now in

  5. University/Science Center Collaborations (A Science Center Perspective): Developing an Infrastructure of Partnerships with Science Centers to Support the Engagement of Scientists and Engineers in Education and Outreach for Broad Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Eric

    2009-03-01

    Science centers, professional associations, corporations and university research centers share the same mission of education and outreach, yet come from ``different worlds.'' This gap may be bridged by working together to leverage unique strengths in partnership. Front-end evaluation results for the development of new resources to support these (mostly volunteer-based) partnerships elucidate the factors which lead to a successful relationship. Maintaining a science museum-scientific community partnership requires that all partners devote adequate resources (time, money, etc.). In general, scientists/engineers and science museum professionals often approach relationships with different assumptions and expectations. The culture of science centers is distinctly different from the culture of science. Scientists/engineers prefer to select how they will ultimately share their expertise from an array of choices. Successful partnerships stem from clearly defined roles and responsibilities. Scientists/engineers are somewhat resistant to the idea of traditional, formal training. Instead of developing new expertise, many prefer to offer their existing strengths and expertise. Maintaining a healthy relationship requires the routine recognition of the contributions of scientists/engineers. As professional societies, university research centers and corporations increasingly engage in education and outreach, a need for a supportive infrastructure becomes evident. Work of TryScience.org/VolTS (Volunteers TryScience), the MRS NISE Net (Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network) subcommittee, NRCEN (NSF Research Center Education Network), the IBM On Demand Community, and IEEE Educational Activities exemplify some of the pieces of this evolving infrastructure.

  6. Energy Frontier Research Center Materials Science of Actinides (A 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Peter

    2011-01-01

    'Energy Frontier Research Center Materials Science of Actinides' was submitted by the EFRC for Materials Science of Actinides (MSA) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. MSA is directed by Peter Burns at the University of Notre Dame, and is a partnership of scientists from ten institutions.The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  7. Family-Centered Care in Juvenile Justice Institutions: A Mixed Methods Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Inge; Mulder, Eva; Rigter, Henk; Breuk, René; van der Vaart, Wander; Vermeiren, Robert

    2016-09-12

    Treatment and rehabilitation interventions in juvenile justice institutions aim to prevent criminal reoffending by adolescents and to enhance their prospects of successful social reintegration. There is evidence that these goals are best achieved when the institution adopts a family-centered approach, involving the parents of the adolescents. The Academic Workplace Forensic Care for Youth has developed two programs for family-centered care for youth detained in groups for short-term and long-term stay, respectively. The overall aim of our study is to evaluate the family-centered care program in the first two years after the first steps of its implementation in short-term stay groups of two juvenile justice institutions in the Netherlands. The current paper discusses our study design. Based on a quantitative pilot study, we opted for a study with an explanatory sequential mixed methods design. This pilot is considered the first stage of our study. The second stage of our study includes concurrent quantitative and qualitative approaches. The quantitative part of our study is a pre-post quasi-experimental comparison of family-centered care with usual care in short-term stay groups. The qualitative part of our study involves in-depth interviews with adolescents, parents, and group workers to elaborate on the preceding quantitative pilot study and to help interpret the outcomes of the quasi-experimental quantitative part of the study. We believe that our study will result in the following findings. In the quantitative comparison of usual care with family-centered care, we assume that in the latter group, parents will be more involved with their child and with the institution, and that parents and adolescents will be more motivated to take part in therapy. In addition, we expect family-centered care to improve family interactions, to decrease parenting stress, and to reduce problem behavior among the adolescents. Finally, we assume that adolescents, parents, and the

  8. Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science: Annual Report October 1998 through September 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiner, Barry M.; Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). It currently operates under a multiple year grant/cooperative agreement that began on October 1, 1997 and is up for renewal in the year 2002. ARC has been designated NASA's Center of Excellence in Information Technology. In this capacity, ARC is charged with the responsibility to build an Information Technology Research Program that is preeminent within NASA. RIACS serves as a bridge between NASA ARC and the academic community, and RIACS scientists and visitors work in close collaboration with NASA scientists. RIACS has the additional goal of broadening the base of researchers in these areas of importance to the nation's space and aeronautics enterprises. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of information technology research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: (1) Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems. Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth. (2) Human-Centered Computing. Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities; (3) High Performance Computing and Networking Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to data analysis of large datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply information technology research to

  9. Study of a conceptual nuclear energy center at Green River, Utah: institutional and licensing issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilman, C.B.; Herman, A.A. Jr.; Vito, D.J.

    1982-04-01

    This document constitutes a segment of a feasibility study investigating the ramification of construcing a nuclear energy center in an arid western region. In this phase of the study, the institutional and licensing issues impacting a NEC were analyzed. The most prominent issue facing such a concept is the ownership form of NEC. In addition, legislation and regulation also have a substantial impact regardless of the ownership format

  10. Mobile Gaming and Student Interactions in a Science Center: The Future of Gaming in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood-Blaine, Dana; Huffman, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the impact of an augmented reality iPad-based mobile game, called The Great STEM Caper, on students' interaction at a science center. An open-source, location-based game platform called ARIS (i.e. Augmented Reality and Interactive Storytelling) was used to create an iPad-based mobile game. The game used QR scan codes and a…

  11. Science self-efficacy of African Americans enrolled in freshman level physical science courses in two historically black institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prihoda, Belinda Ann

    2011-12-01

    Science education must be a priority for citizens to function and be productive in a global, technological society. African Americans receive fewer science degrees in proportion to the Caucasian population. The primary purposes of this study were to determine the difference between the pretest and posttest science self-efficacy scores of African-American nonscience majors, the difference between the pretest and posttest science self-efficacy scores of African-American science majors, the relationship between science self-efficacy and course grade, the relationship between gender and science self-efficacy score, and the relationship between science self-efficacy score and course withdrawal. This study utilized a Likert survey instrument. All participants were enrolled in freshman level courses in the physical sciences at a historically black institution: a college or university. Participants completed the pretest survey within two weeks after the 12th class day of the semester. Initially, 458 participants completed the pretest survey. The posttest was administered within two weeks before the final exam. Only 245 participants completed the posttest survey. Results indicate that there is a difference in science self-efficacy of science majors and nonscience majors. There was no significant difference between the pretest and posttest science self-efficacy scores of African-American science majors and nonscience majors. There was no significant relationship between science self-efficacy and course grade, gender and science self-efficacy score, and course withdrawal and science self-efficacy score.

  12. Network Science Center Research Team’s Visit to Kampala, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    TERMS Network Analysis, Economic Networks, Entrepreneurial Ecosystems , Economic Development, Data Collection 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...the Project Synopsis, Developing Network Models of Entrepreneurial Ecosystems in Developing Economies, on the Network Science Center web site.) A...Thomas visited Kampala, Uganda in support of an ongoing Network Science Center project to develop models of entrepreneurial networks. Our Center has

  13. Area health education centers and health science library services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R T; Howard, F H

    1977-07-01

    A study to determine the impact that the Area Health Education Center type of programs may have on health science libraries was conducted by the Extramural Programs, National Library of Medicine, in conjunction with a contract awarded by the Bureau of Health Manpower, Health Resources Administration, to develop an inventory of the AHEC type of projects in the United States. Specific study tasks included a review of these programs as they relate to library and information activities, on-site surveys on the programs to define their needs for library services and information, and a categorization of library activities. A major finding was that health science libraries and information services are generally not included in AHEC program planning and development, although information and information exchange is a fundamental part of the AHEC type of programs. This study suggests that library inadequacies are basically the result of this planning failure and of a lack of financial resources; however, many other factors may be contributory. The design and value of library activities for these programs needs explication.

  14. The Stocker AstroScience Center at Florida International University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The new Stocker AstroScience Center located on the MMC campus at Florida International University in Miami Florida represents a unique facility for STEM education that arose from a combination of private, State and university funding. The building, completed in the fall of 2013, contains some unique spaces designed not only to educate, but also to inspire students interested in science and space exploration. The observatory consists of a 4-story building (3 floors) with a 24” ACE automated telescope in an Ash dome, and an observing platform above surrounding buildings. Some of the unique features of the observatory include an entrance/exhibition hall with a 6-ft glass tile floor mural linking the Florida climate to space travel, a state-of-the art telescope control that looks like a starship bridge, and displays such as “Music from the universe”. The observatory will also be the focus of our extensive public outreach program that is entering its 20 year.

  15. HEASARC - The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, Alan P.

    2011-01-01

    The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is NASA's archive for high-energy astrophysics and cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, supporting the broad science goals of NASA's Physics of the Cosmos theme. It provides vital scientific infrastructure to the community by standardizing science data formats and analysis programs, providing open access to NASA resources, and implementing powerful archive interfaces. Over the next five years the HEASARC will ingest observations from up to 12 operating missions, while serving data from these and over 30 archival missions to the community. The HEASARC archive presently contains over 37 TB of data, and will contain over 60 TB by the end of 2014. The HEASARC continues to secure major cost savings for NASA missions, providing a reusable mission-independent framework for reducing, analyzing, and archiving data. This approach was recognized in the NRC Portals to the Universe report (2007) as one of the HEASARC's great strengths. This poster describes the past and current activities of the HEASARC and our anticipated developments in coming years. These include preparations to support upcoming high energy missions (NuSTAR, Astro-H, GEMS) and ground-based and sub-orbital CMB experiments, as well as continued support of missions currently operating (Chandra, Fermi, RXTE, Suzaku, Swift, XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL). In 2012 the HEASARC (which now includes LAMBDA) will support the final nine-year WMAP data release. The HEASARC is also upgrading its archive querying and retrieval software with the new Xamin system in early release - and building on opportunities afforded by the growth of the Virtual Observatory and recent developments in virtual environments and cloud computing.

  16. Profile: Institute of Society, Ethics and the Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Daniel

    1971-01-01

    Describes an institute founded to examine moral, ethical, and legal issues raised by possibilities of euthanasia, genetic engineering, behavior control, population control, and improved disease control. Indicates scope of present research. (Editor/AL)

  17. The Arab Council for the Social Sciences: Support for Institutional ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Funding will enable the organization to deliver on its mandate of building a strong network of ... -establishing ACSS's institutional status through staff recruitment, an office in Beirut, clear internal operational procedures, and strategic planning.

  18. Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education Tata Institute of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (A Deemed University) ... level • Innovative curricula, laboratories, teaching and assessment methods • Development ... subject), M Tech or a Master's degree (MA/MSW) in any of the social/ behavioural.

  19. Fiscal 1982 plans of works in National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Science and Technology Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    National Institute of Radiological Sciences, since its establishment in 1957, has engaged in the research and other works on the radiation injuries in human bodies, the medical utilization of radiation and the training and education of personnel in the field. The plans of works in fiscal 1982 in the NIRS are described. As special research works, there are the estimation of the degree of danger due to low level radiation for human bodies, environmental radiation exposure due to nuclear facilities, etc., the medical utilization of particle accelerators, and the biological effects of tritium in nuclear fusion reactor development. Ordinary research works include physics, chemistry, genetics, pharmacy, clinical research, etc. In other areas of activities are radiation risk evaluation, radioactivity investigation, technological aid, personnel education and training, and medical work. (Mori, K.)

  20. A Short Assessment of Select Remediation Issues at the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gephart, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    At the invitation of the National Academies, Roy Gephart traveled to Russia with an eight-member U.S. team during June, 2008 to participate in a workshop hosted by the National Academies and the Russian Academy of Sciences on radiation contamination and remediation issues in the former Soviet Union. Cleanup problems were assessed by the American participants for six Russian sites: Kurchatov Institute, Lakes 10 and 11 at Mayak, Andreev Bay, Krasnokamensk Mining Enterprise (Siberia), Almaz Mining Enterprise (North Caucasus), and one site for testing peaceful nuclear explosions. Roy lead the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute review session and wrote an assessment of key cleanup issues. Kurchatov is the leading institute in the Former Soviet Union devoted to military and civilian nuclear programs. Founded in 1943 in the outskirts of Moscow, this 100 hectare site of nearly undeveloped, prime real estate is now surrounded by densely populated urban and business districts. Today there are growing concerns over the public safety and environmental security of the site resulting from increasingly obsolete nuclear facilities and a legacy of inadequate waste management practices that resulted in contaminant releases and challenging remediation problems. In addition, there is growing concern over the presence of nuclear facilities within urban areas creating potential targets for terrorist attacks.

  1. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Kids' Pages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... opportunity to highly motivated science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) focused undergraduate students in the Raleigh-Durham area to solidly connect with NIEHS, and receive frontier-level training in biomedical research. More Information It's Spring! ...

  2. Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education Tata Institute of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-03-30

    Critical and analytical skills • Commitment to improve education. Science and ... Application submission deadline: March 30, 2018 • Written test: May 13, 2018 • Interview: June. 3rd week ... Those who qualify will be called for an interview.

  3. TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: Science, Technology and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This funding will help strengthen the Science, Technology and Innovation ... It also aims to raise awareness among government officials and parliamentarians of the critical role of this research for evidence-based STI policies ... Related content ...

  4. (Congressional Interest) Institute for Science, Space and Security (ISSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    Studies program between UCCS and University of Zagreb , Croatia (City of Zagreb funding). Conducted three days of meetings with City/University of Zagreb ...security and assist the University of Zagreb in establishing a regional (Eastern Europe) Center of Excellence in Homeland Security. In the long-term...UCCS will assist the University of Zagreb in maturing the Center of Excellence and designing, developing and delivering masters and doctoral degrees

  5. Centers of excellence in healthcare institutions: what they are and how to assemble them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrod, James K; Fortenberry, John L

    2017-07-11

    Centers of excellence-specialized programs within healthcare institutions which supply exceptionally high concentrations of expertise and related resources centered on particular medical areas and delivered in a comprehensive, interdisciplinary fashion-afford many advantages for healthcare providers and the populations they serve. To achieve full value from centers of excellence, proper assembly is an absolute necessity, but guidance is somewhat limited. This effectively forces healthcare providers to pursue establishment largely via trial-and-error, diminishing opportunities for success. Successful development of a center of excellence first requires the acquisition of a detailed understanding of the delivery model and its benefits. Then, concerted actions must be taken on a particular series of administrative and clinical fronts, treating them in prescribed manners to afford synergies which yield an exceptionally high level of care. To reduce hardships associated with acquiring this rather elusive knowledge, remedy shortcomings in the literature, and potentially bolster community health broadly, this article presents information and insights gleaned from Willis-Knighton Health System's extensive experience assembling and operating centers of excellence. This work is intended to educate and enlighten, but most importantly, supply guidance which will permit healthcare establishments to replicate noted processes to realize their own centers of excellence. Centers of excellence have the ability to dramatically enhance the depth and breadth of healthcare services available in communities. Given the numerous mutual benefits afforded by this delivery model, it is hoped that the light shed by this article will help healthcare providers better understand centers of excellence and be more capable and confident in associated development initiatives, affording greater opportunities for themselves and their patient populations.

  6. Online and call center referral for endocrine surgical pathology within institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Vaninder K; Al Khadem, Mai G; Tufano, Ralph P; Russell, Jonathon O

    2017-10-08

    We hypothesized that self-referred patients to academic centers will be equally distributed between general surgery and otolaryngology departments that perform thyroid surgery. We sought to quantify disparities in the assignment of these self-referred patients who may reach an institution through call centers or online pathways. Cross-sectional survey. Key words "thyroid surgery" and "thyroid cancer" were used along with the name of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-listed otolaryngology program in both Google and Bing search engines. The top three search results for departments were reviewed, and a tally was given to general surgery (GS), otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OLHNS), or neither. A multidisciplinary center with both GS and OLHNS was recorded as "equitable." Telephone calls were tallied if they were directed to GS or OLHNS. Out of 400 program tallies, 117 (29.25%) patients were directed to GS and 50 (12.5%) were directed to OLHNS. An additional 181 (45.25%) were directed to neither group ("neither") (P call survey had 62 patients (62%) assigned to a general surgeon, as opposed to 38 (38%) for OLHNS (P < .05). Five institutions offered a multidisciplinary group when searching with Bing, and 11 were found by searching with Google. There is not an equal distribution of self-referred patients with thyroid surgical pathology. It may be important to increase the online presence of OLHNS surgeons who perform thyroid surgery at academic medical institutions. Multidisciplinary centers focused on thyroid and parathyroid surgical disease represents one model of assigning self-referred patients. NA Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Status of teaching elementary science for English learners in science, mathematics and technology centered magnet schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Alyson Kim

    According to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (2001), one in three students speaks a language other than English. Additionally, the Commission stated that a student is considered to be an English learner if the second language acquisition is English. In California more than 1.4 million English learners enter school speaking a variety of languages, and this number continues to rise. There is an imminent need to promote instructional strategies that support this group of diverse learners. Although this was not a California study, the results derived from the nationwide participants' responses provided a congruent assessment of the basic need to provide effective science teaching strategies to all English learners. The purpose of this study was to examine the status of elementary science teaching practices used with English learners in kindergarten through fifth grade in public mathematics, science, and technology-centered elementary magnet schools throughout the country. This descriptive research was designed to provide current information and to identify trends in the areas of curriculum and instruction for English learners in science themed magnet schools. This report described the status of elementary (grades K-5) school science instruction for English learners based on the responses of 116 elementary school teachers: 59 grade K-2, and 57 grade 3-5 teachers. Current research-based approaches support incorporating self-directed learning strategy, expository teaching strategy, active listening strategies, questioning strategies, wait time strategy, small group strategy, peer tutoring strategy, large group learning strategy, demonstrations strategy, formal debates strategy, review sessions strategy, mediated conversation strategy, cooperative learning strategy, and theme-based instruction into the curriculum to assist English learners in science education. Science Technology Society (STS) strategy, problem-based learning strategy, discovery learning

  8. Annual report for FY 2010 on the activities of radiation safety in Nuclear Science Research Institute etc. April 1, 2010 - March 31, 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-03-01

    This annual report describes the activities of Radiation Protection Sector in Department of Radiation Protection in Nuclear Science Research Institute, Safety Section in Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Safety Section in Kansai Photon Science Institute, Operation Safety Administration Section in Aomori Research and Development Center and Safety Section in Naka Fusion Institute. The activities described are environmental monitoring, radiation protection in workplaces, individual monitoring, maintenance of monitoring instruments, and research and development of radiation protection. At these institutes the occupational exposures did not exceed the dose limits. The radioactive gaseous and liquid discharges from the facilities were well below the prescribed limits. The research and development activities obtained certain results in the fields of operational radiation protection technique and the construction of calibration fields for neutron beams. The institutes in Tokai, Takasaki, Aomori and Naka were suffered from the Great East Japan Earthquake and the nuclear power plant accident which followed the earthquake. (author)

  9. National Center for Mathematics and Science - teacher resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathematics and Science (NCISLA) HOME | PROGRAM OVERVIEW | RESEARCH AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT support and improve student understanding of mathematics and science. The instructional resources listed Resources (CD)Powerful Practices in Mathematics and Science A multimedia product for educators, professional

  10. Student-Centered Learning in an Earth Science, Preservice, Teacher-Education Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avard, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to get elementary teachers to teach more science in the classroom, a required preservice science education course was designed to promote the use of hands-on teaching techniques. This paper describes course content and activities for an innovative, student-centered, Earth science class. However, any science-content course could be…

  11. Profile of New Mexico Military Institute's Toles Learning Center: Marketing the LRC into the Twenty-First Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, M. Bruce

    1987-01-01

    Describes New Mexico Military Institute (NMMI), a state-supported combined military high school/junior college. Discusses its new learning resources center, the impact of the center on the community, and efforts to promote a greater demand for center services and raise funds for the facility. Recommends 14 marketing strategies. (DMM)

  12. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Spallation Neutron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowicki, Suzanne F.; Wender, Stephen A.; Mocko, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons, which can be used to perform experiments supporting civilian and national security research. These measurements include nuclear physics experiments for the defense program, basic science, and the radiation effect programs. This paper focuses on the radiation effects program, which involves mostly accelerated testing of semiconductor parts. When cosmic rays strike the earth's atmosphere, they cause nuclear reactions with elements in the air and produce a wide range of energetic particles. Because neutrons are uncharged, they can reach aircraft altitudes and sea level. These neutrons are thought to be the most important threat to semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. The best way to determine the failure rate due to these neutrons is to measure the failure rate in a neutron source that has the same spectrum as those produced by cosmic rays. Los Alamos has a high-energy and a low-energy neutron source for semiconductor testing. Both are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam from the LANSCE accelerator. The high-energy neutron source at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility uses a bare target that is designed to produce fast neutrons with energies from 100 keV to almost 800 MeV. The measured neutron energy distribution from WNR is very similar to that of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons in the atmosphere. However, the flux provided at the WNR facility is typically 5×107 times more intense than the flux of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons. This intense neutron flux allows testing at greatly accelerated rates. An irradiation test of less than an hour is equivalent to many years of neutron exposure due to cosmic-ray neutrons. The low-energy neutron source is located at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center. It is based on a moderated source that provides useful neutrons from subthermal energies to ~100 keV. The characteristics of these sources

  13. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Spallation Neutron Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Suzanne F.; Wender, Stephen A.; Mocko, Michael

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons, which can be used to perform experiments supporting civilian and national security research. These measurements include nuclear physics experiments for the defense program, basic science, and the radiation effect programs. This paper focuses on the radiation effects program, which involves mostly accelerated testing of semiconductor parts. When cosmic rays strike the earth's atmosphere, they cause nuclear reactions with elements in the air and produce a wide range of energetic particles. Because neutrons are uncharged, they can reach aircraft altitudes and sea level. These neutrons are thought to be the most important threat to semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. The best way to determine the failure rate due to these neutrons is to measure the failure rate in a neutron source that has the same spectrum as those produced by cosmic rays. Los Alamos has a high-energy and a low-energy neutron source for semiconductor testing. Both are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam from the LANSCE accelerator. The high-energy neutron source at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility uses a bare target that is designed to produce fast neutrons with energies from 100 keV to almost 800 MeV. The measured neutron energy distribution from WNR is very similar to that of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons in the atmosphere. However, the flux provided at the WNR facility is typically 5×107 times more intense than the flux of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons. This intense neutron flux allows testing at greatly accelerated rates. An irradiation test of less than an hour is equivalent to many years of neutron exposure due to cosmic-ray neutrons. The low-energy neutron source is located at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center. It is based on a moderated source that provides useful neutrons from subthermal energies to ∼100 keV. The characteristics of these sources, and

  14. Population-based geographic access to parent and satellite National Cancer Institute Cancer Center Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Wang, Fahui

    2017-09-01

    Satellite facilities of National Cancer Institute (NCI) cancer centers have expanded their regional footprints. This study characterized geographic access to parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities nationally overall and by sociodemographics. Parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities, which were geocoded in ArcGIS, were ascertained. Travel times from every census tract in the continental United States and Hawaii to the nearest parent and satellite facilities were calculated. Census-based population attributes were used to characterize measures of geographic access for sociodemographic groups. From the 62 NCI cancer centers providing clinical care in 2014, 76 unique parent locations and 211 satellite locations were mapped. The overall proportion of the population within 60 minutes of a facility was 22% for parent facilities and 32.7% for satellite facilities. When satellites were included for potential access, the proportion of some racial groups for which a satellite was the closest NCI cancer center facility increased notably (Native Americans, 22.6% with parent facilities and 39.7% with satellite facilities; whites, 34.8% with parent facilities and 50.3% with satellite facilities; and Asians, 40.0% with parent facilities and 54.0% with satellite facilities), with less marked increases for Hispanic and black populations. Rural populations of all categories had dramatically low proportions living within 60 minutes of an NCI cancer center facility of any type (1.0%-6.6%). Approximately 14% of the population (n = 43,033,310) lived more than 180 minutes from a parent or satellite facility, and most of these individuals were Native Americans and/or rural residents (37% of Native Americans and 41.7% of isolated rural residents). Racial/ethnic and rural populations showed markedly improved geographic access to NCI cancer center care when satellite facilities were included. Cancer 2017;123:3305-11. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American

  15. 75 FR 38100 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...- traditional communication methods to make the significance and applicability of SRP-funded research... and Social Sciences Research, and National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering. [cir... Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and Training Program Strategic Plan; Request for Comments ACTION...

  16. Environmental Aspects of Tritium Around the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miljevic, N.; Sipka, V.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of environmental distribution of tritium around the Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca during the period 1988-1994 is presented. Temporal and local variations of the specific tritium variations in precipitation (Usek, Zeleno Brdo), river waters (the Danube, the Sava and Mlaka Creek) as well as atmospheric water vapor are given. Estimates based on precipitation measurements have shown that 6.3 TBq of tritium activity should be released annually into the atmosphere from the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences. (author)

  17. Person-centered pain management - science and art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braš, Marijana; Đorđević, Veljko; Janjanin, Mladen

    2013-06-01

    We are witnessing an unprecedented development of the medical science, which promises to revolutionize health care and improve patients' health outcomes. However, the core of the medical profession has always been and will be the relationship between the doctor and the patient, and communication is the most widely used clinical skill in medical practice. When we talk about different forms of communication in medicine, we must never forget the importance of communication through art. Although one of the simplest, art is the most effective way to approach the patient and produce the effect that no other means of communication can achieve. Person-centered pain management takes into account psychological, physical, social, and spiritual aspects of health and disease. Art should be used as a therapeutic technique for people who suffer from pain, as well as a means of raising public awareness of this problem. Art can also be one of the best forms of educating medical professionals and others involved in treatment and decision-making on pain.

  18. Case Study in International Cooperation: Cuba's Molecular Immunology Center and Roswell Park Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Rachel; Reid, Mary; Segal, Brahm; Abrams, Scott I; Lee, Kelvin

    2018-04-01

    In 1961, the USA severed diplomatic relations with Cuba, and in 1962 an embargo was imposed on trade and financial relations with that country. It was not until five decades later that the USA and Cuba would reestablish relations. This opened the way for the New York State Trade Mission to Cuba in April 2015, during which Cuba's Molecular Immunology Center and Buffalo, New York's Roswell Park Cancer Institute signed a formal agreement that would set in motion biotechnology research collaboration to address one of the most important causes of death in both countries. Significant research from Cuba led to this groundbreaking collaboration. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of this cooperation, from the Molecular Immunology Center's initial investigations, through the opening of a phase I clinical trial at Roswell Park Cancer Institute with therapies developed at the Center. This cooperation was responsible for the first clinical trial for CIMAvax-EGF involving advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer patients in the USA. A license was also approved by the US Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control authorizing a commercial partnership for development of biotechnology products, combining the cancer research efforts of both institutions. This unusual collaboration between Cuba and the USA-the US economic embargo and travel restrictions not withstanding-opens good prospects for expanded medical research between the two countries. While political and logistical challenges remain, the shared mission and dedication of these Cuban and US scientists points the way towards relationships that can lead to development, testing, approval and use of promising new therapies for cancer patients. KEYWORDS Biotechnology, clinical trials, cancer vaccines, cancer immunotherapy, non-small cell lung cancer, NSCLC, Cuba, USA.

  19. Semantic Data Access Services at NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffer, E.; Hertz, J.; Kusterer, J.

    2012-12-01

    The corpus of Earth Science data products at the Atmospheric Science Data Center at NASA's Langley Research Center comprises a widely heterogeneous set of products, even among those whose subject matter is very similar. Two distinct data products may both contain data on the same parameter, for instance, solar irradiance; but the instruments used, and the circumstances under which the data were collected and processed, may differ significantly. Understanding the differences is critical to using the data effectively. Data distribution services must be able to provide prospective users with enough information to allow them to meaningfully compare and evaluate the data products offered. Semantic technologies - ontologies, triple stores, reasoners, linked data - offer functionality for addressing this issue. Ontologies can provide robust, high-fidelity domain models that serve as common schema for discovering, evaluating, comparing and integrating data from disparate products. Reasoning engines and triple stores can leverage ontologies to support intelligent search applications that allow users to discover, query, retrieve, and easily reformat data from a broad spectrum of sources. We argue that because of the extremely complex nature of scientific data, data distribution systems should wholeheartedly embrace semantic technologies in order to make their data accessible to a broad array of prospective end users, and to ensure that the data they provide will be clearly understood and used appropriately by consumers. Toward this end, we propose a distribution system in which formal ontological models that accurately and comprehensively represent the ASDC's data domain, and fully leverage the expressivity and inferential capabilities of first order logic, are used to generate graph-based representations of the relevant relationships among data sets, observational systems, metadata files, and geospatial, temporal and scientific parameters to help prospective data consumers

  20. The NASA Ames Research Center Institutional Scientific Collection: History, Best Practices and Scientific Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, Jon C.; Chakravarty, Kaushik; French, Alison; Choi, Sungshin; Stewart, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Ames Life Sciences Institutional Scientific Collection (ISC), which is composed of the Ames Life Sciences Data Archive (ALSDA) and the Biospecimen Storage Facility (BSF), is managed by the Space Biosciences Division and has been operational since 1993. The ALSDA is responsible for archiving information and animal biospecimens collected from life science spaceflight experiments and matching ground control experiments. Both fixed and frozen spaceflight and ground tissues are stored in the BSF within the ISC. The ALSDA also manages a Biospecimen Sharing Program, performs curation and long-term storage operations, and makes biospecimens available to the scientific community for research purposes via the Life Science Data Archive public website (https:lsda.jsc.nasa.gov). As part of our best practices, a viability testing plan has been developed for the ISC, which will assess the quality of archived samples. We expect that results from the viability testing will catalyze sample use, enable broader science community interest, and improve operational efficiency of the ISC. The current viability test plan focuses on generating disposition recommendations and is based on using ribonucleic acid (RNA) integrity number (RIN) scores as a criteria for measurement of biospecimen viablity for downstream functional analysis. The plan includes (1) sorting and identification of candidate samples, (2) conducting a statiscally-based power analysis to generate representaive cohorts from the population of stored biospecimens, (3) completion of RIN analysis on select samples, and (4) development of disposition recommendations based on the RIN scores. Results of this work will also support NASA open science initiatives and guides development of the NASA Scientific Collections Directive (a policy on best practices for curation of biological collections). Our RIN-based methodology for characterizing the quality of tissues stored in the ISC since the 1980s also creates unique

  1. Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH, JINR, was established by its founding countries in 1956 with the purpose of joining together the scientific and material potential of Member States in studies of the fundamental properties of matter. JINR is an international inter-governmental scientific research organization, whose activities are based on the principles of openness for participation to all interested states and of their equal, mutually beneficial collaboration.

  2. Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH, JINR, was established by its founding countries in 1956 with the purpose of joining together the scientific and material potential of Member States in studies of the fundamental properties of matter. JINR is an international inter-governmental scientific research organization, the activities of which are based on the principles of openness for participation to all interested states of their equal, mutually beneficial collaboration.

  3. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-09

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). Specifically, we announce a priority for a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on Improving the Accessibility, Usability, and Performance of Technology for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on an area of national need. We intend the priority to contribute to improving the accessibility, usability, and performance of technology for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  4. Fiber optic transmission system delivered to Fusion Research Center of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashida, Mutsuo; Hiramoto, Kiyoshi; Yamazaki, Kunihiro

    1983-01-01

    In general there are many electromagnetically induced noises in the premises of factories, power plants and substations. Under such electrically bad environments, for the computer data transmission that needs high speed processing and high reliability, the optical fiber cable is superion to the coaxial cable or the flat-type cable in aspects of the inductionlessness and a wide bandwidth. Showa Electric Wire and Cable Co., Ltd. has delivered and installed a computer data transmission system consisting of optical modems and optical fiber cables for connecting every experiment building in the premises of Fusion Research Center of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. This paper describes the outline of this system. (author)

  5. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1998-01-12

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future project work is identified.

  6. Activities of the center for public information in the ''Kurchatov Institute''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhoruchkin, V.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of the relations between the nuclear community and the public in the former USSR and Russia arose quite recently, exactly after the Chernobyl accident and after the transition to the democratic social order in the country. Recently the Kurchatov Institute was one of the most classified scientific organization in the country. There was no question of discussing its problems in mass media as well as of visiting its facilities by the public. The Center for Public Information was established in the Institute in 1989, in the time when the tide of the public protests against the development of nuclear power in the USSR was at its zenith. The establishing of our public information service had its two objects: to bring back public confidence to nuclear scientists and to restore the high authority of the Kurchatov Institute in the public opinion; the second one was to favour the creation of the objective attitude in the society concerning the necessity of the development of nuclear power. Our first concern was the journalists. The main concern of our contacts with the public and mass media was to demonstrate and to make them understand that nuclear scientists care the public safety not less than the others do. The specific role of our center and the Kurchatov Institute itself is that we represent the only organization in Russia with the competent stuff experienced in nuclear energy and its safety problems at the same time not submitted to any state bodies responsible for Nuclear Power Plants construction and operation. It gives us the possibility to act as an objective arbiter for the public when discussing the problems of nuclear power development

  7. Praxeologies and Institutional Interactions in the Advanced Science Teacher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Klaus

    disciplines in conjunction. In particular the inquiry process of Study and Research Paths (SRP) is experimented as a promising design to bring about disciplinary interaction. SRP is internationally a very recent design, entirely new to Danish teacher education, and the thesis add to the knowledge of its......The present thesis consists of six papers that address three important aspects in mathematics and science teacher education: ‘Integrating two or more teaching disciplines’, ‘learning from practice’ and ‘interaction between institutions’. These aspects are studied in combination as they have...... unfolded in the context of developing and implementing a Danish education programme called the Advanced Science Teacher Education (ASTE), that aim to educate lower secondary school teachers, who among other things are to excel at interdisciplinarity. The essence of integrated teaching is elusive...

  8. European Bioinformatics Institute: Research Infrastructure needed for Life Science

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The life science community is an ever increasing source of data from increasing diverse range of instruments and sources. EMBL-EBI has a remit to store and exploit this data, collected and made available openly across the world, for the benefit of the whole research community. The research infrastructure needed to support the big data analysis around this mission encompasses high performance networks, high-throughput computing, and a range of cloud and storage solutions - and will be described in the presentation.

  9. The Lunar and Planetary Institute Summer Intern Program in Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, G. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Since 1977, the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) Summer Intern Program brings undergraduate students from across the world to Houston for 10 weeks of their summer where they work one-on-one with a scientist at either LPI or Johnson Space Center on a cutting-edge research project in the planetary sciences. The program is geared for students finishing their sophomore and junior years, although graduating seniors may also apply. It is open to international undergraduates as well as students from the United States. Applicants must have at least 50 semester hours of credit (or equivalent sophomore status) and an interest in pursuing a career in the sciences. The application process is somewhat rigorous, requiring three letters of recommendation, official college transcripts, and a letter describing their background, interests, and career goals. The deadline for applications is in early January of that year of the internship. More information about the program and how to apply can be found on the LPI website: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/lpiintern/. Each advisor reads through the applications, looking for academically excellent students and those with scientific interest and backgrounds compatible with the advisor's specific project. Interns are selected fairly from the applicant pool - there are no pre-arranged agreements or selections based on who knows whom. The projects are different every year as new advisors come into the program, and existing ones change their research interest and directions. The LPI Summer Intern Program gives students the opportunity to participate in peer-reviewed research, learn from top-notch planetary scientists, and preview various careers in science. For many interns, this program was a defining moment in their careers - when they decided whether or not to follow an academic path, which direction they would take, and how. While past interns can be found all over the world and in a wide variety of occupations, all share the common bond of

  10. 76 FR 62422 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Cancellation of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Cancellation of Meeting Notice is hereby given of the cancellation of the Interagency Breast Cancer and Environmental Research Coordinating Committee, October 12, 2011, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m...

  11. 78 FR 56902 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of the following meeting. The meeting will be closed to the public in accordance...

  12. 78 FR 64221 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of the following meetings. The meetings will be closed to the public in accordance...

  13. 75 FR 5771 - Institute of Education Sciences; Overview Information; Education Research and Special Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Institute of Education Sciences; Overview Information; Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs; Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards for Fiscal....305D, 84.305E, 84.324A, 84.324B, and 84.324C. Summary: The Director of the Institute of Education...

  14. 76 FR 13197 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Strategic Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... parties. The goal of this strategic planning process is to define an overarching Vision Statement... this planning process, visit the NIEHS Strategic Planning Web site at Request for Visionary Ideas The... Environmental Health Sciences Strategic Planning AGENCY: National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute...

  15. Towards Strategic Actorhood? The Execution of Institutional Positioning Strategies at Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuori, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Given the emerging interest in institutional positioning and to augment the small number of empirical studies in this field, this paper presents discussion about how Finnish universities of applied sciences implement their profiling strategies. The analysis is based on an examination of documents recently submitted by these institutions when…

  16. 75 FR 46950 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Gulf Oil Spill Health Effects. Date: August 17, 2010. Time: 1 p.m...--Health Risks from Environmental Exposures; 93.142, NIEHS Hazardous Waste Worker Health and Safety... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of...

  17. The First National Student Conference: NASA University Research Centers at Minority Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daso, Endwell O. (Editor); Mebane, Stacie (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The conference includes contributions from 13 minority universities with NASA University Research Centers. Topics discussed include: leadership, survival strategies, life support systems, food systems, simulated hypergravity, chromium diffusion doping, radiation effects on dc-dc converters, metal oxide glasses, crystal growth of Bil3, science and communication on wheels, semiconductor thin films, numerical solution of random algebraic equations, fuzzy logic control, spatial resolution of satellite images, programming language development, nitric oxide in the thermosphere and mesosphere, high performance polyimides, crossover control in genetic algorithms, hyperthermal ion scattering, etc.

  18. 77 FR 4572 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental...

  19. 75 FR 41506 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental...

  20. 76 FR 19104 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; 2011 NIH Director's Pioneer Awards. Date: May 2-4, 2011. Time: 7:45 a.m...

  1. 75 FR 14565 - NIST Summer Institute for Middle School Science Teachers; Availability of Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) at the middle school level (grades 6-8... encourage them to inspire students to pursue careers in STEM fields. DATES: Proposals must be received at... educational institutions that are teaching students in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering and...

  2. Annual report-2011. Institute for Nuclear Research National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iivanyuk, F.O.

    2012-01-01

    Annual report contains information on the fundamental, scientific and applied investigations carried out in the Institute for Nuclear Research of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine in the year 2010. The report contains abstracts of research works in the fields of nuclear physics, atomic energy, radiation physics and radiation material science, physics of plasma, radiation ecology and biology.

  3. 78 FR 12369 - United States Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of Concern AGENCY: Office of Science and Technology Policy... comments on the proposed United States Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual... requirements for certain categories of life sciences research at institutions that accept Federal funding for...

  4. The Natural Science Institute for Teachers of Minority Students: Performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ervin, C.J.

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of the Natural Science Institute for Teachers of Minority Students is to enhance the science knowledge and skills of grades four through twelve science teachers in the District of Columbia Public Schools. The Institute brings school teachers together with practicing scientists and experienced science educators who are currently doing or involved in research and publication, especially in the area of global change. Special emphasis is placed on the interdisciplinary nature of science and the part played by the understanding and teaching about the dynamics of the environment and global change. In addition to these goals, teachers will learn a number of successful alternate strategies for teaching science to minority, disabled and non-English speaking students.

  5. Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission: Annual Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute was established in 2009, as the forth research institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. This Annual Report provides an overview of the major activities of the Institutes in the year 2014. Major items covered in the report include: Strategic objectives; Collaborations; Personnel and Organisational Structure; Facilities and Technical Services; Summary of Research and Development Projects; Human Resource Development; Publications and Technical Reports.

  6. Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center) at Washington, Wisconsin, and Utah State, ARRA Supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovinec, Carl [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2018-03-14

    The objective of the Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center) is to develop and deploy computational models that simulate conditions in smaller, concept-exploration plasma experiments. The PSIC group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, led by Prof. Carl Sovinec, uses and enhances the Non-Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics with Rotation, Open Discussion (NIMROD) code, to simulate macroscopic plasma dynamics in a number of magnetic confinement configurations. These numerical simulations provide information on how magnetic fields and plasma flows evolve over all three spatial dimensions, which supplements the limited access of diagnostics in plasma experiments. The information gained from simulation helps explain how plasma evolves. It is also used to engineer more effective plasma confinement systems, reducing the need for building many experiments to cover the physical parameter space. The ultimate benefit is a more cost-effective approach to the development of fusion energy for peaceful power production. The supplemental funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 were used to purchase computer components that were assembled into a 48-core system with 256 Gb of shared memory. The system was engineered and constructed by the group's system administrator at the time, Anthony Hammond. It was successfully used by then graduate student, Dr. John O'Bryan, for computing magnetic relaxation dynamics that occur during experimental tests of non-inductive startup in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment (pegasus.ep.wisc.edu). Dr. O'Bryan's simulations provided the first detailed explanation of how the driven helical filament of electrical current evolves into a toroidal tokamak-like plasma configuration.

  7. Annual report of R and D activities in Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering and Center for Computational Science and e-Systems from April 1, 2005 to March 31, 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    This report provides an overview of research and development activities in Center for Computational Science and Engineering (CCSE), JAERI in the former half of the fiscal year 2005 (April 1, 2005 - Sep. 30, 2006) and those in Center for Computational Science and e-Systems (CCSE), JAEA, in the latter half of the fiscal year 2005(Oct 1, 2005 - March 31, 2006). In the former half term, the activities have been performed by 5 research groups, Research Group for Computational Science in Atomic Energy, Research Group for Computational Material Science in Atomic Energy, R and D Group for Computer Science, R and D Group for Numerical Experiments, and Quantum Bioinformatics Group in CCSE. At the beginning of the latter half term, these 5 groups were integrated into two offices, Simulation Technology Research and Development Office and Computer Science Research and Development Office at the moment of the unification of JNC (Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute) and JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute), and the latter-half term activities were operated by the two offices. A big project, ITBL (Information Technology Based Laboratory) project and fundamental computational research for atomic energy plant were performed mainly by two groups, the R and D Group for Computer Science and the Research Group for Computational Science in Atomic Energy in the former half term and their integrated office, Computer Science Research and Development Office in the latter half one, respectively. The main result was verification by using structure analysis for real plant executable on the Grid environment, and received Honorable Mentions of Analytic Challenge in the conference 'Supercomputing (SC05)'. The materials science and bioinformatics in atomic energy research field were carried out by three groups, Research Group for Computational Material Science in Atomic Energy, R and D Group for Computer Science, R and D Group for Numerical Experiments, and Quantum Bioinformatics

  8. Gifted and Talented Students' Views about Biology Activities in a Science and Art Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özarslan, Murat; Çetin, Gülcan

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine gifted and talented students' views about biology activities in a science and art center. The study was conducted with 26 gifted and talented students who studied at a science and art center in southwestern Turkey. Students studied animal and plant genus and species in biology activities. Data were collected…

  9. 78 FR 50108 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Item: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ....R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Item: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Rochester Museum & Science Center... that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of a sacred object and an object of...

  10. An Exploration of Hispanic Mothers' Culturally Sustaining Experiences at an Informal Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Science education reform focuses on learner-centered instruction within contexts that support learners' sociocultural experiences. The purpose of this study was to explore Hispanic mothers' experiences as accompanying adults at an informal science center within the context of culturally sustaining experiences, which include the fluidity…

  11. 75 FR 57967 - Science Advisory Board to the National Center for Toxicological Research Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ...] Science Advisory Board to the National Center for Toxicological Research Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... closed to the public. Name of Committee: Science Advisory Board (SAB) to the National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR). General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations to the...

  12. 77 FR 57569 - Science Advisory Board to the National Center for Toxicological Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-18

    ...] Science Advisory Board to the National Center for Toxicological Research; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... closed to the public. Name of Committee: Science Advisory Board (SAB) to the National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR). General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations to the...

  13. 77 FR 31329 - Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods, Hole, MA; Public Meeting/Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods, Hole, MA; Public Meeting/Workshop AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS.../workshop. SUMMARY: NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center will sponsor a workshop to address the stock...

  14. Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Center for Electrical Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory Chemical Sciences & Engineering DOE Logo CSE Home About CSE Research Facilities People Publications Awards News & Highlights Events Search Argonne ... Search Argonne Home > Chemical Sciences & Engineering > Fundamental Interactions Catalysis & Energy Conversion Electrochemical

  15. National Center for Mathematics and Science - who we are

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massachusetts-Dartmouth Expertise Areas Classroom discourse Sociocultural theory in mathematics teacher education The learnability of new ideas, such as complexity, chaos and nonlinear systems Center Research students' mathematical understanding Program evaluation Curriculum theory and reform Center Research

  16. Lujan at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an intense pulsed neutrons source operating at a power level of 80 -100 kW....

  17. Grid Integration Science, NREL Power Systems Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroposki, Benjamin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-04-25

    This report highlights journal articles published in 2016 by researchers in the Power Systems Engineering Center. NREL's Power Systems Engineering Center published 47 journal and magazine articles in the past year, highlighting recent research in grid modernization.

  18. Year 3 LUNAR Annual Report to the NASA Lunar Science Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, Jack; Lazio, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The Lunar University Network for Astrophysics Research (LUNAR) is a team of researchers and students at leading universities, NASA centers, and federal research laboratories undertaking investigations aimed at using the Moon as a platform for space science. LUNAR research includes Lunar Interior Physics & Gravitation using Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR), Low Frequency Cosmology and Astrophysics (LFCA), Planetary Science and the Lunar Ionosphere, Radio Heliophysics, and Exploration Science. The LUN...

  19. Local knowledge, science, and institutional change: the case of desertification control in Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lihua

    2015-03-01

    This article studies the influence of local knowledge on the impact of science on institutional change in ecological and environmental management. Based on an empirical study on desertification control in 12 counties in north China, the study found the following major results: (1) although there was a cubic relationship between the extent and effect of local knowledge, local knowledge significantly influenced the impact of science on institutional change; (2) local knowledge took effect mainly through affecting formal laws and regulations, major actors, and methods of desertification control in institutional change but had no significant impact on the types of property rights; and (3) local knowledge enhanced the impact of science on the results of desertification control through affecting the impact of science on institutional change. These findings provide a reference for researchers, policy makers, and practitioners, both in China and in other regions of the world, to further explore the influence of local knowledge on the impact of science on institutional change and the roles of local knowledge or knowledge in institutional change and governance.

  20. Annual report of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. April 2000-March 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    This report contains all of accomplishments of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), including research and investigations, medical practice, training and technology assistance the institute performed during the given year. Actually, the content covers NIRS activity results in the fields of physics (6 presentations), chemistry (3), bio-medical sciences, clinical research (7), environmental science (15) and space science (5). The third involves fields of biochemistry and biophysics (6), cell biology (6), immunology and hematology (1), pathology and physiology (5), genetics (8) and radiotoxicology (1). Topical issues are clinical trials of heavy-ion radiotherapy for cancer; researches of radiation-sensitive genes and gene-expression profiles; and activities for various accidents after the turning point of the JCO criticality accident in Tokai. NIRS was reborn as an independent corporative body as a result of the national administrative reform and this report is the final one as that from the national institute. (N.I.)

  1. Predicting the Proficiency of Arabic and Persian Linguists Trained at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeRamus, Nicole

    1999-01-01

    The mission of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center (DLIFLC) is to train, sustain, and evaluate foreign language skills of linguists under the guidelines of the Defense Foreign Language Program (DFLP...

  2. UNLV Information Science Research Institute quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-03-31

    Sections of this report include: symposium activity, staff activity, document analysis program, text-retrieval program, institute activity, etc. It is believed that as large, complete collections of documents become available in digital libraries, users will demand complete interaction with the information; document access mechanisms will have to grow beyond keywords and full-text searches to include browsing, searching of images, and searching on basis of abstract concepts. It is proposed to study the microform document conversion process, including image preprocessing, recognition, postprocessing for extracting information, and natural language techniques. Characterization of algorithms will allow generation of a system that automatically adapts to a wide range of image quality, thereby allowing large-scale conversion efforts. It is proposed to focus first on the NSF Antarctic database (approx. 55,000 documents).

  3. Annual report of the Institute for Environmental Sciences, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    A survey research was continually made on the effects of radioactive substances on the environment in the fiscal year, 1998 as well as in the previous year. The research was conducted with the following themes; survey in natural and social environments, study on the distribution of environmental radioactivities, study on the transfer of radioactive substances into the environment, experimental study on the development of closed experiment system for ecological study and experimental study on the biological effects of radioactivity. In addition, several seminars and meetings were held in the institute aiming to spread and enlighten the scientific informations and techniques on the environmental influence of radioactivities. This survey research was entrusted by Atomic Prefecture and the National Government. (J.P.N.)

  4. Annual report of the Institute for Environmental Sciences, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    A survey research was continually made on the effects of radioactive substances on the environment in the fiscal year, 1996 as well as in the previous year. The research was conducted with the following themes; survey in natural and social environments, study on the distribution of environmental radioactivities, study on the transfer of radioactive substances into the environment, experimental study on the development of closed experiment system for ecological study and experimental study on the biological effects of radioactivity. In addition, several seminars and meetings were held in the institute aiming to spread and enlighten the scientific informations and techniques on the environmental influence of radioactivities. This survey research was entrusted by Aomori Prefecture and the National Government. (M.N.)

  5. UNLV Information Science Research Institute quarterly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    Sections of this report include: symposium activity, staff activity, document analysis program, text-retrieval program, institute activity, etc. It is believed that as large, complete collections of documents become available in digital libraries, users will demand complete interaction with the information; document access mechanisms will have to grow beyond keywords and full-text searches to include browsing, searching of images, and searching on basis of abstract concepts. It is proposed to study the microform document conversion process, including image preprocessing, recognition, postprocessing for extracting information, and natural language techniques. Characterization of algorithms will allow generation of a system that automatically adapts to a wide range of image quality, thereby allowing large-scale conversion efforts. It is proposed to focus first on the NSF Antarctic database (approx. 55,000 documents)

  6. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1998. Volume II: Life Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschwend, Beatrice; Jaussi, Rolf [eds.

    1999-09-01

    The Department of Life Sciences, is aiming to perform high quality research in biosciences focused primarily on oncology and in close interaction with the technical facilities at PSI e.g. proton therapy, SINQ, SLS, and the national and international bioscience community. Within this department, the Division of Radiation Protection and Radioactive Waste Treatment is responsible for the radiological safety of the personnel, the installations and the environment at PSI, and it is charged with dismantling obsolete nuclear installations at PSI. The principal research and development activities of this division concern novel methods for neutron dosimetry, and the study of presence and pathways of natural and man made radioactivity in humans and in the environment. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  7. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1998. Volume II: Life Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gschwend, Beatrice; Jaussi, Rolf

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Life Sciences, is aiming to perform high quality research in biosciences focused primarily on oncology and in close interaction with the technical facilities at PSI e.g. proton therapy, SINQ, SLS, and the national and international bioscience community. Within this department, the Division of Radiation Protection and Radioactive Waste Treatment is responsible for the radiological safety of the personnel, the installations and the environment at PSI, and it is charged with dismantling obsolete nuclear installations at PSI. The principal research and development activities of this division concern novel methods for neutron dosimetry, and the study of presence and pathways of natural and man made radioactivity in humans and in the environment. (author)

  8. Disparities in Geographic Accessibility of National Cancer Institute Cancer Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanqing; Fu, Cong; Onega, Tracy; Shi, Xun; Wang, Fahui

    2017-11-11

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Centers form the backbone of the cancer care system in the United States since their inception in the early 1970s. Most studies on their geographic accessibility used primitive measures, and did not examine the disparities across urbanicity or demographic groups. This research uses an advanced accessibility method, termed "2-step floating catchment area (2SFCA)" and implemented in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), to capture the degree of geographic access to NCI Cancer Centers by accounting for competition intensity for the services and travel time between residents and the facilities. The results indicate that urban advantage is pronounced as the average accessibility is highest in large central metro areas, declines to large fringe metro, medium metro, small metro, micropolitan and noncore rural areas. Population under the poverty line are disproportionally concentrated in lower accessibility areas. However, on average Non-Hispanic White have the lowest geographic accessibility, followed by Hispanic, Non-Hispanic Black and Asian, and the differences are statistically significant. The "reversed racial disadvantage" in NCI Cancer Center accessibility seems counterintuitive but is consistent with an influential prior study; and it is in contrast to the common observation of co-location of concentration of minority groups and people under the poverty line.

  9. [Analysis on Research Projects Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China at the National Institute of Parasitic Diseases during 2003-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-jun; Zheng, Bin; Yi, Feng-yun; Xiong, Yan-hong; Zhang, Min-qi

    2015-04-01

    The data of the National Natural Science Foundation (NSFC) projests obtained by the National Institute of Parasitic Diseases (NIPD), Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC) during 2003-2013 were collected from internet-based science information system of NSFC, and NSFC search tool of Dingxiang Garden (http://nsfc.biomart.cn/). The number of funded projects, their subject classification and approved amount were analyzed, and compared with the other institutes of China CDC. Furthermore, the rationalization proposals were given in order to enhance the level of foundation management in the future.

  10. Narrative as a learning tool in science centers : potentials, possibilities and merits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murmann, Mai; Avraamidou, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    In this theoretical paper we explore the use of narrative as a learning tool in informal science settings. Specifically, the purpose of this paper is to ex-plore how narrative can be applied to exhibits in the context of science centers to scaffold visitors science learning. In exploring this idea,

  11. Science Information Centre and Nuclear Library of 'Jozef Stefan' Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stante, A.; Smuc, S.

    2006-01-01

    The 'Jozef Stefan' Institute Science Information Centre is the central Slovene physics library and one of the largest special libraries in Slovenia. Our collection covers the fields of physics, chemistry, biochemistry, electronics, information science, artificial intelligence, energy management, environmental science, material science, robotics etc. The Nuclear Library at the Reactor Centre Podgorica is a part of the Science Information Centre. It collects and keeps literature from the field of reactor and nuclear energy and provides information to scientists employed at the Reactor Centre and users from the Nuclear Power Plant Krsko as well as other experts dealing with nuclear science and similar fields. The orders subscribed are sent by the Science Information Centre to other libraries included in inter-library lending in Slovenia and abroad. (author)

  12. Ranking Iranian biomedical research centers according to H-variants (G, M, A, R) in Scopus and Web of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmudi, Zoleikha; Tahamtan, Iman; Sedghi, Shahram; Roudbari, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a comprehensive bibliometrics analysis to calculate the H, G, M, A and R indicators for all Iranian biomedical research centers (IBRCs) from the output of ISI Web of Science (WoS) and Scopus between 1991 and 2010. We compared the research performance of the research centers according to these indicators. This was a cross-sectional and descriptive-analytical study, conducted on 104 Iranian biomedical research centers between August and September 2011. We collected our data through Scopus and WoS. Pearson correlation coefficient between the scientometrics indicators was calculated using SPSS, version 16. The mean values of all indicators were higher in Scopus than in WoS. Drug Applied Research Center of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences had the highest number of publications in both WoS and Scopus databases. This research center along with Royan Institute received the highest number of citations in both Scopus and WoS, respectively. The highest correlation was seen between G and R (.998) in WoS and between G and R (.990) in Scopus. Furthermore, the highest overlap of the 10 top IBRCs was between G and H in WoS (100%) and between G-R (90%) and H-R (90%) in Scopus. Research centers affiliated to the top ranked Iranian medical universities obtained a better position with respect to the studied scientometrics indicators. All aforementioned indicators are important for ranking bibliometrics studies as they refer to different attributes of scientific output and citation aspects.

  13. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arun K. Joshi, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center and Borlaug Institute for ... N. G. Prasad, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Mohali ... Madhulika Kabra, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi

  14. Member Perceptions of Informal Science Institution Graduate Certificate Program: Case Study of a Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lois A.

    This research attempted to understand the experiences of a cohort of informal and formal science educators and informal science institution (ISI) community representatives during and after completion of a pilot graduate certificate program. Informal science educators (ISEs) find limited opportunities for professional development and support which influence their contributions to America's science literacy and school science education. This emergent design nested case study described how an innovative program provided professional development and enabled growth in participants' abilities to contribute to science literacy. Data were collected through interviews, participant observations, and class artifacts. The program by design and constituency was the overarching entity that accounted for members' experiences. Three principal aspects of the ISI certificate program and cohort which influenced perceptions and reported positive outcomes were (1) the cohort's composition and their collaborative activities which established a vigorous community of practice and fostered community building, mentoring, and networking, (2) long term program design and implementation which promoted experiential learning in a generative classroom, and (3) ability of some members who were able to be independent or autonomous learners to embrace science education reform strategies for greater self-efficacy and career advancement. This research extends the limited literature base for professional development of informal science educators and may benefit informal science institutions, informal and formal science educators, science education reform efforts, and public education and science-technology-society understanding. The study may raise awareness of the need to establish more professional development opportunities for ISEs and to fund professional development. Further, recognizing and appreciating informal science educators as a diverse committed community of professionals who positively

  15. Annual Report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1991 - March 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This annual report is a compilation of the research activities and achievement in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the fiscal year 1991 (from April 1991 through March 1992). The research covers a wide range of radiological sciences from molecular to environmental studies and medicine including engineering. Topics consists of physics, chemistry, biomedical science, clinical research, and environmental sciences, covering a total of 69 titles. A list of publications by staff members, activities of research divisions, and organization chart of the NIRS are given in Appendix. (J.P.N.) 64 refs

  16. Annual report of national institute of radiological sciences, April 1990 - March 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This annual report is a compilation of the research activities and achievement in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the fiscal year 1990 (from April 1990 through March 1991). The research covers a wide range of radiological sciences from molecular to environmental studies and medicine including engineering. Topics consists of physics, chemistry, bio-medical science, clinical research, and environmental sciences, covering a total of 86 titles. A list of publications by staff members, activities of research divisions, and organization chart of the NIRS are given in Appendix. (J.P.N.) 102 refs

  17. Employee Perceptions of Progress with Implementing a Student-Centered Model of Institutional Improvement: An Achieving the Dream Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Annesa LeShawn

    2011-01-01

    Achieving the Dream is a national initiative focused on helping more community college students succeed, particularly students of color and low-income students. Achieving the Dream's student-centered model of institutional improvement focuses on eliminating gaps and raising student achievement by helping institutions build a culture of evidence…

  18. Specification of carbon ion dose at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Nakai, Tatsuaki; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    The clinical dose distributions of therapeutic carbon beams, currently used at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), are based on in-vitro Human Salivary Gland (HSG) cell survival response and clinical experience from fast neutron radiotherapy. Moderate radiosensitivity of HSG cells is expected to be a typical response of tumours to carbon beams. At first, the biological dose distribution is designed so as to cause a flat biological effect on HSG cells in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) region. Then, the entire biological dose distribution is evenly raised in order to attain a RBE (relative biological effectiveness)=3.0 at a depth where dose-averaged LET (linear energy transfer) is 80 keV/μm. At that point, biological experiments have shown that carbon ions can be expected to have a biological effect identical to fast neutrons, which showed a clinical RBE of 3.0 for fast neutron radiotherapy at NIRS. The resulting clinical dose distribution in this approximation is not dependent on dose level, tumour type or fractionation scheme and thus reduces the unknown parameters in the analysis of the clinical results. The width SOBP and the clinical/physical dose at the center of SOBP specify the dose distribution. The clinical results analyzed in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) were found to show good agreement with the expected RBE value at higher TCP levels. The TCP analysis method was applied for the prospective dose estimation of hypofractionation. (author)

  19. Student Services/One Stop Centers: A Qualitative Examination of Implementation at Three Post-Secondary Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Janine M.

    2012-01-01

    This research investigates Student Services/One Stop Centers at three post-secondary institutions, looking at the origination of the centers and success through the lens of behavioral theories. Comparing the 3-stage Group Dynamics Theory of Lewin (1947), Social Learning Theory of Bandura (1977), and the 8-stage Change Management Model of Kotter…

  20. The National Space Science and Technology Center's Education and Public Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G. N.; Denson, R. L.

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the National Space Science and Technology Center's (NSSTC) Education and Public Outreach program (EPO) is to support K-20 education by coalescing academic, government, and business constituents awareness, implementing best business/education practices, and providing stewardship over funds and programs that promote a symbiotic relationship among these entities, specifically in the area of K-20 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education. NSSTC EPO Program's long-term objective is to showcase its effective community-based integrated stakeholder model in support of STEM education and to expand its influence across the Southeast region for scaling ultimately across the United States. The Education and Public Outreach program (EPO) is coordinated by a supporting arm of the NSSTC Administrative Council called the EPO Council (EPOC). The EPOC is funded through federal, state, and private grants, donations, and in-kind contributions. It is comprised of representatives of NSSTC Research Centers, both educators and scientists from the Alabama Space Science and Technology Alliance (SSTA) member institutions, the Alabama Space Grant Consortium and the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Education Office. Through its affiliation with MSFC and the SSTA - a consortium of Alabama's research universities that comprise the NSSTC, EPO fosters the education and development of the next generation of Alabama scientists and engineers by coordinating activities at the K-20 level in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Education, the Alabama Commission on Higher Education, and Alabama's businesses and industries. The EPO program's primary objective is to be Alabama's premiere organization in uniting academia, government, and private industry by way of providing its support to the State and Federal Departments of Education involved in systemic STEM education reform, workforce development, and innovative uses of technology. The NSSTC EPO

  1. U.S. Institutional Research Productivity in Major Science Education Research Journals: Top 30 for 2000's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Lloyd H.; Tang, Nai-en

    2013-01-01

    VonAalst (2010) used Google Scholar to identify the top four science education research journals: "Journal of Research in Science Teaching," "Science Education," "International Journal of Science Education," and "Journal of Science Teacher Education." U.S. institutional productivity for 2000-2009 for the…

  2. Science teacher learning for MBL-supported student-centered science education in the context of secondary education in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, Joke; Tilya, F.; van den Akker, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Science teachers from secondary schools in Tanzania were offered an in-service arrangement to prepare them for the integration of technology in a student-centered approach to science teaching. The in-service arrangement consisted of workshops in which educative curriculum materials were used to

  3. "Wow! Look at That!": Discourse as a Means to Improve Teachers' Science Content Learning in Informal Science Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Gary M.; Lederman, Judith S.; Lederman, Norman G.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, it is not clear whether professional development staff at Informal Science Institutions (ISIs) are considering the way exhibits contribute to the social aspects of learning as described by the contextual model of learning (CML) (Falk & Dierking in "The museum experience." Whalesback, Washington, 1992; "Learning from…

  4. Characterization of the peer review network at the Center for Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyack, Kevin W; Chen, Mei-Ching; Chacko, George

    2014-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the largest source of funding for biomedical research in the world. This funding is largely effected through a competitive grants process. Each year the Center for Scientific Review (CSR) at NIH manages the evaluation, by peer review, of more than 55,000 grant applications. A relevant management question is how this scientific evaluation system, supported by finite resources, could be continuously evaluated and improved for maximal benefit to the scientific community and the taxpaying public. Towards this purpose, we have created the first system-level description of peer review at CSR by applying text analysis, bibliometric, and graph visualization techniques to administrative records. We identify otherwise latent relationships across scientific clusters, which in turn suggest opportunities for structural reorganization of the system based on expert evaluation. Such studies support the creation of monitoring tools and provide transparency and knowledge to stakeholders.

  5. Collaboration and Team Science Field Guide - Center for Research Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collaboration and Team Science: A Field Guide provides insight into the practices of conducting collaborative work. Since its 2010 publication, the authors have worked and learned from teams and organizations all over the world. Learn from these experiences in the second edition of the Team Science Field Guide.

  6. Science and Math in the Library Media Center Using GLOBE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Teresa L.; Levine, Elissa R.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program which helps school library media specialists and science and math teachers bring earth science, math, information literacy, information technology, and student inquiry into the classroom. Discusses use of the Internet to create a global network to study the…

  7. The Bone Marrow Transplantation Center of the National Cancer Institute - its resources to assist patients with bone marrow failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabak, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the bone marrow transplantation center of the brazilian National Cancer Institute, which is responsible for the cancer control in Brazil. The document also describes the resources available in the Institute for assisting patients presenting bone marrow failures. The Center provides for allogeneic and autologous bone marrow transplants, peripheral stem cell transplants, umbilical cord collections and transplants, and a small experience with unrelated bone marrow transplants. The Center receives patient from all over the country and provides very sophisticated medical care at no direct cost to the patients

  8. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science, April 1995 -March 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This annual report presents a brief summary of the research activities and the achievements in the Institute for fiscal year 1995 (from April 1995 to March 1996). The clinical trial of cancer therapy using heavy ion beams is making progress with successful results. Various kinds of basic researches using the same heavy ion beams are also growing up gradually in an open use system available to many researchers not only inside but also outside the Institute. Studies of newly assembled research groups are also going to appear. The Institute is covering a very wide area of comprehensive radiological sciences including physics, chemistry, biomedical sciences, clinical research and environmental science. The recent publications, list of keywords, author index, and organization and staff are included in this report. (M.N.)

  9. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Science, April 1995 - March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This annual report presents a brief summary of the research activities and the achievements in the Institute for fiscal year 1995 (from April 1995 to March 1996). The clinical trial of cancer therapy using heavy ion beams is making progress with successful results. Various kinds of basic researches using the same heavy ion beams are also growing up gradually in an open use system available to many researchers not only inside but also outside the Institute. Studies of newly assembled research groups are also going to appear. The Institute is covering a very wide area of comprehensive radiological sciences including physics, chemistry, biomedical sciences, clinical research and environmental science. The recent publications, list of keywords, author index, and organization and staff are included in this report. (M.N.)

  10. New institutional mechanisms to bridge the information gap between climate science and public policy decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, W.; Gulledge, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Many decision makers lack actionable scientific information needed to prepare for future challenges associated with climate change. Although the scope and quality of available scientific information has increased dramatically in recent years, this information does not always reach - or is not presented in a form that is useful to - decision makers who need it. The producer (i.e. scientists) community tends to be stovepiped, even though consumers (i.e. decision makers) often need interdisciplinary science and analysis. Consumers, who may also be stovepiped in various agencies or subject areas, may lack familiarity with or access to these separate communities, as well as the tools or time to navigate scientific information and disciplines. Closing the communication gap between these communities could be facilitated by institutionalizing processes designed for this purpose. We recommend a variety of mainstreaming policies within the consumer community, as well as mechanisms to generate a strong demand signal that will resonate more strongly with the producer community. We also recommend institutional reforms and methods of incentivizing policy-oriented scientific analysis within the producer community. Our recommendations focus on improving information flow to national security and foreign policy decision makers, but many are relevant to public policy writ large. Recommendations for Producers 1. The scientific community should formally encourage collaborations between natural and social scientists and reward publications in interdisciplinary outlets Incentives could include research funding and honorary awards recognizing service to public policy. 2. Academic merit review should reward research grants and publications targeted at interdisciplinary and/or policy-oriented audiences. Reforms of merit review may require new policies and engaged institutional leadership. Recommendations for Consumers 1. Congress should amend Title VI of the National Defense Education Act

  11. A cross-case analysis of three Native Science Field Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augare, Helen J.; Davíd-Chavez, Dominique M.; Groenke, Frederick I.; Little Plume-Weatherwax, Melissa; Lone Fight, Lisa; Meier, Gene; Quiver-Gaddie, Helene; Returns From Scout, Elvin; Sachatello-Sawyer, Bonnie; St. Pierre, Nate; Valdez, Shelly; Wippert, Rachel

    2017-06-01

    Native Science Field Centers (NSFCs) were created to engage youth and adults in environmental science activities through the integration of traditional Native ways of knowing (understanding about the natural world based on centuries of observation including philosophy, worldview, cosmology, and belief systems of Indigenous peoples), Native languages, and Western science concepts. This paper focuses on the Blackfeet Native Science Field Center, the Lakota Native Science Field Center, and the Wind River Native Science Field Center. One of the long-term, overarching goals of these NSFCs was to stimulate the interest of Native American students in ways that encouraged them to pursue academic and career paths in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. A great deal can be learned from the experiences of the NSFCs in terms of effective educational strategies, as well as advantages and challenges in blending Native ways of knowing and Western scientific knowledge in an informal science education setting. Hopa Mountain—a Bozeman, Montana-based nonprofit—partnered with the Blackfeet Community College on the Blackfeet Reservation, Fremont County School District #21 on the Wind River Reservation, and Oglala Lakota College on the Pine Ridge Reservation to cooperatively establish the Native Science Field Centers. This paper presents a profile of each NSFC and highlights their program components and accomplishments.

  12. Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (a Brazilian regional center for nuclear sciences) - activities report - 1999; Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares - relatorio de atividades - 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-01

    The annual activities report of 1999 of nuclear sciences regional center - Brazilian organization - introduces the next main topics: institutional relations; sectorial actions - logistic support and training, laboratory of radiation protection and dosimetry, laboratory of metrology, laboratory of chemical characterization; technical and scientific events; and financial resources and perspectives for 2000.

  13. Institutional profile: integrated center for research and treatment of vertigo, balance and ocular motor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Thomas; Zwergal, Andreas; Jahn, Klaus; Strupp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In 2009 the German BMBF (German Ministry of Education and Research) established an Integrated Center for Research and Treatment (IFB(LMU)) of Vertigo, Balance and Ocular Motor Disorders in Munich. After the 10-year period of funding by the BMBF, it is envisioned that the (IFB(LMU)) will continue over the long term with the joint support of the University Hospital, the Medical Faculty, and the Bavarian State. Vertigo is one of the most common complaints in medicine. Despite its high prevalence, patients with vertigo generally receive either inappropriate or inadequate treatment. This deplorable situation is internationally well known and its causes are multiple: insufficient interdisciplinary cooperation, no standardized diagnostics and therapy, the failure to translate findings of basic science into clinical applications, and the scarcity of clinical multicenter studies. The (IFB(LMU)) will constitute a suitable tool with which these structural, clinical, and scientific deficits can be overcome. It will also make possible the establishment of an international interdisciplinary referral center. Munich has become the site of a unique concentration of leading experts on vertigo, balance and ocular motor disorders, both in the clinical and basic sciences. Academic structures have paved the way for the creation of an interdisciplinary horizontal network that also allows structured, vertical academic career paths via the Bachelor's and Master's degree programs in Neuroscience, a Graduate School of Systemic Neurosciences, and the Munich Center for Neurosciences - Brain and Mind. The (IFB(LMU)) has the following objectives as regards structure and content: to create an independent patient-oriented clinical research center under the auspices of the Medical Faculty but with autonomous administration and budget; to overcome existing clinical and academic barriers separating the traditional specializations; to establish a standardized interdisciplinary longitudinal and

  14. Western Mineral and Environmental Resources Science Center--providing comprehensive earth science for complex societal issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David G.; Wallace, Alan R.; Schneider, Jill L.

    2010-01-01

    Minerals in the environment and products manufactured from mineral materials are all around us and we use and come into contact with them every day. They impact our way of life and the health of all that lives. Minerals are critical to the Nation's economy and knowing where future mineral resources will come from is important for sustaining the Nation's economy and national security. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Resources Program (MRP) provides scientific information for objective resource assessments and unbiased research results on mineral resource potential, production and consumption statistics, as well as environmental consequences of mining. The MRP conducts this research to provide information needed for land planners and decisionmakers about where mineral commodities are known and suspected in the earth's crust and about the environmental consequences of extracting those commodities. As part of the MRP scientists of the Western Mineral and Environmental Resources Science Center (WMERSC or 'Center' herein) coordinate the development of national, geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral-resource databases and the migration of existing databases to standard models and formats that are available to both internal and external users. The unique expertise developed by Center scientists over many decades in response to mineral-resource-related issues is now in great demand to support applications such as public health research and remediation of environmental hazards that result from mining and mining-related activities. Western Mineral and Environmental Resources Science Center Results of WMERSC research provide timely and unbiased analyses of minerals and inorganic materials to (1) improve stewardship of public lands and resources; (2) support national and international economic and security policies; (3) sustain prosperity and improve our quality of life; and (4) protect and improve public health, safety, and environmental quality. The MRP

  15. Primary Care Research in the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute's Portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Joe V; Slutsky, Jean R

    2016-04-01

    In their article in this issue, Mazur and colleagues analyze the characteristics of early recipients of funding from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). Mazur and colleagues note correctly that PCORI has a unique purpose and mission and suggest that it should therefore have a distinct portfolio of researchers and departments when compared with other funders such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Responding on behalf of PCORI, the authors of this Commentary agree with the characterization of PCORI's mission as distinct from that of NIH and others. They agree too that data found on PCORI's Web site demonstrate that PCORI's portfolio of researchers and departments is more diverse and more heavily populated with clinician researchers, as would be expected. The authors take issue with Mazur and colleagues' suggestion that because half of clinical visits occur within primary care settings, half of PCORI's funded research should be based in primary care departments. PCORI's portfolio reflects what patients and others tell PCORI are the critical questions. Many of these do, in fact, occur with more complex conditions in specialty care. The authors question whether the research of primary care departments is too narrowly focused and whether it sufficiently considers study of these complex conditions. Research on more complex conditions including heart failure, coronary artery disease, and multiple comorbid conditions could be highly valuable when approached from the primary care perspective, where many of the comparative effectiveness questions first arise.

  16. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the steering committee. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued with the Pilot High Velocity FGD (PHV) and the Trace Element Removal (TER) test blocks. In the High Velocity test block, SO{sub 2} removal and mist eliminator carryover rates were investigated while operating the absorber unit with various spray nozzle types and vertical mist eliminator sections. During the Trace Element Removal test block, the mercury measurements and control studies involving the EPA Method 29 continued with testing of several impinger capture solutions, and the use of activated carbon injection across the Pulse-Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) unit. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System was utilized this month in the TER test configuration to inject and transfer activated carbon to the PJFF bags for downstream mercury capture. Work also began in December to prepare the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Absorber system for receipt of the B and W Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX) unit to be used in the 1996 DOE/PRDA testing. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained in cold-standby this month.

  17. The National Institutes of Health Center for Human Immunology, Autoimmunity, and Inflammation: history and progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickler, Howard B; McCoy, J Philip; Nussenblatt, Robert; Perl, Shira; Schwartzberg, Pamela A; Tsang, John S; Wang, Ena; Young, Neil S

    2013-05-01

    The Center for Human Immunology, Autoimmunity, and Inflammation (CHI) is an exciting initiative of the NIH intramural program begun in 2009. It is uniquely trans-NIH in support (multiple institutes) and leadership (senior scientists from several institutes who donate their time). Its goal is an in-depth assessment of the human immune system using high-throughput multiplex technologies for examination of immune cells and their products, the genome, gene expression, and epigenetic modulation obtained from individuals both before and after interventions, adding information from in-depth clinical phenotyping, and then applying advanced biostatistical and computer modeling methods for mining these diverse data. The aim is to develop a comprehensive picture of the human "immunome" in health and disease, elucidate common pathogenic pathways in various diseases, identify and validate biomarkers that predict disease progression and responses to new interventions, and identify potential targets for new therapeutic modalities. Challenges, opportunities, and progress are detailed. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. The NIH-NIAID Schistosomiasis Resource Center at the Biomedical Research Institute: Molecular Redux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Cody

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis remains a health burden in many parts of the world. The complex life cycle of Schistosoma parasites and the economic and societal conditions present in endemic areas make the prospect of eradication unlikely in the foreseeable future. Continued and vigorous research efforts must therefore be directed at this disease, particularly since only a single World Health Organization (WHO-approved drug is available for treatment. The National Institutes of Health (NIH-National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID Schistosomiasis Resource Center (SRC at the Biomedical Research Institute provides investigators with the critical raw materials needed to carry out this important research. The SRC makes available, free of charge (including international shipping costs, not only infected host organisms but also a wide array of molecular reagents derived from all life stages of each of the three main human schistosome parasites. As the field of schistosomiasis research rapidly advances, it is likely to become increasingly reliant on omics, transgenics, epigenetics, and microbiome-related research approaches. The SRC has and will continue to monitor and contribute to advances in the field in order to support these research efforts with an expanding array of molecular reagents. In addition to providing investigators with source materials, the SRC has expanded its educational mission by offering a molecular techniques training course and has recently organized an international schistosomiasis-focused meeting. This review provides an overview of the materials and services that are available at the SRC for schistosomiasis researchers, with a focus on updates that have occurred since the original overview in 2008.

  19. NASA Johnson Space Center Life Sciences Data System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Hasan; Cardenas, Jeffery

    1994-01-01

    The Life Sciences Project Division (LSPD) at JSC, which manages human life sciences flight experiments for the NASA Life Sciences Division, augmented its Life Sciences Data System (LSDS) in support of the Spacelab Life Sciences-2 (SLS-2) mission, October 1993. The LSDS is a portable ground system supporting Shuttle, Spacelab, and Mir based life sciences experiments. The LSDS supports acquisition, processing, display, and storage of real-time experiment telemetry in a workstation environment. The system may acquire digital or analog data, storing the data in experiment packet format. Data packets from any acquisition source are archived and meta-parameters are derived through the application of mathematical and logical operators. Parameters may be displayed in text and/or graphical form, or output to analog devices. Experiment data packets may be retransmitted through the network interface and database applications may be developed to support virtually any data packet format. The user interface provides menu- and icon-driven program control and the LSDS system can be integrated with other workstations to perform a variety of functions. The generic capabilities, adaptability, and ease of use make the LSDS a cost-effective solution to many experiment data processing requirements. The same system is used for experiment systems functional and integration tests, flight crew training sessions and mission simulations. In addition, the system has provided the infrastructure for the development of the JSC Life Sciences Data Archive System scheduled for completion in December 1994.

  20. A distributed model: redefining a robust research subject advocacy program at the Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Sabune J; Cagliero, Enrico; Witte, Elizabeth; Bierer, Barbara E

    2014-08-01

    The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center ("Harvard Catalyst") Research Subject Advocacy (RSA) Program has reengineered subject advocacy, distributing the delivery of advocacy functions through a multi-institutional, central platform rather than vesting these roles and responsibilities in a single individual functioning as a subject advocate. The program is process-oriented and output-driven, drawing on the strengths of participating institutions to engage local stakeholders both in the protection of research subjects and in advocacy for subjects' rights. The program engages stakeholder communities in the collaborative development and distributed delivery of accessible and applicable educational programming and resources. The Harvard Catalyst RSA Program identifies, develops, and supports the sharing and distribution of expertise, education, and resources for the benefit of all institutions, with a particular focus on the frontline: research subjects, researchers, research coordinators, and research nurses. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The effects of integrating service learning into computer science: an inter-institutional longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Jamie; Barnes, Tiffany; Buch, Kim; Rorrer, Audrey; Zuo, Huifang

    2015-07-01

    This study is a follow-up to one published in computer science education in 2010 that reported preliminary results showing a positive impact of service learning on student attitudes associated with success and retention in computer science. That paper described how service learning was incorporated into a computer science course in the context of the Students & Technology in Academia, Research, and Service (STARS) Alliance, an NSF-supported broadening participation in computing initiative that aims to diversify the computer science pipeline through innovative pedagogy and inter-institutional partnerships. The current paper describes how the STARS Alliance has expanded to diverse institutions, all using service learning as a vehicle for broadening participation in computing and enhancing attitudes and behaviors associated with student success. Results supported the STARS model of service learning for enhancing computing efficacy and computing commitment and for providing diverse students with many personal and professional development benefits.

  2. Management information system of research institute supported by ministry of science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-15

    This book mentions development strategy of MIS. This book contains development strategy of MIS research institute supported by government, computerization of administrative work of research institute, library computer system, methodology on system development, LAN build of ministry science and technology, ocean data base energy data base, computerization of research data management case of construction and analysis for chemical DB, information system of life science, electronic data interchange, queueing theory, biotechnology and computer, comprehensive weather information system, special equipment of data and data processing of oil-hunt operation.

  3. Management information system of research institute supported by ministry of science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This book mentions development strategy of MIS. This book contains development strategy of MIS research institute supported by government, computerization of administrative work of research institute, library computer system, methodology on system development, LAN build of ministry science and technology, ocean data base energy data base, computerization of research data management case of construction and analysis for chemical DB, information system of life science, electronic data interchange, queueing theory, biotechnology and computer, comprehensive weather information system, special equipment of data and data processing of oil-hunt operation.

  4. Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences: reincarnation of a 50 year old State Observatory of Nainital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Ram

    2006-03-01

    The fifty year old State Observatory, well known as U.P. State Observatory till the formation of Uttaranchal in November 2000, was reincarnated on March 22, 2004 as Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences with acronym ARIES, an autonomous institute, under the Department of Science & Technology, Government of India. The growth of academic and technical activities and new mandate of the Institute are briefly described. In early 60's, the Institute was one of the 12 centres established by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, USA, all over the globe but the only centre in India for imaging artificial earth satellites. Commensurating with its observing capabilities, the Institute started a number of front-line research programmes during the last decade, e.g., optical follow up observations of GRB afterglows, radio and space borne astronomical resources, intra-night optical variability in active galactic nuclei as well as gravitational microlensing and milli-magnitude variations in the rapidly oscillating peculiar A type stars. As a part of atmospheric studies, characterisation of aerosol at an altitude of about 2 km is going on since 2002. ARIES has plans for establishing modern observing facilities equipped with latest backend instruments in the area of both astrophysics and atmospheric science. Formation of ARIES, therefore augurs well for the overall development of astrophysics and atmospheric science in India.

  5. Harvard Catalyst | The Clinical Translational Science Center IND/IDE Consult Service: Providing an IND/IDE Consult Service in a Decentralized Network of Academic Healthcare Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Sabune J.; Bierer, Barbara E.; Wolf, Delia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations require sponsors of clinical investigations involving an investigational drug or device to submit an Investigational New Drug (IND) or Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application. Strict adherence to applicable regulations is vital to the success of clinical research. Unlike most major pharmaceutical sponsors, investigator sponsors often do not fully appreciate their regulatory obligations nor have resources to ensure compliance. As a result they can place themselves and their institutions at risk. Nevertheless, investigator‐initiated clinical trials are vital to the further development of innovative drugs, biologics, and medical devices. The IND/IDE Subcommittee under the Regulatory Knowledge and Support Program at Harvard Catalyst, The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center worked in collaboration with Harvard and Harvard affiliated institutions to create and launch an IND/IDE Consult Service in a decentralized network of collaborating Academic Healthcare Centers (AHC). The IND/IDE Consult Service offers expertise, resources, and shared experiences to assist sponsor‐investigators and IRBs in meeting regulatory requirements for conducting and reviewing investigator‐initiated IND/IDE studies. The scope of the services provided by the Harvard Catalyst IND/IDE Consult Service are described, including the specifics of the service, lessons learned, and challenges faced, in a scalable model that builds inter‐institutional capacity. PMID:24455986

  6. Harvard Catalyst | The Clinical Translational Science Center IND/IDE Consult Service: providing an IND/IDE consult service in a decentralized network of academic healthcare centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min J; Winkler, Sabune J; Bierer, Barbara E; Wolf, Delia

    2014-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations require sponsors of clinical investigations involving an investigational drug or device to submit an Investigational New Drug (IND) or Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application. Strict adherence to applicable regulations is vital to the success of clinical research. Unlike most major pharmaceutical sponsors, investigator sponsors often do not fully appreciate their regulatory obligations nor have resources to ensure compliance. As a result they can place themselves and their institutions at risk. Nevertheless, investigator-initiated clinical trials are vital to the further development of innovative drugs, biologics, and medical devices. The IND/IDE Subcommittee under the Regulatory Knowledge and Support Program at Harvard Catalyst, The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center worked in collaboration with Harvard and Harvard affiliated institutions to create and launch an IND/IDE Consult Service in a decentralized network of collaborating Academic Healthcare Centers (AHC). The IND/IDE Consult Service offers expertise, resources, and shared experiences to assist sponsor-investigators and IRBs in meeting regulatory requirements for conducting and reviewing investigator-initiated IND/IDE studies. The scope of the services provided by the Harvard Catalyst IND/IDE Consult Service are described, including the specifics of the service, lessons learned, and challenges faced, in a scalable model that builds inter-institutional capacity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Developing institutional collaboration between Wageningen University and the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnema, A.B.; Lin, Zhai; Qu, Liang; Jacobsen, E.

    2006-01-01

    Scientific co-operation between the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS) and Wageningen University (WU) has been underway since 1990, especially in the field of plant sciences. In 2001, CAAS and WU initiated a formal joint PhD training programme to further structure their co-operation. The goals of this co-operation are to: (1) initiate long-term institutional collaboration through capacity building; (2) jointly establish a modern laboratory; (3) jointly develop a cross-cultural sc...

  8. Models of Interinstitutional Partnerships between Research Intensive Universities and Minority Serving Institutions (MSI) across the Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Alecia; Norris, Keith; Verbalis, Joseph G.; Poland, Russell; Bernard, Gordon; Stephens, David S.; Dubinett, Steven M.; Imperato‐McGinley, Julianne; Dottin, Robert P.; Pulley, Jill; West, Andrew; Brown, Arleen; Mellman, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Health disparities are an immense challenge to American society. Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSAs) housed within the National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS) are designed to accelerate the translation of experimental findings into clinically meaningful practices and bring new therapies to the doorsteps of all patients. Research Centers at Minority Institutions (RCMI) program at the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) are designed to build capacity for biomedical research and training at minority serving institutions. The CTSA created a mechanism fostering formal collaborations between research intensive universities and minority serving institutions (MSI) supported by the RCMI program. These consortium‐level collaborations activate unique translational research approaches to reduce health disparities with credence to each academic institutions history and unique characteristics. Five formal partnerships between research intensive universities and MSI have formed as a result of the CTSA and RCMI programs. These partnerships present a multifocal approach; shifting cultural change and consciousness toward addressing health disparities, and training the next generation of minority scientists. This collaborative model is based on the respective strengths and contributions of the partnering institutions, allowing bidirectional interchange and leveraging NIH and institutional investments providing measurable benchmarks toward the elimination of health disparities. PMID:24119157

  9. 78 FR 77687 - Science Advisory Board to the National Center for Toxicological Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... year. The SAB will be presented with an overview of the Division of Microbiology Subcommittee and the... National Toxicology Program of the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences on current and...

  10. 77 FR 19699 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of both sacred objects and... Rochester Museum & Science Center that meet the definition of both sacred objects and [[Page 19700

  11. Master's Level Graduate Training in Medical Physics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the master's degree program in medical physics developed at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Required courses for the program, and requirements for admission are included in the appendices. (HM)

  12. About Region 3's Laboratory and Field Services at EPA's Environmental Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mission & contact information for EPA Region 3's Laboratory and Field Services located at EPA's Environmental Science Center: the Office of Analytical Services and Quality Assurance & Field Inspection Program

  13. Spent fuel storage facility at science and technical center 'Sosny': Experience of ten years activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chigrinov, S.; Goulo, V.; Lunev, A.; Belousov, N.; Salnikov, L.; Boiko, L.

    2000-01-01

    Spent fuel storage of the Academic Science and Technical Center in Minsk is in operation already more then 10 years. In the paper aspects of its design, operation practice, problems and decisions for future are discussed. (author)

  14. National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center, Version 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, R.; Fort, E.; Hartke-O'Berg, N.; Varela-Acevedo, E.; Padgett, Holly A.

    2013-01-01

    The mission of the USGS's National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) is to serve the scientific needs of managers of fish, wildlife, habitats, and ecosystems as they plan for a changing climate. DOI Climate Science Centers (CSCs) are management by NCCWSC and include this mission as a core responsibility, in line with the CSC mission to provide scientific support for climate-adaptation across a full range of natural and cultural resources. NCCWSC is a Science Center application designed in Drupal with the OMEGA theme. As a content management system, Drupal allows the science center to keep their website up-to-date with current publications, news, meetings and projects. OMEGA allows the site to be adaptive at different screen sizes and is developed on the 960 grid.

  15. 77 FR 51564 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Herrett Center for Arts and Science, College of Southern Idaho...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... Inventory Completion: Herrett Center for Arts and Science, College of Southern Idaho, Twin Falls, ID AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Herrett Center for Arts and Science, College... associated funerary object may contact the Herrett Center for Arts and Science, College of Southern Idaho...

  16. Mobile STEMship Discovery Center: K-12 Aerospace-Based Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Mobile Teaching Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-03

    AND SUBTITLE Mobile STEMship Discovery Center: K-12 Aerospace-Based Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Mobile Teaching Vehicle...Center program to be able to expose Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) space-inspired science centers for DC Metro beltway schools

  17. Summary of research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science during the period October 1, 1983 through March 31, 1984 is summarized.

  18. Summary of research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period October 1, 1988 through March 31, 1989 is summarized.

  19. Research in progress and other activities of the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics and computer science during the period April 1, 1993 through September 30, 1993. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustic and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  20. 78 FR 7794 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Sentinel Animal Study for Public Health. Date: February 27, 2013... from Environmental Exposures; 93.142, NIEHS Hazardous Waste Worker Health and Safety Training; 93.143...; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated...

  1. Report on the work of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences 27 January - December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    The work of the New Zealand Institute of Nuclear Sciences during the period January-June 1975 is summarized under the following headings: A) Nuclear Physics; B) Radiation Research; C) Isotope Geochemistry - Stable Isotopes; D) Radiocarbon Dating and Fallout; E) Radioisotope Applications; F) Instrumentation. Appendices on current research projects, staff publications and library holdings are included. (D.C.R.)

  2. Report on the work of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences 26 July - December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-04-01

    The work of the New Zealand Institute of Nuclear Sciences during the period January-June 1975 is summarized under the following headings: A) Nuclear Physics; B) Radiation Research; C) Isotope Geochemistry - Stable Isotopes; D) Radiocarbon Dating and Fallout; E) Radioisotope Applications; F) Instrumentation. Appendices on current research projects, staff publications and library holdings are included. (D.C.R.)

  3. Looking in the Right Places: Minority-Serving Institutions as Sources of Diverse Earth Science Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaris, John R.; Manduca, Cathryn A.; Iverson, Ellen R.; Orr, Cailin Huyck

    2017-01-01

    Despite gains over the last decade, the geoscience student population in the United States today continues to lag other science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines in terms of diversity. Minority-serving institutions (MSIs) can play an important role in efforts to broaden underrepresented student engagement with Earth Science…

  4. Summer Teacher Enhancement Institute for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Using the Problem-Based Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard H.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the Institute were: (a) increase participants' content knowledge about aeronautics, science, mathematics, and technology, (b) model and promote the use of scientific inquiry through problem-based learning, (c) investigate the use of instructional technologies and their applications to curricula, and (d) encourage the dissemination of TEI experiences to colleagues, students, and parents.

  5. 75 FR 36111 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Cranbrook Institute of Science, Bloomfield Hills, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan, on behalf of the Michigan Anishnaabek..., Oakland County Medical Examiner (CIS reference 9738 and 9739). No known individuals were identified. No... to the Cranbrook Institute of Science by the Little Traverse Bay Bands of the Odawa Indians on behalf...

  6. Radioactive waste treatment at the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovic, Z [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1989-07-01

    The results of many years work on the problems of treatment and interim storage of radioactive waste at the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences are presented. The main R/D work based on chemical treatment, solidification and pressing is described (author)

  7. Radioactive waste treatment at the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, Z.

    1989-01-01

    The results of many years work on the problems of treatment and interim storage of radioactive waste at the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences are presented. The main R/D work based on chemical treatment, solidification and pressing is described (author)

  8. 6-33 Optimization of ARP System in Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang; Yongping[1; Gou; Shizhe[1; Yuan; Chao[1; Yue; Min[1; Ma; Yuan[1

    2015-01-01

    The Academia Resource Planning (hereafter abbreviated as ARP) of the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) was launched in 2005. It is an important scientific research management system of CAS. In order to meet the multiple dimensions and levels application requirements, the second phase of ARP has gradually formed ten management systems, two application platforms and four application projects.

  9. Post-doctoral research work developed at the National Institute for Fusion Science - Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, M.

    1992-05-01

    This is a research report report on the work developed at the National Institute for Fusion Science - Japan, involving study of Beam Emission Spectroscopy. It describes the use of a fast neutral lithium beam (8 KeV) to measure the density profile in a Compact Helical Device. (A.C.A.S.)

  10. [Eugène-Humbert Guitard and French Institute of History of Science (1932-1939)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Named "membre-conseil" of the French Institute of History of Science in April 1932, Guitard gives there, from January 1935 to February 1939, a dozen history of pharmacy conferences. Those conferences will give birth to her especially valuable Manuel d'histoire de la littérature pharmaceutique, published in 1942 by Caffin. The author re-examines this intellectual adventure.

  11. 77 FR 48506 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; What Works Clearinghouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; What... request to continue a currently approved collection under OMB Control Number 1850-0788 for the What Works... considered public records. Title of Collection: What Works Clearinghouse. OMB Control Number: 1850-0788. Type...

  12. 75 FR 14128 - Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology Postdoctoral Researcher and Visiting Fellow...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... Measurement Science and Engineering Program; Availability of Funds AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and... Measurement Science and Engineering Program. This program is intended to promote research, training, and... mission to support the development of nanotechnology through research on measurement and fabrication...

  13. Jackson State University (JSU)’s Center of Excellence in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education (CESTEME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-08

    Actuarial Science Taylor, Triniti Lanier Alcorn State University Animal Science Tchounwou, Hervey Madison Central Jackson State University Computer...for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Jackson State University (JSU)’s Center of Excellence in Science , Technology, Engineering...Final Report: Jackson State University (JSU)’s Center of Excellence in Science , Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education (CESTEME) Report

  14. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center: Report to the Steering Committee, June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (SDA) and Pulse Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) - Carbon Injection System. Investigations also continued across the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit, while the 1.0 MW Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode as monthly inspections were conducted. Pilot Testing Highlights Testing efforts in June were focused on the HAP test block and the Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block. Both programs were conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit and PJFF unit. The HAP test block was temporarily concluded in June to further review the test data. This program began in March as part of the DOE Advanced Power Systems Program; the mission of this program is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. The 1996 HAP test block focuses on three research areas, including: Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury; Enhanced particulate-phase HAPs removal by electrostatic charging of liquid droplets; and Enhanced mercury removal by addition of additives to FGD process liquor. The TER test block is part of EPRI`s overall program to develop control technology options for reduction of trace element emissions. This experimental program investigates mercury removal and mercury speciation under different operating conditions.

  15. Confronting conflict: addressing institutional conflicts of interest in academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bryan A; Mackey, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Individual conflicts of interest are rife in healthcare, and substantial attention has been given to address them. Yet a more substantive concern-institutional conflicts of interest ("ICOIs") in academic medical centers ("AMCs") engaged in research and clinical care-have yet to garner sufficient attention, despite their higher stakes for patient safety and welfare. ICOIs are standard in AMCs, are virtually unregulated, and have led to patient deaths. Upon review of ICOIs, we find a clear absence of substantive efforts to confront these conflicts. We also assess the Jesse Gelsinger case, which resulted in the death of a study participant exemplifying a deep-seated culture of institutional indifference and complicity in unmanaged conflicts. Federal policy, particularly the Bayh-Dole Act, also creates and promotes ICOIs. Efforts to address ICOIs are narrow or abstract, and do not provide for a systemic infrastructure with effective enforcement mechanisms. Hence, in this paper, we provide a comprehensive proposal to address ICOIs utilizing a "Centralized System" model that would proactively review, manage, approve, and conduct assessments of conflicts, and would have independent power to evaluate and enforce any violations via sanctions. It would also manage any industry funds and pharmaceutical samples and be a condition of participation in public healthcare reimbursement and federal grant funding. The ICOI policy itself would provide for disclosure requirements, separate management of commercial enterprise units from academic units, voluntary remediation of conflicts, and education on ICOIs. Finally, we propose a new model of medical education-academic detailing-in place of current marketing-focused "education." Using such a system, AMCs can wean themselves from industry reliance and promote a culture of accountability and independence from industry influence. By doing so, clinical research and treatment can return to a focus on patient care, not profits.

  16. Development of atomic spectroscopy methods in geological institutes of Faculty of Natural Sciences Comenius University and Slovak Academy of Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medved, E.

    1998-01-01

    Development of atomic spectrochemistry methods in Geological Institute of Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University (GI FNS CU) is connected with its establishment in 1957. Its instrumental equipment and location resulted from the already existing Laboratory in the Chair for Mineralogy and Crystallography of FNS CU. In Geological Institute of Slovak Academy of Science (GI SAS) the development of atomic spectroscopy methods started later, only since 1963, when the Member of Academy, Prof. RNDr. B. Cambel, DrSc. became its director. In both institutes the methods of atomic emission spectrography were used as first. A new quality in the development started since 1969 when the Institutes moved to common buildings in Petrzalka (Bratislava), the first atomic absorption spectrometers were acquired and the Institutes were 'strengthened' by coming of Prof. Ing. E. Plsko, DrSc. In the following years the Institutes started to collaborate with some other organisations which were equipped with new facilities, e.g. in 1975 with X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, electron microprobe and in 1985 with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. This enabled to improve essentially the quality of research activities of both institutes in the chemical characterisation of geological materials, as well as in pedagogical work (students practice, diploma works and dissertations). In the present time characterized by new economic conditions a reduction of GI SAS laboratory activities has been realised. The laboratories of the GI FNS CU have, thanks to their director Ing. V. Stresko, PhD. shown also hence-forward a rich research, pedagogical and society activities what can be documented by numerous publications, citations, obtained awards, representations in professional societies and commissions, local and foreign advisory boards, accreditation boards etc. (author)

  17. The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adebimpe Oyeyemi

    elucidates on the scholarship of discovery, the scholarship of application, the scholarship of integration and the scholarship of ... Science and professional education in medicine and health are .... approaches, modification of an existing approach that results in .... Their Teaching to Advance Practice and Improve Students.

  18. Science on the net: an analysis of the websites of the European public research institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Massoli

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a study on the websites of several European public research institutions that aims at identifying the science communication model chosen and implemented online with the purpose of reaching different target publics. The analytical approach takes into account a number of indicators: from the institutional identity to the scientific features, from the interactive services to the internationalisation level, in order to evaluate whether the web provides an added value in the adopted communication model and in building a relation with the users. Lights and shades emerge from this study in which good practices side examples of a much weaker science communication approach, outlining a general context where a public research institution website has been still used as a presentation tool and its interactive opportunities have not been capitalised.

  19. National Space Science Data Center and World Data Center A for Rockets and Satellites - Ionospheric data holdings and services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilitza, D.; King, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The activities and services of the National Space Science data Center (NSSDC) and the World Data Center A for Rockets and Satellites (WDC-A-R and S) are described with special emphasis on ionospheric physics. The present catalog/archive system is explained and future developments are indicated. In addition to the basic data acquisition, archiving, and dissemination functions, ongoing activities include the Central Online Data Directory (CODD), the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshopps (CDAW), the Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN), advanced data management systems (CD/DIS, NCDS, PLDS), and publication of the NSSDC News, the SPACEWARN Bulletin, and several NSSD reports.

  20. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1993 - March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This report summarized briefly the research activities and achievements in the Institute for fiscal year 1993 (from April 1993 through March 1994). At the end of this period, the construction of HIMAC has been completed and preparatory experiments of physical and biological studies necessary to the clinical trial have started by use of the heavy ion beams of HIMAC itself. The Institute is covering a wide range of comprehensive radiological sciences from molecular biology to environmental studies and medicine including engineering for heavy ion therapy of cancer. Therefore, the topics collected in the main part have been classified into five categories (physics, chemistry, bio-medical sciences, clinical research and environmental sciences). (J.P.N.).

  1. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1993 - March 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This report summarized briefly the research activities and achievements in the Institute for fiscal year 1993 (from April 1993 through March 1994). At the end of this period, the construction of HIMAC has been completed and preparatory experiments of physical and biological studies necessary to the clinical trial have started by use of the heavy ion beams of HIMAC itself. The Institute is covering a wide range of comprehensive radiological sciences from molecular biology to environmental studies and medicine including engineering for heavy ion therapy of cancer. Therefore, the topics collected in the main part have been classified into five categories (physics, chemistry, bio-medical sciences, clinical research and environmental sciences). (J.P.N.)

  2. 75 FR 36666 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... and 1941, the Works Progress Administration/Indian Arts Project paid members of the Tonawanda Seneca..., director, Rochester Museum of Arts & Science (now Rochester Museum & Science Center), with the intent of... medicine faces were also created under the auspices of the Works Progress Administration/Indian Arts...

  3. 75 FR 23801 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY, that meet the definitions of ``sacred objects'' and ``objects of... center of the Seneca religious fire. This was agreed upon by representatives from the Seneca Nation of.... Tonawanda Seneca Nation traditional religious leaders have identified these medicine faces as being needed...

  4. Characteristics of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Research Design Programs in Institutions With Clinical and Translational Science Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbar, Mohammad H; Dickerson, Aisha S; Ahn, Chul; Carter, Rickey E; Hessabi, Manouchehr; Lindsell, Christopher J; Nietert, Paul J; Oster, Robert A; Pollock, Brad H; Welty, Leah J

    2017-02-01

    To learn the size, composition, and scholarly output of biostatistics, epidemiology, and research design (BERD) units in U.S. academic health centers (AHCs). Each year for four years, the authors surveyed all BERD units in U.S. AHCs that were members of the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Consortium. In 2010, 46 BERD units were surveyed; in 2011, 55; in 2012, 60; and in 2013, 61. Response rates to the 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013 surveys were 93.5%, 98.2%, 98.3%, and 86.9%, respectively. Overall, the size of BERD units ranged from 3 to 86 individuals. The median FTE in BERD units remained similar and ranged from 3.0 to 3.5 FTEs over the years. BERD units reported more availability of doctoral-level biostatisticians than doctoral-level epidemiologists. In 2011, 2012, and 2013, more than a third of BERD units provided consulting support on 101 to 200 projects. A majority of BERD units reported that between 25% and 75% (in 2011) and 31% to 70% (in 2012) of their consulting was to junior investigators. More than two-thirds of BERD units reported their contributions to the submission of 20 or more non-BERD grant or contract applications annually. Nearly half of BERD units reported 1 to 10 manuscripts submitted annually with a BERD practitioner as the first or corresponding author. The findings regarding BERD units provide a benchmark against which to compare BERD resources and may be particularly useful for institutions planning to develop new units to support programs such as the CTSA.

  5. NASA Johnson Space Center's Planetary Sample Analysis and Mission Science (PSAMS) Laboratory: A National Facility for Planetary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center's (JSC's) Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Division, part of the Exploration Integration and Science Directorate, houses a unique combination of laboratories and other assets for conducting cutting edge planetary research. These facilities have been accessed for decades by outside scientists, most at no cost and on an informal basis. ARES has thus provided substantial leverage to many past and ongoing science projects at the national and international level. Here we propose to formalize that support via an ARES/JSC Plane-tary Sample Analysis and Mission Science Laboratory (PSAMS Lab). We maintain three major research capa-bilities: astromaterial sample analysis, planetary process simulation, and robotic-mission analog research. ARES scientists also support planning for eventual human ex-ploration missions, including astronaut geological training. We outline our facility's capabilities and its potential service to the community at large which, taken together with longstanding ARES experience and expertise in curation and in applied mission science, enable multi-disciplinary planetary research possible at no other institution. Comprehensive campaigns incorporating sample data, experimental constraints, and mission science data can be conducted under one roof.

  6. Crowd-Sourced Radio Science at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, C. D.; McTernan, J. K.; Suggs, R. M.; Rawlins, L.; Krause, L. H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adams, M. L.

    2018-01-01

    August 21, 2017 provided a unique opportunity to investigate the effects of the total solar eclipse on high frequency (HF) radio propagation and ionospheric variability. In Marshall Space Flight Center's partnership with the US Space and Rocket Center (USSRC) and Austin Peay State University (APSU), we engaged citizen scientists and students in an investigation of the effects of an eclipse on the mid-latitude ionosphere. Activities included fieldwork and station-based data collection of HF Amateur Radio frequency bands and VLF radio waves before, during, and after the eclipse to build a continuous record of changing propagation conditions as the moon's shadow marched across the United States. Post-eclipse radio propagation analysis provided insights into ionospheric variability due to the eclipse.

  7. A Center for Excellence in Mathematical Sciences Final Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-18

    concentration are a Groebner Basis Project and a Symbolic Methods in AI and Computer Science project, with simultaneous development of other needed areas. The... Groebner construction algorithm. Develop an algebraic theory of piece wise polynomial approximation based on the Bezier- Bernstein algebra. Address...questions surrounding polytopes, splines, and complexity of Groebner basis computations. In topology determine the homotopy type of subdivision lattice of a

  8. International Collaboration in Packaging Education: Hands-on System-on-Package (SOP) Graduate Level Courses at Indian Institute of Science and Georgia Tech PRC

    OpenAIRE

    Varadarajan, Mahesh; Bhattacharya, Swapan; Doraiswami, Ravi; Rao, Ananda G; Rao, NJ; May, Gary; Conrad, Leyla; Tummala, Rao

    2005-01-01

    System-on-Package (SOP) continues to revolutionize the realization of convergent systems in microelectronics packaging. The SOP concept which began at the Packaging Research Center (PRC) at Georgia Tech has benefited its international collaborative partners in education including the Indian Institute of Science (IISc). The academic program for electronics packaging currently in the Centre for Electronics Design and Technology (CEDT) at IISc is aimed at educating a new breed of globally-compet...

  9. The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center annual report for 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Acevedo, Elda

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, Congress created the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The center was formed to respond to the demands of natural resource managers for rigorous scientific information and effective tools for assessing and responding to climate change. Located at the USGS National Headquarters in Reston, Va., the NCCWSC has invested more than $93 million (through FY13) in cutting-edge climate change research and, in response to Secretarial Order No. 3289, established and is managing eight regional Department of Interior (DOI) Climate Science Centers (CSCs). In 2013:

  10. NASA Astrophysics E/PO: The Impact of the Space Telescope Science Institute Office of Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Denise A.; Jirdeh, Hussein; Eisenhamer, Bonnie; Villard, Ray

    2015-01-01

    As the science operations center for Hubble and Webb, the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) is uniquely positioned to captivate the imagination and inspire learners of all ages in humanity's quest to understand fundamental questions about our universe and our place in it. With the 25th anniversary of Hubble's launch and deployment approaching in April 2015, this presentation will provide an overview of the impact of the STScI's Office of Public Outreach's programs to engage students, educators, and the public in exploring the universe through audience-based news, education, and outreach programs. At the heart of our programs lies a tight coupling of scientific, education, and communications expertise. By partnering scientists and educators, we assure current, accurate science content and education products and programs that are classroom-ready and held to the highest pedagogical standards. Likewise, news and outreach programs accurately convey cutting-edge science and technology in a way that is attuned to audience needs. The combination of Hubble's scientific capabilities and majestic imagery, together with a deep commitment to creating effective programs to share Hubble science with the education community and the public, has enabled the STScI Office of Public Outreach programs to engage 6 million students and ½ million educators per year, and 24 million online viewers per year. Hubble press releases generate approximately 5,000 online news articles per year with an average circulation of 125 million potential readers per press release news story. We will also share how best practices and lessons learned from this long-lived program are already being applied to engage a new generation of explorers in the science and technology of the James Webb Space Telescope.

  11. NASA Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach: The Impact of the Space Telescope Science Institute Office of Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Denise Anne; Jirdeh, Hussein; Eisenhamer, Bonnie; Villard, Ray; Green, Joel David

    2015-08-01

    As the science operations center for the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope, the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) is uniquely positioned to captivate the imagination and inspire learners of all ages in humanity’s quest to understand fundamental questions about our universe and our place in it. This presentation will provide an overview of the impact of the STScI’s Office of Public Outreach’s efforts to engage students, educators, and the public in exploring the universe through audience-based news, education, and outreach programs.At the heart of our programs lies a tight coupling of scientific, education, and communications expertise. By partnering scientists and educators, we assure current, accurate science content and education products and programs that are classroom-ready and held to the highest pedagogical standards. Likewise, news and outreach programs accurately convey cutting-edge science and technology in a way that is attuned to audience needs. The combination of Hubble’s scientific capabilities, majestic imagery, and our deep commitment to create effective programs to share Hubble science with the education community and the public, has enabled the STScI Office of Public Outreach programs to engage 6 million students and ½ million educators per year, and 24 million online viewers per year. Hubble press releases generate approximately 5,000 online news articles per year with an average circulation of 125 million potential readers per press release news story. We will also share how best practices and lessons learned from this long-lived program are already being applied to engage a new generation of explorers in the science and technology of the James Webb Space Telescope.

  12. The efficacy of student-centered instruction in supporting science learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, E M; Bevis, T H; Saka, Y; Southerland, S A; Sampson, V; Tate, R L

    2012-10-05

    Transforming science learning through student-centered instruction that engages students in a variety of scientific practices is central to national science-teaching reform efforts. Our study employed a large-scale, randomized-cluster experimental design to compare the effects of student-centered and teacher-centered approaches on elementary school students' understanding of space-science concepts. Data included measures of student characteristics and learning and teacher characteristics and fidelity to the instructional approach. Results reveal that learning outcomes were higher for students enrolled in classrooms engaging in scientific practices through a student-centered approach; two moderators were identified. A statistical search for potential causal mechanisms for the observed outcomes uncovered two potential mediators: students' understanding of models and evidence and the self-efficacy of teachers.

  13. Annual report for FY 2007 on the activities of radiation control in Nuclear Science Research Institute etc. April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This annual report describes the activities of Radiation Protection Sector in Department of Radiation Protection in Nuclear Science Research Institute, Safety Section in Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Safety Section in Kansai Photon Science Institute and Operation Safety Administration Section in Aomori Research and Development Center. The report covers environmental monitoring around the facilities, radiation protection of workplace and workers, individual monitoring, maintenance of monitoring instruments, and research and development of radiation protection technologies, which were performed at the Radiation Protection Sector. There were no occupational or public exposures exceeding the prescribed dose limits. No effluent releases were recorded exceeding the prescribed limits on the amount and concentration of radioactivity for gaseous release and liquid waste. As for the research and development activities, studies were conducted continuously focusing mainly on the following themes: technological developments on operational radiation protection and establishment of calibration fields for various energy types of neutrons. (author)

  14. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1989 - March 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    This annual report is a compilation of the research activities and achievement in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the fiscal year 1990 (from April 1989 through March 1990). Efforts at the NIRS are particularly aimed at three long term projects: 'risk due to low level radiation exposure to the general population', 'assessment of radiation exposure of the public to radioactivities as related to the environment', and 'food chain and medical use of accelerated heavy ions'. The research covers a wide range of radiological sciences from molecular to environmental studies and medicine including engineering. Topics consists of physics, chemistry, bio-medical science, clinical research, and environmental sciences, covering a total of 80 titles. A list of publications by staff members, activities of research divisions, and organization chart of the NIRS are given in Appendix. (N.K.)

  15. Center of Excellence in Space Data and Information Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesha, Yelena

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the range of computer science-related activities undertaken by CESDIS for NASA in the twelve months from July 1, 1998 through June 30, 1999. These activities address issues related to accessing, processing, and analyzing data from space observing systems through collaborative efforts with university, industry, and NASA space and Earth scientists. The sections of this report which follow, detail the activities undertaken by the members of each of the CESDIS branches. This includes contributions from university faculty members and graduate students as well as CESDIS employees. Phone numbers and e-mail addresses appear in Appendix F (CESDIS Personnel and Associates) to facilitate interactions and new collaborations.

  16. Small neutron sources as centers for innovation and science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, D.V.

    2009-01-01

    The education and training of the next generation of scientists who will form the user base for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) remains a significant issue for the future success of this national facility. These scientists will be drawn from a wide variety of disciplines (physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering) and therefore the development of an effective interdisciplinary training program represents a significant challenge. In addition, effective test facilities to develop the full potential of pulsed neutron sources for science do not exist. Each of these problems represents a significant hurdle for the future health of neutron science in this country. An essential part of the solution to both problems is to get neutron sources of useful intensities into the hands of researchers and students at universities, where faculty can teach students about neutron production and the utility of neutrons for solving scientific problems. Due to a combination of developments in proton accelerator technology, neutron optics, cold neutron moderators, computer technology, and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrumentation, it is now technically possible and cost effective to construct a pulsed cold neutron source suitable for use in a university setting and devoted to studies of nano structures in the fields of materials science, polymers, microemulsions, and biology. Such a source, based on (p,n) reactions in light nuclei induced by a few MeV pulsed proton beam coupled to a cold neutron moderator, would also be ideal for the study of a number of technical issues which are essential for the development of neutron science such as cold and perhaps ultracold neutron moderators, neutron optical devices, neutron detector technology, and transparent DAQ/user interfaces. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we possess almost all of the required instrumentation and expertise to efficiently launch the first serious attempt to develop an intense pulsed cold

  17. MIDWESTERN REGIONAL CENTER OF THE DOE NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR CLIMATIC CHANGE RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, Andrew J. [Michigan Technological University

    2014-02-28

    The goal of NICCR (National Institute for Climatic Change Research) was to mobilize university researchers, from all regions of the country, in support of the climatic change research objectives of DOE/BER. The NICCR Midwestern Regional Center (MRC) supported work in the following states: North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio. The MRC of NICCR was able to support nearly $8 million in climatic change research, including $6,671,303 for twenty projects solicited and selected by the MRC over five requests for proposals (RFPs) and $1,051,666 for the final year of ten projects from the discontinued DOE NIGEC (National Institute for Global Environmental Change) program. The projects selected and funded by the MRC resulted in 135 peer-reviewed publications and supported the training of 25 PhD students and 23 Masters students. Another 36 publications were generated by the final year of continuing NIGEC projects supported by the MRC. The projects funded by the MRC used a variety of approaches to answer questions relevant to the DOE’s climate change research program. These included experiments that manipulated temperature, moisture and other global change factors; studies that sought to understand how the distribution of species and ecosystems might change under future climates; studies that used measurements and modeling to examine current ecosystem fluxes of energy and mass and those that would exist under future conditions; and studies that synthesized existing data sets to improve our understanding of the effects of climatic change on terrestrial ecosystems. In all of these efforts, the MRC specifically sought to identify and quantify responses of terrestrial ecosystems that were not well understood or not well modeled by current efforts. The MRC also sought to better understand and model important feedbacks between terrestrial ecosystems, atmospheric chemistry, and regional

  18. The popularization of the nuclear sciences and its impact in the public opinion. Strategies of institutional communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega E, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    A continuous concern that is presented among those responsible for the exercise of the science and the technology in the Westerner entire world is to give to know the chore of their institutions and individuals. As in the case of several Mexican institutions, and particularly of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ), one of their rector axes are to diffuse their achievements among the different social actors. A suitable vehicle to impact positively to the public opinion on the advances and tendencies of the nuclear energy it is the popularization of the science. The purpose of the popularization is to place accessible information in hands of the public and, by this, it requires of the use of talkative techniques derived of the journalism and of the public relationships, mainly, besides a basic knowledge of the scientific activity. In simple terms, it is not possible to achieve a positive image of the incomprehensible thing. By this cause, the correct understanding of the current administration of the nuclear energy represents the success or the failure of a strategy of institutional communication. Additionally, it is necessary a deep knowledge of the public opinion, in order to classify it and to have the option of to diversify the messages, of agreement with the characteristics of each segment of the public. Nevertheless their competition, the scientific popularization is centered in the construction of texts and other talkative tools, for that its acting frequently doesn't reach the effective dissemination of the messages. In this context, the use of a strategy of institutional communication represents the multi-functional option: on one hand and derived of the strategic planning, it will establish objectives, the periods of realization of the actions and the form of evaluating their efficiency; and on the other hand, it will allow the incorporation of creative solutions according with the nature of the origin institution, the space-time conditions

  19. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Projects and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on Technologies to Support Successful Aging with Disability under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for a competition in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on areas of national need. We intend to use this priority to improve outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

  20. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on Universal Interfaces and Information Technology Access under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for a competition in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on areas of national need. We intend to use this priority to improve outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

  1. Activities of JAEA in the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Shozo

    2013-05-01

    Since the Headquarter of the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) was established in Moscow, Russian Federation in 1994, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), which includes both Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and Japan has been made various, considerable contributions as well as participation in partner projects in ISTC activities. By the way, the Russian Federation Party, which is a Government Board Member of ISTC, made the statement that the Russian Federation would withdraw from ISTC until the end of 2015 in the 52th Government Board in held Moscow, 9 December 2010. This is based on the possible consequences of the Executive Order of the President of the Russian Federation dated 11 August 2010 with respect to the withdraw of the Russian Federation from ISTC. So that the Government Board has been discussing about the continuation and/or the establishment of a new organization for ISTC. In any case, the Headquarter of ISTC could stay at Moscow until the end of 2015 at latest. This time is considered as a transition period of ISTC and it is summarized that the collaborations, contributions of JAEA and outcomes from them for ISTC activities in this report. (author)

  2. Patterns of biomedical science production in a sub-Saharan research center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnandji Selidji T

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research activities in sub-Saharan Africa may be limited to delegated tasks due to the strong control from Western collaborators, which could lead to scientific production of little value in terms of its impact on social and economic innovation in less developed areas. However, the current contexts of international biomedical research including the development of public-private partnerships and research institutions in Africa suggest that scientific activities are growing in sub-Saharan Africa. This study aims to describe the patterns of clinical research activities at a sub-Saharan biomedical research center. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with a core group of researchers at the Medical Research Unit of the Albert Schweitzer Hospital from June 2009 to February 2010 in Lambaréné, Gabon. Scientific activities running at the MRU as well as the implementation of ethical and regulatory standards were covered by the interview sessions. Results The framework of clinical research includes transnational studies and research initiated locally. In transnational collaborations, a sub-Saharan research institution may be limited to producing confirmatory and late-stage data with little impact on economic and social innovation. However, ethical and regulatory guidelines are being implemented taking into consideration the local contexts. Similarly, the scientific content of studies designed by researchers at the MRU, if local needs are taken into account, may potentially contribute to a scientific production with long-term value on social and economic innovation in sub-Saharan Africa. Conclusion Further research questions and methods in social sciences should comprehensively address the construction of scientific content with the social, economic and cultural contexts surrounding research activities.

  3. Explaining the accreditation process from the institutional isomorphism perspective: a case study of Jordanian primary healthcare centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyahya, Mohammad; Hijazi, Heba; Harvey, Heather

    2018-01-01

    While the main focus of accreditation initiatives has been on hospitals, the implementation of these programs is a relatively new notion among other types of healthcare facilities. Correspondingly, this study aims to understand how accreditation is perceived among primary public healthcare centers using an isomorphic institutional theory. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 56 healthcare professionals and administrative staff from seven non-profit healthcare centers in Jordan using an explanatory case-study approach. The informants' narratives revealed that all three components of institutional theory: coercive, mimetic, and normative pressure, were drivers for institutional change in seeking accreditation. There was an overlapping and blending between the three various types of pressure. While participants perceived that healthcare centers faced formal and informal pressures to achieve accreditation, health centers were reluctant about the time, amount of effort, and their ability to achieve the accreditation. Ambiguity and fear of failure forced them to model successful ones. Moreover, the findings revealed that normative values of health professionals enhanced institutional isomorphism and influenced the accreditation process. Identifying these isomorphic changes may help key stakeholders to develop plans, policies, and procedures that could improve the quality of healthcare and enhance accreditation as an organizational strategic plan. Moreover, the study provided explanations of why and how organizations move to adopt new interventions and grow over time. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Understanding bureaucracy in health science ethics: toward a better institutional review board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Barry; Slade, Catherine; Hirsch, Paul

    2009-09-01

    Research involving human participants continues to grow dramatically, fueled by advances in medical technology, globalization of research, and financial and professional incentives. This creates increasing opportunities for ethical errors with devastating effects. The typical professional and policy response to calamities involving human participants in research is to layer on more ethical guidelines or strictures. We used a recent case-the Johns Hopkins University/Kennedy Kreiger Institute Lead Paint Study-to examine lessons learned since the Tuskegee Syphilis Study about the role of institutionalized science ethics in the protection of human participants in research. We address the role of the institutional review board as the focal point for policy attention.

  5. Engaging patients and stakeholders in research proposal review: the patient-centered outcomes research institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleurence, Rachael L; Forsythe, Laura P; Lauer, Michael; Rotter, Jason; Ioannidis, John P A; Beal, Anne; Frank, Lori; Selby, Joseph V

    2014-07-15

    The inaugural round of merit review for the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) in November 2012 included patients and other stakeholders, as well as scientists. This article examines relationships among scores of the 3 reviewer types, changes in scoring after in-person discussion, and the effect of inclusion of patient and stakeholder reviewers on the review process. In the first phase, 363 scientists scored 480 applications. In the second phase, 59 scientists, 21 patients, and 31 stakeholders provided a "prediscussion" score and a final "postdiscussion" score after an in-person meeting for applications. Bland-Altman plots were used to characterize levels of agreement among and within reviewer types before and after discussion. Before discussion, there was little agreement among average scores given by the 4 lead scientific reviewers and patient and stakeholder reviewers. After discussion, the 4 primary reviewers showed mild convergence in their scores, and the 21-member panel came to a much stronger agreement. Of the 25 awards with the best (and lowest) scores after phase 2, only 13 had ranked in the top 25 after the phase 1 review by scientists. Five percent of the 480 proposals submitted were funded. The authors conclude that patient and stakeholder reviewers brought different perspectives to the review process but that in-person discussion led to closer agreement among reviewer types. It is not yet known whether these conclusions are generalizable to future rounds of peer review. Future work would benefit from additional data collection for evaluation purposes and from long-term evaluation of the effect on the funded research.

  6. Total body surface area overestimation at referring institutions in children transferred to a burn center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Douglas S; Hadley, Edmund D; Swett, Katrina R; Pranikoff, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Total body surface area (TBSA) burned is a powerful descriptor of burn severity and influences the volume of resuscitation required in burn patients. The incidence and severity of TBSA overestimation by referring institutions (RIs) in children transferred to a burn center (BC) are unclear. The association between TBSA overestimation and overresuscitation is unknown as is that between TBSA overestimation and outcome. The trauma registry at a BC was queried over 7.25 years for children presenting with burns. TBSA estimate at RIs and BC, total fluid volume given before arrival at a BC, demographic variables, and clinical variables were reviewed. Nearly 20 per cent of children arrived from RIs without TBSA estimation. Nearly 50 per cent were overestimated by 5 per cent or greater TBSA and burn sizes were overestimated by up to 44 per cent TBSA. Average TBSA measured at BC was 9.5 ± 8.3 per cent compared with 15.5 ± 11.8 per cent as measured at RIs (P < 0.0001). Burns between 10 and 19.9 per cent TBSA were overestimated most often and by the greatest amounts. There was a statistically significant relationship between overestimation of TBSA by 5 per cent or greater and overresuscitation by 10 mL/kg or greater (P = 0.02). No patient demographic or clinical factors were associated with TBSA overestimation. Education efforts aimed at emergency department physicians regarding the importance of always calculating TBSA as well as the mechanics of TBSA estimation and calculating resuscitation volume are needed. Further studies should evaluate the association of TBSA overestimation by RIs with adverse outcomes and complications in the burned child.

  7. Time required for institutional review board review at one Veterans Affairs medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Daniel E; Hanusa, Barbara H; Stone, Roslyn A; Ling, Bruce S; Arnold, Robert M

    2015-02-01

    Despite growing concern that institutional review boards (IRBs) impose burdensome delays on research, little is known about the time required for IRB review across different types of research. To measure the overall and incremental process times for IRB review as a process of quality improvement. After developing a detailed process flowchart of the IRB review process, 2 analysts abstracted temporal data from the records pertaining to all 103 protocols newly submitted to the IRB at a large urban Veterans Affairs medical center from June 1, 2009, through May 31, 2011. Disagreements were reviewed with the principal investigator to reach consensus. We then compared the review times across review types using analysis of variance and post hoc Scheffé tests after achieving normally distributed data through logarithmic transformation. Calendar days from initial submission to final approval of research protocols. Initial IRB review took 2 to 4 months, with expedited and exempt reviews requiring less time (median [range], 85 [23-631] and 82 [16-437] days, respectively) than full board reviews (median [range], 131 [64-296] days; P = .008). The median time required for credentialing of investigators was 1 day (range, 0-74 days), and review by the research and development committee took a median of 15 days (range, 0-184 days). There were no significant differences in credentialing or research and development times across review types (exempt, expedited, or full board). Of the extreme delays in IRB review, 80.0% were due to investigators' slow responses to requested changes. There were no systematic delays attributable to the information security officer, privacy officer, or IRB chair. Measuring and analyzing review times is a critical first step in establishing a culture and process of continuous quality improvement among IRBs that govern research programs. The review times observed at this IRB are substantially longer than the 60-day target recommended by expert panels

  8. [Tinnitus Center at the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine--earliest experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzek, Wojciech J; Sułkowski, Wiesław J; Kowalska, Sylwia; Makowska, Zofia

    2002-01-01

    Of the 150 patients admitted in 2001 to the Tinnitus Center located at the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź, Poland, 80 were subjected to complex examinations consisted of standardized questionnaire on medical history, psychological tests and audiological assessment. The diagnostic procedure was completed for 52 patients (23 females and 29 males; mean age: 53 years). In this group, five patients were found to have conductive hearing loss due to chronic eustachtis or otosclerosis. They were excluded from further studies. Among the other 47 patients, 26 showed normal hearing threshold and 21 suffered from uni- or bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Hyperacusis was diagnosed in 16 cases. The measurements of brainstem evoked potentials revealed V wave latency asymmetry in 7 cases, which implied the necessity to perform CT or MNR. In neither of cases did this diagnosis confirm the suspected tumor development (n. VIII neurinoma or pontocerebral angle tumor. The preliminary assessment of treatment efficacy for subjective tinnitus with use of retraining therapy yielded the following conclusions: 1. The application of hearing aid brings about an immediate improvement in the patient's self-assessment of hearing and a better tolerance towards tinnitus. 2. A systematic all-day wear of noise generators contributes to the patient's increased tolerance towards tinnitus, improved mental condition and alleviated hyperacusis. 3. The efficacy of the tinnitus retraining therapy, following Jastreboff, depends on providing the patient with detailed information on the causes and mechanisms of tinnitus development. 4. The negative diagnostics for tumor within the cranial cavity has not only a soothing effect on the patient as it relieves his/her stress, but it can also be a good starting point for the tinnitus retraining therapy.

  9. Institutional framework and the principles of regenerative medicine centers and rehabilitation in a megapolis

    OpenAIRE

    Shapovalenko Т.V.

    2013-01-01

    A concept of development of centers for regenerative medicine and rehabilitation, organizational bases of rehabilitation centers, basic principles and approaches to the creation and activities of the rehabilitation treatment and rehabilitation in the city are presented in the study.

  10. 1992 Environmental Summer Science Camp Program evaluation. The International Environmental Institute of Westinghouse Hanford Company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    This report describes the 1992 Westinghouse Hanford Company/US Department of Energy Environmental Summer Science Camp. The objective of the ``camp`` was to motivate sixth and seventh graders to pursue studies in math, science, and the environment. This objective was accomplished through hands-on fun activities while studying the present and future challenges facing our environment. The camp was funded through Technical Task Plan, 424203, from the US Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Technology Development,to Westinghouse Hanford Company`s International Environmental Institute, Education and Internship Performance Group.

  11. Relationships between academic institutions and industry in the life sciences--an industry survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, D; Causino, N; Campbell, E; Louis, K S

    1996-02-08

    Despite growing acceptance of relationships between academia and industry in the life sciences, systematic, up-to-date information about their extent and the consequences for the parties involved remains scarce. We attempted to collect information about the prevalence, magnitude, commercial benefits, and potential risks of such relationships by surveying a representative sample of life-science companies in the United States to determine their relationships with academic institutions. We collected data by telephone from May through September 1994 from senior executives of 210 life-science companies (of 306 companies surveyed; response rate, 69 percent). The sample contained all Fortune 500 companies in the fields of agriculture, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals; all international pharmaceutical companies with sales volumes similar to those of the Fortune 500 companies; and a random sample of non-Fortune 500 companies in the life sciences drawn from multiple commercial and noncommercial directories. Both the survey instrument and the survey methods resembled those of our 1984 study of 106 biotechnology companies, allowing us to assess the evolution of relationships between academia and industry over the past decade. Ninety percent of companies conducting life-science research in the United States had relationships involving the life sciences with an academic institution in 1994. Fifty-nine percent supported research in such institutions, providing an estimated $1.5 billion, or approximately 11.7 percent of all research-and-development funding received that year. The agreements with universities tended to be short-term and to involve small amounts, implying that most such relationships supported applied research or development. Over 60 percent of companies providing support for life-science research in universities had received patents, products, and sales as a result of those relationships. At the same time, the companies reported that their relationships with

  12. Annual report for FY 2012 on the activities of radiation safety in Nuclear Science Research Institute etc. April 1, 2012 - March 31, 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-02-01

    This annual report describes the activities in the 2012 fiscal year of Department of Radiation Protection in Nuclear Science Research Institute, Safety Section in Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Safety Section in Kansai Photon Science Institute, Operation Safety Administration Section in Aomori Research and Development Center and Safety Section in Naka Fusion Institute. The activities described are environmental monitoring, radiation protection practices in workplaces, individual monitoring, maintenance of monitoring instruments, and research and development of radiation protection. At these institutes the occupational exposures did not exceed the dose limits. The radioactive gaseous and liquid discharges from the facilities were well below the prescribed limits. The radiological situations at the institutes in Tokai, Aomori and Naka have been affected by the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident in March 2011. The research and development activities produced certain results in the fields of radiation protection technique. The radiation protection experts in the institutes actively participated in the projects after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. (author)

  13. Annual report for FY 2012 on the activities of radiation safety in Nuclear Science Research Institute etc. April 1, 2012 - March 31, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-02-15

    This annual report describes the activities in the 2012 fiscal year of Department of Radiation Protection in Nuclear Science Research Institute, Safety Section in Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Safety Section in Kansai Photon Science Institute, Operation Safety Administration Section in Aomori Research and Development Center and Safety Section in Naka Fusion Institute. The activities described are environmental monitoring, radiation protection practices in workplaces, individual monitoring, maintenance of monitoring instruments, and research and development of radiation protection. At these institutes the occupational exposures did not exceed the dose limits. The radioactive gaseous and liquid discharges from the facilities were well below the prescribed limits. The radiological situations at the institutes in Tokai, Aomori and Naka have been affected by the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident in March 2011. The research and development activities produced certain results in the fields of radiation protection technique. The radiation protection experts in the institutes actively participated in the projects after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. (author)

  14. Neutron Tomography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, William Riley

    2017-01-01

    Neutron imaging is an incredibly powerful tool for non-destructive sample characterization and materials science. Neutron tomography is one technique that results in a three-dimensional model of the sample, representing the interaction of the neutrons with the sample. This relies both on reliable data acquisition and on image processing after acquisition. Over the course of the project, the focus has changed from the former to the latter, culminating in a large-scale reconstruction of a meter-long fossilized skull. The full reconstruction is not yet complete, though tools have been developed to improve the speed and accuracy of the reconstruction. This project helps to improve the capabilities of LANSCE and LANL with regards to imaging large or unwieldy objects.

  15. Neutron Tomography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, William Riley [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Neutron imaging is an incredibly powerful tool for non-destructive sample characterization and materials science. Neutron tomography is one technique that results in a three-dimensional model of the sample, representing the interaction of the neutrons with the sample. This relies both on reliable data acquisition and on image processing after acquisition. Over the course of the project, the focus has changed from the former to the latter, culminating in a large-scale reconstruction of a meter-long fossilized skull. The full reconstruction is not yet complete, though tools have been developed to improve the speed and accuracy of the reconstruction. This project helps to improve the capabilities of LANSCE and LANL with regards to imaging large or unwieldy objects.

  16. Tribal engagement strategy of the South Central Climate Science Center, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, William J.; Taylor, April; Winton, Kimberly T.

    2014-01-01

    The South Central Climate Science Center was established by the U.S. Department of the Interior in 2012 to increase understanding of climate change and coordinate an effective response to climate-change effects on Native American tribes and natural and cultural resources that the Department manages. The eight regional Climate Science Centers of the U.S. Department of the Interior work closely with natural-resource management agencies, university researchers, and others such as tribes and private landowners on climate-change issues. The relatively large number of Native Americans in the south central United States and their special knowledge of changing ecosystems make working with tribes and tribal members on climate-change issues particularly important in this part of the Nation. This circular describes priorities of the South Central Climate Science Center and provides information about resources available from Climate Science Centers and partner agencies regarding climate change. The circular also describes how this Climate Science Center, tribes and tribal members, and others can collaborate to minimize potential harmful effects of climate change on human society and our surrounding ecosystems.

  17. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC): Advancing the frontiers of computational science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, J. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) provides researchers with high-performance computing tools to tackle science`s biggest and most challenging problems. Founded in 1974 by DOE/ER, the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center was the first unclassified supercomputer center and was the model for those that followed. Over the years the center`s name was changed to the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center and then to NERSC; it was relocated to LBNL. NERSC, one of the largest unclassified scientific computing resources in the world, is the principal provider of general-purpose computing services to DOE/ER programs: Magnetic Fusion Energy, High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Health and Environmental Research, and the Office of Computational and Technology Research. NERSC users are a diverse community located throughout US and in several foreign countries. This brochure describes: the NERSC advantage, its computational resources and services, future technologies, scientific resources, and computational science of scale (interdisciplinary research over a decade or longer; examples: combustion in engines, waste management chemistry, global climate change modeling).

  18. Liaison activities with the Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences: FY 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.; Elovich, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    The Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences is conducting a program of fundamental and applied research into the chemistry of the actinides and technetium in alkaline media such as are present in the Hanford Site underground waste storage tanks. This work is being coordinated and the results disseminated through a technical liaison maintained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The technical liaison is performing laboratory studies on plutonium chemistry in alkaline media. The activities at the Institute of Physical Chemistry and through the liaison are pursued to improve understanding of the chemical behavior of key long-lived radioactive elements under current operating and proposed tank waste processing conditions. Both activities are supported by the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program under the Office of Science and Technology of the U.S. Department of Energy

  19. Annual report of National Institute for Fusion Science. April 2011 - March 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This annual report summarizes the research activities at NIFS (the National Institute for Fusion Science) between April 2011 and March 2012. NIFS is pursuing the integration of science and technology to realize a fusion power plant. The systematization of plasma physics, and research and development of reactor relevant engineering are key elements in our strategy. NIFS has been exploiting its role as an inter-university research organization and executing a variety of excellent collaborating studies together with universities and research institutes abroad as well as in Japan. The major projects of NIFS are the Large Helical Device (LHD) Project, the Numerical Simulation Research Project, the Fusion Engineering Research Project and the Coordination Research Project. These major projects are accompanied by unique supporting research. Advanced engineering and fusion reactor design studies are strongly promoted. (J.P.N.)

  20. Annual report of National Institute for Fusion Science. April 2009 - March 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This annual report summarizes the research activities at NIFS (the National Institute for Fusion Science) between April 2009 and March 2010. NIFS is pursuing the integration of science and technology to realize a fusion power plant. The systematization of plasma physics, and research and development of reactor relevant engineering are key elements in our strategy. NIFS has been exploiting its role as an inter-university research organization and executing a variety of excellent collaborating studies together with universities and research institutes abroad as well as in Japan. The major projects of NIFS are the Large Helical Device (LHD) Project, the Numerical Simulation Research Project, the Fusion Engineering Research Project and the Coordination Research Project. These major projects are accompanied by unique supporting research. Advanced engineering and fusion reactor design studies are strongly promoted. (J.P.N.)