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Sample records for science band studying

  1. Study of rotational band in 111Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, S.; Banerjee, P.; Ray, I.; Kshetri, R.; Raut, R.; Goswami, A.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Bhattacharya, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Basu, S.K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2006-01-01

    The motivation of the present work is to study the negative-parity rotational band in 111 Sn. Study of the lifetimes of the states of the rotational band is expected to provide information on their structures as well as the band termination phenomenon

  2. Experimental study on the adiabatic shear bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affouard, J.

    1984-07-01

    Four martensitic steels (Z50CDV5 steel, 28CND8 steel, 35NCDV16 steel and 4340 steel) with different hardness between 190 and 600 Hsub(B) (Brinell hardness), have been studied by means of dynamic compressive tests on split Hopkinson pressure bar. Microscopic observations show that the fracture are associated to the development of adiabatic shear bands (except 4340 steel with 190 Hsub(B) hardness). By means of tests for which the deformation is stopped at predetermined levels, the measurement of shear and hardness inside the band and the matrix indicates the chronology of this phenomenon: first the localization of shear, followed by the formation of adiabatic shear band and ultimatly crack initiation and propagation. These results correlated with few simulations by finite elements have permitted to suggest two mecanisms of deformation leading to the formation of adiabatic shear bands in this specific test [fr

  3. Statistical study of auroral omega bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of very few statistical studies on auroral omega bands motivated us to test-use a semi-automatic method for identifying large-scale undulations of the diffuse aurora boundary and to investigate their occurrence. Five identical all-sky cameras with overlapping fields of view provided data for 438 auroral omega-like structures over Fennoscandian Lapland from 1996 to 2007. The results from this set of omega band events agree remarkably well with previous observations of omega band occurrence in magnetic local time (MLT, lifetime, location between the region 1 and 2 field-aligned currents, as well as current density estimates. The average peak emission height of omega forms corresponds to the estimated precipitation energies of a few keV, which experienced no significant change during the events. Analysis of both local and global magnetic indices demonstrates that omega bands are observed during substorm expansion and recovery phases that are more intense than average substorm expansion and recovery phases in the same region. The omega occurrence with respect to the substorm expansion and recovery phases is in a very good agreement with an earlier observed distribution of fast earthward flows in the plasma sheet during expansion and recovery phases. These findings support the theory that omegas are produced by fast earthward flows and auroral streamers, despite the rarity of good conjugate observations.

  4. W-band accelerator study in KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xiongwei; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize the W-band accelerator study in KEK. We present a design study on W-Band photocathode RF gun which is capable of generating and accelerating 300 pC electron bunch. The design system is made up of 91.392 GHz photocathode RF gun and 91.392 GHz traveling wave linac cells. Based on the numerical simulation using SUPERFISH and PARMELA and the conventional RF linac scaling law, the design will produce 300 pC at 1.74 MeV with bunch length 0.72 ps and normalized transverse emittance 0.55 mm mrad. We study the beam dynamics in high frequency and high gradient; due to the high gradient, the pondermotive effect plays an important role in beam dynamics; we found the pondermotive effect still exist with only the fundamental space harmonics (synchrotron mode) due to the coupling of the transverse and longitudinal motion

  5. Thematic mapper studies band correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, S. G.; Kiang, R.

    1976-01-01

    Spectral data representative of thematic mapper candidate bands 1 and 3 to 7 were obtained by selecting appropriate combinations of bands from the JSC 24 channel multispectral scanner. Of all the bands assigned, only candidate bands 4 (.74 mu to .80 mu) and 5 (.80 mu to .91 mu) showed consistently high intercorrelation from region to region and time to time. This extremely high correlation persisted when looking at the composite data set in a multitemporal, multilocation domain. The GISS investigations lend positive confirmation to the hypothesis, that TM bands 4 and 5 are redundant.

  6. Study of intruder band in 112Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, S.; Banerjee, P.; Ray, I.; Kshetri, R.; Raut, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Saha-Sarkar, M.; Goswami, A.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Basu, S.K.

    2007-01-01

    Excited states of the positive-parity intruder band in 112 Sn, populated in the 100 Mo( 20 Ne,α4n) reaction at a beam energy of 136 MeV, have been studied. The band has been observed up to 11570.0 keV with spin (24 + ). Mean lifetimes have been measured for six states up to the 22 + , 10335.1 keV level and an upper limit of the lifetime has been estimated for the 11570.0 keV (24 + ) state. The B(E2) values, derived from the present lifetime results, correspond to a moderate quadrupole deformation of β 2 ∼0.18 for states with spin J π >=12 + , and the decrease in B(E2) for the 14 + ->12 + transition is consistent with a ν(h 11/2 ) 2 alignment at ω∼0.35 MeV, predicted by a cranked shell-model calculation. Total Routhian surface calculations predict a triaxial shape following the alignment

  7. Valence band photoemission studies of clean metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehner, P.S.

    1978-04-01

    The application of Angle-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARPES) to crystalline solids and the utilization of such studies to illuminate several questions concerning the detailed electronic structure of such materials, are discussed. Specifically, by construction of a Direct Transition (DT) model and the utilization of energy-dependent angle-resolved normal photoemission in the photon energy range 32 eV < or = hν < or = 200 eV, the bulk band structure of copper is experimentally mapped out along three different directions in the Brillouin Zone; GAMMA to K, GAMMA to L, and GAMMA to X. In addition, various effects which influence the obtainable resolution in vector k-space, namely, thermal disorder, momentum broadening, and band mixing, are discussed and are shown to place severe limitations on the applicability of the DT model. Finally, a model for Angle-Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS) based on the symmetry of the initial-state wavefunctions is presented and compared to experimental results obtained from copper single crystals

  8. Band structure studies of actinide systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelling, D.D.

    1976-01-01

    The nature of the f-orbitals in an actinide system plays a crucial role in determining the electronic properties. It has long been realized that when the actinide separation is small enough for the f-orbitals to interact directly, the system will exhibit itinerant electron properties: an absence of local moment due to the f-orbitals and sometimes even superconductivity. However, a number of systems with the larger actinide separation that should imply local moment behavior also exhibit intinerant properties. Such systems (URh 3 , UIr 3 , UGe 3 , UC) were examined to learn something about the other f-interactions. A preliminary observation made is that there is apparently a very large and ansiotropic mass enhancement in these systems. There is very good reason to believe that this is not solely due to large electron--electron correlations but to a large electron--phonon interaction as well. These features of the ''non-magnetic'', large actinide separation systems are discussed in light of our results to date. Finally, the results of some recent molecular calculations on actinide hexafluorides are used to illustrate the shielding effects on the intra-atomic Coulomb term U/sub f-f/ which would appear in any attempt to study the formation of local moments. As one becomes interested in materials for which a band structure is no longer an adequate model, this screened U/sub ff/ is the significant parameter and efforts must be made to evaluate it in solid state systems

  9. Study on electromagnetic constants of rotational bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdurazakov, A.A.; Adib, Yu.Sh.; Karakhodzhaev, A.K.

    1991-01-01

    Values of electromagnetic constant S and rotation bands of odd nuclei with Z=64-70 within the mass number change interval A=153-173 are determined. Values of γ-transition mixing parameter with M1+E2 multipolarity are presented. ρ parameter dependence on mass number A is discussed

  10. Ka-band SAR interferometry studies for the SWOT mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, D. E.; Fu, L.; Rodriguez, E.; Hodges, R.; Brown, S.

    2008-12-01

    The primary objective of the NRC Decadal Survey recommended SWOT (Surface Water and Ocean Topography) Mission is to measure the water elevation of the global oceans, as well as terrestrial water bodies (such as rivers, lakes, reservoirs, and wetlands), to answer key scientific questions on the kinetic energy of ocean circulation, the spatial and temporal variability of the world's surface freshwater storage and discharge, and to provide societal benefits on predicting climate change, coastal zone management, flood prediction, and water resources management. The SWOT mission plans to carry the following suite of microwave instruments: a Ka-band interferometer, a dual-frequency nadir altimeter, and a multi-frequency water-vapor radiometer dedicated to measuring wet tropospheric path delay to correct the radar measurements. We are currently funded by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) to reduce the risk of the main technological drivers of SWOT, by addressing the following technologies: the Ka-band radar interferometric antenna design, the on-board interferometric SAR processor, and the internally calibrated high-frequency radiometer. The goal is to significantly enhance the readiness level of the new technologies required for SWOT, while laying the foundations for the next-generation missions to map water elevation for studying Earth. The first two technologies address the challenges of the Ka-band SAR interferometry, while the high- frequency radiometer addresses the requirement for small-scale wet tropospheric corrections for coastal zone applications. In this paper, we present the scientific rational, need and objectives behind these technology items currently under development.

  11. Study of positive-parity yrast band in 83Rb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, S.; Banerjee, P.; Ray, I.; Kshetri, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Goswami, A.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R.P.; Kumar, R.; Bhowmik, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    The properties of the positive-parity yrast band in the odd-A 81,83,85 Rb (Z=37) isotopes show remarkable changes as N increases. The objective of the present work is to study the structure of the lowest positive-parity band in 83 Rb from lifetime studies

  12. Systematic study of β-band and correlation with g- band using power law and soft rotor formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoch, Vikas; Kaushik, Reetu; Sharma, S.; Gupta, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear structure of even Z even N medium mass transitional nuclei consist of ground state band, K π =0 1 β-band, K π =2 1 γ- band and other higher bands. As we move away from closed shell, energy levels are low lying from spherical to deformed nuclei and energy deviated from ideal rotor behavior. The energy of these transitional nuclei in ground band can also be studied using Bohr Mottelson energy expression, Soft Rotor Formula (SRF), Power Law (PL) etc. Recently, Gupta et al. (2013) modified SRF for non zero band head K π =2 1 γ-band and reproduced the level energies. Here same formula applied for K π =0 1 β-band and the level energies are reproduced and compared with experimental energies. The power law is also used for recalculation of level energies and for useful comparison

  13. Study of yrast band in 155Tm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raut, R.; Bhowal, S.; Ganguly, S.; Kshetri, R.; Banerjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhowmik, R.K.; Dasmahapatra, B.; Gangopadhyay, G.; Mukherjee, A.; Muralithar, S.; SahaSarkar, M.; Singh, R.P.; Goswami, A.

    2007-01-01

    The nucleus 155 Tm has been studied by a detailed in-beam gamma spectroscopy following the reaction 144 Sm( 14 N, 3n) 155 Tm, at a beam energy, E lab =70MeV, using a Compton suppressed gamma detector array. More than 25 new gamma transitions have been placed in the proposed scheme and the latter has been extended upto a spin-parity of (51/2 - ) at an excitation energy ∼ 6 MeV

  14. Citizen Science Air Sensor Project with Clean Air Carolina and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA scientists are partnering with Clean Air Carolina (CAC) in Charlotte, N.C., and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) in Cherokee, N.C., to conduct a citizen science air quality project in these regions.

  15. Simulation study of the high intensity S-Band photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiongwei; Nakajima, Kazuhisa [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, we report the results of simulation study of the high intensity S-Band photoinjector. The aim of the simulation study is to transport high bunch charge with low emittance evolution. The simulation result shows that 7nC bunch with rms emittance 22.3 {pi} mm mrad can be outputted at the exit of photoinjector. (author)

  16. Simulation study of the high intensity S-Band photoinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiongwei; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of simulation study of the high intensity S-Band photoinjector. The aim of the simulation study is to transport high bunch charge with low emittance evolution. The simulation result shows that 7nC bunch with rms emittance 22.3 π mm mrad can be outputted at the exit of photoinjector. (author)

  17. Study of ΔI = 1 band in 83Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, Aparajita; Banerjee, P.; Ray, I.; Kshetri, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Ganguly, Sourav . sgpresi@rediffmail.com; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R.P.; Kumar, R.; Bhowmik, R.K.

    2008-01-01

    Previously, the ΔI = 1 band in 83 Kr have been studied and reported in the literature. The lifetime results reported are smaller than those reported by about of a factor of two. A re-measurement of these level lifetimes has been attempted in the present work in view of the discrepancies in the reported results

  18. Spacelab Science Results Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, R. J.; Lundquist, C. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Horwitz, J. L.; Germany, G. A.; Cruise, J. F.; Lewis, M. L.; Murphy, K. L.

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with OSTA-1 in November 1981 and ending with Neurolab in March 1998, a total of 36 Shuttle missions carried various Spacelab components such as the Spacelab module, pallet, instrument pointing system, or mission peculiar experiment support structure. The experiments carried out during these flights included astrophysics, solar physics, plasma physics, atmospheric science, Earth observations, and a wide range of microgravity experiments in life sciences, biotechnology, materials science, and fluid physics which includes combustion and critical point phenomena. In all, some 764 experiments were conducted by investigators from the U.S., Europe, and Japan. The purpose of this Spacelab Science Results Study is to document the contributions made in each of the major research areas by giving a brief synopsis of the more significant experiments and an extensive list of the publications that were produced. We have also endeavored to show how these results impacted the existing body of knowledge, where they have spawned new fields, and if appropriate, where the knowledge they produced has been applied.

  19. Study of band structure of some odd proton Eu isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandit, Rakesh K.; Rani Devi; Khosa, S.K.

    2016-01-01

    Much work has been done on the odd-Z, odd-A nuclei in the rare earth region because of occurrence of fascinating variety of structures of nuclei in this mass region. The Eu nuclei are in the transitional deformation region and it provides an opportunity to investigate theoretically the deformation changes with mass number and excitation energy besides to study the structure of their excited states. The 153 Eu nucleus has been well studied over the last two decades. The aim of the present work is to study in detail the band structure of some odd-Z nuclei

  20. Study of band structure in 78,80Sr using Triaxial Projected Shell Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behera, N.; Naik, Z.; Bhat, G.H.; Sheikh, J.A.; Palit, R.; Sun, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of present work is to carry out a systematic study of the yrast-band and gamma-band structure for the even-even 78-80 Sr nuclei using Triaxial Projected Shell Model (TPSM) approach. These nuclei were chosen because 78 Sr has well developed side band(unassigned configuration) and 80 Sr has well developed band observed experimentally

  1. Wake-field studies on photonic band gap accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; Kroll, N.; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, M/S 26, P.O. Box 4349, Stanford, California; Smith, D.R.; Schultz, S.

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the wake-field of several metal Photonic Band Gap (PBG) cavities which consist of either a square or a hexagonal array of metal cylinders, bounded on top and bottom by conducting or superconducting sheets, surrounded by placing microwave absorber at the periphery or by replacing outer rows of metal cylinders with lossy dielectric ones, or by metallic walls. A removed cylinder from the center of the array constitutes a site defect where a localized electromagnetic mode can occur. While both monopole and dipole wake-fields have been studied, we confine our attention here mainly to the dipole case. The dipole wake-field is produced by modes in the propagation bands which tend to fill the entire cavity more or less uniformly and are thus easy to damp selectively. MAFIA time domain simulation of the transverse wake-field has been compared with that of a cylindrical pill-box comparison cavity. Even without damping the wake-field of the metal PBG cavity is substantially smaller than that of the pill-box cavity and may be further reduced by increasing the size of the lattice. By introducing lossy material at the periphery we have been able to produce Q factors for the dipole modes in the 40 to 120 range without significantly degrading the accelerating mode. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  2. Science Study For A Low Cost Upper Atmosphere Sounder (LOCUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, D.; Swinyard, B. M.; Ellison, B. N.; Siddans, R.; Kerridge, B. J.; Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W.

    2013-12-01

    We present the findings of an initial science study to define the spectral bands for the proposed Mesosphere / Lower Thermosphere (MLT) sounder LOCUS. The LOCUS mission (Fig 1) uses disruptive technologies to make key MLT species detectable globally by satellite remote sensing for the first time. This presentation summarises the technological and scientific foundation on which the current 4-band Terahertz (THz) and sub- millimetre wave (SMW) instrument configuration was conceived.

  3. Study of intruder band in {sup 112}Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganguly, S. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Banerjee, P. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India)]. E-mail: polash.banerjee@saha.ac.in; Ray, I. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Kshetri, R. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Raut, R. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Bhattacharya, S. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Saha-Sarkar, M. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Goswami, A. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Mukhopadhyay, S. [UGC-DAE-CSR, Kolkata 700098 (India); Mukherjee, A. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Mukherjee, G. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700064 (India); Basu, S.K. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2007-06-01

    Excited states of the positive-parity intruder band in {sup 112}Sn, populated in the {sup 100}Mo({sup 20}Ne,{alpha}4n) reaction at a beam energy of 136 MeV, have been studied. The band has been observed up to 11570.0 keV with spin (24{sup +}). Mean lifetimes have been measured for six states up to the 22{sup +}, 10335.1 keV level and an upper limit of the lifetime has been estimated for the 11570.0 keV (24{sup +}) state. The B(E2) values, derived from the present lifetime results, correspond to a moderate quadrupole deformation of {beta}{sub 2}{approx}0.18 for states with spin J{sup {pi}}>=12{sup +}, and the decrease in B(E2) for the 14{sup +}->12{sup +} transition is consistent with a {nu}(h{sub 11/2}){sup 2} alignment at {omega}{approx}0.35 MeV, predicted by a cranked shell-model calculation. Total Routhian surface calculations predict a triaxial shape following the alignment.

  4. Design studies of the Ku-band, wide-band Gyro-TWT amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sang Wook; Lee, Han Seul; Jang, Kwong Ho; Choi, Jin Joo; Hong, Yong Jun; Shin, Jin Woo; So, Jun Ho; Won, Jong Hyo

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports a Ku-band, wide band Gyrotron-Traveling-wave-tube(Gyro-TWT) that is currently being developed at Kwangwoon University. The Gyro-TWT has a two stage linear tapered interaction circuit to obtain a wide operating bandwidth. The linearly-tapered interaction circuit and nonlinearly-tapered magnetic field gives the Gyro-TWT a wide operating bandwidth. The Gyro-TWT bandwidth is 23%. The 2d-Particle-in-cell(PIC) and MAGIC2d code simulation results are 17.3 dB and 24.34 kW, respectively for the maximum saturated output power. A double anode MIG was simulated with E-Gun code. The results were 0.7 for the transvers to the axial beam velocity ratio (=alpha) and a 2.3% axial velocity spread at 50 kV and 4 A. A magnetic field profile simulation was performed by using the Poisson code to obtain the grazing magnetic field of the entire interaction circuit with Poisson code.

  5. Snap-lock bags with red band: A study of manufacturing characteristics, thermal and chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Yvonne Hui Ying; Koh, Alaric C W; Lim, Shing Min; Yew, Sok Yee

    2015-10-01

    Drug packaging is commonly submitted to the Forensic Chemistry and Physics Laboratory of the Health Sciences Authority, Singapore, for examination. The drugs seized are often packaged in plastic bags. These bags are examined for linkages to provide law enforcement with useful associations between the traffickers and drug abusers. The plastic bags submitted may include snap-lock bags, some with a red band located above the snap-lock closure and some without. Current techniques for examination involve looking at the physical characteristics (dimensions, thickness and polarising patterns) and manufacturing marks of these bags. In cases where manufacturing marks on the main body of the bags are poor or absent, the manufacturing characteristics present on the red band can be examined. A study involving approximately 1000 bags was conducted to better understand the variations in the manufacturing characteristics of the red band. This understanding is crucial in helping to determine associations/eliminations between bags. Two instrumental techniques, namely differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were explored to evaluate the effectiveness of examining the chemical composition to discriminate the bags. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental studies of narrow band effects in the actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, M.B.

    1976-01-01

    In many actinide metallic systems the f-electrons exhibit band behavior. This is a consequence of direct f-f wave function overlap or hybridization of f-electrons with s-, p-, and d-electrons. The f-bands can be responsible for large electronic densities of states at the Fermi level which may lead to band magnetism of various types. Although the concept of valence instabilities must be approached cautiously especially in the light actinides, it would not be surprising to observe them in the future, especially in Am compounds.

  7. Experimental studies of narrow band effects in the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, M.B.

    1976-01-01

    In many actinide metallic systems the f-electrons exhibit band behavior. This is a consequence of direct f-f wave function overlap or hybridization of f-electrons with s-, p-, and d-electrons. The f-bands can be responsible for large electronic densities of states at the Fermi level which may lead to band magnetism of various types. Although the concept of valence instabilities must be approached cautiously especially in the light actinides, it would not be surprising to observe them in the future, especially in Am compounds

  8. Experimental study of shear bands formation in a granular material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thai Binh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an experimental investigation of the formation of shear bands in a granular sample submitted to a biaxial test. Our principal result is the direct observation of the bifurcation at the origin of the localization process in the material. At the bifurcation, the shear band is spatially extended: we observe a breaking of symmetry without any sudden localization of the deformation in a narrow band. Our work thus allows to clearly distinguish different phenomena: bifurcation which is a ponctual event which occurs before the peak, localization which is a process that covers a range of deformation of several percents during which the peak occurs and finally stationary shear bands which are well-defined permanent structures that can be observed at the end of the localization process, after the peak.

  9. Study of positive parity bands in 137Pr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Priyanka; Kumar, Suresh; Jain, A.K.; Singh, Sukhjeet; Malik, S.S.; Sinha, Rishi Kumar; Dhal, Anukul; Chaturvedi, L.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R.P.; Madhavan, N.; Kumar, Rakesh; Bhowmik, R.K.; Pancholi, S.C.; Jain, H.C.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the analysis and interpretation of the positive parity states in 137 Pr have been reported. The detailed interpretation with configuration assignments and the calculations for the bands will be reported

  10. Study of ground, γ and γγ - bands in 112Ru nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.; Kumar, Rajesh; Varshney, A.K.; Gupta, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, RTRM has been employed in which the projection of angular momentum along 15-axis causing rotational band and another projection of angular momentum in (25, 35) plane that produce anomalous rotational bands. The employment of RTRM with Lipas parameter describes the energies of the different bands

  11. Study on quantum beam science by using ultra short electron pulse, FEL, and slow positron beam at ISIR (Institute of Science and Industrial Research), Osaka University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Tagawa, S.; Okuda, S.; Honda, Y.; Kimura, N.; Yamamoto, T.; Isoyama, G.

    1995-01-01

    Three projects for quantum beam science, an ultra fast electron pulse, a free electron laser, and a slow positron beam, has been started by using 38 MeV L-band and 150 MeV S-band linacs at ISIR in Osaka University. Both study on the production of three beams and study on quantum material science by using three beams will play an important role in the beam science. (author)

  12. Microscopic study of superdeformed rotational bands in {sup 151} Tb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Aouad, N.; Dudek, J.; Li, X.; Luo, W.D.; Molique, H.; Bouguettoucha, A.; Byrski, TH.; Beck, F.; Finck, C.; Kharraja, B. [Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France). Centre de Recherches Nucleaires; Dobaczewski, J. [Warsaw Univ. (Poland); Kharraja, B. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Structure of eight superdeformed bands in the nucleus {sup 151}Tb is analyzed using the results of the Hartree-Fock and Woods-Saxon cranking approaches. It is demonstrated that far going similarities between the two approaches exit and predictions related to the structure of rotational bands calculated within the two models are nearly parallel. An interpretation scenario for the structure of the superdeformed bands is presented and predictions related to the exit spins are made. Small but systematic discrepancies between experiment and theory, analyzed in terms of the dynamical moments, J{sup (2)}, are shown to exist. The pairing correlations taken into account by using the particle-number-projection technique are shown to increase the disagreement. Sources of these systematic discrepancies are discussed - they are most likely related to the yet not optimal parametrization of the nuclear interactions used. (authors). 60 refs.

  13. Studies of a powerful PPM focused X-band klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avrakhov, P.; Balakin, V.; Chashurin, V.

    1998-01-01

    Results of computer simulation and testing of the powerful X band klystron with phase-pulse modulation are presented. The klystron was developed for KEK synchrotron. The simulation efficiency of the klystron is smaller than the testing one. The parasitic oscillations are detected in the klystron, and it is necessary to suppress them [ru

  14. Life with a Gastric Band. Long-Term Outcomes of Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding-a Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Piotr K; Olszewski, Robert; Kwiatkowski, Andrzej; Gałązka-Świderek, Natalia; Cichoń, Krzysztof; Paśnik, Krzysztof

    2017-05-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is the third most popular bariatric procedure worldwide. Various authors present ambivalent long-term follow up results. We revised records of the patients who underwent LAGB between 2003 and 2006 along with history of additional check-ins. Patients with outdated details were tracked with the national health insurance database and social media (Facebook). An online survey was sent. The patients who did not have their band removed were included in this study. We calculated the percent total weight loss (%TWL) and percent excess weight loss (%EWL), along with changes in body mass index (ΔBMI). Satisfactory weight loss was set at >50% EWL (for BMI = 25 kg/m 2 ). Since eight patients gained weight, we decided to include negative values of %TWL, %EWL, and ΔBMI. One hundred seven patients underwent LAGB from 2003 to 2006. The mean follow-up time was 11.2 (±1.2) years. Eleven percent of patients were lost to follow up (n = 12). There was one perioperative death. Fifty-four of the patients (n = 57) had their band removed. Thirty-seven patients still have the band (39%) and were included in the study. The mean %EWL was 27% (-56-112%) and %TWL was 11% (-19-53%). Twelve patients achieved %EWL > 50% (32%). Thiry-two patients still suffer from obesity, with BMI over 30 kg/m 2 . Eight patients (22%) gained additional weight. Patients with %EWL > 50% suffered less from gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms than those with EWL < 50% (p < 0.05). Out of 107 cases, only 11.2% of patients with gastric band (n = 12) achieved satisfactory %EWL. Twenty-two percent of patients regained their weight or even exceeded it. Overall results suggest that LAGB is not an effective bariatric procedure in long term observation.

  15. Experimental study of energy harvesting in UHF band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernacki, Ł; Gozdur, R; Salamon, N

    2016-01-01

    A huge progress of down-sizing technology together with trend of decreasing power consumption and, on the other hand, increasing efficiency of electronics give the opportunity to design and to implement the energy harvesters as main power sources. This paper refers to the energy that can be harvested from electromagnetic field in the unlicensed frequency bands. The paper contains description of the most popular techniques and transducers that can be applied in energy harvesting domain. The overview of current research and commercial solutions was performed for bands in ultra-high frequency range, which are unlicensed and where transmission is not limited by administrative arrangements. During the experiments with Powercast’s receiver, the same bands as sources of electromagnetic field were taken into account. This power source is used for conducting radio-communication process and excess energy could be used for powering the extra electronic circuits. The paper presents elaborated prototype of energy harvesting system and the measurements of power harvested in ultra-high frequency range. The evaluation of RF energy harvesters for powering ultra-low power (ULP) electronic devices was performed based on survey and results of the experiments. (paper)

  16. Study of multi-quasiparticle band structures in 197Tl using α beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, G.; Nandi, S.; Pai, H.

    2016-01-01

    Study of the multi-quasiparticle (qp) states and the band structures built on them in the neutron deficient Tl nuclei in A ∼ 190 mass region provides useful information on particle-hole interaction in the heavy nuclei. In order to investigate the multi-qp band structures we have studied the excited states in 197 Tl by gamma ray spectroscopy

  17. Studies on the red absorption band of chlorophyll a in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, J.B.; Kleinen Hammans, J.W.; Arnolds, W.J.

    1965-01-01

    It was studied whether certain earlier observed weak shoulders on the red absorption band of chlorophyll a in vivo might represent anomalies due to overlap of absorption bands. The results are suggested of the fact that no such anomalies occur. It is therefore concluded that the present study

  18. Measuring Science Curriculum Improvement Study Teachers' Attitudinal Changes Toward Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovey, Larry Michael

    Investigated were three questions related to the relationship between a science teacher's attitude regarding the use of a newer science program, in this instance the Science Curriculum Improvement Study (SCIS): (1) Could the Projective Tests of Attitudes, originally designed for fifth-grade students, be modified for use with adults? (2) Is there a…

  19. Studies on defect detectability in banded stainless steel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyamsunder, M.T.; Rao, B.P.C.; Babu Rao, C.; Jayakumar, T.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    During inspection of one batch of stainless steel cladding tubes, a few of the tubes gave rise to continuous large amplitude indications throughout the length of the tube. It was observed that the presence of any defects in such tubes would be impossible to detect, due to the poor signal-to-noise ratio. Detailed investigations regarding the surface profile of the tubes were carried out using a novel technique called the projected interferometry method revealed periodic diametral variations and the same were further confirmed by cross sectional profiling. The feasibility of detecting defects in such banded tubes, using eddy current testing were carried out on tubes with artificial defects. This paper discusses the use of three different eddy current methods and their relative performances for inspection. The specific advantages of the phased array eddy current testing method in unambiguous defect detection in situations similar to the one encountered during the present investigations are also discussed. (author)

  20. What science are you singing? A study of the science image in the mainstream music of Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Ju; Allgaier, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Previous research showed that pop music bands in the Western world have sometimes included science imagery in their lyrics. Their songs could potentially be helpful facilitators for science communication and public engagement purposes. However, so far no systematic research has been conducted for investigating science in popular music in Eastern cultures. This study explores whether science has been regarded as an element in the creation of popular mainstream music, and examines the content and quantity of distribution through an analysis of mainstream music lyrics, to reflect on the conditions of the absorption of science into popular culture. The results indicate that expressions related to astronomy and space science feature very prominently. Most of the lyrics are connected to emotional states and mood expressions and they are only very rarely related to actual issues of science. The implications for science communication and further research are discussed in the final section. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Head and hand detuning effect study of narrow-band against wide-band mobile phone antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahramzy, Pevand; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2014-01-01

    Wide-band (WB) and narrow-band (NB) antennas in terms of performance are compared, when interacting with the user’s right head and hand (RHH). The investigations are done through experimental measurements, using standardised head phantom and hand. It is shown that WB antennas detune more than NB ...

  2. Atomistic simulation study of the shear-band deformation mechanism in Mg-Cu metallic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Nicholas; Schiøtz, Jakob; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2006-01-01

    We have simulated plastic deformation of a model Mg-Cu metallic glass in order to study shear banding. In uniaxial tension, we find a necking instability occurs rather than shear banding. We can force the latter to occur by deforming in plane strain, forbidding the change of length in one...... of the transverse directions. Furthermore, in most of the simulations a notch is used to initiate shear bands, which lie at a 45 degrees angle to the tensile loading direction. The shear bands are characterized by the Falk and Langer local measure of plastic deformation D-min(2), averaged here over volumes...... observe a slight decrease in density, up to 1%, within the shear band, which is consistent with notions of increased free volume or disorder within a plastically deforming amorphous material....

  3. Experimental study of ΔI=1 bands in 111In

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, P.; Pradhan, M. K.; Ganguly, S.; Sharma, H. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2011-01-01

    The two ΔI=1 bands in 111 In, built upon the 3461.0 and 4931.8 keV states, have been studied. The bands were populated in the reaction 100 Mo( 19 F, α4nγ) at a beam energy of 105 MeV. Mean lifetimes of nine states, four in the first and five in the second band, have been determined for the first time from Doppler shift attenuation data. The deduced B(M1) rates and their behavior as a function of level spin support the interpretation of these bands within the framework of the shears mechanism. The geometrical model of Machiavelli et al. has been used to derive the effective gyromagnetic ratios for the two bands.

  4. Experimental study of ΔI=1 bands in In111

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, P.; Ganguly, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Sharma, H. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2011-02-01

    The two ΔI=1 bands in In111, built upon the 3461.0 and 4931.8 keV states, have been studied. The bands were populated in the reaction Mo100(F19,α4nγ) at a beam energy of 105 MeV. Mean lifetimes of nine states, four in the first and five in the second band, have been determined for the first time from Doppler shift attenuation data. The deduced B(M1) rates and their behavior as a function of level spin support the interpretation of these bands within the framework of the shears mechanism. The geometrical model of Machiavelli has been used to derive the effective gyromagnetic ratios for the two bands.

  5. Terry Turbopump Expanded Operating Band Full-Scale Component and Basic Science Detailed Test Plan - Final.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Solom, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This document details the milestone approach to define the true operating limitations (margins) of the Terry turbopump systems used in the nuclear industry for Milestone 3 (full-scale component experiments) and Milestone 4 (Terry turbopump basic science experiments) efforts. The overall multinational-sponsored program creates the technical basis to: (1) reduce and defer additional utility costs, (2) simplify plant operations, and (3) provide a better understanding of the true margin which could reduce overall risk of operations.

  6. Case studies in conservation science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisulca, Christina

    The research presented in this dissertation covers three separate topics of conservation as defined by the National Science Foundation: 1) Materials Stabilization, Strengthening, Monitoring, and Repair; 2. Understanding Material Degradation and Aging; and 3) Materials and Structural Characterization of Cultural Heritage Objects (the 'technical study'). The first topic is addressed through a study to assess the consolidant tetraethoxysilane for the stabilization of alum treated wood. Falling under materials degradation studies is a study published in American Museum Novitates to understand how environmental conditions affect the aging of fossil resins from five different deposits. Two separate studies are included in technical study of cultural heritage objects which comprises the third research area of materials characterization. The first is a survey of red dyes used in Chinese paintings from the Ming Dynasty to the Early Republic (1364-1911). The second is a study of the pigments, dyes and binders used in Hawaiian barkcloth (kapa) from the 19th century.

  7. Theoretical study of band structure of odd-mass {sup 115,117}I isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dhanvir, E-mail: singh1472phy@gmail.com; Kumar, Amit, E-mail: akbcw2@gmail.com; Sharma, Chetan, E-mail: chetan24101985@gmail.com [Research Scholar, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu-180006 (India); Singh, Suram, E-mail: suramsingh@gmail.com [Assistant Professor, Department of Physics, Govt. Degree College, Kathua-184101 (India); Bharti, Arun, E-mail: arunbharti-2003@yahoo.co.in [Professor, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu-180006 (India)

    2016-05-06

    By using the microscopic approach of Projected Shell Model (PSM), negative-parity band structures of odd mass neutron-rich {sup 115,117}I nuclei have been studied with the deformed single-particle states generated by the standard Nilsson potential. For these isotopes, the band structures have been analyzed in terms of quasi-particles configurations. The phenomenon of back bending in moment of inertia is also studied in the present work.

  8. Experimental Study of Electronic Quantum Interference, Photonic Crystal Cavity, Photonic Band Edge Effects for Optical Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-26

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2016-0003 TR-2016-0003 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF ELECTRONIC QUANTUM INTERFERENCE , PHOTONIC CRYSTAL CAVITY, PHOTONIC BAND...EDGE EFFECTS FOR OPTICAL AMPLIFICATION Shawn-Yu Lin Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 110 8th Street Troy, New York 12180 26 Jan 2016 Final Report...2014 – 11 Jan 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Experimental Study of Electronic Quantum Interference , Photonic Crystal Cavity, Photonic Band Edge Effects

  9. Study of III-V semiconductor band structure by synchrotron photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, G.P.; Cerrina, F.; Anderson, J.; Lapeyre, G.J.; Smith, R.J.; Hermanson, J.; Knapp, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Angle-resolved synchrotron photoemission studies of six III-V semiconductors have been carried out. For emission normal to the (110) plane of these materials, peaks in the experimental spectra were identified with the bands involved in the transitions, and the critical point energies X 3 , X 5 , and Σ 1 /sup min/, were determined. The data indicate that k perpendicular is conserved in the transitions. Comparison of the data with theoretical bands permits an evaluation of k perpendicular associated with the experimentally observed transition, and from this information the bands were plotted out

  10. Theoretical studies on band structure and optical properties of 3C-SiC by FPLAPW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, P.; Xie, C.; Xu, F.; Pan, H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: SiC has attracted more interests because of its great technological importance in microelectronic and photoelectronic devices. We have studied the band structure and optical properties of 3C-SiC by using a Full Potential Linearized Augmented Plane Waves (FPLAPW) method. The partial density of states (DOS) of Si and C atoms as well as the band structure of 3C-SiC are presented. The calculated band gap is 1.30eV, which is much less than the experimental value. It is attributed to a deficiency of the local density theory. The imaginary part of the dielectric function has been obtained directly from the band structure calculation. With the band gap correction, the real part of the dielectric function has been derived from the imaginary part by Kramers Kronig (K-K) dispersion relationship. The calculated results are in good agreement with the results measured by Petalas et al. by using ultraviolet spectroscopic ellipsometry in the photon energy range of 5eV-10eV. The band-to-band transition can be identified from the critical points exhibited in the calculated dielectric function, which is consistent with the experimental results of Petalas et al. The refractive index, extinction coefficient and reflectivity have also been calculated from obtained dielectric function, which are in agreement with the experimental results of Logothetidis and Lambrecht

  11. A microscopic study of the S band in the generator co-ordinate approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuest, E.; Ansari, A.

    1985-04-01

    Using particle number and spin projected cranked Hartree-Fock-Bogolubov (CHFB) wave functions in the generator co-ordinate method (GCM) with the cranking frequency as a GC the shortcomings of the usual CHFB theory are removed and the ground as well as the s band are studied simultaneously. In particular, low-spin properties of the s band are discussed for a backbending nucleus 158 Dy. (author)

  12. Modeling and experimental studies of a side band power re-injection locked magnetron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Yi; Yuan, Ping; Zhu, Hua-Cheng; Huang, Ka-Ma; Yang, Yang

    2016-12-01

    A side band power re-injection locked (SBPRIL) magnetron is presented in this paper. A tuning stub is placed between the external injection locked (EIL) magnetron and the circulator. Side band power of the EIL magnetron is reflected back to the magnetron. The reflected side band power is reused and pulled back to the central frequency. A phase-locking model is developed from circuit theory to explain the process of reuse of side band power in SBPRIL magnetron. Theoretical analysis proves that the side band power is pulled back to the central frequency of the SBPRIL magnetron, then the amplitude of the RF voltage increases and the phase noise performance is improved. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of a 10-vane continuous wave (CW) magnetron model is presented. Computer simulation predicts that the frequency spectrum’s peak of the SBPRIL magnetron has an increase of 3.25 dB compared with the free running magnetron. The phase noise performance at the side band offset reduces 12.05 dB for the SBPRIL magnetron. Besides, the SBPRIL magnetron experiment is presented. Experimental results show that the spectrum peak rises by 14.29% for SBPRIL magnetron compared with the free running magnetron. The phase noise reduces more than 25 dB at 45-kHz offset compared with the free running magnetron. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB328902) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61501311).

  13. Multi-Band (K- Q- and E-Band) Multi-Tone Millimeter-Wave Frequency Synthesizer for Radio Wave Propagation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a multi-band multi-tone millimeter-wave frequency synthesizer, based on a solid-state frequency comb generator. The intended application of the synthesizer is in a space-borne transmitter for radio wave atmospheric studies at K-band (18 to 26.5 GHz), Q-band (37 to 42 GHz), and E-band (71 to 76 GHz). These studies would enable the design of robust multi-Gbps data rate space-to-ground satellite communication links. Lastly, the architecture for a compact multi-tone beacon transmitter, which includes a high frequency synthesizer, a polarizer, and a conical horn antenna, has been investigated for a notional CubeSat based space-to-ground radio wave propagation experiment.

  14. Graphene-induced band gap renormalization in polythiophene: a many-body perturbation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsusi, F.; Fedorov, I. A.; Gerivani, S.

    2018-01-01

    Density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory at the G0W0 level are employed to study the electronic properties of polythiophene (PT) adsorbed on the graphene surface. Analysis of the charge density difference shows that substrate-adsorbate interaction leads to a strong physisorption and interfacial electric dipole moment formation. The electrostatic potential displays a  -0.19 eV shift in the graphene work function from its initial value of 4.53 eV, as the result of the interaction. The LDA band gap of the polymer does not show any change. However, the band structure exhibits weak orbital hybridizations resulting from slight overlapping between the polymer and graphene states wave functions. The interfacial polarization effects on the band gap and levels alignment are investigated at the G0W0 level and show a notable reduction of PT band gap compared to that of the isolated chain.

  15. Politicizing science: conceptions of politics in science and technology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mark B

    2015-02-01

    This essay examines five ideal-typical conceptions of politics in science and technology studies. Rather than evaluating these conceptions with reference to a single standard, the essay shows how different conceptions of politics serve distinct purposes: normative critique, two approaches to empirical description, and two views of democracy. I discuss each conception of politics with respect to how well it fulfills its apparent primary purpose, as well as its implications for the purpose of studying a key issue in contemporary democratic societies: the politicization of science. In this respect, the essay goes beyond classifying different conceptions of politics and also recommends the fifth conception as especially conducive to understanding and shaping the processes whereby science becomes a site or object of political activity. The essay also employs several analytical distinctions to help clarify the differences among conceptions of politics: between science as 'political' (adjective) and science as a site of 'politics' (noun), between spatial-conceptions and activity-conceptions of politics, between latent conflicts and actual conflicts, and between politics and power. The essay also makes the methodological argument that the politics of science and technology is best studied with concepts and methods that facilitate dialogue between actors and analysts. The main goal, however, is not to defend a particular view of politics, but to promote conversation on the conceptions of politics that animate research in social studies of science and technology.

  16. Simulation study of resonant reflector for S-band BWO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choyal, Y; Parmar, Nidhi; Saini, Ajay Kumar; Chhotray, S K; Bhat, K S; Kumar, Lalit

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the result of simulation studies of resonant reflector used for reflection of backward wave in relativistic BWO. The resonant reflector is modelled and analyzed by CST MWS for TM 01 . A TM 01 mode is fed at the output end of the BWO and signal is observed at the cathode end. Results show that 90 percent of the backward TM 01 wave is get reflected back by the locked TM 02 mode in the resonant reflector.

  17. Science Anxiety, Science Attitudes, and Constructivism: A Binational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Fred B.; Kastrup, Helge; Udo, Maria; Hislop, Nelda; Shefner, Rachel; Mallow, Jeffry

    2013-08-01

    Students' attitudes and anxieties about science were measured by responses to two self-report questionnaires. The cohorts were Danish and American students at the upper secondary- and university-levels. Relationships between and among science attitudes, science anxiety, gender, and nationality were examined. Particular attention was paid to constructivist attitudes about science. These fell into at least three broad conceptual categories: Negativity of Science Toward the Individual, Subjective Construction of Knowledge, and Inherent Bias Against Women. Multigroup confirmatory factor analyses revealed that these dimensions of constructivist attitudes were equally applicable and had the same meaning in both cultures. Gender differences in mean levels of constructivist attitudes were found; these varied across the two cultures. Constructivist beliefs were associated with science anxiety, but in different ways for females and males, and for Danes and Americans. In agreement with earlier studies, females in both the US and Danish cohorts were significantly more science anxious than males, and the gender differences for the Americans were larger than those for the Danes. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for reducing science anxiety by changing constructivist beliefs.

  18. Study of yrast band in {sup 155}Tm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raut, R. [Nuclear and Atomic Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700064 (India); Bhowal, S. [Department of Physics, Surendranath College (Evening), M.G. road, Kolkata-700009 (India); Ganguly, S.; Kshetri, R.; Banerjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S. [Nuclear and Atomic Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700064 (India); Bhowmik, R.K. [Inter University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi (India); Dasmahapatra, B. [Nuclear and Atomic Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700064 (India); Gangopadhyay, G. [Department of Physics, University College of Science Technology, 92, A.P.C. road, Kolkata-700073 (India); Mukherjee, A. [Nuclear and Atomic Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700064 (India); Muralithar, S. [Inter University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi (India); SahaSarkar, M. [Nuclear and Atomic Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700064 (India); Singh, R.P. [Inter University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi (India); Goswami, A. [Nuclear and Atomic Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700064 (India)], E-mail: asimananda.goswami@saha.ac.in

    2007-10-01

    The nucleus {sup 155}Tm has been studied by a detailed in-beam gamma spectroscopy following the reaction {sup 144}Sm({sup 14}N, 3n){sup 155}Tm, at a beam energy, E{sub lab}=70MeV, using a Compton suppressed gamma detector array. More than 25 new gamma transitions have been placed in the proposed scheme and the latter has been extended upto a spin-parity of (51/2{sup -}) at an excitation energy {approx} 6 MeV.

  19. Cultural studies of science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Joanna; McDonald, Geraldine

    2008-07-01

    In response to Stetsenko's [2008, Cultural Studies of Science Education, 3] call for a more unified approach in sociocultural perspectives, this paper traces the origins of the use of sociocultural ideas in New Zealand from the 1970s to the present. Of those New Zealanders working from a sociocultural perspective who responded to our query most had encountered these ideas while overseas. More recently activity theory has been of interest and used in reports of work in early childhood, workplace change in the apple industry, and in-service teacher education. In all these projects the use of activity theory has been useful for understanding how the elements of a system can transform the activity. We end by agreeing with Stetsenko that there needs to be a more concerted approach by those working from a sociocultural perspective to recognise the contribution of others in the field.

  20. Electron Band Alignment at Interfaces of Semiconductors with Insulating Oxides: An Internal Photoemission Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeri V. Afanas'ev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of the electron energy band alignment at interfaces between different semiconductors and wide-gap oxide insulators is examined using the internal photoemission spectroscopy, which is based on observations of optically-induced electron (or hole transitions across the semiconductor/insulator barrier. Interfaces of various semiconductors ranging from the conventional silicon to the high-mobility Ge-based (Ge, Si1-xGex, Ge1-xSnx and AIIIBV group (GaAs, InxGa1-xAs, InAs, GaP, InP, GaSb, InSb materials were studied revealing several general trends in the evolution of band offsets. It is found that in the oxides of metals with cation radii larger than ≈0.7 Å, the oxide valence band top remains nearly at the same energy (±0.2 eV irrespective of the cation sort. Using this result, it becomes possible to predict the interface band alignment between oxides and semiconductors as well as between dissimilar insulating oxides on the basis of the oxide bandgap width which are also affected by crystallization. By contrast, oxides of light elements, for example, Be, Mg, Al, Si, and Sc exhibit significant shifts of the valence band top. General trends in band lineup variations caused by a change in the composition of semiconductor photoemission material are also revealed.

  1. Science Studies from Archived Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, T. P.; Manweiler, J. W.; Patterson, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Goals for spaceflight investigations include the discovery and characterization of physical features of the in- situ and remote environment. Abundant successes of flight investigations are easily documented. Prudent scientific practice dictates that to the maximum extent possible, observations should be well-characterized, reliably catalogued, and knowledgeably interpreted. This is especially true of data sets used in the publication of results in the reviewed literature. Typical scientific standards include making primary data numbers available to other investigators for replicated study. While NASA's contracts with investigators have required that data be submitted to agency official archives, the details, completeness (especially of ancillary and metadata) and forms differ from investigation to investigation and project to project. After several generations of improvements and refinements, modern computing and communications technology makes it possible to link multiple data sets at multiple locations through a unified data model. Virtual Observatories provide the overall organizational structures and SPASE-compliant XML defines the data granules that can be located. Proofs of the feasibility and value of this latest approach remain to be seen, but its ultimate goal of improving archival research using flight-derived data sets appears to depend on user acceptance and efficient use of the VxO resources. Criteria based on the authors experience in science derived from archival sources follow: 1. Interfaces and tools must be easy to learn, easy to use, and reliable. 2. Data numbers must be promptly downloadable in plain text. 3. Data must be available in or readily converted to physical units using calibrations and algorithms easily traceable as part of the search. Knowledge about (or heritage of) specific data items present in the science literature must be associated with the search for that item. 4. Data items must be trustworthy, having quoted uncertainties and

  2. Study of free-radical centers in lignin with 2-mm band ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzina, S.I.; Demidov, S.V.; Brezgunov, A.Yu.; Poluehktov, O.G.; Grinberg, O.Ya.; Dubinskij, A.A.; Mikhajlov, A.I.; Lebedev, Ya.S.

    1993-01-01

    The nature of paramagnetic centers in pristine lignin and lignin, treated with molecular chlorine, aqueous solutions of acids and alkalis, and γ- and UV-irradiated, was studied with 2-mm band ESR spectroscopy. Most of the observed singlet ESR lines are accounted for by radicals with conjugated bonds. High reactivity of double bonds of polyconjugated systems was in the processes studied

  3. Microscopic study of low-lying collective bands in 77Kr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extensive experimental studies of 77Kr have recently been performed by Sylvan et al [4] and Johnson et al [5] (see also refs [6,7]). These experimental studies have resulted in the identification of positive parity and negative parity collective bands up to very high spin. The ground state for 77Kr is based on K = 5/2+ with the.

  4. The effect of band Jahn-Teller distortion on the magnetoresistivity of manganites: a model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, G C; Panda, Saswati; Behera, S N

    2011-01-01

    We present a model study of magnetoresistance through the interplay of magnetisation, structural distortion and external magnetic field for the manganite systems. The manganite system is described by the Hamiltonian which consists of the s-d type double exchange interaction, Heisenberg spin-spin interaction among the core electrons, and the static and dynamic band Jahn-Teller (JT) interaction in the e g band. The relaxation time of the e g electron is found from the imaginary part of the Green's function using the total Hamiltonian consisting of the interactions due to the electron and phonon. The calculated resistivity exhibits a peak in the pure JT distorted insulating phase separating the low temperature metallic ferromagnetic phase and the high temperature paramagnetic phase. The resistivity is suppressed with the increase of the external magnetic field. The e g electron band splitting and its effect on magnetoresistivity is reported here. (paper)

  5. The effect of band Jahn-Teller distortion on the magnetoresistivity of manganites: a model study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rout, G C [Condensed Matter Physics Group, P G Department of Applied Physics and Ballistics, F M University, Balasore 756 019 (India); Panda, Saswati [Trident Academy of Technology, F2/A, Chandaka Industrial Estate, Bhubaneswar 751 024 (India); Behera, S N, E-mail: gcr@iopb.res.in, E-mail: saswatip7@gmail.com [National Institute of Science and Technology, Palur Hills, Berhampur 761 008 (India)

    2011-10-05

    We present a model study of magnetoresistance through the interplay of magnetisation, structural distortion and external magnetic field for the manganite systems. The manganite system is described by the Hamiltonian which consists of the s-d type double exchange interaction, Heisenberg spin-spin interaction among the core electrons, and the static and dynamic band Jahn-Teller (JT) interaction in the e{sub g} band. The relaxation time of the e{sub g} electron is found from the imaginary part of the Green's function using the total Hamiltonian consisting of the interactions due to the electron and phonon. The calculated resistivity exhibits a peak in the pure JT distorted insulating phase separating the low temperature metallic ferromagnetic phase and the high temperature paramagnetic phase. The resistivity is suppressed with the increase of the external magnetic field. The e{sub g} electron band splitting and its effect on magnetoresistivity is reported here. (paper)

  6. Ab initio electronic band structure study of III-VI layered semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olguín, Daniel; Rubio-Ponce, Alberto; Cantarero, Andrés

    2013-08-01

    We present a total energy study of the electronic properties of the rhombohedral γ-InSe, hexagonal ɛ-GaSe, and monoclinic GaTe layered compounds. The calculations have been done using the full potential linear augmented plane wave method, including spin-orbit interaction. The calculated valence bands of the three compounds compare well with angle resolved photoemission measurements and a discussion of the small discrepancies found has been given. The present calculations are also compared with recent and previous band structure calculations available in the literature for the three compounds. Finally, in order to improve the calculated band gap value we have used the recently proposed modified Becke-Johnson correction for the exchange-correlation potential.

  7. Infrared cross-sections and integrated band intensities of propylene: Temperature-dependent studies

    KAUST Repository

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami

    2014-01-01

    Propylene, a by-product of biomass burning, thermal cracking of hydrocarbons and incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, is a ubiquitous molecule found in the environment and atmosphere. Accurate infrared (IR) cross-sections and integrated band intensities of propylene are essential for quantitative measurements and atmospheric modeling. We measured absolute IR cross-sections of propylene using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy over the wavenumber range of 400-6500cm-1 and at gas temperatures between 296 and 460K. We recorded these spectra at spectral resolutions ranging from 0.08 to 0.5cm-1 and measured the integrated band intensities for a number of vibrational bands in certain spectral regions. We then compared the integrated band intensities measured at room temperature with values derived from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) databases. Our results agreed well with the results reported in the two databases with a maximum deviation of about 4%. The peak cross-sections for the primary bands decreased by about 20-54% when the temperature increased from 296 to 460K. Moreover, we determined the integrated band intensities as a function of temperature for certain features in various spectral regions; we found no significant temperature dependence over the range of temperatures considered here. We also studied the effect of temperature on absorption cross-section using a Difference Frequency Generation (DFG) laser system. We compared the DFG results with those obtained from the FTIR study at certain wavenumbers over the 2850-2975cm-1 range and found a reasonable agreement with less than 10% discrepancy. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. A STUDY ON THE MANAGEMENT OF DISPLACED FRACTURES OF PATELLA USING MODIFIED TENSION BAND WIRING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Babu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patella is an important component of the extensor mechanism of the knee. A patella fracture constitutes 1% of all skeletal fractures resulting from either direct or indirect trauma. Any improper and inadequate treatment would inevitably lead to a disability which would be most perceptibly felt in a country like India, where squatting is important activity in daily life. The goal of treatment is to regain the continuity of the extensor mechanism and congruity of patellofemoral a rticulation so that the normal function of the knee can be restored. Several techniques have been described for internal fixation of fractures of patella. The ideal fixation for the fracture patella is that it should be strong enough to allow early mobiliz ation, reduce posttraumatic stiffness and perhaps help the healing of the articular surface . AIMS: To analyze the functional outcome of displaced transverse fractures of the patella treated by Modified Tension Band Wiring principle (Muller using A. Dutta & S. K. Gupta Scoring System. To extend the application of Modified Tension Band wiring for minimally comminuted fractures of patella and assesses the results. CONCLUSION : The present study shows that modified tension band wiring (Muller is an effective p rocedure in the management of displaced transverse patellar fractures, with excellent to good results. Minimally comminuted patellar fractures also yielded excellent to good results with Modified tension band wiring as an extended application. The results in the present study are comparable to other modifications of Tension Band Wiring principle. The surgery of Modified Tension Band Wiring gives rigid fixation and helps in early mobilization. Regular and scheduled post- operative physiotherapy plays an impor tant role in the functional outcome.

  9. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter K-Band (26 GHz) Signal Analysis: Initial Study Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D. D.; Heckman, D.

    2017-11-01

    Lower frequency telemetry bands are becoming more limited in bandwidth due to increased competition between flight projects and other entities. Higher frequency bands offer significantly more bandwidth and hence the prospect of much higher data rates. Future or prospective flight projects considering higher frequency bands such as Ka-band (32 GHz) for deep-space and K-band (26 GHz) for near-Earth telemetry links are interested in past flight experience with available received data at these frequencies. Given that there is increased degradation due to the atmosphere at these higher frequencies, there is an effort to retrieve flight data of received signal strength to analyze performance under a variety of factors. Such factors include elevation angle, season, and atmospheric conditions. This article reports on the analysis findings of over 10 million observations of received signal strength of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft collected between 2014 and 2017. We analyzed these data to characterize link performance over a wide range of weather conditions, season, and as a function of elevation angle. Based on this analysis, we have confirmed the safety of using a 3-dB margin for preflight planning purposes. These results suggest that a 3-dB margin with respect to adverse conditions will ensure a 98 to 99 percent data return under 95 percent weather conditions at 26 GHz (K-band), thus confirming expectations from link budget predictions. The results suggest that this margin should be applicable for all elevation angles above 10 deg. Thus, missions that have sufficient power for their desired data rates may opt to use 10 deg as their minimum elevation angle. Limitations of this study include climate variability and the fact that the observations require removal of hotbody noise in order to perform an adequate cumulative distribution function (CDF) analysis, which is planned for a future comprehensive study. Flight projects may use other link margins

  10. Gastric band slippage: a case-controlled study comparing new and old radiographic signs of this important surgical complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, David W; Pietryga, Jason A; Grand, David J; Chang, Kevin J; Murphy, Brian L; Egglin, Thomas K

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of four radiographic signs of gastric band slippage: abnormal phi angle, the "O sign," inferior displacement of the superolateral gastric band margin, and presence of an air-fluid level above the gastric band. A search of the electronic medical record identified 21 patients with a surgically proven slipped gastric band and 63 randomly-selected asymptomatic gastric band patients who had undergone barium swallow studies. These studies were evaluated for the four signs of band slippage by two independent radiologists who were blinded to clinical data. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for each radiographic sign of band slippage. Interobserver agreement between radiologists was assessed using the Fleiss kappa statistic. In evaluating for gastric band slippage, an abnormal phi angle greater than 58° was 91-95% sensitive and 52-62% specific (κ = 0.78), the O sign was 33-48% sensitive but 97% specific (κ = 0.84), inferior displacement of the superolateral band margin by more than 2.4 cm from the diaphragm was 95% sensitive and 97-98% specific (κ = 0.97), and the presence of an air-fluid level was 95% sensitive and 100% specific (κ = 1.00). We report two previously undescribed radiographic signs of gastric band slippage that are both sensitive and specific for this important surgical complication and recommend that these signs should be incorporated into the imaging evaluation of gastric band patients.

  11. A study of science leadership and science standards in exemplary standards-based science programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Wendy Renae

    The purpose for conducting this qualitative study was to explore best practices of exemplary standards-based science programs and instructional leadership practices in a charter high school and in a traditional high school. The focus of this study included how twelve participants aligned practices to National Science Education Standards to describe their science programs and science instructional practices. This study used a multi-site case study qualitative design. Data were obtained through a review of literature, interviews, observations, review of educational documents, and researcher's notes collected in a field log. The methodology used was a multi-site case study because of the potential, through cross analysis, for providing greater explanation of the findings in the study (Merriam, 1988). This study discovered six characteristics about the two high school's science programs that enhance the literature found in the National Science Education Standards; (a) Culture of expectations for learning-In exemplary science programs teachers are familiar with a wide range of curricula. They have the ability to examine critically and select activities to use with their students to promote the understanding of science; (b) Culture of varied experiences-In exemplary science programs students are provided different paths to learning, which help students, take in information and make sense of concepts and skills that are set forth by the standards; (c) Culture of continuous feedback-In exemplary science programs teachers and students work together to engage students in ongoing assessments of their work and that of others as prescribed in the standards; (d) Culture of Observations-In exemplary science programs students, teachers, and principals reflect on classroom instructional practices; teachers receive ongoing evaluations about their teaching and apply feedback towards improving practices as outlined in the standards; (e) Culture of continuous learning-In exemplary

  12. A case study on large-scale dynamical influence on bright band using cloud radar during the Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ambuj K.; Kalapureddy, M. C. R.; Devisetty, Hari Krishna; Deshpande, Sachin M.; Pandithurai, G.

    2018-02-01

    The present study is a first of its kind attempt in exploring the physical features (e.g., height, width, intensity, duration) of tropical Indian bright band using a Ka-band cloud radar under the influence of large-scale cyclonic circulation and attempts to explain the abrupt changes in bright band features, viz., rise in the bright band height by 430 m and deepening of the bright band by about 300 m observed at around 14:00 UTC on Sep 14, 2016, synoptically as well as locally. The study extends the utility of cloud radar to understand how the bright band features are associated with light precipitation, ranging from 0 to 1.5 mm/h. Our analysis of the precipitation event of Sep 14-15, 2016 shows that the bright band above (below) 3.7 km, thickness less (more) than 300 m can potentially lead to light drizzle of 0-0.25 mm/h (drizzle/light rain) at the surface. It is also seen that the cloud radar may be suitable for bright band study within light drizzle limits than under higher rain conditions. Further, the study illustrates that the bright band features can be determined using the polarimetric capability of the cloud radar. It is shown that an LDR value of - 22 dB can be associated with the top height of bright band in the Ka-band observations which is useful in the extraction of the bright band top height and its width. This study is useful for understanding the bright band phenomenon and could be potentially useful in establishing the bright band-surface rain relationship through the perspective of a cloud radar, which would be helpful to enhance the cloud radar-based quantitative estimates of precipitation.

  13. An Observational Study of Intermediate Band Students' Self-Regulated Practice Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksza, Peter; Prichard, Stephanie; Sorbo, Diana

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate intermediate musicians' self-regulated practice behaviors. Thirty sixth- through eighth-grade students were observed practicing band repertoire individually for 20 min. Practice sessions were coded according to practice frame frequency and duration, length of musical passage selected, most prominent…

  14. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-20

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ~ 7 eV) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν >/~ 400 eV) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of CeMIn5(M = Rh, Ir, and Co) and YbRh2Si2 with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant U5f compounds such as UFeGa5, their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all U5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized U5f compounds such as UPd3 and UO2 are essentially explained by the localized model that treats U5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion U-based compounds such as the hidden-order compound URu2Si2, their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures are generally well-explained by the band-structure calculation, whereas the states in the vicinity of EF show some deviations due to electron correlation effects. Furthermore, the electronic structures of URu2Si2 in the paramagnetic and hidden-order phases are

  15. A Passive Microwave L-Band Boreal Forest Freeze/Thaw and Vegetation Phenology Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A.; Sonnentag, O.; Pappas, C.; Mavrovic, A.; Royer, A.; Berg, A. A.; Rowlandson, T. L.; Lemay, J.; Helgason, W.; Barr, A.; Black, T. A.; Derksen, C.; Toose, P.

    2016-12-01

    The boreal forest is the second largest land biome in the world and thus plays a major role in the global and regional climate systems. The extent, timing and duration of seasonal freeze/thaw (F/T) state influences vegetation developmental stages (phenology) and, consequently, constitute an important control on how boreal forest ecosystems exchange carbon, water and energy with the atmosphere. The effective retrieval of seasonal F/T state from L-Band radiometry was demonstrated using satellite mission. However, disentangling the seasonally differing contributions from forest overstory and understory vegetation, and the soil surface to the satellite signal remains challenging. Here we present initial results from a radiometer field campaign to improve our understanding of the L-Band derived boreal forest F/T signal and vegetation phenology. Two L-Band surface-based radiometers (SBR) are installed on a micrometeorological tower at the Southern Old Black Spruce site in central Saskatchewan over the 2016-2017 F/T season. One radiometer unit is installed on the flux tower so it views forest including all overstory and understory vegetation and the moss-covered ground surface. A second radiometer unit is installed within the boreal forest overstory, viewing the understory and the ground surface. The objectives of our study are (i) to disentangle the L-Band F/T signal contribution of boreal forest overstory from the understory and ground surface, (ii) to link the L-Band F/T signal to related boreal forest structural and functional characteristics, and (iii) to investigate the use of the L-Band signal to characterize boreal forest carbon, water and energy fluxes. The SBR observations above and within the forest canopy are used to retrieve the transmissivity (γ) and the scattering albedo (ω), two parameters that describe the emission of the forest canopy though the F/T season. These two forest parameters are compared with boreal forest structural and functional

  16. Study of LEO-SAT microwave link for broad-band mobile satellite communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujise, Masayuki; Chujo, Wataru; Chiba, Isamu; Furuhama, Yoji; Kawabata, Kazuaki; Konishi, Yoshihiko

    1993-01-01

    In the field of mobile satellite communications, a system based on low-earth-orbit satellites (LEO-SAT's) such as the Iridium system has been proposed. The LEO-SAT system is able to offer mobile telecommunication services in high-latitude areas. Rain degradation, fading and shadowing are also expected to be decreased when the system is operated at a high elevation angle. Furthermore, the propagation delay generated in the LEO-SAT system is less pronounced than that in the geostationary orbit satellite (GEO-SAT) system and, in voice services, the effect of the delay is almost negligible. We proposed a concept of a broad-band mobile satellite communication system with LEO-SAT's and Optical ISL. In that system, a fixed L-band (1.6/1.5 GHz) multibeam is used to offer narrow band service to the mobile terminals in the entire area covered by a LEO-SAT and steerable Ka-band (30/20 GHz) spot beams are used for the wide band service. In this paper, we present results of a study of LEO-SAT microwave link between a satellite and a mobile terminal for a broad-band mobile satellite communication system. First, the results of link budget calculations are presented and the antennas mounted on satellites are shown. For a future mobile antenna technology, we also show digital beamforming (DBF) techniques. DBF, together with modulation and/or demodulation, is becoming a key technique for mobile antennas with advanced functions such as antenna pattern calibration, correction, and radio interference suppression. In this paper, efficient DBF techniques for transmitting and receiving are presented. Furthermore, an adaptive array antenna system suitable for this LEO-SAT is presented.

  17. Metal release profiles of orthodontic bands, brackets, and wires: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendl, B; Wiltsche, H; Lankmayr, E; Winsauer, H; Walter, A; Muchitsch, A; Jakse, N; Wendl, M; Wendl, T

    2017-11-01

    The present study evaluated the temporal release of Co Cr, Mn, and Ni from the components of a typical orthodontic appliance during simulated orthodontic treatment. Several commercially available types of bands, brackets, and wires were exposed to an artificial saliva solution for at least 44 days and the metals released were quantified in regular intervals using inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, Elan DRC+, Perkin Elmer, USA). Corrosion products encountered on some products were investigated by a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalyzer (EDX). Bands released the largest quantities of Co, Cr, Mn, and Ni, followed by brackets and wires. Three different temporal metal release profiles were observed: (1) constant, though not necessarily linear release, (2) saturation (metal release stopped after a certain time), and (3) an intermediate release profile that showed signs of saturation without reaching saturation. These temporal metal liberation profiles were found to be strongly dependent on the individual test pieces. The corrosion products which developed on some of the bands after a 6-month immersion in artificial saliva and the different metal release profiles of the investigated bands were traced back to different attachments welded onto the bands. The use of constant release rates will clearly underestimate metal intake by the patient during the first couple of days and overestimate exposure during the remainder of the treatment which is usually several months long. While our data are consistent with heavy metal release by orthodontic materials at levels well below typical dietary intake, we nevertheless recommend the use of titanium brackets and replacement of the band with a tube in cases of severe Ni or Cr allergy.

  18. In-beam γ-spectroscopic study of rotational bands in 103Rh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuti, I.; Timar, J.; Sohler, D.; Koike, T.; Lee, I.Y.; Machiavelli, A.O.

    2012-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Earlier studies revealed the existence of chiral partner candidate bands in 103 Rh. In order to construct a more complex level scheme, and to collect more information on the band structure, we studied the experimental properties of the rotational bands of this nucleus. For this analysis, excited states of 103 Rh were populated through the 96 Zr( 11 B,4n) reaction at a beam energy of 40 MeV. The beam, provided by the 88-in. cyclotron of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), impinged on a 500 μg/cm 2 self-supporting target foil. For detection of the emitted γ-rays, the GAMMASPHERE spectrometer was used. Out of a sum of 9x10 9 events, about the 65% could be assigned to 103 Rh. In the present phase of the study, the level scheme was constructed based on γγγ-coincidence relationships, as well as energy and intensity balances of the observed γ-rays. The analysis included the evaluation of 2- and 3-dimensional histograms, using the RADWARE software package. Three typical γγγ-coincidence spectra are shown in Figure 1. We doubled the number of transitions assigned to 103 Rh and we established five new bands to the formerly known six ones. In order to assign firm spin-parities to the states, we plan to make an angular correlation (DCO) analysis for the observed transitions.

  19. A prospective study of outcome from rubber band ligation of piles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longman, R J; Thomson, W H F

    2006-02-01

    With the recent introduction of stapled anopexy it is timely to review the benefits of existing treatment options for piles. This study investigates the effectiveness and safety of rubber band ligation (RBL) of piles in the outpatient setting. Two hundred and fifty-two consecutive patients referred with piles in an 18-month period were studied prospectively. In those patients deemed suitable for banding of piles, data were collected on symptoms, proctoscopic appearance and degree of piles. Short and long-term outcome data were recorded for success of treatment and complications. Of 203 patients considered suitable and who attended for RBL, 176 kept their follow-up appointment. One hundred and forty-eight (84%) had been rendered symptom-free. A third of patients, however, had proctoscopic evidence of persistent piles, whilst in half of those patients with continuing symptoms the anal cushions appeared normal. Six (3%) patients had suffered a complication. Long-term follow-up by questionnaire found that 44% of respondents remained asymptomatic at a median of 46 months from banding. Six (5%) of 117 responders to the questionnaire had, though previously normal, suffered a postbanding impairment of continence. Most patients with piles of any degree can be safely managed by rubber band ligation, but return of symptoms in the long term affects more than half of patients treated.

  20. Cohort studies in health sciences librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, Jonathan

    2002-10-01

    What are the key characteristics of the cohort study design and its varied applications, and how can this research design be utilized in health sciences librarianship? The health, social, behavioral, biological, library, earth, and management sciences literatures were used as sources. All fields except for health sciences librarianship were scanned topically for either well-known or diverse applications of the cohort design. The health sciences library literature available to the author principally for the years 1990 to 2000, supplemented by papers or posters presented at annual meetings of the Medical Library Association. A narrative review for the health, social, behavioral, biological, earth, and management sciences literatures and a systematic review for health sciences librarianship literature for the years 1990 to 2000, with three exceptions, were conducted. The author conducted principally a manual search of the health sciences librarianship literature for the years 1990 to 2000 as part of this systematic review. The cohort design has been applied to answer a wide array of theoretical or practical research questions in the health, social, behavioral, biological, and management sciences. Health sciences librarianship also offers several major applications of the cohort design. The cohort design has great potential for answering research questions in the field of health sciences librarianship, particularly evidence-based librarianship (EBL), although that potential has not been fully explored.

  1. Different Traditions in the Study of Disciplinarity in Science--Science and Technology Studies, Library and Information Science and Scientometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojevic, Staša

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Disciplinarity and other forms of differentiation in science have long been studied in the fields of science and technology studies, information science and scientometrics. However, it is not obvious whether these fields are building on each other's findings. Methods: An analysis is made of 609 articles on disciplinarity…

  2. Comparative study of the two-phonon Raman bands of silicene and graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, Valentin N; Lambin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational study of the two-phonon Raman spectra of silicene and graphene within a density-functional non-orthogonal tight-binding model. Due to the presence of linear bands close to the Fermi energy in the electronic structure of both structures, the Raman scattering by phonons is resonant. We find that the Raman spectra exhibit a crossover behavior for laser excitation close to the π-plasmon energy. This phenomenon is explained by the disappearance of certain paths for resonant Raman scattering and the appearance of other paths beyond this energy. Besides that, the electronic joint density of states (DOS) is divergent at this energy, which is reflected on the behavior of the Raman bands of the two structures in a qualitatively different way. Additionally, a number of Raman bands, originating from divergent phonon DOS at the M point and at points, inside the Brillouin zone, is also predicted. The calculated spectra for graphene are in excellent agreement with available experimental data. The obtained Raman bands can be used for structural characterization of silicene and graphene samples by Raman spectroscopy. (paper)

  3. Gamma band oscillations under influence of bromazepam during a sensorimotor integration task: an EEG coherence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minc, Daniel; Machado, Sergio; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Machado, Dionis; Cunha, Marlo; Cagy, Mauricio; Budde, Henning; Basile, Luis; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2010-01-18

    The goal of the present study was to explore the dynamics of the gamma band using the coherence of the quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) in a sensorimotor integration task and the influence of the neuromodulator bromazepam on the band behavior. Our hypothesis is that the needs of the typewriting task will demand the coupling of different brain areas, and that the gamma band will promote the binding of information. It is also expected that the neuromodulator will modify this coupling. The sample was composed of 39 healthy subjects. We used a randomized double-blind design and divided subjects into three groups: placebo (n=13), bromazepam 3mg (n=13) and bromazepam 6 mg (n=13). The two-way ANOVA analysis demonstrated a main effect for the factors condition (i.e., C4-CZ electrode pair) and moment (i.e., C3-CZ, C3-C4 and C4-CZ pairs of electrodes). We propose that the gamma band plays an important role in the binding among several brain areas in complex motor tasks and that each hemisphere is influenced in a different manner by the neuromodulator. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Study on rotational bands in odd-odd nuclei 102,l04Nb by using PSM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yongsheng; Hu Wentao; Feng Youliang; Wang Jinbao; Yu Shaoying; Shen Caiwan

    2012-01-01

    The Projected Shell Model (PSM) is used to study the low energy scheme of the neutron-rich normal-deformed isotopes of odd-odd nuclei 102,104 Nb. The quasiparticle configuration is assigned. The theoretical calculations of the energy band of 102,104 Nb could well reproduce the experimental data. It is shown that PSM is a valid method for studying the low energy scheme of heavy nuclei. (authors)

  5. Empowering Later Adulthood Music Education: A Case Study of a Rock Band for Third-Age Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laes, Tuulikki

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a case study of a group of approximately 70-year-old women who are learning to play rock band instruments in a formal music school context. The study examines the individual and shared meanings that the participants assigned to taking part in the rock band. The study aligns with John Dewey's view that the meanings of present…

  6. An Application of Multi-band Forced Photometry to One Square Degree of SERVS: Accurate Photometric Redshifts and Implications for Future Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyland, Kristina; Lacy, Mark [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Sajina, Anna [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Pforr, Janine [ESA/ESTEC SCI-S, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Farrah, Duncan [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Wilson, Gillian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California-Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA, 92521 (United States); Surace, Jason [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, M/S 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Häußler, Boris [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Vaccari, Mattia [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of the Western Cape, Robert Sobukwe Road, 7535 Bellville, Cape Town (South Africa); Jarvis, Matt, E-mail: knyland@nrao.edu [Department of Physics, Oxford Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    We apply The Tractor image modeling code to improve upon existing multi-band photometry for the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). SERVS consists of post-cryogenic Spitzer observations at 3.6 and 4.5 μ m over five well-studied deep fields spanning 18 deg{sup 2}. In concert with data from ground-based near-infrared (NIR) and optical surveys, SERVS aims to provide a census of the properties of massive galaxies out to z  ≈ 5. To accomplish this, we are using The Tractor to perform “forced photometry.” This technique employs prior measurements of source positions and surface brightness profiles from a high-resolution fiducial band from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations survey to model and fit the fluxes at lower-resolution bands. We discuss our implementation of The Tractor over a square-degree test region within the XMM Large Scale Structure field with deep imaging in 12 NIR/optical bands. Our new multi-band source catalogs offer a number of advantages over traditional position-matched catalogs, including (1) consistent source cross-identification between bands, (2) de-blending of sources that are clearly resolved in the fiducial band but blended in the lower resolution SERVS data, (3) a higher source detection fraction in each band, (4) a larger number of candidate galaxies in the redshift range 5 <  z  < 6, and (5) a statistically significant improvement in the photometric redshift accuracy as evidenced by the significant decrease in the fraction of outliers compared to spectroscopic redshifts. Thus, forced photometry using The Tractor offers a means of improving the accuracy of multi-band extragalactic surveys designed for galaxy evolution studies. We will extend our application of this technique to the full SERVS footprint in the future.

  7. An Ecological Study on the Introduction of the Banded Sculpin Into a Coal Flyash Impacted Stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrico, B.A.; Ryon, M.G.

    1996-02-01

    A number of banded sculpins [Cottus carolinae (Gill)] were obtained from a population in a reference stream, marked with subcutaneous acrylic paint injections, and introduced into McCoy Branch, a small second-order stream located on the Oak Ridge Reservation in eastern Tennessee, which was inhabited by only a few banded sculpins prior to the study. McCoy Branch had received deposits of coal ash slurry for a prolonged period, however, there were some indications of recovery in the macroinvertebrate community due to improvements in water quality. Stream habitat characteristics and water chemistry parameters were monitored in McCoy Branch and a reference stream for a three-year period. Feeding patterns and reproductive activities of the banded sculpins were also monitored during the study. Sculpin population parameters including density, condition factor, and young-of-year (YOY) abundance and survival were studied. The results of the study show that the introduced fish have survived and appear to be in good condition. The sculpins have maintained a density of approximately 0.12 fish per square meter of stream, a figure similar to that found in other headwater streams located in the region. Colonization rates and sculpin densities in McCoy Branch were lower than expected, perhaps due to physical habitat degradation and reduced macroinvertebrate abundance. Evidence of sculpin reproduction in McCoy Branch was seen in the presence of gravid female sculpins (1994 and 1995) and YOY fish (1993 through 1995 year classes). This study indicates that McCoy Branch continues to recover from past perturbations to the point where it can now support a viable population of banded sculpins

  8. An Ecological Study on the Introduction of the Banded Sculpin Into a Coal Flyash Impacted Stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrico, B.A.; Ryon, M.G.

    1996-02-01

    A number of banded sculpins [Cottus carolinae (Gill)] were obtained from a population in a reference stream, marked with subcutaneous acrylic paint injections, and introduced into McCoy Branch, a small second-order stream located on the Oak Ridge Reservation in eastern Tennessee, which was inhabited by only a few banded sculpins prior to the study. McCoy Branch had received deposits of coal ash slurry for a prolonged period, however, there were some indications of recovery in the macroinvertebrate community due to improvements in water quality. Stream habitat characteristics and water chemistry parameters were monitored in McCoy Branch and a reference stream for a three-year period. Feeding patterns and reproductive activities of the banded sculpins were also monitored during the study. Sculpin population parameters including density, condition factor, and young-of-year (YOY) abundance and survival were studied. The results of the study show that the introduced fish have survived and appear to be in good condition. The sculpins have maintained a density of approximately 0.12 fish per square meter of stream, a figure similar to that found in other headwater streams located in the region. Colonization rates and sculpin densities in McCoy Branch were lower than expected, perhaps due to physical habitat degradation and reduced macroinvertebrate abundance. Evidence of sculpin reproduction in McCoy Branch was seen in the presence of gravid female sculpins (1994 and 1995) and YOY fish (1993 through 1995 year classes). This study indicates that McCoy Branch continues to recover from past perturbations to the point where it can now support a viable population of banded sculpins.

  9. Study of sub band gap absorption of Sn doped CdSe thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Rani, Mamta; Tripathi, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    The nanocrystalline thin films of Sn doped CdSe at different dopants concentration are prepared by thermal evaporation technique on glass substrate at room temperature. The effect of Sn doping on the optical properties of CdSe has been studied. A decrease in band gap value is observed with increase in Sn concentration. Constant photocurrent method (CPM) is used to study the absorption coefficient in the sub band gap region. Urbach energy has been obtained from CPM spectra which are found to increase with amount of Sn dopants. The refractive index data calculated from transmittance is used for the identification of oscillator strength and oscillator energy using single oscillator model which is found to be 7.7 and 2.12 eV, 6.7 and 2.5 eV for CdSe:Sn 1% and CdSe:Sn 5% respectively

  10. A first principle study of band structure of III-nitride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Rashid [Centre for High Energy Physics University of the Punjab, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan)]. E-mail: rasofi@hotmail.com; Akbarzadeh, H. [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, 841546 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fazal-e-Aleem [Centre for High Energy Physics University of the Punjab, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan)

    2005-12-15

    The band structure of both phases, zinc-blende and wurtzite, of aluminum nitride, indium nitride and gallium nitride has been studied using computational methods. The study has been done using first principle full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method, within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). For the exchange correlation potential, generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and an alternative form of GGA proposed by Engel and Vosko (GGA-EV) have been used. Results obtained for band structure of these compounds have been compared with experimental results as well as other first principle computations. Our results show a significant improvement over other theoretical work and are closer to the experimental data.

  11. Study of sub band gap absorption of Sn doped CdSe thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Rani, Mamta [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh- 160014 (India); Tripathi, S. K., E-mail: surya@pu.ac.in [Centre of Advanced Study in Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh- 160014 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The nanocrystalline thin films of Sn doped CdSe at different dopants concentration are prepared by thermal evaporation technique on glass substrate at room temperature. The effect of Sn doping on the optical properties of CdSe has been studied. A decrease in band gap value is observed with increase in Sn concentration. Constant photocurrent method (CPM) is used to study the absorption coefficient in the sub band gap region. Urbach energy has been obtained from CPM spectra which are found to increase with amount of Sn dopants. The refractive index data calculated from transmittance is used for the identification of oscillator strength and oscillator energy using single oscillator model which is found to be 7.7 and 2.12 eV, 6.7 and 2.5 eV for CdSe:Sn 1% and CdSe:Sn 5% respectively.

  12. Banded versus Single-sided bonded space maintainers: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Mittal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study is conducted to evaluate and compare the clinical performance of conventional band and loop space maintainer and fiber reinforced composite resin (FRCR space maintainers. Materials and Methods: A total of 45 extraction sites in the age group of 6–9 years having premature loss of primary molars or indicated for extraction were selected for the study. The patients were randomly divided into three groups as Group I, in which conventional band and loop space maintainer was given, Group II and Group III (FRCR, in which FRCR (everStick CandB and impregnated glass fibers (Interlig space maintainers were given, respectively. Patients were recalled at 3, 6, and 12-month interval for evaluation of all the three types of space maintainer. Results: Overall success rate of Group I was 86.7%, for Group II was 80%, and for Group III was 73.3% at the end of the study. Patient acceptability was significantly higher in Group II and Group III (FRCR as compared to Group I (Conventional band and loop. In Group I, cement loss and fracture of loop, whereas in Group II and Group III, debonding at enamel composite was the most common failure followed by debonding at fiber composite and fiber fracture. FRCR space maintainers were found to be cost-effective as compared to Group I. More linear changes and angular changes were recorded in Group I as compared to Group II and Group III but difference was not significant (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Only single (buccal surface application of FRCR space maintainers showed almost equal clinical efficacy compared to conventional band and loop space maintainer with significantly better patient acceptability, less cost, and time taken.

  13. The handbook of science and technology studies

    CERN Document Server

    Fouché, Rayvon; Miller, Clark A; Smith-Doerr, Laurel

    2017-01-01

    Science and Technology Studies (STS) is a flourishing interdisciplinary field that examines the transformative power of science and technology to arrange and rearrange contemporary societies. The Handbook of Science and Technology Studies provides a comprehensive and authoritative overview of the field, reviewing current research and major theoretical and methodological approaches in a way that is accessible to both new and established scholars from a range of disciplines. This new edition, sponsored by the Society for Social Studies of Science, is the fourth in a series of volumes that have defined the field of STS. It features 36 chapters, each written for the fourth edition, that capture the state of the art in a rich and rapidly growing field. One especially notable development is the increasing integration of feminist, gender, and postcolonial studies into the body of STS knowledge. The book covers methods and participatory practices in STS research; mechanisms by which knowledge, people, and societies ...

  14. Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices studied by Brillouin light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubbiotti, G.; Tacchi, S. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IOM-CNR), Sede di Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Montoncello, F.; Giovannini, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Ferrara, Via G. Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Madami, M.; Carlotti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Ding, J.; Adeyeye, A. O. [Information Storage Materials Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2015-06-29

    The Brillouin light scattering technique has been exploited to study the angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of squared Permalloy antidot lattice. Frequency dispersion of spin waves has been measured for a set of fixed wave vector magnitudes, while varying the wave vector in-plane orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field. The magnonic band gap between the two most dispersive modes exhibits a minimum value at an angular position, which exclusively depends on the product between the selected wave vector magnitude and the lattice constant of the array. The experimental data are in very good agreement with predictions obtained by dynamical matrix method calculations. The presented results are relevant for magnonic devices where the antidot lattice, acting as a diffraction grating, is exploited to achieve multidirectional spin wave emission.

  15. Spectroscopic studies on novel donor-acceptor and low band-gap polymeric semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cravino, A.

    2002-11-01

    Novel low band-gap conjugated polymeric semiconductors as well as conjugated electron donor chains carrying electron acceptor substituents were electrochemically prepared and investigated by means of different spectroscopic techniques. Using in situ FTIR and ESR spectroelectrochemistry, the spectroscopic features of injected positive charges are found to be different as opposed to the negative charge carriers on the same conjugated polymer. These results, for which the theoretical models so far developed do not account, demonstrate the different structure and delocalization of charge carriers with opposite signs. In addition, vibrational spectroscopy results proof the enhanced 'quinoid' character of low band-gap conjugated chains. Excited state spectroscopy was applied to study photoexcitations in conjugated polymers carrying tetracyanoanthraquinone type or fullerene moieties. This novel class of materials, hereafter called double-cable polymers, was found promising as alternative to the conjugated polymer:fullerene mixtures currently used for the preparation of 'bulk-heterojunction' polymeric solar cells. (author)

  16. Study of yrast bands and electromagnetic properties in neutron-rich 114-128Cd isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Ritu; Pandit, Rakesh K.; Devi, Rani; Khosa, S. K.

    2018-02-01

    The projected shell model framework has been employed to carry out a systematic study on the deformation systematics of E (21+) and E (41+) / E (21+) values, BCS subshell occupation numbers, yrast spectra, backbending phenomena and electromagnetic quantities in 114-128Cd isotopes. Present calculations reproduce the observed systematics of the E (21+), R42 and B (E 2 ;2+ →0+) values for 114-128Cd isotopic mass chain and give the evidence that deformation increases as one moves from 114Cd to 118Cd, thereafter it decreases up to 126Cd. This in turn confirms 118Cd to be the most deformed nucleus in this set of isotopic mass chain. The emergence of backbending, decrease in B (E 2) values and change in g-factors in all these isotopes are intimately related to the crossing of g-band by 2-qp bands.

  17. How narrow-band and broad-band uvb irradiation influences the immunohistochemistry analyses of experimental animals’ skin – a comparative study. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Borowska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This is the second part of the artcle series impact narrow-band UVB radiation (NB-UVB and broad-band UVB radiation (BB-UVB on experimental animals’ skin (white Wistar female rats. The aim of this comparative study was immunohistochemistry analyses containing expression of p53 protein. Expression of p53 protein was performed on two experimental groups. One – exposed to NB-UVB; the other – exposed to BB-UVB radiation. The results indicate that p53 protein takes an active part in the process of apoptosis that is induced by both NB-UVB and BB-UVB. The results showed an increase in p53 expressing cells following BB-UVB than NB-UVB phototherapy.

  18. Experimental study of the 2p-2h band in 111Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, S.; Banerjee, P.; Ray, I.; Kshetri, R.; Raut, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Saha-Sarkar, M.; Goswami, A.; Basu, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    The ΔI=2 intruder band in 111 Sn, built upon the 4074.3 keV state, was studied. The states were populated in the 100 Mo( 20 Ne, α5n) reaction at a beam energy of 136 MeV. Mean lifetimes of five states up to 8737.2 keV (spin 43/2 - ) have been measured for the first time using the Doppler shift attenuation method. In addition, an upper limit of mean lifetime has been estimated for the 9860.0 keV (spin 47/2 - ) state. The B(E2) values, derived from the present lifetime results, indicate a quadrupole deformation of β 2 =0.28±0.02 for the 31/2 - state and decrease progressively with spin, suggesting a reduction in collectivity. The dynamic moment of inertia for the band also decreases continuously up to the highest observed frequencies. These results, along with the predictions of a total Routhian surface calculation, suggest that the ΔI=2 band in 111 Sn undergoes a change of shape from collective prolate to triaxial with increase in spin and possibly terminates in a noncollective oblate state at a high spin

  19. Theoretical and experimental studies of the ZnSe/CuInSe2 heterojunction band offset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A.J.; Schwerdtfeger, C.R.; Wei, S.; Zunger, A.; Rioux, D.; Patel, R.; Hoechst, H.

    1993-01-01

    We report first-principles band structure calculations that show that ZnSe/CuInSe 2 has a significant valence band offset (VBO, ΔE v ): 0.70±0.05 eV for the relaxed interface and 0.60±0.05 eV for the coherent interface. These large values demonstrate the failure of the common anion rule. This is traced to a stronger Cu,d-Se,p level repulsion in CuInSe 2 than the Zn,d-Se,p repulsion in ZnSe. The VBO was then studied by synchrotron radiation soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. ZnSe overlayers were sequentially grown in steps on n-type CuInSe 2 (112) single crystals at 200 degree C. In situ photoemission measurements were acquired after each growth in order to observe changes in the valence band electronic structure as well as changes in the In 4d and Zn 3d core lines. Results of these measurements reveal that the VBO is ΔE v =0.70±0.15 eV, in good agreement with the first-principles prediction

  20. Electromagnetic Compatibility Studies: LTE BS vs. Aeronautical Radionavigation Services in 694-790 MHz Frequency Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stankevičius Evaldas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the sharing analysis of the 694–790 MHz frequency band for Mobile services IMT and Aeronautical radio-navigation services (ARNS using SEAMCAT (established by CEPT software based on the statistical simulation (Monte-Carlo method. In 2012 the World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-12 decided to allocate the 694–790 MHz frequency band (the so-called 700 MHz band to mobile services IMT (excluding aeronautical mobile after WRC-15 conference. But this agreement raises electromagnetic compatibility problems, which should be solved until WRC-15 [1]. This study was carried out in two phases: first applying theoretical analysis, then statistical Monte-Carlo simulations with SEAMCAT software tool in order to verify results obtained in theoretical approach. Analytical calculations shows that the required protection distances between ARNS stations and the MS base stations are 132 km. The obtained results from SEAMCAT simulations indicate that separation distance should be above 100 km. These results illustrate that the systems are not electromagnetically compatible. The possible mitigation technic could be antenna pattern correction.

  1. Experimental Studies of W-Band Accelerator Structures at High Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Marc E

    2001-02-09

    A high-gradient electron accelerator is desired for high-energy physics research, where frequency scalings of breakdown and trapping of itinerant beamline particles dictates operation of the accelerator at short wavelengths. The first results of design and test of a high-gradient mm-wave linac with an operating frequency at 91.392 GHz (W-band) are presented. A novel approach to particle acceleration is presented employing a planar, dielectric lined waveguide used for particle acceleration. The traveling wave fields in the planar dielectric accelerator (PDA) are analyzed for an idealized structure, along with a circuit equivalent model used for understanding the structure as a microwave circuit. Along with the W-band accelerator structures, other components designed and tested are high power rf windows, high power attenuators, and a high power squeeze-type phase shifter. The design of the accelerator and its components where eased with the aide of numerical simulations using a finite-difference electromagnetic field solver. Manufacturing considerations of the small, delicate mm-wave components and the steps taken to reach a robust fabrication process are detailed. These devices were characterized under low power using a two-port vector network analyzer to verify tune and match, including measurements of the structures' fields using a bead-pull. The measurements are compared with theory throughout. Addition studies of the W-band structures were performed under high power utilizing a 11.424 GHz electron linac as a current source. Test results include W-band power levels of 200 kW, corresponding to fields in the PDA of over 20 MV/m, a higher gradient than any collider. Planar accelerator devices naturally have an rf quadrupole component of the accelerating field. Presented for the first time are the measurements of this effect.

  2. Enabling recruitment success in bariatric surgical trials: pilot phase of the By-Band-Sleeve study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramasivan, S; Rogers, C A; Welbourn, R; Byrne, J P; Salter, N; Mahon, D; Noble, H; Kelly, J; Mazza, G; Whybrow, P; Andrews, R C; Wilson, C; Blazeby, J M; Donovan, J L

    2017-11-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving surgical procedures are challenging for recruitment and infrequent in the specialty of bariatrics. The pilot phase of the By-Band-Sleeve study (gastric bypass versus gastric band versus sleeve gastrectomy) provided the opportunity for an investigation of recruitment using a qualitative research integrated in trials (QuinteT) recruitment intervention (QRI). The QRI investigated recruitment in two centers in the pilot phase comparing bypass and banding, through the analysis of 12 in-depth staff interviews, 84 audio recordings of patient consultations, 19 non-participant observations of consultations and patient screening data. QRI findings were developed into a plan of action and fed back to centers to improve information provision and recruitment organization. Recruitment proved to be extremely difficult with only two patients recruited during the first 2 months. The pivotal issue in Center A was that an effective and established clinical service could not easily adapt to the needs of the RCT. There was little scope to present RCT details or ensure efficient eligibility assessment, and recruiters struggled to convey equipoise. Following presentation of QRI findings, recruitment in Center A increased from 9% in the first 2 months (2/22) to 40% (26/65) in the 4 months thereafter. Center B, commencing recruitment 3 months after Center A, learnt from the emerging issues in Center A and set up a special clinic for trial recruitment. The trial successfully completed pilot recruitment and progressed to the main phase across 11 centers. The QRI identified key issues that enabled the integration of the trial into the clinical setting. This contributed to successful recruitment in the By-Band-Sleeve trial-currently the largest in bariatric practice-and offers opportunities to optimize recruitment in other trials in bariatrics.

  3. X- and Q-band EPR studies on fine powders of irradiated plants. New approach for detection of their radiation history by using Q-band EPR spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Aleksieva, Katerina

    2004-01-01

    X- and Q-band EPR studies after γ-irradiation of some dry spices and aromatic herbs are reported. Before irradiation all samples show only one singlet line in X-band EPR, whereas the Q-band EPR spectrum of the same samples is a superposition of two individual spectra--one corresponding to the above EPR signal, with an anisotropic spectrum, and a second one consisting of six lines due to the Mn 2+ naturally present in plants. The radiation induced EPR signal due to cellulose free radicals was not detected after γ-irradiation, but only the increase of the natural signal present before the irradiation. The fading kinetic of this EPR signal was monitored in three cases--when samples were kept in plastic bags without any special conditioning after irradiation, when samples were covered with paraffin before irradiation and when samples were dried at 60 deg. C for 1 h before irradiation. The studies show that stability of radiation induced EPR signals decreases in the order of: paraffin covered > heated before irradiation > kept at room conditions. The two EPR spectra in the Q-band--one with radiation dependent intensity and a second due to Mn 2+ , which is radiation independent allow identification of previous radiation treatment based on the fact that Mn 2+ quantity in the sample is constant whereas the quantity of radiation-induced free radicals is temperature dependent. It was found that for irradiated samples the ratio between EPR intensity of the free radicals and that of Mn 2+ before and after heating decreases with 50-60% whereas for non-irradiated samples it is ca. 10-15%

  4. The Effect of Sandblasting on the Retention of Orthodontic Bands: An in vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal A Nalawade

    2013-01-01

    Interpretation and conclusion: GIC requires the highest force to deband when compared with polycarboxylate and zinc phosphate cements when used on nonsandblasted bands. In-office sandblasting appears to be an efficient method to increase the retention of orthodontic bands.

  5. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  6. Study on the properties of tunable prohibited band gaps for one-dimensional ternary magnetized plasma photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haifeng; Zheng Jianping; Zhu Rongjun

    2012-01-01

    The transfer matrix method was applied to study on the properties of tunable prohibited band gaps for one-dimensional ternary magnetized plasma photonic crystals with TE wave arbitrary incident under ideal conditions. TE wave would be divided into left-handed circularly polarized wave and right-handed circularly polarized wave after propagation through one-dimensional ternary magnetized plasma photonic crystals. The calculated transmission coefficients were used to analyze the effects of parameter of plasma, plasma filling factor, incident angle and relative dielectric constant for dielectric layer on the properties of tunable prohibited band gap. The results illustrate that the width of band gaps can not be broadened by increasing plasma collision frequency, the numbers and width of band gaps can be tuned by changing plasma frequency, plasma filling factor and relative dielectric constant for dielectric layer. The band gaps for right-handed circularly polarized wave can be tuned by the plasma gyro frequency, but band gaps for the left-handed circularly polarized wave can't influenced. Low-frequency region of band gaps will be broadened, while high-frequency region of band gaps will be firstly narrow and then broaden with increasing incident angle. (authors)

  7. A Study of Laughter in Science Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Ritchie, Stephen M.; Hudson, Peter; Mergard, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Laughter is a fundamental human phenomenon. Yet there is little educational research on the potential functions of laughter on the enacted (lived) curriculum. In this study, we identify the functions of laughter in a beginning science teacher's classroom throughout her first year of teaching. Our study shows that laughter is more than a gratuitous…

  8. African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences. ... Studies in Mathematics and Sciences (AJESMS) is an international publication that ... in the fields of mathematics education, science education and related disciplines.

  9. Studying NASA's Transition to Ka-Band Communications for Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmins, David T.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Mortensen, Dale; Welch, Bryan; Downey, Joseph; Evans, Michael

    2014-01-01

    As the S-band spectrum becomes crowded, future space missions will need to consider moving command and telemetry services to Ka-band. NASA's Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed provides a software-defined radio (SDR) platform that is capable of supporting investigation of this service transition. The testbed contains two S-band SDRs and one Ka-band SDR. Over the past year, SCaN Testbed has demonstrated Ka-band communications capabilities with NASAs Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) using both open- and closed-loop antenna tracking profiles. A number of technical areas need to be addressed for successful transition to Ka-band. The smaller antenna beamwidth at Ka-band increases the criticality of antenna pointing, necessitating closed loop tracking algorithms and new techniques for received power estimation. Additionally, the antenna pointing routines require enhanced knowledge of spacecraft position and attitude for initial acquisition, versus an S-band antenna. Ka-band provides a number of technical advantages for bulk data transfer. Unlike at S-band, a larger bandwidth may be available for space missions, allowing increased data rates. The potential for high rate data transfer can also be extended for direct-to-ground links through use of variable or adaptive coding and modulation. Specific examples of Ka-band research from SCaN Testbeds first year of operation will be cited, such as communications link performance with TDRSS, and the effects of truss flexure on antenna pointing.

  10. The study of response of wide band gap semiconductor detectors using the Geant4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Riaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy dependence on the intrinsic efficiency, absolute efficiency, full energy peak absolute efficiency and peak-to-total ratio have been studied for various wide band gap semiconductor detectors using the Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulations. The detector thickness of 1-4 mm and the area in 16-100 mm2 range were considered in this work. In excellent agreement with earlier work (Rybka et al., [20], the Geant4 simulated values of detector efficiencies have been found to decrease with incident g-ray energy. Both for the detector thickness and the detector area, the increasing trends have been observed for total efficiency as well as for full-energy peak efficiency in 0.1 MeV-50 MeV range. For Cd1-xZnxTe, the detector response remained insensitive to changes in relative proportions of Zn. For various wide band gap detectors studied in this work, the detection efficiency of TlBr was found highest over the entire range of energy, followed by the HgI2, CdTe, and then by CZT.

  11. Band alignment in organic devices: Photoemission studies of model oligomers on In2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blyth, R. I. R.; Duschek, R.; Koller, G.; Netzer, F. P.; Ramsey, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    The interfaces of In 2 O 3 , a model for indium - tin - oxide (ITO), with benzene, thiophene, and benzaldehyde, models for technologically important organic molecules, are studied using angle resolved ultraviolet photoemission and work function measurements. Band alignment diagrams for hypothetical Al/organic/ITO devices have been drawn, using values determined from this work and previously published studies of these molecules on Al(111). The similarity between the bonding of benzene and thiophene on Al(111) and In 2 O 3 , i.e., largely electrostatic, leads to near identical alignment at both metal and oxide interfaces. This indicates that clean Al and ITO will make a very poor electron/hole injecting pair. We suggest that the apparent efficiency of Al as an electron injecting contact in real devices is due to the presence of oxygen at the Al/organic interface. For benzaldehyde the interaction with In 2 O 3 is largely electrostatic, in contrast to the covalent bonds formed on Al(111). This leads to very different alignment at the Al and oxide interfaces, showing the importance of the particular organic - inorganic interaction in determining band alignment. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  12. Gamma spectroscopical studies of strongly deformed rotational bands in 73Br and 79Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heese, J.

    1989-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis the excitation structures of the nuclei 73 Br and 79 Sr were studied. For the population of high-spin states the reactions 40 Ca( 36 Ar,3p) 73 Br, -58 Ni( 24 Mg,2αp) 73 Br and 58 Ni( 24 Mg,2pn) 79 Sr were used. The level scheme of 73 Br could be extended by γγ coincidence measurements by 18 new states up to the spins 45/2 + respectively 45/2 - . DSA lifetime measurements yielded information about the deformations of the observed rotational bands. The conversion coefficients of the low-energetic transitions in the range of the excitation spectrum below 500 keV were determined and allowed the assignments of spins and parities. Furthermore the converted decay of the 27-keV state was observed for the first time, from the measured intensities of the electron line the lifetime of this state was estimated to 1.1 ≤ τ ≤ 9.1 μs. The measurement of the lifetime and the g factor of the isomeric 240-keV state confirmed the already known spin values and allowed statements on the particle structure. Lifetime measurements in 79 Sr were performed up to the states 21/2 + and 17/2 - . They yielded informations on E2 and M1 transition strengthened in the rotational bands. The transition strengths calculated from the lifetimes show that both nuclei are strongly prolate deformed. The sign of the deformation could be concluded in the case of 73 Br from the observed band structure, in 79 Sr it was calculated from E2/M1 mixing ratios. The E2-transition strengths show a reduction in both nuclei in the region of the g 9/2 proton alignment. Alignment effects in the rotational bands were discussed in the framework of the cranked shell model. Microscopical calculations in the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov cranking model with a deformed Woods-Saxon potential were performed. (orig./HSI) [de

  13. Report from the banding lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Mr. Tautin reported on the seemingly everchanging structure of biological science units within the Interior Department. Current Congressional proposals would either change the name of the Bird Banding Lab's parent agency or make it part of the Geological Survey. The current Congress has not looked favorably on science budgets within the Interior Department, and the Banding Lab's budget is being squeezed ever tighter.

  14. Band alignments in Fe/graphene/Si(001) junctions studied by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Breton, J.-C.; Tricot, S.; Delhaye, G.; Lépine, B.; Turban, P.; Schieffer, P.

    2016-08-01

    The control of tunnel contact resistance is of primary importance for semiconductor-based spintronic devices. This control is hardly achieved with conventional oxide-based tunnel barriers due to deposition-induced interface states. Manipulation of single 2D atomic crystals (such as graphene sheets) weakly interacting with their substrate might represent an alternative and efficient way to design new heterostructures for a variety of different purposes including spin injection into semiconductors. In the present paper, we study by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy the band alignments and interface chemistry of iron-graphene-hydrogenated passivated silicon (001) surfaces for a low and a high n-doping concentration. We find that the hydrogen passivation of the Si(001) surface remains efficient even with a graphene sheet on the Si(001) surface. For both doping concentrations, the semiconductor is close to flat-band conditions which indicates that the Fermi level is unpinned on the semiconductor side of the Graphene/Si(001):H interface. When iron is deposited on the graphene/Si(001):H structures, the Schottky barrier height remains mainly unaffected by the metallic overlayer with a very low barrier height for electrons, a sought-after property in semiconductor based spintronic devices. Finally, we demonstrate that the graphene layer intercalated between the metal and semiconductor also serves as a protection against iron-silicide formation even at elevated temperatures preventing from the formation of a Si-based magnetic dead layer.

  15. Band alignments in Fe/graphene/Si(001) junctions studied by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Breton, J.-C.; Tricot, S.; Delhaye, G.; Lépine, B.; Turban, P.; Schieffer, P.

    2016-01-01

    The control of tunnel contact resistance is of primary importance for semiconductor-based spintronic devices. This control is hardly achieved with conventional oxide-based tunnel barriers due to deposition-induced interface states. Manipulation of single 2D atomic crystals (such as graphene sheets) weakly interacting with their substrate might represent an alternative and efficient way to design new heterostructures for a variety of different purposes including spin injection into semiconductors. In the present paper, we study by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy the band alignments and interface chemistry of iron–graphene-hydrogenated passivated silicon (001) surfaces for a low and a high n-doping concentration. We find that the hydrogen passivation of the Si(001) surface remains efficient even with a graphene sheet on the Si(001) surface. For both doping concentrations, the semiconductor is close to flat-band conditions which indicates that the Fermi level is unpinned on the semiconductor side of the Graphene/Si(001):H interface. When iron is deposited on the graphene/Si(001):H structures, the Schottky barrier height remains mainly unaffected by the metallic overlayer with a very low barrier height for electrons, a sought-after property in semiconductor based spintronic devices. Finally, we demonstrate that the graphene layer intercalated between the metal and semiconductor also serves as a protection against iron-silicide formation even at elevated temperatures preventing from the formation of a Si-based magnetic dead layer.

  16. Estimate of the atmospheric turbidity from three broad-band solar radiation algorithms. A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. López

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric turbidity is an important parameter for assessing the air pollution in local areas, as well as being the main parameter controlling the attenuation of solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface under cloudless sky conditions. Among the different turbidity indices, the Ångström turbidity coefficient β is frequently used. In this work, we analyse the performance of three methods based on broad-band solar irradiance measurements in the estimation of β. The evaluation of the performance of the models was undertaken by graphical and statistical (root mean square errors and mean bias errors means. The data sets used in this study comprise measurements of broad-band solar irradiance obtained at eight radiometric stations and aerosol optical thickness measurements obtained at one co-located radiometric station. Since all three methods require estimates of precipitable water content, three common methods for calculating atmospheric precipitable water content from surface air temperature and relative humidity are evaluated. Results show that these methods exhibit significant differences for low values of precipitable water. The effect of these differences in precipitable water estimates on turbidity algorithms is discussed. Differences in hourly turbidity estimates are later examined. The effects of random errors in pyranometer measurements and cloud interferences on the performance of the models are also presented. Examination of the annual cycle of monthly mean values of β for each location has shown that all three turbidity algorithms are suitable for analysing long-term trends and seasonal patterns.

  17. Estimate of the atmospheric turbidity from three broad-band solar radiation algorithms. A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. López

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric turbidity is an important parameter for assessing the air pollution in local areas, as well as being the main parameter controlling the attenuation of solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface under cloudless sky conditions. Among the different turbidity indices, the Ångström turbidity coefficient β is frequently used. In this work, we analyse the performance of three methods based on broad-band solar irradiance measurements in the estimation of β. The evaluation of the performance of the models was undertaken by graphical and statistical (root mean square errors and mean bias errors means. The data sets used in this study comprise measurements of broad-band solar irradiance obtained at eight radiometric stations and aerosol optical thickness measurements obtained at one co-located radiometric station. Since all three methods require estimates of precipitable water content, three common methods for calculating atmospheric precipitable water content from surface air temperature and relative humidity are evaluated. Results show that these methods exhibit significant differences for low values of precipitable water. The effect of these differences in precipitable water estimates on turbidity algorithms is discussed. Differences in hourly turbidity estimates are later examined. The effects of random errors in pyranometer measurements and cloud interferences on the performance of the models are also presented. Examination of the annual cycle of monthly mean values of β for each location has shown that all three turbidity algorithms are suitable for analysing long-term trends and seasonal patterns.

  18. Study of fine films nature on the surface of copper band by photoelectron spectroscopy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reznichenko, K.N.; Fedorov, V.N.; Shevakin, Yu.F.

    1983-01-01

    The composition of surface films formed on the copper band of industrial production under atmospheric conditions, its changes in thickness and determination of chemical state of the above films are studied. It has been found by the methods of X-ray photoelectronic and Auger-spectroscopy that defect formations on the surface of the copper band of industrial production represent copper oxides in the form of fine films, their change in colour from blue to dark blue probably is determined by different thickness of these defects. The said films on copper have practically identical chemical composition characterized by the presence of unequally valent copper, oxygen in various states (adsorbed and in the form of oxides), carbon and iron. By means of chemical shifts of the line Cu 2psub(3/2) and Ol s the presence in the external part of the film of CuO copper oxide is established and nearer to the interface surface film-metal-of Cu 2 O cuprous oxide which indicates a two-layer surface film structure. The presence of adsorbed carbon and iron in the film composition is a result of surface contamination

  19. Optical band gap and spectroscopic study of lithium alumino silicate glass containing Y3+ ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeri, M S; Rezvani, M

    2011-09-01

    The effect of different amounts of Y2O3 dopant on lithium alumino silicate (LAS) glass has been studied in this work. Glasses having 14.8Li2O-20Al2O3-65.2SiO2 (wt%) composition accompanied with Y2O3 dopant were prepared by normal melting process. In order to calculate the absorption coefficient of samples, transmittance and reflectance spectra of polished samples were measured in the room temperature. Optical properties i.e. Fermi energy level, direct and indirect optical band gaps and Urbach energy were calculated using functionality of extinction coefficient from Fermi-Dirac distribution function, Tauc's plot and the exponential part of absorption coefficient diagram, respectively. It has been clarified that variation in mentioned optical parameters is associated with the changes in physical properties of samples i.e. density or molar mass. On the other hand, increasing of Y3+ ions in the glassy microstructure of samples provides a semiconducting character to LAS glass by reducing the direct and indirect optical band gaps of glass samples from 1.97 to 1.67 and 3.46 to 2.1 (eV), respectively. These changes could be attributed to the role of Y3+ ions as the network former in the track of SiO4 tetrahedrals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nature of Science Contextualized: Studying Nature of Science with Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tala, Suvi; Vesterinen, Veli-Matti

    2015-01-01

    Understanding nature of science (NOS) is widely considered an important educational objective and views of NOS are closely linked to science teaching and learning. Thus there is a lively discussion about what understanding NOS means and how it is reached. As a result of analyses in educational, philosophical, sociological and historical research,…

  1. Cannon Wear and Erosion Science and Technology Objective Program (STO) 155-mm Projectile Rotating Band/Obturation for Extended Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    refractory metal coatings such as chrome plating have slowed the erosion at the origin but have not prevented down bore wear. Down bore wear is due...in the current projectile inventory: the M107, M864/M549A1, and the M483A1 types (fig. 1). The band material is either copper or a copper/ zinc alloy... ductility and sufficient tensile (shear) strength in order to engrave and survive 300 in. of tube travel. In the materials, these properties are

  2. Angular dependent XPS study of surface band bending on Ga-polar n-GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong; Liu, Tong; Zhao, Yanfei; Zhu, Yafeng; Huang, Zengli; Li, Fangsen; Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Liqun; Zhang, Shuming; Dingsun, An; Yang, Hui

    2018-05-01

    Surface band bending and composition of Ga-polar n-GaN with different surface treatments were characterized by using angular dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Upward surface band bending of varying degree was observed distinctly upon to the treatment methods. Besides the nitrogen vacancies, we found that surface states of oxygen-containing absorbates (O-H component) also contribute to the surface band bending, which lead the Fermi level pined at a level further closer to the conduction band edge on n-GaN surface. The n-GaN surface with lower surface band bending exhibits better linear electrical properties for Ti/GaN Ohmic contacts. Moreover, the density of positively charged surface states could be derived from the values of surface band bending.

  3. From Science to e-Science to Semantic e-Science: A Heliosphysics Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narock, Thomas; Fox, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed unparalleled efforts to make scientific data web accessible. The Semantic Web has proven invaluable in this effort; however, much of the literature is devoted to system design, ontology creation, and trials and tribulations of current technologies. In order to fully develop the nascent field of Semantic e-Science we must also evaluate systems in real-world settings. We describe a case study within the field of Heliophysics and provide a comparison of the evolutionary stages of data discovery, from manual to semantically enable. We describe the socio-technical implications of moving toward automated and intelligent data discovery. In doing so, we highlight how this process enhances what is currently being done manually in various scientific disciplines. Our case study illustrates that Semantic e-Science is more than just semantic search. The integration of search with web services, relational databases, and other cyberinfrastructure is a central tenet of our case study and one that we believe has applicability as a generalized research area within Semantic e-Science. This case study illustrates a specific example of the benefits, and limitations, of semantically replicating data discovery. We show examples of significant reductions in time and effort enable by Semantic e-Science; yet, we argue that a "complete" solution requires integrating semantic search with other research areas such as data provenance and web services.

  4. Electronic band structure in porous silicon studied by photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki-Won; Kim, Young-You

    2004-01-01

    In this research, we used photoluminescence (PL) and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) to visualize the electronic band structure in porous silicon (PS). From the combined results of the PLE measurements at various PL emission energies and the PL measurements under excitation at various PLE absorption energies, we infer that three different electronic band structures, originating from different luminescent origins, give rise to the PL spectrum. Through either thermal activation or diffusive transfer, excited carriers are moved to each of the electronic band structures.

  5. Study of the superdeformed band in {sup 194}Pb with EUROGAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannachi, F [Daresbury Lab. (United Kingdom); [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse; Porquet, M G; Bastin, G; Deloncle, I; Gall, B; Schuck, C; Smith, A G [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse; Bourgeois, C; Duprat, J; Korichi, A; Perrin, N; Sergolle, H [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Poffe, N [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Astier, A; Coz, Y Le; Meyer, M; Redon, N [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Bentley, M; Simpson, J [Daresbury Lab. (United Kingdom); Sharpey-Schafer, J F; Joyce, M J; Beausang, C W; Fallon, P; Paul, E S; Dagnall, P J; Forbes, S A; Gale, S; Jones, P M [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Oliver Lodge Lab.; Wadsworth, R; Clark, R M [Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Gradignan (France). Centre d` Etudes Nucleaires; Curien, D [Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France). Centre de Recherches Nucleaires

    1992-08-01

    An experiment has been carried out using a subset of the EUROGAM array to investigate the decay out of the superdeformed (SD) band in {sup 194}Pb. Two new band members and a new decay pattern into the low lying states at normal deformation (ND) have been established for this band. New spectroscopic information about the level scheme at normal deformation has also been extracted. (author). 9 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  6. Study of band terminating in the A ≅ 100 by EUROGAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gizon, J.; Gizon, A.; Genevey, J.; Santos, D.; Nyako, B.M.; Timar, J.; Zolnai, L.; Boston, A.J.; Zoss, D.T.; Paul, E.S.; Semple, A.T.; O'Brien, N.J.; Parry, C.M.; Cata-Danil, Gh.; Bucurescu, D.; Afanasjev, A.V.; Ragnarsson, I.

    1997-01-01

    Terminating bands in nuclei in the A≅ 100 region have been investigated using the EUROGAM2 array. Results have been obtained for Pd (Z 46) and Rh (Z = 45) isotopes. In the nucleus 102 Pd, eight terminating configurations are identified. It is the first nucleus where terminating bands built on the valence space configurations and on core excited configurations are observed. Terminating bands have been also found in 103 Pd and 102 Rh. For 102 Rh it is the first case of band terminations identified in a doubly-odd nucleus below the Z = 50 shell closure. (authors)

  7. Electronic band structure study of colossal magnetoresistance in Tl 2Mn 2O 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, D.-K.; Whangbo, M.-H.; Subramanian, M. A.

    1997-02-01

    The electronic structure of Tl 2Mn 2O 7 was examined by performing tight binding band calculations. The overlap between the Mn t 2g- and Tl 6 s-block bands results in a partial filling of the Tl 6 s-block bands. The associated Fermi surface consists of 12 cigar-shape electron pockets with each electron pocket about {1}/{1000} of the first Brillouin zone in size. The Tl 6 s-block bands have orbital contributions from the Mn atoms, and the carrier density is very low. These are important for the occurrence of a colossal magnetoresistance in Tl 2Mn 2O 7.

  8. New concepts of science and medicine in science and technology studies and their relevance to science education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Yun Wang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Science education often adopts a narrow view of science that assumes the lay public is ignorant, which seemingly justifies a science education limited to a promotional narrative of progress in the form of scientific knowledge void of meaningful social context. We propose that to prepare students as future concerned citizens of a technoscientific society, science education should be informed by science, technology, and society (STS perspectives. An STS-informed science education, in our view, will include the following curricular elements: science controversy education, gender issues, historical perspective, and a move away from a Eurocentric view by looking into the distinctive patterns of other regional (in this case of Taiwan, East Asian approaches to science, technology, and medicine. This article outlines the significance of some major STS studies as a means of illustrating the ways in which STS perspectives can, if incorporated into science education, enhance our understanding of science and technology and their relationships with society.

  9. Study of band terminating in the A {approx_equal} 100 by EUROGAM; Recherche de terminaisons de bandes dans la region A {approx_equal} 100 avec EUROGAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizon, J.; Gizon, A.; Genevey, J.; Santos, D. [Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires, Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France); Nyako, B.M.; Timar, J.; Zolnai, L. [Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen (Hungary); Boston, A.J.; Zoss, D.T.; Paul, E.S.; Semple, A.T. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); O`Brien, N.J.; Parry, C.M. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York (United Kingdom); Cata-Danil, Gh.; Bucurescu, D. [Horia Hulubei Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Afanasjev, A.V.; Ragnarsson, I. [Department of Mathematical Physics, University of Lund, Lund (Sweden)

    1997-12-31

    Terminating bands in nuclei in the A{approx_equal} 100 region have been investigated using the EUROGAM2 array. Results have been obtained for Pd (Z 46) and Rh (Z = 45) isotopes. In the nucleus {sup 102}Pd, eight terminating configurations are identified. It is the first nucleus where terminating bands built on the valence space configurations and on core excited configurations are observed. Terminating bands have been also found in {sup 103}Pd and {sup 102}Rh. For {sup 102}Rh it is the first case of band terminations identified in a doubly-odd nucleus below the Z = 50 shell closure. (authors) 9 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Status report of a 500 GeV S-band linear collider study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balewski, K.; Bieler, M.; Bothe, W.; Bredehoeft, K.; Brinkmann, R.; Choroba, S.; Dwersteg, B.; Ebert, M.; Febel, A.; Fischer, R.; Floettmann, K.; Holzer, B.; Juergensen, H.; Kouptsidis, J.; Kumpfert, H.; Loeffler, F.; Marx, M.; Narciss, H.; Neumann, R.; Peters, F.; Peters, M.; Pillat, P.; Rossbach, J.; Schumann, G.; Schwarz, W.; Vilcins, S.; Voss, G.A.; Werner, M.; Wipf, S.; Wuempelmann, H.; Beyer, H.G.; Dehler, M.; Dohlus, M.; Ebeling, F.; Hahne, P.; Holtkamp, N.; Klatt, R.; Krawczyk, F.; Tsakanov, V.; Rienen, U. van; Wanzenberg, R.; Weiland, T.; Wolter, H.

    1991-12-01

    This paper describes the status of a feasibility study of a 500 GeV center of mass linear collider, which is based almost entirely on conventional rf-technology. The basic components are S-band travelling wave, constant-gradient accelerating structures and 130 MW klystrons. 3 GeV damping rings are used to produce extremely small emittances in both planes which are in the same range as those of the next generation synchrotron light sources. Very strong focussing in the linear accelerator and near the interaction region, as well as a dedicated chromatic correction scheme, are necessary to achieve spot sizes that have not been produced yet. The methods envisaged to stabilize the motion of the tiny beam along the 15 km long linac seem promising and give rise to be assumption that the proposed values can be reached with todays' available technology. (orig.)

  11. Laser-activated solid protein bands for peripheral nerve repair: an vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauto, A; Trickett, R; Malik, R; Dawes, J M; Owen, E R

    1997-01-01

    Severed tibial nerves in rats were repaired using a novel technique, utilizing a semiconductor diode-laser-activated protein solder applied longitudinally across the join. Welding was produced by selective laser denaturation of solid solder bands containing the dye indocyanine green. An in vivo study, using 48 adult male Wistar rats, compared conventional microsuture-repaired tibial nerves with laser solder-repaired nerves. Nerve repairs were characterised immediately after surgery and after 3 months. Successful regeneration with average compound muscle action potentials of 2.5 +/- 0.5 mV and 2.7 +/- 0.3 mV (mean and standard deviation) was demonstrated for the laser-soldered nerves and the sutured nerves, respectively. Histopathology confirmed comparable regeneration of axons in laser- and suture-operated nerves. The laser-based nerve repair technique was easier and faster than microsuture repair, minimising manipulation damage to the nerve.

  12. Studies of Gravity Waves Using Michelson Interferometer Measurements of OH (3-1) Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Young-In; Cho, Young-Min; Lee, Bang Yong; Kim, J.

    2001-06-01

    As part of a long-term program for polar upper atmospheric studies, temperatures and intensities of the OH (3-1) bands were derived from spectrometric observations of airglow emissions over King Sejong station (62.22o S, 301.25o E). These measurements were made with a Michelson interferometer to cover wavelength regions between 1000 nm and 2000 nm. A spectral analysis was performed to individual nights of data to acquire information on the waves in the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. It is assumed that the measured fluctuations in the intensity and temperature of the OH (3-1) airglow were caused by gravity waves propagating through the emission layer. Correlation of intensity and temperature variation revealed oscillations with periods ranging from 2 to 9 hours. We also calculated Krassovsky's parameter and compared with published values.

  13. Studies of Gravity Waves Using Michelson Interferometer Measurements of OH (3-1 Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-In Won

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available As part of a long-term program for polar upper atmospheric studies, temperatures and intensities of the OH (3-1 bands were derived from spectrometric observations of airglow emissions over King Sejong station (62.22o S, 301.25o E. These measurements were made with a Michelson interferometer to cover wavelength regions between 1000 nm and 2000 nm. A spectral analysis was performed to individual nights of data to acquire information on the waves in the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. It is assumed that the measured fluctuations in the intensity and temperature of the OH (3-1 airglow were caused by gravity waves propagating through the emission layer. Correlation of intensity and temperature variation revealed oscillations with periods ranging from 2 to 9 hours. We also calculated Krassovsky's parameter and compared with published values.

  14. S-band multiple-access interference study for advanced tracking and data relay satellite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei-Chung; Yang, Chau-Chin

    1990-01-01

    The results of a study on the effect of mutual interference among S-band multiple access (SMA) system users of advanced tracking and data relay satellite system (ATDRSS) are presented. In the ATDRSS era, the SMA system is required to support data rates ranging from 10 kb/s to 3 Mb/s. The system will consist of four advanced tracking and data relay satellites (ATDRS) each supporting up to five telemetry links. All users have 10 MHz bandwidth with their carrier frequency equal to 2.2875 GHz. A hybrid SDMA/CDMA scheme is used to mitigate the effect of the interference among system users. SMA system interference probability is evaluated with CLASS software. User link margin degradation due to mutual interference between two users is evaluated. System interference probability is evaluated for the projected 1996 mission model, a reference mission model, and a modified reference mission model.

  15. Study on the stability and reliability of Clinotron at Y-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Wang, Jianguo; Chen, Zaigao; Wang, Guangqiang; Wang, Dongyang; Teng, Yan

    2017-11-01

    To improve the stability and reliability of Clinotron at the Y-band, some key issues are researched, such as the synchronous operating mode, the heat accumulation on the slow-wave structure, and the errors in micro-fabrication. By analyzing the dispersion relationship, the working mode is determined as the TM10 mode. The problem of heat dissipation on a comb is researched to make a trade-off on the choice of suitable working conditions, making sure that the safety and efficiency of the device are guaranteed simultaneously. The study on the effect of tolerance on device's performance is also conducted to determine the acceptable error during micro-fabrication. The validity of the device and the cost for fabrication are both taken into consideration. At last, the performance of Clinotron under the optimized conditions demonstrates that it can work steadily at 315.89 GHz and the output power is about 12 W, showing advanced stability and reliability.

  16. Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy versus Laparoscopic Banded Sleeve Gastrectomy: First Prospective Pilot Randomized Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Tognoni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The placement of ring or band around the gastric tube might prevent the dilation after Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG. We describe the first randomized study comparing LSG and Laparoscopic Banded Sleeve Gastrectomy (LBSG. Material and Method. Fifty obese patients were enrolled in the study between January 2014 and January 2015. We analysed differences in operative time, complication rate, mortality, and BMI between the two groups over a period of 12 months. Results. Twenty-five patients received LSG (group A and 25 LBSG (group B. The mean preoperative BMI was 47.3±6.58 kg/m2 and 44.95±5.85 kg/m2, respectively, in the two groups. There was no statistical relevant difference in operative time. No intraoperative complications occurred. Mean BMI registered after 3, 6, and 12 months in groups A and B, respectively, were 37.86±5.72 kg/m2 and 37.58±6.21 kg/m2 (p=0.869, 33.64±6.08 kg/m2 and 32.03±5.24 kg/m2 (p=0.325, and 29.72±4.40 kg/m2 and 27.42±4.47 kg/m2 (p=0.186; no statistical relevant difference was registered between the two groups. Conclusion. LBSG is a safe and feasible procedure. The time required for the device positioning did not influence significantly the surgical time. The results of bodyweight loss did not document any statistically significant differences among the two groups, even though LBSG group showed a mean BMI slightly lower than that of the control group.

  17. A Mathematical Study of the One-Dimensional Keller and Rubinov Model for Liesegang Bands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, D.; van der Hout, R.; Mimura, M.; Ohnishi, I.

    2009-01-01

    Our purpose is to start understanding from a mathematical viewpoint experiments in which regularized structures with spatially distinct bands or rings of precipitated material are exhibited, with clearly visible scaling properties. Such patterns are known as Liesegang bands or rings. In this paper,

  18. Pressure variation of the valence band width in Ge: A self-consistent GW study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modak, Paritosh; Svane, Axel; Christensen, Niels Egede

    2009-01-01

    . In the present work we report results of quasiparticle self-consistent GW  (QSGW) band calculations for diamond- as well as β-tin-type Ge under pressure. For both phases we find that the band width increases with pressure. For β-tin Ge this agrees with experiment and density-functional theory, but for diamond Ge...

  19. Theoretical study of relative width of photonic band gap for the 3-D ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of refractive index and relative radius of the photonic band gap for the fcc closed packed 3-D dielectric microstructure are reported and comparison of experimental observations and theoretical predictions are given. This work is useful for the understanding of photonic crystals and occurrence of the photonic band gap.

  20. Correction of hypokyphosis in thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis using sublaminar bands: a 3D multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilharreborde, Brice; Pesenti, Sébastien; Ferrero, Emmanuelle; Accadbled, Franck; Jouve, Jean-Luc; De Gauzy, Jérôme Sales; Mazda, Keyvan

    2018-02-01

    The comparison of implants and correction methods remain controversial in AIS. Excellent frontal and axial correction rates have been reported with all-screw constructs, but at the expense of sagittal alignment, which has a tendency to flatten postoperatively. Posteromedial translation using hybrid constructs seems to preserve and improve thoracic kyphosis (TK), but no series exist to date with a significant number of hypokyphotic patients. In addition, the measures of TK in 2D are often wrong in severe AIS due to axial rotation. The goals of this study were therefore to analyze the 3D radiological outcomes of a group of hypokyphotic AIS patients operated with sublaminar bands. 35 consecutive AIS hypokyphotic patients (T4T12 3D spinal reconstructions were performed preoperatively, postoperatively and at the latest follow-up by an independent observer using SterEOS (EOS imaging, Paris, France), and 2D and 3D measurements were compared. In addition, a new 3D parameter [sagittal shift of the apical vertebra (SSAV)], reflecting the translation of the apical vertebra of the main curve in the patient sagittal plane, was described and reported. The age of the cohort was 16 years and the number of sublaminar bands used for correction averaged 6 (±1.5). T1T12 and T4T12 sagittal Cobb angles appeared to be overestimated on 2D postoperatively (3°, p = 0.002 and 4°, p 3D measurements were kept for the quantitative analysis of the postoperative correction. T4T12 TK significantly increased after surgery (average 8° ± 7°, p 3D T4T12 kyphosis (r = 0.62). Measures in 2D tend to overestimate sagittal alignment and are not sufficient to evaluate postoperative correction. SSAV is a new 3D parameter reflecting the TK change that needs to be further investigated and used in the future. This series confirms that sublaminar bands should be considered in hypokyphotic patients, since thoracic sagittal alignment was restored in 68.6% of the cases.

  1. Band structure of Heusler compounds studied by photoemission and tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbelo Jorge, Elena

    2011-07-01

    Heusler compounds are key materials for spintronic applications. They have attracted a lot of interest due to their half-metallic properties predicted by band structure calculations. The aim of this work is to evaluate experimentally the validity of the predictions of half metallicity by band structure calculations for two specific Heusler compounds, Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7} and Co{sub 2}MnGa. Two different spectroscopy methods for the analysis of the electronic properties were used: Angular Resolved Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARUPS) and Tunneling Spectroscopy. Heusler compounds are prepared as thin films by RF-sputtering in an ultra high vacuum system. For the characterization of the samples, bulk and surface crystallographic and magnetic properties of Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7} and Co{sub 2}MnGa are studied. X-ray and electron diffraction reveal a bulk and surface crossover between two different types of sublattice order (from B2 to L2{sub 1}) with increasing annealing temperature. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism results show that the magnetic properties in the surface and bulk are identical, although the magnetic moments obtained are 5 % below from the theoretically predicted. By ARUPS evidence for the validity of the predicted total bulk density of states (DOS) was demonstrated for both Heusler compounds. Additional ARUPS intensity contributions close to the Fermi energy indicates the presence of a specific surface DOS. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the crystallographic order, controlled by annealing, plays an important role on broadening effects of DOS features. Improving order resulted in better defined ARUPS features. Tunneling magnetoresistance measurements of Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7} and Co{sub 2}MnGa based MTJ's result in a Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7} spin polarization of 44 %, which is the highest experimentally obtained value for this compound, although it is lower than the 100 % predicted. For Co

  2. Terry Turbopump Expanded Operating Band Full-Scale Component and Basic Science Detailed Test Plan-Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solom, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Severe Accident Analysis Dept.; Ross, Kyle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Severe Accident Analysis Dept.; Cardoni, Jeffrey N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Severe Accident Analysis Dept.; Osborn, Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Severe Accident Analysis Dept.

    2017-08-01

    This document details the milestone approach to define the true operating limitations (margins) of the Terry turbopump systems used in the nuclear industry for Milestone 3 (full-scale component experiments) and Milestone 4 (Terry turbopump basic science experiments) efforts. The overall multinational-sponsored program creates the technical basis to: (1) reduce and defer additional utility costs, (2) simplify plant operations, and (3) provide a better understanding of the true margin which could reduce overall risk of operations.

  3. Do compulsory secondary science courses change students’ attitude towards studying science?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lærke Elisabeth; Petersen, Morten Rask

    2015-01-01

    recruitment to STEM education has been a compulsory course in the Gymnasium called Natural Science Subject (NSS). This is an interdisciplinary, introductory course with the intention that students shall “ … realize the importance of knowing and understanding natural science thinking” (Authors translation...... science and science careers. In this approach we ended up with the following research question: “Does a compulsory introductory sciences course have an impact on students’ attitude towards studying sciences in secondary school?” In this approach we chose to use parameters as motivation (Deci & Ryan, 2002...... Subject course. The distribution included all levels (K10-K12) and all study lines. Student answers were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U-test using SPSS statistics 22 as analytical tool. Comparisons for this study were made across study lines (natural science vs. human science & social science...

  4. Design, construction and tuning of S-band coupler for electron linear accelerator of institute for research in fundamental sciences (IPM E-linac)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasemi, F.; Abbasi Davani, F.; Lamehi Rachti, M.; Shaker, H.; Ahmadiannamin, S.

    2015-01-01

    Design and construction of an electron linear accelerator by Institute for Research in Fundamental Science (IPM) is considered as Iran’s first attempt to construct such an accelerator. In order to design a linear accelerating tube, after defining the accelerating tube and buncher geometries, RF input and output couplers must be designed. In this article, firstly, a brief report on the specifications of an S-band electron linear accelerator which is in progress in the school of particles and accelerators is presented and then, the design process and construction reports of the couplers required for this accelerator are described. Through performing necessary calculations and tuning the coupling factor and resonant frequency, couplers with desired specification have been fabricated by shrinking method. The final obtained coupling factor and resonant frequency have been respectively 1.05 and 2997 MHz for the first coupler, and 0.98 and 2996.9 MHz for the second one that are close to calculation results

  5. When Science Studies Religion: Six Philosophy Lessons for Science Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigliucci, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    It is an unfortunate fact of academic life that there is a sharp divide between science and philosophy, with scientists often being openly dismissive of philosophy, and philosophers being equally contemptuous of the naivete of scientists when it comes to the philosophical underpinnings of their own discipline. In this paper I explore the…

  6. Monte Carlo study of superconductivity in the three-band Emery model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, M.; Pattnaik, P.C.; Morgenstern, I.; Newns, D.M.; von der Linden, W.

    1990-01-01

    We have examined the three-band Hubbard model for the copper oxide planes in high-temperature superconductors using the projector quantum Monte Carlo method. We find no evidence for s-wave superconductivity

  7. Bulk band gaps in divalent hexaborides: A soft x-ray emission study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Gweon, Gey-Hong; Allen, James W.; Bianchi, Andrea D.; Fisk, Zachary

    2001-01-01

    Boron K-edge soft x-ray emission and absorption are used to address the fundamental question of whether divalent hexaborides are intrinsic semimetals or defect-doped bandgap insulators. These bulk sensitive measurements, complementary and consistent with surface-sensitive angle-resolved photoemission experiments, confirm the existence of a bulk band gap and the location of the chemical potential at the bottom of the conduction band

  8. The Soriya Band: A Case Study of Cambodian American Rock Music in Southern California

    OpenAIRE

    Seng, Sophea

    2016-01-01

    Following the 1975-1979 genocide, Cambodian exiles in the U.S. recreated cultural institutions through music. Music remains significant in rebuilding cultural life in diasporic Cambodian communities. Live bands perform contemporary and classic ballads during Cambodian New Year in April, at wedding parties and in restaurants on weekend nights. Live rock bands continue to dot community celebrations as survivors collectively create musical repertoires and schedule practices to perform at festive...

  9. Systematic study on intermolecular valence-band dispersion in molecular crystalline films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Intermolecular valence-band dispersion of crystalline films of phthalocyanines. • Intermolecular transfer integral versus lattice constant. • Site-specific intermolecular interaction and resultant valence-band dispersion. • Band narrowing effect induced by elevated temperature. - Abstract: Functionalities of organic semiconductors are governed not only by individual properties of constituent molecules but also by solid-state electronic states near the Fermi level such as frontier molecular orbitals, depending on weak intermolecular interactions in various conformations. The individual molecular property has been widely investigated in detail; on the other hand, the weak intermolecular interaction is difficult to investigate precisely due to the presence of the structural and thermal energy broadenings in organic solids. Here we show quite small but essential intermolecular valence band dispersions and their temperature dependence of sub-0.1-eV scale in crystalline films of metal phthalocyanines (H_2Pc, ZnPc, CoPc, MnPc, and F_1_6ZnPc) by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) with synchrotron radiation. The observed bands show intermolecular and site dependent dispersion widths, phases, and periodicities, for different chemical substitution of terminal groups and central metals in the phthalocyanine molecule. The precise and systematic band-dispersion measurement would be a credible approach toward the comprehensive understanding of intermolecular interactions and resultant charge transport properties as well as their tuning by substituents in organic molecular systems.

  10. Electro-resistive bands for non-invasive cardiac and respiration monitoring, a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gargiulo, Gaetano D; Breen, Paul P; O’Loughlin, Aiden

    2015-01-01

    Continuous unobtrusive monitoring of tidal volume, particularly for critical care patients (i.e. neonates and patients in intensive care) during sleep studies and during daily activities, is still an unresolved monitoring need. Also a successful monitoring solution is yet to be proposed for continuous non-invasive cardiac stroke volume monitoring that is a novel clinical need. In this paper we present the feasibility study for a wearable, non-invasive, non-contact and unobtrusive sensor (embedded in a standard T-shirt) based on four electro-resistive bands that simultaneously monitors tidal volume and cardiac stroke volume changes. This low power sensor system (requires only 100 mW and accepts a wide power supply range up to ±18 V); thus the sensor can be easily embedded in existing wearable solutions (i.e. Holter monitors). Moreover, being contactless, it can be worn over bandages or electrodes, and as it does not rely over the integrity of the garment to work, it allows practitioners to perform procedures during monitoring. For this preliminary evaluation, one subject has worn the sensor over the period of 24 h (removing it only to shower); the accuracy of the tidal volume tested against a portable spirometer reported a precision of ±10% also during physical activity; accuracy tests for cardiac output (as it may require invasive procedure) have not been carried out in this preliminary trial. (note)

  11. Finite-size effects on band structure of CdS nanocrystallites studied by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, Soumitra; Biswas, Subhajit; Chaudhuri, Subhadra; Nambissan, P.M.G.

    2005-01-01

    Quantum confinement effects in nanocrystalline CdS were studied using positrons as spectroscopic probes to explore the defect characteristics. The lifetime of positrons annihilating at the vacancy clusters on nanocrystalline grain surfaces increased remarkably consequent to the onset of such finite-size effects. The Doppler broadened line shape was also found to reflect rather sensitively such distinct changes in the electron momentum redistribution scanned by the positrons, owing to the widening of the band gap. The nanocrystalline sizes of the samples used were confirmed from x-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy and the optical absorption results supported the quantum size effects. Positron annihilation results indicated distinct qualitative changes between CdS nanorods and the bulk sample, notwithstanding the identical x-ray diffraction pattern and close resemblance of the optical absorption spectra. The results are promising in the event of positron annihilation being proved to be a very successful tool for the study of such finite-size effects in semiconductor nanoparticles

  12. Psychological predictors of outcome in vertical banded gastroplasty: a 6 months prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leombruni, Paolo; Pierò, Andrea; Dosio, Davide; Novelli, Alessia; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Morino, Mario; Toppino, Mauro; Fassino, Secondo

    2007-07-01

    At present, bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity. Several factors appear to influence the patient's ability to adjust to the postoperative condition, but reliable predictors are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess whether psychological presurgical variables can predict outcome of vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG) in the short term. 38 severely obese patients (6 men and 32 women) underwent laparoscopic VBG. All were assessed prospectively at TO (before surgery) and at T6 (6 months after surgery) with a semi-structured interview and a battery of psychological tests: State Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI), Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Binge Eating Scale (BES), Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ), and (only at TO) the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). The comparison between TO and T6 found a significant weight loss and an improvement in several dimensions of EDI-2, BDI, and BSQ, together with an increase in the frequency of vomiting. Self-directedness (TCI) and Body Dissatisfaction (EDI-2) appear to be predictors of short-term outcome regarding weight loss. Self-transcendence (TCI) is associated with emerging side-effects. Although larger and longer studies are necessary to confirm these data, Self directedness and Self trascendence emerge as predictors of 6 months clinical and psychological outcome of VBG.

  13. Wide Band-Gap Semiconductor Radiation Detectors: Science Fiction, Horror Story, or Headlines (460th Brookhaven Lecture)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    With radiation constantly occurring from natural sources all around us -- from food, building materials, and rays from the sun, to name a few -- detecting radiotracers for medical procedures and other radiation to keep people safe is not easy. In order to make better use of radiation to diagnose or treat certain health conditions, or to track radiological materials being transported, stored, and used, the quest is on to develop improved radiation detectors. James gives a brief introduction on radiation detection and explain how it is used in applications ranging from medical to homeland security. He then discusses how new materials and better ways to analyze them here at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and the future NSLS-II will lead to a new class of radiation detectors that will provide unprecedented advances in medical and industrial imaging, basic science, and the nonproliferation of nuclear materials.

  14. THE FIRST SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF TYPE Ibc SUPERNOVA MULTI-BAND LIGHT CURVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drout, Maria R.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair; Green, Yoav; Cenko, S. Bradley; Fox, Derek B.; Leonard, Douglas C.; Sand, David J.; Moon, Dae-Sik

    2011-01-01

    We present detailed optical photometry for 25 Type Ibc supernovae (SNe Ibc) within d ≈ 150 Mpc obtained with the robotic Palomar 60 inch telescope in 2004-2007. This study represents the first uniform, systematic, and statistical sample of multi-band SNe Ibc light curves available to date. We correct the light curves for host galaxy extinction using a new technique based on the photometric color evolution, namely, we show that the (V – R) color of extinction-corrected SNe Ibc at Δt ≈ 10 days after V-band maximum is tightly distributed, ((V – R) V10 ) = 0.26 ± 0.06 mag. Using this technique, we find that SNe Ibc typically suffer from significant host galaxy extinction, (E(B – V)) ≈ 0.4 mag. A comparison of the extinction-corrected light curves for helium-rich (Type Ib) and helium-poor (Type Ic) SNe reveals that they are statistically indistinguishable, both in luminosity and decline rate. We report peak absolute magnitudes of (M R ) = –17.9 ± 0.9 mag and (M R ) = –18.3 ± 0.6 mag for SNe Ib and Ic, respectively. Focusing on the broad-lined (BL) SNe Ic, we find that they are more luminous than the normal SNe Ibc sample, (M R ) = –19.0 ± 1.1 mag, with a probability of only 1.6% that they are drawn from the same population of explosions. By comparing the peak absolute magnitudes of SNe Ic-BL with those inferred for local engine-driven explosions (GRB-SN 1998bw, XRF-SN 2006aj, and SN 2009bb) we find a 25% probability that relativistic SNe are drawn from the overall SNe Ic-BL population. Finally, we fit analytic models to the light curves to derive typical 56 Ni masses of M Ni ≈ 0.2 and 0.5 M ☉ for SNe Ibc and SNe Ic-BL, respectively. With reasonable assumptions for the photospheric velocities, we further extract kinetic energy and ejecta mass values of M ej ≈ 2 M ☉ and E K ≈ 10 51 erg for SNe Ibc, while for SNe Ic-BL we find higher values, M ej ≈ 5 M ☉ and E K ≈ 10 52 erg. We discuss the implications for the progenitors of SNe Ibc

  15. High-resolution endoscopy plus chromoendoscopy or narrow-band imaging in Barrett's esophagus: a prospective randomized crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kara, M. A.; Peters, F. P.; Rosmolen, W. D.; Krishnadath, K. K.; ten Kate, F. J.; Fockens, P.; Bergman, J. J. G. H.

    2005-01-01

    Background and study aims: High-resolution endoscopy (HRE) may improve the detection of early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus. Indigo carmine chromoendoscopy (ICc) and narrow-band imaging (NBI) may be useful techniques to complement HRE. The aim of this study was to compare HRE-ICC with HrE-NBI for

  16. Studying Students' Science Literacy: Non-Scientific Beliefs and Science Literacy Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impey, C.; Buxner, S.

    2015-11-01

    We have been conducting a study of university students' science literacy for the past 24 years. Based on the work of the National Science Board's ongoing national survey of the US public, we have administered the same survey to undergraduate science students at the University of Arizona almost every year since 1989. Results have shown relatively little change in students' overall science literacy, descriptions of science, and knowledge of basic science topics for almost a quarter of a century despite an increase in education interventions, the rise of the internet, and increased access to knowledge. Several trends do exist in students' science literacy and descriptions of science. Students who exhibit beliefs in non-scientific phenomenon (e.g., lucky numbers, creationism) consistently have lower science literacy scores and less correct descriptions of scientific phenomenon. Although not surprising, our results support ongoing efforts to help students generate evidence based thinking.

  17. African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences: Advanced Search. Journal Home > African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences: Advanced Search. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  18. High-gradient breakdown studies of an X-band Compact Linear Collider prototype structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Wu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A Compact Linear Collider prototype traveling-wave accelerator structure fabricated at Tsinghua University was recently high-gradient tested at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK. This X-band structure showed good high-gradient performance of up to 100  MV/m and obtained a breakdown rate of 1.27×10^{−8} per pulse per meter at a pulse length of 250 ns. This performance was similar to that of previous structures tested at KEK and the test facility at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN, thereby validating the assembly and bonding of the fabricated structure. Phenomena related to vacuum breakdown were investigated and are discussed in the present study. Evaluation of the breakdown timing revealed a special type of breakdown occurring in the immediately succeeding pulse after a usual breakdown. These breakdowns tended to occur at the beginning of the rf pulse, whereas usual breakdowns were uniformly distributed in the rf pulse. The high-gradient test was conducted under the international collaboration research program among Tsinghua University, CERN, and KEK.

  19. Estimate of the atmospheric turbidity from three broad-band solar radiation algorithms. A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, G.; Batlles, F.J. [Dept. de Ingenieria Electrica y Termica, EPS La Rabida, Univ. de Huelva, Huelva (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Atmospheric turbidity is an important parameter for assessing the air pollution in local areas, as well as being the main parameter controlling the attenuation of solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface under cloudless sky conditions. Among the different turbidity indices, the Aangstroem turbidity coefficient {beta} is frequently used. In this work, we analyse the performance of three methods based on broadband solar irradiance measurements in the estimation of {beta}. The evaluation of the performance of the models was undertaken by graphical and statistical (root mean square errors and mean bias errors) means. The data sets used in this study comprise measurements of broad-band solar irradiance obtained at eight radiometric stations and aerosol optical thickness measurements obtained at one co-located radiometric station. Since all three methods require estimates of precipitable water content, three common methods for calculating atmospheric precipitable water content from surface air temperature and relative humidity are evaluated. Results show that these methods exhibit significant differences for low values of precipitable water. The effect of these differences in precipitable water estimates on turbidity algorithms is discussed. Differences in hourly turbidity estimates are later examined. The effects of random errors in pyranometer measurements and cloud interferences on the performance of the models are also presented. Examination of the annual cycle of monthly mean values of {beta} for each location has shown that all three turbidity algorithms are suitable for analysing long-term trends and seasonal patterns. (orig.)

  20. [Suppression of tinnitus by band noise masker--a study of 600 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Kamio, T; Ohkawara, D; Aoki, H; Baba, S; Yagi, T

    1997-09-01

    We performed Band Noise Masker (BNM) therapy for the suppression of tinnitus in 600 patients and measured the pitch, loudness and masking level of tinnitus and residual inhibition (RI). We examined the efficiency of BNM therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of suppression of tinnitus by BNM. Tinnitus was suppressed in 394 patients (66%) after BNM therapy. In the group of patients in whom we suppressed tinnitus, the loudness of tinnitus was reduced from 7.7 +/- 5.7dBSL to 7.5 +/- 5.5dBSL (p pitch of tinnitus did not exhibit a marked change. In the group of patients in whom we did not suppress tinnitus, the loudness and pitch of tinnitus did not exhibit a marked change. The efficiency of BNM therapy was high in the cases of presbyacusis and low in the cases of sudden deafness. There was no significant relationship between RI and the efficiency of BNM therapy. We examined these data and discussed the mechanism of suppression of tinnitus by BNM therapy. In all cases, after BNM therapy, the auditory threshold did not become worse. In 4 cases tinnitus became worse temporarily. In conclusion, BNM therapy is an effective mode for tinnitus control, is easily performed in our outpatient clinic or at home, and has no serious complications.

  1. Breakdown Characteristics Study on an 18 Cell X-band Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, F

    2008-01-01

    A CLIC designed 18 cells, low group velocity (2.4% to 1.0% c), X-band (11.4 GHz) accelerator structure (denoted T18) was designed at CERN, its cells were built at KEK, and it was assembled and tested at SLAC. An interesting feature of this structure is that the gradient in the last cell is about 50% higher than that in the first cell. This structure has been RF conditioned at SLAC NLCTA for about 1400 hours where it incurred about 2200 breakdowns. This paper presents the characteristics of these breakdowns, including (1) the breakdown rate dependence on gradient, pulse width and conditioning time, (2) the breakdown distribution along the structure, (3) relation between breakdown and pulsed heating dependence study and (4) electric field decay time for breakdown changing over the whole conditioning time. Overall, this structure performed very well, having a final breakdown rate of less than 1e-6/pulse/m at 106 MV/m with 230 ns pulse width

  2. Breakdown Characteristics Study on an 18 Cell X-band Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Faya

    2009-01-01

    A CLIC designed 18 cells, low group velocity (2.4% to 1.0% c), X-band (11.4 GHz) accelerator structure (denoted T18) was designed at CERN, its cells were built at KEK, and it was assembled and tested at SLAC. An interesting feature of this structure is that the gradient in the last cell is about 50% higher than that in the first cell. This structure has been RF conditioned at SLAC NLCTA for about 1400 hours where it incurred about 2200 breakdowns. This paper presents the characteristics of these breakdowns, including 1) the breakdown rate dependence on gradient, pulse width and conditioning time, 2) the breakdown distribution along the structure, 3) relation between breakdown and pulsed heating dependence study and 4) electric field decay time for breakdown changing over the whole conditioning time. Overall, this structure performed very well, having a final breakdown rate of less than 1e-6/pulse/m at 106 MV/m with 230 ns pulse width.

  3. Staircase bands in odd-odd Ag isotopes: 107Ag a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, P.; Rather, Niyaz; Roy, Santosh; Chattopadhyay, S.; Goswami, A; Nag, S.; Palit, R.; Saha, S.; Trevadi, T.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclei near Z=50 shell closer display various facets of tilted axis rotation (TAR) as predicted both from mean field tilted axis cranking results (TAC) as well as more intuitive, geometrical model approach, popularly known as Shears mechanism. These include pure TAC features such as the observation of Chiral bands, Anti-magnetic rotation and Magnetic Rotation (MR). These excitations are predominantly generated by the valance neutrons in low-Ω orbitals of h 11/2 and the valance protons in high-Ω orbitals of g 9/2 . In contrary to the common notion of MR, significant core rotation were reported in these nuclei which were attributed to the neutron occupation in shape driving h 11/2 orbital. However, the interplay/competition between the core rotation (Principal axis rotation (PAR)) and the tilted angular momentum generated by the Shears structure, exhibit variety of phenomena already observed by our group in Ag and Cd isotopes. It is to be noted that the relatively small level densities near the Fermi levels for both neutron and proton sector in mass-100 region allow us to study such subtle effects which otherwise are not reported in any other mass region

  4. Study of the characteristics of forced homogeneous turbulence using band-pass Fourier filtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kareem, Waleed Abdel [Suez Canal University, Suez (Egypt)

    2012-03-15

    Simulations of forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence with resolutions of 128{sup 3} and 256{sup 3} using the Lattice Boltzmann method are carried out. The multi-scale vortical structures are identified using the band-pass Fourier cutoff filtering. Three fields at each simulation are extracted and their characteristics are studied. The vortical structures are visualized using the Q-identification method. A new lattice segmentation scheme to identify the central axes of the vortical structures is introduced. The central points of each vortex are identified and they are connected using the direction cosines technique. Results show that the Q-spectrum of the fine scale field survives at low and high wave-numbers. However, the large and intermediate Q-spectra survives till wave-numbers less than or equal to twice the used velocity cutoff wave-numbers. It is found that the extracted central axes clearly resemble the corresponding vortical structures at each scale. Using the central axes scheme, the radii and lengths of the vortical structures at each scale are determined and compared. It is also found that the radii of the identified vortical structures at each scale in both simulations are of the order of several times the Kolmogorov microscales.

  5. Randomized prospective study of olecranon fracture fixation: cable pin system versus tension band wiring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q-H; Fu, Z-G; Zhou, J-L; Lu, T; Liu, T; Shan, L; Liu, Y; Bai, L

    2012-01-01

    This prospective, randomized study compared the effectiveness of the cable pin system (CPS) versus tension band wiring (TBW) for olecranon fracture fixation. Patients with acute transverse or slight oblique olecranon fractures were randomly divided into two groups: one fixed by CPS and the other by TBW. Clinical outcome data were collected and analysed following a mean duration of 21 months. The mean ± SD fracture healing time was significantly shorter in the CPS group (n = 30; 9.73 ± 2.02 weeks) compared with the TBW group (n = 32; 11.13 ± 2.21 weeks). One patient in the CPS group and seven patients in the TBW group experienced postoperative complications; this difference was statistically significant. The mean ± SD Mayo Elbow Performance Score in the CPS group was significantly higher (88.67 ± 6.42) than that in the TBW group (80.78 ± 11.99). Logistic regression analysis showed an association between fixation method and fracture healing time, complications and elbow function. Internal fixation by CPS is an effective method for olecranon fracture and is associated with a shorter healing time, fewer complications and better function than TBW.

  6. Deflation versus maintained inflation of gastric band in pregnancy: A national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferys, Amanda; Lenguerrand, Erik; Cornthwaite, Katie; Johnson, Andrew; Lynch, Mary; Hyde, Judith; Draycott, Tim; Siassakos, Dimitrios

    2017-06-01

    With no evidence to guide management of the gastric band in pregnancy, we aim to compare outcomes according to band management. Data were collected on all women pregnant (November 2011-October 2012) following gastric banding, using the UK Obstetric Surveillance System surveillance system. We compared outcomes between band management groups and with national data. Band management was variable; deflation 43.4%, inflation maintained 56.6%. The deflation group had lower risk of small for gestational age infants (no cases vs. 11.3%; risk ratio = 0.14, p  = 0.05). There was greater gestational weight gain (deflation 15.4 kg, inflation 7.6 kg; adjusted p  = 0.05), and perhaps higher risk of gestational hypertension (deflation 10.5%, inflation no cases; p  = 0.08) in the deflation group. Other maternal outcomes were similar between management groups but overall worse than national data. Deflation is associated with better outcomes for babies but worse outcomes for mothers than maintained inflation.

  7. A comparative in vivo and in vitro L-band EPR study of irradiated rat incisors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zdravkova, M.; Gallez, B.; Debuyst, R.

    2005-01-01

    L-band (∼1GHz) EPR has the potential to measure the absorbed radiation dose in human teeth inside the mouth (in vivo analyses). One crucial point in the development of the method is to know if dosimetry evaluation carried out in vivo after accidental exposures can be reliably based on calibration curves built in vitro. The aim of the present work is to specifically address this point. First, we compared L-band in vitro and in vivo analyses in irradiated rat teeth and estimated the possible loss in in vivo experiments due to rat movements and mouth proximity. Second, the lower pair of rat incisors were analysed by L-band EPR before and after irradiation (50Gy), first on the living rat, then on the same dead rat, finally after extraction of the teeth. X-band powder spectra were also taken after crushing of the two teeth. Irradiations of dead rats and extracted teeth were also carried out. Comparing L-band spectra obtained with living rats and removed heads does not show any significant difference due to possible small rat movements or breathing. Relative standard deviations of the amplitudes of the dosimetric signal are quite high (27-54%). Nevertheless, it seems to be a tendency to have higher signals in irradiated extracted teeth than in irradiated animals

  8. Science Fiction: Better than Delphi Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Milton T.

    1994-01-01

    Considers science fiction as a literary genre and as a predictor of technological advances, particularly in the information industry. An annotated bibliography is included of 11 science fiction titles and 1 nonfiction book that suggest possible information futures. (LRW)

  9. No effect of forearm band and extensor strengthening exercises for the treatment of tennis elbow: a prospective randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luginbühl, Rolf; Brunner, Florian; Schneeberger, Alberto G

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this prospective randomised study was to analyse the effect of the forearm support band and of strengthening exercises for the treatment of tennis elbow. Twenty-nine patients with 30 tennis elbows were randomised into 3 groups of treatment: (I) forearm support band, (II) strengthening exercises and (III) both methods. The patients had a standardised examination at their first visit, and then after 6 weeks, 3 months and 1 year. At the latest follow-up, there was a significant improvement of the symptoms compared to before treatment (p<0.0001), considering all patients independently of the methods of treatment. However, no differences in the scores were found between the 3 groups of treatment (p=0.27), indicating that no beneficial influence was found either for the strengthening exercises or for the forearm support band. Improvement seems to occur with time, independent of the method of treatment used.

  10. Computational study of the shift of the G band of double-walled carbon nanotubes due to interlayer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Valentin N.; Levshov, Dmitry I.; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Paillet, Matthieu

    2018-04-01

    The interactions between the layers of double-walled carbon nanotubes induce a measurable shift of the G bands relative to the isolated layers. While experimental data on this shift in freestanding double-walled carbon nanotubes has been reported in the past several years, a comprehensive theoretical description of the observed shift is still lacking. The prediction of this shift is important for supporting the assignment of the measured double-walled nanotubes to particular nanotube types. Here, we report a computational study of the G-band shift as a function of the semiconducting inner layer radius and interlayer separation. We find that with increasing interlayer separation, the G band shift decreases, passes through zero and becomes negative, and further increases in absolute value for the wide range of considered inner layer radii. The theoretical predictions are shown to agree with the available experimental data within the experimental uncertainty.

  11. Reel Science: An Ethnographic Study of Girls' Science Identity Development in and through Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Rachel L.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation study contributes to the research on filmmaking and identity development by exploring the ways that film production provided unique opportunities for a team of four girls to engage in science, to develop identities in science, and to see and understand science differently. Using social practice, identity, and feminist theory and…

  12. HMB-45 Study Before and After Narrow-Band (311 nm Ultraviolet B Treatment in Vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosavi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Vitiligo is an acquired disease in which the loss of functional melanocytes results in depigmented macules and patches. Over the years, wide arrays of markers for melanocytes have been described, including human melanoma black 45 (HMB-45. Narrow-band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB therapy is one of the therapeutic modalities for vitiligo. Objectives We sought to detect HMB-45 staining after 30 sessions of NB-UVB therapy in vitiligo and perivitiliginous skin. Patients and Methods All the participants were planned to have 30 sessions of NB-UVB therapy with 724 lamps (FS, 72 T, 12-HO Daavlin MED at 311 nm wavelengths. The patients underwent skin sampling from lesional and perilesional area before and after 30 sessions of treatment. The skin biopsies were sent to the laboratory for light microscopy and immunohistochemical study. The evaluation of HMB-45 was based on the quantitative method, measuring the number of positive stained cells. Clinical response was defined as repigmentation in three categories: more than 75%; between 40% and 75%; and less than 40%. The data were analyzed using SPSS (version 17. Results Twenty-nine patients completed the study. The Wilcoxon test showed a meaningful relation between HMB-45 staining before and after NB-UVB treatment in perilesional skin. We did not find a meaningful relation between HMB-45 staining before and after treatment regarding the mean age, gender, mean duration of disease, and initial lesional area (P = 0.55, P = 0.41, P = 0.55, and P = 0.87, respectively. After 30 sessions of NB-UVB therapy, repigmentation was less than 40% in 8 (27.6%, 40 - 75% in 7 (24.1%, and more than 75% in 6 patients. Conclusions The HMB-45 stain strength significantly changed after treatment in perilesional skin.

  13. Reel Science: An Ethnographic Study of Girls' Science Identity Development In and Through Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Rachel L.

    This dissertation study contributes to the research on filmmaking and identity development by exploring the ways that film production provided unique opportunities for a team of four girls to engage in science, to develop identities in science, and to see and understand science differently. Using social practice, identity, and feminist theory and New Literacies Studies as a theoretical lens and grounded theory and multimodality as analytic frameworks, I present findings that suggest that girls in this study authored identities and communicated and represented science in and through film in ways that drew on their social, cultural, and embodied resources and the material resources of the after-school science club. Findings from this study highlight the affordances of filmmaking as a venue for engaging in the disciplinary practices of science and for accessing and authoring identities in science.

  14. An Empirical Study on Washback Effects of the Internet-Based College English Test Band 4 in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Yan, Jiaolan; Liu, Bao

    2014-01-01

    Based on Bailey's washback model, in respect of participants, process and products, the present empirical study was conducted to find the actual washback effects of the internet-based College English Test Band 4 (IB CET-4). The methods adopted are questionnaires, class observation, interview and the analysis of both the CET-4 teaching and testing…

  15. A Study of Criteria for the Evaluation of Secondary School Instrumentalists When Auditioning for Festival Bands. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Curtis D., Jr.

    This study purposed to develop a means of evaluating student performance in auditions for festival bands which would minimize the inconsistencies of subjective judgment. Tape recordings of student auditions were played three times to judges. During the first audition, evaluators rated students on a continuum scale with numerical divisions, and…

  16. A Case Study Exploring the Use of GarageBand[TM] and an Electronic Bulletin Board in Preservice Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vratulis, Vetta; Morton, Charlene

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative research study is an exploration of the merit and shortcomings of using a combination of the music software GarageBand[TM] and an electronic bulletin board to facilitate musical and peer learning in a 3-month elementary music methods curriculum and instruction course. A pedagogical objective of this assignment was to increase the…

  17. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis correction achieved by posteromedial translation using polyester bands: A comparative study of subtransverse process versus sublaminar fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, C; Ilharreborde, B; Fournier, J; Mazda, K; Bonnard, C

    2014-11-01

    Sublaminar polyester bands have been used in hybrid construct to achieve correction of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis since 2003. Despite the reported safety of the bands, some surgeons remain reluctant at the idea of approaching the canal because of the potential neurological complications reported with the Luque wiring. Sub transverse bands might be an alternative. The present study is the first to compare sublaminar polyester band fixation to fixation of polyester bands around the transverse processes in hybrid constructs used to treat AIS. Two cohorts of consecutive patients treated for thoracic AIS were retrospectively reviewed, with a minimum 2-year follow-up. Posteromedial translation was used for main curve correction in all cases. Sublaminar polyester bands were used in group 1 (20 patients). In group 2 (20 patients), the same implant was used, but the bands were passed around the transverse process instead of the lamina. Radiographic analysis included frontal Cobb angle measurements for each curve, thoracic kyphosis and rotation of the apical vertebra (RVA). Mean operative time was similar in groups 1 and 2 (235±35 and 240±30minutes, respectively). Mean frontal correction achieved for the main curve was similar in both groups, 62.5±17.4% in group 1 and 54.1±19.4% in group 2. Sagittal correction was similar, with a final mean thoracic kyphosis of 30.9°±9.7° and 27.8°± 6.8° in group 1 and 2, respectively. Correction of RVA was similar in both groups postoperatively, 65.8% (±29.1) and 54.4% (±42.7) in group 1 and 2 respectively. No transverse process or lamina fracture was observed during insertion of the bands or curve correction in any of the groups. This study confirms that anchorage of Universal clamps (UCs) around transverse processes is a safe and efficacious technique in both the frontal and sagittal planes, providing a useful alternative for the correction of moderate AIS. UCs attached to transverse processes can achieve correction of

  18. Study of odd-even staggering in γ-band of 228Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshney, A.K.; Singh, Y.; Singh, M.; Bihari, Chhail; Gupta, D.K.; Gupta, K.K.

    2007-01-01

    228 Th is a well deformed nucleus of asymmetric parameter γ=13deg. We have been encouraged to undertake the present work that while 228 Th fulfills the basic requirement of triaxiality why not triaxial rotor model be employed to explain OES in γ-band

  19. Optical study of the band structure of wurtzite GaP nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Assali, S.

    2016-07-25

    We investigated the optical properties of wurtzite (WZ) GaP nanowires by performing photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved PL measurements in the temperature range from 4 K to 300 K, together with atom probe tomography to identify residual impurities in the nanowires. At low temperature, the WZ GaP luminescence shows donor-acceptor pair emission at 2.115 eV and 2.088 eV, and Burstein-Moss band-filling continuum between 2.180 and 2.253 eV, resulting in a direct band gap above 2.170 eV. Sharp exciton α-β-γ lines are observed at 2.140–2.164–2.252 eV, respectively, showing clear differences in lifetime, presence of phonon replicas, and temperature-dependence. The excitonic nature of those peaks is critically discussed, leading to a direct band gap of ∼2.190 eV and to a resonant state associated with the γ-line ∼80 meV above the Γ8C conduction band edge.

  20. Review of studies on conventional linear colliders in the S- and X-Band regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.

    1992-07-01

    This paper gives a status report on the conventional approaches to linear colliders at DESY, KEK, SLAC and INP-Protvino in the S- and X-Band regime. Critical topics are reviewed and a discussion of global issues such as future R ampersand D requirements is included

  1. Optical study of the band structure of wurtzite GaP nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Assali, S.; Greil, J.; Zardo, I.; Belabbes, Abderrezak; de Moor, M. W. A.; Koelling, S.; Koenraad, P. M.; Bechstedt, F.; Bakkers, E. P. A. M.; Haverkort, J. E. M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the optical properties of wurtzite (WZ) GaP nanowires by performing photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved PL measurements in the temperature range from 4 K to 300 K, together with atom probe tomography to identify residual impurities in the nanowires. At low temperature, the WZ GaP luminescence shows donor-acceptor pair emission at 2.115 eV and 2.088 eV, and Burstein-Moss band-filling continuum between 2.180 and 2.253 eV, resulting in a direct band gap above 2.170 eV. Sharp exciton α-β-γ lines are observed at 2.140–2.164–2.252 eV, respectively, showing clear differences in lifetime, presence of phonon replicas, and temperature-dependence. The excitonic nature of those peaks is critically discussed, leading to a direct band gap of ∼2.190 eV and to a resonant state associated with the γ-line ∼80 meV above the Γ8C conduction band edge.

  2. Properties of superdeformed bands in the 151Tb nucleus studied with the EUROGAM French-British spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finck, Christian

    1997-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the study of superdeformation (SD) of the atomic nucleus. In the mass region A ≅ 150 those nuclei have a quadrupole deformation of about 0.6. However, this value is an average and the microscopic structure reflected in the band configurations, affects this deformation. Determination of this value by electric quadrupole moment studies is particularly useful especially for the identical SD bands (SD bands belonging to neighbouring nuclei and having the same moment of inertia). Knowledge of the different quadrupole deformation should shed light on the competition between mass difference, spin alignment and deformation of the nucleus. The electric quadrupole moments are deduced from lifetime measurements of the SD states using the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method. Experimentally, one observes a variation in the electric quadrupole moments of the lowest SD states which suggests a gradual change of the nuclear deformation towards normal less deformed shapes. The deexcitation mechanism is poorly understood in the A ≅ 150 mass region due to lack of experimental information: up to now, no transition connecting the second and the first potential well has been observed for these SD states. Experimental studies of deexcitation patterns of SD bands are therefore crucial to fix the decay-out mechanism. Experimental data on the 151 Tb nucleus were collected via fusion-evaporation reaction, using the EUROGAM phase II array. (author)

  3. 78 FR 33074 - Army Science Board Summer Study Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ...--This study evaluates what science and technology competencies the Army must maintain and/or develop as... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Session AGENCY... the Army announces the following committee meeting: 1. Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). 2...

  4. Electronic structure investigation of MoS2 and MoSe2 using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and ab initio band structure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahatha, S K; Patel, K D; Menon, Krishnakumar S R

    2012-11-28

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and ab initio band structure calculations have been used to study the detailed valence band structure of molybdenite, MoS(2) and MoSe(2). The experimental band structure obtained from ARPES has been found to be in good agreement with the theoretical calculations performed using the linear augmented plane wave (LAPW) method. In going from MoS(2) to MoSe(2), the dispersion of the valence bands decreases along both k(parallel) and k(perpendicular), revealing the increased two-dimensional character which is attributed to the increasing interlayer distance or c/a ratio in these compounds. The width of the valence band and the band gap are also found to decrease, whereas the valence band maxima shift towards the higher binding energy from MoS(2) to MoSe(2).

  5. The minimum test battery to screen for binocular vision anomalies: report 3 of the BAND study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussaindeen, Jameel Rizwana; Rakshit, Archayeeta; Singh, Neeraj Kumar; Swaminathan, Meenakshi; George, Ronnie; Kapur, Suman; Scheiman, Mitchell; Ramani, Krishna Kumar

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to report the minimum test battery needed to screen non-strabismic binocular vision anomalies (NSBVAs) in a community set-up. When large numbers are to be screened we aim to identify the most useful test battery when there is no opportunity for a more comprehensive and time-consuming clinical examination. The prevalence estimates and normative data for binocular vision parameters were estimated from the Binocular Vision Anomalies and Normative Data (BAND) study, following which cut-off estimates and receiver operating characteristic curves to identify the minimum test battery have been plotted. In the receiver operating characteristic phase of the study, children between nine and 17 years of age were screened in two schools in the rural arm using the minimum test battery, and the prevalence estimates with the minimum test battery were found. Receiver operating characteristic analyses revealed that near point of convergence with penlight and red filter (> 7.5 cm), monocular accommodative facility ( 1.25 prism dioptres) were significant factors with cut-off values for best sensitivity and specificity. This minimum test battery was applied to a cohort of 305 children. The mean (standard deviation) age of the subjects was 12.7 (two) years with 121 males and 184 females. Using the minimum battery of tests obtained through the receiver operating characteristic analyses, the prevalence of NSBVAs was found to be 26 per cent. Near point of convergence with penlight and red filter > 10 cm was found to have the highest sensitivity (80 per cent) and specificity (73 per cent) for the diagnosis of convergence insufficiency. For the diagnosis of accommodative infacility, monocular accommodative facility with a cut-off of less than seven cycles per minute was the best predictor for screening (92 per cent sensitivity and 90 per cent specificity). The minimum test battery of near point of convergence with penlight and red filter, difference between distance and near

  6. Comparing the Knotless Tension Band and the Traditional Stainless Steel Wire Tension Band Fixation for Medial Malleolus Fractures: A Retrospective Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Downey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional stainless steel wire tension band (WTB has been popularized for small avulsion fractures at the medial malleolus. Despite the tension band principle creating a stable construct, complications continue to arise utilizing the traditional stainless steel WTB with patients experiencing hardware irritation at the tension band site and subsequent hardware removal. Coupled with hardware irritation is fatigue failure with the wire. The goal of this investigation was to retrospectively compare this traditional wire technique to an innovative knotless tension band (KTB technique in order to decrease costly complications. A total of 107 patients were reviewed with a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Outcome measures include descriptive data, fracture classification, results through economic costs, and fixation results (including hardware status, healing status, pain status, and time to healing. The KTB group had a 13% lower true cost as compared to the WTB group while the fixation results were equivocal for the measured outcomes. Our results demonstrate that the innovative KTB is comparable to the traditional WTB while offering a lower true cost, an irritation free reduction all without the frustration of returning to the operating room for additional hardware removal, which averages approximately to $8,288.

  7. Science comics as tools for science education and communication: a brief, exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tatalovic

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Comics are a popular art form especially among children and as such provide a potential medium for science education and communication. In an attempt to present science comics in a museum exhibit I found many science themed comics and graphic books. Here I attempt to provide an overview of already available comics that communicate science, the genre of ‘science comics’. I also provide a quick literature review for evidence that comics can indeed be efficiently used for promoting scientific literacy via education and communication. I address the issue of lack of studies about science comics and their readers and suggest some possible reasons for this as well as some questions that could be addressed in future studies on the effect these comics may have on science communication.

  8. Negotiating science and engineering: an exploratory case study of a reform-minded science teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzey, S. Selcen; Ring-Whalen, Elizabeth A.

    2018-05-01

    Engineering has been slowly integrated into K-12 science classrooms in the United States as the result of recent science education reforms. Such changes in science teaching require that a science teacher is confident with and committed to content, practices, language, and cultures related to both science and engineering. However, from the perspective of the science teacher, this would require not only the development of knowledge and pedagogies associated with engineering, but also the construction of new identities operating within the reforms and within the context of their school. In this study, a middle school science teacher was observed and interviewed over a period of nine months to explore his experiences as he adopted new values, discourses, and practices and constructed his identity as a reform-minded science teacher. Our findings revealed that, as the teacher attempted to become a reform-minded science teacher, he constantly negotiated his professional identities - a dynamic process that created conflicts in his classroom practices. Several differences were observed between the teacher's science and engineering instruction: hands-on activities, depth and detail of content, language use, and the way the teacher positioned himself and his students with respect to science and engineering. Implications for science teacher professional development are discussed.

  9. New concepts of science and medicine in science and technology studies and their relevance to science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiu-Yun; Stocker, Joel F; Fu, Daiwie

    2012-02-01

    Science education often adopts a narrow view of science that assumes the lay public is ignorant, which seemingly justifies a science education limited to a promotional narrative of progress in the form of scientific knowledge void of meaningful social context. We propose that to prepare students as future concerned citizens of a technoscientific society, science education should be informed by science, technology, and society (STS) perspectives. An STS-informed science education, in our view, will include the following curricular elements: science controversy education, gender issues, historical perspective, and a move away from a Eurocentric view by looking into the distinctive patterns of other regional (in this case of Taiwan, East Asian) approaches to science, technology, and medicine. This article outlines the significance of some major STS studies as a means of illustrating the ways in which STS perspectives can, if incorporated into science education, enhance our understanding of science and technology and their relationships with society. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Aging in autonomic control by multifractal studies of cardiac interbeat intervals in the VLF band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowiec, Danuta; Kryszewski, Stanisław; Rynkiewicz, Andrzej; Wdowczyk-Szulc, Joanna; Żarczyńska-Buchowiecka, Marta; Gałąska, Rafał

    2011-01-01

    The heart rate responds dynamically to various intrinsic and environmental stimuli. The autonomic nervous system is said to play a major role in this response. Multifractal analysis offers a novel method to assess the response of cardiac interbeat intervals. Twenty-four hour ECG recordings of RR interbeat intervals (of 48 elderly volunteers (age 65–94), 40 middle-aged persons (age 45–53) and 36 young adults (age 18–26)) were investigated to study the effect of aging on autonomic regulation during normal activity in healthy adults. Heart RR-interval variability in the very low frequency (VLF) band (32–420 RR intervals) was evaluated by multifractal tools. The nocturnal and diurnal signals of 6 h duration were studied separately. For each signal, the analysis was performed twice: for a given signal and for the integrated signal. A multifractal spectrum was quantified by the h max value at which a multifractal spectrum attained its maximum, width of a spectrum, Hurst exponent, extreme events h left and distance between the maxima of a signal and its integrated counterpart. The following seven characteristics are suggested as quantifying the age-related decrease in the autonomic function ('int' refers to the integrated signal): (a) h sleep max − h max wake > 0.05 for a signal; (b) h int max > 1.15 for wake; (c) h int max − h max > 0.85 for sleep; (d) Hurst wake − Hurst sleep < 0.01; (e) width wake > 0.07; (f) width int < 0.30 for sleep; (g) h int left > 0.75. Eighty-one percent of elderly people had at least four of these properties, and ninety-two percent of young people had three or less. This shows that the multifractal approach offers a concise and reliable index of healthy aging for each individual. Additionally, the applied method yielded insights into dynamical changes in the autonomic regulation due to the circadian cycle and aging. Our observations support the hypothesis that imbalance in the autonomic control due to healthy aging could

  11. Energy band modulation of graphane by hydrogen-vacancy chains: A first-principles study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi-Ru Wu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated a variety of configurations of hydrogen-vacancy chains in graphane by first-principles density functional calculation. We found that graphane with two zigzag H-vacancy chains segregated by one or more H chain is generally a nonmagnetic conductor or has a negligible band gap. However, the same structure is turned into a semiconductor and generates a magnetic moment if either one or both of the vacancy chains are blocked by isolated H atoms. If H-vacancy chains are continuously distributed, the structure is similar to a zigzag graphene nanoribbon embedded in graphane. It was also found that the embedded zigzag graphene nanoribbon is antiferromagnetic, and isolated H atoms left in the 2-chain nanoribbon can tune the band gap and generate net magnetic moments. Similar effects are also obtained if bare carbon atoms are present outside the nanoribbon. These results are useful for designing graphene-based nanoelectronic circuits.

  12. Band formation in xenon-argon alloys studied by photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuernberger, R.; Himpsel, F.J.; Schwentner, N.; Koch, E.E.

    1977-01-01

    Photoelectron energy distribution curves for Xenon-Argon alloys for concentrations ranging from 0-100% have been measured by excitation with synchrotron radiation at hupsilon = 13.8 eV, 16.5 eV and 18.0 eV. With increasing Xe concentration the gradual formation of Xe valence bands starting from the atomic Xe 5p 1 / 2 and Xe 5p 3 / 2 states is observed. Similarly with Ar the 3p states are broadened with increasing Ar concentration. Rather high concentrations of Xe or Ar are necessary in order to reach the fully developed Xe or Ar bands respectively. The results are discussed in terms of a concentration dependent tightbinding bandstructure. (orig.) [de

  13. First-principles study on band structures and electrical transports of doped-SnTe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Dong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tin telluride is a thermoelectric material that enables the conversion of thermal energy to electricity. SnTe demonstrates a great potential for large-scale applications due to its lead-free nature and the similar crystal structure to PbTe. In this paper, the effect of dopants (i.e., Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu, Yb, Zn, Cd, Hg, and In on the band structures and electrical transport properties of SnTe was investigated based on the first-principles density functional theory including spin–orbit coupling. The results show that Zn and Cd have a dominant effect of band convergence, leading to power factor enhancement. Indium induces obvious resonant states, while Hg-doped SnTe exhibits a different behavior with defect states locating slightly above the Fermi level.

  14. Study of Optical Band Gap of CuO Using Fermi's Golden Rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemade, K R; Waghuley, S A

    2012-01-01

    Quantum size effect where the electronic and optical properties of solids are altered due to changes in the band structures, enhanced the surface/volume ratio in nano dimensions forces more than 33% of the atoms to be on the surface (for 10nm dot 35), which drastically altering the physical properties such as having lower melting temperature and lower sintering temperature, and higher diffusion force at elevated temperatures. Consequently, its Fermi's golden rule analysis becomes crucial. Cupric oxide (CuO) is an important transition metal oxide with the basis of several high temperature superconductors and giant magnetoresistance materials. In present investigation, optical Band Gap from UV data using Fermi's golden rule for single step chemically synthesized CuO was computed.

  15. Optical study of the band structure of wurtzite GaP nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Assali, S.; Greil, J.; Zardo, I.; Belabbes, A.; de Moor, M.W.A.; Kölling, S.; Koenraad, P.M.; Bechstedt, F.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Haverkort, J.E.M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the optical properties of wurtzite (WZ) GaP nanowires by performing photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved PL measurements in the temperature range from 4 K to 300 K, together with atom probe tomography to identify residual impurities in the nanowires. At low temperature, the WZ GaP luminescence shows donor-acceptor pair emission at 2.115 eV and 2.088 eV, and Burstein-Moss band-filling continuum between 2.180 and 2.253 eV, resulting in a direct band gap above 2.170 eV. Sharp...

  16. Band-Gap Engineering in ZnO Thin Films: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Vani; Jha, Pardeep K.; Panda, S. K.; Jha, Priyanka A.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2018-05-01

    Zinc oxide thin films are synthesized and characterized using x-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and optical spectroscopy. Our results reveal that the structural, morphological, and optical properties are closely related to the stress of the sample provided that the texture of the film remains the same. The anomalous results are obtained once the texture is altered to a different orientation. We support this experimental observation by carrying out first-principles hybrid functional calculations for two different orientations of the sample and show that the effect of quantum confinement is much stronger for the (100) surface than the (001) surface of ZnO. Furthermore, our calculations provide a route to enhance the band gap of ZnO by more than 50% compared to the bulk band gap, opening up possibilities for wide-range industrial applications.

  17. Optical band gap study of a-Se and Se-Sb thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Ramandeep; Singh, Palwinder; Thakur, Anup

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous selenium (a-Se) and a-Se_9_5Sb_5 alloy were prepared using melt quenching technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirmed the amorphous nature of the prepared samples. Composition of the prepared samples has been determined using Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) confirmed the glassy nature of the prepared samples. Thin films of the prepared samples were deposited on glass substrate using thermal evaporation method. Amorphous nature of the deposited films was confirmed using XRD. Optical properties of these films were obtained from the UV-VIS transmission spectra, at normal incidence, over 200-1100 nm spectral range. The optical absorption edge was described by using the model given by the Tauc. Optical band gap of the deposited films was calculated using Tauc plot. Optical characterization showed that average transmission and optical band gap decreased with the addition of antinomy.

  18. Electronic structure and optical properties of Cs2HgI4: Experimental study and band-structure DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentyev, A. A.; Gabrelian, B. V.; Vu, V. T.; Shkumat, P. N.; Myronchuk, G. L.; Khvyshchun, M.; Fedorchuk, A. O.; Parasyuk, O. V.; Khyzhun, O. Y.

    2015-04-01

    High-quality single crystal of cesium mercury tetraiodide, Cs2HgI4, has been synthesized by the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger method and its crystal structure has been refined. In addition, electronic structure and optical properties of Cs2HgI4 have been studied. For the crystal under study, X-ray photoelectron core-level and valence-band spectra for pristine and Ar+-ion irradiated surfaces have been measured. The present X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicate that the Cs2HgI4 single crystal surface is very sensitive with respect to Ar+ ion-irradiation. In particular, Ar+ bombardment of the single crystal surface alters the elemental stoichiometry of the Cs2HgI4 surface. To elucidate peculiarities of the energy distribution of the electronic states within the valence-band and conduction-band regions of the Cs2HgI4 compound, we have performed first-principles band-structure calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) as incorporated in the WIEN2k package. Total and partial densities of states for Cs2HgI4 have been calculated. The DFT calculations reveal that the I p states make the major contributions in the upper portion of the valence band, while the Hg d, Cs p and I s states are the dominant contributors in its lower portion. Temperature dependence of the light absorption coefficient and specific electrical conductivity has been explored for Cs2HgI4 in the temperature range of 77-300 K. Main optical characteristics of the Cs2HgI4 compound have been elucidated by the first-principles calculations.

  19. Experimental study of the πh11/2 band in 113 Sb

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    States only up to 59/2− were observed in the = 2 band. Mean lifetimes for the five states (from 4460 to 7998 keV) were measured for the first time using Doppler shift attenuation method. An upper limit of the lifetime (0.14 ps) was estimated for the 9061 keV, 47/2− state. The (2) values, derived from the present lifetime ...

  20. Endogenously generated gamma-band oscillations in early visual cortex: A neurofeedback study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Nina; Wibral, Michael; Bland, Gareth; Singer, Wolf

    2018-04-26

    Human subjects were trained with neurofeedback (NFB) to enhance the power of narrow-band gamma oscillations in circumscribed regions of early visual cortex. To select the region and the oscillation frequency for NFB training, gamma oscillations were induced with locally presented drifting gratings. The source and frequency of these induced oscillations were determined using beamforming methods. During NFB training the power of narrow band gamma oscillations was continuously extracted from this source with online beamforming and converted into the pitch of a tone signal. We found that seven out of ten subjects were able to selectively increase the amplitude of gamma oscillations in the absence of visual stimulation. One subject however failed completely and two subjects succeeded to manipulate the feedback signal by contraction of muscles. In all subjects the attempts to enhance visual gamma oscillations were associated with an increase of beta oscillations over precentral/frontal regions. Only successful subjects exhibited an additional marked increase of theta oscillations over precentral/prefrontal and temporal regions whereas unsuccessful subjects showed an increase of alpha band oscillations over occipital regions. We argue that spatially confined networks in early visual cortex can be entrained to engage in narrow band gamma oscillations not only by visual stimuli but also by top down signals. We interpret the concomitant increase in beta oscillations as indication for an engagement of the fronto-parietal attention network and the increase of theta oscillations as a correlate of imagery. Our finding support the application of NFB in disease conditions associated with impaired gamma synchronization. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Study on general design of dual-DMD based infrared two-band scene simulation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yue; Qiao, Yang; Xu, Xi-ping

    2017-02-01

    Mid-wave infrared(MWIR) and long-wave infrared(LWIR) two-band scene simulation system is a kind of testing equipment that used for infrared two-band imaging seeker. Not only it would be qualified for working waveband, but also realize the essence requests that infrared radiation characteristics should correspond to the real scene. Past single-digital micromirror device (DMD) based infrared scene simulation system does not take the huge difference between targets and background radiation into account, and it cannot realize the separated modulation to two-band light beam. Consequently, single-DMD based infrared scene simulation system cannot accurately express the thermal scene model that upper-computer built, and it is not that practical. To solve the problem, we design a dual-DMD based, dual-channel, co-aperture, compact-structure infrared two-band scene simulation system. The operating principle of the system is introduced in detail, and energy transfer process of the hardware-in-the-loop simulation experiment is analyzed as well. Also, it builds the equation about the signal-to-noise ratio of infrared detector in the seeker, directing the system overall design. The general design scheme of system is given, including the creation of infrared scene model, overall control, optical-mechanical structure design and image registration. By analyzing and comparing the past designs, we discuss the arrangement of optical engine framework in the system. According to the main content of working principle and overall design, we summarize each key techniques in the system.

  2. Study of the structure of yrast bands of neutron-rich 114-124Pd isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Ritu; Devi, Rani; Khosa, S. K.

    2018-02-01

    The projected shell model calculations have been carried out in the neutron-rich 114-124Pd isotopic mass chain. The results have been obtained for the deformation systematics of E(2+1) and E(4+1)/E({2}+1) values, BCS subshell occupation numbers, yrast spectra, backbending phenomena, B( E2) transition probabilities and g-factors in these nuclei. The observed systematics of E(2+1) values and R_{42} ratios in the 114-124Pd isotopic mass chain indicate that there is a decrease of collectivity as the neutron number increases from 68 to 78. The occurrence of backbending in these nuclei as well as the changes in the calculated B( E2) transition probabilities and g -factors predict that there are changes in the structure of yrast bands in these nuclei. These changes occur at the spin where there is crossing of g-band by 2-qp bands. The predicted backbendings and predicted values of B( E2)s and g-factors in some of the isotopes need to be confirmed experimentally.

  3. Fusing Panchromatic and SWIR Bands Based on Cnn - a Preliminary Study Over WORLDVIEW-3 Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, M.; Ma, H.; Bao, Y.; Wang, L.

    2018-04-01

    The traditional fusion methods are based on the fact that the spectral ranges of the Panchromatic (PAN) and multispectral bands (MS) are almost overlapping. In this paper, we propose a new pan-sharpening method for the fusion of PAN and SWIR (short-wave infrared) bands, whose spectral coverages are not overlapping. This problem is addressed with a convolutional neural network (CNN), which is trained by WorldView-3 dataset. CNN can learn the complex relationship among bands, and thus alleviate spectral distortion. Consequently, in our network, we use the simple three-layer basic architecture with 16 × 16 kernels to conduct the experiment. Every layer use different receptive field. The first two layers compute 512 feature maps by using the 16 × 16 and 1 × 1 receptive field respectively and the third layer with a 8 × 8 receptive field. The fusion results are optimized by continuous training. As for assessment, four evaluation indexes including Entropy, CC, SAM and UIQI are selected built on subjective visual effect and quantitative evaluation. The preliminary experimental results demonstrate that the fusion algorithms can effectively enhance the spatial information. Unfortunately, the fusion image has spectral distortion, it cannot maintain the spectral information of the SWIR image.

  4. The Influence of Disciplines on the Knowledge of Science: A Study of the Nature of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Akarsu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available At least four factors affect pupils’ understanding of the nature of science: teachers’ specialization in different science areas (physics, chemistry, and biology, gender issues, teaching experience in elementary school environments, and the perspectives of acquiring necessary knowledge. This study is the introduction part of a research project which will be initiated soon. Four elementary science teachers participated in the study. The results reveal that participants’ views of the aspects of nature of science are not solely diverged, based on their major disciplines, but there exist significant distinctions according to gender differences.

  5. Case study of science teaching in an elementary school: Characteristics of an exemplary science teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Huey-Lien

    Improving the quality of science teaching is one of the greatest concerns in recent science education reform efforts. Many science educators suggest that case studies of exemplary science teachers may provide guidance for these reform efforts. For this reason, the characteristics of exemplary science teaching practices have been identified in recent years. However, the literature lacks research exploring exemplary teacher beliefs about the nature of science and science pedagogy, the relationships between their beliefs and practices, or how outstanding teachers overcome difficulties in order to facilitate their students' science learning. In this study, Sam-Yu, an identified exemplary science teacher who teaches in an elementary school in Pintung, Taiwan, was the subject. An interpretative research design (Erickson, 1986) based on principles of naturalistic inquiry (Lincoln & Guba, 1985) was used. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were employed in this case study. The qualitative method involved conducting interviews with the teacher and students, observing classroom activities and analyzing the structure of the learning materials. The quantitative methods involved using the Learning Climate Inventory (LCI) (Lin, 1997) instrument to assess the learning environment of the exemplary science classroom. This study found that Sam-Yu had a blend of views on the nature of science and a varied knowledge about science pedagogy. Personal preferences, past experiences, and the national science curriculum all played important roles in the development and refinement of Sam-Yu's beliefs about science and pedagogy. Regarding his teaching practices, Sam-Yu provided the best learning experiences, as evidenced in both classroom observations and the survey results, for his students by using a variety of strategies. In addition, his classroom behaviors were highly associated with his beliefs about science and pedagogy. However, due to school-based and socio-cultural constraints

  6. X-band ESR study on evaluation of radicals induced in pasteurized pepper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Masaaki; Ogawa, Satoko; Ukai, Mitsuko; Oowada, Shigeru

    2007-01-01

    The radical properties of pasteurized pepper were investigated by means of X-band ESR spectroscopy. Pasteurization process was done by irradiation or steam. There were three radicals in the specimens before and after pasteurization. Upon irradiation a new radical was found. ESR peak intensity of specimen before and after parturition with steam was almost same level. Peak intensity of radiated pepper showed almost 4 times as compare with that of non treated pepper. Radical activity of the specimens after pasteurization showed almost same value. We concluded that radicals were induced by irradiation. But the radical activity was not changed before and after pasteurization. (author)

  7. Environment, Science and Innovation. Analysis from the Perspective of Science Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muñoz, A.; Lopera, E.; Cornejo, M.

    2015-01-01

    )Humankind is facing important challenges. Environmental degradation, of which climate change is the main exponent, is one of them. Science and innovation are key factors to address this challenge, in a context in which is becoming more evident the lack of commitment of society with scientific and technological development. Taking this into consideration, this paper analyzes the interaction among environment, science and innovation from the perspective of science studies.

  8. Theoretical study of electronic absorption spectroscopy of propadienylidene molecule vis-â-vis the observed diffuse interstellar bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Samala Nagaprasad; Mahapatra, S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Theoretical study of spectroscopy and dynamics of electronically excited l-C 3 H 2 . ► Construction of ab initio electronic potential energy and diabatic coupling surfaces. ► First principles study of nuclear dynamics on excited electronic states. ► Findings reveal l-C 3 H 2 is a potential molecular carrier of diffuse interstellar bands. ► Electronically excited l-C 3 H 2 decays by ultrafast nonradiative internal conversion. -- Abstract: Observation of broad and diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) at 4881 Å and 5440 Å assigned to the optical absorption spectrum of Y-shaped propadienylidene (H 2 C=C=C:) molecule is theoretically examined in this paper. This molecule apparently absorbs in the same wavelength region as the observed DIBs and was suggested to be a potential carrier of these DIBs. This assignment mostly relied on the experimental data from radioastronomy and laboratory measurements. Motivated by these available experimental data we attempt here a theoretical study and investigate the detailed electronic structure and nuclear dynamics underlying the electronic absorption bands of propadienylidene molecule. Our results show that this molecule indeed absorbs in the wavelength region of the recorded DIBs. Strong nonadiabatic coupling between its energetically low-lying electronic states plays major role, initiates ultrafast internal conversion and contributes to the spectral broadening. Theoretical findings are finally compared with the available experimental and theoretical data and discussed in connection with the recorded DIBs.

  9. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser flash photolysis studies were carried out on two types of silver nanoparticles prepared by ... Type II silver nanoparticles showed a 390 nm surface plasmon band with a shoulder at 550 nm. ... Journal of Chemical Sciences | News.

  10. Simulation study of InGaN intermediate-band solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Kuo-Feng; Hung, Chien-Lun; Tsai, Yao-Lung

    2016-01-01

    The performances of single-junction InGaN solar cells with various intermediate bands (IBs) have been simulated using the lifetime model of a 1D simulation program called Analysis of Microelectronic and Photonic Structures (AMPS-1D). It has been observed that the maximum efficiencies of the InGaN solar cells with one, two and three intermediate bands are 47.72%, 55.10% and 58.20%, respectively, which outperform the 25.96% efficiency of the conventional single-junction structure by far. This is primarily attributed to the outstanding capability of the light harvesting from the sub-bandgap absorption. At the optimized bandgap of 2.41 eV, two-IB InGaN solar cells with the IB positions located at 0.95–1.1 eV and 0.3–0.75 eV, respectively, may have an opportunity to realize over 50% efficiency. (paper)

  11. Functional Form of the Radiometric Equation for the SNPP VIIRS Reflective Solar Bands: An Initial Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ning; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2016-01-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite is a passive scanning radiometer and an imager, observing radiative energy from the Earth in 22 spectral bands from 0.41 to 12 microns which include 14 reflective solar bands (RSBs). Extending the formula used by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instruments, currently the VIIRS determines the sensor aperture spectral radiance through a quadratic polynomial of its detector digital count. It has been known that for the RSBs the quadratic polynomial is not adequate in the design specified spectral radiance region and using a quadratic polynomial could drastically increase the errors in the polynomial coefficients, leading to possible large errors in the determined aperture spectral radiance. In addition, it is very desirable to be able to extend the radiance calculation formula to correctly retrieve the aperture spectral radiance with the level beyond the design specified range. In order to more accurately determine the aperture spectral radiance from the observed digital count, we examine a few polynomials of the detector digital count to calculate the sensor aperture spectral radiance.

  12. Band bending at the surface of Bi2Se3 studied from first principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakyta, P; Szunyogh, L; Ujfalussy, B

    2015-01-01

    The band bending (BB) effect on the surface of the second-generation topological insulators implies a serious challenge to design transport devices. The BB is triggered by the effective electric field generated by charged impurities close to the surface and by the inhomogeneous charge distribution of the occupied surface states (SSs). Our self-consistent calculations in the Korringa–Kohn–Rostoker framework showed that in contrast to the bulk bands, the spectrum of the SSs is not bent at the surface. In turn, it is possible to tune the energy level of the Dirac point via the deposited surface dopants. In addition, the electrostatic modifications induced by the charged impurities on the surface induce long range oscillations in the charge density. For dopants located beneath the surface, however, these oscillations become highly suppressed. Our findings are in good agreement with recent experiments, however, our results indicate that the concentration of the surface doping cannot be estimated from the energy shift of the Dirac cone within the scope of the effective continuous model for the protected SSs. (paper)

  13. EEG-neurofeedback training of beta band (12-22Hz) affects alpha and beta frequencies - A controlled study of a healthy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurewicz, Katarzyna; Paluch, Katarzyna; Kublik, Ewa; Rogala, Jacek; Mikicin, Mirosław; Wróbel, Andrzej

    2018-01-08

    The frequency-function relation of various EEG bands has inspired EEG-neurofeedback procedures intending to improve cognitive abilities in numerous clinical groups. In this study, we administered EEG-neurofeedback (EEG-NFB) to a healthy population to determine the efficacy of this procedure. We evaluated feedback manipulation in the beta band (12-22Hz), known to be involved in visual attention processing. Two groups of healthy adults were trained to either up- or down-regulate beta band activity, thus providing mutual control. Up-regulation training induced increases in beta and alpha band (8-12Hz) amplitudes during the first three sessions. Group-independent increases in the activity of both bands were observed in the later phase of training. EEG changes were not matched by measured behavioural indices of attention. Parallel changes in the two bands challenge the idea of frequency-specific EEG-NFB protocols and suggest their interdependence. Our study exposes the possibility (i) that the alpha band is more prone to manipulation, and (ii) that changes in the bands' amplitudes are independent from specified training. We therefore encourage a more comprehensive approach to EEG-neurofeedback training embracing physiological and/or operational relations among various EEG bands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Girls Doing Science: A Case Study of Science Literacy in All-Female Middle Grade Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Susan Elisabeth

    In the face of low adolescent literacy rates (NCES, 2012), concerns about the nation's prospects of remaining competitive in science and technology (Hill, Corbett, & St. Rose, 2010), a persistent gender gap in science (NCES, 2012; Reilly, 2012), and the continued rollout of college- and career-ready standards, there is a need to focus on adolescent girls' science literacy. Such science literacy involves not only general knowledge about science, but also the ability to engage in the advanced reading and writing practices fundamental to doing science (Norris & Phillips, 2003). In this thesis, I present three articles with findings that respond to this need. They are the results of a multiple-case embedded (Yin, 2009) study that I conducted over the course of 7 months in four science classrooms (grades 5 through 8; 50 students) taught by a single teacher in a small all-female middle school. I collected in-depth data focused on science literacy from multiple sources, including (a) fieldnotes (Emerson, Fretz & Shaw, 2011), (b) videorecorded classroom observations (102 classes, 113 hours, recorded on 29 days), (c) a survey of all students, (d) semi-structured interviews with the subsample of 12 focal students (ranging from 18 to 37 minutes) and (e) photographs of classroom artifacts and student work. In the first article, I provide a window into standard literacy practices in science classrooms by examining the reading and writing genres to which students are exposed. In the second article, I examine how a teacher's language and instructional practices within her classrooms, and popular images of science from the world beyond their classrooms might shape adolescent girls' science identities. Finally, in the third article, I explore different aspects of science identity using the words of three case study students. Taken together, these studies fill gaps in the literature by investigating science literacy in an understudied context, all-female classrooms. In addition

  15. Deflation of gastric band balloon in pregnancy for improving outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferys, Amanda E; Siassakos, Dimitrios; Draycott, Tim; Akande, Valentine A; Fox, Robert

    2013-04-30

    In line with the rise in the prevalence of obesity, an increasing number of women of childbearing age are undergoing laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), resulting in an increasing number of pregnancies with a band in place. Currently, there is no consensus on optimal band management in pregnancy. Some clinicians advocate leaving the band balloon inflated to reduce gestational weight gain and associated adverse perinatal outcomes. However, there are concerns that maintaining balloon inflation during pregnancy might increase the risk of band complications and adversely affect fetal development and/or growth as a result of reduced nutritional intake. To compare maternal and perinatal outcomes for elective gastric band balloon deflation versus intention to maintain balloon inflation during pregnancy. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 September 2012) and the Web of Science database (1940 to September 2012). Randomised-controlled trials comparing elective deflation of the gastric band balloon with intention to maintain balloon inflation in pregnant women who have undergone LAGB. Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion. No studies met the criteria for inclusion in the review. To date no randomised controlled trials exist that compare elective deflation of the gastric band balloon in pregnancy versus intention to maintain balloon inflation. Further research is needed to define the optimum management of the gastric band balloon in pregnancy.

  16. A fruitful encounter between Cognitive Science and Science & Technology Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Derra

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Scholars deriving from different schools of thought, especially if these grow out of different traditions, do not meet too frequently, and it is even more rare for these meeting to result in creating theories or research practices that would be cognitively surprising or rich in refreshing ideas. Therefore, the material we present in the current issue of Avant (1/2013 is exceptional. In the following part you can read articles by representatives of the so-called Toruń (postconstructivist school, “(Postconstructivism on the subject of techno-science” by Ewa Bińczyk and “A-socio-logy of a condition. A study of controversies surrounding etiology, diagnosis and therapy of ADHD” by Łukasz Afeltowicz and Michał Wróblewski.

  17. Effect of Pd ion doping in the band gap of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles: structural and optical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandan, Brajesh; Venugopal, B. [Pondicherry University, Centre for Nanoscience and Technology (India); Amirthapandian, S.; Panigrahi, B. K. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Ion Beam and Computer Simulation Section, Materials Science Group (India); Thangadurai, P., E-mail: thangadurai.p@gmail.com [Pondicherry University, Centre for Nanoscience and Technology (India)

    2013-10-15

    Pd ion doping has influenced the band gap of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Undoped and Pd ion-doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. A tetragonal phase of SnO{sub 2} with a grain size range of 7-13 nm was obtained (studied by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy). A decreasing trend in the particle size with increasing doping concentration was observed. The presence of Pd in doped SnO{sub 2} was confirmed by chemical analysis carried out by energy-dispersive spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope. Diffuse reflectance spectra showed a blue shift in absorption with increasing palladium concentration. Band gap of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles was estimated from the diffuse reflectance spectra using Kubelka-Munk function and it was increasing with the increase of Pd ion concentration from 3.73 to 4.21 eV. The variation in band gap is attributed predominantly to the lattice strain and particle size. All the samples showed a broad photoluminescence emission centered at 375 nm when excited at 270 nm. A systematic study on the structural and optical properties of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles is presented.

  18. Climate change studies and the human sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Poul; Winiwarter, Verena

    2017-09-01

    Policy makers have made repeated calls for integration of human and natural sciences in the field of climate change. Serious multidisciplinary attempts began already in the 1950s. Progress has certainly been made in understanding the role of humans in the planetary system. New perspectives have clarified policy advice, and three insights are singled out in the paper: the critique of historicism, the distinction between benign and wicked problems, and the cultural critique of the 'myths of nature'. Nevertheless, analysis of the IPCC Assessment Reports indicates that integration is skewed towards a particular dimension of human sciences (economics) and major insights from cultural theory and historical analysis have not made it into climate science. A number of relevant disciplines are almost absent in the composition of authorship. Nevertheless, selective assumptions and arguments are made about e.g. historical findings in key documents. In conclusion, we suggest to seek remedies for the lack of historical scholarship in the IPCC reports. More effort at science-policy exchange is needed, and an Integrated Platform to channel humanities and social science expertise for climate change research might be one promising way.

  19. Study Skills of Arts and Science College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, J. Master Arul; Rajendran, K. K.

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to find out the level of study skills of arts and science college students. Study Skills Check List developed and standardized by Virginia University, Australia (2006) is used to collect the relevant data. The sample consists of 216 Government arts and science college students of Tiruchirappalli district, Tamil…

  20. An Empirical Study about China: Gender Equity in Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun; Staver, John R.

    A data base representing a random sample of more than 10,000 grade 9 students in an SISS (Second IEA Science Study) Extended Study (SES), a key project supported by the China State Commission of Education in the late 1980s, was employed in this study to investigate gender equity in student science achievement in China. This empirical data analysis…

  1. Ultraviolet out-of-band radiation studies in laser tin plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchamy, Homaira; Szilagyi, John; Masnavi, Majid; Richardson, Martin

    2017-11-01

    Out-of-band long wavelength emission measurements from high power, high-repetition-rate extreme-ultra-violet lithography (EUVL) laser plasma sources are imperative to estimating heat deposition in EUV mirrors, and the impact of short wavelength light transported through the imaging system to the wafer surface. This paper reports a series of experiments conducted to measure the absolute spectral irradiances of laser-plasmas produced from planar tin targets over the wavelength region of 124 to 164 nm by 1.06 μm wavelength, 10 ns full-width-at-half-maximum Gaussian laser pulses. The use of spherical targets is relevant to the EUVL source scenario. Although plasmas produced from planar surfaces evolve differently, there is a close similarity to the evolution of current from 10.6 μm CO2 laser EUVL sources, which use a pre-pulse from a lower energy solid-state laser to melt and reform an initial spherical droplet into a thin planar disc target. The maximum of radiation conversion efficiency in the 124-164 nm wavelength band (1%/2πsr) occurs at the laser intensity of 1010 W cm-2. A developed collisional-radiative model reveals the strong experimental spectra that originate mainly from the 4d105p2-4d105s5p, 4d105p-4d105s resonance lines, and 4d95p-4d95s unresolved transition arrays from Sn III, Sn IV, and Sn V ions, respectively. The calculated conversion efficiencies using a 2D radiation-hydrodynamics model are in agreement with the measurements. The model predicts the out-of-band (100-400 nm) radiation conversion efficiencies generated by both 1.06 and 10.6 μm pulses. The 10.6 μm laser pulse produces a higher conversion efficiency (12%/2πsr) at the lower laser intensity of 109 W cm-2.

  2. Scientists' attitudes on science and values: Case studies and survey methods in philosophy of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Daniel; Gonnerman, Chad; O'Rourke, Michael

    2017-06-01

    This article examines the relevance of survey data of scientists' attitudes about science and values to case studies in philosophy of science. We describe two methodological challenges confronting such case studies: 1) small samples, and 2) potential for bias in selection, emphasis, and interpretation. Examples are given to illustrate that these challenges can arise for case studies in the science and values literature. We propose that these challenges can be mitigated through an approach in which case studies and survey methods are viewed as complementary, and use data from the Toolbox Dialogue Initiative to illustrate this claim. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluating the More Suitable ISM Frequency Band for IoT-Based Smart Grids: A Quantitative Study of 915 MHz vs. 2400 MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Ruben M; Garcia-Sanchez, Antonio-Javier; Garcia-Sanchez, Felipe; Garcia-Haro, Joan

    2016-12-31

    IoT has begun to be employed pervasively in industrial environments and critical infrastructures thanks to its positive impact on performance and efficiency. Among these environments, the Smart Grid (SG) excels as the perfect host for this technology, mainly due to its potential to become the motor of the rest of electrically-dependent infrastructures. To make this SG-oriented IoT cost-effective, most deployments employ unlicensed ISM bands, specifically the 2400 MHz one, due to its extended communication bandwidth in comparison with lower bands. This band has been extensively used for years by Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) and Mobile Ad-hoc Networks (MANET), from which the IoT technologically inherits. However, this work questions and evaluates the suitability of such a "default" communication band in SG environments, compared with the 915 MHz ISM band. A comprehensive quantitative comparison of these bands has been accomplished in terms of: power consumption, average network delay, and packet reception rate. To allow such a study, a dual-band propagation model specifically designed for the SG has been derived, tested, and incorporated into the well-known TOSSIM simulator. Simulation results reveal that only in the absence of other 2400 MHz interfering devices (such as WiFi or Bluetooth) or in small networks, is the 2400 MHz band the best option. In any other case, SG-oriented IoT quantitatively perform better if operating in the 915 MHz band.

  4. Evaluating the More Suitable ISM Frequency Band for IoT-Based Smart Grids: A Quantitative Study of 915 MHz vs. 2400 MHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben M. Sandoval

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available IoT has begun to be employed pervasively in industrial environments and critical infrastructures thanks to its positive impact on performance and efficiency. Among these environments, the Smart Grid (SG excels as the perfect host for this technology, mainly due to its potential to become the motor of the rest of electrically-dependent infrastructures. To make this SG-oriented IoT cost-effective, most deployments employ unlicensed ISM bands, specifically the 2400 MHz one, due to its extended communication bandwidth in comparison with lower bands. This band has been extensively used for years by Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN and Mobile Ad-hoc Networks (MANET, from which the IoT technologically inherits. However, this work questions and evaluates the suitability of such a “default” communication band in SG environments, compared with the 915 MHz ISM band. A comprehensive quantitative comparison of these bands has been accomplished in terms of: power consumption, average network delay, and packet reception rate. To allow such a study, a dual-band propagation model specifically designed for the SG has been derived, tested, and incorporated into the well-known TOSSIM simulator. Simulation results reveal that only in the absence of other 2400 MHz interfering devices (such as WiFi or Bluetooth or in small networks, is the 2400 MHz band the best option. In any other case, SG-oriented IoT quantitatively perform better if operating in the 915 MHz band.

  5. New Approaches to the Study of Students' Response to Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Lars

    2011-01-01

    of science and school science. In this chapter I describe two new approaches to the study of students’ responses to school science, both pragmatic by nature, and combining perspectives from cultural research with a quantitative or a Mixed Methods methodology. The approaches have been applied to studies......’Students’ responses’ to science include their attitudes and internalization of science (e.g. valueing, identifying) as well as their choices and actions related to science. This broader conception has advantages over attitudes alone, when it comes to understanding students’ paths in and out...... of Physics in Danish upper secondary school, and though these targeted different aspects of students’ responses and applied highly different methods the results were found to complement each other. A study using the first approach related students’ attitudes towards physics to various types of Cultural...

  6. Magnetic dichroism in UV photoemission at off-normal emission: Study of the valence bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venus, D.; Kuch, W.; Lin, M.; Schneider, C.M.; Ebert, H.; Kirschner, J.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic dichroism of angle-resolved UV photoemission from fcc Co/Cu(001) thin films has been measured using linearly p-polarized light, and a coplanar geometry where the light and photoelectron wave vectors are antiparallel, and both are perpendicular to the in-plane sample magnetization. This geometry emphasizes information about state dispersion due to the crystalline symmetry. An orderly dispersion of the features in the magnetic dichroism over a wide range of off-normal angles of electron emission is related in detail to the bulk band structure of fcc Co. The measurements confirm the practical utility of magnetic dichroism experiments as a relatively simple complement to spin-resolved photoemission. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  7. Atomic structure of shear bands in Cu64Zr36 metallic glasses studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Shidong; Qi, Li; Wang, Limin; Pan, Shaopeng; Ma, Mingzhen; Zhang, Xinyu; Li, Gong; Liu, Riping

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Figure shows that atoms in the shear band (SB) moved desultorily compared with those in the matrix. These atoms seriously interacted with each other similar to the grain boundary in crystalline materials. Figuratively, if these atoms wanted to “pass” the shear band, they should arrange their irritations. However, stress concentrations and high energy were observed in SB, which resulted in instability in the deformation process and finally led to a disastrously brittle fracture. - Abstract: Molecular dynamics simulations on the atomic structure of shear bands (SBs) in Cu 64 Zr 36 metallic glasses are presented. Results show that the atoms in the SB move desultorily, in contrast to those in the matrix. The saturated degree of bonded pairs considering the “liquid-like” character of SB quantitatively provides important details in extending earlier studies on SBs. Zr-centered 〈0, 2, 8, 5〉 clusters exhibit strong spatial correlations and tendency to connect with each other in short-range order. The 〈0, 2, 8, 5〉 cluster-type medium-range order is the main feature inside the SB relative to the matrix. The fractal results demonstrate the planar-like fashion of the 〈0, 2, 8, 5〉 network in SB, forming an interpenetrating solid-like backbone. Such heterogeneous structure provides a fundamental structural perspective of mechanical instability in SB

  8. High power experimental studies of hybrid photonic band gap accelerator structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JieXi Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the first high power tests of hybrid photonic band gap (PBG accelerator structures. Three hybrid PBG (HPBG structures were designed, built and tested at 17.14 GHz. Each structure had a triangular lattice array with 60 inner sapphire rods and 24 outer copper rods sandwiched between copper disks. The dielectric PBG band gap map allows the unique feature of overmoded operation in a TM_{02} mode, with suppression of both lower order modes, such as the TM_{11} mode, as well as higher order modes. The use of sapphire rods, which have negligible dielectric loss, required inclusion of the dielectric birefringence in the design. The three structures were designed to sequentially reduce the peak surface electric field. Simulations showed relatively high surface fields at the triple point as well as in any gaps between components in the clamped assembly. The third structure used sapphire rods with small pin extensions at each end and obtained the highest gradient of 19  MV/m, corresponding to a surface electric field of 78  MV/m, with a breakdown probability of 5×10^{-1} per pulse per meter for a 100-ns input power pulse. Operation at a gradient above 20  MV/m led to runaway breakdowns with extensive light emission and eventual damage. For all three structures, multipactor light emission was observed at gradients well below the breakdown threshold. This research indicated that multipactor triggered at the triple point limited the operational gradient of the hybrid structure.

  9. Study on natural convection in core barrel. Experimental and numerical results for band type spacer pads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kenji; Kawamata, Nobuhiro; Kamide, Hideki

    2003-03-01

    In a fast reactor an Inter-Wrapper Flow (IWF) is one of significant phenomena for decay heat removal under natural circulation condition, when a direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) is adopted for decay heat removal system. Cold coolant provided by dipped heat exchangers (DHX) of DRACS can penetrate into the core barrel (region between the subassemblies) and it makes natural convection int he core barrel. Such IWF will depend on a spacer pad geometry of subassemblies. Water experiment, TRIF (Test Rig for Inter-wrapper Flow), was carried out for IWF in a reactor core. The test section modeled a 1/12th sector of the core and upper plenum of reactor vessel. Experimental parameters were the spacer pad geometry and flow path geometries connecting the upper plenum and core barrel. Numerical simulation using AQUA code was also performed to confirm applicability of a simulation method. An experimental series using a button type spacer pad had been carried out. Here a band type spacer pad was examined. Temperatures at subassembly wall were measured with parameter of the flow path geometries; one was a connection pipe between the upper plenum and core barrel and the other was flow hole in core former plates between the outermost subassemblies and the core barrel. It was found that these flow paths were effective to remove heat in the core in case of the band type spacer pad. A general purpose three dimensional analysis code, AQUA, was applied to the experimental analysis. Each subassembly and inter wrapper gap region were modeled by slab mesh geometry. Pressure loss coefficient at the pacer pad was set based on the geometry. The numerical simulation results were in good agreement with measured temperature profiles in the core. (author)

  10. Interpretive Media Study and Interpretive Social Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carragee, Kevin M.

    1990-01-01

    Defines the major theoretical influences on interpretive approaches in mass communication, examines the central concepts of these perspectives, and provides a critique of these approaches. States that the adoption of interpretive approaches in mass communication has ignored varied critiques of interpretive social science. Suggests that critical…

  11. FCC study in Science Agora 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Tomihisa, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Photos from European Union's participation in Science Agora 2017 in Tokyo. A number of events highlighted the strong collaborative efforts between Europe and Japan at frontier research. The global effort to design a Future Circular Collider was one of the projects presented as it highlights the international nature of modern research and how it transcends boundaries.

  12. Scientists Reflect on Why They Chose to Study Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venville, Grady; Rennie, Léonie; Hanbury, Colin; Longnecker, Nancy

    2013-12-01

    A concern commonly raised in literature and in media relates to the declining proportions of students who enter and remain in the `science pipeline', and whether many countries, including Australia and New Zealand, have enough budding scientists to fill research and industry positions in the coming years. In addition, there is concern that insufficient numbers of students continue in science to ensure an informed, scientifically literate citizenry. The aim of the research presented in this paper was to survey current Australian and New Zealand scientists to explore their reasons for choosing to study science. An online survey was conducted via a link to SurveyGizmo. The data presented are from 726 respondents who answered 22 forced-choice items and an open-ended question about the reasons they chose to study science. The quantitative data were analysed using t tests and analyses of variance followed by Duncan's multiple range tests, and the qualitative data were analysed thematically. The quantitative data showed that the main reasons scientists reported choosing to study science were because they were interested in science and because they were good at science. Secondary school science classes and one particular science teacher also were found to be important factors. Of much less importance were the prestige of science and financial considerations. The qualitative data expanded on these findings and showed that passion for science and/or curiosity about the world were important factors and also highlighted the importance of recreational pursuits, such as camping when a child. In the words of one respondent, `People don't go into science for the money and glory. It's passion for knowledge and science that always attracted me to the field'.

  13. Third International Mathematics and Science Study 1999 Video Study Technical Report: Volume 2--Science. Technical Report. NCES 2011-049

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Helen E.; Lemmens, Meike; Druker, Stephen L.; Roth, Kathleen J.

    2011-01-01

    This second volume of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 1999 Video Study Technical Report focuses on every aspect of the planning, implementation, processing, analysis, and reporting of the science components of the TIMSS 1999 Video Study. The report is intended to serve as a record of the actions and documentation of…

  14. History, Philosophy and Sociology of Science in Science Education: Results from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsingchi A.; Sshmidt, William H.

    Throughout the history of enhancing the public scientific literacy, researchers have postulated that since every citizen is expected to have informal opinions on the relationships among government, education, and issues of scientific research and development, it is imperative that appreciation of the past complexities of science and society and the nature of scientific knowledge be a part of the education of both scientists and non-scientists. HPSS inclusion has been found to be an effective way to reach the goal of enhancing science literacy for all citizens. Although reports stated that HPSS inclusion is not a new educational practice in other part of the world, nevertheless, no large scale study has ever been attempted to report the HPSS educational conditions around the world. This study utilizes the rich data collected by TIMSS to unveil the current conditions of HPSS in the science education of about forty TIMSS countries. Based on the analysis results, recommendations to science educators of the world are provided.

  15. Directory of Research in Social Studies/Social Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Anna R.; Carnett, George S.

    Described are current trends in the social and behavioral sciences intended to meet the needs of the educational community. The projects listed include studies in anthropology, sociology, political science, history, geography, foreign area studies, economics, international relations, and environmental education. Part I of the directory lists…

  16. Case Studies in Science Education, Booklet X: Vortex as Harbinger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, Gordon

    This booklet is the eleventh of a series of 16 booklets that together describe and present findings for a study which involved field observations and a survey of science teaching and learning in American public schools during the school year 1976-77. The study was undertaken to provide the National Science Foundation with a portrayal of current…

  17. Deep-Space Ka-Band Flight Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D. D.

    2017-11-01

    Lower frequency bands have become more congested in allocated bandwidth as there is increased competition between flight projects and other entities. Going to higher frequency bands offers significantly more bandwidth, allowing for the use of much higher data rates. However, Ka-band is more susceptible to weather effects than lower frequency bands currently used for most standard downlink telemetry operations. Future or prospective flight projects considering deep-space Ka-band (32-GHz) telemetry data links have expressed an interest in understanding past flight experience with received Ka-band downlink performance. Especially important to these flight projects is gaining a better understanding of weather effects from the experience of current or past missions that operated Ka-band radio systems. We will discuss the historical flight experience of several Ka-band missions starting from Mars Observer in 1993 up to present-day deep-space missions such as Kepler. The study of historical Ka-band flight experience allows one to recommend margin policy for future missions. Of particular interest, we will review previously reported-on flight experience with the Cassini spacecraft Ka-band radio system that has been used for radio science investigations as well as engineering studies from 2004 to 2015, when Cassini was in orbit around the planet Saturn. In this article, we will focus primarily on the Kepler spacecraft Ka-band link, which has been used for operational telemetry downlink from an Earth trailing orbit where the spacecraft resides. We analyzed the received Ka-band signal level data in order to characterize link performance over a wide range of weather conditions and as a function of elevation angle. Based on this analysis of Kepler and Cassini flight data, we found that a 4-dB margin with respect to adverse conditions ensures that we achieve at least a 95 percent data return.

  18. Noise exposure in marching bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies involving orchestras have shown that music ensembles can produce hazardous noise levels. There are no similar data for marching bands and pep bands. In order to evaluate the noise levels produced by marching and pep bands, 1/3-octave-band sound-pressure levels were measured while these groups rehearsed and performed. Data were collected while marching with the bands to ensure a realistic environment. Comparing these data to OSHA and NIOSH criteria, marching and pep band exposures often exceed safe values. For typical exposures, OSHA doses range from 11% to 295%, while NIOSH doses range from 35% to 3055%. Exposures that would be considered hazardous in the workplace are common in marching and pep bands; students and band directors should take steps to recognize the risk posed by various instruments and various locations, and should implement hearing conservation efforts.

  19. Life science students' attitudes, interest, and performance in introductory physics for life sciences: An exploratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Catherine H.; Wisittanawat, Panchompoo; Cai, Ming; Renninger, K. Ann

    2018-06-01

    In response to national calls for improved physical sciences education for students pursuing careers in the life sciences and medicine, reformed introductory physics for life sciences (IPLS) courses are being developed. This exploratory study is among the first to assess the effect of an IPLS course on students' attitudes, interest, and performance. The IPLS course studied was the second semester of introductory physics, following a standard first semester course, allowing the outcomes of the same students in a standard course and in an IPLS course to be compared. In the IPLS course, each physics topic was introduced and elaborated in the context of a life science example, and developing students' skills in applying physics to life science situations was an explicitly stated course goal. Items from the Colorado Learning about Science Survey were used to assess change in students' attitudes toward and their interest in physics. Whereas the same students' attitudes declined during the standard first semester course, we found that students' attitudes toward physics hold steady or improve in the IPLS course. In particular, students with low initial interest in physics displayed greater increases in both attitudes and interest during the IPLS course than in the preceding standard course. We also find that in the IPLS course, students' interest in the life science examples is a better predictor of their performance than their pre-IPLS interest in physics. Our work suggests that the life science examples in the IPLS course can support the development of student interest in physics and positively influence their performance.

  20. Family science: An ethnographic case study of the ordinary science and literacy experiences of one family

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Glenda M.

    Despite the copious research available on science learning, little is known about ways in which the public engages in free-choice science learning and even fewer studies have focused on how families engage in science to learn about the world around them. The same was true about studies of literacy development in the home until the 1980s when researchers (e.g. Bissex, 1980; Heath, 1983; Taylor, 1983) began documenting the literacy happenings and practices of young children in natural settings. Findings from intensive emergent literacy research studies have challenged traditional approaches to the teaching and learning of literacy, especially drawing attention to the active role children take in their own learning. Drawing upon those early literacy studies, this research project uses ethnographic case study methods along with a naturalistic inquiry approach, to document the daily explorations of one science-oriented family. Over a three year span, I have followed my own family, in our natural setting, through our day-to-day experiences with science and literacy as we seek to mediate and understand the world around us. In doing so, I have explored the ways we have shared knowledge and constructed learning through science books and read alouds, self-initiated inquiry learning, and communication. Throughout the three year research period, I have collected data and documented my own young children's understanding of the nature of science by observing their engagement with world around them.

  1. Study of band gap and determination of size of PbS quantum dots synthesized by colloidal solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Ghamsari

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available   PbS semiconductor non-crystals have been synthesized in order to study the modification of their electronic structures and optical properties in relation to their size. The synthesis has been carried out by using the techniques of colloidal chemistry. Strong quantum confinement behavior has been observed based on the analysis of optical spectra of these particles. The average particle size approximated by x-ray line width and hyperbolic band model calculation. Heterogeneous broadening of optical spectrum is studied finally.

  2. Properties of superdeformed bands in the {sup 151}Tb nucleus studied with the EUROGAM French-British spectrometer; Proprietes des bandes superdeformees dans le noyau de {sup 151}Tb etudiees avec le spectrometre franco-britannique EUROGAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finck, Christian [Centre de Recherches Nucleaires de Strasbourg-Cronenbourg, 67 (France)

    1997-04-24

    The subject of this thesis is the study of superdeformation (SD) of the atomic nucleus. In the mass region A {approx_equal} 150 those nuclei have a quadrupole deformation of about 0.6. However, this value is an average and the microscopic structure reflected in the band configurations, affects this deformation. Determination of this value by electric quadrupole moment studies is particularly useful especially for the identical SD bands (SD bands belonging to neighbouring nuclei and having the same moment of inertia). Knowledge of the different quadrupole deformation should shed light on the competition between mass difference, spin alignment and deformation of the nucleus. The electric quadrupole moments are deduced from lifetime measurements of the SD states using the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method. Experimentally, one observes a variation in the electric quadrupole moments of the lowest SD states which suggests a gradual change of the nuclear deformation towards normal less deformed shapes. The deexcitation mechanism is poorly understood in the A {approx_equal} 150 mass region due to lack of experimental information: up to now, no transition connecting the second and the first potential well has been observed for these SD states. Experimental studies of deexcitation patterns of SD bands are therefore crucial to fix the decay-out mechanism. Experimental data on the {sup 151}Tb nucleus were collected via fusion-evaporation reaction, using the EUROGAM phase II array. (author) 121 refs., 61 figs., 22 tabs.

  3. Decay of superdeformed bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the study of superdeformation is to directly connect the large number of superdeformed bands now known to the yrast states. In this way, excitation energies, spins and parities can be assigned to the levels in the second well which is essential to establish the collective and single-particle components of these bands. This paper will review some of the progress which has been made to understand the decay of superdeformed bands using the new arrays including the measurement of the total decay spectrum and the establishment of direct one-step decays from the superdeformed band to the yrast line in 194 Hg. 42 refs., 5 figs

  4. A Multi-Year Study on Rice Morphological Parameter Estimation with X-Band Polsar Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Yuzugullu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Rice fields have been monitored with spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR systems for decades. SAR is an essential source of data and allows for the estimation of plant properties such as canopy height, leaf area index, phenological phase, and yield. However, the information on detailed plant morphology in meter-scale resolution is necessary for the development of better management practices. This letter presents the results of the procedure that estimates the stalk height, leaf length and leaf width of rice fields from a copolar X-band TerraSAR-X time series data based on a priori phenological phase. The methodology includes a computationally efficient stochastic inversion algorithm of a metamodel that mimics a radiative transfer theory-driven electromagnetic scattering (EM model. The EM model and its metamodel are employed to simulate the backscattering intensities from flooded rice fields based on their simplified physical structures. The results of the inversion procedure are found to be accurate for cultivation seasons from 2013 to 2015 with root mean square errors less than 13.5 cm for stalk height, 7 cm for leaf length, and 4 mm for leaf width parameters. The results of this research provided new perspectives on the use of EM models and computationally efficient metamodels for agriculture management practices.

  5. Quantitative spectroscopic J-band study of red supergiants in Perseus OB-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazak, J. Zachary; Kudritzki, Rolf; Davies, Ben; Bergemann, Maria; Plez, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate how the metallicities of red supergiant (RSG) stars can be measured from quantitative spectroscopy down to resolutions of ≈3000 in the J-band. We have obtained high resolution spectra on a sample of the RSG population of h and χ Persei, a double cluster in the solar neighborhood. We show that careful application of the MARCS model atmospheres returns measurements of Z consistent with solar metallicity. Using two grids of synthetic spectra–one in pure LTE and one with non-LTE (NLTE) calculations for the most important diagnostic lines–we measure Z = +0.04 ± 0.10 (LTE) and Z = –0.04 ± 0.08 (NLTE) for the sample of eleven RSGs in the cluster. We degrade the spectral resolution of our observations and find that those values remain consistent down to resolutions of less than λ/δλ of 3000. Using measurements of effective temperatures we compare our results with stellar evolution theory and find good agreement. We construct a synthetic cluster spectrum and find that analyzing this composite spectrum with single-star RSG models returns an accurate metallicity. We conclude that the RSGs make ideal targets in the near infrared for measuring the metallicities of star forming galaxies out to 7-10 Mpc and up to 10 times farther by observing the integrated light of unresolved super star clusters.

  6. Broad-band spectral studies of optical lightnings and possible correlation with solar activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, C.L.; Sapru, M.L.; Kaul, R.K.; Razdan, H.

    1984-01-01

    Optical pulses from lightning discharges have been recorded in a ground-based experiment, meant primarily for the detection of cosmic X- and γ-ray bursts through the atmospheric fluorescence technique. It is shown that the spectral ratio Asub(v)/Asub(y), i.e. the ratio of pulse amplitudes in the violet to that in yellow wavelength bands (3400-4300 A and 4400-6000 A respectively) provides a good indication of the lightning channel temperature, the range of derived temperatures extending from 5.000 K to 60.000 K. Based on the distribution of observed Asub(v)/Asub(y) values on a daily basis, it has been possible to separate the observed lightning activity into two classes. One class of event is shown to be correlated with the peaking of the global atmospheric electric field and occurs preferentially on days when the ground-level cosmic ray intensity shows a significant decrease in association with an increase in geomagnetic activity. The results are discussed in terms of the contemporary views regarding solar control of atmospheric electricity and the various sun-weather correlations reported earlier. (author)

  7. STATUS OF X-BAND STANDING WAVE STRUCTURE STUDIES AT SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgashev, Valery A.

    2003-01-01

    The linacs proposed for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) and Japanese Linear Collider (JLC) would contain several thousand X-Band accelerator structures that would operate at a loaded gradient of 50 MV/m. An extensive experimental and theoretical program is underway at SLAC, FNAL and KEK to develop structures that reliably operate at this gradient. The development of standing wave structures is a part of this program. The properties of standing wave structures allow them to operate at the loaded gradient in contrast to traveling wave structures that need conditioning to the unloaded gradient (65 MV/m for NLC/JLC). The gradients in the standing structures tested thus far have been limited by input coupler breakdowns. The behavior of these breakdowns is consistent with a model of pulsed heating due to high magnetic fields. New input couplers have been designed to reduce maximum magnetic fields. This paper discusses design considerations related to high power performance, wakefield suppression and results of high power tests of prototype standing wave structures

  8. Emission Channeling Studies on the Behaviour of Light Alkali Atoms in Wide-Band-Gap Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    Recknagel, E; Quintel, H

    2002-01-01

    % IS342 \\\\ \\\\ A major problem in the development of electronic devices based on diamond and wide-band-gap II-VI compound semiconductors, like ZnSe, is the extreme difficulty of either n- or p-type doping. The only reports of successful n-type doping of diamond involves ion implanted Li, which was found to be an intersititial donor. Recent theoretical calculations suggest that Na, P and N dopant atoms are also good candidates for n-type doping of diamond. No experimental evidence has been obtained up to now, mainly because of the complex and partly unresolved defect situation created during ion implantation, which is necessary to incorporate potential donor atoms into diamond. \\\\ \\\\In the case of ZnSe, considerable effort has been invested in trying to fabricate pn-junctions in order to make efficient, blue-light emitting diodes. However, it has proved to be very difficult to obtain p-type ZnSe, mainly because of electrical compensation related to background donor impurities. Li and Na are believed to be ampho...

  9. Influence of field study on learning and attitudes toward science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackney, David L.

    In an effort to improve attitudes toward science and academic achievement among college students who are non-science majors, an informal science educational experience in the form of a natural science field study course was created. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a field study experience on student science attitudes and achievement. Outcomes from the field study groups were compared to students who enrolled in a traditional lecture/lab course. Academic achievement was measured via pre and posttest measures of geologic knowledge. Attitudes toward science were measured with a Science Attitudes Survey that utilized Likert-scale type items in the instrument. To explore student impressions and reactions to participating in the field study experience, interviews were conducted with open-ended questions. Patterns of responses were identified to explore common themes. Field study participants were found to have significantly higher gains from pre to posttest scores compared with the gains made by students who participated in a formal Earth Science course. There was no significant difference found in overall attitudes toward science and technology as measured with this attitudes survey between students who participated in the two formats of courses over the last five years. However, comments shared by participants in the field study through interviews suggest that their attitudes toward science had in fact been affected in positive ways. Other patterns of responses indicate positive impacts made on students on a number of fronts including affective, cognitive, and social interactions. All students interviewed rated the field study experience as valuable educationally or extremely valuable educationally.

  10. X - Band EPR Study on Poly(Li-2-Hydroxyethyl Methacrylate)-Co-Poly(4-Vinly Pyridine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usta, A.

    2008-01-01

    Some copolymers have important properties that it is alter rapidly from a liquid to a solid state when an external electric field is applied. In this study, the polymer was synthesized by six ionomers with different molar masses. The polymer has been irradiated with 60 C o - γ rays at room temperature along three days. After irradiation, the material has been investigated by X-band Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectrometer at various conditions. A very intensity ESR peaks have been observed at temperature between 130-450K along with that displayed, this ESR peaks were changed with temperature and produced radical was stable

  11. Non-Determinism: An Abstract Concept in Computer Science Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armoni, Michal; Gal-Ezer, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Non-determinism is one of the most important, yet abstract, recurring concepts of Computer Science. It plays an important role in Computer Science areas such as formal language theory, computability theory, distributed computing, and operating systems. We conducted a series of studies on the perception of non-determinism. In the current research,…

  12. Breathing Life into Engineering: A Lesson Study Life Science Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Maria; Yang, Li-Ling; Briggs, May; Hession, Alicia; Koussa, Anita; Wagoner, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    A fifth grade life science lesson was implemented through a lesson study approach in two fifth grade classrooms. The research lesson was designed by a team of four elementary school teachers with the goal of emphasizing engineering practices consistent with the "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS) (Achieve Inc. 2013). The fifth…

  13. Developing "Butterfly Warriors": A Case Study of Science for Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junjun; Cowie, Bronwen

    2013-01-01

    Given worldwide concern about a decline in student engagement in school science and an increasing call for science for citizenship in New Zealand Curriculum, this study focused on a butterfly unit that investigated how students in a year-4 primary classroom learnt about New Zealand butterflies through thinking, talking, and acting as citizen…

  14. Increased Alpha Band Functional Connectivity Following the Quadrato Motor Training: A Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lasaponara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Quadrato Motor Training (QMT is a new training paradigm, which was found to increase cognitive flexibility, creativity and spatial cognition. In addition, QMT was reported to enhance inter- and intra-hemispheric alpha coherence as well as Fractional Anisotropy (FA in a number of white matter pathways including corpus callosum. Taken together, these results seem to suggest that electrophysiological and structural changes induced by QMT may be due to an enhanced interplay and communication of the different brain areas within and between the right and the left hemisphere. In order to test this hypothesis using the exact low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA, we estimated the current neural density and lagged linear connectivity (LLC of the alpha band in the resting state electroencephalography (rsEEG recorded with open (OE and closed eyes (CE at three different time points, following 6 and 12 weeks of daily QMT. Significant changes were observed for the functional connectivity. In particular, we found that limbic and fronto-temporal alpha connectivity in the OE condition increased after 6 weeks, while it enhanced at the CE condition in occipital network following 12-weeks of daily training. These findings seem to show that the QMT may have dissociable long-term effects on the functional connectivity depending on the different ways of recording rsEEG. OE recording pointed out a faster onset of Linear Lag Connectivity modulations that tend to decay as quickly, while CE recording showed sensible effect only after the complete 3-months training.

  15. Science Education at Riverside Middle School A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, Bettie Ann Pickens

    For more than thirty years the gender gap in science and related careers has been a key concern of researchers, teachers, professional organizations, and policy makers. Despite indicators of progress for women and girls on some measures of achievement, course enrollment patterns, and employment, fewer women than men pursue college degrees and careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. According to the results of national assessments, the gender gap in science achievement begins to be evident in the middle school years. Gender and school science achievement involve a complex set of factors associated with schools and child/family systems that may include school leadership, institutional practices, curriculum content, teacher training programs, teacher expectations, student interests, parental involvement, and cultural values. This ethnographic case study was designed to explore the context for science education reform and the participation of middle school girls. The study analyzed and compared teaching strategies and female student engagement in sixth, seventh, and eighth grade science classrooms. The setting was a middle school situated in a district that was well-known for its achievement in reading, math, and technology. Findings from the study indicated that while classroom instruction was predominantly organized around traditional school science, the girls were more disciplined and outperformed the boys. The size of the classrooms, time to prepare for hands-on activities, and obtaining resources were identified as barriers to teaching science in ways that aligned with recent national science reform initiatives. Parents who participated in the study were very supportive of their daughters' academic progress and career goals. A few of the parents suggested that the school's science program include more hands-on activities; instruction designed for the advanced learner; and information related to future careers. Overall the teachers and

  16. Investigation of Inquiry-based Science Pedagogy among Middle Level Science Teachers: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Sunny Minelli

    This study implemented a qualitative approach to examine the phenomenon of "inquiry-based science pedagogy or inquiry instruction" as it has been experienced by individuals. Data was collected through online open-ended surveys, focus groups, and teacher reported self-reflections to answer the research questions: 1) How do middle level science teachers conceptualize "inquiry-based instruction?" 2) What are preferred instructional strategies for implementation in middle level science classrooms? And 3) How do middle level science teachers perceive the connection between science instruction and student learning? The participants within this research study represent 33 percent of teachers in grades 5 through 9 within six school districts in northeastern Pennsylvania. Of the 12 consent forms originally obtained, 10 teachers completed all three phases of the data collection, including the online survey, participation in focus groups, and teacher self-reflection. 60 percent of the participants taught only science, and 40 percent taught all content areas. Of the ten participants, 50 percent were certified teachers of science and 50 percent were certified as teachers of elementary education. 70 percent of the research participants reflected having obtained a master's, with 60 percent of these degrees being received in areas of education, and 10 percent in the area of science. The research participants have a total of 85 collective years of experience as professional educators, with the average years of experience being 8.5 years. Analysis of data revealed three themes related to research question #1) How do middle-level science teachers conceptualize inquiry-based instruction? and sub-question #1) How do middle-level science teachers characterize effective instruction? The themes that capture the essence of teachers' formulation of inquiry-based instruction that emerged in this study were student centered, problem solving, and hands-on . Analysis of data revealed one theme

  17. Valeriu Bologa’s studies on the history of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    BÂRSU, CRISTIAN

    2016-01-01

    History of science is a vast and complex domain, comprising many sub-domains, such as: the history of medicine, history of chemistry, history of physics etc. Different specialists in these sub-domains, trying to reach the general and integrative understanding of the history of science, succeeded only after they acquired a rich scientific experience in their fields of activity. One of the scientists who had interesting papers on the history of science was Valeriu Bologa (1892–1971). He was the first Romanian professor of history of medicine. Our paper presents some milestones regarding his preoccupations on the history of science. The aim of our study is to prove that, although he was primarily a historian of medicine, he surpassed this framework, proving to be a skillful historian of science. The topics of his works on the history of science included: the value of the unity of science, the ethical aspects of science during centuries, the interferences between the history of science and the history of medicine etc. PMID:27547069

  18. Valeriu Bologa's studies on the history of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bârsu, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    History of science is a vast and complex domain, comprising many sub-domains, such as: the history of medicine, history of chemistry, history of physics etc. Different specialists in these sub-domains, trying to reach the general and integrative understanding of the history of science, succeeded only after they acquired a rich scientific experience in their fields of activity. One of the scientists who had interesting papers on the history of science was Valeriu Bologa (1892-1971). He was the first Romanian professor of history of medicine. Our paper presents some milestones regarding his preoccupations on the history of science. The aim of our study is to prove that, although he was primarily a historian of medicine, he surpassed this framework, proving to be a skillful historian of science. The topics of his works on the history of science included: the value of the unity of science, the ethical aspects of science during centuries, the interferences between the history of science and the history of medicine etc.

  19. Studying religious music at the grassroots level: a look into the discourse practices of Christian metal bands online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henna Jousmäki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Religious issues are studied in various ways, most prominently by sociologists of religion. This paper suggests that in today’s world of globally intersecting webs of people, places, ideas and action, scholars and readers interested in religion will find themselves benefiting from cross-disciplinary approaches which help them to conceptualize and describe today’s phenomena at different levels. This paper describes how the emerging discipline of the sociology of language and religion may be applied to studying Christian metal bands’ discourse online. Although previous studies give a good idea of the structures, practices and tendencies in and related to Christian metal, little is reported on what happens at the very micro-level of Christian metal – for example, how they represent themselves to their audiences, what they sing about, and what else they say and, importantly, how they say it. To fill this gap, Christian metal bands’ online presence is examined with a particular interest in how the bands utilize online spaces to build up Christian metal identity and culture with the help of textual, discursive, and multimodal resources. This includes a look at the online self-representation of Christian metal bands, a more detailed investigation of the uses of the Bible on bands’ websites, as well as perspectives on an important part of Christian metal; namely the lyrics.

  20. Study of the Effect of Simulated Rain on the Offset Parabolic Antenna at Ku-Band with Different Elevation Angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mostafa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of rain on the receiver antenna is a major factor to degrade the system performance in a frequency above 10 GHz. This paper deals with the wet antenna attenuation at Ku-band with three different frequencies at different rain rates. During the Ku-band propagation experiment, it was discovered that rain water on the antenna caused a significant attenuation. It is necessary to estimate the losses caused by water on the antenna in order to separate these losses from the atmospheric propagation losses. The experiment was done at USM Engineering Campus to study the attenuation for these physical parameters. A Ku-band RF signal was generated by a signal generator and transmitted via horn antenna. The signal was received using a smooth offset antenna of 60 cm by 54 cm (Astro dish and measured using spectrum analyzer. In order to simulate a rain, pipes with bores of a same distance were implemented. Three cases were considered: in the first case one pipe was used to simulate low rain rate, the second case two pipes were used to simulate medium rain rate, and the third case three pipes were used to simulate heavy rain rate. In addition, the tap was used to control the flow of water in order to get more values of rain rate. The total attenuation of RF signals due to water layer on the feed and on the reflector feed was found to be 3.1 dB at worst case. On the other hand, the attenuation of RF signal due to the feed only was 2.83 dB, so the major attenuation occur was due to feed.

  1. The Impact of Teachers and Their Science Teaching on Students' "Science Interest": A Four-Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Marianne R.; Skamp, Keith R.

    2013-01-01

    There is a crisis in school science in Australia and this may be related to insufficient students developing an interest in science. This extended study looked at changes in 14 students' interest in science as they moved through junior secondary school into Year 10. Although the majority of these students still had an interest in science in Year…

  2. Studies in Mathematics, Volume 22. Studies in Computer Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Seymour V., Ed.

    The nine articles in this collection were selected because they represent concerns central to computer science, emphasize topics of particular interest to mathematicians, and underscore the wide range of areas deeply and continually affected by computer science. The contents consist of: "Introduction" (S. V. Pollack), "The…

  3. Undergraduate female science-related career choices: A phenomenological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Kathy S.

    This qualitative phenomenological study used a modified Groenewald's five steps method with semi-structured, recorded, and transcribed interviews to focus on the underrepresentation of females in science-related careers. The study explored the lived experiences of a purposive sample of 25 senior female college students attending a college in Macon, Georgia. Ten major themes emerged from the research study that included (a) journey to a science-related career; (b) realization of career interest; (c) family support (d) society's role; (e) professors' treatment of students; (f) lack of mentors and models; (g) gender and career success; (h) females and other disadvantages in science-related careers; (i) rewards of the journey; and (j) advice for the journey. The three minor themes identified were (a) decision-making; (b) career awareness; and (c) guidance. The key findings revealed that females pursuing a science degree or subsequent science-related career, shared their experience with other females interested in science as a career choice, dealt with barriers standing in the way of their personal goals, lack role models, and received little or no support from family and friends. The study findings may offer information to female college students interested in pursuing science-related careers and further foundational research on gender disparities in career choice.

  4. African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences. ... on senior high school students' proficiency in solving linear equation word problems ... from parents and teachers' influence on students' mathematics-related self-beliefs ...

  5. African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences. ... The level of detail varies; some disciplines produce manuscripts that comprise discrete .... Duplicate publication, sometimes called self-plagiarism, occurs when an author ...

  6. Randomized Prospective Study of Endoscopic Rubber Band Ligation Compared With Bipolar Coagulation for Chronically Bleeding Internal Hemorrhoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutabha, Rome; Jensen, Dennis M.; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our purpose was to compare the efficacy, complications, success rate, recurrence rate at 1 year, and crossovers of rubber band ligation (RBL) with those of bipolar electrocoagulation (BPEC) treatment for chronically bleeding internal hemorrhoids. METHODS: A total of 45 patients of mean age 51.5 years, who had rectal bleeding from grade II or III hemorrhoids and in whom intensive medical therapy failed, were randomized in a prospective study comparing RBL with BPEC. Treatment failure was predefined as continued bleeding, occurrence of a major complication, or failure to reduce the size of all internal hemorrhoidal segments to grade I in ≤ 3 treatments. Patients were followed up for 1 year. RESULTS: With similar patients, rectal bleeding and other symptoms were controlled with significantly fewer treatments of RBL than of BPEC (2.3±0.2 vs. 3.8±0.4, P 0.05), but significantly fewer failures and crossovers (8% vs. 38%). Symptomatic recurrence at 1 year was 10% RBL and 15% BPEC. CONCLUSIONS: For patients with chronically bleeding grade II or III internal hemorrhoids that are unresponsive to medical therapy, safety and complication rates of banding and BPEC were similar. The success rate was significantly higher with RBL than with BPEC. Symptom recurrence rates at 1 year were similar. PMID:19513028

  7. Study of Oxidative Stress in Vitiligo and Use of Narrow Band UVB-311 as a Method of Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawzy, N.; Rashed, L.

    2012-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired depigmenting disease characterized by circumscribed depigmenting macules devoid of identifiable melanocytes. The disease has uncertain aetiopathogenesis. The aim of this research is to estimate the level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) as antioxidants and Nitric oxide and superoxide anion as oxidants in vitiligo patients and evaluate the clinical effectiveness of narrow band UVB (NB-UVB-311) as a method of treatment and repairing the oxidative stress-induced damage. This study included twenty vitiligo patients and fifteen-age and sex matched control. There was statistically significant increase in the levels of SOD in active vitiligo lesions compared to control (P<0.001). There was statistically significant decrease in the level of CAT in vitiligo skin lesions compared to skin of control. After using NB-UVB- 311 the level of SOD was significantly decreased and CAT level was significantly increased (P<0.001). There was statistically significant increase in the level of nitric oxide and superoxide in vitiligo patients compared to control. After using NB-UVB-311 as treatment, the level of nitric oxide and superoxide anion was significantly decreased (P<0.001) in vitiligo patients. These results provide some evidence regarding the oxidant /antioxidant balance in vitiligo patients and the positive role of narrow band UVB- 311 as a treatment of vitiligo

  8. Life science students’ attitudes, interest, and performance in introductory physics for life sciences: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine H. Crouch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In response to national calls for improved physical sciences education for students pursuing careers in the life sciences and medicine, reformed introductory physics for life sciences (IPLS courses are being developed. This exploratory study is among the first to assess the effect of an IPLS course on students’ attitudes, interest, and performance. The IPLS course studied was the second semester of introductory physics, following a standard first semester course, allowing the outcomes of the same students in a standard course and in an IPLS course to be compared. In the IPLS course, each physics topic was introduced and elaborated in the context of a life science example, and developing students’ skills in applying physics to life science situations was an explicitly stated course goal. Items from the Colorado Learning about Science Survey were used to assess change in students’ attitudes toward and their interest in physics. Whereas the same students’ attitudes declined during the standard first semester course, we found that students’ attitudes toward physics hold steady or improve in the IPLS course. In particular, students with low initial interest in physics displayed greater increases in both attitudes and interest during the IPLS course than in the preceding standard course. We also find that in the IPLS course, students’ interest in the life science examples is a better predictor of their performance than their pre-IPLS interest in physics. Our work suggests that the life science examples in the IPLS course can support the development of student interest in physics and positively influence their performance.

  9. Band Structure Engineering of Cs2AgBiBr6 Perovskite through Order-Disordered Transition: A First-Principle Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingxiu; Zhang, Peng; Wei, Su-Huai

    2018-01-04

    Cs 2 AgBiBr 6 was proposed as one of the inorganic, stable, and nontoxic replacements of the methylammonium lead halides (CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 , which is currently considered as one of the most promising light-harvesting material for solar cells). However, the wide indirect band gap of Cs 2 AgBiBr 6 suggests that its application in photovoltaics is limited. Using the first-principle calculation, we show that by controlling the ordering parameter at the mixed sublattice, the band gap of Cs 2 AgBiBr 6 can vary continuously from a wide indirect band gap of 1.93 eV for the fully ordered double-perovskite structure to a small pseudodirect band gap of 0.44 eV for the fully random alloy. Therefore, one can achieve better light absorption simply by controlling the growth temperature and thus the ordering parameters and band gaps. We also show that controlled doping in Cs 2 AgBiBr 6 can change the energy difference between ordered and disordered Cs 2 AgBiBr 6 , thus providing further control of the ordering parameters and the band gaps. Our study, therefore, provides a novel approach to carry out band structure engineering in the mixed perovskites for optoelectronic applications.

  10. Study on the Effect of Secondary Banded Structure on the Fatigue Property of Non-Quenched and Tempered Micro Alloyed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajie, Cheng; Qingliang, Liao; Yue, Zhang

    Due to composition segregation and cooling speed, streamline or banded structure were often obtained in the thermal forming parts along the direction of parts forming. Generally speaking, banded structure doesn't decrease the longitudinal mechanical properties, so the secondary banded structure can't get enough attention. The effect of secondary banded structure on the fatigue properties of micro alloyed DG20Mn and 35CrMo steel was investigated using the axial tensile fatigue test of stress ratio of 0.1. The result shows that secondary banded structure was obtained in the center of the steel parts, because of the composition segregation and the lower cooling rate in center part of steel. Secondary banded structure has no significant effect on axial tensile properties of both DG20Mn and 35CrMo, but decreases the axial tensile fatigue performance of DG20Mn steel. This study suggests that under the high cyclic tensile stress, multi-source damage cracks in steel initiated by large strain of pearlite of secondary banded structure, which is larger than damage strain, is the major factor of the decrease of fatigue life of steel.

  11. NSTX Diagnostics for Fusion Plasma Science Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Johnson, D.; Roquemore, L.; Bitter, M.; Levinton, F.; Paoletti, F.; Stutman, D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will discuss how plasma science issues are addressed by the diagnostics for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), the newest large-scale machine in the magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) program. The development of new schemes for plasma confinement involves the interplay of experimental results and theoretical interpretations. A fundamental requirement, for example, is a determination of the equilibria for these configurations. For MCF, this is well established in the solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation. While it is simple to state its basis in the balance between the kinetic and magnetic pressures, what they are as functions of space and time are often not easy to obtain. Quantities like the plasma pressure and current density are not directly measurable. They are derived from data that are themselves complex products of more basic parameters. The same difficulties apply to the understanding of plasma instabilities. Not only are the needs for spatial and temporal resolution more stringent, but the wave parameters which characterize the instabilities are difficult to resolve. We will show how solutions to the problems of diagnostic design on NSTX, and the physics insight the data analysis provides, benefits both NSTX and the broader scientific community

  12. Thermally controlled mid-IR band-gap engineering in all-glass chalcogenide microstructured fibers: a numerical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barh, Ajanta; Varshney, Ravi K.; Pal, Bishnu P.

    2017-01-01

    Presence of photonic band-gap (PBG) in an all-glass low refractive index (RI) contrast chalcogenide (Ch) microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) is investigated numerically. The effect of external temperature on the position of band-gap is explored to realize potential fiber-based wavelength filters....... Then the temperature sensitivity of band-gaps is investigated to design fiber-based mid-IR wavelength filters/sensors....

  13. Band structure and Fermi surface of UPd2Al3 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Saitoh, Yuji; Okane, Tetsuo; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Fujimori, Atsushi; Haga, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Onuki, Yoshichika

    2007-01-01

    We have observed the band structure and Fermi surfaces of the heavy Fermion superconductor UPd 2 Al 3 by angle-resolved photoemission experiments in the soft X-ray region. We observed renormalized quasi-particle bands in the vicinity of the Fermi level and strongly dispersive bands on the higher binding energy side. Our observation suggests that the structure previously assigned to contributions from localized states in the U 5f spectrum has strong energy dispersions

  14. Contribution of the New WORLDVIEW-2 Spectral Bands for Urban Mapping in Coastal Areas: Case Study SÃO LUÍS ( MARANHÃO State, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, U. D. V.; kux, H. J. H.

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study is to verify the contribution of the spectral bands from the new WorldView-2 satellite for the extraction of urban targets aiming a detailed mapping from the city of São Luis, at the coastal zone of Maranhão State, Brazil. This satellite system has 3 bands in the visible portion of the spectrum and also the following 4 new bands: Coastal (400-450 nm), Yellow (585- 625 nm), Red Edge (705-745 nm), and Near Infrared 2 (860-1040 nm). As for the methodology used, initially a fusion was made among the panchromatic and the multispectral bands, combining the spectral information of the multispectral bands with the geometric information of the panchromatic band. Following the ortho-rectification of the dataset was done, using ground control points (GCPs) obtained during field survey. The classification reached high values of Kappa indices. The use of the new bands Red Edge and Near Infrared 2, allowed the improvement of discriminations at tidal flats, mangrove and other vegetation types. The Yellow band improved the discrimination of bare soils - very important information for urban planning - and ceramic roofs. The Coastal band allowed to map the tidal channels which cross the urban area of São Luis, a typical feature of this coastal area. The functionalities of software GEODMA used, allowed an efficient attribute selection which improved the land cover classification from the test sites. The new WorldView-2 bands permit the identification and extraction of the features mentioned, because these bands are positioned at important parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, such as band Red Edge, which strongly improves the discrimination of vegetation conditions. Combining both higher spatial and spectral resolutions, WorldView-2 data allows an improvement on the discrimination of physical characteristics of the targets of interest, thus permitting a higher precision of land use/land cover maps, contributing to urban planning. The test sites of this

  15. Titanium mesh as a low-profile alternative for tension-band augmentation in patella fracture fixation: A biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Aaron J; Salas, Christina; Rise, LeRoy; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Taha, Mahmoud Reda; DeCoster, Thomas A; Gehlert, Rick J

    2015-01-01

    We performed a simple biomechanical study to compare the fixation strength of titanium mesh with traditional tension-band augmentation, which is a standard treatment for transverse patella fractures. We hypothesised that titanium mesh augmentation is not inferior in fixation strength to the standard treatment. Twenty-four synthetic patellae were tested. Twelve were fixed with stainless steel wire and parallel cannulated screws. Twelve were fixed with parallel cannulated screws, augmented with anterior titanium mesh and four screws. A custom test fixture was developed to simulate a knee flexed to 90°. A uniaxial force was applied to the simulated extensor mechanism at this angle. A non-inferiority study design was used to evaluate ultimate force required for failure of each construct as a measure of fixation strength. Stiffness of the bone/implant construct, fracture gap immediately prior to failure, and modes of failure are also reported. The mean difference in force at failure was -23.0 N (95% CI: -123.6 to 77.6N) between mesh and wire constructs, well within the pre-defined non-inferiority margin of -260 N. Mean stiffness of the mesh and wire constructs were 19.42 N/mm (95% CI: 18.57-20.27 N/mm) and 19.49 N/mm (95% CI: 18.64-20.35 N/mm), respectively. Mean gap distance for the mesh constructs immediately prior to failure was 2.11 mm (95% CI: 1.35-2.88 mm) and 3.87 mm (95% CI: 2.60-5.13 mm) for wire constructs. Titanium mesh augmentation is not inferior to tension-band wire augmentation when comparing ultimate force required for failure in this simplified biomechanical model. Results also indicate that stiffness of the two constructs is similar but that the mesh maintains a smaller fracture gap prior to failure. The results of this study indicate that the use of titanium mesh plating augmentation as a low-profile alternative to tension-band wiring for fixation of transverse patella fractures warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  16. Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) and study on new opportunities in plasma science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of plasma science in the United States. Accordingly, the Committee identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special symposia are among the mechanisms used by the PLSC to meet its charge. This progress report presents a review of PLSC activities from July 15, 1991 to May 31, 1992. The details of prior activities are discussed in earlier reports. This report also includes the status of activities associated with the PLSC study on opportunities in plasma science and technology. During the above period, the PLSC has continued to track and participate in, when requested, discussions on the health of the field. Much of the perspective of the PLSC has been presented in the recently-published report Research Briefing on Contemporary Problems in Plasma Science. That report has served as the basis for briefings to representatives of the federal government as well as the community-at-large. In keeping with its charge to identify and highlight specific areas for scientific and technological opportunities, the PLSC completed publication of the report Plasma Processing of Materials: Scientific and Technological Opportunities and launched a study on new opportunities in plasma science and technology

  17. Exploring inductive risk case studies of values in science

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Ted

    2017-01-01

    Science is the most reliable means available for understanding the world around us and our place in it. But, since science draws conclusions based on limited empirical evidence, there is always a chance that a scientific inference will be incorrect. That chance, known as inductive risk, is endemic to science. Though inductive risk has always been present in scientific practice, the role of values in responding to it has only recently gained extensive attention from philosophers, scientists, and policy-makers. Exploring Inductive Risk brings together a set of eleven concrete case studies with the goals of illustrating the pervasiveness of inductive risk, assisting scientists and policymakers in responding to it, and moving theoretical discussions of this phenomenon forward. The case studies range over a wide variety of scientific contexts, including the drug approval process, high energy particle physics, dual-use research, climate science, research on gender disparities in employment, clinical trials, and to...

  18. Science Mission Definition Studies for TROPIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, J. F.

    1997-01-01

    This document summarizes the results of mission definition studies for solar electric propulsion missions that have been carried out over the last approximately three years. The major output from the studies has been two proposals which were submitted to NASA in response to Announcements of Opportunity for missions and an ongoing Global Magnetospheric Dynamics mission study. The bulk of this report consists of copies of the proposals and preliminary materials from the GMD study that will be completed in the coming months.

  19. A Case Study Investigating Secondary Science Teachers' Perceptions of Science Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Phyllis Ann

    This project study addressed the lack of inclusion of discipline literacy pedagogy in secondary classrooms in a rural school district in eastern North Carolina. Discipline literacy practices are recommended in the Common Core Standards for History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. The district had implemented content area reading strategies across content areas, yet no significant progress in secondary students' reading abilities had been demonstrated in statewide or national assessments. The conceptual framework that drove this study was disciplinary literacy, founded by the literacy research of Shanahan, Shanahan, and Zygouris-Coe. Within a qualitative case study method, this investigation of 8 secondary science teachers' experiences teaching literacy during content instruction focused on practices of embedding science-specific reading strategies into lessons and factors that influence teachers' decisions to participate in professional development to advance their learning of discipline-specific literacy methods. Data were collected and triangulated using a focus group and 8 individual interviews. Data from both methods were analyzed into codes and categories that developed into emergent themes. Findings from the focus group and individual interviews revealed that the science teachers possessed limited knowledge of science-specific reading strategies; used random, general literacy practices; and had completed inadequate professional development on science-related topics. Positive change may occur if district leaders support teachers in expanding their knowledge and application of discipline literacy strategies through participation in discipline literacy-focused professional development. The study may provide educators and researchers a deeper understanding of disciplinary literacy and increase research on the topic.

  20. Design Study of Control System for Radiation Therapy System Based on 6 MeV X-band LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sehee; Kim, Jaehyun; Chae, Moonsik; Lee, Byeongno; Oh, Kyeongmin; Lee, Soomin; Ju, Jinsik; Park, Sangjoon; Kim, Hansoo; Jeong, Kyeongmin

    2017-01-01

    Linear accelerator(LINAC) is used in various fields such as industrial, defense, medical, etc because it is easy to control radiation energy or flow rate. KAERI developed a robot-based radiation therapy system that can efficiently irradiate radiation in a short period of time. Unlike the old type which uses a single robot arm, two robot arms are used and the smart bed is linked to track the respiration. This paper discusses the development of system of integrated X-band LINAC modules installed in smart robot therapy machines. In this study, total control program for integrating and controlling the medical LINAC modules was developed and verified. Future research will continue to reduce delays between transmissions and receptions and minimize interference between the modules.

  1. Band Jahn-Teller effect on the density of states of the magnetic high-Tc superconductors: A model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, B.; Mohanta, K.L.; Rout, G.C.

    2012-01-01

    We report here a mean-field study of competing antiferromagnetism, superconductivity and lattice strain phases and their effect on the local density of states of the cuprate system. Our model Hamiltonian incorporating these interactions is reported earlier [G.C. Rout et al., Physica C, 2007]. The analytic expression for superconducting, antiferromagnetism and lattice strain order parameters are calculated and solved self-consistently. The interplay of these order parameters is investigated considering the calculated density of states (DOSs) of the conduction electrons. The DOS displays multiple gap structures with multiple peaks. It is suggested that the tunneling conductance data obtained from the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements could be interpreted by using the quasi-particle bands calculated from our model Hamiltonian. We have discussed the mechanism to calculate the order parameters from the conductance data.

  2. Study on W-band sheet-beam traveling-wave tube based on flat-roofed sine waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shuanzhu; Xu, Jin; Jiang, Xuebing; Lei, Xia; Wu, Gangxiong; Li, Qian; Ding, Chong; Yu, Xiang; Wang, Wenxiang; Gong, Yubin; Wei, Yanyu

    2018-05-01

    A W-band sheet electron beam (SEB) traveling-wave tube (TWT) based on flat-roofed sine waveguide slow-wave structure (FRSWG-SWS) is proposed. The sine wave of the metal grating is replaced by a flat-roofed sine wave around the electron beam tunnel. The slow-wave characteristics including the dispersion properties and interaction impedance have been investigated by using the eigenmode solver in the 3-D electromagnetic simulation software Ansoft HFSS. Through calculations, the FRSWG SWS possesses the larger average interaction impedance than the conventional sine waveguide (SWG) SWS in the frequency range of 86-110 GHz. The beam-wave interaction was studied and particle-in-cell simulation results show that the SEB TWT can produce output power over 120 W within the bandwidth ranging from 90 to 100 GHz, and the maximum output power is 226 W at typical frequency 94 GHz, corresponding electron efficiency of 5.89%.

  3. Martensitic transformation between competing phases in Ti–Ta alloys: a solid-state nudged elastic band study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Tanmoy; Rogal, Jutta; Drautz, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    A combined density functional theory and solid-state nudged elastic band study is presented to investigate the martensitic transformation between β → (α″, ω) phases in the Ti–Ta system. The minimum energy paths along the transformation are calculated and the transformation mechanisms as well as relative stabilities of the different phases are discussed for various compositions. The analysis of the transformation paths is complemented by calculations of phonon spectra to determine the dynamical stability of the β, α″, and ω phase. Our theoretical results confirm the experimental findings that with increasing Ta concentration there is a competition between the destabilisation of the α″ and ω phase and the stabilisation of the high-temperature β phase. (paper)

  4. Blinded with Science or Informed by Charts? A Replication Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dragicevic , Pierre; Jansen , Yvonne

    2018-01-01

    International audience; We provide a reappraisal of Tal and Wansink's study "Blinded with Science" , where seemingly trivial charts were shown to increase belief in drug efficacy, presumably because charts are associated with science. Through a series of four replications conducted on two crowdsourcing platforms, we investigate an alternative explanation, namely, that the charts allowed participants to better assess the drug's efficacy. Considered together, our experiments suggest that the ch...

  5. Secondary Science Teachers' Implementation of CCSS and NGSS Literacy Practices: A Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Sally Valentino; Thomas, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    Most middle and high school students struggle with reading and writing in science. This may be because science teachers are reluctant to teach literacy in science class. New standards now require a shift in the way science teachers develop students' literacy in science. This survey study examined the extent to which science teachers report…

  6. Effect of phase formation on valence band photoemission and photoresonance study of Ti/Ni multilayers using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, Pramod; Chaudhari, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents investigation of Ti-Ni alloy phase formation and its effect on valence band (VB) photoemission and photoresonance study of as-deposited as well as annealed Ti/Ni multilayers (MLs) up to 600 deg. C using synchrotron radiation. For this purpose [Ti (50 A)/Ni (50 A)]X 10 ML structures were deposited by using electron-beam evaporation technique under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions. Formation of different phases of Ti-Ni alloy due to annealing treatment has been confirmed by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The XRD pattern corresponding as-deposited ML sample shows crystalline nature of both Ti and Ni deposited layers, whereas 300 deg. C annealed ML sample show solid-state reaction (SSR) leading to amorphization and subsequent recrystallisation at higher temperatures of annealing (≥400 deg. C) with the formation of TiNi, TiNi 3 and Ti 2 Ni alloy phases. The survey scans corresponding to 400, 500 and 600 deg. C annealed ML sample shows interdiffusion and intermixing of Ni atoms into Ti layers leading to chemical Ti-Ni alloys phase formation at interface. The corresponding recorded VB spectra using synchrotron radiation at 134 eV on as-deposited ML sample with successive sputtering shows alternately photoemission bands due to Ti 3d and Ni 3d, respectively, indicating there is no mixing of the consequent layers and any phase formation at the interface during deposition. However, ML samples annealed at higher temperatures of annealing, particularly at 400, 500 and 600 deg. C show a clear shift in Ni 3d band and its satellite peak position to higher BE side indicates Ti-Ni alloy phase formation. In addition to this, reduction of satellite peak intensity and Ni 3d density of states (DOS) near Fermi level is also observed due to Ti-Ni phase formation with higher annealing temperatures. The variable photon energy VB measurements on as-deposited and ML samples annealed at 400 deg. C confirms existence and BE position of observed Ni 3d satellite

  7. Slope Superficial Displacement Monitoring by Small Baseline SAR Interferometry Using Data from L-band ALOS PALSAR and X-band TerraSAR: A Case Study of Hong Kong, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulong Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the development of spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR platforms, and in particular the increase in the availability of multi-source (multi-band and multi-resolution data, it is now feasible to design a surface displacement monitoring application using multi-temporal SAR interferometry (MT-InSAR. Landslides have high socio-economic impacts in many countries because of potential geo-hazards and heavy casualties. In this study, taking into account the merits of ALOS PALSAR (L-band, good coherence preservation and TerraSAR (X-band, high resolution and short revisit times data, we applied an improved small baseline InSAR (SB-InSAR with 3-D phase unwrapping approach, to monitor slope superficial displacement in Hong Kong, China, a mountainous subtropical zone city influenced by over-urbanization and heavy monsoonal rains. Results revealed that the synergistic use of PALSAR and TerraSAR data produces different outcomes in relation to data reliability and spatial-temporal resolution, and hence could be of significant value for a comprehensive understanding and monitoring of unstable slopes.

  8. The Connoisseurship of Conducting: A Qualitative Study of Exemplary Wind Band Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Nancy; Henry, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to gain an in-depth perspective through examining how the conducting pedagogy of three selected exemplary high school and college instrumental music conductors function within the context of an actual rehearsal. A typical rehearsal was video recorded, followed by a "think-aloud" session in which the conductor viewed the…

  9. Microscopic insight in the study of yrast bands in selenium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the rotational-like energy spacings of the yrast states with I≥6. ... even–even selenium isotopes, the study of structure of high spin states through mea- ... calculations with this model can achieve a comparable quality to the large-scale ... model in that the PSM uses the angular momentum projected states as the basis.

  10. Microscopic study of positive-parity yrast bands of Th isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tor arrays. Thorium is one of the isotopic mass chains that has been studied. The level ... the valence space and np-interaction in SOP orbits plays a crucial role in determining the ..... parameters suggested by Rozmej [37] in the actinide region.

  11. Hispanic women overcoming deterrents to computer science: A phenomenological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herling, Lourdes

    The products of computer science are important to all aspects of society and are tools in the solution of the world's problems. It is, therefore, troubling that the United States faces a shortage in qualified graduates in computer science. The number of women and minorities in computer science is significantly lower than the percentage of the U.S. population which they represent. The overall enrollment in computer science programs has continued to decline with the enrollment of women declining at a higher rate than that of men. This study addressed three aspects of underrepresentation about which there has been little previous research: addressing computing disciplines specifically rather than embedding them within the STEM disciplines, what attracts women and minorities to computer science, and addressing the issues of race/ethnicity and gender in conjunction rather than in isolation. Since women of underrepresented ethnicities are more severely underrepresented than women in general, it is important to consider whether race and ethnicity play a role in addition to gender as has been suggested by previous research. Therefore, this study examined what attracted Hispanic women to computer science specifically. The study determines whether being subjected to multiple marginalizations---female and Hispanic---played a role in the experiences of Hispanic women currently in computer science. The study found five emergent themes within the experiences of Hispanic women in computer science. Encouragement and role models strongly influenced not only the participants' choice to major in the field, but to persist as well. Most of the participants experienced a negative atmosphere and feelings of not fitting in while in college and industry. The interdisciplinary nature of computer science was the most common aspect that attracted the participants to computer science. The aptitudes participants commonly believed are needed for success in computer science are the Twenty

  12. Kaolinite: Defect defined material properties – A soft X-ray and first principles study of the band gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietzsch, A., E-mail: annette.pietzsch@helmholtz-berlin.de [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation in Synchrotron Radiation Research G-ISRR, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Nisar, J. [Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC), P.O. Box 2151, Islamabad (Pakistan); Jämstorp, E. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Gråsjö, J. [Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Box 580, 75123 Uppsala (Sweden); Århammar, C. [Coromant R& D, S-126 80 Stockholm (Sweden); Ahuja, R.; Rubensson, J.-E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The respective electronic structure of synthetic and natural kaolinite is compared. • The size of the band gap and thus many important material properties are defined by defect states in the band gap. • The oxygen-based defect states are identified and analyzed. • The band gap of kaolinite decreases significantly due to the forming of defects. - Abstract: By combining X-ray absorption spectroscopy and first principles calculations we have determined the electronic structure of synthetic and natural kaolinite as a model system for engineered and natural clay materials. We have analyzed defect states in the band gap and find that both natural and synthetic kaolinite contain defects where oxygen replaces hydrogen in one of the Al (0 0 1)-hydroxyl groups of the kaolinite clay sheets. The band gap of both synthetic and natural kaolinite is found to decrease by about 3.2 eV as this defect is formed.

  13. Ferroelectric switching of band alignments in LSMO/PZT/Co multiferroic tunnel junctions: an ab initio study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, M; Stojić, N; Binggeli, N

    2017-08-04

    Band alignments in ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) are expected to play a critical role in determining the charge transport across the tunneling barrier. In general, however, the interface band discontinuities and their polarization dependence are not well known in these systems. Using a first-principles density-functional-theory approach, we explore the ferroelectric (FE) polarization dependence of the band alignments in [Formula: see text] (LSMO/PZT/Co) multiferroic tunnel junctions, for which recent experiments indicated an ON/OFF conductivity behavior upon switching the PZT FE polarization. Our results on the pseudomorphic defect-free LSMO/PZT/Co FTJs evidence a major FE switching effect on the band discontinuities at both interfaces. Based on the changes in the band alignments, we provide a possible explanation for the observed trends in the resistive switching.

  14. Kaolinite: Defect defined material properties – A soft X-ray and first principles study of the band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietzsch, A.; Nisar, J.; Jämstorp, E.; Gråsjö, J.; Århammar, C.; Ahuja, R.; Rubensson, J.-E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The respective electronic structure of synthetic and natural kaolinite is compared. • The size of the band gap and thus many important material properties are defined by defect states in the band gap. • The oxygen-based defect states are identified and analyzed. • The band gap of kaolinite decreases significantly due to the forming of defects. - Abstract: By combining X-ray absorption spectroscopy and first principles calculations we have determined the electronic structure of synthetic and natural kaolinite as a model system for engineered and natural clay materials. We have analyzed defect states in the band gap and find that both natural and synthetic kaolinite contain defects where oxygen replaces hydrogen in one of the Al (0 0 1)-hydroxyl groups of the kaolinite clay sheets. The band gap of both synthetic and natural kaolinite is found to decrease by about 3.2 eV as this defect is formed

  15. Adsorption of Ti on LiAlH4 surfaces studied by band structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevvik, O.M.

    2004-01-01

    LiAlH 4 is a potential light-weight hydrogen storage material if hydrogenation can be made reversible. In NaAlH 4 this may be done by adding small amounts of Ti, but the same effect has not yet been observed in LiAlH 4 . To understand these mechanisms, detailed studies of the materials with and without the additive are necessary. In this study, two-dimensional slabs representing the open (0 1 0) and densely packed (1 0 1) surfaces of LiAlH 4 have been used to model adsorption of titanium atoms on those surfaces. The results show that the Ti atom tends to move below the surface towards interstitial sites rather than binding to a Li ion or AlH 4 complex at the surface

  16. Study of fission product γ spectra in the band 2-500 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, A.

    1959-01-01

    In the study of the γ spectrum of uranium fission products, particular attention has been given in this note to the part of the spectrum ranging between 0 and 500 keV after a given pile operating programme and the evolution of this spectrum with time after a pile shutdown has been followed. The study be related to the fission products which appear in the pile as a whole or on those produced in a uranium sample assumed to have been placed in the pile. The latter case has been envisaged here. The spectrum determination is based partly on theory and partly on experiment. The pile operating conditions are different in the two cases, which widens the range of validity of the spectra traced here. (author) [fr

  17. The design study of the high power solid-state amplifier in S-band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozyo, E.; Kobayashi, K.; Yoshida, K.

    1976-01-01

    We have designed the 500W high power solid-state amplifier for the microwave system of INS electron linac. In this design study the output pulse power level of each module is set as possible as high, so the total number of elements is well reduced within the present microwave technics. In comparison with TWTA highly stabilized and maintenance-free operations are expected with 5 years' MTF. (auth.)

  18. A study of the Teachers` Academy for Mathematics and Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett, B.; Scheirer, M.A.; Raizen, S.

    1994-09-15

    The Teachers` Academy for Mathematics and Science in Chicago (TAMS) is a freestanding institution founded in 1989 by scientists and a variety of other stakeholders, to advance the systemic reform of mathematics and science education in Chicago`s public schools. It focuses on the ``re-tooling`` of its elementary level teachers. The TAMS program, which has been funded in part by the DOE, contributes to strategic goals two through five of the Office of University and Science Education (OUSE). This evaluation of TAMS by the National Center for Improving Science Education is primarily a qualitative study that summarizes the history and current status of the organization and its programs. Data was obtained through extensive interviews, observations, and document review, using a framework of templates to guide data collection and analyses. The findings are organized around a series of lessons learned from the first three years of TAMS and conclusions about its current status.

  19. [Science and society. Guidelines for the Leopoldina Study Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    In order to adequately perform its many diverse tasks as a scholars' society and as the German National Academy of Sciences, the Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher Leopoldina needs to view itself in a historical context. This can only happen as part of a culture of remembrance which fosters the memory of the Leopoldina's past and subjects this to a critical analysis in the context of the history of science and academies. The newly founded Leopoldina Study Center for the History of Science and Science Academies is to be a forum that pursues established forms of historical research at the Leopoldina, organizes new scientific projects, and presents its findings to the public. The aim is to involve as many Leopoldina members as possible from all of its disciplines, as well as to collaborate with national and international partners.

  20. Students' Preconceptions and Perceptions of Science-Oriented Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korpershoek, Hanke; Kuyper, Hans; Bosker, Roel; van der Werf, Greetje

    2013-01-01

    Do non-science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students' views about STEM studies correspond with how STEM students actually perceive these studies? This paper deals with this issue by comparing higher education students' attitudes towards STEM studies between those who actually did

  1. Newspapers in Science Education: A Study Involving Sixth Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-San; Wang, Yun-Fei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the learning performance of sixth grade elementary school students using newspapers in science teaching. A quasi-experimental design with a single group was used in this study. Thirty-three sixth grade elementary school students participated in this study. The research instruments consisted of three…

  2. Recombination properties of diode structures by study of thermal emission beyond the fundamental absorption band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrowski, T; Wȩgrzecki, M; Czerwinski, A; Teslenko, G I; Malyutenko, O Y; Malyutenko, V K

    2014-01-01

    The study presents the possibilities of applying the measurement of spatial and temporal distribution of thermal radiation of a p-n junction structure located in a homogeneous temperature field higher than the ambient temperature, modulated by the presence of excess carriers injected through the junction, to determine surface recombination velocity at the injecting contact of the diode emitter and to measure the diffusion length in the base. Good agreement was obtained between the experimental results and calculations based on solutions of the transport equations.

  3. A broad band X-ray imaging spectrophotometer for astrophysical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Kenneth S. K.; Lee, Dong Hwan; Ku, William H.-M.

    1988-01-01

    A broadband X-ray imaging spectrophotometer (BBXRIS) has been built for astrophysical studies. The BBXRIS is based on a large-imaging gas scintillation proportional counter (LIGSPC), a combination of a gas scintillation proportional counter and a multiwire proportional counter, which achieves 8 percent (FWHM) energy resolution and 1.5-mm (FWHM) spatial resolution at 5.9 keV. The LIGSPC can be integrated with a grazing incidence mirror and a coded aperture mask to provide imaging over a broad range of X-ray energies. The results of tests involving the LIGSPC and a coded aperture mask are presented, and possible applications of the BBXRIS are discussed.

  4. Photonic band gaps and defects in two dimensions: Studies of the transmission coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigalas, M.; Soukoulis, C.M.; Economou, E.N.; Chan, C.T.; Ho, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    Using the transfer-matrix technique for the propagation of electromagnetic waves in dielectric structures, we calculate the transmission coefficient versus the frequency of the incident wave for different polarizations in two-dimensional periodic and/or random arrangements of dielectric cylinders. This technique has been applied to cases where the plane-wave method fails or becomes too time consuming, such as when the dielectric constant is frequency dependent or has a nonzero imaginary part, and when defects are present in an otherwise periodic system. For all the cases studied, the results compared well with experiment

  5. Band Gap Transition Studies of U:ThO2 Using Cathodoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    regarding x-ray fluorescence. 2.1 Atomic Properties of Ux:Th1−xO2 Thorium and uranium dioxide are metal oxides with the fluorite crystal structure...thorium oxide is a material upon which few studies have been performed. The goal of this research is to determine how the insertion of uranium atoms into...doped thorium oxide crystal, 041 TU, with uranium mass concentration of 22.7% before chemical cleaning. Mass pre-cleaning: 0.341 g. 7 Figure 1.5

  6. Study of rotational bands in 136 Pr using on-line γ-spectroscopy methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emediato, L.G.R.

    1990-01-01

    The structure of the doubly odd nucleus 136 Pr has been studied using techniques of on-line γ-spectroscopy with the reactions 123 Sb ( 16 O, 3 n) 136 Pr and 126 Te ( 14 N, 4 n) 136 Pr populating high spin states. The excitation functions were measured at four energies, and γ-γ-τ coincidences and angular distributions at 69 M e V and 56 M e V, respectively, using high resolution HPGe detectors (2 K e V) and targets of enriched isotope of 123 Sb (99%) and 126 Te (94%) with thicknesses of approximately 9 mg/cm 2 . (author)

  7. An ethnographic study of the construction of science on television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Koshi

    1999-10-01

    The medium of television is an important manifestation of popular culture. Television stories and images frequently represent the position occupied by science and scientists in society. This study focuses on three questions. First, what is the form and content of the science that is constructed on television programs in which high school students see science? Second, how do television practitioners who deal with science approach and think about their work? Third, in what ways do high school students appropriate the science in these programs? Ethnographic methods, which did not include the technique of participant observation, were used to address these questions. Two types of text provided the basis for ethnographic analysis. First, text whose production was beyond the control of the researcher was used in the form of approximately 10 hours of programming, which included both fictional and non-fictional genres. Selection was based upon the results of questionnaires, in which students were asked to list those programs in which they saw the most science together with their reasons for each choice. Second, text whose production was somewhat within my control as researcher was used in the form of transcripts of interviews with television practitioners and students. In addition, written responses to the researcher's questions and transcripts of student discussion groups are texts that fall into this second category. The findings point to the centrality of the notion of the nature of science, which is constructed by a variety of factors. These include, first, story---representing events, people and the process of science on television. Story is shaped by plot, discourse, characters and genre. Second, images work to construct a nature of science and, in turn, constitute choices made about the composition, sequence and duration of shots. Third, who the television practitioners who produce a program are in conjunction with the culture of the institution they work for

  8. Study of SNS and SIS NbN Josephson junctions coupled to a microwave band-pass filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggetta, E; Setzu, R; Villegier, J C [Laboratoire de Cryophysique, DRFMC, CEA, Grenoble (France)

    2006-06-01

    We have fabricated both NbN/Ta{sub x}N/NbN SN*S-type, NbN/MgO/NbN SIS-type Josephson junctions and microwave band-pass filters on different substrates (Si, Sapphire, MgO). NbN films have been deposited on both sides of (100) oriented, 250 {mu}m thick, MgO substrates with a high crystalline texture quality. The aim was to investigate the performances and the maximum achievable operating frequency in an NbN based RSFQ modulator front-end of an ADC in the 4 K-10 K temperature range. We observed that Ta{sub x}N thin films can be tuned from an insulating phase to a superconducting phase (Tc {approx}4K) by varying the nitrogen content during sputter deposition while the barrier height of MgO can also be controlled by deposition conditions and by tri-layer postdeposition annealing. Junction properties (Jc{approx}10-25 kA/cm{sup 2}), Mac Cumber parameter and RnIc product measured up to 1 mV are shown to be controlled by the reactive sputtering conditions. We have designed three pole band-pass filters and resonators in a micro-strip configuration and studied the junction coupling with the filters. We will show that a sigma-delta NbN technology is a suitable solution for analogue-to-digital conversion in the future generations of telecommunication satellites to achieve high sampling frequency and large bandwidth at high carrier frequency signal.

  9. Study of SNS and SIS NbN Josephson junctions coupled to a microwave band-pass filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggetta, E; Setzu, R; Villegier, J C

    2006-01-01

    We have fabricated both NbN/Ta x N/NbN SN*S-type, NbN/MgO/NbN SIS-type Josephson junctions and microwave band-pass filters on different substrates (Si, Sapphire, MgO). NbN films have been deposited on both sides of (100) oriented, 250 μm thick, MgO substrates with a high crystalline texture quality. The aim was to investigate the performances and the maximum achievable operating frequency in an NbN based RSFQ modulator front-end of an ADC in the 4 K-10 K temperature range. We observed that Ta x N thin films can be tuned from an insulating phase to a superconducting phase (Tc ∼4K) by varying the nitrogen content during sputter deposition while the barrier height of MgO can also be controlled by deposition conditions and by tri-layer postdeposition annealing. Junction properties (Jc∼10-25 kA/cm 2 ), Mac Cumber parameter and RnIc product measured up to 1 mV are shown to be controlled by the reactive sputtering conditions. We have designed three pole band-pass filters and resonators in a micro-strip configuration and studied the junction coupling with the filters. We will show that a sigma-delta NbN technology is a suitable solution for analogue-to-digital conversion in the future generations of telecommunication satellites to achieve high sampling frequency and large bandwidth at high carrier frequency signal

  10. Diet and Cardiovascular Risk in University Marching Band, Dance Team and Cheer Squad Members: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuamer Diana

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of death in the United States. Diets high in fat, especially saturated fat, are often linked to obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, all risk factors for CVD. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between diet and CVD risk factors in members of a university marching band, dance team and cheer squad. Methods In 2004, 232 marching band, dance team and cheer squad members completed a self-administered survey evaluating dietary intake. Body mass index (BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, blood pressure, fasting serum glucose and cholesterol were measured. Unpaired t-test and Pearson's chi square test were used to determine baseline differences by gender. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine the cross-sectional association between dietary intake of various food groups such as grains, meats, fruits & vegetables, dairy, water, alcohol and risk factors for CVD namely BMI, WHR, blood glucose, total cholesterol, and blood pressure (BP. Results 45% of the participants were overweight; 30% of females and 4.3% of males had WHR ≥ 0.80 and 0.95 respectively. Almost 8% were hyperglycemic, 10% hypercholesterolemic, 15% had high systolic and 9% had high diastolic BP. Less than 50% consumed the recommended servings of grains, fruits and vegetables, dairy and water and 58% consumed alcohol. Higher grains intake was positively associated with higher BMI (Adjusted β = 1.97, p = 0.030, 95% CI: 0.19, 3.74 and; higher alcohol intake was also positively associated with higher BMI (Adjusted β = 0.15, p = 0.002, 95% CI: 0.06, 0.24. Conclusion These results warrant the evaluation of existing college-based health programs and development of new interventions to improve dietary habits and promote a healthy lifestyle in these athletes.

  11. VUV Fourier-transform absorption study of the Lyman and Werner bands in D2

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Arno; Dickenson, Gareth D.; Salumbides, Edcel J.; Ubachs, Wim; de Oliveira, Nelson; Joyeux, Denis; Nahon, Laurent

    2012-06-01

    An extensive survey of the D2 absorption spectrum has been performed with the high-resolution VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer employing synchrotron radiation. The frequency range of 90 000-119 000 cm-1 covers the full depth of the potential wells of the B sideset{^1}{+u}{Σ}, B^' } sideset{^1}{+u}{Σ}, and C 1Πu electronic states up to the D(1s) + D(2ℓ) dissociation limit. Improved level energies of rovibrational levels have been determined up to respectively v = 51, v = 13, and v = 20. Highest resolution is achieved by probing absorption in a molecular gas jet with slit geometry, as well as in a liquid helium cooled static gas cell, resulting in line widths of ≈0.35 cm-1. Extended calibration methods are employed to extract line positions of D2 lines at absolute accuracies of 0.03 cm-1. The D 1Πu and B^' ' } sideset{^1}{+u}{Σ} electronic states correlate with the D(1s) + D(3ℓ) dissociation limit, but support a few vibrational levels below the second dissociation limit, respectively, v = 0-3 and v = 0-1, and are also included in the presented study. The complete set of resulting level energies is the most comprehensive and accurate data set for D2. The observations are compared with previous studies, both experimental and theoretical.

  12. Discursive Contextures of Science: Euro/West-Centrism and Science and Technology Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Prasad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Science and Technology Studies (STS by the very act of showing the multiplicity, contingency, and context-dependence of scientific knowledge and practice, provincialized modern science. Postcolonial interventions within STS have pursued this goal even further. Nevertheless, Euro/West-centrism continues to inflect not only scientific practices and lay imaginaries, but also sociological and historical analyses of sciences. In this article, drawing on my own training within STS – first under J.P.S. Uberoi, who was concerned with structuralist analysis of modernity and science, and thereafter under Andy Pickering, when we focused on material agency and temporal emergence and extensively engaged with Actor Network Theory - I emphasize the continuing role of Euro/West-centric discourses in defining the “self” and the “other” and in impacting epistemological and ontological interventions. More broadly, building on a concept of Michael Lynch’s, I call for excavation and analysis of discursive contextures of sciences. In the second section of the article, through a brief analysis of embryonic stem cell therapy in a clinic in Delhi, I show how with shifting transnational landscape of technoscience certain discursive contextures are being “deterritorialized” and left “stuttering.”

  13. LAP-BAND for BMI 30-40: 5-year health outcomes from the multicenter pivotal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, J B; Eaton, L L; Vincent, V; Michaelson, R

    2016-02-01

    We performed a 5-year multicenter study to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the LAP-BAND System surgery (LBS) in patients with obesity with a body mass index (BMI) of 30-39.9 kg m(-)(2). This pivotal study was designed to support LBS application to the US Food and Drug Administration for broadening the indications for surgery and the lower BMI indication was approved with 1-year data in 2011, with the intention to complete the 5-year evaluation. To present broad health outcome data including weight change, patient reported outcomes, comorbidity change and complications during the 5-year study. The study was conducted at seven US private practice clinical trial sites. We enrolled 149 BMI 30-39.9 subjects into a 5-year, multicenter, longitudinal, prospective post-approval study. Data for those completing each time point are presented. The predefined target of at least 30% excess weight loss was achieved by more than 76% of subjects by 1-year and at every year thereafter during the 5-year study. Mean percentage weight loss at 5 years was 15.9±12.4%. Sustained weight loss was accompanied by sustained improvement in generic and weight-specific quality of life, symptoms of depression and the prevalence of binge-eating disorder. The number of subjects with normal fasting triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, plasma glucose and HbA1c increased significantly between baseline and 5 years. Fifty-four months after LBS implantation, the rate of device explants without replacement was 5.4%; however, the rate of explants increased to 12.1% by month 60 owing to no cost-elective band removals offered to subjects at study exit. No deaths or unanticipated adverse device effects were reported. The LBS is safe and effective for people with BMI 30-39.9 with demonstrated improvements in weight loss, comorbidities and quality of life, and with a low explant rate through 5 years following treatment.

  14. Biomedical Engineering and Cognitive Science Secondary Science Curriculum Development: A Three Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stacy S.; Sherwood, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    This study reports on a multi-year effort to create and evaluate cognitive-based curricular materials for secondary school science classrooms. A team of secondary teachers, educational researchers, and academic biomedical engineers developed a series of curriculum units that are based in biomedical engineering for secondary level students in…

  15. Study of the excitation bands in 75Br and 77Rb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luehmann, L.

    1985-01-01

    Via the compound-nucleus reactions 62 Ni( 16 O,p2n) 75 Br, 66 Zn( 12 C,p2n) 75 Br, and 40 Ca( 40 Ca,3p) 77 Rb the excitation behaviour of the nuclei 75 Br and 77 Rb was studied. By the application of different gamma-spectroscopic methods as the measurement of γ angular anisotropies, nγ-spectra, excitation functions, and γγ-coincidences the known level schemes could be extended by 10 respectively 16 transitions. Recoil-distance Doppler-shift and Doppler-shift attenuation measurements served for the determination of the lifetimes of 42 nuclear states in the range 0.1 ps [de

  16. Studies on the decoupled rotation bands in the nuclei 79Rb, 81Rb, and 79Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panqueva Alvarez, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    High spin states in 79 Rb, 81 Rb, and 79 Kr were studied by means of the following reactions: 63 Cu( 19 F,p2n) 79 Rb, 70 Ge( 12 C,p2n) 79 Rb, 65 Cu( 16 O,2n) 79 Rb, 65 Cu( 19 F,p2n) 81 Rb, 63 Cu( 19 F,2pn) 79 Kr, and 70 Ge( 12 C,2pn) 79 Kr. On the base of γ single spectra, excitation functions, γ angular distributions, γγ and nγ coincidences, RDDS- and DSA lifetime measurements a level scheme of 79 Rb with 13 new found excited states is proposed. Also a series of stretched E2-transitions between posivite parity states in 79 Kr could be identified. The observed M1 and E2 transition probabilities, which were obtained via the experimental determination of the lifetime as well the branching ratio of 26 excited states, form the base for a comprehensive discussion of the nuclear structure of the studied isotopes. For this reason theoretical calculations with the asymmetric rotor-plus-quasiparticle with variable moment of inertia (AROVMI) as well with the interacting boson-fermion (IBVM) model were performed. The good agreement between experiment and theory permits to relate the decrease of the B(E2)-values in 79 Rb to a finite dimensional (N=8) boson space, to cancel the discrepancies stated by Friederichs et.al., and to analyze 79 Kr the influence of a gsub(9/2) neutron on the deformation of the 78 Kr core. (orig./HSI) [de

  17. Experimental study and calculations of nitric oxide absorption in the γ(0,0) and γ(1,0) bands for strong temperature conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trad, H.; Higelin, P.; Djebaieli-Chaumeix, N.; Mounaim-Rousselle, C.

    2005-01-01

    Absorption spectra of nitric oxide in the γ(0,0) and γ(1,0) bands have been measured for hard temperature conditions up to 1700 K in order to validate a model for the simulation of these two bands. The good agreement between experiments and calculations (relative errors of 2-5% for the γ(0,0) band and 10-15% for the γ(1,0) band) consolidates the two important assumptions concerning the intermediate Hund's case between (a) and (b) for the X 2 Π state of the γ(0,0) and γ(1,0) absorption bands and the use of collisional broadening parameters of γ(0,0) to simulate the γ(1,0) band. Using this simulation, a study of the Beer-Lambert law behavior at high temperature has been carried out. With the instrument resolution used for these experiments, it was shown that a correction of the Beer-Lambert law is necessary. To apply this technique for the measurements of NO concentrations inside the combustion chamber of an optical SI engine, a new formulation of the Beer-Lambert law has been introduced, since the modified form proposed in the literature is no longer applicable in the total column range of interest

  18. Feasibility study of EEW application in Korea ; Testing different frequency bands for small earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, H. C.; Park, J. H.; Sheen, D. H.

    2009-04-01

    At present, it seems almost impossible to predict where and how much strong a earthquake will happen within very limited time such as two or three days before it occurs. However, the advantage of modern electronic techniques can support us very fast communication tools around nation-wide area so that we can receive P- waves arrival information from seismic stations through communication lines before S-waves strike our living site. This is the key of EEW(Earthquake Early Warning) concept that is under development around world especially including Japan, United State of America, and Taiwan. In this pilot study we proposed the direction for developing Korean Earthquake Early Warning System. Considering the state of the art techniques used in Japan, USA and Taiwan, ElarmS would be more adaptable to Korea since ElarmS can work from the low limit of moderate earthquakes around magnitude 3.5, which would annually happen in Korea. Using 27 events ranging in magnitude from 2.2 to 4.9 occurring in South Korea for 2007, we investigate empirical magnitude scaling relationships in South Korea due to the variation of the duration of the P waveform. We measure the maximum predominant period and the peak displacement or velocity amplitude from the first few seconds of P wave arrivals to derive period-magnitude and amplitude-magnitude scaling relationship, respectively. We find that it is possible to determine the magnitude of earthquakes only using the first 2 seconds of the P wave and, for the period-magnitude relationship, 10 Hz low-pass filter yields better estimate than 3 Hz. This is because the magnitudes of most events used in this study are too small (<3.0). It is also shown that peak displacement for velocity instruments and peak velocity for accelerometers have their own magnitude scaling relationships, respectively. Thus, for the amplitude-magnitude relationship, like the relationships in northern California, two individual amplitude scaling relationships would be

  19. Implanted muon studies in condensed matter science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, S.F.J.

    1986-12-01

    The paper reviews the broad range of applications of implanted muons in condensed matter. Muon spin rotation is discussed, along with the studies in magnetism, muonion, metals and organic radicals. A description of muon spin relaxation is also given, as well as techniques and applications appropriate to pulsed muon sources. (UK)

  20. Asian Studies/Global Studies: Transcending Area Studies and Social Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Lie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The post–World War II growth of area studies, and Asian studies in particular, posed a serious challenge to the mainstream social sciences. Yet the epistemic and institutional foundations of area studies were never well articulated or justified, and the post–Cold War years brought a pervasive sense of crisis to its intellectual mission and justification. In particular, the author focuses on the tensions, if not contradictions, between social science disciplines and area studies. In advocating a more integrated human science, which depends more on mobile networks of scholars than on fixed fields of discipline-bound professors, the author suggests global studies as a fitting field of inquiry in the age of globalization.

  1. Administrative support of novice science teachers: A multiple case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacuone, Leann

    Novice science teachers leave the confines of colleges and universities to embark on a new adventure in education where they aim to influence young minds, make a difference in the world, and share their love for their content. They have learned their pedagogical skills with the support and assistance of fellow classmates, a supporting professor, and a cooperating teacher. These teachers enter their new place of employment and are met with many unexpected challenges, such as a lack of resources, no one to ask questions of, and a busy staff with already established relationships, causing them to feel an overall lack of support and resulting in many new teachers rethinking their career choice and leaving the field of education within 5 years of entering. This multiple-case study investigated the administrative support 4 novice science teachers received during an academic year and the novice teachers' perceptions of the support they received to answer the following research question: How do novice science teachers who have consistent interactions with administrators develop during their first year? To answer this question, semistructured interviews, reflection journals, observations, resumes, long-range plans, and student discipline referrals were collected. The findings from this study show novice science teachers who had incidents occur in the classroom requiring administrative assistance and guidance felt more confident in enforcing their classroom management policies and procedures as the year progressed to change student behavior. The novice science teachers perceived administrators who provided resources including technology, office supplies, science supplies, and the guidance of a mentor as supportive. Novice science teachers who engaged in dialogue after administrative observations, were provided the opportunity to attend professional development outside the district, and had a mentor who taught the same discipline made more changes to their instructional

  2. Study of material science by neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.J.; Yoon, B.K.; Cheon, B.C.; Lee, C.Y.; Kim, C.S.

    1980-01-01

    To develop accurate methods of texture measurement in metallic materials by neutron diffraction, (100),(200),(111) and (310) pole figures have been measured for the oriented silicon steel sheet, and currently study of correction methods for neutron absorption and extinction effects are in progress. For quantitative analysis of texture of polycrystalline material with a cubic structure, a software has been developed to calculate inverse pole figures for arbitrary direction specified in the speciman as well as pole figures for arbitrary chosen crystallographic planes from three experimental pole figures. This work is to be extended for the calculation of three dimensional orientation distribution function and for the evaluation of errors in the quantitative analysis of texture. Work is also for the study of N-H...O hydrogen bond in amino acid by observing molecular motions using neutron inelastic scattering. Measurement of neutron inelastic scattering spectrum of L-Serine is completed at 100 0 K and over the energy transfer range of 20-150 meV. (KAERI INIS Section)

  3. Postgraduate Studies in Librarianship and Information Science in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Cañavate, Antonio; Larios-Suárez, Verónica

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the history and current situation of postgraduate studies in Librarianship and Information Science (LIS) at the university level in Spain before and after the development of the Bologna Process's European Higher Education Area (EHEA). It contextualizes the historical development of these studies, describing how official…

  4. Investigating Science Collaboratively: A Case Study of Group Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinicola, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    Discussions of one urban middle school group of students who were investigating scientific phenomena were analyzed; this study was conducted to discern if and how peer interaction contributes to learning. Through a social constructivist lens, case study methodology, we examined conceptual change among group members. Data about science talk was…

  5. Design science research as research approach in doctoral studies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kotzé, P

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the use of design science research (DSR) gained momentum as a research approach in information systems (IS), the adoption of a DSR approach in postgraduate studies became more acceptable. This paper reflects on a study to investigate how a...

  6. A case study exploring science competence and science confidence of middle school girls from marginalized backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Yeni Violeta

    The inclusion of learners from underrepresented background in biology field research experiences has not been widely explored in the literature. Increased access and equity to experiences for groups historically underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) has been identified as a priority for many, yet little is known about the components these experiences should have and what types of transformations participants undergo as a result of these experiences. This dissertation explored the systemic creation of an intervention purposely designed to serve middle school girls from underrepresented backgrounds, the implementation of such intervention, and effect on the girls' science competence and science confidence. El Espejo, Spanish for "The Mirror," was an ongoing field ecology research program for middle schools girls founded in 2009 at a local interdisciplinary learning center. Girls from all walks of life had the opportunity to be apprentice researchers and to work with scientists and science educators from the local community. All activities were strategically designed to promote student-led inquiry, career awareness, cultural awareness, and opportunities for research and mentorship for girls from underrepresented backgrounds. An increased understanding of if, how, and why this experience was perceived by the girls to be life changing was of importance to add to the conversations that seek ways to inspire and prepare this generation of students to be the next generation of scientists. The study built on systems theory, and on theories that were embedded in the participants' system: critical race theory, identity theory, and experiential learning theory, grounded in the context of the lived experiences of girls from underrepresented backgrounds. The girls' experiences were captured through journals, observer participant notes, photo-documentation, artifacts (posters, videos) created by the girls, and by using science perception

  7. Impact of Initiatives to Implement Science Inquiry: A Comparative Study of the Turkish, Israeli, Swedish and Czech Science Education Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Jana; Enghag, Margareta; Stuchlikova, Iva; Cakmakci, Gultekin; Peleg, Ran; Baram-Tsabari, Ayelet

    2017-01-01

    This empirical study investigates factors that influence the implementation of science inquiry in the education systems of Turkey, Israel, Sweden and the Czech Republic. Data was collected by means of recordings of science experts' discussions as part of an EU-funded project called Science-Teacher Education Advanced Methods (2009-2012). Results of…

  8. Nature of Science Lessons, Argumentation and Scientific Discussions among Students in Science Class: A Case Study in a Successful School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Elif; Ucus, Sukran

    2015-01-01

    Argumentation is highlighted as one of the most important activities of science education by many researchers. The main aim of this research is to examine primary school students' nature of science classes and argumentation skills in terms of their academic success in primary science classes. Thus, the main interest of the study is centered on the…

  9. Nature of Science Lessons, Argumentation and Scientific Discussions among Students in Science Classes: A Case Study in a Successful School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Elif; Ucus, Sukran

    2015-01-01

    Argumentation is highlighted as one of the most important activities of science education by many researchers. The main aim of this research is to examine primary school students' nature of science classes and argumentation skills in terms of their academic success in primary science classes. Thus, the main interest of the study is centered on the…

  10. Integrating Science and Technology: Using Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge as a Framework to Study the Practices of Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Rose M.; Dawson, Kara; Ritzhaupt, Albert D.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined how teachers involved in a yearlong technology integration initiative planned to enact technological, pedagogical, and content practices in science lessons. These science teachers, engaged in an initiative to integrate educational technology in inquiry-based science lessons, provided a total of 525 lesson plans for this…

  11. Life Science Students' Attitudes, Interest, and Performance in Introductory Physics for Life Sciences: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Catherine H.; Wisittanawat, Panchompoo; Cai, Ming; Renninger, K. Ann

    2018-01-01

    In response to national calls for improved physical sciences education for students pursuing careers in the life sciences and medicine, reformed introductory physics for life sciences (IPLS) courses are being developed. This exploratory study is among the first to assess the effect of an IPLS course on students' attitudes, interest, and…

  12. Understanding the Influence of Learners' Forethought on Their Use of Science Study Strategies in Postsecondary Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Karee E.; Lo, Wen-Juo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding self-regulation in science learning is important for theorists and practitioners alike. However, very little has been done to explore and understand students' self-regulatory processes in postsecondary science courses. In this study, the influence of science efficacy, learning value, and goal orientation on the perceived use of…

  13. Studies in Low-Energy Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brune, Carl R.; Grimes, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a summary of research projects in the area of low energy nuclear reactions and structure, carried out between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2005 and supported by U.S. DOE grant number DE-FG03-03NA00074. Cross sections measured with high resolution have been subjected to an Ericson theory analysis to infer information about the nuclear level density. Other measurements were made of the spectral shape of particles produced in evaporation processes; these also yield level density information. A major project was the development of a new Hauser-Feshbach code for analyzing such spectra. Other measurements produced information on the spectra of gamma rays emitted in reactions on heavy nuclei and gave a means of refining our understanding of gamma-ray strength functions. Finally,reactions on light nuclei were studied and subjected to an R-matrix analysis. Cross sections fora network of nuclear reactions proceedingthrough a given compound nucleus shouldgreatly constrain the family of allowed parameters. Modifications to the formalism andcomputer code are also discussed.

  14. Studies in Low-Energy Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brune, Carl R.; Grimes, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents a summary of research projects in the area of low energy nuclear reactions and structure, carried out between March 1, 2006 and October 31, 2009 which were supported by U.S. DOE grant number DE-FG52-06NA26187. We describe here research into low-energy nuclear reactions and structure. The statistical properties of nuclei have been studied by measuring level densities and also calculating them theoretically. Our approach of measuring level densities via evaporation spectra is able to reach a very wide range of nuclei by using heavy ion beams (we expect to develop experiments using radioactive beams in the near future). Another focus of the program has been on γ-ray strength functions. These clearly impact nuclear reactions, but they are much less understood than corresponding transmission coefficients for nucleons. We have begun investigations of a new approach, using γ-γ coincidences following radiative capture. Finally, we have undertaken several measurements of cross sections involving light nuclei which are important in various applications. The 9 Be(α,n) and B(d,n) reactions have been measured at Ohio University, while neutron-induced reactions have been measured at Los Alamos (LANSCE).

  15. Congenital Constriction Band Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Gupta, Fareed Malik, Rishabh Gupta, M.A.Basit, Dara Singh

    2008-01-01

    Congenital constriction bands are anomalous bands that encircle a digit or an extremity. Congenitalconstriction band syndrome is rare condition and is mostly associated with other musculoskeletaldisorders.We report such a rare experience.

  16. Fidelity study of the superconducting phase diagram in the two-dimensional single-band Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, C. J.; Moritz, B.; Chen, C.-C.; Shastry, B. Sriram; Devereaux, T. P.

    2011-09-01

    Extensive numerical studies have demonstrated that the two-dimensional single-band Hubbard model contains much of the key physics in cuprate high-temperature superconductors. However, there is no definitive proof that the Hubbard model truly possesses a superconducting ground state or, if it does, of how it depends on model parameters. To answer these longstanding questions, we study an extension of the Hubbard model including an infinite-range d-wave pair field term, which precipitates a superconducting state in the d-wave channel. Using exact diagonalization on 16-site square clusters, we study the evolution of the ground state as a function of the strength of the pairing term. This is achieved by monitoring the fidelity metric of the ground state, as well as determining the ratio between the two largest eigenvalues of the d-wave pair/spin/charge-density matrices. The calculations show a d-wave superconducting ground state in doped clusters bracketed by a strong antiferromagnetic state at half filling controlled by the Coulomb repulsion U and a weak short-range checkerboard charge ordered state at larger hole doping controlled by the next-nearest-neighbor hopping t'. We also demonstrate that negative t' plays an important role in facilitating d-wave superconductivity.

  17. The Science Manager's Guide to Case Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branch, Kristi M.; Peffers, Melissa S.; Ruegg, Rosalie T.; Vallario, Robert W.

    2001-09-24

    This guide takes the science manager through the steps of planning, implementing, validating, communicating, and using case studies. It outlines the major methods of analysis, describing their relative merits and applicability while providing relevant examples and sources of additional information. Well-designed case studies can provide a combination of rich qualitative and quantitative information, offering valuable insights into the nature, outputs, and longer-term impacts of the research. An objective, systematic, and credible approach to the evaluation of U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science programs adds value to the research process and is the subject of this guide.

  18. Opening and closing of band gaps in magnonic waveguide by rotating the triangular antidots - A micromagnetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivek, T.; Bhoomeeswaran, H.; Sabareesan, P.

    2018-05-01

    Spin waves in ID periodic triangular array of antidots are encarved in a permalloy magnonic waveguide is investigated through micromagnetic simulation. The effect of the rotating array of antidots and in-plane rotation of the scattering centers on the band structure are investigated, to indicate new possibilities of fine tuning of spin-wave filter pass and stop bands. The results show that, the opening and closing of band gaps paves a way for band pass and stop filters on waveguide. From the results, the scattering center and strong spatial distribution field plays crucible role for controlling opening and closing bandgap width of ˜12 GHz for 0° rotation. We have obtained a single narrow bandgap of width 1GHz is obtained for 90° rotation of the antidot. Similarly, the tunability is achieved for desired microwave applications done by rotating triangular antidots with different orientation.

  19. First-principles study of direct and narrow band gap semiconducting β-CuGaO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Semiconducting oxides have attracted much attention due to their great stability in air or water and the abundance of oxygen. Recent success in synthesizing a metastable phase of CuGaO 2 with direct narrow band gap opens up new applications of semiconducting oxides as absorber layer for photovoltaics. Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, we investigate the thermodynamic and mechanical stabilities as well as the structural and electronic properties of the β-CuGaO 2 phase. Our calculations show that the β-CuGaO 2 structure is dynamically and mechanically stable. The energy band gap is confirmed to be direct at the Γ point of Brillouin zone. The optical absorption occurs right at the band gap edge and the density of states near the valance band maximum is large, inducing an intense absorption of light as observed in experiment. (paper)

  20. Deformation bands in porous sandstone: case study in basins of northeast Brazil; Bandas de deformacao em arenitos porosos: estudo de casos em bacias do nordeste do Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Talles Souza [PETROBRAS, RN (Brazil). Interpretacao e Avaliacao de bacias da Costa Leste do Brasil E and P. Gerencia de Interpretacao], e-mail: tallesferreira@petrobras.com.br; Silva, Fernando Cesar Alves da [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN). Dept. de Geologia Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Geodinamica e Geofisica (Brazil)], e-mail: fernando@geologia.ufrn.br

    2010-05-15

    The meso and microscopic scale sandstone characterizations of the deformation bands of three sedimentary basins in northeastern Brazil; the Potiguar and Sergipe-Alagoas basins (Brazilian Atlantic Margin) and the Tucano Basin (aborted rift basin) were compared for their similarities and differences. Deformation bands are structures commonly developed in porous sandstones that make up the main reservoir-rock in siliciclastic petroleum systems. These structures influence the permo-porous properties and consequently the migration pathway into a sandstone reservoir. To understand their formation process and development has been the focus of a great number of articles in recent petroleum geology literature. This study highlights the similarities and the differences in the features and deformation mechanisms that provoked the development of deformation bands in the damage zones of major faults in three different sedimentary basins. In terms of basin tectonics, the deformation bands' formation and geometric arrangements are associated with major structures. In the case of the Acu Formation, a correlation was observed with the dextral Afonso Bezerra fault system, whereas in the Sergipe-Alagoas Basin the normal dextral strike-slip faults can be associated with the faulting of the boarder basin. In the Tucano Basin case, the deformation basins are related to the Jeremoabo transpressional fault, a major structure a few kilometers to the north. This study applies structural geology tools to better understand the geometric arrangement and growing mechanisms of deformation bands in different lithological and tectonic settings. Although the deformation bands present a similar aspect in a macroscopic view, the interplay between depositional and mineralogical parameters of the host rock, as well as the basin's burial and tectonic history resulted in the development of different sandstone deformation bands in three northeastern brazilian basins. (author)

  1. Monitoring of Three Case Studies of Creeping Landslides in Ecuador using L-band SAR Interferometry (InSAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga Torres, T. M.; Mohseni Aref, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tannia Mayorga Torres1,21 Universidad Central del Ecuador. Faculty of Geology, Mining, Oil, and Environment 2 Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship 2015-16 IntroductionLandslides lead to human and economic losses across the country, mainly in the winter season. On the other hand, satellite radar data has cost-effective benefits due to open-source software and free availability of data. With the purpose of establishing an early warning system of landslide-related surface deformation, three case studies were designed in the Coast, Sierra (Andean), and Oriente (jungle) regions. The objective of this work was to assess the capability of L-band InSAR to get phase information. For the calculation of the interferograms in Repeat Orbit Interferometry PACkage, the displacement was detected as the error and was corrected. The coherence images (Figure 1) determined that L-band is suitable for InSAR processing. Under this frame, as a first approach, the stacking DInSAR technique [1] was applied in the case studies [2]; however, due to lush vegetation and steep topography, it is necessary to apply advanced InSAR techniques [3]. The purpose of the research is to determine a pattern of data acquisition and successful results to understand the spatial and temporal ground movements associated with landslides. The further work consists of establishing landslide inventories to combine phases of SAR images to generate maps of surface deformation in Tumba-San Francisco and Guarumales to compare the results with ground-based measurements to determine the maps' accuracy. References[1] Sandwell D., Price E. (1998). Phase gradient approach to stacking interferograms. Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 103, N. B12, pp. 30,183-30,204. [2] Mayorga T., Platzeck G. (2014). Using DInSAR as a tool to detect unstable terrain areas in an Andes region in Ecuador. NH3.5-Blue Poster B298, Vol. 16, EGU2014-16203. Austria. [3] Wasowski J., Bovenga F. (2014). Investigating landslides and unstable slopes with

  2. Microwave processed bulk and nano NiMg ferrites: A comparative study on X-band electromagnetic interference shielding properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra Babu Naidu, K., E-mail: chandrababu954@gmail.com [Ceramic Composite Laboratory, Centre for Crystal Growth, SAS, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamilnadu (India); Madhuri, W., E-mail: madhuriw12@gmail.com [Ceramic Composite Laboratory, Centre for Crystal Growth, SAS, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamilnadu (India); IFW, Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research, Technische Universität Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2017-02-01

    Bulk and nano Ni{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0–1) samples were synthesized via microwave double sintering and microwave assisted hydrothermal techniques respectively. The diffraction pattern confirmed the formation of cubic spinel phases in case of both the ferrites. The larger bulk densities were achieved to the bulk than that of nano. In addition, a comparative study on X-band (8.4–12 GHz) electromagnetic interference shielding properties of current bulk and nanomaterials was elucidated. The results showed that the bulk Ni{sub 0.6}Mg{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} composition revealed the highest total shielding efficiency (SE{sub T}) of ∼17 dB. In comparison, the shielding efficiency values of all bulk contents were higher than that of nano because of larger bulk densities. Moreover, the ac-electromagnetic parameters such as electrical conductivity (σ{sub ac}), the respective real (ε′ & μ′) and imaginary parts (ε″ & μ″) of complex permittivity and permeability were investigated as a function of gigahertz frequency. The bulk ferrites of x = 0.4 & 0.6 showed the high ε″ of 10.26 & 6.71 and μ″ of 3.65 & 3.09 respectively at 12 GHz which can work as promising microwave absorber materials. Interestingly, nanoferrites exhibited negative μ″ values at few frequencies due to geometrical effects which improves the microwave absorption. - Highlights: • Bulk and nano NiMg ferrites are prepared by microwave and hydrothermal method. • X-band EMI shielding properties are studied for both bulk and nano ferrites. • Bulk Ni{sub 0.6}Mg{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} revealed the highest SE{sub T} of ∼17 dB at 8.4 GHz. • Bulk x = 0.4 & 0.6 showed the high ε″ and μ″ at 12 GHz for absorber applications.

  3. Negotiating Science and Engineering: An Exploratory Case Study of a Reform-Minded Science Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzey, S. Selcen; Ring-Whalen, Elizabeth A.

    2018-01-01

    Engineering has been slowly integrated into K-12 science classrooms in the United States as the result of recent science education reforms. Such changes in science teaching require that a science teacher is confident with and committed to content, practices, language, and cultures related to both science and engineering. However, from the…

  4. Chromosomal aberrations induced by low-dose γ-irradiation: Study of R-banded chromosomes of human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Achkar, W.; Lefrancois, D.; Aurias, A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of low-dose (0-0.5 Gy) γ-radiations was studied on R-banded chromosomes from lymphocytes of healthy donors of various ages. In cells from newborns, an increase of chromosome damage roughly proportional to the dose was found. In lymphocytes from young adults chromosomal aberrations were not detected at doses of 0.05 and 0.1 Gy, and in lymphocytes from old adults not even at 0.2 Gy. The difficulty in detecting aberrations in lymphocytes from adults is largely due to a considerable background of chromosomal anomalies which should be borne in mind in dosimetry studies. The rate of induction largely depends on the types of rearrangements. One-break terminal deletions are efficiently induced at 0.1 and 0.2 Gy and are the best indicators of exposure at these doses. At 0.5 Gy, the frequencies of 2-break lesions, i.e., dicentrics and reciprocal translocations, increase, whereas the of deletions decreases. (author). 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Comparison of Tension-Band Wiring With the Cable Pin System in Patella Fractures: A Randomized Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qing-xian; Hai, Yong; Du, Xin-ru; Xu, Zi-yu; Lu, Tie; Shan, Lei; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jun-lin

    2015-12-01

    To compare the outcome of tension-band wiring (TBW) with the cable pin system (CPS) for transverse fractures of the patella. Randomized prospective study. Academic Level I trauma center. From February 2008 to December 2011, 73 consecutive patients with transverse fractures of the patella were prospectively enrolled in this study. The patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: one group was treated using the CPS, and the other group was treated using the modified TBW. The clinical outcome assessment included analyses of the radiographic images, the modified Hospital for Special Surgery scoring system, and complications. The follow-up time ranged from 12 to 29 months. All fractures healed, with a union rate of 100%. The fracture healing time was significantly shorter in the CPS group (8.51 ± 2.59 weeks, n = 34) compared with the TBW group (11.79 ± 3.04 weeks, n = 39). Postoperative complications in the CPS and TBW groups were observed in 1 and 9 patients, respectively, a difference that was statistically significant. The mean Hospital for Special Surgery score for the CPS group (90.53 ± 5.19 points) was significantly higher than that for the TBW group (81.36 ± 12.71 points). The CPS is a viable option for transverse fractures of the patella and is associated with a shorter healing time, fewer complications, and better function than TBW. Therapeutic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  6. Computer Science Lesson Study: Building Computing Skills among Elementary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    The lack of diversity in the technology workforce in the United States has proven to be a stubborn problem, resisting even the most well-funded reform efforts. With the absence of computer science education in the mainstream K-12 curriculum, only a narrow band of students in public schools go on to careers in technology. The problem persists…

  7. Interfacial electron-transfer equilibria and flat-band potentials of α-Fe2O3 and TiO2 colloids studied by pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrijevic, N.M.; Savic, D.; Micic, O.I.; Nozik, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics and equilibria of electron transfer between methylviologen cation radicals and α-Fe 2 O 3 or TiO 2 colloidal particles were studied with the pulse-radiolysis technique. The rates of electron transfer to both colloids are lower than those predicted for a diffusion-controlled reaction. For higher pHs (TiO 2 , pH > 2; α-Fe 2 O 3 , pH > 9) the established equilibrium MV + in equilibrium MV 2+ + (e - )/sub coll/ is strongly influenced by the MV 2+ concentration and pH. The MV + equilibrium concentration can be exploited to derive the flat-band potential of the semiconductor colloids. The method for determining the flat-band potential of the particles is independent of whether the injected electrons are free or trapped, and whether the electrons raise the bulk Fermi level toward the conduction band or just produce a space charge. The flat-band potentials for both colloids appear to be somewhat more negative (-0.1 to -0.2 V) than the corresponding single-crystal electrodes. Also, the flat-band potentials become slightly more negative with increasing radiation dose (initial MV + concentration). The effect of absorbed radiation dose is explained by the corresponding changes in the ratio of oxidized to reduced forms of the redox couple, which in turn changes the adsorbed ionic charge on the semiconductor surface. For colloidal particles of TiO 2 stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), the flat-band potentials were almost the same as those for PVA-free TiO 2 sols. The decrease of particle diameter from 800 to 70 A does not affect the value of the flat-band potentials for TiO 2 and α-Fe 2 O 3 colloids. 28 references, 9 figures

  8. The Low Band Observatory (LOBO): Expanding the VLA Low Frequency Commensal System for Continuous, Broad-band, sub-GHz Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Namir E.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Helmboldt, Joseph F.; Peters, Wendy M.; Brisken, Walter; Hyman, Scott D.; Polisensky, Emil; Hicks, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) are currently commissioning the VLA Low Frequency Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE) on a subset of JVLA antennas at modest bandwidth. Its bounded scientific goals are to leverage thousands of JVLA on-sky hours per year for ionospheric and transient studies, and to demonstrate the practicality of a prime-focus commensal system on the JVLA. Here we explore the natural expansion of VLITE to a full-antenna, full-bandwidth Low Band Observatory (LOBO) that would follow naturally from a successful VLITE experience. The new Low Band JVLA receivers, coupled with the existing primary focus feeds, can access two frequency bands: 4 band (54 - 86 MHz) and P band (236-492 MHz). The 4 band feeds are newly designed and now undergoing testing. If they prove successful then they can be permanently mounted at the primary focus, unlike their narrow band predecessors. The combination of Low Band receivers and fixed, primary-focus feeds could provide continuous, broad-band data over two complimentary low-frequency bands. The system would also leverage the relatively large fields-of-view of ~10 degrees at 4 band, and ~2.5 degrees at P band, coupling an excellent survey capability with a natural advantage for serendipitous discoveries. We discuss the compelling science case that flows from LOBO's robust imaging and time domain capabilities coupled with thousands of hours of wide-field, JVLA observing time each year. We also touch on the possibility to incorporate Long Wavelength Array (LWA) stations as additional 'dishes' through the LOBO backend, to improve calibration and sensitivity in LOBO's 4 band.

  9. Collaboration between science teacher educators and science faculty from arts and sciences for the purpose of developing a middle childhood science teacher education program: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gayle A.

    1998-12-01

    The science teacher educators at a midwestern university set a goal to establish a collaborative relationship between themselves and representatives from the College of Arts & Sciences for the purpose of developing a middle childhood science education program. The coming together of these two faculties provided a unique opportunity to explore the issues and experiences that emerge as such a collaborative relationship is formed. In order to gain a holistic perspective of the collaboration, a phenomenological case study design and methods were utilized. The study took a qualitative approach to allow the experiences and issues to emerge in a naturalistic manner. The question, 'What are the issues and experiences that emerge as science teacher educators and science faculty attempt to form a collaborative relationship for the purpose of developing a middle childhood science teacher program?' was answered by gathering a wealth of data. These data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews, observations and written document reviews. An overall picture was painted of the case by means of heuristic, phenomenological, and issues analyses. The researcher followed Moustakas' Phases of Heuristic Research to answer the questions 'What does science mean to me?' and 'What are my beliefs about the issues guiding this case?' prior to completing the phenomenological analysis. The phenomenological analysis followed Moustakas' 'Modification of the Van Kaam Methods of Analysis of Phenomenological Data'. This inquiry showed that the participants in this study came to the collaboration for many different reasons and ideas about the purpose for such a relationship. The participants also had very different ideas about how such a relationship should be conducted. These differences combined to create some issues that affected the development of curriculum and instruction. The issues involved the lack of (a) mutual respect for the work of the partners, (b) understanding about the

  10. Transition state region in the A-Band photodissociation of allyl iodide—A femtosecond extreme ultraviolet transient absorption study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacherjee, Aditi, E-mail: abhattacherjee@berkeley.edu, E-mail: andrewattar@berkeley.edu; Attar, Andrew R., E-mail: abhattacherjee@berkeley.edu, E-mail: andrewattar@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Leone, Stephen R., E-mail: srl@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-28

    Femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy based on a high-harmonic generation source is used to study the 266 nm induced A-band photodissociation dynamics of allyl iodide (CH{sub 2} =CHCH{sub 2}I). The photolysis of the C—I bond at this wavelength produces iodine atoms both in the ground ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}, I) and spin-orbit excited ({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}, I*) states, with the latter as the predominant channel. Using XUV absorption at the iodine N{sub 4/5} edge (45–60 eV), the experiments constitute a direct probe of not only the long-lived atomic iodine reaction products but also the fleeting transition state region of the repulsive n{sub I}σ{sup ∗}{sub C—I} excited states. Specifically, three distinct features are identified in the XUV transient absorption spectrum at 45.3 eV, 47.4 eV, and 48.4 eV (denoted transients A, B, and C, respectively), which arise from the repulsive valence-excited nσ{sup ∗} states and project onto the high-lying core-excited states of the dissociating molecule via excitation of 4d(I) core electrons. Transients A and B originate from 4d(I) → n(I) core-to-valence transitions, whereas transient C is best assigned to a 4d(I) →σ{sup ∗}(C—I) transition. The measured differential absorbance of these new features along with the I/I* branching ratios known from the literature is used to suggest a more definitive assignment, albeit provisional, of the transients to specific dissociative states within the A-band manifold. The transients are found to peak around 55 fs–65 fs and decay completely by 145 fs–185 fs, demonstrating the ability of XUV spectroscopy to map the evolution of reactants into products in real time. The similarity in the energies of transients A and B with analogous features observed in methyl iodide [Attar et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 6, 5072, (2015)] together with the new observation of transient C in the present work provides a more complete picture of the valence electronic

  11. "Two Cultures" Topics for General Studies Science Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James H.

    1982-01-01

    Theses proposed in C. P. Snow's book "The Two Cultures," including uncommunicative scientific and literary groups, gap between rich and poor, overpopulation, and nuclear war remain viable topics. Discusses the scientific and literary cultural gap and what can be done in general studies science courses to ameliorate the condition.…

  12. Marxism in Vygotskian Approaches to Cultural Studies of Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Paulo, Jr.; Ostermann, Fernanda; Rezende, Flavia

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we initially address the main categories of Marxism, illustrating how Vygotsky has appropriated them as mediational meta-theoretical tools for building concepts for his psychological approach. In order to investigate the influence of Marxism in cultural studies of science education, we make an account of how current research,…

  13. Consumer Citizenship Curriculum Guides for Social Studies, English, Science, Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Louise; Smith, Alice

    These four consumer citizenship curriculum guides for social studies, English, science, and mathematics incorporate consumer education into these subject matter areas in grades 8-12. Each guide is organized around 10 main component/goals. They are basic economics in the marketplace, credit, consumer law/protection, banking skills, comparison…

  14. Social studies of science and us. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses some social impacts related with nuclear wastes, nuclear energy, nuclear weapons and radioanalytical chemistry. They are based on the talks delivered at the meeting of the Society for the Social Studies of Science (4S) in November 1983. (The first part of the publication does not contain references to nuclear problems). (A.L.)

  15. Weight Loss Failure and Reoperation After Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding and Gastric Bypass: a Case-Matched Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, James G; Clingempeel, Natasha L; Wolf, Luke G

    2017-11-01

    Not long ago, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) was considered a safe and effective treatment of morbid obesity; however, long-term outcomes revealed significant complication and failure rates. We hypothesized that LAGB has higher rates of weight loss failure, reoperation, and overall failure compared to laparoscopic gastric bypass (LRYGB) at long-term follow-up. A matched case-control study was performed. Patients who underwent primary LAGB or LRYGB at a university hospital between 2004 and 2011 were propensity matched for age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI), and weight-related co-morbidities. Outcomes included demographics, percent excess weight loss (% EWL) and reoperation, weight loss failure (failure (procedure-related reoperation and/or failure at 3 years (75 vs. 10.5%, P failure rates were higher after LAGB. The most common complication after LAGB was pouch/esophageal enlargement (9.7%) and after LRYGB was internal hernia (4.8%). LAGB patients had higher morbidity (19 vs. 12.7%, P = 0.04) but similar procedure-related mortality (0 vs. 0.4%). LAGB has significantly higher rates of weight loss failure compared to LRYGB with similar rates of procedure-related reoperation. Overall failure rates are higher after LAGB. These data suggest the long-term effectiveness of LAGB might be limited.

  16. A Scale to Assess Science Activity Videos (SASAV): The Study of Validity and Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Yilmaz; Bakirci, Hasan

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop an assessment scale for science activity videos that can be used to determine qualified science activity videos that can fulfill the objectives of activity based science education, help teachers to evaluate any science activity videos and decide whether to include into science learning process. The subjects…

  17. Feasibility Studies on the Use of Higher Frequency Bands and Beamforming Selection Scheme for High Speed Train Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayotunde O. Laiyemo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With increasing popularity of high speed trains and traffic forecast for future cellular networks, the need to provide improved data rates using higher frequency bands (HFBs for train passengers is becoming crucial. In this paper, we modify the OFDM frame structure for HST, taking into account the increasing sensitivity to speed at HFBs. A lower bound on the SNR/SINR for a given rate for reliable communication was derived considering the physical layer parameters from the OFDM frame. We also analyze different pathloss models in the context of examining the required gain needed to achieve the same performance as with microwave bands. Finally, we present a time-based analogue beamforming selection approach for HST. We observed that, irrespective of the pathloss models used, the required gains are within the same range. For the same SNR/SINR at different frequency bands, the achievable data rate varies with respect to the frequency bands. Our results show the potential of the use of HFBs. However, due to the increased sensitivity of some channel parameters, a maximum frequency band of 38 GHz is suggested. Evaluation of our proposed beamforming scheme indicates a close performance to the optimal SVD scheme with a marginal rate gap of less than 2 b/s/Hz.

  18. Signs of taste for science: a methodology for studying the constitution of interest in the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderhag, P.; Wickman, P.-O.; Hamza, K. M.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present a methodological approach for analyzing the transformation of interest in science through classroom talk and action. To this end, we use the construct of taste for science as a social and communicative operationalization, or proxy, to the more psychologically oriented construct of interest. To gain a taste for science as part of school science activities means developing habits of performing and valuing certain distinctions about ways to talk, act and be that are jointly construed as belonging in the school science classroom. In this view, to learn science is not only about learning the curriculum content, but also about learning a normative and aesthetic content in terms of habits of distinguishing and valuing. The approach thus complements previous studies on students' interest in science, by making it possible to analyze how taste for science is constituted, moment-by-moment, through talk and action in the science classroom. In developing the method, we supplement theoretical constructs coming from pragmatism and Pierre Bourdieu with empirical data from a lower secondary science classroom. The application of the method to this classroom demonstrates the potential that the approach has for analyzing how conceptual, normative, and aesthetic distinctions within the science classroom interact in the constitution of taste for, and thereby potentially also in the development of interest in science among students.

  19. Science and ecological literacy in undergraduate field studies education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapp, Kim J.

    There is an ever-increasing number of issues that face our world today; from climate change, water and food scarcity, to pollution and resource extraction. Science and ecology play fundamental roles in these problems, and yet the understanding of these fields is limited in our society (Miller, 2002; McBride, Brewer, Berkowitz, and Borrie, 2013). Across the nation students are finishing their undergraduate degrees and are expected to enter the workforce and society with the skills needed to succeed. The deficit of science and ecological literacy in these students has been recognized and a call for reform begun (D'Avanzo, 2003 and NRC, 2009). This mixed-methods study looked at how a field studies course could fill the gap of science and ecological literacy in undergraduates. Using grounded theory, five key themes were data-derived; definitions, systems thinking, human's role in the environment, impetus for change and transference. These themes where then triangulated for validity and reliability through qualitative and quantitative assessments. A sixth theme was also identified, the learning environment. Due to limited data to support this themes' development and reliability it is discussed in Chapter 5 to provide recommendations for further research. Key findings show that this field studies program influenced students' science and ecological literacy through educational theory and practice.

  20. Marxism in Vygotskian approaches to cultural studies of science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Junior, Paulo; Ostermann, Fernanda; Rezende, Flavia

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we initially address the main categories of Marxism, illustrating how Vygotsky has appropriated them as mediational meta-theoretical tools for building concepts for his psychological approach. In order to investigate the influence of Marxism in cultural studies of science education, we make an account of how current research, sustained by Vygotsky's original and successor theories, has been appropriating meta-theoretical categories of dialectical materialism. Once we identified Cultural Studies of Science Education as a journal that would probably concentrate papers that follow these perspectives, we decided to take it as the context of this study. In the process of selecting the corpus to be reviewed from the editions published from 2006 to 2011, we have found that 16 % of the articles that matched keywords denoting frameworks related to the Vygotskian tradition developed and appropriated the categories of dialectical materialism. The quality and originality of contemporary development of CHAT denote that this framework has been playing a very important role in recent expansion of Vygotskian approaches to research in science education. Among the papers that we considered to develop and appropriate Vygotskian frameworks, incompletion in the appropriation of meta-theoretical categories of dialectical materialism and the misusage of dialectics intertwined with dialogism were highlighted. Our findings suggest that overcoming these limitations can enhance political analysis of sociocultural phenomena in the context of science education. It also represents a strengthening of the role of dialectical materialism in expanding sociocultural perspectives toward a better articulation between individual and institutional-centered analyses.

  1. Early Changes in Alpha Band Power and DMN BOLD Activity in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Simultaneous Resting State EEG-fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Brueggen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI–resting state electroencephalography (rsEEG studies in healthy adults showed robust positive associations of signal power in the alpha band with BOLD signal in the thalamus, and more heterogeneous associations in cortical default mode network (DMN regions. Negative associations were found in occipital regions. In Alzheimer’s disease (AD, rsfMRI studies revealed a disruption of the DMN, while rsEEG studies consistently reported a reduced power within the alpha band. The present study is the first to employ simultaneous rsfMRI-rsEEG in an AD sample, investigating the association of alpha band power and BOLD signal, compared to healthy controls (HC. We hypothesized to find reduced positive associations in DMN regions and reduced negative associations in occipital regions in the AD group. Simultaneous resting state fMRI–EEG was recorded in 14 patients with mild AD and 14 HC, matched for age and gender. Power within the EEG alpha band (8–12 Hz, 8–10 Hz, and 10–12 Hz was computed from occipital electrodes and served as regressor in voxel-wise linear regression analyses, to assess the association with the BOLD signal. Compared to HC, the AD group showed significantly decreased positive associations between BOLD signal and occipital alpha band power in clusters in the superior, middle and inferior frontal cortex, inferior temporal lobe and thalamus (p < 0.01, uncorr., cluster size ≥ 50 voxels. This group effect was more pronounced in the upper alpha sub-band, compared to the lower alpha sub-band. Notably, we observed a high inter-individual heterogeneity. Negative associations were only reduced in the lower alpha range in the hippocampus, putamen and cerebellum. The present study gives first insights into the relationship of resting-state EEG and fMRI characteristics in an AD sample. The results suggest that positive associations between alpha band power and BOLD

  2. Science/art - art/science: case studies of the development of a professional art product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesko, S.C.; Marchant, M.

    1997-02-24

    Objective was to follow the cognitive and creative processes demonstrated by student research participants as they integrated a developing knowledge of ``big`` science, as practiced at LLNL, into a personal and idiosyncratic visual, graphical, or multimedia product. The participants, all non-scientists, involved in this process, attended a series of design classes, sponsored by LLNL at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena CA. As a result of this study, we have become interested in the possibility of similar characteristics between scientists and artists. We have also become interested in the different processes that can be used to teach science to non-scientists, so that they are able to understand and portray scientific information.

  3. Rovibrational study of the 2ν2 band of D213CO by high-resolution Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q. Y.; Tan, T. L.; A'dawiah, Rabia'tul; Ng, L. L.

    2018-03-01

    The high-resolution FTIR spectrum of the 2ν2 band (3250-3380 cm-1) of D213CO was recorded at an unapodized resolution of 0.0063 cm-1. A total of 747 rovibrational transitions have been assigned and fitted up to J″ = 32 and Ka″ = 10 using the Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation. A set of accurate upper state (v2 = 2) rovibrational constants, three rotational and five quartic centrifugal distortion constants, were determined for the first time. The band center of the 2ν2 band was found to be 3326.765109 ± 0.000079 cm-1. The rms deviation of the rovibrational fit was 0.00096 cm-1.

  4. NASA Earth Science Mission Control Center Enterprise Emerging Technology Study Study (MCC Technology Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dan; Horan, Stephen; Royer, Don; Sullivan, Don; Moe, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of the study to identify technologies that could have a significant impact on Earth Science mission operations when looking out at the 5-15 year horizon (through 2025). The potential benefits of the new technologies will be discussed, as well as recommendations for early research and development, prototyping, or analysis for these technologies.

  5. Revisional bariatric surgery after failed laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding - a single-center, long-term retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Piotr K; Olszewski, Robert; Kwiatkowski, Andrzej P; Paśnik, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) used to be one of the most popular bariatric procedures. To present our institution's experience with LAGB, its complications, causes of failure and revisional bariatric procedures, in a long-term follow-up. Records of patients who underwent pars flaccida LAGB from 2003 to 2006 were gathered. We selected data on patients with a history of additional bariatric procedures. Their initial demographic data, body mass index and causes of revision were gathered. We analyzed length of stay and early perioperative complications. 60% of patients (n = 57) who underwent LAGB in our institution between 2003 and 2006 had their band removed (out of 107, 11% lost to follow-up). Median time to revisional surgery was 50 months. The main reasons for removal were: weight regain (n = 23; 40%), band slippage (n = 14; 25%), and pouch dilatation (n = 9; 16%). Thirty (53%) patients required additional bariatric surgery, 10 (33%) of which were simultaneous with band removal. The most popular procedures were: laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) (n = 15; 50%), open gastric bypass (n = 8; 27%), and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) - (n = 3; 10%). Mean length of stay (LOS) was 5.4 ±2.0. One (3%) perioperative complication was reported. The results show that LAGB is not an effective bariatric procedure in long-term follow-up due to the high rate of complications causing band removal and the high rate of obesity recurrence. Revisional bariatric surgery after failed LAGB may be performed in a one-stage approach with band removal.

  6. Snowmass 2002: The Fusion Energy Sciences Summer Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, N.; Navratil, G.; Bangerter, R.

    2002-01-01

    The Fusion Summer Study 2002 will be a forum for the critical technical assessment of major next-steps in the fusion energy sciences program, and will provide crucial community input to the long-range planning activities undertaken by the DOE [Department of Energy] and the FESAC [Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee]. It will be an ideal place for a broad community of scientists to examine goals and proposed initiatives in burning plasma science in magnetic fusion energy and integrated research experiments in inertial fusion energy. This meeting is open to every member of the fusion energy science community and significant international participation is encouraged. The objectives of the Fusion Summer Study are three: (1) Review scientific issues in burning plasmas to establish the basis for the following two objectives and to address the relations of burning plasma in tokamaks to innovative magnetic fusion energy (MFE) confinement concepts and of ignition in inertial fusion energy (IFE) to integrated research facilities. (2) Provide a forum for critical discussion and review of proposed MFE burning plasma experiments (e.g., IGNITOR, FIRE, and ITER) and assess the scientific and technological research opportunities and prospective benefits of these approaches to the study of burning plasmas. (3) Provide a forum for the IFE community to present plans for prospective integrated research facilities, assess present status of the technical base for each, and establish a timetable and technical progress necessary to proceed for each. Based on significant preparatory work by the fusion community prior to the July Snowmass meeting, the Snowmass working groups will prepare a draft report that documents the scientific and technological benefits of studies of burning plasmas. The report will also include criteria by which the benefits of each approach to fusion science, fusion engineering/technology, and the fusion development path can be assessed. Finally, the report

  7. Snowmass 2002: The Fusion Energy Sciences Summer Study; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N. Sauthoff; G. Navratil; R. Bangerter

    2002-01-01

    The Fusion Summer Study 2002 will be a forum for the critical technical assessment of major next-steps in the fusion energy sciences program, and will provide crucial community input to the long-range planning activities undertaken by the DOE[Department of Energy] and the FESAC[Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee]. It will be an ideal place for a broad community of scientists to examine goals and proposed initiatives in burning plasma science in magnetic fusion energy and integrated research experiments in inertial fusion energy. This meeting is open to every member of the fusion energy science community and significant international participation is encouraged. The objectives of the Fusion Summer Study are three: (1) Review scientific issues in burning plasmas to establish the basis for the following two objectives and to address the relations of burning plasma in tokamaks to innovative magnetic fusion energy (MFE) confinement concepts and of ignition in inertial fusion energy (IFE) to integrated research facilities. (2) Provide a forum for critical discussion and review of proposed MFE burning plasma experiments (e.g., IGNITOR, FIRE, and ITER) and assess the scientific and technological research opportunities and prospective benefits of these approaches to the study of burning plasmas. (3) Provide a forum for the IFE community to present plans for prospective integrated research facilities, assess present status of the technical base for each, and establish a timetable and technical progress necessary to proceed for each. Based on significant preparatory work by the fusion community prior to the July Snowmass meeting, the Snowmass working groups will prepare a draft report that documents the scientific and technological benefits of studies of burning plasmas. The report will also include criteria by which the benefits of each approach to fusion science, fusion engineering/technology, and the fusion development path can be assessed. Finally, the report will

  8. The art and science of selecting graduate students in the biomedical sciences: Performance in doctoral study of the foundational sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee-Young; Berkowitz, Oren; Symes, Karen; Dasgupta, Shoumita

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate associations between admissions criteria and performance in Ph.D. programs at Boston University School of Medicine. The initial phase of this project examined student performance in the classroom component of a newly established curriculum named "Foundations in Biomedical Sciences (FiBS)". Quantitative measures including undergraduate grade point average (GPA), graduate record examination (GRE; a standardized, computer-based test) scores for the verbal (assessment of test takers' ability to analyze, evaluate, and synthesize information and concepts provided in writing) and quantitative (assessment of test takers' problem-solving ability) components of the examination, previous research experience, and competitiveness of previous research institution were used in the study. These criteria were compared with competencies in the program defined as students who pass the curriculum as well as students categorized as High Performers. These data indicated that there is a significant positive correlation between FiBS performance and undergraduate GPA, GRE scores, and competitiveness of undergraduate institution. No significant correlations were found between FiBS performance and research background. By taking a data-driven approach to examine admissions and performance, we hope to refine our admissions criteria to facilitate an unbiased approach to recruitment of students in the life sciences and to share our strategy to support similar goals at other institutions.

  9. Simulation study for ground-based Ku-band microwave observations of ozone and hydroxyl in the polar middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, David; Clilverd, Mark; Kosch, Michael; Verronen, Pekka

    2017-04-01

    Commercial satellite TV broadcasting is possible due to remarkable advances in microwave electronics, enabling weak signals transmitted over 36,000 km from geostationary orbit to be received by inexpensive rooftop dishes. The Ku band satellite frequencies (10.70-14.25 GHz) overlap microwave emissions from ozone (O3) at 11.072 GHz and hydroxyl radical (OH) at 13.44 GHz. These important chemical species in the polar middle atmosphere respond strongly to solar variability and, at high latitudes, geomagnetic activity associated with space weather. Atmospheric model calculations predict that energetic electron precipitation (EEP) driven by magnetospheric substorms produces large changes in polar mesospheric O3 and OH. The EEP typically peaks at geomagnetic latitudes ˜65˚ (e.g. Kilpisjärvi, Finland and Syowa station, Antarctica) and evolves rapidly with time eastwards and over the geomagnetic latitude range 60˚ -80˚ (e.g. reaching Halley, Antarctica). During the substorms OH can increase by more than 1000% at 64-84 km. The substorms leave footprints of 5-55% O3 loss lasting many hours of local time, with strong altitude and seasonal dependences. An atmospheric simulation and retrieval study is performed to determine the specification and design requirements for microwave radiometers capable of measuring O3 and OH profiles from Arctic and Antarctic locations using accessible satellite TV receiver technology. The proposed observations are highly applicable to studies of EEP, atmospheric dynamics, planetaryscale circulation, chemical transport, and the representation of these processes in polar and global climate models. They would provide a lowcost, reliable alternative to increasingly sparse satellite measurements, extending long-term data records and also providing "ground truth" calibration data.

  10. Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Frequency Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D.; Butman, S.; Shambayati, S.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, launched on November 7, 1996, carries an experimental space-to-ground telecommunications link at Ka-band (32 GHz) along with the primary X-band (8.4 GHz) downlink. The signals are simultaneously transmitted from a 1.5-in diameter parabolic high gain antenna (HGA) on MGS and received by a beam-waveguide (BWG) R&D 34-meter antenna located in NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network (DSN) complex near Barstow, California. The projected 5-dB link advantage of Ka-band relative to X-band was confirmed in previous reports using measurements of MGS signal strength data acquired during the first two years of the link experiment from December 1996 to December 1998. Analysis of X-band and Ka-band frequency data and difference frequency (fx-fka)/3.8 data will be presented here. On board the spacecraft, a low-power sample of the X-band downlink from the transponder is upconverted to 32 GHz, the Ka-band frequency, amplified to I-W using a Solid State Power Amplifier, and radiated from the dual X/Ka HGA. The X-band signal is amplified by one of two 25 W TWTAs. An upconverter first downconverts the 8.42 GHz X-band signal to 8 GHz and then multiplies using a X4 multiplier producing the 32 GHz Ka-band frequency. The frequency source selection is performed by an RF switch which can be commanded to select a VCO (Voltage Controlled Oscillator) or USO (Ultra-Stable Oscillator) reference. The Ka-band frequency can be either coherent with the X-band downlink reference or a hybrid combination of the USO and VCO derived frequencies. The data in this study were chosen such that the Ka-band signal is purely coherent with the X-band signal, that is the downconverter is driven by the same frequency source as the X-band downlink). The ground station used to acquire the data is DSS-13, a 34-meter BWG antenna which incorporates a series of mirrors inside beam waveguide tubes which guide the energy to a subterranean pedestal room, providing a stable environment

  11. An Ongoing Investigation of Science Literacy: Results of a 22-Year Study Probing Students' Knowledge and Attitude Towards Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impey, C.; Buxner, S.; Antonellis, J.; CATS

    2013-04-01

    This talk presents findings related to our ongoing work investigating students' knowledge and attitudes towards science and technology. We present an overview of research studies and findings including a comparison of the science literacy measures of University of Arizona students compared to national studies, conceptions related to astrology, views of radiation, and students' pseudoscience and religious beliefs. We discuss implications for instructors and researchers interested in improving students' science literacy scores and diagnosing alternative beliefs.

  12. Ultra-Wideband Optical Modulation Spectrometer (OMS) Development: Study of the Optical Setup of a Wide-Band Optical Modulation Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolls, Volker; Stringfellow, Guy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to advance the design of the optical setup for a wide-band Optical Modulation Spectrometer (OMS) for use with astronomical heterodyne receiver systems. This report describes the progress of this investigation achieved from March until December 2001.

  13. High school and college introductory science education experiences: A study regarding perceptions of university students persisting in science as a major area of study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, L. Denise

    The focus of this study was to investigate college students' perception of high school and college introductory science learning experiences related to persistence in science as a major area of study in college. The study included students' perceptions of the following areas of science education: (1) teacher interpersonal relationship with students, (2) teacher personality styles, (3) teacher knowledge of the content, (4) instructional methods, and (5) science course content. A survey research design was employed in the investigative study to collect and analyze data. One hundred ninety two students participated in the research study. A survey instrument entitled Science Education Perception Survey was used to collect data. The researcher sought to reject or support three null hypotheses as related to participants' perceptions of high school and college introductory science education experiences. Using binomial regression analysis, this study analyzed differences between students persisting in science and students not persisting in science as a major. The quantitative research indicated that significant differences exist between persistence in science as a major and high school science teacher traits and college introductory science instructional methods. Although these variables were found to be significant predictors, the percent variance was low and should be considered closely before concluded these as strong predictors of persistence. Major findings of the qualitative component indicated that students perceived that: (a) interest in high school science course content and high school science teacher personality and interpersonal relationships had the greatest effect on students' choice of major area of study; (b) interest in college introductory science course content had the greatest effect on students' choice of major area of study; (c) students recalled laboratory activities and overall good teaching as most meaningful to their high school science

  14. Science comics as tools for science education and communication: a brief, exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    M. Tatalovic

    2009-01-01

    Comics are a popular art form especially among children and as such provide a potential medium for science education and communication. In an attempt to present science comics in a museum exhibit I found many science themed comics and graphic books. Here I attempt to provide an overview of already available comics that communicate science, the genre of ‘science comics’. I also provide a quick literature review for evidence that comics can indeed be efficiently used for promoting scientific li...

  15. Anterolateral Knee Extra-articular Stabilizers: A Robotic Sectioning Study of the Anterolateral Ligament and Distal Iliotibial Band Kaplan Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geeslin, Andrew G; Chahla, Jorge; Moatshe, Gilbert; Muckenhirn, Kyle J; Kruckeberg, Bradley M; Brady, Alex W; Coggins, Ashley; Dornan, Grant J; Getgood, Alan M; Godin, Jonathan A; LaPrade, Robert F

    2018-05-01

    The individual kinematic roles of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) and the distal iliotibial band Kaplan fibers in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency require further clarification. This will improve understanding of their potential contribution to residual anterolateral rotational laxity after ACL reconstruction and may influence selection of an anterolateral extra-articular reconstruction technique, which is currently a matter of debate. Hypothesis/Purpose: To compare the role of the ALL and the Kaplan fibers in stabilizing the knee against tibial internal rotation, anterior tibial translation, and the pivot shift in ACL-deficient knees. We hypothesized that the Kaplan fibers would provide greater tibial internal rotation restraint than the ALL in ACL-deficient knees and that both structures would provide restraint against internal rotation during a simulated pivot-shift test. Controlled laboratory study. Ten paired fresh-frozen cadaveric knees (n = 20) were used to investigate the effect of sectioning the ALL and the Kaplan fibers in ACL-deficient knees with a 6 degrees of freedom robotic testing system. After ACL sectioning, sectioning was randomly performed for the ALL and the Kaplan fibers. An established robotic testing protocol was utilized to assess knee kinematics when the specimens were subjected to a 5-N·m internal rotation torque (0°-90° at 15° increments), a simulated pivot shift with 10-N·m valgus and 5-N·m internal rotation torque (15° and 30°), and an 88-N anterior tibial load (30° and 90°). Sectioning of the ACL led to significantly increased tibial internal rotation (from 0° to 90°) and anterior tibial translation (30° and 90°) as compared with the intact state. Significantly increased internal rotation occurred with further sectioning of the ALL (15°-90°) and Kaplan fibers (15°, 60°-90°). At higher flexion angles (60°-90°), sectioning the Kaplan fibers led to significantly greater internal rotation

  16. Effects of the c-Si/a-SiO2 interfacial atomic structure on its band alignment: an ab initio study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fan; Pham, Hieu H; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2017-12-13

    The crystalline-Si/amorphous-SiO 2 (c-Si/a-SiO 2 ) interface is an important system used in many applications, ranging from transistors to solar cells. The transition region of the c-Si/a-SiO 2 interface plays a critical role in determining the band alignment between the two regions. However, the question of how this interface band offset is affected by the transition region thickness and its local atomic arrangement is yet to be fully investigated. Here, by controlling the parameters of the classical Monte Carlo bond switching algorithm, we have generated the atomic structures of the interfaces with various thicknesses, as well as containing Si at different oxidation states. A hybrid functional method, as shown by our calculations to reproduce the GW and experimental results for bulk Si and SiO 2 , was used to calculate the electronic structure of the heterojunction. This allowed us to study the correlation between the interface band characterization and its atomic structures. We found that although the systems with different thicknesses showed quite different atomic structures near the transition region, the calculated band offset tended to be the same, unaffected by the details of the interfacial structure. Our band offset calculation agrees well with the experimental measurements. This robustness of the interfacial electronic structure to its interfacial atomic details could be another reason for the success of the c-Si/a-SiO 2 interface in Si-based electronic applications. Nevertheless, when a reactive force field is used to generate the a-SiO 2 and c-Si/a-SiO 2 interfaces, the band offset significantly deviates from the experimental values by about 1 eV.

  17. Science teachers teaching socioscientific issues (SSI): Four case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunju

    Socioscientific issues (SSI) are a class of issues that represent the social, ethical, and moral aspects of science in society. The need for the inclusion of SSI into science curricula has been generally accepted, but relatively few science teachers have incorporated SSI into their courses. Most science teachers feel that their most important task by far is to teach the principles of science, and any substantive pedagogical changes represent a burden. However, there are some teachers who address SSI out of personal initiatives. This dissertation study investigates four high school science teachers who address SSI out of their own initiative and explores their deeper inspirations, values, philosophies, and personal ideals that lead them to teach SSI. The overall approach is based on essentialist methodology (Witz, Goodwin, Hart, & Thomas, 2001; Witz, 2006a) with its focus on "the participant as ally" and "essentialist portraiture." The primary data source is four to six in-depth interviews with individual teachers (about 40-90 minutes for each interview). The interviews are complemented by extensive classroom observations of individual teachers' teaching SSI and by document analysis (including teaching materials, rubrics, student group projects and journals, etc.). There are two major findings. First, the teachers' deeper values and ideals are a source of larger inspiration that plays a significant role in changing their teaching practice. This inspiration may involve higher aspects (e.g., deep concern for students' development, unselfishness, caring, etc.) and commitment. Their teaching represents an integration of their personal experiences, values, concerns, and worldviews, which forms a larger inspiration for teaching. Teaching SSI is a part of this larger process. Second, the current curriculum reforms (STS, SSI, and NOS) only suggest theoretical ideals and do not effectively touch teachers' deeper values and ideals. Basically, the teachers are doing what they

  18. Simulation study of CD variation caused by field edge effects and out-of-band radiation in EUVL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weimin; Niroomand, Ardavan; Lorusso, Gian F.; Boone, Robert; Lucas, Kevin; Demmerle, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    Although extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) remains a promising candidate for semiconductor device manufacturing of the 1x nm half pitch node and beyond, many technological burdens have to be overcome. The "field edge effect" in EUVL is one of them. The image border region of an EUV mask,also known as the "black border" (BB), reflects a few percent of the incident EUV light, resulting in a leakage of light into neighboring exposure fields, especially at the corner of the field where three adjacent exposures take place. This effect significantly impacts on CD uniformity (CDU) across the exposure field. To avoid this phenomenon, a light-shielding border is introduced by etching away the entire absorber and multi-layer (ML)at the image border region of the EUV mask. In this paper, we present a method of modeling the field edge effect (also called the BB effect) by using rigorous lithography simulation with a calibrated resist model. An additional "flare level" at the field edge is introduced on top of the exposure tool flare map to account for the BB effect. The parameters in this model include the reflectivity and the width of the BB, which are mainly determining the leakage of EUV light and its influence range, respectively. Another parameter is the transition width which represents the half shadow effect of the reticle masking blades. By setting the corresponding parameters, the simulation results match well the experimental results obtained at the imec's NXE:3100 EUV exposure tool. Moreover, these results indicate that the out-of-band (OoB) radiation also contributes to the CDU. Using simulation we can also determine the OoB effect rigorouslyusing the methodology of an "effective mask blank". The study in this paper demonstrates that the impact of BB and OoB effects on CDU can be well predicted by simulations.

  19. Study of CD variation caused by the black border effect and out-of-band radiation in extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weimin; Niroomand, Ardavan; Lorusso, Gian F.; Boone, Robert; Lucas, Kevin; Demmerle, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    Although extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) remains a promising candidate for semiconductor device manufacturing of the 1× nm half pitch node and beyond, many technological burdens have to be overcome. The "field edge effect" in EUVL is one of them. The image border region of an EUV mask, also known as the "black border" (BB), reflects a few percent of the incident EUV light, resulting in a leakage of light into neighboring exposure fields, especially at the corner of the field where three adjacent exposures take place. This effect significantly impacts on critical dimension (CD) uniformity (CDU) across the exposure field. To avoid this phenomenon, a light-shielding border is introduced by etching away the entire absorber and multilayer at the image border region of the EUV mask. We present a method of modeling the field edge effect (also called the BB effect) by using rigorous lithography simulation with a calibrated resist model. An additional "flare level" at the field edge is introduced on top of the exposure tool flare map to account for the BB effect. The parameters in this model include the reflectivity and the width of the BB, which are mainly determining the leakage of EUV light and its influence range, respectively. Another parameter is the transition width which represents the half shadow effect of the reticle masking blades. By setting the corresponding parameters, the simulation results match well the experimental results obtained at the IMEC's NXE:3100 EUV exposure tool. Moreover, these results indicate that the out-of-band (OoB) radiation also contributes to the CDU. Using simulation, we can also determine the OoB effect rigorously using the methodology of an "effective mask blank." The study demonstrates that the impact of BB and OoB effects on CDU can be well predicted by simulations.

  20. A feasibility study of high intensity positron sources for the S-band and TESLA linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glantz, R.

    1997-10-01

    Future high energy linear colliders require luminosities above 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Therefore beam intensities have to be provided up to two orders of magnitude higher than achieved at present. It is comparably simple to reach high electron intensities. Positron intensities in this range, however, are difficult to realize with conventional positron sources. A new method of positron production was proposed in 1979 by V.E. Balakin and A.A. Mikhailichenko. The photons, necessary for pair production, are not generated by bremsstrahlung but by high energy electrons passing through an undulator. Based on this principle, a high intensity, unpolarized and polarized positron source for linear colliders was developed by K.Floettmann. In the present work, the requirements derived by K.Floettmann are used to study the feasibility of both the polarized and the unpolarized positron source. For economical reasons it is advantageous to use the beam after the interaction for positron production. In the main part of the present work a beam line is developed which guarantees a stable operation of the unpolarized wiggler-based positron source for the S-Band and TESLA linear collider. The requirements on the electron beam emittances are much higher for the polarized undulator-based source. For TESLA it is shown, that an operation of the polarized source is possible for design interactions. For a stable operation, taking into account perturbations at the interaction point, further investigations are necessary. For the SBLC, an operation of the polarized source is not possible with the present design.

  1. Structural vs electronic origin of renormalized band widths in TTF-TCNQ: An angular dependent NEXAFS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sing, M; Meyer, J; Hoinkis, M

    2007-01-01

    in the topmost surface layer. We find that the tilt angles of the molecules with respect to the one-dimensional axis are essentially the same as in the bulk. Thus, we can rule out surface relaxation as the origin of the renormalized band widths which were inferred from the analysis of photoemission data within...

  2. Synchrotron Studies of Narrow Band and Low-Dimensional Materials. Final Report for July 1, 1990 --- December 31, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J. W.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes a 12-year program of various kinds of synchrotron spectroscopies directed at the electronic structures of narrow band and low-dimensional materials that display correlated electron behaviors such as metal-insulator transitions, mixed valence, superconductivity, Kondo moment quenching, heavy Fermions, and non-Fermi liquid properties

  3. Study of interfaces and band offsets in TiN/amorphous LaLuO3 gate stacks

    KAUST Repository

    Mitrovic, Ivona Z.

    2011-07-01

    TiN/LaLuO3 (LLO) gate stacks formed by molecular beam deposition have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, medium energy ion scattering, spectroscopic ellipsometry, scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results indicate an amorphous structure for deposited LLO films. The band offset between the Fermi level of TiN and valence band of LLO is estimated to be 2.65 ± 0.05 eV. A weaker La-O-Lu bond and a prominent Ti2p sub-peak which relates to Ti bond to interstitial oxygen have been identified for an ultra-thin 1.7 nm TiN/3 nm LLO gate stack. The angle-dependent XPS analysis of Si2s spectra as well as shifts of La4d, La3d and Lu4d core levels suggests a silicate-type with Si-rich SiOx LLO/Si interface. Symmetrical valence and conduction band offsets for LLO to Si of 2.2 eV and the bandgap of 5.5 ± 0.1 eV have been derived from the measurements. The band alignment for ultra-thin TiN/LLO gate stack is affected by structural changes. Copyright © 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence of non-strabismic anomalies of binocular vision in Tamil Nadu: report 2 of BAND study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussaindeen, Jameel Rizwana; Rakshit, Archayeeta; Singh, Neeraj Kumar; George, Ronnie; Swaminathan, Meenakshi; Kapur, Suman; Scheiman, Mitchell; Ramani, Krishna Kumar

    2017-11-01

    Population-based studies on the prevalence of non-strabismic anomalies of binocular vision in ethnic Indians are more than two decades old. Based on indigenous normative data, the BAND (Binocular Vision Anomalies and Normative Data) study aims to report the prevalence of non-strabismic anomalies of binocular vision among school children in rural and urban Tamil Nadu. This population-based, cross-sectional study was designed to estimate the prevalence of non-strabismic anomalies of binocular vision in the rural and urban population of Tamil Nadu. In four schools, two each in rural and urban arms, 920 children in the age range of seven to 17 years were included in the study. Comprehensive binocular vision assessment was done for all children including evaluation of vergence and accommodative systems. In the first phase of the study, normative data of parameters of binocular vision were assessed followed by prevalence estimates of non-strabismic anomalies of binocular vision. The mean and standard deviation of the age of the sample were 12.7 ± 2.7 years. The prevalence of non-strabismic anomalies of binocular vision in the urban and rural arms was found to be 31.5 and 29.6 per cent, respectively. Convergence insufficiency was the most prevalent (16.5 and 17.6 per cent in the urban and rural arms, respectively) among all the types of non-strabismic anomalies of binocular vision. There was no gender predilection and no statistically significant differences were observed between the rural and urban arms in the prevalence of non-strabismic anomalies of binocular vision (Z-test, p > 0.05). The prevalence of non-strabismic anomalies of binocular vision was found to be higher in the 13 to 17 years age group (36.2 per cent) compared to seven to 12 years (25.1 per cent) (Z-test, p < 0.05). Non-strabismic binocular vision anomalies are highly prevalent among school children and the prevalence increases with age. With increasing near visual demands in the higher

  5. PAHs and the Diffuse Interstellar Bands. What have we Learned from the New Generation of Laboratory and Observational Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2005-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important and ubiquitous component of carbon-bearing materials in space. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands (UIR bands) and PAH spectral features are now being used as new probes of the ISM. PAHs are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). In the model dealing with the interstellar spectral features, PAHs are present as a mixture of radicals, ions and neutral species. PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge for laboratory astrophysics is to reproduce (in a realistic way) the physical conditions that exist in the emission and/or absorption interstellar zones, An extensive laboratory program has been developed at NASA Ames to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAHs in astrophysical environments and to describe how they influence the radiation and energy balance in space and the interstellar chemistry. In particular, laboratory experiments provide measurements of the spectral characteristics of interstellar PAH analogs from the ultraviolet and visible range to the infrared range for comparison with astronomical data. This paper will focus on the recent progress made in the laboratory to measure the direct absorption spectra of neutral and ionized PAHs in the gas phase in the near-W and visible range in astrophysically relevant environments. These measurements provide data on PAHs and nanometer-sized particles that can now be directly compared to astronomical observations. The harsh physical conditions of the IS medium - characterized by a low temperature, an absence of collisions and strong V W radiation fields - are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions are formed from the neutral

  6. Stabilization of Olecranon Fractures by Tension Band Wiring or Plate Osteosynthesis: A Retrospective Study of 41 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournet, Alexandre; Boursier, Jean-François; Corbeau, Solène; Decambron, Adeline; Viateau, Véronique; Fayolle, Pascal; Bedu, Anne-Sophie; Leperlier, Dimitri; Manassero, Mathieu

    2018-01-01

     This article aimed to describe olecranon fracture in dogs and cats and their stabilization with tension band wiring or plate osteosynthesis, and to evaluate complications associated with each technique.  Medical records of cats and dogs that had been surgically treated for olecranon fractures with either tension band wiring or plate osteosynthesis were retrospectively reviewed. The surgical technique, complications and long-term outcomes were assessed.  Forty-one olecranon fractures were included. Fractures were articular, comminuted and open in 90, 31 and 27% of cases, respectively. Tension band wiring and plate osteosynthesis were performed in 22 and 19 fractures, respectively. Complications occurred more commonly after tension band wiring (74%) compared with plate osteosynthesis (27%) ( p  = 0.002) and these were probably related to it being used in comminuted fractures ( p  = 0.01) or to errors in technique. Minor complications included Kirschner wires migration ( n  = 5), pain ( n  = 3), osteomyelitis ( n  = 3), skin breakdown ( n  = 3) and seroma ( n  = 1). Implant failure requiring further fixation ( n  = 4) was observed only in the tension band wiring group. Other major complications included skin wound debridement and closure ( n  = 1) and chronic lameness requiring implant removal ( n  = 7). Long-term functional outcomes were excellent regardless of the technique used.  Plate osteosynthesis should be performed for olecranon fracture repair if technically feasible. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  7. Introduction. Progress in Earth science and climate studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J Michael T

    2008-12-28

    In this introductory paper, I review the 'visions of the future' articles prepared by top young scientists for the second of the two Christmas 2008 Triennial Issues of Phil. Trans. R. Soc.A, devoted respectively to astronomy and Earth science. Topics covered in the Earth science issue include: trace gases in the atmosphere; dynamics of the Antarctic circumpolar current; a study of the boundary between the Earth's rocky mantle and its iron core; and two studies of volcanoes and their plumes. A final section devoted to ecology and climate covers: the mathematical modelling of plant-soil interactions; the effects of the boreal forests on the Earth's climate; the role of the past palaeoclimate in testing and calibrating today's numerical climate models; and the evaluation of these models including the quantification of their uncertainties.

  8. Practice Theory and Pragmatism in Science & Technology Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Anders

    2015-01-01

    begin by an introduction to some of the proponents of practice theory and of pragmatism. Regarding the latter, I primarily present work by Dewey because this is what I am most familiar with. Although I recognize that practice theory and pragmatism differ on fundamental philosophical issues in relation...... to the normative evaluation of action, I show that the two intellectual traditions have much in common when it comes to what they do to STS studies. After this introduction to practice theory, my paper will proceed in the following steps. Firstly, I will briefly survey practice theoretical and pragmatist......Science & Technology Studies (STS) and social science has made a turn, a ‘practice turn’, and the notion ‘practice theory’ has made its way into the field of STS. But it is notable that proponents of this turn and theory rarely mention American pragmatism as a source of inspiration or refer...

  9. Understanding understanding in secondary school science: An interpretive study

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Maureen Gail

    This study investigated the teaching of secondary school science with an emphasis on promoting student understanding. In particular, I focused on two research questions: What are the possible meanings of teaching for understanding? And, how might one teach secondary school science for understanding? After semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 secondary school science teachers, grounded theory methodology was used to interpret the data. As a result of the selective coding process, I was able to identify 14 connected components of teaching for understanding (TfU). The process of TfU involves: puzzle-solving, a specific pedagogy and a conscious decision. The teacher must be a reflective practitioner who has some knowledge of the facets of understanding. The teacher comes to a critical incident or crisis in his or her pedagogy and adopts a mindset which highlights TfU as a personal problematic. Teachers operate with student-centred rather than teacher-centred metaphors. TfU requires a firm belief in and passion for the process, a positive attitude and excellent pedagogical content knowledge. It hinges on a performance view of understanding and demands risk-taking in the science classroom. Abstracting these ideas to a theory led me to the notion of Purposive Teaching . In their purposive-driven role as pedagogues, these teachers have placed TfU at the core of their daily practice. Constraints and challenges facing TfU as well as implications of the findings are discussed. Keywords. science teaching, teaching for understanding, purposive teaching, constructivism, understanding, pedagogy, pedagogical content knowledge, memorization, meaningful learning, reflective practice.

  10. Managing change : Case study: HAMK University of Applied Sciences, Valkeakoski

    OpenAIRE

    Chau Thi Tra, Mi

    2012-01-01

    In response to changes imposed by the Finnish government on the Univer-sities of Applied Sciences system in the near future, HAMK has proactive-ly adopted several programmes to prepare for future challenges and rein-force the organization’s competitiveness. However, organizational change has never been an easy, straightforward issue and how to manage change effectively has become an interest to the organization. The study aims at providing suggestions for a more successful change im-pleme...

  11. The Normality of EU Sport Policy Studies: Disciplinary Locus in Political Science, Sport Science or Elsewhere?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Kornbeck

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Normality of EU Sport Policy Studies: Disciplinary Locus in Political Science, Sport Science or Elsewhere? Mainstream European integration research has shown that research on the EU tends to follow the conjunctures of European integration itself. This realisation has led to some debate on which branch of political science – international relations or government – or indeed other academic disciplines is/are the most appropriate locus for such research. The paper takes these debates one step further by looking at the occurrence of ‘EU & sport’ studies within the wider field of EU studies. The main material used comes from the ECLAS database. Findings lead to a discussion of whether ‘EU & sport’ studies should rather be for EU specialists or for sport specialists and a plea for disciplinary normalisation whereby sport science would need to get more directly involved (without necessarily overwriting political science. Some ideas are added regarding the need for a mapping of Central & Eastern European scholarship. Normalita politických studií EU v oblasti sportu: místo v oborech politologie, sportovních vědách či jinde? Hlavní integrační proudy v evropském výzkumu dokumentují, že výzkum v EU má tendenci zkoumat evropskou integraci jako takovou. Toto poznání vedlo k diskusi, v kterém oboru politologie – mezinárodní vztahy či vláda – nebo i v jiných akademických disciplínách je nejvhodnější místo pro takový výzkum. Stať se pokouší posunout tyto diskuse o krok dále tím, že studie o „EU a sportu“ se posuzují v širším záběru EU studií. Hlavní informační zdroje pocházejí z databáze ECLAS. Naše zjištění vedou k diskusi o problematice „EU a sportu“ v tom smyslu, zda by tyto studie měly být spíše určeny odborníkům EU, nebo sportovním specialistům. Důležitá je otázka disciplinární začlenění této problematiky, s širším zapojením sportovních věd (aniž by

  12. NATURAL SCIENCE AT SCHOOL: MODERN APPROACHES TO THE DIFFERENTIATED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dechtyarenko S.G.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the possibility of differentiated study natural science at school on the basis of ecological educational process. Natural science is the science about nature as a single unity or totality of the natural sciences, which constituting a single unit. The main aim of the course is to develop student’s natural science competence through integrated mastering system knowledge about nature and man, the basics of environmental knowledge, ways of improving teaching and learning activities, development of value orientations in relation to the nature. There is strong need to review approaches to teaching nature science at schools, taking into account the general trend of greening of the educational process. The aim of the work is to analyze the possibility of practical application of modern approaches to differentiated teaching of the nature science at school greening within the educational process. In our view, the environmental component may be a basis to the formation and differentiated teaching in general. The environmental component of the educational sector has been aimed to the student’s environmental consciousness and compliance with rules of environmentally safe behavior in the environment. The learning of the integrated knowledge about nature and man can be submitted through the prism of action of the environmental factors according classic approach to their classification: abiotic, biotic and anthropogenic factors. In parallel, it is reasonable to raise the issues of practical importance as some natural objects and actions of each of these factors. The new degree of the studying of the environment has been provided by the beginning of the systematization of knowledge about natural objects and structure of the universe, by the formation of primary concepts about the relationship between the world of the living and inanimate nature, between organisms and between human activities and changes that has been occurred in the

  13. Student science publishing: an exploratory study of undergraduate science research journals and popular science magazines in the US and Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mico Tatalovic

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Science magazines have an important role in disseminating scientific knowledge into the public sphere and in discussing the broader scope affected by scientific research such as technology, ethics and politics. Student-run science magazines afford opportunities for future scientists, communicators, politicians and others to practice communicating science. The ability to translate ‘scientese’ into a jargon-free discussion is rarely easy: it requires practice, and student magazines may provide good practice ground for undergraduate and graduate science students wishing to improve their communication skills.

  14. Band alignment studies of Al2O3/CuGaO2 and ZnO/CuGaO2 hetero-structures grown by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajimsha, R.S.; Das, Amit K.; Joshi, M.P.; Kukreja, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Band offset studies at the interface of Al 2 O 3 /CuGaO 2 and ZnO/CuGaO 2 hetero-structures were performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. • Valance band offsets (VBO) of these hetero-structures were obtained from respective XPS peak positions and VB spectra using Kraut's equation. • Al 2 O 3 /CuGaO 2 interface exhibited a type I band alignment with valance band offset (VBO) of 4.05 eV whereas type II band alignment was observed in ZnO/CuGaO 2 hetero-structure with a VBO of 2.32 eV. • Schematic band alignment diagram for the interface of these hetero-structures has been constructed. • Band offset and alignment studies of these heterojunctions are important for gaining insight to the design of various optoelectronic devices based on such hetero-structures. - Abstract: We have studied the band offset and alignment of pulsed laser deposited Al 2 O 3 /CuGaO 2 and ZnO/CuGaO 2 hetero-structures using photoelectron spectroscopy. Al 2 O 3 /CuGaO 2 interface exhibited a type I band alignment with valance band offset (VBO) of 4.05 eV whereas type II band alignment was observed in ZnO/CuGaO 2 hetero-structure with a VBO of 2.32 eV. Schematic band alignment diagram for the interface of these hetero-structures has been constructed. Band offset and alignment studies of these heterojunctions are important for gaining insight to the design of various optoelectronic devices based on such hetero-structures

  15. Study of the relation of the band at 3595 CM{sup -1} in FTIR spectrum of natural quartz with color development by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Helena Cristina M.; Lameiras, Fernando S., E-mail: helenacrisms@gmail.com, E-mail: fsl@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Brazil is a major producer of gemological quartz as smoky quartz, morion, citrine, amethyst, and prasiolite. Due to its abundance, hardness, and color varieties, quartz is used in jewelry industry. However, very often quartz is found in nature colorless or with faint colors, which requires exposure to ionizing radiation for color enhancement or development. Not all quartz can develop color. Chromophore chemical elements must be present in suitable proportions for color development after irradiation and heating. Infrared spectrometry is used to separate the quartz that can develop colors from the ones that cannot. Bands in infrared spectrum can indicate the presence and relative contents of chromophore chemical elements, such as aluminum, iron, lithium, sodium, and hydrogen. Some samples of colorless quartz show a band at 3595 cm{sup -1} whose origin is yet not assigned. Samples of quartz with a prominent band at 3595 cm{sup -1} were exposed to gamma rays and heating to observe its behavior. From the statistical point of view, no modification was observed on the position and amplitude of this band after irradiation up 75 kGy and heating to 300-330 deg C. This study should be completed with samples of different origins and higher doses, as well as chemical analyses of trace chemical elements in the samples. (author)

  16. First-principle study of the electronic band structure and the effective mass of the ternary alloy GaxIn1-xP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. Q.; Song, T. L.; Liang, X. X.; Zhao, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the electronic band structure and the effective mass of the ternary alloy GaxIn1-xP are studied by the first principle calculations. The software QUANTUM ESPRESSO and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the exchange correlations have been used in the calculations. We calculate the lattice parameter, band gap and effective mass of the ternary alloy GaxIn1-xP for the Ga composition x varying from 0.0 to 1.0 by the step of 0.125. The effect of the Ga composition on the lattice parameter and the electronic density of states are discussed. The results show that the lattice parameter varies with the composition almost linearly following the Vegard's law. A direct-to-indirect band-gap crossover is found to occur close to x = 0.7. The effective masses are also calculated at Γ(000) high symmetry point along the [100] direction. The results show that the band gap and the electron effective mass vary nonlinearly with composition x.

  17. Study of the relation of the band at 3595 CM-1 in FTIR spectrum of natural quartz with color development by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Helena Cristina M.; Lameiras, Fernando S.

    2015-01-01

    Brazil is a major producer of gemological quartz as smoky quartz, morion, citrine, amethyst, and prasiolite. Due to its abundance, hardness, and color varieties, quartz is used in jewelry industry. However, very often quartz is found in nature colorless or with faint colors, which requires exposure to ionizing radiation for color enhancement or development. Not all quartz can develop color. Chromophore chemical elements must be present in suitable proportions for color development after irradiation and heating. Infrared spectrometry is used to separate the quartz that can develop colors from the ones that cannot. Bands in infrared spectrum can indicate the presence and relative contents of chromophore chemical elements, such as aluminum, iron, lithium, sodium, and hydrogen. Some samples of colorless quartz show a band at 3595 cm -1 whose origin is yet not assigned. Samples of quartz with a prominent band at 3595 cm -1 were exposed to gamma rays and heating to observe its behavior. From the statistical point of view, no modification was observed on the position and amplitude of this band after irradiation up 75 kGy and heating to 300-330 deg C. This study should be completed with samples of different origins and higher doses, as well as chemical analyses of trace chemical elements in the samples. (author)

  18. Life Sciences Division and Center for Human Genome Studies 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cram, L.S.; Stafford, C. [comp.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Life Sciences Division and the biological aspects of the Center for Human Genome Studies for the calendar year 1994. The technical portion of the report is divided into two parts, (1) selected research highlights and (2) research projects and accomplishments. The research highlights provide a more detailed description of a select set of projects. A technical description of all projects is presented in sufficient detail so that the informed reader will be able to assess the scope and significance of each project. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the group leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  19. Development and studies of Cd_1_−_xMg_xTe thin films with varying band gaps to understand the Mg incorporation and the related material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomera, Roger C.; Martínez, Omar S.; Pantoja-Enriquez, J.; Mathews, N.R.; Reyes-Banda, Martín G.; Krishnan, B.; Mathew, X.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Cd_1_−_xMg_xTe films with band gap in the range 1.47–2.41 eV is obtained. • Cd substitution by Mg was confirmed with SIMS and XPS analysis. • Cd_1_−_xMg_xTe films maintained CdTe structural features but with higher band gap. • Mg incorporation in CdTe inhibited grain growth. - Abstract: In this paper we report a systematic work involving the development of Cd_1_−_xMg_xTe thin films by co-evaporation of CdTe and Mg. The evaporation rate of both materials were adjusted to obtain ternary films of varying stoichiometry and hence the band gap. We have deposited films with band gap ranging from 1.47 to 2.41 eV. The films were characterized for structural, morphological, optical, opto-electronic, and spectroscopic properties. The film stoichiometry was studied across the thickness using SIMS data. SEM images showed that the grain size has a dependence on Mg content in the film, which inhibits the grain growth. The structural parameters showed a systematic dependence on Mg content in the film, however, there was no noticeable change in the XRD reflections with respect that of pure CdTe for lower concentrations of Mg. XPS analysis shed light on the incorporation of Mg further supporting the band gap variations observed with the UV–Vis spectroscopic studies. The photoresponse of the film was affected by Mg incorporation. Prototype devices of the type Cd_1_−_XMg_xTe/CdS were fabricated and the results are discussed.

  20. Central Computer Science Concepts to Research-Based Teacher Training in Computer Science: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendler, Andreas; Klaudt, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    The significance of computer science for economics and society is undisputed. In particular, computer science is acknowledged to play a key role in schools (e.g., by opening multiple career paths). The provision of effective computer science education in schools is dependent on teachers who are able to properly represent the discipline and whose…

  1. Understanding the Influence of Learners' Forethought on Their Use of Science Study Strategies in Postsecondary Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Karee E.; Lo, Wen-Juo

    2015-11-01

    Understanding self-regulation in science learning is important for theorists and practitioners alike. However, very little has been done to explore and understand students' self-regulatory processes in postsecondary science courses. In this study, the influence of science efficacy, learning value, and goal orientation on the perceived use of science study strategies was explored using structural equation modeling. In addition, the study served to validate the first two stages of Zimmerman's cyclical model of self-regulation and to address the common methodological weakness in self-regulation research in which data are all collected at one point after the learning cycle is complete. Thus, data were collected across the learning cycle rather than asking students to reflect upon each construct after the learning cycle was complete. The findings supported the hypothesized model in which it was predicted that self-efficacy would significantly and positively influence students' perceived science strategy use, and the influence of students' valuation of science learning on science study strategies would be mediated by their learning goal orientation. The findings of the study are discussed and implications for undergraduate science instructors are proposed.

  2. Comparison of the karyotypes ofPsathyrostachys juncea andP. huashanica (Poaceae) studied by banding techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, Ib; Bothmer, R. von

    1986-01-01

    . The patterns of both taxa are polymorphic, supporting that both taxa are outbreeders. The karyotypic characters suggest that P. juncea is more closely related to P. fragilis than either is to P. huashanica. N-banding stains weakly. Silver nitrate staining demonstrates that nucleolus organizers of both species...... have different nucleolus forming capacities. The presence of micronucleoli suggests that both species have an extra unidentified chromosome with nucleolus forming capacity....

  3. science

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    David Spurgeon

    Give us the tools: science and technology for development. Ottawa, ...... altered technical rela- tionships among the factors used in the process of production, and the en- .... to ourselves only the rights of audit and periodic substantive review." If a ...... and destroying scarce water reserves, recreational areas and a generally.

  4. Liberal Studies in Science--A Successful Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevons, F. R.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the job placement success experienced by graduates of the Science Greats Course at the University of Manchester. Discusses the course content which centers on the social relations of science. Since nearly half the course involves science content, the author discusses the science background necessary for enrollees. Presents a personal…

  5. Application of AMS radiocarbon in earth system science studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dong Jin; Park, Mi Kyung; Kim, Kyung Ryul

    2001-01-01

    Radiocarbon, a cosmic ray-produced isotope, is one of the most important tracers in Earth system sciences. The strong involvement of carbon in the biosphere and its half life of 5720 years are reflected in appropriate applications in archeology, as well as in the Earth system sciences. Radiocarbon dating had an important turning point in 1977 with the discovery that mass spectrometry with tandem acceleration could be used to measure C-14. This new technique, known as AMS or accelerator mass spectrometry reduced the required sample size to the order of mg, three orders of magnitude smaller than for conventional techniques, thus opening the range of applicability of C-14 studies to a much wider range of samples. However, the application has been complicated by two major activities of human beings on a global scale: the extensive usage of fossil fuel since the industrial revolution and nuclear testing in the atmosphere, which have influenced the natural balance of radiocarbon in the atmosphere. However, the separation of bomb-produced carbon from natural background carbon has produced a very fruitful understanding of the global carbon cycle and the conveyor belt system in the ocean, which will be essential for understanding global environmental problems, such as global warming, in the coming century. Carbon cycle studies in Korea have been made since the early 1990s. The studies include monitoring of CO 2 concentrations in the atmosphere, stable isotope studies, and carbon cycle studies in the sea around Korea. The opening of ths AMS facility at Seoul National University (SNU) will enhance carbon studies in Earth system sciences greatly in the future

  6. Superdeformed bands in 130Ce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, E.S.; Semple, A.T.; Boston, A.J.; Joss, D.T.; Nolan, P.J.; Shepherd, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    Four superdeformed bands have been assigned to 130 Ce following a high-statistics γ-ray study using the EUROGAM II spectrometer. The strongest band exhibits two distinct backbends which, in one scenario, may be interpreted as crossings between high-j N = 6 neutron orbitals (νi 13/2 ) and low-j N = 4 orbitals (νd 3/2 ) in an unpaired system. (author)

  7. A randomised controlled study of standard versus accelerated deflation of the Terumo radial band haemostasis device after transradial diagnostic cardiac catheterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuling, J Han; Vermeulen, Robert P; van den Heuvel, Ad Fm; Schurer, Remco Aj; van der Harst, Pim

    2017-04-01

    Radial access is the preferential access route in patients undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography. We hypothesised that we could reduce hospital stay and improve patient comfort by accelerated deflation of the radial compression device (Terumo radial band). The aim of this study was to compare accelerated pressure reduction with a standard Terumo radial band protocol with regard to local bleeding complications and reported pain scores after cardiac catheterisation. We performed a single centre prospective randomised trial to compare accelerated care to standard care for patients undergoing diagnostic catheterisation through radial access. Patients in the accelerated care group started deflation after 1 hour, with a 2 ml/10-minute interval. Patients in the standard care group started after 2 hours with additional steps of deflation at 3 and 4 hours. Of the 173 analysed patients 86 received accelerated care and 87 patients standard care. A total of 19 patients had pulsatile bleeding, which occurred similarly in the two groups (standard care 11 vs. accelerated care 8, P=0.47). The time to Terumo radial band removal was on average 129 minutes shorter for accelerated care patients compared to standard care ( P<0.01). At 1 hour after Terumo radial band placement, accelerated care patients more often reported pain scores of 0 than standard care patients (89% vs. 74%, P=0.02). There was no increase in local bleedings in the accelerated pressure reduction of the Terumo radial band after diagnostic cardiac catheterisation, increasing patient comfort and reducing hospital stay. These findings will further facilitate the widespread implementation of radial access.

  8. Comparison of Hemostasis Times With a Kaolin-Based Hemostatic Pad (QuikClot Radial) vs Mechanical Compression (TR Band) Following Transradial Access: A Pilot Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jonathan S; Niu, Jianli; Pastor-Cervantes, Juan A

    2017-10-01

    Hemostasis following transradial access (TRA) is usually achieved by mechanical compression. We investigated use of the QuikClot Radial hemostasis pad (Z-Medica) compared with the TR Band (Terumo Medical) to shorten hemostasis after TRA. Thirty patients undergoing TRA coronary angiography and/or percutaneous coronary intervention were randomized into three cohorts post TRA: 10 patients received mechanical compression with the TR Band, 10 patients received 30 min of compression with the QuikClot Radial pad, and 10 patients received 60 min of compression with the QuikClot Radial pad. Times to hemostasis and access-site complications were recorded. Radial artery patency was evaluated 1 hour after hemostasis by the reverse Barbeau's test. There were no differences in patient characteristics, mean dose of heparin (7117 ± 1054 IU), or mean activated clotting time value (210 ± 50 sec) at the end of procedure among the three groups. Successful hemostasis was achieved in 100% of patients with both the 30-min and 60-min compression groups using the QuikClot pad. Hemostasis failure occurred in 50% of patients when the TR Band was initially weaned at the protocol-driven time (40 min after sheath removal). Mean compression time for hemostasis with the TR Band was 149.4 min compared with 30.7 min and 60.9 min for the 30-min and 60-min QuikClot groups, respectively. No radial artery occlusion occurred in any subject at the end of the study. Use of the QuikClot Radial pad following TRA in this pilot trial significantly shortened hemostasis times when compared with the TR Band, with no increased complications noted.

  9. An Exploratory Case Study of Olympiad Students' Attitudes towards and Passion for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Mary; Venville, Grady

    2011-01-01

    Much is known about high school students' attitudes towards science but there is almost no research on what passion for science might look like and how it might be manifested. This exploratory case study took advantage of a unique group of highly gifted science students participating in the Australian Science Olympiad (N = 69) to explore their…

  10. Bioinformatics in High School Biology Curricula: A Study of State Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefer, Stephen H.; Sheppard, Keith

    2008-01-01

    The proliferation of bioinformatics in modern biology marks a modern revolution in science that promises to influence science education at all levels. This study analyzed secondary school science standards of 49 U.S. states (Iowa has no science framework) and the District of Columbia for content related to bioinformatics. The bioinformatics…

  11. Case Study: Teaching Nature of Science through Scientific Models--The Geocentric vs. Heliocentric Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Matthew; Rogers, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In the nonmajor science classroom, case studies--when used as learning tools--should help students build the necessary framework to understand the nature of science. For most students, the nonmajor science course (in this case, Astronomy 101) may be the last time that they interact with science in a formal learning setting. A National Science…

  12. Band mapping of surface states vs. adsorbate coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotenberg, E.; Kevan, S.D.; Denlinger, J.D.; Chung, Jin-Wook

    1997-01-01

    The theory of electron bands, which arises from basic quantum mechanical principles, has been the cornerstone of solid state physics for over 60 years. Simply put, an energy band is an electron state in a solid whose energy varies with its momentum (similar to, but with a more complicated dependence than, how a free electron's energy is proportional to its momentum squared). Much attention over the last 15 years has been given to the study of band structure of surfaces and interfaces, especially as the applications of these two-dimensional systems have become increasingly important to industry and science. The ultraESCA endstation at beamline 7.01 at the Advanced Light Source was developed for very high-energy - (∼50 meV) and angular - ( 12 photons/sec) makes the detailed study of the evolution of bands possible. The authors are interested in learning how, when one forms a chemical bond between a metal and an overlaying atom or molecule, the resulting charge transfer to or from the adsorbate affects the surface bands. In some cases of interest, intermediate coverages lead to different band structure than at the extremes of clean and saturated surfaces. Surfaces of tungsten are particularly interesting, as their atomic geometry has been shown to be exquisitely sensitive to both the surface vibrational and electronic properties. In this study, the authors looked at the surface bands of tungsten ((110) surface), as a function both of coverage and mass of overlaying atoms. The adsorbed atoms were hydrogen and the alkali atoms lithium and cesium

  13. Revisiting Short-Wave-Infrared (SWIR) Bands for Atmospheric Correction in Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlevan, Nima; Roger, Jean-Claude; Ahmad, Ziauddin

    2017-01-01

    The shortwave infrared (SWIR) bands on the existing Earth Observing missions like MODIS have been designed to meet land and atmospheric science requirements. The future geostationary and polar-orbiting ocean color missions, however, require highly sensitive SWIR bands (greater than 1550nm) to allow for a precise removal of aerosol contributions. This will allow for reasonable retrievals of the remote sensing reflectance (R(sub rs)) using standard NASA atmospheric corrections over turbid coastal waters. Design, fabrication, and maintaining high-performance SWIR bands at very low signal levels bear significant costs on dedicated ocean color missions. This study aims at providing a full analysis of the utility of alternative SWIR bands within the 1600nm atmospheric window if the bands within the 2200nm window were to be excluded due to engineering/cost constraints. Following a series of sensitivity analyses for various spectral band configurations as a function of water vapor amount, we chose spectral bands centered at 1565 and 1675nm as suitable alternative bands within the 1600nm window for a future geostationary imager. The sensitivity of this band combination to different aerosol conditions, calibration uncertainties, and extreme water turbidity were studied and compared with that of all band combinations available on existing polar-orbiting missions. The combination of the alternative channels was shown to be as sensitive to test aerosol models as existing near-infrared (NIR) band combinations (e.g., 748 and 869nm) over clear open ocean waters. It was further demonstrated that while in extremely turbid waters the 1565/1675 band pair yields R(sub rs) retrievals as good as those derived from all other existing SWIR band pairs (greater than 1550nm), their total calibration uncertainties must be less than 1% to meet current science requirements for ocean color retrievals (i.e., delta R(sub rs) (443) less than 5%). We further show that the aerosol removal using the

  14. A Comparative Study of the Quality of Teaching Learning Process at Post Graduate Level in the Faculty of Science and Social Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzadi, Uzma; Shaheen, Gulnaz; Shah, Ashfaque Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    The study was intended to compare the quality of teaching learning process in the faculty of social science and science at University of Sargodha. This study was descriptive and quantitative in nature. The objectives of the study were to compare the quality of teaching learning process in the faculty of social science and science at University of…

  15. Contested Domains of Science and Science Learning in Contemporary Native American Communities: Three Case Studies from a National Science Foundation grant titled, "Archaeology Pathways for Native Learners"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Nancy Brossard

    This dissertation provides a critical analysis of three informal science education partnerships that resulted from a 2003-2006 National Science Foundation grant titled, "Archaeology Pathways for Native Learners" (ESI-0307858), hosted by the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center. This dissertation is designed to contribute to understandings of learning processes that occur within and at the intersection of diverse worldviews and knowledge systems, by drawing upon experiences derived from three disparate contexts: 1) The Navajo Nation Museum in Window Rock, Arizona; 2) The A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center on the Zuni Reservation in Zuni, New Mexico; and 3) Science learning camps at the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center for Native youth of southern New England. While informal science education is increasingly moving toward decolonizing and cross-cutting institutional boundaries of learning through critical thinking and real-world applications, the construction of "science" (even within diverse contexts) continues to be framed within a homogenous, predominantly Euro-American perspective. This study analyzes the language of Western science employed in these partnerships, with particular attention to the use of Western/Native binaries that shape perceptions of Native peoples and communities, real or imagined. Connections are drawn to broader nation-state interests in education, science, and the global economy. The role of educational evaluation in these case studies is also critically analyzed, by questioning the ways in which it is constructed, conducted, and evaluated for the purposes of informing future projects and subsequent funding. This study unpacks problems of the dominant language of "expert" knowledge embedded in Western science discourse, and highlights the possibilities of indigenous knowledge systems that can inform Western science frameworks of education and evaluation. Ultimately, this study suggests that research

  16. Teaching Mathematical Modelling for Earth Sciences via Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin-She

    2010-05-01

    Mathematical modelling is becoming crucially important for earth sciences because the modelling of complex systems such as geological, geophysical and environmental processes requires mathematical analysis, numerical methods and computer programming. However, a substantial fraction of earth science undergraduates and graduates may not have sufficient skills in mathematical modelling, which is due to either limited mathematical training or lack of appropriate mathematical textbooks for self-study. In this paper, we described a detailed case-study-based approach for teaching mathematical modelling. We illustrate how essential mathematical skills can be developed for students with limited training in secondary mathematics so that they are confident in dealing with real-world mathematical modelling at university level. We have chosen various topics such as Airy isostasy, greenhouse effect, sedimentation and Stokes' flow,free-air and Bouguer gravity, Brownian motion, rain-drop dynamics, impact cratering, heat conduction and cooling of the lithosphere as case studies; and we use these step-by-step case studies to teach exponentials, logarithms, spherical geometry, basic calculus, complex numbers, Fourier transforms, ordinary differential equations, vectors and matrix algebra, partial differential equations, geostatistics and basic numeric methods. Implications for teaching university mathematics for earth scientists for tomorrow's classroom will also be discussed. Refereces 1) D. L. Turcotte and G. Schubert, Geodynamics, 2nd Edition, Cambridge University Press, (2002). 2) X. S. Yang, Introductory Mathematics for Earth Scientists, Dunedin Academic Press, (2009).

  17. UK Nuclear Science Forum. Progress report: Data studies during 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    2001-06-01

    The UK Nuclear Science Forum (UKNSF) now meets once per year to discuss issues of direct relevance to forum members, and to review nuclear data for application in the UK nuclear industry. Links are also maintained through the year, mainly through e-mail and the normal postal system. Work of immediate interest includes the measurement and evaluation of decay data (e.g., half-lives and gamma-ray emission probabilities), fission yields and thermal neutron cross sections; all known UK studies in 2000 are summarised in this document. Specific applications and international links of relevance in the field of nuclear data are also described

  18. Semantic e-Science in Space Physics - A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narock, T.; Yoon, V.; Merka, J.; Szabo, A.

    2009-05-01

    Several search and retrieval systems for space physics data are currently under development in NASA's heliophysics data environment. We present a case study of two such systems, and describe our efforts in implementing an ontology to aid in data discovery. In doing so we highlight the various aspects of knowledge representation and show how they led to our ontology design, creation, and implementation. We discuss advantages that scientific reasoning allows, as well as difficulties encountered in current tools and standards. Finally, we present a space physics research project conducted with and without e-Science and contrast the two approaches.

  19. Backbendings of superdeformed bands in 36;40Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xu-Hui; He, Xiao-Tao

    2018-05-01

    Experimentally observed superdeformed (SD) rotational bands in 36Ar and 40Ar are studied by the cranked shell model (CSM) with the pairing correlations treated by a particle-number-conserving (PNC) method. This is the first time that PNC-CSM calculations have been performed on the light nuclear mass region around A=40. The experimental kinematic moments of inertia J (1) versus rotational frequency are reproduced well. The backbending of the SD band at frequency around ℏω=1.5 MeV in 36Ar is attributed to the sharp rise of the simultaneous alignments of the neutron and proton 1d 5/2[202]5/2 pairs and 1f 7/2[321]3/2 pairs, which is a consequence of the band crossing between the 1d 5/2[202]5/2 and 1f 7/2[321]3/2 configuration states. The gentle upbending at low frequency of the SD band in 40Ar is mainly affected by the alignments of the neutron 1f 7/2[321]3/2 pairs and proton 1d 5/2[202]5/2 pairs. The PNC-CSM calculations show that besides the diagonal parts, the off-diagonal parts of the alignments play an important role in the rotational behavior of the SD bands. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11775112 and 11275098) and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions

  20. Valence band structure of PDMS surface and a blend with MWCNTs: A UPS and MIES study of an insulating polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmerl, Natalya M.; Khodakov, Dmitriy A.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Ellis, Amanda V.; Andersson, Gunther G., E-mail: gunther.andersson@flinders.edu.au

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Valence electron spectroscopy was performed on an insulating polymer using different charge compensation methods. • MWCNT were embedded in PDMS and found to be the most effective method for reducing the charging of the insulating polymer. • The valence band spectrum of PDMS was obtained via MIES and UPS. • Ion scattering spectroscopy was used to determine the concentration depth profile of the PDMS in the sample. - Abstract: The use of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is increasing with new technologies working toward compact, flexible and transparent devices for use in medical and microfluidic systems. Electronic characterization of PDMS and other insulating materials is difficult due to charging, yet necessary for many applications where the interfacial structure is vital to device function or further modification. The outermost layer in particular is of importance as this is the area where chemical reactions such as surface functionalization will occur. Here, we investigate the valence band structure of the outermost layer and near surface area of PDMS through the use of metastable induced photoelectron spectroscopy (MIES) paired with ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The chemical composition of the samples under investigation were measured via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the vertical distribution of the polymer was shown with neutral impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (NICISS). Three separate methods for charge compensation are used for the samples, and their effectiveness is compared.

  1. A comparative study of solution-processed low- and high-band-gap chalcopyrite thin-film solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Se Jin; Moon, Sung Hwan; Min, Byoung Koun; Cho, Yunae; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Doh-Kwon; Gwak, Jihye; Kim, Jihyun

    2014-01-01

    Low-cost and printable chalcopyrite thin-film solar cells were fabricated by a precursor solution-based coating method with a multi-step heat-treatment process (oxidation, sulfurization, and selenization). The high-band-gap (1.57 eV) Cu(In x Ga 1−x )S 2 (CIGS) solar cell showed a high open-circuit voltage of 787 mV, whereas the low-band-gap (1.12 eV) Cu(In x Ga 1−x )(S 1−y Se y ) 2 (CIGSSe) cell exhibited a high short-circuit current density of 32.6 mA cm −2 . The energy conversion efficiencies were 8.28% for CIGS and 8.81% for CIGSSe under standard irradiation conditions. Despite similar efficiencies, the two samples showed notable differences in grain size, surface morphology, and interfacial properties. Low-temperature transport and admittance characteristics of the samples clearly revealed how their structural differences influenced their photovoltaic and electrical properties. Such analyses provide insight into the enhanced solar cell performance of the solution-processed chalcopyrite thin films. (paper)

  2. Science and Cooking: Motivating the Study of Freshman Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, David

    2011-03-01

    This talk will describe a course offered to Harvard undergraduates as a general education science course, meant to intrduce freshman-level science for non-science majors. The course was a collaboration between world-class chefs and science professors. The chefs introduced concepts of cooking and the professors used these to motivate scientific concepts. The lectures were designed to provide a coherent introduction to freshman physics, primarily through soft matter science. The lectures were supplemented by a lab experiments, designed by a team of very talented graduate students and post docs, that supplemented the science taught in lecture. The course was very successful in motivating non-science students to learn, and even enjoy, basic science concepts. This course depended on contributions from Michael Brenner, Otger Campas, Amy Rowat and a team of talented graduate student teaching fellows.

  3. Effects of side-chain and electron exchange correlation on the band structure of perylene diimide liquid crystals: a density functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantes, J T; Lima, M P; Fazzio, A; Xiang, H; Wei, Su-Huai; Dalpian, G M

    2009-04-23

    The structural and electronic properties of perylene diimide liquid crystal PPEEB are studied using ab initio methods based on the density functional theory (DFT). Using available experimental crystallographic data as a guide, we propose a detailed structural model for the packing of solid PPEEB. We find that due to the localized nature of the band edge wave function, theoretical approaches beyond the standard method, such as hybrid functional (PBE0), are required to correctly characterize the band structure of this material. Moreover, unlike previous assumptions, we observe the formation of hydrogen bonds between the side chains of different molecules, which leads to a dispersion of the energy levels. This result indicates that the side chains of the molecular crystal not only are responsible for its structural conformation but also can be used for tuning the electronic and optical properties of these materials.

  4. A Meta-Synthesis of Turkish Studies in Science Process Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Murat; Çalik, Muammer; Özmen, Haluk

    2016-01-01

    This study thematically evaluates Turkish studies in science process skills (SPS) from 2000 to 2015. In looking for SPS studies, the authors entered the keywords "process skills, science process skills, science education and Turkey/Turkish" in well-known databases (i.e., Academic Search Complete, Education Research Complete, ERIC, and…

  5. Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    microscopy and imaging science, interfacial and surface science, materials discovery, and thin-film material Science Materials Science Illustration with bottom row showing a ball-and-stick model and top row dense black band. State-of-the-art advances in materials science come from a combination of experiments

  6. Hispanic Women Overcoming Deterrents to Computer Science: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herling, Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    The products of computer science are important to all aspects of society and are tools in the solution of the world's problems. It is, therefore, troubling that the United States faces a shortage in qualified graduates in computer science. The number of women and minorities in computer science is significantly lower than the percentage of the…

  7. Achieving equity through critical science agency: An ethnographic study of African American students in a health science career academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun-Frank, Julie

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential of a High School Health Science Career Academy to support African American students' science career trajectories. I used three key theoretical tools---critical science agency (Basu, 2007; Calabrese Barton & Tan, 2008), power (Nespor, 1994), and cultural production (Carlone, 2004; Eisenhart & Finkel, 1998) to highlight the intersections between the career trajectory implied by the Academy (its curriculum, classroom activities, and clinical experiences) and the students' pursued career trajectories. Data was collected over five months and included individual student interviews, group interviews, parent and administrator interviews, field notes from a culminating medical course and clinical internship, and Academy recruitment documents. The results of this study suggest that participants pursued a health science career for altruistic purposes and the Academy was a resource they drew upon to do so. However, the meanings of science and science person implied by the Academy hindered the possibility for many participants' to advance their science career trajectories. While the Academy promised to expose students to a variety of high-status health care roles, they were funneled into feminine, entry-level positions. This study adds to previous underrepresentation literature by contextualizing how identity-related factors influence African American students' career attainment.

  8. Science for Survival: The Modern Synthesis of Evolution and The Biological Sciences Curriculum Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lisa Anne

    In this historical dissertation, I examined the process of curriculum development in the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) in the United States during the period 1959-1963. The presentation of evolution in the high school texts was based on a more robust form of Darwinian evolution which developed during the 1930s and 1940s called "the modern synthesis of evolution." Building primarily on the work of historians Vassiliki Smocovitis and John L. Rudolph, I used the archival papers and published writings of the four architects of the modern synthesis and the four most influential leaders of the BSCS in regards to evolution to investigate how the modern synthetic theory of evolution shaped the BSCS curriculum. The central question was "Why was evolution so important to the BSCS to make it the central theme of the texts?" Important answers to this question had already been offered in the historiography, but it was still not clear why every citizen in the world needed to understand evolution. I found that the emphasis on natural selection in the modern synthesis shifted the focus away from humans as passive participants to the recognition that humans are active agents in their own cultural and biological evolution. This required re-education of the world citizenry, which was accomplished in part by the BSCS textbooks. I also found that BSCS leaders Grobman, Glass, and Muller had serious concerns regarding the effects of nuclear radiation on the human gene pool, and were actively involved in informing th public. Lastly, I found that concerns of 1950s reform eugenicists were addressed in the BSCS textbooks, without mentioning eugenics by name. I suggest that the leaders of the BSCS, especially Bentley Glass and Hermann J. Muller, thought that students needed to understand genetics and evolution to be able to make some of the tough choices they might be called on to make as the dominant species on earth and the next reproductive generation in the nuclear age. This

  9. Science-Relevant Curiosity Expression and Interest in Science: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Megan R.; Hsi, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    In efforts to understand and promote long-term interest in science, much work has focused on measuring students' interest in topics of science, typically with surveys. This approach has challenges, as interest in a topic may not necessarily indicate interest in scientific practices and pursuits. An underexplored and perhaps productive way to…

  10. Assessment of the Forensic Sciences Profession: A Legal Study Concerning the Forensic Sciences Personnel. Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Oliver, Jr.

    The place and function of forensic sciences personnel in American criminal law and court procedure, and the criteria used by criminal trial judges and lawyers to assess the value of forensic sciences personnel were investigated. Federal, state, Virgin Island, and Puerto Rican laws were examined, and a search of the medical and legal literature…

  11. Planetary Science Technology Infusion Study: Findings and Recommendations Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David J.; Sandifer, Carl E., II; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Vento, Daniel M.; Zakrajsek, June F.

    2014-01-01

    The Planetary Science Division (PSD) within the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) Science Mission Directorate (SMD) at NASA Headquarters sought to understand how to better realize a scientific return on spacecraft system technology investments currently being funded. In order to achieve this objective, a team at NASA Glenn Research Center was tasked with surveying the science and mission communities to collect their insight on technology infusion and additionally sought inputs from industry, universities, and other organizations involved with proposing for future PSD missions. This survey was undertaken by issuing a Request for Information (RFI) activity that requested input from the proposing community on present technology infusion efforts. The Technology Infusion Study was initiated in March 2013 with the release of the RFI request. The evaluation team compiled and assessed this input in order to provide PSD with recommendations on how to effectively infuse new spacecraft systems technologies that it develops into future competed missions enabling increased scientific discoveries, lower mission cost, or both. This team is comprised of personnel from the Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program and the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Program staff.The RFI survey covered two aspects of technology infusion: 1) General Insight, including: their assessment of barriers to technology infusion as related to infusion approach; technology readiness; information and documentation products; communication; integration considerations; interaction with technology development areas; cost-capped mission areas; risk considerations; system level impacts and implementation; and mission pull. 2) Specific technologies from the most recent PSD Announcements of Opportunities (AOs): The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), aerocapture and aeroshell hardware technologies, the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system, and the

  12. Munazza's story: Understanding science teaching and conceptions of the nature of science in Pakistan through a life history study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halai, Nelofer

    In this study I have described and tried to comprehend how a female science teacher understands her practice. Additionally, I have developed some understanding of her understanding of the nature of science. While teaching science, a teacher projects messages about the nature of science that can be captured by observations and interviews. Furthermore, the manner is which a teacher conceptualizes science for teaching, at least in part, depends on personal life experiences. Hence, I have used the life history method to understand Munazza's practice. Munazza is a young female science teacher working in a private, co-educational school for children from middle income families in Karachi, Pakistan. Her stories are central to the study, and I have represented them using a number of narrative devices. I have woven in my own stories too, to illustrate my perspective as a researcher. The data includes 13 life history interviews and many informal conversations with Munazza, observations of science teaching in classes seven and eight, and interviews with other science teachers and administrative staff of the school. Munazza's personal biography and experiences of school and undergraduate courses has influenced the way she teaches. It has also influenced the way she does not teach. She was not inspired by her science teachers, so she has tried not to teach the way she was taught science. Contextual factors, her conception of preparation for teaching as preparation for subject content and the tension that she faces in balancing care and control in her classroom are some factors that influence her teaching. Munazza believes that science is a stable, superior and value-free way of knowing. In trying to understand the natural world, observations come first, which give reliable information about the world leading inductively to a "theory". Hence, she relies a great deal on demonstrations in the class where students "see" for themselves and abstract the scientific concept from the

  13. Quality of life after laparoscopic gastric banding: Prospective study (152 cases) with a follow-up of 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champault, Axèle; Duwat, Olivier; Polliand, Claude; Rizk, Nabil; Champault, Gérard G

    2006-06-01

    To evaluate influence of laparoscopic gastric banding (LGB) on quality of life (QOL) in patients with morbid obesity. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding is a popular bariatric operation in Europe. The objectives of surgical therapy in patients with morbid obesity are reduction of body weight, and a positive influence on the obesity-related comorbidity as well the concomitant psychologic and social restrictions of these patients. In a prospective clinical trial, development of the individual patient QOL was analyzed, after LGB in patients with morbid obesity. From October 1999 to January 2001, 152 patients [119 women, 33 men, mean age 38.4 y (range 24 to 62), mean body mass index 44.3 (range 38 to 63)] underwent evaluation for LGB according the following protocol: history of obesity; concise counseling of patients and relative on nonsurgical treatment alternatives, risk of surgery, psychologic testing, questionnaire for eating habits, necessity of lifestyle change after surgery; medical evaluation including endocrinologic and nutritionist work-up, upper GI endoscopy, evaluation of QOL using the Gastro Intestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI). Decision for surgery was a multidisciplinary consensus. This group was follow-up at least 2 years, focusing on weight loss and QOL. Mean operative time was 82 minutes; mean hospital stay was 2.3 days and the mean follow-up period was 34 months. The BMI dropped from 44.3 to 29.6 kg/m and all comorbid conditions improved markedly: diabetes melitus resolved in 71% of the patients, hypertension in 33%, and sleep apnea in 90%. However, 26 patients (17%) had late complications requiring reoperation. Preoperative global GIQLI score was 95 (range 56 to 140), significant different of the healthy volunteers score (120) (70 to 140) P < 0.001. Correlated with weight loss (percentage loss of overweight and BMI), the global score of the group increased to 100 at 3 months, 104 at 6, 111 at 1 year to reach 119 at 2 years which is no

  14. How science teachers balance religion and evolution in the science classroom: A case study of science classes in a Florida Public School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Pierre Dominique

    The purpose of this case study was to research how science teachers balance both religion and evolution in the science classroom with as little controversy as possible. In this study I attempted to provide some insight on how teachers are currently teaching evolution in their science classes in light of the religious beliefs of the students as well as their own. The case study was conducted in a school district in Florida where I attempted to answer the following questions: (a) How do science teachers in the Florida School District (FSD) approach the religion--evolution issue in preparing students for a career in a field of science? (b) How do science teachers in the FSD reconcile the subject of evolution with the religious views of their students? (c) How do science teachers in the FSD reconcile their own religious views with the teaching of evolution? (d) How do science teachers in the FSD perceive the relationship between religion and science? The data was collected through interviews with two high school teachers, and one middle school teacher, by observing each participant teach, by collecting site documents and by administering an exploratory survey to student volunteers. Analysis was conducted by open coding which produced four themes from which the research questions were answered and the survey answers were counted to produce the percentages displayed in the tables in chapter four. The teachers avoided discussion on religiously oriented questions or statements by the students and did not reveal their own religious orientation. The topic of microevolution appeared to reduce stress in the classroom environment, as opposed to addressing macroevolution.

  15. An interactional ethnographic study of the construction of literate practices of science and writing in a university science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Nuno Afonso De Freitas Lopes De

    An interactional ethnographic study informed by a sociocultural perspective was conducted to examine how a professor and students discursively and interactionally shaped the basis for engaging in the work of a community of geologists. Specifically, the study examined the role the Question of the Day, an interactive writing activity in the lecture, in affording students opportunities for learning the literate practices of science and how to incorporate them in thinking critically. A writing-intensive, introductory oceanography course given in the Geological Sciences Department was chosen because the professor designed it to emphasize writing in the discipline and science literacy within a science inquiry framework. The study was conducted in two phases: a pilot in 2002 and the current study in the Spring Quarter of 2003. Grounded in the view that members in a classroom construct a culture, this study explored the daily construction of the literate practices of science and writing. This view of classrooms was informed by four bodies of research: interactional ethnography, sociolinguistics sociology of science and Writing In the Disciplines. Through participant observation, data were collected in the lecture and laboratory settings in the form of field notes, video, interviews, and artifacts to explore issues of science literacy in discourse, social action, and writing. Examination of participation in the Question of the Day interactive writing activity revealed that it played a key role in initiating and supporting a view of science and inquiry. As the activity permitted collaboration, it encouraged students to engage in the social process to critically explore a discourse of science and key practices with and through their writing. In daily interaction, participants were shown to take up social positions as scientist and engage in science inquiry to explore theory, examine data, and articulately reformulate knowledge in making oral and written scientific arguments

  16. The Black Cultural Ethos and science teachers' practices: A case study exploring how four high school science teachers meet their African American students' needs in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Samantha L.

    The underachievement of African American students in science has been a persistent problem in science education. The achievement patterns of African American students indicate that researchers must take a closer look at the types of practices that are being used to meet these students' needs in science classrooms. Determining why science teachers decide to employ certain practices in their classrooms begins with a careful examination of teachers' beliefs as well as their instructional approaches. The purpose of this study was to explore four urban high school science teachers' beliefs about their African American students' learning needs and to investigate how these teachers go about addressing students' needs in science classrooms. This research study also explored the extent to which teachers' practices aligned with the nine dimensions of an established cultural instructional theory, namely the Black Cultural Ethos. Qualitative research methods were employed to gather data from the four teachers. Artifact data were collected from the teachers and they were interviewed and observed. Believing that their students had academic-related needs as well as needs tied to their learning preferences, the four science teachers employed a variety of instructional strategies to meet their students where they were in learning. Overall, the instructional strategies that the teachers employed to meet their students' needs aligned with five of the nine tenets of the Black Cultural Ethos theory.

  17. The Swiss biotech referendum: A case study of science communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cueni, Thomas B.

    1999-01-01

    many people inside and outside Switzerland expected with trepidation because of the possible spillover effect into other European countries, turned out to provide the most convincing case study of successful communication on modem science. What appeared to be a major threat provided a platform for strong public endorsement of genetic research in Switzerland

  18. California Diploma Project Technical Report III: Validity Study--Validity Study of the Health Sciences and Medical Technology Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaughy, Charis; Bryck, Rick; de Gonzalez, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    This study is a validity study of the recently revised version of the Health Science Standards. The purpose of this study is to understand how the Health Science Standards relate to college and career readiness, as represented by survey ratings submitted by entry-level college instructors of health science courses and industry representatives. For…

  19. Band-gap sensitive adsorption of fluorine molecules on sidewalls of carbon nanotubes: an ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Woon Ih; Park, Sohee; Kim, Tae-Eun; Park, Noejung; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Lee, Young Hee; Ihm, Jisoon; Han, Seungwu

    2006-01-01

    We report from ab initio calculations that the band-gap sensitive side-wall functionalization of a carbon nanotube is feasible with the fluorine molecule (F 2 ), which can provide a route to the extraction of semiconducting nanotubes by etching away metallic ones. In the small diameter cases like (11, 0) and (12, 0), the nanotubes are easily functionalized with F 2 regardless of their electronic properties. As the diameter becomes larger, however, the fluorination is favoured on metallic CNTs with smaller activation barriers than those of semiconducting ones. Our results suggest that low-temperature exposure to F 2 molecules in the gas phase can make a dominant portion of fluorinated metallic nanotubes and unfluorinated semiconducting ones. This is consistent with recent experimental reports

  20. Studying the extinction coefficient due to aerosol particles at different spectral bands in some regions at great Cairo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaltout, M.A. Mosalam; Tadros, M.T.Y.; El-Metwally, M.

    2000-01-01

    Extinction coefficient due to aerosol has been estimated by Pyrheliometric and Gorgie type Actinometric measurements in the industrial, urban areas and compared with agricultural areas. The measurements distributed over one year from June 1992 to May 1993 were made under clear sky for five spectral bands. The results show two maxima in hot wet and spring months and minimum in winter months, but there is a fluctuation in urban area. Diurnal variations show maximum at noon especially in the industrial area. Level of extinction coefficient in the industrial and urban area is greater that that of the agricultural area, except for hot wet months is due to the increase of water vapor content in agricultural area. Spectral distribution of the extinction coefficient decreases monotonically with wavelength. Size of particles in industrial area is greater than in urban and agricultural areas. The temperature and water vapor content have important rules in increasing the extinction coefficient of aerosols. (Author)

  1. Quasiparticle self-consistent GW study of cuprates: electronic structure, model parameters, and the two-band theory for Tc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seung Woo; Kotani, Takao; Kino, Hiori; Kuroki, Kazuhiko; Han, Myung Joon

    2015-07-24

    Despite decades of progress, an understanding of unconventional superconductivity still remains elusive. An important open question is about the material dependence of the superconducting properties. Using the quasiparticle self-consistent GW method, we re-examine the electronic structure of copper oxide high-Tc materials. We show that QSGW captures several important features, distinctive from the conventional LDA results. The energy level splitting between d(x(2)-y(2)) and d(3z(2)-r(2)) is significantly enlarged and the van Hove singularity point is lowered. The calculated results compare better than LDA with recent experimental results from resonant inelastic xray scattering and angle resolved photoemission experiments. This agreement with the experiments supports the previously suggested two-band theory for the material dependence of the superconducting transition temperature, Tc.

  2. Morphological and isozymic banding pattern study of white grubs (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae as pest of bark crop in mounth Merapi’s slope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUGIYARTO

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available White grub (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae is a group of soil pest at any agrosystem., especially at Salak pondoh (Salacca zalacca (Gaert. Voss. crop. The characteristics of this specimen were very crucial to be studied in order to find the exact biocontrol. The aim of this research was to know the characteristics of white grubs (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera based on morphological and isozyme banding patterns. This research was conducted on August - November 2007 at Sleman and Magelang districts for the morphological purposes, while for the isozyme data were conducted at Sub Laboratory Biology, Central Laboratory of Sebelas Maret University Surakarta. Sample was taken by using stratified random sampling method, on five stations. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE using the vertical type was taken to isozyme analysis. The enzyme used in this research were peroxidase and esterase to detect the isozyme banding patterns. The results showed that there was no morphological variation of white grubs (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera at salak pondoh agroecosystem in Mounth Merapi’s slope. Based on this character, there was one species of white grub found, i.e. Holotrichia javana. There was a genetic variation based on the variation of isozyme banding patterns.

  3. A theoretical study of pressure-induced phase transitions and electronic band structure of anti-A-sesquioxide type γ-Be3N2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paliwal, Uttam; Joshi, Kunj Bihari

    2011-01-01

    Structural parameters and electronic band structure of anti-A-sesquioxide (aAs) type γ-Be 3 N 2 are presented following the first-principles linear combination of atomic orbitals method within the framework of a posteriori density-functional theory implemented in the CRYSTAL code. Pressure-induced phase transitions among the four polymorphs α, β, cubic-γ and aAs-γ of Be 3 N 2 are examined. Enthalpy-pressure curves do not show the possibility of pressure-induced structural phase transition to the cubic-γ phase. However, α → aAs-γ and β → aAs-γ structural phase transitions are observed at 139 GPa and 93 GPa, respectively. Band structure calculations predict that aAs-γ Be 3 N 2 is an indirect semiconductor with 4.73 eV bandgap at L point. Variation of bandgap with pressure and deformation potentials are studied for the α, β and aAs-γ polymorphs. Pressure-dependent band structure calculations reveal that, within the low-pressure limit, bandgaps of β and aAs-γ increase with pressure unlike α-Be 3 N 2 .

  4. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 29; Issue 4. Impedance and a.c. conductivity studies on Ba(Nd0.2Ti0.6Nb0.2)O3 ceramic prepared through conventional and microwave sintering route. Syed Mahboob G Prasad G S Kumar. Ceramics and Glasses Volume 29 Issue 4 August 2006 pp 347-355 ...

  5. Science into art: A study of the creative process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchant, M. [Cosumnes River Coll., Folsom Lake Center, CA (United States); Sesko, S.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-03-14

    Objective was to examine the creative process, demonstrated by 5 student participants in a class at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena CA, from the germ of the creative idea through the final creative product. The students, drawn from classes sponsored by LLNL, were assigned the problem of representing ``big`` science, as practiced at LLNL, in a graphic, artistic, or multimedia product. As a result of this study, it was discovered that the process of creativity with these students was not linear in nature, nor did it strictly follow the traditional creativity 5-step schema of preparation, incubation, insight, evaluation, and elaboration. Of particular interest were several emergent themes of the creative process: spontaneous use of metaphor to describe the Laboratory; a general lack of interest in ``school`` science or mathematics by the American art students; a well developed sense of conscience; and finally, the symbolism inherent in the repeated use of a single artistic element. This use of the circle revealed a continuity of thinking and design perhaps related to the idealistic bias mentioned above.

  6. Student reflections on choosing to study science post-16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Angela G.; Dunne, Máiréad

    2011-06-01

    The research recounted in this paper was designed primarily to attempt to understand the reasons for the low uptake of the natural sciences beyond compulsory education in England. This has caused widespread concern within governmental quarters, university science departments and the scientific community as a whole. This research explored the problem from the position of the students who recently made their choices. The student voices were heard through a series of interviews which highlighted the complexities of the process of post-16 choice. Social theories of pedagogy and identity, such as those of Basil Bernstein, were used in an analysis of the interview texts. Dominant themes used by the students in rationalising their post-16 subject choice related to their past pedagogical experiences, school discourses of differentiation and the students' notions of their future educational and occupational pathways. This study provides no simple solutions but highlights the importance of student voice to our understandings of what influences subject choice at this critical post-16 stage.

  7. A Novel Ku-Band/Ka-Band and Ka-Band/E-Band Multimode Waveguide Couplers for Power Measurement of Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Harmonic Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler, fabricated from two dissimilar frequency band waveguides, is capable of isolating power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT) amplifier. Test results from proof-of-concept demonstrations are presented for a Ku-band/Ka-band MDC and a Ka-band/E-band MDC. In addition to power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a satellite borne beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequencies (Ka-band and E-band).

  8. Enacting Disability: How Can Science and Technology Studies Inform Disability Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galis, Vasilis

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss how science and technology studies (STS) can inform disability studies and challenge dominant approaches, such as the medical and the social models, in the ordering and representation of disability. Disability studies and STS have followed somewhat parallel paths in the history of ideas. From a positivist approach to…

  9. Looking at Life. Study Guide. Unit A2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Bunty

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  10. Increasing High School Student Interest in Science: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartuli, Cindy A.

    2016-01-01

    An action research study was conducted to determine how to increase student interest in learning science and pursuing a STEM career. The study began by exploring 10th-grade student and teacher perceptions of student interest in science in order to design an instructional strategy for stimulating student interest in learning and pursuing science.…

  11. L-band brightness temperature disaggregation for use with S-band and C-band radiometer data for WCOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, P.; Shi, J.; Zhao, T.; Cosh, M. H.; Bindlish, R.

    2017-12-01

    There are two passive microwave sensors onboard the Water Cycle Observation Mission (WCOM), which includes a synthetic aperture radiometer operating at L-S-C bands and a scanning microwave radiometer operating from C- to W-bands. It provides a unique opportunity to disaggregate L-band brightness temperature (soil moisture) with S-band C-bands radiometer data. In this study, passive-only downscaling methodologies are developed and evaluated. Based on the radiative transfer modeling, it was found that the TBs (brightness temperature) between the L-band and S-band exhibit a linear relationship, and there is an exponential relationship between L-band and C-band. We carried out the downscaling results by two methods: (1) downscaling with L-S-C band passive measurements with the same incidence angle from payload IMI; (2) downscaling with L-C band passive measurements with different incidence angle from payloads IMI and PMI. The downscaling method with L-S bands with the same incident angle was first evaluated using SMEX02 data. The RMSE are 2.69 K and 1.52 K for H and V polarization respectively. The downscaling method with L-C bands is developed with different incident angles using SMEX03 data. The RMSE are 2.97 K and 2.68 K for H and V polarization respectively. These results showed that high-resolution L-band brightness temperature and soil moisture products could be generated from the future WCOM passive-only observations.

  12. Wide Band to ''Double Band'' upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, P.; Currier, R.; Garbincius, P.; Butler, J.

    1988-06-01

    The Wide Band beam currently uses electrons obtained from secondary photon conversions to produce the photon beam incident on the experimental targets. By transporting the positrons produced in these conversions as well as the electrons it is possible to almost double the number of photons delivered to the experiments per primary beam proton. 11 figs

  13. The making of a bilingual science educator: An autobiographical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Hugo Alejandro

    This qualitative study explores the journey of a Latino educator in becoming a bilingual high school science teacher and university professor. It focuses on discovering how the practice of teaching and learning is shaped through social, psychological, and cultural factors. Through the use of an autobiographical method known as currere, the researcher recounts personal and educational experiences that address important issues in education related to language, science, culture, and social class through the perspective of one doing the work. The study reviews the literature on autobiographical forms of research in the field of education and suggests how autobiography in education, an emerging genre, holds the promise for creating new meanings of the self while at the same time attempts to develop a theory of autobiography that acknowledges the importance of people of color and other marginalized groups. Data collected include 22 hours of audiotaped recordings, conversations, and educational artifacts including notes from innovative classroom projects, lesson plans, conference presentations, computer files, graduate coursework, classroom videotaping, university course evaluations, and department memos. Findings of this study revealed that: (a) the process of becoming a transformative educator involves critical self-reflection on one's cultural/ethnic identity and linguistic heritage; (b) the importance of self-reflection on one's teaching is a critical component in moving towards a more culturally and linguistically responsive curriculum; (c) the bilingual educator can achieve a greater understanding of the important role in the maintenance, implementation, and promotion of minority language education through a reflective practice; and (d) the development of the underrepresented voice in education and the awakening to one's personal and philosophical worldviews is as important as the preparation one receives in becoming a bilingual teacher.

  14. ANALYSIS OF STUDENTS’ DECISION MAKING TO SOLVE SCIENCE REASONING TEST OF TRENDS IN INTERNATIONAL MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE STUDY (TIMSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Novianawati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine students’ decision making strategy to answer TIMSS science reasoning test in cognitive reasoning domain. This research is quantitative descriptive research. The result shows that students tend to use compensatory strategy for decision making in solving multiple-choice questions and use rational category to answer essay questions. The result shows that more than half of students have been able to answer the questions TIMSS science tests correctly.

  15. Study of the positioning of the films of the MLC by a Test of bands and your influence in the clinic dosimetry in IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano Zabaleta, S.; Millan Cebrian, E.; Calvo Carrillo, S.; Alba Escorihuela, V.; Garcia Romero, A.; Ortega Pardina, P.; Canella Anoz, M.; Hernandez Vitoria, A.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a test of adjacent bands inspired by the proposed in AAPM Report No. 72, we provides a parameter characterizing the state of the MLC as to the actual position of its blades. This test has been validated by studying repeatability and reproducibility and has found the correlation between the parameter and creep detected by the ILD. Subsequently it has studied the impact of changes in the positioning of the blades on clinical dosimetry in IMRT patients, reconstructing the patient dose by Matrix Evolution team and Compass software, IBA Dosimetry. (Author)

  16. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Declan T; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Mattick, Rye Cr; Hickman, Joy; Mandall, Nicky A

    2016-10-25

    Orthodontic treatment involves using fixed or removable appliances (dental braces) to correct the positions of teeth. It has been shown that the quality of treatment result obtained with fixed appliances is much better than with removable appliances. Fixed appliances are, therefore, favoured by most orthodontists for treatment. The success of a fixed orthodontic appliance depends on the metal attachments (brackets and bands) being attached securely to the teeth so that they do not become loose during treatment. Brackets are usually attached to the front and side teeth, whereas bands (metal rings that go round the teeth) are more commonly used on the back teeth (molars). A number of adhesives are available to attach bands to teeth and it is important to understand which group of adhesives bond most reliably, as well as reducing or preventing dental decay during the treatment period. To evaluate the effectiveness of the adhesives used to attach bands to teeth during fixed appliance treatment, in terms of:(1) how often the bands come off during treatment; and(2) whether they protect the banded teeth against decay during fixed appliance treatment. The following electronic databases were searched: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (searched 2 June 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 5) in the Cochrane Library (searched 2 June 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 2 June 2016) and EMBASE Ovid (1980 to 2 June 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised and controlled clinical trials (RCTs and CCTs) (including split-mouth studies) of adhesives used to attach orthodontic bands to molar teeth were selected. Patients with full arch fixed orthodontic appliance(s) who had bands attached to molars were included. All review authors

  17. Advances in Ka-Band Communication System for CubeSats and SmallSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegege, Obadiah; Wong, Yen F.; Altunc, Serhat

    2016-01-01

    A study was performed that evaluated the feasibility of Ka-band communication system to provide CubeSat/SmallSat high rate science data downlink with ground antennas ranging from the small portable 1.2m/2.4m to apertures 5.4M, 7.3M, 11M, and 18M, for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Lunar CubeSat missions. This study included link analysis to determine the data rate requirement, based on the current TRL of Ka-band flight hardware and ground support infrastructure. Recent advances in Ka-band transceivers and antennas, options of portable ground stations, and various coverage distances were included in the analysis. The link/coverage analysis results show that Cubesat/Smallsat missions communication requirements including frequencies and data rates can be met by utilizing Near Earth Network (NEN) Ka-band support with 2 W and high gain (>6 dBi) antennas.

  18. Girls and science education in Mauritius: a study of science class practices and their effects on girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naugah, Jayantee; Watts, Mike

    2013-11-01

    Background: The population of Mauritius consists of 52% females and scientific literacy is seen to be of vital importance for all young people if they are to be sufficiently equipped to meet the challenges of a fast changing world. Previous research shows, however, that science is not popular among girls. This paper explores one of many reasons why few girls opt for science subjects after compulsory schooling. Purpose: This study investigated the approaches to teaching in four science classrooms in Mauritius, with particular emphases on the preferences of girls as they learn science. Sample: A total of 20 student interviews and 16 teacher interviews were conducted in four schools in Mauritius. The four mixed-faith schools comprised two all-girl schools (one state, one fee-paying), and two mixed-sex schools (one state, one fee-paying), within urban, suburban and rural situations. Design and method: 80 non-participant lessons were observed, of which 60 were science lessons while the remaining 20 non-science lessons were in economics, accounts and commerce. Group interviews with five pupils in each of the four schools were conducted and 16 individual interviews with teachers in the four schools gave an insight into the pedagogic approaches used for the teaching and learning of science. Results: Transmissive approaches to teaching, giving little opportunity for collaborative or activity-based learning, were found to be the most important factors in alienating the girls from science. Conclusions: There need to be radical changes in approaches to teaching to retain young girls' interest in the sciences.

  19. Present study of dreaming : Comparing brain science with psychoanalysis

    OpenAIRE

    森田, 修平; 岡本, 祐子

    2013-01-01

    Dream has been brought the stage of scientific research from Freud. After the discovery of REM sleep, The research of dream is shifted from the psychoanalysistic stage to the stage of the view of brain science. Hobson thought there is no sense that interpret dream from the view of brain science, so, he criticized the way of Fruedian's psychoanalysis. However, Solms tried to reexamine the psychoanalysis from the view of brain science. Now, the research of dream recall frequency is done by the ...

  20. Needs Assessment Study in Science Education: Sample of Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Ozdilek; M. Ozkan

    2008-01-01

    A needs assessment process was conducted to determine the difficulties and requirements of a science unit as an example how needs assessment process can be used in science education in Turkey. A 40-item teacher questionnaire containing four dimensions related to a chemistry unit named “Travel to the Inner Structure of Matter” as presented in the current curriculum materials was administered. The questionnaire was completed by 130 elementary school science teachers in order to get their views ...

  1. THE RELEVANCE OF SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES IN LEGAL SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Imanuel W. Nalle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Some law schools in Indonesia reject socio-legal studies with epistemological arguments that puts jurisprudence as sui generis. Rejection is based argument that jurisprudence is a normative science. In fact socio-legal studies in the development of jurisprudence outside Indonesia has long existed and contributed to the legal reform. Socio-legal studies also significant for legal reform. It is caused by the existence of non doctrinal aspect in law making and implementation of the law. Therefore the position and relevance of socio-legal research is not related to the benefits that provided for the development of national law or jurisprudence. Beberapa fakultas hukum di Indonesia menolak penelitian sosio-legal dengan argumentasi epistemologis yang menempatkan ilmu hukum sebagai sui generis. Penolakan tersebut didasarkan argumentasi bahwa ilmu hukum adalah ilmu yang bersifat normatif. Kenyataannya studi sosio-legal dalam perkembangan ilmu hukum di luar Indonesia telah lama eksis dan berperan dalam pembaharuan hukum. Selain itu, studi sosiolegal juga berperan dalam pembaharuan hukum. Hal ini disebabkan adanya aspek-aspek nondoktrinal yang berperan dalam pembentukan hukum dan implementasi hukum di masyarakat. Oleh karena itu kedudukan dan relevansi penelitian sosio-legal pada ada tidaknya manfaat yang diberikan bagi perkembangan hukum nasional ataupun ilmu hukum.

  2. THE RELEVANCE OF SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES IN LEGAL SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Imanuel W. Nalle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Some law schools in Indonesia reject socio-legal studies with epistemological arguments that puts jurisprudence as sui generis. Rejection is based argument that jurisprudence is a normative science. In fact socio-legal studies in the development of jurisprudence outside Indonesia has long existed and contributed to the legal reform. Socio-legal studies also significant for legal reform. It is caused by the existence of non doctrinal aspect in law making and implementation of the law. Therefore the position and relevance of socio-legal research is not related to the benefits that provided for the development of national law or jurisprudence.   Beberapa fakultas hukum di Indonesia menolak penelitian sosio-legal dengan argumentasi epistemologis yang menempatkan ilmu hukum sebagai sui generis. Penolakan tersebut didasarkan argumentasi bahwa ilmu hukum adalah ilmu yang bersifat normatif. Kenyataannya studi sosio-legal dalam perkembangan ilmu hukum di luar Indonesia telah lama eksis dan berperan dalam pembaharuan hukum. Selain itu, studi sosiolegal juga berperan dalam pembaharuan hukum. Hal ini disebabkan adanya aspek-aspek nondoktrinal yang berperan dalam pembentukan hukum dan implementasi hukum di masyarakat. Oleh karena itu kedudukan dan relevansi penelitian sosio-legal pada ada tidaknya manfaat yang diberikan bagi perkembangan hukum nasional ataupun ilmu hukum.

  3. Amniotic constriction bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Amniotic band sequence URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/ ... birth. The baby should be delivered in a medical center that has specialists experienced in caring for babies ... or partial loss of function of a body part. Congenital bands affecting large parts of the body cause the ...

  4. Design study of an S-band RF cavity of a dual-energy electron LINAC for the CIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeong-No; Park, Hyungdal; Song, Ki-baek; Li, Yonggui; Lee, Byung Cheol; Cha, Sung-su; Lee, Jong-Chul; Shin, Seung-Wook; Chai, Jong-seo

    2014-01-01

    The design of a resonance frequency (RF) cavity for the dual-energy S-band electron linear accelerator (LINAC) has been carried out for the cargo inspection system (CIS). This Standing-wave-type RF cavity is operated at a frequency under the 2856-MHz resonance frequency and generates electron beams of 9 MeV (high mode) and 6 MeV (low mode). The electrons are accelerated from the initial energy of the electron gun to the target energy (9 or 6 MeV) inside the RF cavity by using the RF power transmitted from a 5.5-MW-class klystron. Then, electron beams with a 1-kW average power (both high mode and low mode) bombard an X-ray target a 2-mm spot size. The proposed accelerating gradient was 13 MV/m, and the designed Q value was about 7100. On going research on 15-MeV non-destructive inspections for military or other applications is presented.

  5. Low-valent low-coordinated manganese(I) ion dimer: a temperature dependent W-band EPR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorace, Lorenzo; Golze, Christian; Gatteschi, Dante; Bencini, Alessandro; Roesky, Herbert W; Chai, Jianfang; Stückl, A Claudia

    2006-01-09

    W-Band EPR spectra of [[HC(CMeNAr)(2)]Mn](2) (Ar = 2,6-(i)Pr(2)C(6)H(3)) have been measured at different temperatures. The spectra show a behavior which is typical for an antiferromagnetically coupled dimer with excited states populating upon increasing temperature. By following the intensity variation of the different features of the spectra with temperature, we attributed different groups of resonances to the S = 1, 2, and 3 states of the dimer. Their corresponding spin Hamiltonian parameters were derived from simulations. The zero-field-splitting parameters measured in this way were D(S=1) = 1.57 cm(-1) and E(S=1) = 0.064 cm(-1), D(S=2) = 0.266 cm(-1) and E(S=2) = 0.0045 cm(-1), and D(S=3) = 0.075 cm(-1) and E(S=3) = 0. On the basis of the molecular structure of the system, we could estimate that zero-field splitting (ZFS) is the result of anisotropic exchange and single-ion anisotropic contributions of similar magnitude (|D| approximately 0.2 cm(-1)). These results allow a deeper insight into the electronic structure of the Mn(I) centers in low-coordination environments, further supporting the electronic structure of Mn(I) to be 4s(1)3d(5), as previously indicated by DFT calculations.

  6. A Three-decade X-band VLBI Study of 3CR Lobe-dominated Quasar Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hough David H.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We report X-band VLBI observations of several 3CR lobe-dominated quasar nuclei from 1981 to 2010, mostly obtained with the NRAO VLBA. The goal is to follow flux density outbursts and to fully determine the jet morphology and kinematics on 1-100 pc scales. In 3C207, the core region has flux outbursts at mean intervals of ~7 yr; one of these is actually a double outburst from a stationary true core and a swinging component ~0.5 mas apart. The position angle (PA of the swinging component varies by ~40°, while the PA values of the jet components span ~25°. The jet extends to ~25 mas. Average superluminal speeds are ~10c. One component shows apparent acceleration from 7c to 14c at 2-3 mas from the true core, in a jet recollimation zone that redirects the flow toward PA ~90°. Individual jet components expand until reaching the recollimation zone. In 3C263 and other objects, some of the same phenomena are seen, including ejection of jet components over a range in PA, superluminal motion, and apparent acceleration, but to a lesser degree. Possible physical interpretations involving beaming, orientation, projection, precession, and magnetic effects are discussed.

  7. Study on coral annual banding for the investigation of Asian monsoon; Asian monsoon to sango nenrin kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, A. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Kawabata, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    A coral skeleton is sampled at Kenya`s Malindi National Marine Park situated west of the Seychelles, and it offers information about the Afro-Asian monsoon. An X-ray profile of the specimen discloses the seasonal variation in the density of the coral skeleton. The oxygen isotopic ratio, which is generally affected by the seawater oxygen isotopic ratio composition which is dependent on the surface layer water temperature and fresh water, is found dominated, in the coral skeleton, practically by the surface layer water temperature. Accordingly, the oxygen isotopic ratio represents the seasonal and annual variations in the surface layer water temperature. It is inferred that the emergence of Ba/Ca ratio peaks in December into January reflects the presence of Ba from rivers, and there are indications that the Somali current has transported water to the coral sampling area from the Galana River which is the greatest river in Kenya. Five of the Ba/Ca ratio peaks coincide with peaks in the UV fluorescent band, which is attributed to the presence of terrigenous organic matters. The ENSO and Asian monsoon phenomena are estimated on the basis of the findings described above. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Studies of Shear Band Velocity Using Spatially and Temporally Resolved Measurements of Strain During Quasistatic Compression of Bulk Metallic Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, W J; Samale, M; Hufnagel, T; LeBlanc, M; Florando, J

    2009-06-15

    We have made measurements of the temporal and spatial features of the evolution of strain during the serrated flow of Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass tested under quasistatic, room temperature, uniaxial compression. Strain and load data were acquired at rates of up to 400 kHz using strain gages affixed to all four sides of the specimen and a piezoelectric load cell located near the specimen. Calculation of the displacement rate requires an assumption about the nature of the shear displacement. If one assumes that the entire shear plane displaces simultaneously, the displacement rate is approximately 0.002 m/s. If instead one assumes that the displacement occurs as a localized propagating front, the velocity of the front is approximately 2.8 m/s. In either case, the velocity is orders of magnitude less than the shear wave speed ({approx}2000 m/s). The significance of these measurements for estimates of heating in shear bands is discussed.

  9. Diversity of band gap and photoluminescence properties of lead halide perovskite: A halogen-dependent spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenlei; Jiang, Yunfeng; Zhu, Xiuwei; Luo, Chunhua; Jiang, Kai; Chen, Liangliang; Zhang, Juan

    2018-05-01

    The effects of halogen substitution on microstructure, optical absorption, and phonon modes for perovskite CH3NH3PbX3 (MAPbX3, X = I/Br/Cl) films grown on FTO substrates have been investigated. The X-ray diffraction analysis exhibited good crystallization, and the strong diffraction peak assigned to (1 0 0) c for X = Br/Cl shifted toward a higher angle compared to (1 1 0) t of MAPbI3. Band-gap tuning from 1.63 to 2.37 to 3.11 eV in the I-Br-Cl series can be found due to the halogen effects. These energy values closely match the positions of peak determined from photoluminescence experiments. The remarkable absorption dip and emission peak appear for the MAPbBr3, suggesting higher crystallinity under the same preparation conditions. The wavenumbers of main IR-vibrations slightly decrease with ionic radius of the halogen increasing (in the order of Cl-Br-I), which related to the increasing polarizability. These results provide important progress towards the understanding of the halide role in the realization of high performance MAPbX3-based solar cells.

  10. Information Science: Science or Social Science?

    OpenAIRE

    Sreeramana Aithal; Paul P.K.,; Bhuimali A.

    2017-01-01

    Collection, selection, processing, management, and dissemination of information are the main and ultimate role of Information Science and similar studies such as Information Studies, Information Management, Library Science, and Communication Science and so on. However, Information Science deals with some different characteristics than these subjects. Information Science is most interdisciplinary Science combines with so many knowledge clusters and domains. Information Science is a broad disci...

  11. Next Generation Science Standards: A National Mixed-Methods Study on Teacher Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Susan; Megowan, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) science and engineering practices are ways of eliciting the reasoning and applying foundational ideas in science. As research has revealed barriers to states and schools adopting the NGSS, this mixed-methods study attempts to identify characteristics of professional development (PD) that will support NGSS…

  12. Microteaching Lesson Study: An Approach to Prepare Teacher Candidates to Teach Science through Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, George; Xu, Judy

    2017-01-01

    Inquiry-based teaching has become the most recommended approach in science education for a few decades; however, it is not a common practice yet in k-12 school classrooms. In order to prepare future teachers to teach science through inquiry, a Microteaching Lesson Study (MLS) approach was employed in our science methods courses. Instead of asking…

  13. Characteristics of Abductive Inquiry in Earth Science: An Undergraduate Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Phil Seok

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this case study was to describe characteristic features of abductive inquiry learning activities in the domain of earth science. Participants were undergraduate junior and senior students who were enrolled in an earth science education course offered for preservice secondary science teachers at a university in Korea. The undergraduate…

  14. A Study on the Evaluation of Science Projects of Primary School Students Based on Scientific Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Sema Nur; Ozer, Dilek Zeren; Ozkan, Muhlis

    2013-01-01

    This study re-evaluated 454 science projects that were prepared by primary school students between 2007 and 2011 within the scope of Science Projects Event for Primary School Students. Also, submitted to TUBITAK BIDEB Bursa regional science board by MNE regional work groups in accordance with scientific research methods and techniques, including…

  15. The Effects of Integrating Service Learning into Computer Science: An Inter-Institutional Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Jamie; Barnes, Tiffany; Buch, Kim; Rorrer, Audrey; Zuo, Huifang

    2015-01-01

    This study is a follow-up to one published in computer science education in 2010 that reported preliminary results showing a positive impact of service learning on student attitudes associated with success and retention in computer science. That paper described how service learning was incorporated into a computer science course in the context of…

  16. Middle School Science Teachers' Perceptions of Social Justice: A Study of Two Female Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Bhaskar

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this qualitative study is to document two middle school science teachers' perceptions of social justice and how these teachers implement various aspects of social justice in their science instruction. The two teachers teach science in an urban school that serves students from low-income, immigrant, and ethnic minority families. The…

  17. A Computational Study of Commonsense Science: An Exploration in the Automated Analysis of Clinical Interview Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherin, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    A large body of research in the learning sciences has focused on students' commonsense science knowledge--the everyday knowledge of the natural world that is gained outside of formal instruction. Although researchers studying commonsense science have employed a variety of methods, 1-on-1 clinical interviews have played a unique role. The data…

  18. Critical Accountability: Dilemmas for Interventionist Studies of E-Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, P.; Beaulieu, A.

    2007-01-01

    E-science initiatives are technology-enabled interventions in current research practices. These interventions are justified by the hope that e-science infrastructures and tools will foster new venues for researchers and scholars. This triggers a complex interaction between hope, hype, and

  19. Science Fiction in Education: Case Studies from Classroom Implementations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrasidas, Charalambos; Avraamidou, Lucy; Theodoridou, Katerina; Themistokleous, Sotiris; Panaou, Petros

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript reports on findings from the implementation of the EU project "Science Fiction in Education" (Sci-Fi-Ed). The project provides teachers with tools, training, and guidance that will assist them in enhancing their teaching, making science more attractive to students, connecting it with real-life issues such as the…

  20. Case Studies of Liberal Arts Computer Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, D.; Brady, A.; Danyluk, A.; Adams, J.; Lawrence, A.

    2010-01-01

    Many undergraduate liberal arts institutions offer computer science majors. This article illustrates how quality computer science programs can be realized in a wide variety of liberal arts settings by describing and contrasting the actual programs at five liberal arts colleges: Williams College, Kalamazoo College, the State University of New York…

  1. Leon Cooper's Perspective on Teaching Science: An Interview Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaz, Mansoor; Klassen, Stephen; McMillan, Barbara; Metz, Don

    2010-01-01

    The authors of this paper portray the perspective of Professor Leon Cooper, a theoretical physicist, Nobel laureate, active researcher, and physics textbook author, on teaching science and on the nature of science (NOS). The views presented emerged from an interview prepared by the authors and responded to in writing by Professor Cooper. Based on…

  2. A Study of Common Beliefs and Misconceptions in Physical Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Mary; Larrabee, Timothy G.; Barman, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    The Science Belief Test is an online instrument comprised of 47 statements that require true or false responses and request written explanations to accompany these responses. It targets topics in chemistry, physics, biology, earth science, and astronomy and was initially designed to assess preservice elementary teachers' beliefs about general…

  3. The tight binding model study of the role of band filling on the charge gap in graphene-on-substrate in paramagnetic state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Rudrashish; Sahu, Sivabrata; Rout, G. C.

    2017-05-01

    We communicate here a tight binding theoretical model study of the band filling effect on the charge gap in graphene-on-substrate. The Hamiltonian consists of nearest neighbor electron hopping and substrate induced gap. Besides this the Coulomb interaction is considered here within mean-field approximation in the paramagnetic limit. The electron occupancies at two sublattices are calculated by Green's function technique and are solved self consistently. Finally the charge gap i.e. Δ ¯=U [ - ] is calculated and computed numerically. The results are reported.

  4. Electronic properties of an organic molecule within MCM-41 host: a spectroscopic and theoretical study toward elucidating the variation in band gaps of the guest species

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, L Z; Tang Guo Qing; Liao Dai Zhen

    2003-01-01

    An organic molecule salicylidene-1,2-ethanediamine 1, has been encapsulated in the nanocavities of MCM-41 and this nanocomposite material has been investigated by X-ray diffraction, absorption and emission spectroscopy. Results from the spectroscopic measurements show that the bathochromic shift of the 0-0 transitions is correlated with the reduction of the HOMO-LUMO band gap accompanying by the energy changes of the frontier orbitals. Theoretical studies indicate that the energy levels of HOMO and LUMO increase when 1 is confined, and the HOMO is more sensitive than the LUMO.

  5. An X- and Q-band Fe3+ EPR study of nanoparticles of magnetic semiconductor Zn1−xFexO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, Sushil K.; Andronenko, S.I.; Thurber, A.; Punnoose, A.; Nalepa, A.

    2014-01-01

    EPR studies on two types of nanoparticles of Fe 3+ doped, 0.1–10%, ZnO, NL and QJ, prepared using similar chemical hydrolysis methods, in diethylene glycol, and in denatured ethanol solutions, respectively, were carried out at X-band (∼9.5 GHz) at 77 K and at Q-band (∼34.0 GHz) at 10, 80, and 295 K. To interpret the experimental results, EPR spectra were simulated by exact diagonalization of the spin-Hamiltonian matrix to identify the Fe ions at different magnetically active sites in these samples. The simulation for NL samples revealed that they contained (i) Fe 3+ ions, which substituted for Zn ions, the zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameter which has a large distribution over the sample due to oxygen vacancies in the second coordination sphere; (ii) EPR signal from surface oxygen defects; and (iii) ferromagnetically (FM) coupled Fe ions with concentration of Fe more than 1%. The EPR spectra for QJ samples are very different from those for NL samples, exhibiting only rather intense FM EPR lines. The FM and EPR spectra in NL and/or QJ samples are found to vary strongly with differences in the surface morphology of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • X and Q band EPR studies on NL and QJ nanoparticles of Fe 3+ doped ZnO at 10, 80, and 295 K. • Fe ions are present at different magnetically active sites in these samples. • NL samples consist of paramagnetic Fe 3+ ions, and ferromagnetically coupled Fe ions. • QJ samples exhibit only intense ferromagnetic lines, different from QJ. • Spectra vary strongly with the surface morphology of nanoparticles

  6. Study of science students' expectation for university writing courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanthi Nadarajan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The New Malaysia Education Blueprint (2012 states that the private sector continues to have concerns for Malaysian graduates’ English proficiency. The present study investigates the views and expectations of science students taking English courses in a public university. The findings revealed that learners saw opportunities to communicate and job applications process as important soft skills. They preferred practical learning methods above traditional teaching methods. Learners considered group performance, personal attitudes and online activities as important learning opportunities, while factual knowledge, report writing were least supported despite the fact that the majority viewed both assessments and instructional process as relevant. The data revealed that though they were dissatisfied with their existing level of proficiency, many students continued to expect an A for their course. An assessment of the learner’s’ language ability revealed that language ability was less under the learner’s control and more dependent on learner proficiency level. Taken together, this study suggests that the curriculum for the Professional Writing course should be highly diversified and balanced, with some emphasis on getting less proficient learners to read and improve their grammar skills while better students should be given opportunities to develop creative talents and interpersonal skills.

  7. Progressive statistics for studies in sports medicine and exercise science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, William G; Marshall, Stephen W; Batterham, Alan M; Hanin, Juri

    2009-01-01

    Statistical guidelines and expert statements are now available to assist in the analysis and reporting of studies in some biomedical disciplines. We present here a more progressive resource for sample-based studies, meta-analyses, and case studies in sports medicine and exercise science. We offer forthright advice on the following controversial or novel issues: using precision of estimation for inferences about population effects in preference to null-hypothesis testing, which is inadequate for assessing clinical or practical importance; justifying sample size via acceptable precision or confidence for clinical decisions rather than via adequate power for statistical significance; showing SD rather than SEM, to better communicate the magnitude of differences in means and nonuniformity of error; avoiding purely nonparametric analyses, which cannot provide inferences about magnitude and are unnecessary; using regression statistics in validity studies, in preference to the impractical and biased limits of agreement; making greater use of qualitative methods to enrich sample-based quantitative projects; and seeking ethics approval for public access to the depersonalized raw data of a study, to address the need for more scrutiny of research and better meta-analyses. Advice on less contentious issues includes the following: using covariates in linear models to adjust for confounders, to account for individual differences, and to identify potential mechanisms of an effect; using log transformation to deal with nonuniformity of effects and error; identifying and deleting outliers; presenting descriptive, effect, and inferential statistics in appropriate formats; and contending with bias arising from problems with sampling, assignment, blinding, measurement error, and researchers' prejudices. This article should advance the field by stimulating debate, promoting innovative approaches, and serving as a useful checklist for authors, reviewers, and editors.

  8. Band parameters of phosphorene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lew Yan Voon, L C; Wang, J; Zhang, Y; Willatzen, M

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory are computed using a first-principles theory based upon the generalized-gradient approximation to the density-functional theory. These parameters and Hamiltonian will be useful for modeling physical properties of phosphorene. (paper)

  9. Infrared diffuse interstellar bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galazutdinov, G. A.; Lee, Jae-Joon; Han, Inwoo; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Valyavin, G.; Krełowski, J.

    2017-05-01

    We present high-resolution (R ˜ 45 000) profiles of 14 diffuse interstellar bands in the ˜1.45 to ˜2.45 μm range based on spectra obtained with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrograph at the McDonald Observatory. The revised list of diffuse bands with accurately estimated rest wavelengths includes six new features. The diffuse band at 15 268.2 Å demonstrates a very symmetric profile shape and thus can serve as a reference for finding the 'interstellar correction' to the rest wavelength frame in the H range, which suffers from a lack of known atomic/molecular lines.

  10. Band parameters of phosphorene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory...... are computed using a first-principles theory based upon the generalized-gradient approximation to the density-functional theory. These parameters and Hamiltonian will be useful for modeling physical properties of phosphorene....

  11. The Defense Science Board 2001 Summer Study on Defense Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    HIT” The threat of biological weapons arises in part from a decades-old megatrend in the life sciences. New advances in molecular biology, genetics...99 The Technology Landscape Today.................................... 101 Biological Warfare Defense...planning and programming, today’s environment comprises a broader, more diffuse set of concerns: terrorism, biological warfare, regional tensions

  12. Photoreflectance study of the near-band-edge transitions of chemical vapor deposition-grown mono- and few-layer MoS{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Kuang-I, E-mail: kilin@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Jen; Wang, Bo-Yan; Cheng, Yung-Chen [Department of Materials Science, National University of Tainan, Tainan 70005, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chang-Hsiao, E-mail: chsiaoc@fcu.edu.tw [Department of Automatic Control Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-21

    Room-temperature photoreflectance (PR) and reflectance (R) spectroscopy are utilized to investigate the near-band-edge transitions of molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) thin films grown on sapphire substrates by a hot-wall chemical vapor deposition system. The layer thickness and optical properties of the MoS{sub 2} thin films are confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscope, and photoluminescence (PL) analysis. The B exciton shows relatively weak PL intensity in comparing with the A exciton even for monolayer MoS{sub 2} films. In the R spectrum of few‐layer MoS{sub 2}, it is not possible to clearly observe exciton related features. The PR spectra have two sharp, derivative-like features on a featureless background. Throughout the PR lineshape fitting, the transition energies are designated as the A and B excitons at the K-point of the Brillouin zone, but at room temperature there seems to be no distinguishable feature corresponding to an H‐point transition for the mono- and few-layer MoS{sub 2} films unlike in bulk. These transition energies are slightly larger than those obtained by PL, which is attributed to the Stokes shifts related to doping level. The obtained values of valence-band spin-orbit splitting are in good agreement with those from other experimental methods. By comparing the PR lineshapes, the dominant modulation mechanism is attributed to variations of the exciton transition energies due to change in the built-in electric field. On the strength of this study, PR spectroscopy is demonstrated as a powerful technique for characterizing the near-band-edge transitions of MoS{sub 2} from monolayer to bulk.

  13. Prospective study of bacteremia rate after elective band ligation and sclerotherapy with cyanoacrylate for esophageal varices in patients with advanced liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilha, Danielle Queiroz; Correia, Lucianna Motta; Monaghan, Marie; Lenz, Luciano; Santos, Marcus; Libera, Ermelindo Della

    2011-01-01

    Band ligation (BL) is the most appropriate endoscopic treatment for acute bleeding or prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding. Sclerotherapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (CY) can be an alternative for patients with advanced liver disease. Bacteremia is an infrequent complication after BL while the bacteremia rate following treatment with CY for esophageal varices remains unknown. To evaluate and compare the incidence of transient bacteremia between cirrhotic patients submitted to diagnostic endoscopy, CY and BL for treatment of esophageal varices. A prospective study comprising the period from 2004 to 2007 was conducted at Hospital of Universidade Federal de São Paulo, UNIFESP, SP, Brazil. Cirrhotic patients with advanced liver disease (Child-Pugh B or C) were enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups according treatment: BL Group (patients undergoing band ligation, n = 20) and CY Group (patients receiving cyanoacrylate injection for esophageal variceal, n = 18). Cirrhotic patients with no esophageal varices or without indication for endoscopic treatment were recruited as control (diagnostic group n = 20). Bacteremia was evaluated by blood culture at baseline and 30 minutes after the procedure. After 137 scheduled endoscopic procedures, none of the 58 patients had fever or any sign suggestive of infection. All baseline cultures were negative. No positive cultures were observed after CY or in the control group - diagnostic endoscopy. Three (4.6 %) positive cultures were found out of the 65 sessions of band ligation (P = 0.187). Two of these samples were positive for coagulase-negative staphylococcus, which could be regarded as a contaminant. The isolated microorganism in the other case was Klebsiella oxytoca. The patient in this case presented no evidence of immunodeficiency except liver disease. There was no significant difference in bacteremia rate between these three groups. BL or CY injection for non-bleeding esophageal varices may be considered

  14. Elastic Properties and the Band Gap of AlNxP1-x Semiconductor Alloy: A Comparative Study of Various Ab Initio Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Polak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural and elastic properties of AlNxP1-x, a novel semiconductor alloy, are studied from the first principles in both zinc-blende and wurtzite structures. Performances of the finite difference (FD method and the density functional perturbation theory (DFPT are tested and compared. Both of these methods are applied to two different approaches of alloy simulation, a supercell of 16 and 32 atoms (for zinc-blende and wurtzite structures, resp. and the alchemical mixing (AM method, where the pseudopotentials are mixed in an appropriate way to form an alloy. All elastic properties, including the elastic tensors, elastic moduli, Poisson’s ratio, B/G, and relaxation coefficient, as well as lattice parameters are calculated using all said methods. Conclusions about the use of the approaches investigated in this paper and about their performance are drawn. In addition, in both crystal structures, the band gap is studied in the whole composition range using the MBJLDA functional. The band gap bowings are unusually high, which confirms earlier reports.

  15. Re-analysis of a banding study to test the effects of an experimental increase in bag limits of mourning doves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis, D.L.; White, Gary C.

    2002-01-01

    In 1966-1971, eastern US states with hunting seasons on mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) participated in a study designed to estimate the effects of bag limit increases on population survival rates. More than 400 000 adult and juvenile birds were banded and released during this period, and subsequent harvest and return of bands, together with total harvest estimates from mail and telephone surveys of hunters, provided the database for analysis. The original analysis used an ANOVA framework, and resulted in inferences of no effect of bag limit increase on population parameters (Hayne 1975). We used a logistic regression analysis to infer that the bag limit increase did not cause a biologically significant increase in harvest rate and thus the experiment could not provide any insight into the relationship between harvest and annual survival rates. Harvest rate estimates of breeding populations from geographical subregions were used as covariates in a Program MARK analysis and revealed an association between annual survival and harvest rates, although this relationship is potentially confounded by a latitudinal gradient in survival rates of dove populations. We discuss methodological problems encountered in the analysis of these data, and provide recommendations for future studies of the relationship between harvest and annual survival rates of mourning dove populations.

  16. Study of morphology effects on magnetic interactions and band gap variations for 3d late transition metal bi-doped ZnO nanostructures by hybrid DFT calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Soumendu, E-mail: soumendu@bose.res.in; Baral, Sayan; Mookerjee, Abhijit [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Sciences, S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector-III, Salt Lake City, Kolkata 700 098 (India); Kaphle, Gopi Chandra [Central Department of Physics, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu (Nepal)

    2015-08-28

    Using density functional theory (DFT) based electronic structure calculations, the effects of morphology of semiconducting nanostructures on the magnetic interaction between two magnetic dopant atoms as well as a possibility of tuning band gaps have been studied in the case of the bi-doped (ZnO){sub 24} nanostructures with the impurity dopant atoms of the 3d late transition metals—Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. To explore the morphology effect, three different structures of the host (ZnO){sub 24} nano-system, having different degrees of spatial confinement, have been considered: a two dimensional nanosheet, a one dimensional nanotube, and a finite cage-shaped nanocluster. The present study employs hybrid density functional theory to accurately describe the electronic structure of all the systems. It is shown here that the magnetic coupling between the two dopant atoms remains mostly anti-ferromagnetic in the course of changing the morphology from the sheet geometry to the cage-shaped geometry of the host systems, except for the case of energetically most stable bi-Mn doping, which shows a transition from ferromagnetic to anti-ferromagnetic coupling with decreasing aspect ratio of the host system. The effect of the shape change, however, has a significant effect on the overall band gap variations of both the pristine as well as all the bi-doped systems, irrespective of the nature of the dopant atoms and provides a means for easy tunability of their optoelectronic properties.

  17. Ideas in Practice: Studies in Atmospheric Pollution For Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Donald R.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the content and structure of an enviromental course offered by the Department of Engineering Technology at Western Kentucky University. The course focuses on atmospheric pollution and is designed for science teachers currently teaching in the school system. (JR)

  18. African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of constructivist teaching strategies and traditional lecture method on students' learning outcomes in Nigeria's integrated science education · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. DI Oludipe, DB Awofodu ...

  19. CSF oligoclonal banding - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100145.htm CSF oligoclonal banding - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 5 out of 5 Overview The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves to supply nutrients to the central nervous ...

  20. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eat by making you feel full after eating small amounts of food. After surgery, your doctor can adjust the band ... You will feel full after eating just a small amount of food. The food in the small upper pouch will ...